Science.gov

Sample records for cost optimal heat

  1. Nitinol Heat Engine power plant system installation and cost optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, E.C.; McNichols, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    Nitinol Heat Engines (NHE) use a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium to directly convert the thermal energy in hot water to mechanical power (and, through a generator, to electricity). The authors designed a commercial version of a NHE based on the thermoturbine configuration developed in prototype form under contract to the Department of Energy in 1978-1980. The operation and cost of various forms of NHE have been described previously, but the penalties and costs associated with integrating the complete NHE system into installations supplying the thermal energy have not previously been determined. They found that these costs are most important, as they will often exceed the costs of the NHE proper. However, the total installed costs are quite low and result in very economical power from waste-heat or geothermal hot-water sources.

  2. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  3. Heliostat cost optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reeken, Finn; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Keck, Thomas; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for a heliostat cost optimization study. First different variants of small, medium sized and large heliostats are designed. Then the respective costs, tracking and optical quality are determined. For the calculation of optical quality a structural model of the heliostat is programmed and analyzed using finite element software. The costs are determined based on inquiries and from experience with similar structures. Eventually the levelised electricity costs for a reference power tower plant are calculated. Before each annual simulation run the heliostat field is optimized. Calculated LCOEs are then used to identify the most suitable option(s). Finally, the conclusions and findings of this extensive cost study are used to define the concept of a new cost-efficient heliostat called `Stellio'.

  4. Optimal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre; Doering, Charles R.

    2015-11-01

    The transport of heat by buoyancy driven flows, i.e., thermal convection plays a central role in many natural phenomena and an understanding of how to control its mechanisms is relevant to many engineering applications. In this talk we will consider a variational formulation of optimal heat transport in simple geometries. Numerical results, limits on heat transport, and a comparison to Rayleigh-Bénard convection will be presented. Research supported by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  5. Work, heat, and oxygen cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, P.

    1973-01-01

    Human energy is discussed in terms of the whole man. The physical work a man does, the heat he produces, and the quantity of oxygen he takes from the air to combine with food, the fuel source of his energy, are described. The daily energy exchange, work and heat dissipation, oxygen costs of specific activities, anaerobic work, and working in space suits are summarized.

  6. Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

  7. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  8. Optimizing Sustainable Geothermal Heat Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Iti; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Buscheck, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal heat, though renewable, can be depleted over time if the rate of heat extraction exceeds the natural rate of renewal. As such, the sustainability of a geothermal resource is typically viewed as preserving the energy of the reservoir by weighing heat extraction against renewability. But heat that is extracted from a geothermal reservoir is used to provide a service to society and an economic gain to the provider of that service. For heat extraction used for market commodities, sustainability entails balancing the rate at which the reservoir temperature renews with the rate at which heat is extracted and converted into economic profit. We present a model for managing geothermal resources that combines simulations of geothermal reservoir performance with natural resource economics in order to develop optimal heat mining strategies. Similar optimal control approaches have been developed for managing other renewable resources, like fisheries and forests. We used the Non-isothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) model to simulate the performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir under a variety of geologic and operational situations. The results of NUFT are integrated into the optimization model to determine the extraction path over time that maximizes the net present profit given the performance of the geothermal resource. Results suggest that the discount rate that is used to calculate the net present value of economic gain is a major determinant of the optimal extraction path, particularly for shallower and cooler reservoirs, where the regeneration of energy due to the natural geothermal heat flux is a smaller percentage of the amount of energy that is extracted from the reservoir.

  9. Optimal design of plate-fin heat exchangers by particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Darus, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    This study explores the application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for optimization of a cross-flow plate fin heat exchanger. Minimization total annual cost is the target of optimization. Seven design parameters, namely, heat exchanger length at hot and cold sides, fin height, fin frequency, fin thickness, fin-strip length and number of hot side layers are selected as optimization variables. A case study from the literature proves the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in case of achieving more accurate results.

  10. Optimal Ground Source Heat Pump System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Metin; Yavuzturk, Cy; Pinder, George

    2015-04-15

    Despite the facts that GSHPs first gained popularity as early as the 1940’s and they can achieve 30 to 60 percent in energy savings and carbon emission reductions relative to conventional HVAC systems, the use of geothermal energy in the U.S. has been less than 1 percent of the total energy consumption. The key barriers preventing this technically-mature technology from reaching its full commercial potential have been its high installation cost and limited consumer knowledge and trust in GSHP systems to deliver the technology in a cost-effective manner in the market place. Led by ENVIRON, with support from University Hartford and University of Vermont, the team developed and tested a software-based a decision making tool (‘OptGSHP’) for the least-cost design of ground-source heat pump (‘GSHP’) systems. OptGSHP combines state of the art optimization algorithms with GSHP-specific HVAC and groundwater flow and heat transport simulation. The particular strength of OptGSHP is in integrating heat transport due to groundwater flow into the design, which most of the GSHP designs do not get credit for and therefore are overdesigned.

  11. Reducing home heating and cooling costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

  12. Renewable Energy Cost Optimization Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-12-31

    The Software allow users to determine the optimum combination of renewable energy technologies to minimize life cycle cost for a facility by employing various algorithms which calculate initial and operating cost, energy delivery, and other attributes associated with each technology as a function of size.

  13. Global optimization algorithm for heat exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, I.; Grossmann, I.E. )

    1993-03-01

    This paper deals with the global optimization of heat exchanger networks with fixed topology. It is shown that if linear area cost functions are assumed, as well as arithmetic mean driving force temperature differences in networks with isothermal mixing, the corresponding nonlinear programming (NLP) optimization problem involves linear constraints and a sum of linear fractional functions in the objective which are nonconvex. A rigorous algorithm is proposed that is based on a convex NLP underestimator that involves linear and nonlinear estimators for fractional and bilinear terms which provide a tight lower bound to the global optimum. This NLP problem is used within a spatial branch and bound method for which branching rules are given. Basic properties of the proposed method are presented, and its application is illustrated with several example problems. The results show that the proposed method only requires few nodes in the branch and bound search.

  14. Low cost process heat recovery. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, P.; McCray, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to analyze waste heat recovery potential, economic analysis, heat exchanger and system design, and computer analysis programs. The heating demand and heat recovery potential at a Madison neighborhood bakery was conducted. The building has steam heat and natural gas is used in the hot water heater, the cooking stoves, and in the baking oven. Heat recovery potential was analyzed based upon fuel consumption in the baking oven, flue gas temperature, mass flow rate, and hours of oven operation. The feasibility of waste heat recovery systems is analyzed using life cycle cost and life cycle savings. For a first approximation, hand calculations were performed for air-to-air flat plate, fin-plate, and liquid-to-air tube type heat exchangers using the temperature and mass flow data from a pizza restaurant in Madison. Then a heat exchanger analysis program was written in interactive BASIC. The analysis indicates that heat recovery using the flat-plate and fin-plate exchanger designs is technically feasible and yields high effectiveness. (MCW)

  15. Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Tam; Alan Nizamoff; Sheldon Kramer; Scott Olson; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts; David Stopek; Robert Zabransky; Jeffrey Hoffmann; Erik Shuster; Nelson Zhan

    2005-05-01

    As part of an ongoing effort of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate the feasibility of gasification on a broader level, Nexant, Inc. was contracted to perform a comprehensive study to provide a set of gasification alternatives for consideration by the DOE. Nexant completed the first two tasks (Tasks 1 and 2) of the ''Gasification Plant Cost and Performance Optimization Study'' for the DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in 2003. These tasks evaluated the use of the E-GAS{trademark} gasification technology (now owned by ConocoPhillips) for the production of power either alone or with polygeneration of industrial grade steam, fuel gas, hydrocarbon liquids, or hydrogen. NETL expanded this effort in Task 3 to evaluate Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. The Task 3 study had three main objectives. The first was to examine the application of the gasifier at an industrial application in upstate New York using a Southeastern Ohio coal. The second was to investigate the GTI gasifier in a stand-alone lignite-fueled IGCC power plant application, sited in North Dakota. The final goal was to train NETL personnel in the methods of process design and systems analysis. These objectives were divided into five subtasks. Subtasks 3.2 through 3.4 covered the technical analyses for the different design cases. Subtask 3.1 covered management activities, and Subtask 3.5 covered reporting. Conceptual designs were developed for several coal gasification facilities based on the fluidized bed U-GAS{reg_sign} gasifier. Subtask 3.2 developed two base case designs for industrial combined heat and power facilities using Southeastern Ohio coal that will be located at an upstate New York location. One base case design used an air-blown gasifier, and the other used an oxygen-blown gasifier in order to evaluate their relative economics. Subtask 3.3 developed an advanced design for an air-blown gasification combined heat and power

  16. Development of optimized, graded-permeability axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapolnek, Michael R.; Holmes, H. Rolland

    1988-01-01

    Heat pipe performance can usually be improved by uniformly varying or grading wick permeability from end to end. A unique and cost effective method for grading the permeability of an axial groove heat pipe is described - selective chemical etching of the pipe casing. This method was developed and demonstrated on a proof-of-concept test article. The process improved the test article's performance by 50 percent. Further improvement is possible through the use of optimally etched grooves.

  17. Cold Climates Heat Pump Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Heat pumps provide an efficient heating method; however they suffer from sever capacity and performance degradation at low ambient conditions. This has deterred market penetration in cold climates. There is a continuing effort to find an efficient air source cold climate heat pump that maintains acceptable capacity and performance at low ambient conditions. Systematic optimization techniques provide a reliable approach for the design of such systems. This paper presents a step-by-step approach for the design optimization of cold climate heat pumps. We first start by describing the optimization problem: objective function, constraints, and design space. Then we illustrate how to perform this design optimization using an open source publically available optimization toolbox. The response of the heat pump design was evaluated using a validated component based vapor compression model. This model was treated as a black box model within the optimization framework. Optimum designs for different system configurations are presented. These optimum results were further analyzed to understand the performance tradeoff and selection criteria. The paper ends with a discussion on the use of systematic optimization for the cold climate heat pump design.

  18. Selection and costing of heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    ESDU 92013 gives guidance on the selection of heat exchanger types for a given duty against various criteria; they include the general characteristics, together with such detailed aspects as the ranges of pressure and temperature appropriate, compatibility with the fluids involved, space and weight requirements, and cleaning accessibility and maintenance. That allows an initial choice to be made from 18 principal types of exchangers. The various types are all illustrated. A final choice can then be made between the feasible types on the basis of costs. Detailed costing data provided by manufacturers are tabulated as a function of heat load, operating pressure and the types of cold- and hot-side fluids for the following types of exchangers: shell-and-tube, double-pipe, printed-circuit, plate-fin, air-cooled and welded plate. Costing data are also tabulated as a function of heat load and the types of cold- and hot-side fluids for gasketed-plate exchangers. Seven worked examples of selection based on technical suitability and using the tabulated cost data illustrate fully the use of the information.

  19. Cost optimization of a hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Peter J. Limon

    2001-11-30

    This paper discusses cost scaling laws and optimization of hadron colliders based on high field magnets. Using a few simplifying assumptions that should give a reasonable approximation, cost of the magnet is divided among several major components. Scaling law for every component is determined along with the weight factors that allow cost comparison between different magnet designs. Cost of hadron collider as a function of field, aperture size and critical current density in superconductor is described analytically that allows cost optimization by changing magnet parameters. The optimum magnetic field is determined for machines based on NbTi superconductor, operating at 4.2 K or 1.9 K and NB{sub 3}Sn superconductor operating at 4.2 K. Analyzed influence of main magnet design parameters on a machine cost provided information on ways leading to the magnet cost reduction. Economical justification of a NB{sub 3}Sn collider is performed, which lets to determine the maximum price ratio between NB{sub 3}Sn and NbTi superconductors that makes NB{sub 3}Sn collider economically effective.

  20. Messaging with cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/m(2)) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, approximately 10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?" PMID:20624056

  1. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/sq m) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(exp 2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, -10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  2. A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

  3. Optimization of Transient Heat Exchanger Performance for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran Anleu, Gabriela; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Lavine, Adrienne; Wirz, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Heat exchangers are used in a multitude of applications within systems for energy generation, energy conversion, or energy storage. Many of these systems (e.g. solar power plants) function under transient conditions, but the design of the heat exchangers is typically optimized assuming steady state conditions. There is a potential for significant energy savings if the transient behavior of the heat exchanger is taken into account in designing the heat exchanger by optimizing its operating conditions in relation to the transient behavior of the overall system. The physics of the transient behavior of a heat exchanger needs to be understood to provide design parameters for transient heat exchangers to deliver energy savings. A numerical model was used to determine the optimized mass flow rates thermal properties for a thermal energy storage system. The transient behavior is strongly linked to the dimensionless parameters relating fluid properties, the mass flow rates, and the temperature of the fluids at the inlet of each stream. Smart metals, or advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction will be used to meet the three goals mentioned before: 1) energy and cost reduction, 2) size reduction, and 3) optimal performance for all modes of operation.

  4. Optimal design of crossflow heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bulck, E. )

    1991-05-01

    The design of plate-fin and tube-fin crossflow heat exchangers is discussed. The transfer surface area of crossflow heat exchangers is used ineffectively because of the nonuniform distribution of the heat transfer across the volume of the exchanger. The optimal distribution of the transfer surface area for maximum heat exchanger effectiveness and constant total surface area is determined. It is found that a Dirac delta distribution of the transfer surface aligned along the diagonal of the crossflow exchanger gives the best performance; equal to that of a counterflow device. Design guidelines for optimal area allocation within crossflow heat exchangers are established. Compared to conventional designs, designs following these guidelines may lead to either a higher exchanger effectiveness for equal pressure drops and surface area, reduced pressure drops for equal exchanger effectiveness, or reduced weight and a near cubic form of the exchanger core for equal pressure drops and effectiveness.

  5. Central heat engine cost and availability study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the performance and cost of commercially available heat engines for use at solar power plants. The scope of inquiry spans power ratings of 500 kW to 50 MW and peak cycle temperatures of 750 /sup 0/F to 1200 /sup 0/F. Data were collected by surveying manufacturers of steam turbines, organic Rankine (ORC) systems, and ancillary equipment (steam condensers, cooling towers, pumps, etc.). Methods were developed for estimating design-point and off-design efficiencies of steam Rankine cycle (SRC) and ORC systems. In the size-temperature range of interest, SRC systems were found to be the only heat engines requiring no additional development effort, and SRC capital and operating cost estimates were developed. Commercially available steam turbines limit peak cycle temperatures to about 1000 /sup 0/F in this size range, which in turn limits efficiency. Other systems were identified that could be prototyped using existing turbomachines. These systems include ORC, advanced SRC, and various configurations employing Brayton cycle equipment, i.e., gas turbines. The latter are limited to peak cycle temperatures of 1500 /sup 0/F in solar applications, based on existing heat-exchanger technology. The advanced systems were found to offer performance advantages over SRC in specific cases. 7 refs., 30 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

  7. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  8. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  9. Optimal Management of Geothermal Heat Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, I. H.; Bielicki, J. M.; Buscheck, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy technologies use the constant heat flux from the subsurface in order to produce heat or electricity for societal use. As such, a geothermal energy system is not inherently variable, like systems based on wind and solar resources, and an operator can conceivably control the rate at which heat is extracted and used directly, or converted into a commodity that is used. Although geothermal heat is a renewable resource, this heat can be depleted over time if the rate of heat extraction exceeds the natural rate of renewal (Rybach, 2003). For heat extraction used for commodities that are sold on the market, sustainability entails balancing the rate at which the reservoir renews with the rate at which heat is extracted and converted into profit, on a net present value basis. We present a model that couples natural resource economic approaches for managing renewable resources with simulations of geothermal reservoir performance in order to develop an optimal heat mining strategy that balances economic gain with the performance and renewability of the reservoir. Similar optimal control approaches have been extensively studied for renewable natural resource management of fisheries and forests (Bonfil, 2005; Gordon, 1954; Weitzman, 2003). Those models determine an optimal path of extraction of fish or timber, by balancing the regeneration of stocks of fish or timber that are not harvested with the profit from the sale of the fish or timber that is harvested. Our model balances the regeneration of reservoir temperature with the net proceeds from extracting heat and converting it to electricity that is sold to consumers. We used the Non-isothermal Unconfined-confined Flow and Transport (NUFT) model (Hao, Sun, & Nitao, 2011) to simulate the performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir under a variety of geologic and operational situations. The results of NUFT are incorporated into the natural resource economics model to determine production strategies that

  10. GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel S. Tam

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the

  11. Cost Optimization and Technology Enablement COTSAT-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Lindsay, Michael C.; Klupar, Peter Damian; Swank, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Cost Optimized Test of Spacecraft Avionics and Technologies (COTSAT-1) is an ongoing spacecraft research and development project at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The space industry was a hot bed of innovation and development at its birth. Many new technologies were developed for and first demonstrated in space. In the recent past this trend has reversed with most of the new technology funding and research being driven by the private industry. Most of the recent advances in spaceflight hardware have come from the cell phone industry with a lag of about 10 to 15 years from lab demonstration to in space usage. NASA has started a project designed to address this problem. The prototype spacecraft known as Cost Optimized Test of Spacecraft Avionics and Technologies (COTSAT-1) and CheapSat work to reduce these issues. This paper highlights the approach taken by NASA Ames Research center to achieve significant subsystem cost reductions. The COSTAT-1 research system design incorporates use of COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf), MOTS (Modified Off The Shelf), and GOTS (Government Off The Shelf) hardware for a remote sensing spacecraft. The COTSAT-1 team demonstrated building a fully functional spacecraft for $500K parts and $2.0M labor. The COTSAT-1 system, including a selected science payload, is described within this paper. Many of the advancements identified in the process of cost reduction can be attributed to the use of a one-atmosphere pressurized structure to house the spacecraft components. By using COTS hardware, the spacecraft program can utilize investments already made by commercial vendors. This ambitious project development philosophy/cycle has yielded the COTSAT-1 flight hardware. This paper highlights the advancements of the COTSAT-1 spacecraft leading to the delivery of the current flight hardware that is now located at NASA Ames Research Center. This paper also addresses the plans for COTSAT-2.

  12. GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon Kramer

    2003-09-01

    This project developed optimized designs and cost estimates for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC coproduction projects that produced hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and hydrocarbon liquid fuel precursors in addition to power. The as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project was the starting point for this study that was performed by Bechtel, Global Energy and Nexant under Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-99FT40342. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This non-optimized plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW.1 This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for

  13. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases, the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the /W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery TEG with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric (TE) treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery TEG yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of 1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of 1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but preferred TE design regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor F opt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have profound implications on the design and

  14. Costs and benefits of realism and optimism

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Lisa; Antrobus, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review What is the relationship between rationality and mental health? By considering the psychological literature on depressive realism and unrealistic optimism, it was hypothesized that, in the context of judgments about the self, accurate cognitions are psychologically maladaptive and inaccurate cognitions are psychologically adaptive. Recent studies recommend being cautious in drawing any general conclusion about the style of thinking and mental health. Recent findings Recent investigations suggest that people with depressive symptoms are more accurate than controls in tasks involving time perception and estimates of personal circumstances, but not in other tasks. Unrealistic optimism remains a robust phenomenon across a variety of tasks and domains, and researchers are starting to explore its neural bases. However, the challenge is to determine to what extent and in what way unrealistic optimism is beneficial. Summary We should revisit the hypothesis that optimistic cognitions are psychologically adaptive, whereas realistic thinking is not. Realistic beliefs and expectations can be conducive to wellbeing and good functioning, and wildly optimistic cognitions have considerable psychological costs. PMID:25594418

  15. Optimal Operation System of the Integrated District Heating System with Multiple Regional Branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ui Sik; Park, Tae Chang; Kim, Lae-Hyun; Yeo, Yeong Koo

    This paper presents an optimal production and distribution management for structural and operational optimization of the integrated district heating system (DHS) with multiple regional branches. A DHS consists of energy suppliers and consumers, district heating pipelines network and heat storage facilities in the covered region. In the optimal management system, production of heat and electric power, regional heat demand, electric power bidding and sales, transport and storage of heat at each regional DHS are taken into account. The optimal management system is formulated as a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) where the objectives is to minimize the overall cost of the integrated DHS while satisfying the operation constraints of heat units and networks as well as fulfilling heating demands from consumers. Piecewise linear formulation of the production cost function and stairwise formulation of the start-up cost function are used to compute nonlinear cost function approximately. Evaluation of the total overall cost is based on weekly operations at each district heat branches. Numerical simulations show the increase of energy efficiency due to the introduction of the present optimal management system.

  16. Cost analysis of new and retrofit hot-air type solar assisted heating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.; Hawkins, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed cost analysis/cost improvement study was performed on two Department of Energy/National Aeronautics and Space Administration operational test sites to determine actual costs and potential cost improvements of new and retrofit hot air type, solar assisted heating and hot water systems for single family sized structures. This analysis concentrated on the first cost of a system which included procurement, installation, and integration of a solar assisted heating and hot water system on a new or retrofit basis; it also provided several cost projections which can be used as inputs to payback analyses, depending upon the degree of optimism or future improvements assumed. Cost definitions were developed for five categories of cost, and preliminary estimates were developed for each. The costing methodology, approach, and results together with several candidate low cost designs are described.

  17. Numerical simulation and optimization of enhanced heat transfer for high power LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Pu; Peng, Xu; Houchao, Miao; Li, Zhang

    2013-07-01

    A mathematical model of high power LED lights heat transfer was established, in which heat transfer structure of heat pipe was simplified based on the equivalent thermal resistance network model, and numerically solved by using the CFD software, the steady state temperature distributions were obtained. The simulation results indicate that ambient air temperature, the number of heat pipe, the thickness of bond coating, and the size of radiator play important roles for LED chip temperature, however, the influence of copper sink thickness is negligible. The heat transfer structure was optimized based on these results, and the optimized structure can achieve a better balance between cost reducing and heat transfer enhancement.

  18. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

  19. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  20. Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Combined Heating and Humidification Coil for HVAC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoros, Liliana; Andresen, Bjarne

    2016-07-01

    The total cost of ownership is calculated for a combined heating and humidification coil of an air-handling unit taking into account investment and operation costs simultaneously. This total cost represents the optimization function for which the minimum is sought. The parameters for the cost dependencies are the physical dimensions of the coil: length, width and height. The term "coil" is used generically since in this setup it generates heating as well as humidification in a single unit. The first part of the paper deals with the constructive optimization and finds the relationship between the dimensions for a minimum cost. The second part of the paper takes the results of the constructive optimization further and, based on the data derived in our previous papers, analyzes the minimum total cost for the humidification coil while balancing the amount of water used to humidify the air and modify its temperature.

  1. Cost optimization in low volume VLSI circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, K. B., Jr.; Kerns, D. V., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of integrated circuit (IC) cost to electronic system cost is developed using models for integrated circuit cost which are based on design/fabrication approach. Emphasis is on understanding the relationship between cost and volume for custom circuits suitable for NASA applications. In this report, reliability is a major consideration in the models developed. Results are given for several typical IC designs using off the shelf, full custom, and semicustom IC's with single and double level metallization.

  2. International standards for cost-optimized space missions and infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Merle

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of international standards is essential for the success of multiagency space missions. Here, two key areas for international standardization are proposed: the development of standards for infrastructure and the development of multiagency standards. Such standards will ultimately enable cost-optimized small missions as well as a cost-optimized superset of space infractructures.

  3. A low-computational-cost inverse heat transfer technique for convective heat transfer measurements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Greco, C. S.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of the convective wall heat flux in hypersonic flows may be particularly challenging in the presence of high-temperature gradients and when using high-thermal-conductivity materials. In this case, the solution of multidimensional problems is necessary, but it considerably increases the computational cost. In this paper, a low-computational-cost inverse data reduction technique is presented. It uses a recursive least-squares approach in combination with the trust-region-reflective algorithm as optimization procedure. The computational cost is reduced by performing the discrete Fourier transform on the discrete convective heat flux function and by identifying the most relevant coefficients as objects of the optimization algorithm. In the paper, the technique is validated by means of both synthetic data, built in order to reproduce physical conditions, and experimental data, carried out in the Hypersonic Test Facility Delft at Mach 7.5 on two wind tunnel models having different thermal properties.

  4. Optimal cost basis for seismic design

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    The paper summarizes a methodology for establishing seismic design levels based on a cost-benefit assessment. The methodology requires the development of costs and benefits for varying design levels of vibratory ground motion and surface fault displacements. The optimum design level for a given structure is that which gives the minimum total direct and earthquake consequence costs. The example used is the surface facilities of the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  5. OPTIMAL COST CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ATTACHED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a cost-benefit analysis for alternative programs intended for the control of the nuisance growth of an attached alga (Cladophora). Such analyses require that changes in water quality be quantitatively related to the cost of implementation for specific manageme...

  6. Optimizing conceptual aircraft designs for minimum life cycle cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.

    1989-01-01

    A life cycle cost (LCC) module has been added to the FLight Optimization System (FLOPS), allowing the additional optimization variables of life cycle cost, direct operating cost, and acquisition cost. Extensive use of the methodology on short-, medium-, and medium-to-long range aircraft has demonstrated that the system works well. Results from the study show that optimization parameter has a definite effect on the aircraft, and that optimizing an aircraft for minimum LCC results in a different airplane than when optimizing for minimum take-off gross weight (TOGW), fuel burned, direct operation cost (DOC), or acquisition cost. Additionally, the economic assumptions can have a strong impact on the configurations optimized for minimum LCC or DOC. Also, results show that advanced technology can be worthwhile, even if it results in higher manufacturing and operating costs. Examining the number of engines a configuration should have demonstrated a real payoff of including life cycle cost in the conceptual design process: the minimum TOGW of fuel aircraft did not always have the lowest life cycle cost when considering the number of engines.

  7. Optimization of life cycle management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    As can be seen from the case studies, a LCM program needs to address and integrate, in the decision process, technical, political, licensing, remaining plant life, component replacement cycles, and financial issues. As part of the LCM evaluations, existing plant programs, ongoing replacement projects, short and long-term operation and maintenance issues, and life extension strategies must be considered. The development of the LCM evaluations and the cost benefit analysis identifies critical technical and life cycle cost parameters. These {open_quotes}discoveries{close_quotes} result from the detailed and effective use of a consistent, quantifiable, and well documented methodology. The systematic development and implementation of a plant-wide LCM program provides for an integrated and structured process that leads to the most practical and effective recommendations. Through the implementation of these recommendations and cost effective decisions, the overall power production costs can be controlled and ultimately lowered.

  8. Development of a low-cost heat storage furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, E. )

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the development of a low cost central electric heat storage furnace for residential use in the USA. The heat storage furnace design uses crushed trap rock, a basaltic rock found throughout the USA. Residential furnaces were built and successfully tested both under laboratory conditions and in residences from Minnesota to New England. Although the furnace was developed for residential space heating, applications for commercial and industrial heating are under consideration. Heat storage using off-peak electricity is used as a load management tool in several ways. The specific application considered in this paper is space heating with warm air. In this application, the furnace converts off-peak electric power to heat and stores it for space heating during non-peak periods on a daily cycle basis.

  9. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  10. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  11. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  12. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  13. Searching for cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses. PMID:20624057

  14. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arriarrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  15. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication, this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  16. Use of Algorithm of Changes for Optimal Design of Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, S. C.; Tam, H. K.; Chio, C. H.; Tam, L. M.

    2010-05-01

    For economic reasons, the optimal design of heat exchanger is required. Design of heat exchanger is usually based on the iterative process. The design conditions, equipment geometries, the heat transfer and friction factor correlations are totally involved in the process. Using the traditional iterative method, many trials are needed for satisfying the compromise between the heat exchange performance and the cost consideration. The process is cumbersome and the optimal design is often depending on the design engineer's experience. Therefore, in the recent studies, many researchers, reviewed in [1], applied the genetic algorithm (GA) [2] for designing the heat exchanger. The results outperformed the traditional method. In this study, the alternative approach, algorithm of changes, is proposed for optimal design of shell-tube heat exchanger [3]. This new method, algorithm of changes based on I Ching (???), is developed originality by the author. In the algorithms, the hexagram operations in I Ching has been generalized to binary string case and the iterative procedure which imitates the I Ching inference is also defined. On the basis of [3], the shell inside diameter, tube outside diameter, and baffles spacing were treated as the design (or optimized) variables. The cost of the heat exchanger was arranged as the objective function. Through the case study, the results show that the algorithm of changes is comparable to the GA method. Both of method can find the optimal solution in a short time. However, without interchanging information between binary strings, the algorithm of changes has advantage on parallel computation over GA.

  17. Low Cost Polymer heat Exchangers for Condensing Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Thomas; Trojanowski, Rebecca; Wei, George; Worek, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Work in this project sought to develop a suitable design for a low cost, corrosion resistant heat exchanger as part of a high efficiency condensing boiler. Based upon the design parameters and cost analysis several geometries and material options were explored. The project also quantified and demonstrated the durability of the selected polymer/filler composite under expected operating conditions. The core material idea included a polymer matrix with fillers for thermal conductivity improvement. While the work focused on conventional heating oil, this concept could also be applicable to natural gas, low sulfur heating oil, and biodiesel- although these are considered to be less challenging environments. An extruded polymer composite heat exchanger was designed, built, and tested during this project, demonstrating technical feasibility of this corrosion-resistant material approach. In such flue gas-to-air heat exchangers, the controlling resistance to heat transfer is in the gas-side convective layer and not in the tube material. For this reason, the lower thermal conductivity polymer composite heat exchanger can achieve overall heat transfer performance comparable to a metal heat exchanger. However, with the polymer composite, the surface temperature on the gas side will be higher, leading to a lower water vapor condensation rate.

  18. The optimization of Stirling refrigerator and Stirling heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xin-Mei

    2007-03-01

    The optimization of an irreversible Stirling refrigerator or a Stirling heat engine is an important research subject for a long time. Taking into account of the influence of mixed thermal resistance and regeneration loss in the performance study, we have derived the optimal relation of both of them. For Stirling refrigerator, we have deduced the optimal relation between the thermal resistance coefficient and the efficiency. To the Stirling heat engine, we have deduced the optimal relation between the power output and the efficiency. The conclusions obtained mirror the observed performance of the Stirling refrigerator or the Stirling heat engine quite well. Thus, the results may provide a new theoretical guidance to the optimal design and the selection of optimal operating condition of the Stirling refrigerator or the Stirling heat engine.

  19. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  20. Optimization of Composition and Heat Treating of Die Steels for Extended Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Quanyou Zhou

    2002-01-30

    An ''average'' die casting die costs fifty thousand dollars. A die used in making die cast aluminum engine blocks can cost well over one million dollars. These costs provide a strong incentive for extension of die life. While vacuum quenched Premium Grade H13 dies have become the most widely used in the United States, tool makers and die casters are constantly searching for new steels and heat treating procedures to extend die life. This project was undertaken to investigate the effects of composition and heat treating on die life and optimize these parameters.

  1. Application of trajectory optimization principles to minimize aircraft operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Morello, S. A.; Erzberger, H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes various applications of trajectory optimization principles that have been or are being devised by both government and industrial researchers to minimize aircraft direct operating costs (DOC). These costs (time and fuel) are computed for aircraft constrained to fly over a fixed range. Optimization theory is briefly outlined, and specific algorithms which have resulted from application of this theory are described. Typical results which demonstrate use of these algorithms and the potential savings which they can produce are given. Finally, need for further trajectory optimization research is presented.

  2. Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

    2012-08-01

    The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

  3. Investigation of low-cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massions, V. P.; Mach, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication, testing, and evaluation of materials and techniques employed in the fabrication of ablative heat shield panels are described. Results of this effort show projected reductions in labor man-hours for dielectric curing of panels when compared to panels molded in a steam-heated press. In addition, panels were fabricated with more than one density within the cross-section. These dual-density panels show significant weight and cost reduction potentials.

  4. Optimization principle of operating parameters of heat exchanger by using CFD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mičieta, Jozef; Jiří, Vondál; Jandačka, Jozef; Lenhard, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Design of effective heat transfer devices and minimizing costs are desired sections in industry and they are important for both engineers and users due to the wide-scale use of heat exchangers. Traditional approach to design is based on iterative process in which is gradually changed design parameters, until a satisfactory solution is achieved. The design process of the heat exchanger is very dependent on the experience of the engineer, thereby the use of computational software is a major advantage in view of time. Determination of operating parameters of the heat exchanger and the subsequent estimation of operating costs have a major impact on the expected profitability of the device. There are on the one hand the material and production costs, which are immediately reflected in the cost of device. But on the other hand, there are somewhat hidden costs in view of economic operation of the heat exchanger. The economic balance of operation significantly affects the technical solution and accompanies the design of the heat exchanger since its inception. Therefore, there is important not underestimate the choice of operating parameters. The article describes an optimization procedure for choice of cost-effective operational parameters for a simple double pipe heat exchanger by using CFD software and the subsequent proposal to modify its design for more economical operation.

  5. Starship Sails Propelled by Cost-Optimized Directed Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, J.

    Microwave and laser-propelled sails are a new class of spacecraft using photon acceleration. It is the only method of interstellar flight that has no physics issues. Laboratory demonstrations of basic features of beam-driven propulsion, flight, stability (`beam-riding'), and induced spin, have been completed in the last decade, primarily in the microwave. It offers much lower cost probes after a substantial investment in the launcher. Engineering issues are being addressed by other applications: fusion (microwave, millimeter and laser sources) and astronomy (large aperture antennas). There are many candidate sail materials: carbon nanotubes and microtrusses, beryllium, graphene, etc. For acceleration of a sail, what is the cost-optimum high power system? Here the cost is used to constrain design parameters to estimate system power, aperture and elements of capital and operating cost. From general relations for cost-optimal transmitter aperture and power, system cost scales with kinetic energy and inversely with sail diameter and frequency. So optimal sails will be larger, lower in mass and driven by higher frequency beams. Estimated costs include economies of scale. We present several starship point concepts. Systems based on microwave, millimeter wave and laser technologies are of equal cost at today's costs. The frequency advantage of lasers is cancelled by the high cost of both the laser and the radiating optic. Cost of interstellar sailships is very high, driven by current costs for radiation source, antennas and especially electrical power. The high speeds necessary for fast interstellar missions make the operating cost exceed the capital cost. Such sailcraft will not be flown until the cost of electrical power in space is reduced orders of magnitude below current levels.

  6. Optimization in solar heating/photovoltaic systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vourazelis, D.G.

    1990-12-01

    This thesis is a design of an alternative system which may provide heating to the Naval Postgraduate School swimming pool. Particularly, it is a solar heating/photovoltaic system designed for a better efficiency and less cost of installation and maintenance. Principles of heat transfer, control and fluid dynamics theory are used for the determination of this heating system elements. The feasibility of its installation and use is analyzed.

  7. Application of Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm in the Heating System Planning Problem

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong-Jiang; Yu, Nan-Yang; Hu, Jun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Based on the life cycle cost (LCC) approach, this paper presents an integral mathematical model and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for the heating system planning (HSP) problem. The proposed mathematical model minimizes the cost of heating system as the objective for a given life cycle time. For the particularity of HSP problem, the general particle swarm optimization algorithm was improved. An actual case study was calculated to check its feasibility in practical use. The results show that the improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) algorithm can more preferably solve the HSP problem than PSO algorithm. Moreover, the results also present the potential to provide useful information when making decisions in the practical planning process. Therefore, it is believed that if this approach is applied correctly and in combination with other elements, it can become a powerful and effective optimization tool for HSP problem. PMID:23935429

  8. Optimal footfall patterns for cost minimization in running.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ross H; Hamill, Joseph

    2015-08-20

    Optimality in footfall pattern use is often studied in relation to running performance and injury risk. The typical variables assessed (metabolic cost, impact force) represent only two of many potential variables runners might want to minimize situationally. Here we used optimal control theory to predict optimal model-based running mechanics with 44 different cost functions. We tallied the frequency of different footfall patterns, then examined which patterns minimized which types of cost functions. When the model wore shoes, rearfoot striking (RFS) was predicted by 57% of the cost functions and was consistently optimal for functions related to whole-body energy expenditure and peak joint contact forces. No other footfall pattern was predicted by more than 25% of the functions. Non-RFS patterns tended to be optimal for functions that gave equal weight to all muscles, avoiding localized muscle fatigue. Non-RFS patterns were also predicted when minimizing average joint contact forces. Similar predictions were seen when the model ran barefoot, where RFS was optimal for 55% of the functions. The results suggest that RFS is the most versatile footfall pattern (optimal for the greatest number of goals), and may explain why RFS is the most common pattern in recreational shod runners. We argue that natural non-RFS runners are not necessarily behaving "sub-optimally", but rather may be optimizing their gaits on factors not tested here (e.g. comfort, which is difficult to quantify). In addition, switching from RFS to non-RFS may reduce the joint load accumulated during a run if speed and step length are maintained. PMID:25952545

  9. Optimized Heat Interception for Cryogen Tank Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, Edgar R.; Miller, F. K.

    2007-01-01

    We consider means for using the cooling available in boil-off gas to intercept heat conducted through the support structure of a cryogen tank. A one-dimensional model of the structure coupled to a gas stream gives an analytical expression for heat leak in terms of flow rate for temperature independent-properties and laminar flow. A numerical model has been developed for heat transfer on a thin cylindrical tube with an attached vent line. The model is used to determine the vent path layout that will minimize heat flow into the cryogen tank. The results are useful for a number of applications, but the one of interest in this study is the minimization of the boil-off in large cryopropellant tanks in low Earth and low lunar orbit.

  10. On Optimizing an Archibald Rubber-Band Heat Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, J. G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the criteria and procedure for optimizing the performance of Archibald rubber-band heat engines by using the appropriate choice of dimensions, minimizing frictional torque, maximizing torque and balancing the rubber band system. (GA)

  11. Cost-Performance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, Kazuaki; Shakouri, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost compared with commercialized micro gas turbines but higher operating cost per energy due to moderate efficiency. The quantitative benefit of the thermoelectric system on a price-per-energy (/J) basis lies in its scalability, especially at a smaller scale (<10 kW), where mechanical thermodynamic systems are inefficient. This study is based on propane as a chemical energy source for combustion. The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the maximum power output from the TE generator is not necessarily equal to the economic optimum (lowest /kWh). The lowest cost is achieved when the TE module is optimized between the maximum power output and the maximum efficiency, dependent on the fuel price and operation time duration. The initial investment (/W) for TE systems is much lower than for micro gas turbines when considering a low fractional area for the TE elements, e.g., 5% to 10% inside the module. Although the initial cost of the TE system is much less, the micro gas turbine has a lower energy price for longer-term operation due to its higher efficiency. For very long-term operation, operating cost dominates, thus efficiency and material ZT become the key cost factors.

  12. Genetic Algorithm Optimization of a Cost Competitive Hybrid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George

    2014-01-01

    Performance, reliability and cost have always been drivers in the rocket business. Hybrid rockets have been late entries into the launch business due to substantial early development work on liquid rockets and later on solid rockets. Slowly the technology readiness level of hybrids has been increasing due to various large scale testing and flight tests of hybrid rockets. A remaining issue is the cost of hybrids vs the existing launch propulsion systems. This paper will review the known state of the art hybrid development work to date and incorporate it into a genetic algorithm to optimize the configuration based on various parameters. A cost module will be incorporated to the code based on the weights of the components. The design will be optimized on meeting the performance requirements at the lowest cost.

  13. Genetic Algorithm Optimization of a Cost Competitive Hybrid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George

    2015-01-01

    Performance, reliability and cost have always been drivers in the rocket business. Hybrid rockets have been late entries into the launch business due to substantial early development work on liquid rockets and solid rockets. Slowly the technology readiness level of hybrids has been increasing due to various large scale testing and flight tests of hybrid rockets. One remaining issue is the cost of hybrids versus the existing launch propulsion systems. This paper will review the known state-of-the-art hybrid development work to date and incorporate it into a genetic algorithm to optimize the configuration based on various parameters. A cost module will be incorporated to the code based on the weights of the components. The design will be optimized on meeting the performance requirements at the lowest cost.

  14. An optimized procedure for determining incremental heat rate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyola, A.H.; Grady, W.M. ); Viviani, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes an optimized procedure for producing generator incremental heat rate curves from continually sampled unit performance data. A generalized reduced gradient algorithm is applied to optimally locate break points in incremental heat rate curves. The advantages include the ability to automatically take into consideration slow time-varying effects such as unit aging and temperature variations in combustion air and cooling water. The procedure is tested using actual fuel rate data for four generators.

  15. Optimizing Ice Thermal Storage to Reduce Energy Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher L.

    Energy cost for buildings is an issue of concern for owners across the U.S. The bigger the building, the greater the concern. A part of this is due to the energy required to cool the building and the way in which charges are set when paying for energy consumed during different times of the day. This study will prove that designing ice thermal storage properly will minimize energy cost in buildings. The effectiveness of ice thermal storage as a means to reduce energy costs lies within transferring the time of most energy consumption from on-peak to off-peak periods. Multiple variables go into the equation of finding the optimal use of ice thermal storage and they are all judged with the final objective of minimizing monthly energy costs. This research discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, energy demand, and the total energy cost. A tool for optimal design of ice thermal storage is developed, considering variables such as chiller and ice storage sizes and charging and discharge times. The simulations take place in a four-story building and investigate the potential of Ice Thermal Storage as a resource in reducing and minimizing energy cost for cooling. The simulations test the effectiveness of Ice Thermal Storage implemented into the four-story building in ten locations across the United States.

  16. Residential heating and cooling loads and costs for the South

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A. S.; Hyatt, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    This report examines typical residential heating and cooling loads for 24 southern cities and six other US cities. A 1536-square-foot house is examined, with concrete slab floor, frame construction, ventilated attic, and glazing area equivalent to 12% of the floor area. Five basic variations of this house were analyzed: two insulation levels with two compass orientations each, and a sun-tempered case. The building load calculations were based on a non-rigorous methodology typically used within the building community today. The estimated heating and cooling loads and the impact of insulation, orientation, and sun-tempering are illustrated with regional maps. Typical fuel costs and heating systems are also examined and shown to have a major role in determining whether the building design emphasis should be on heating or cooling.

  17. COTSAT Small Spacecraft Cost Optimization for Government and Commercial Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bui, David; Dallara, Christopher; Ghassemieh, Shakib; Hanratty, James; Jackson, Evan; Klupar, Pete; Lindsay, Michael; Ling, Kuok; Mattei, Nicholas; Mayer, David; Quigley, Emmett; Spremo, Stevan; Young, Zion

    2009-01-01

    Cost Optimized Test of Spacecraft Avionics and Technologies (COTSAT-1) is an ongoing spacecraft research and development project at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The prototype spacecraft, also known as CheapSat, is the first of what could potentially be a series of rapidly produced low-cost spacecraft. The COTSAT-1 team is committed to realizing the challenging goal of building a fully functional spacecraft for $500K parts and $2.0M labor. The project's efforts have resulted in significant accomplishments within the scope of a limited budget and schedule. Completion and delivery of the flight hardware to the Engineering Directorate at NASA Ames occurred in February 2009 and a cost effective qualification program is currently under study. The COTSAT-1 spacecraft is now located at NASA Ames Research Center and is awaiting a cost effective launch opportunity. This paper highlights the advancements of the COTSAT-1 spacecraft cost reduction techniques.

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of optimal control measures for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Paula; Silva, Cristiana J; Torres, Delfim F M

    2014-10-01

    We propose and analyze an optimal control problem where the control system is a mathematical model for tuberculosis that considers reinfection. The control functions represent the fraction of early latent and persistent latent individuals that are treated. Our aim was to study how these control measures should be implemented, for a certain time period, in order to reduce the number of active infected individuals, while minimizing the interventions implementation costs. The optimal intervention is compared along different epidemiological scenarios, by varying the transmission coefficient. The impact of variation of the risk of reinfection, as a result of acquired immunity to a previous infection for treated individuals on the optimal controls and associated solutions, is analyzed. A cost-effectiveness analysis is done, to compare the application of each one of the control measures, separately or in combination. PMID:25245395

  19. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Federal buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water.[2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514.

  20. Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

  1. A new optimization approach for shell and tube heat exchangers by using electromagnetism-like algorithm (EM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, Azher M.; Abed, Issa Ahmed; Majdi, Hasan Sh.; Al-Shamani, Ali Najah; Sopian, K.

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a new procedure for optimal design of shell and tube heat exchangers. The electromagnetism-like algorithm is applied to save on heat exchanger capital cost and designing a compact, high performance heat exchanger with effective use of the allowable pressure drop (cost of the pump). An optimization algorithm is then utilized to determine the optimal values of both geometric design parameters and maximum allowable pressure drop by pursuing the minimization of a total cost function. A computer code is developed for the optimal shell and tube heat exchangers. Different test cases are solved to demonstrate the effectiveness and ability of the proposed algorithm. Results are also compared with those obtained by other approaches available in the literature. The comparisons indicate that a proposed design procedure can be successfully applied in the optimal design of shell and tube heat exchangers. In particular, in the examined cases a reduction of total costs up to 30, 29, and 56.15 % compared with the original design and up to 18, 5.5 and 7.4 % compared with other approaches for case study 1, 2 and 3 respectively, are observed. In this work, economic optimization resulting from the proposed design procedure are relevant especially when the size/volume is critical for high performance and compact unit, moderate volume and cost are needed.

  2. Design optimization for cost and quality: The robust design approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1990-01-01

    Designing reliable, low cost, and operable space systems has become the key to future space operations. Designing high quality space systems at low cost is an economic and technological challenge to the designer. A systematic and efficient way to meet this challenge is a new method of design optimization for performance, quality, and cost, called Robust Design. Robust Design is an approach for design optimization. It consists of: making system performance insensitive to material and subsystem variation, thus allowing the use of less costly materials and components; making designs less sensitive to the variations in the operating environment, thus improving reliability and reducing operating costs; and using a new structured development process so that engineering time is used most productively. The objective in Robust Design is to select the best combination of controllable design parameters so that the system is most robust to uncontrollable noise factors. The robust design methodology uses a mathematical tool called an orthogonal array, from design of experiments theory, to study a large number of decision variables with a significantly small number of experiments. Robust design also uses a statistical measure of performance, called a signal-to-noise ratio, from electrical control theory, to evaluate the level of performance and the effect of noise factors. The purpose is to investigate the Robust Design methodology for improving quality and cost, demonstrate its application by the use of an example, and suggest its use as an integral part of space system design process.

  3. Optimization of combined endoreversible Carnot heat engines with different objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xue-Tao; Liang, Xin-Gang

    2015-06-01

    Taking the output power, thermal efficiency, and thermo-economic performance as the optimization objectives, we optimize the operation parameters of a thermodynamic system with combined endoreversible Carnot heat engines in this paper. The applicabilities of the entropy generation minimization and entransy theory to the optimizations are discussed. For the discussed cases, only the entransy loss coefficient is always agreeable to the optimization of thermal efficiency. The applicabilities of the other discussed concepts to the optimizations are conditional. Different concepts and principles are needed for different optimization objectives, and the optimization principles have their application preconditions. When the preconditions are not satisfied, the principles may be not applicable. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51376101) and the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups, China (Grant No. 51321002).

  4. APECS: A family of optimization products for least cost generation

    SciTech Connect

    Petrill, E.; Stallings, J.; Shea, S.

    1996-05-01

    Reducing costs of power generation is the primary focus of many power generators today in efforts to prepare for competition in a deregulated market, to increase profitability, or to retain customers. To help power generators track and manage power generation costs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) offers APECS{sup plus}, one of EPRI`s APECS - Advisory Plant and Environmental Control System - family of optimization products for fossil power plants. The APECS family of products provides tools and techniques to optimize costs, as well as NO{sub x} emissions and performance, in fossil power plants. These products include APECS{sup plus}, GNOCIS, and ULTRAMAX{reg_sign}. The products have varying degrees of functionality and their application at a power plant will depend on the site-specific needs and resources in each case. This paper describes APECS{sup plus}, the cost management product of the APECS family of optimization products. The other key products in this family, GNOCIS and ULTRAMAX{reg_sign}, are mentioned here and described in more detail in the literature.

  5. Second-law-based thermoeconomic optimization of two-phase heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Zubair, S.M. ); Kadaba, P.V.; Evans, R.B. )

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical method for the second-law-based thermoeconomic optimization of two-phase heat exchangers used as condensers or evaporators. The concept of internal economy as a means of estimating the economic value of entropy generated (due to finite temperature difference heat transfer and pressure drops) has been proposed, thus permitting the engineer to trade the cost of entropy generation in the heat exchanger against its capital expenditure. Results are presented in terms of the optimum heat exchanger area as a function of the exit/inlet temperature ratio of the coolant, unit cost of energy dissipated, and the optimum overall heat transfer coefficient. The total heat transfer resistance represented by (1/U = C1 + C2 Re{sup {minus}n}) in the present analysis is patterned after Wilson (1915) which accommodates the complexities associated with the determination of the two-phase heat transfer coefficient and the buildup of surface scaling resistances. The analysis of a water-cooled condenser and an air-cooled evaporator is presented with supporting numerical examples which are based on the thermoeconomic optimization procedure of this paper.

  6. Optimizing sensor packaging costs and performances in environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandelli, Alessandro; Grimaccia, Francesco; Zich, Riccardo E.

    2005-02-01

    Sensor packaging has been identified as one of the most significant areas of research for enabling sensor usage in harsh environments for several application fields. Protection is one of the primary goals of sensor packaging; however, research deals not only with robust and resistant packages optimization, but also with electromagnetic performance. On the other hand, from the economic point of view, wireless sensor networks present hundreds of thousands of small sensors, namely motes, whose costs should be reduced at the lowest level, thus driving low the packaging cost also. So far, packaging issues have not been extended to such topics because these products are not yet in the advanced production cycle. However, in order to guarantee high EMC performance and low packaging costs, it is necessary to address the packaging strategy from the very beginning. Technological improvements that impacts on production time and costs can be suitable organized by anticipating the above mentioned issues in the development and design of the motes, obtaining in this way a significant reduction of final efforts for optimization. The paper addresses the development and production techniques necessary to identify the real needs in such a field and provides the suitable strategies to enhance industrial performance of high-volumes productions. Moreover the electrical and mechanical characteristics of these devices are reviewed and better identified in function of the environmental requirements and electromagnetic compatibility. Future developments complete the scenario and introduce the next mote generation characterized by a cost lower by an order of magnitude.

  7. TRU Waste Management Program cost/schedule optimization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Detamore, J.A. . Joint Integration Office); Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A. Corp., Boulder, CO )

    1985-10-01

    The cost/schedule optimization task is a necessary function to insure that program goals and plans are optimized from a cost and schedule aspect. Results of this study will offer DOE information with which it can establish, within institutional constraints, the most efficient program for the long-term management and disposal of contact handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). To this end, a comprehensive review of program cost/schedule tradeoffs has been made, to identify any major cost saving opportunities that may be realized by modification of current program plans. It was decided that all promising scenarios would be explored, and institutional limitations to implementation would be described. Since a virtually limitless number of possible scenarios can be envisioned, it was necessary to distill these possibilities into a manageable number of alternatives. The resultant scenarios were described in the cost/schedule strategy and work plan document. Each scenario was compared with the base case: waste processing at the originating site; transport of CH-TRU wastes in TRUPACT; shipment of drums in 6-Packs; 25 year stored waste workoff; WIPP operational 10/88, with all sites shipping to WIPP beginning 10/88; and no processing at WIPP. Major savings were identified in two alternate scenarios: centralize waste processing at INEL and eliminate rail shipment of TRUPACT. No attempt was made to calculate savings due to combination of scenarios. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

  8. Cost Estimates of Electricity from a TPV Residential Heating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palfinger, Günther; Bitnar, Bernd; Durisch, Wilhelm; Mayor, Jean-Claude; Grützmacher, Detlev; Gobrecht, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system was built using a 12 to 20 kWth methane burner which should be integrated into a conventional residential heating system. The TPV system is cylindrical in shape and consists of a selective Yb2O3 emitter, a quartz glass tube to prevent the exhaust gases from heating the cells and a 0.2 m2 monocrystalline silicon solar cell module which is water cooled. The maximum system efficiency of 1.0 % was obtained at a thermal input power of 12 kWth. The electrical power suffices to run a residential heating system in the full power range (12 to 20 kWth) independently of the grid. The end user costs of the TPV components - emitter, glass tube, photocells and cell cooling circuit - were estimated considering 4 different TPV scenarios. The existing technique was compared with an improved system currently under development, which consists of a flexible photocell module that can be glued into the boiler housing and with systems with improved system efficiency (1.5 to 5 %) and geometry. Prices of the electricity from 2.5 to 22 EURcents/kWhel (excl. gas of about 3.5 EURcents/kWh), which corresponds to system costs of 340 to 3000 EUR/kWel,peak, were calculated. The price of electricity by TPV was compared with that of fuel cells and gas engines. While fuel cells are still expensive, gas engines have the disadvantage of maintenance, noise and bulkiness. TPV, in contrast, is a cost efficient alternative to produce heat and electricity, particularly in small peripheral units.

  9. Effect of Heat Leak and Finite Thermal Capacity on the Optimal Configuration of a Two-Heat-Reservoir Heat Engine for Another Linear Heat Transfer Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tong; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui; Wu, Chih

    2003-12-01

    Based on a model of a two-heat-reservoir heat engine with a finite high-temperature source and bypass heat leak, the optimal configuration of the cycle is found for the fixed cycle period with another linear heat transfer law . The finite thermal capacity source without heat leak makes the configuration of the cycle to a class of generalized Carnot cycle. The configuration of the cycle with heat leak and finite thermal capacity source is different from others.

  10. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  11. Optimal Heat Collection Element Shapes for Parabolic Trough Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2007-11-15

    For nearly 150 years, the cross section of the heat collection tubes used at the focus of parabolic trough solar concentrators has been circular. This type of tube is obviously simple and easily fabricated, but it is not optimal. It is shown in this article that the optimal shape, assuming a perfect parabolic figure for the concentrating mirror, is instead oblong, and is approximately given by a pair of facing parabolic segments.

  12. Optimizing and controlling the operation of heat-exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, N.; Marchetti, J.L.

    1998-05-01

    A procedure was developed for on-line optimization and control systems of heat-exchanger networks, which features a two-level control structure, one for a constant configuration control system and the other for a supervisor on-line optimizer. The coordination between levels is achieved by adjusting the formulation of the optimization problem to meet requirements of the adopted control system. The general goal is always to work without losing stream temperature targets while keeping the highest energy integration. The operation constraints used for heat-exchanger and utility units emphasize the computation of heat-exchanger duties rather than intermediate stream temperatures. This simplifies the modeling task and provides clear links with the limits of the manipulated variables. The optimal condition is determined using LP or NLP, depending on the final problem formulation. Degrees of freedom for optimization and equation constraints for considering simple and multiple bypasses are rigorously discussed. An example used shows how the optimization problem can be adjusted to a specific network design, its expected operating space, and the control configuration. Dynamic simulations also show benefits and limitations of this procedure.

  13. Cost optimization of induction linac drivers for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1986-12-29

    Recent developments in high reliability components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) make possible the use of these devices as economical power drives for very high gradient linear colliders. A particularly attractive realization of this ''two-beam accelerator'' approach is to configure the LIA as a monolithic relativistic klystron operating at 10 to 12 GHz with induction cells providing periodic reacceleration of the high current beam. Based upon a recent engineering design of a state-of-the-art, 10- to 20-MeV LIA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, this paper presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of the relativistic klystron to the parameter regime of interest for the next generation high energy physics machines. The algorithm allows optimization of the collider luminosity with respect to cost by varying the characteristics (pulse length, drive current, repetition rate, etc.) of the klystron. It also allows us to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies.

  14. Numerical Modeling and Optimization of Warm-water Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Yaser; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    For cooling in large data-centers and supercomputers, water is increasingly replacing air as the working fluid in heat sinks. Utilizing water provides unique capabilities; for example: higher heat capacity, Prandtl number, and convection heat transfer coefficient. The use of warm, rather than chilled, water has the potential to provide increased energy efficiency. The geometric and operating parameters of the heat sink govern its performance. Numerical modeling is used to examine the influence of geometry and operating conditions on key metrics such as thermal and flow resistance. This model also facilitates studies on cooling of electronic chip hot spots and failure scenarios. We report on the optimal parameters for a warm-water heat sink to achieve maximum cooling performance.

  15. Optimizing bulk milk dioxin monitoring based on costs and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lascano-Alcoser, V H; Velthuis, A G J; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Hoogenboom, L A P; Oude Lansink, A G J M

    2013-07-01

    Dioxins are environmental pollutants, potentially present in milk products, which have negative consequences for human health and for the firms and farms involved in the dairy chain. Dioxin monitoring in feed and food has been implemented to detect their presence and estimate their levels in food chains. However, the costs and effectiveness of such programs have not been evaluated. In this study, the costs and effectiveness of bulk milk dioxin monitoring in milk trucks were estimated to optimize the sampling and pooling monitoring strategies aimed at detecting at least 1 contaminated dairy farm out of 20,000 at a target dioxin concentration level. Incidents of different proportions, in terms of the number of contaminated farms, and concentrations were simulated. A combined testing strategy, consisting of screening and confirmatory methods, was assumed as well as testing of pooled samples. Two optimization models were built using linear programming. The first model aimed to minimize monitoring costs subject to a minimum required effectiveness of finding an incident, whereas the second model aimed to maximize the effectiveness for a given monitoring budget. Our results show that a high level of effectiveness is possible, but at high costs. Given specific assumptions, monitoring with 95% effectiveness to detect an incident of 1 contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration of 2 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat [European Commission's (EC) action level] costs €2.6 million per month. At the same level of effectiveness, a 73% cost reduction is possible when aiming to detect an incident where 2 farms are contaminated at a dioxin concentration of 3 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat (EC maximum level). With a fixed budget of €40,000 per month, the probability of detecting an incident with a single contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration equal to the EC action level is 4.4%. This probability almost doubled (8.0%) when aiming to detect the same incident but with a dioxin

  16. Control and operation cost optimization of the HISS cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.; Bieser, F.; Anderson, D.

    1983-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. A previous paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration and gas management. This paper discusses a control strategy which has allowed full time unattended operation, along with significant nitrogen and power cost reductions. Reduction of liquid nitrogen consumption has been accomplished by making use of the sensible heat available in the cold exhaust gas. Measured nitrogen throughput agrees with calculations for sensible heat utilization of zero to 70%. Calculated consumption saving over this range is 40 liters per hour for conductive losses to the supports only. The measured throughput differential for the total system is higher.

  17. Linear versus quadratic portfolio optimization model with transaction cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Norhidayah Bt Ab; Kamil, Karmila Hanim; Elias, Siti Masitah

    2014-06-01

    Optimization model is introduced to become one of the decision making tools in investment. Hence, it is always a big challenge for investors to select the best model that could fulfill their goal in investment with respect to risk and return. In this paper we aims to discuss and compare the portfolio allocation and performance generated by quadratic and linear portfolio optimization models namely of Markowitz and Maximin model respectively. The application of these models has been proven to be significant and popular among others. However transaction cost has been debated as one of the important aspects that should be considered for portfolio reallocation as portfolio return could be significantly reduced when transaction cost is taken into consideration. Therefore, recognizing the importance to consider transaction cost value when calculating portfolio' return, we formulate this paper by using data from Shariah compliant securities listed in Bursa Malaysia. It is expected that, results from this paper will effectively justify the advantage of one model to another and shed some lights in quest to find the best decision making tools in investment for individual investors.

  18. Optimized heat exchanger unit in a thermoacoustic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah

    2012-06-01

    Due to concern over the environmental impact caused by hazardous refrigerants, the last ten years or so has seen increasing research into thermoacoustic refrigeration. A thermoacoustic refrigerator is a device which uses acoustic power to pump heat. It holds the merits of simple mechanical design, absence of harmful refrigerants and having no or few moving parts. However, the performance of the thermoacoustic refrigerator, particularly the standing wave types, is currently not competitive compared to its counterpart conventional vapor-compression refrigerator. Thermoacoustic refrigeration prototypes, built up-to-date, achieved 0.1-0.2 relative coefficient of performance (COPR) compared with that of 0.33-0.5 for the conventional vapor-compression refrigerators. The poor heat exchanger design is one of the reasons for this poor efficiency. This paper discussed the influence of the thermoacoustic refrigerator heat exchanger's parameters on its design and the optimization of the performance of the system using the Lagrange multiplier method. The results showed that, the dissipated power is less than the published value by about 49% in the cold heat exchanger and about 38.5% in the hot heat exchanger. Furthermore, the increase of the cold heat exchanger effectiveness is found to be 3%. Thus, the decrease in the dissipated power in both heat exchangers with effective cold heat exchanger increases the performance of the thermoacoustic refrigerator.

  19. Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

  20. Final draft: IEA Task 1. Report on Subtask D, optimization of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, T.L.

    1981-03-01

    A review of general techniques and specific methods useful in the optimization of solar heating and cooling systems is undertaken. A discussion of the state-of-the-art and the principal problems in both the simplified thermal performance analysis and economic analysis portions of the optimization problem are presented. Sample economic analyses are performed using several widely used economic criteria. The predicted thermal results of one typical, widely used simplified method is compared to detailed simulation results. A methodology for and the results of a sensitivity study of key economic parameters in the life cycle cost method are presented. Finally, a simple graphical optimization technique based on the life cycle cost method is proposed.

  1. Physical Protection System Upgrades - Optimizing for Performance and Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Hicks, Mary Jane

    1999-07-09

    CPA--Cost and Performance Analysis--is an architecture that supports analysis of physical protection systems and upgrade options. ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Security Systems), a tool for evaluating performance of physical protection systems, currently forms the cornerstone for evaluating detection probabilities and delay times of the system. Cost and performance data are offered to the decision-maker at the systems level and to technologists at the path-element level. A new optimization engine has been attached to the CPA methodology to automate analyses of many combinations (portfolios) of technologies. That engine controls a new analysis sequencer that automatically modifies ASSESS PPS files (facility descriptions), automatically invokes ASSESS Outsider analysis and then saves results for post-processing. Users can constrain the search to an upper bound on total cost, to a lower bound on level of performance, or to include specific technologies or technology types. This process has been applied to a set of technology development proposals to identify those portfolios that provide the most improvement in physical security for the lowest cost to install, operate and maintain at a baseline facility.

  2. Cost optimization of a sky surveillance visual sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Naeem; Khursheed, Khursheed; Imran, Muhammad; Lawal, Najeem; O'Nils, Mattias

    2012-06-01

    A Visual Sensor Network (VSN) is a network of spatially distributed cameras. The primary difference between VSN and other type of sensor networks is the nature and volume of information. A VSN generally consists of cameras, communication, storage and central computer, where image data from multiple cameras is processed and fused. In this paper, we use optimization techniques to reduce the cost as derived by a model of a VSN to track large birds, such as Golden Eagle, in the sky. The core idea is to divide a given monitoring range of altitudes into a number of sub-ranges of altitudes. The sub-ranges of altitudes are monitored by individual VSNs, VSN1 monitors lower range, VSN2 monitors next higher and so on, such that a minimum cost is used to monitor a given area. The VSNs may use similar or different types of cameras but different optical components, thus, forming a heterogeneous network. We have calculated the cost required to cover a given area by considering an altitudes range as single element and also by dividing it into sub-ranges. To cover a given area with given altitudes range, with a single VSN requires 694 camera nodes in comparison to dividing this range into sub-ranges of altitudes, which requires only 88 nodes, which is 87% reduction in the cost.

  3. Energy and efficiency optimization of a Brownian heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Mulugeta; Yalew, Yeneneh

    2007-03-01

    A simple Brownian heat engine is modeled as a Brownian particle moving in an external sawtooth potential (with or without) load assisted by the thermal kick it gets from alternately placed hot and cold heat reservoirs along its path. We get closed form expression for its current in terms of the parameters characterizing the model. After analyzing the way it consumes energy to do useful work, we also get closed form expressions for its efficiency as well as for its coefficient of performance when the engine performs as a refrigerator. Recently suggested optimization criteria enables us to exhaustively explore and compare the different operating conditions of the engine.

  4. A low-cost induction power supply for substrate heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, L. G.; Hemmelman, B. T.

    1993-05-01

    The design and construction of a 1-kW induction heating supply is described. The system was optimized for applications in which the power is coupled into a graphite susceptor which is the substrate holder for samples placed in the reaction chamber of a chemical vapor deposition system. The supply draws power from a 120-V, 20-A service outlet and delivers a 10-kHz output which is proportional to the magnitude of a 0-5 Vdc control signal. Presently available power n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors permit the construction of a compact unit which is small enough to be installed inside of a deposition cabinet.

  5. Cost-Optimal Pathways to 75% Fuel Reduction in Remote Alaskan Villages: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, Travis; Cutler, Dylan; Hirsch, Brian; Olis, Dan; Anderson, Kate

    2015-10-28

    There are thousands of isolated, diesel-powered microgrids that deliver energy to remote communities around the world at very high energy costs. The Remote Communities Renewable Energy program aims to help these communities reduce their fuel consumption and lower their energy costs through the use of high penetration renewable energy. As part of this program, the REopt modeling platform for energy system integration and optimization was used to analyze cost-optimal pathways toward achieving a combined 75% reduction in diesel fuel and fuel oil consumption in a select Alaskan village. In addition to the existing diesel generator and fuel oil heating technologies, the model was able to select from among wind, battery storage, and dispatchable electric heaters to meet the electrical and thermal loads. The model results indicate that while 75% fuel reduction appears to be technically feasible it may not be economically viable at this time. When the fuel reduction target was relaxed, the results indicate that by installing high-penetration renewable energy, the community could lower their energy costs by 21% while still reducing their fuel consumption by 54%.

  6. Cost-Optimal Pathways to 75% Fuel Reduction in Remote Alaskan Villages

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, Travis; Cutler, Dylan; Hirsch, Brian; Olis, Dan; Anderson, Kate

    2015-08-01

    There are thousands of isolated, diesel-powered microgrids that deliver energy to remote communities around the world at very high energy costs. The Remote Communities Renewable Energy program aims to help these communities reduce their fuel consumption and lower their energy costs through the use of high penetration renewable energy. As part of this program, the REopt modeling platform for energy system integration and optimization was used to analyze cost-optimal pathways toward achieving a combined 75% reduction in diesel fuel and fuel oil consumption in a select Alaskan village. In addition to the existing diesel generator and fuel oil heating technologies, the model was able to select from among wind, battery storage, and dispatchable electric heaters to meet the electrical and thermal loads. The model results indicate that while 75% fuel reduction appears to be technically feasible it may not be economically viable at this time. When the fuel reduction target was relaxed, the results indicate that by installing high-penetration renewable energy, the community could lower their energy costs by 21% while still reducing their fuel consumption by 54%.

  7. 16 CFR Appendix I to Part 305 - Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air... CONSERVATION ACT (âENERGY LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. I Appendix I to Part 305—Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners Manufacturer's rated heating capacity (Btu's/hr.) Range of HSPF's...

  8. Optimization of a localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for heat shock protein 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, R. C.; Young, Z.; Brock, L.; Nieva, P. M.; Vijayan, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance, a property characteristic of metal nanoparticles, is a promising technique for the development of low cost, rapid, and portable biosensors for a variety of medical diagnostic applications. In order to meet the demanding detection limits required for many such applications, performance improvements are required. Designing nanoparticle structures to maximize refractive index sensitivity and optimize the electromagnetic field decay length is one approach to achieving better performance. However, experimentally finding the optimal nanoparticle structure, as has been done in the past, is time consuming and costly, and needs to be done for each biomolecule of interest. Instead, simulations can be used to find the optimal nanoparticle design prior to fabrication. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling technique that allows the design of optimal nanoparticles for LSPR biosensors, and report on the effect of the size and shape of gold nanoparticles on the sensitivity and decay length. The results are used to determine the optimal nanoparticle geometry for an LSPR immunosensor for heat shock protein 70, an important protein with applications in medical and wildlife diagnostics. Our simulations show an improvement of 373% in sensor response when using the optimal configuration, showcasing the significant advantages of proper nanoparticle design.

  9. Low cost lift-off process optimization for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shilpi; Bansal, Deepak; Panwar, Deepak; Shukla, Neha; Kumar, Arvind; Kothari, Prateek; Verma, Seema; Rangra, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    The patterning of thin films play major role in the performance of MEMS devices. The wet etching gives an isotropic profile and etch rate depends on the temperature, size of the microstructures and repetitive use of the solution. Even with the use of selective etchants, it significantly attacks the underlying layer. On the other side, dry etching is expensive process. In this paper, double layer of photoresist is optimized for lift-off process. Double layer lift-off technique offers process simplicity, low cost, over conventional single layer lift-off or bilayer lift-off with LOR. The problem of retention and flagging is resolved. The thickness of double coat photoresist is increased by 2.3 times to single coat photo resist.

  10. Optimize the OPC control recipe with cost function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo

    2010-09-01

    With the design rule shrinks rapidly, full chip robust Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) will definitely need longer time due to the increasing pattern density. Furthermore, to achieve a perfect OPC control recipe becomes more difficult. For, the critical dimension of the design features is deeply sub exposure wavelength, and there is only limited room for the OPC correction. Usually very complicated scripts need to be developed to handle the shrinking designs, which can be infinitely complicated. So when you are defining a parameter value in your OPC control recipe, one problem is how to find the optimum setting. And usually there are a bund of parameters in the script, some of which may have impact on others performance. We here demonstrate an approach of how to find the optimized setting of the critical parameters with cost function. And this will be helpful to reduce the difficulty for OPC recipe development.

  11. A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the report is to compare capital costs associated with the three designs of ground source heat pumps. Specifically, the costs considered are those associated with the heat source/heat sink or ground source portion of the system. In order to standardize the heat rejection over the three designs, it was assumed that the heat pump loop would operate at a temperature range of 85{degree} (to the heat pumps) to 95{degree} (from the heat pumps) under peak conditions. The assumption of constant loop temperature conditions for all three permits an apples-to-apples comparison of the alternatives.

  12. Impacts of Various Characteristics of Electricity and Heat Demand on the Optimal Configuration of a Microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroki; Asano, Hiroshi; Tsujita, Shinsuke

    A methodology was developed to design the number and capacity for each piece of equipment (e.g. gas engines, batteries, thermal storage tanks) in microgrids with combined heat and power systems. We analyzed three types of microgrids; the first one consists of an office building and an apartment, the second one consists of a hospital and an apartment, the third one consists of a hotel, office and retails. In the methodology, annual cost is minimized by considering the partial load efficiency of a gas engine and its scale economy, and the optimal number and capacity of each piece of equipment and the annual operational schedule are determined by using the optimal planning method. Based on calculations using this design methodology, it is found that the optimal number of gas engines is determined by the ratio of bottom to peak of the electricity demand and the ratio of heat to electricity demand. The optimal capacity of a battery required to supply electricity for a limited time during a peak demand period is auxiliary. The thermal storage tank for space cooling and space heating is selected to minimize the use of auxiliary equipment such as a gas absorption chiller.

  13. Optimization of plasmonic heating by gold nanospheres and nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nadine; Ford, Michael J; Cortie, Michael B

    2006-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles have strong and tunable absorption peaks in their optical extinction spectra, a phenomenon that has recently been exploited to generate localized heating in the vicinity of these particles. However the optimum particle geometry and illumination regime to maximize these effects appears not to have been previously examined in any detail. Here we show that the interplay between the particles' absorption cross-sections, volume, and surface area lead to there being specific conditions that can maximize particle temperature and surface heat flux. Optical absorption efficiencies were calculated from the formulation of Mie, and radiative, convective, and conductive heat transfer models were used to model the thermal performance of particles in different situations. Two technologically relevant scenarios for illumination, namely, irradiation by sunlight at 800 W/m2 and by a monochromatic laser source of 50 kW/m2 tuned to the peak absorption wavelength, were considered. For irradiation by sunlight, the resultant heat flux is optimized for an 80 nm diameter nanoshell with an aspect ratio of 0.8, while for irradiation by laser the maximum heat flux is found for 50 nm nanoshells, with an aspect ratio of 0.9. PMID:16771316

  14. Structuring an EPICS System to Optimize Reliability, Performance and Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bickley, Matthew; White, Karen S

    2005-10-10

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) uses EPICS as the basis for its control system, effectively operating a number of plants at the laboratory, including the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator (CEBA), a Free Electron Laser (FEL), Central Helium Liquefier, and several ancillary systems. We now use over 200 distributed computers running over a complex segmented network with 350,000 EPICS records and 50,000 control points to support operation of two machines for three experimental halls, along with the supporting infrastructure. During the 10 years that EPICS has been in use we have made a number of design and implementation choices in the interest of optimizing control system reliability, performance, security and cost. At the highest level, the control system is divided into a number of distinct segments, each controlling a separate operational plant. This supports operational independence, and therefore reliability, and provides a more flexible environment for maintenance and support. The control system is relatively open, allowing any of the 300 account holders to look at data from any segment. However security and operational needs mandate restricted write access to the various control points based on each user's job function and the operational mode of the facility. Additionally, the large number of simultaneous users, coupled with the amount of available data, necessitates the use of throttling mechanisms such as a Nameserver, which effectively reduces broadcast traffic and improves application initialization performance. Our segmented approach provides natural boundaries for managing data flow and restricting access, using tools such as the EPICS Gateway and Channel Access Security. This architecture enables cost optimizations by allowing expensive resources, such as Oracle, to be effectively shared throughout the control system, while minimizing the impact of a failure in any single area. This paper discusses the various design

  15. Automatic optimization of localized heat treatment for Al-Si-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A.; Holzmann, T.

    2016-03-01

    Material properties of aluminium alloys can usually be achieved by a heat treatment and quenching procedure. In case that only local strengthening is needed, a local heat treatment and quenching strategy could be an option to the energy intensive, time consuming and costly treatment of the whole part. One of the essential problem using a local strengthening procedure is the lack of knowledge about suitable process parameters. Therefore, a multiple criteria optimization approach with local strengthening as target function was set up, whereby the material constitution was calculated based on the precipitation evolution during local heat treatment and cooling. By automatically varying the exposure time and laser power, a series of process simulations was performed to find adequate process parameters for the sufficient local strengthening of the alloy.

  16. Aircraft path planning for optimal imaging using dynamic cost functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Gordon; Chaudhry, Haseeb; Kochersberger, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Unmanned aircraft development has accelerated with recent technological improvements in sensing and communications, which has resulted in an "applications lag" for how these aircraft can best be utilized. The aircraft are becoming smaller, more maneuverable and have longer endurance to perform sensing and sampling missions, but operating them aggressively to exploit these capabilities has not been a primary focus in unmanned systems development. This paper addresses a means of aerial vehicle path planning to provide a realistic optimal path in acquiring imagery for structure from motion (SfM) reconstructions and performing radiation surveys. This method will allow SfM reconstructions to occur accurately and with minimal flight time so that the reconstructions can be executed efficiently. An assumption is made that we have 3D point cloud data available prior to the flight. A discrete set of scan lines are proposed for the given area that are scored based on visibility of the scene. Our approach finds a time-efficient path and calculates trajectories between scan lines and over obstacles encountered along those scan lines. Aircraft dynamics are incorporated into the path planning algorithm as dynamic cost functions to create optimal imaging paths in minimum time. Simulations of the path planning algorithm are shown for an urban environment. We also present our approach for image-based terrain mapping, which is able to efficiently perform a 3D reconstruction of a large area without the use of GPS data.

  17. Particle swarm optimization algorithm based low cost magnetometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. S.; Siddharth, S., Syed, Z., El-Sheimy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a microprocessor provide inertial digital data from which position and orientation is obtained by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the absolute user heading based on Earth's magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are corrupted by several errors including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometer. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. The estimated bias and scale factor errors from the proposed algorithm improve the heading accuracy and the results are also statistically significant. Also, it can help in the development of the Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs) when combined with the INS and GPS/Wi-Fi especially in the indoor environments

  18. Cost Optimal Elastic Auto-Scaling in Cloud Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sidhanta, S.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Today, elastic scaling is critical part of leveraging cloud. Elastic scaling refers to adding resources only when it is needed and deleting resources when not in use. Elastic scaling ensures compute/server resources are not over provisioned. Today, Amazon and Windows Azure are the only two platform provider that allow auto-scaling of cloud resources where servers are automatically added and deleted. However, these solution falls short of following key features: A) Requires explicit policy definition such server load and therefore lacks any predictive intelligence to make optimal decision; B) Does not decide on the right size of resource and thereby does not result in cost optimal resource pool. In a typical cloud deployment model, we consider two types of application scenario: A. Batch processing jobs → Hadoop/Big Data case B. Transactional applications → Any application that process continuous transactions (Requests/response) In reference of classical queuing model, we are trying to model a scenario where servers have a price and capacity (size) and system can add delete servers to maintain a certain queue length. Classical queueing models applies to scenario where number of servers are constant. So we cannot apply stationary system analysis in this case. We investigate the following questions 1. Can we define Job queue and use the metric to define such a queue to predict the resource requirement in a quasi-stationary way? Can we map that into an optimal sizing problem? 2. Do we need to get into a level of load (CPU/Data) on server level to characterize the size requirement? How do we learn that based on Job type?

  19. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  20. Refrigeration Playbook. Heat Reclaim; Optimizing Heat Rejection and Refrigeration Heat Reclaim for Supermarket Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Chuck; Nelson, Eric; Armer, James; Johnson, Tim; Hirsch, Adam; Doebber, Ian

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this playbook and accompanying spreadsheets is to generalize the detailed CBP analysis and to put tools in the hands of experienced refrigeration designers to evaluate multiple applications of refrigeration waste heat reclaim across the United States. Supermarkets with large portfolios of similar buildings can use these tools to assess the impact of large-scale implementation of heat reclaim systems. In addition, the playbook provides best practices for implementing heat reclaim systems to achieve the best long-term performance possible. It includes guidance on operations and maintenance as well as measurement and verification.

  1. Optimal Design and Operation of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Stochastic Cost Optimization Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Parker, J.; Borden, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) has been applied at many dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminated sites. A stirred reactor-type model was developed that considers DNAPL dissolution using a field-scale mass transfer function, instantaneous reaction of oxidant with aqueous and adsorbed contaminant and with readily oxidizable natural oxygen demand ("fast NOD"), and second-order kinetic reactions with "slow NOD." DNAPL dissolution enhancement as a function of oxidant concentration and inhibition due to manganese dioxide precipitation during permanganate injection are included in the model. The DNAPL source area is divided into multiple treatment zones with different areas, depths, and contaminant masses based on site characterization data. The performance model is coupled with a cost module that involves a set of unit costs representing specific fixed and operating costs. Monitoring of groundwater and/or soil concentrations in each treatment zone is employed to assess ISCO performance and make real-time decisions on oxidant reinjection or ISCO termination. Key ISCO design variables include the oxidant concentration to be injected, time to begin performance monitoring, groundwater and/or soil contaminant concentrations to trigger reinjection or terminate ISCO, number of monitoring wells or geoprobe locations per treatment zone, number of samples per sampling event and location, and monitoring frequency. Design variables for each treatment zone may be optimized to minimize expected cost over a set of Monte Carlo simulations that consider uncertainty in site parameters. The model is incorporated in the Stochastic Cost Optimization Toolkit (SCOToolkit) program, which couples the ISCO model with a dissolved plume transport model and with modules for other remediation strategies. An example problem is presented that illustrates design tradeoffs required to deal with characterization and monitoring uncertainty. Monitoring soil concentration changes during ISCO

  2. Acoustic Optimization of Automotive Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Ye, B. Q.; Guo, X.; Hui, P.

    2012-06-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has been increasing with recent advances in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). This study analyzes the acoustic attenuation performance of exhaust-based TEGs. The acoustic characteristics of two different thermal designs of exhaust gas heat exchanger in TEGs are discussed in terms of transmission loss and acoustic insertion loss. GT-Power simulations and bench tests on a dynamometer with a high-performance production engine are carried out. Results indicate that the acoustic attenuation of TEGs could be determined and optimized. In addition, the feasibility of integration of exhaust-based TEGs and engine mufflers into the exhaust line is tested, which can help to reduce space and improve vehicle integration.

  3. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  4. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  5. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty. PMID:26350025

  6. TRU Waste Management Program. Cost/schedule optimization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Detamore, J.A.; Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    This Current Year Work Plan presents in detail a description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office Rockwell International (JIO/RI) during FY86. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO/RI by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO/RI tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance development, task monitoring, task progress information gathering and reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of reports for DOE detailing program status. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO/RI to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. These analyses include short-term analyses in response to DOE information requests, along with performing an RH Cost/Schedule Optimization report. Systems models will be developed, updated, and upgraded as needed to enhance JIO/RI's capability to evaluate the adequacy of program efforts in various fields. A TRU program data base will be maintained and updated to provide DOE with timely responses to inventory related questions.

  7. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

    2004-11-30

    While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

  8. Low Cost Advanced Thermoelectric (TE) Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Low cost, fully integrated TE generators (TEGs) to recover waste heat from vehicle exhaust will reduce transportation sector energy consumption and emissions. TEGs will be the first application of high-temperature TE materials for high-volume use and establish new industrial sectors with scaled up production capability of TEG materials and components. We will create a potential supply chain for practical automotive TEGs and identify manufacturing and assembly processes for large scale production of TEG materials and components. Our work focusses on several innovative R&D paths: (1) enhanced TE material performance by doping and compositional tuning, (2) optimized TE material fabrication and processing to reduce thermal conductivity and improve fracture strength, (3) high volume production for successful skutterudite commercialization, (4) new material, nanostructure, and nanoscale approaches to reduce thermal interface and electrical contact resistances, (5) innovative heat exchangers for high efficiency heat flows and optimum temperature profiles despite highly variable exhaust gas operating conditions, (6) new modeling and simulation tools, and (7) inexpensive materials for thermal insulation and coatings for TE encapsulation. Recent results will be presented. Supported by the U.S. DOE Vehicle Technology Program.

  9. Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant

    SciTech Connect

    Faletti, D.W.

    1981-03-01

    Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

  10. Optimal periodic proof test based on cost-effective and reliability criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory study for the optimization of periodic proof tests for fatigue-critical structures is presented. The optimal proof load level and the optimal number of periodic proof tests are determined by minimizing the total expected (statistical average) cost, while the constraint on the allowable level of structural reliability is satisfied. The total expected cost consists of the expected cost of proof tests, the expected cost of structures destroyed by proof tests, and the expected cost of structural failure in service. It is demonstrated by numerical examples that significant cost saving and reliability improvement for fatigue-critical structures can be achieved by the application of the optimal periodic proof test. The present study is relevant to the establishment of optimal maintenance procedures for fatigue-critical structures.

  11. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  12. Optimization of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Carter, M. D.; Taylor, D. J.; Bosia, G.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    1996-11-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports. Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on either end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40--70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines, (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control, and (3) Faraday shield/bumper geometry to minimize rf sheath-induced structure heating and impurity generation.

  13. Optimization of Thermoelectric Components for Automobile Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.

    2015-10-01

    For a typical spark ignition engine approximately 40% of available thermal energy is lost as hot exhaust gas. To improve fuel economy, researchers are currently evaluating technology which exploits exhaust stream thermal power by use of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that operate on the basis of the Seebeck effect. A 5% improvement in fuel economy, achieved by use of TEG output power, is a stated objective for light-duty trucks and personal automobiles. System modeling of thermoelectric (TE) components requires solution of coupled thermal and electric fluxes through the n and p-type semiconductor legs, given appropriate thermal boundary conditions at the junctions. Such applications have large thermal gradients along the semiconductor legs, and material properties are highly dependent on spatially varying temperature profiles. In this work, one-dimensional heat flux and temperature variations across thermoelectric legs were solved by using an iterative numerical approach to optimize both TE module and TEG designs. Design traits were investigated by assuming use of skutterudite as a thermoelectric material with potential for automotive applications in which exhaust gas and heat exchanger temperatures typically vary from 100°C to over 600°C. Dependence of leg efficiency, thermal fluxes and electric power generation on leg geometry, fill fractions, electric current, thermal boundary conditions, etc., were studied in detail. Optimum leg geometries were computed for a variety of automotive exhaust conditions.

  14. Cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports using OPTIM and TRAGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggs, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports are computed using OPTIM and TRAGEN. The savings in fuel and direct operating costs per nautical mile for each of the different types of optimal trajectories over a standard profile are shown.

  15. Color tunable low cost transparent heat reflector using copper and titanium oxide for energy saving application.

    PubMed

    Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Chua, Sing Teng; Sharma, Mohit; Wong, Ten It; Tan, Hui Ru; Chi, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer coating structure comprising a copper (Cu) layer sandwiched between titanium dioxide (TiO2) were demonstrated as a transparent heat reflecting (THR) coating on glass for energy-saving window application. The main highlight is the utilization of Cu, a low-cost material, in-lieu of silver which is widely used in current commercial heat reflecting coating on glass. Color tunable transparent heat reflecting coating was realized through the design of multilayer structure and process optimization. The impact of thermal treatment on the overall performance of sputter deposited TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film on glass substrate is investigated in detail. Significant enhancement of transmittance in the visible range and reflectance in the infra-red (IR) region has been observed after thermal treatment of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film at 500 °C due to the improvement of crystal quality of TiO2. Highest visible transmittance of 90% and IR reflectance of 85% at a wavelength of 1200 nm are demonstrated for the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film after annealing at 500 °C. Performance of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 heat reflector coating decreases after thermal treatment at 600 °C. The wear performance of the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer structure has been evaluated through scratch hardness test. The present work shows promising characteristics of Cu-based THR coating for energy-saving building industry. PMID:26846687

  16. Color tunable low cost transparent heat reflector using copper and titanium oxide for energy saving application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Chua, Sing Teng; Sharma, Mohit; Wong, Ten It; Tan, Hui Ru; Chi, Dongzhi

    2016-02-01

    Multilayer coating structure comprising a copper (Cu) layer sandwiched between titanium dioxide (TiO2) were demonstrated as a transparent heat reflecting (THR) coating on glass for energy-saving window application. The main highlight is the utilization of Cu, a low-cost material, in-lieu of silver which is widely used in current commercial heat reflecting coating on glass. Color tunable transparent heat reflecting coating was realized through the design of multilayer structure and process optimization. The impact of thermal treatment on the overall performance of sputter deposited TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film on glass substrate is investigated in detail. Significant enhancement of transmittance in the visible range and reflectance in the infra-red (IR) region has been observed after thermal treatment of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film at 500 °C due to the improvement of crystal quality of TiO2. Highest visible transmittance of 90% and IR reflectance of 85% at a wavelength of 1200 nm are demonstrated for the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film after annealing at 500 °C. Performance of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 heat reflector coating decreases after thermal treatment at 600 °C. The wear performance of the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer structure has been evaluated through scratch hardness test. The present work shows promising characteristics of Cu-based THR coating for energy-saving building industry.

  17. Color tunable low cost transparent heat reflector using copper and titanium oxide for energy saving application

    PubMed Central

    Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Chua, Sing Teng; Sharma, Mohit; Wong, Ten It; Tan, Hui Ru; Chi, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer coating structure comprising a copper (Cu) layer sandwiched between titanium dioxide (TiO2) were demonstrated as a transparent heat reflecting (THR) coating on glass for energy-saving window application. The main highlight is the utilization of Cu, a low-cost material, in-lieu of silver which is widely used in current commercial heat reflecting coating on glass. Color tunable transparent heat reflecting coating was realized through the design of multilayer structure and process optimization. The impact of thermal treatment on the overall performance of sputter deposited TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film on glass substrate is investigated in detail. Significant enhancement of transmittance in the visible range and reflectance in the infra-red (IR) region has been observed after thermal treatment of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film at 500 °C due to the improvement of crystal quality of TiO2. Highest visible transmittance of 90% and IR reflectance of 85% at a wavelength of 1200 nm are demonstrated for the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer thin film after annealing at 500 °C. Performance of TiO2/Cu/TiO2 heat reflector coating decreases after thermal treatment at 600 °C. The wear performance of the TiO2/Cu/TiO2 multilayer structure has been evaluated through scratch hardness test. The present work shows promising characteristics of Cu-based THR coating for energy-saving building industry. PMID:26846687

  18. Process Cost Modeling for Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Han P.; Freeman, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For early design concepts, the conventional approach to cost is normally some kind of parametric weight-based cost model. There is now ample evidence that this approach can be misleading and inaccurate. By the nature of its development, a parametric cost model requires historical data and is valid only if the new design is analogous to those for which the model was derived. Advanced aerospace vehicles have no historical production data and are nowhere near the vehicles of the past. Using an existing weight-based cost model would only lead to errors and distortions of the true production cost. This report outlines the development of a process-based cost model in which the physical elements of the vehicle are costed according to a first-order dynamics model. This theoretical cost model, first advocated by early work at MIT, has been expanded to cover the basic structures of an advanced aerospace vehicle. Elemental costs based on the geometry of the design can be summed up to provide an overall estimation of the total production cost for a design configuration. This capability to directly link any design configuration to realistic cost estimation is a key requirement for high payoff MDO problems. Another important consideration in this report is the handling of part or product complexity. Here the concept of cost modulus is introduced to take into account variability due to different materials, sizes, shapes, precision of fabrication, and equipment requirements. The most important implication of the development of the proposed process-based cost model is that different design configurations can now be quickly related to their cost estimates in a seamless calculation process easily implemented on any spreadsheet tool. In successive sections, the report addresses the issues of cost modeling as follows. First, an introduction is presented to provide the background for the research work. Next, a quick review of cost estimation techniques is made with the intention to

  19. A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1995-02-01

    In the March 1994 issue of the Quarterly Bulletin, a Geo-Heat Center Research Project involving ground-source heat pumps (GSHP) systems for commercial buildings was introduced. This project which evaluated the capital costs associated with three different ground-source designs was completed in June 1994. As a result of this work, a final report {open_quotes}A Capital Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems{close_quotes} was issued. This article is a summary of that report. The full report is available from the Geo-Heat Center.

  20. Thermal and cost goal analysis for passive solar heating designs

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, S.A.; Kirschner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Economic methodologies developed over the past several years for the design of residential solar systems have been based on life cycle cost (LCC) minimization. Because of uncertainties involving future economic conditions and the varied decision making processes of home designers, builders, and owners, LCC design approaches are not always appropriate. To deal with some of the constraints that enter the design process, and to narrow the number of variables to those that do not depend on future economic conditions, a simplified thermal and cost goal approach for passive designs is presented. Arithmetic and graphical approaches are presented with examples given for each. Goals discussed include simple payback, solar savings fraction, collection area, maximum allowable construction budget, variable cost goals, and Btu savings.

  1. Selection and costing of heat exchangers. Air-cooled type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-12-01

    ESDU 94043 extends the information in ESDU 92013 which, when an air-cooled exchanger is found appropriate and is costed, provides the results for a datum design 40 ft (12.2 m) long with G-fins and 1 in (25 mm) diameter tube operating at a noise level of 85 dBa. It provides factors derived from an analysis of manufacturer's data to be applied to the cost results from ESDU 92013 to account for variations in those parameters and features. Additional guidance on the configuration and use of air-cooled exchangers is given. The data are incorporated in ESDUpac A9213 which is a Fortran program that implements the selection and costing method of ESDU 92013. It is provided on disc in the software volume compiled to run under DOS with a user-friendly interface that prompts on screen for input data.

  2. Parameter and cost optimizations for a modular stellarator reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchon, W. N. G.; Johnson, P. C.; Watson, C. J. H.

    1983-02-01

    The physical scaling and cost scaling of a modular stellarator reactor are described. It is shown that configurations based on l=2 are best able to support adequate beta, and physical relationships are derived which enable the geometry and parameters of an l=2 modular stellarator to be defined. A cost scaling for the components of the nuclear island is developed using Starfire (tokamak reactor study) engineering as a basis. It is shown that for minimum cost the stellarator should be of small aspect ratio. For a 4000 MWth plant, as Starfire, the optimum configuration is a 15 coil, 3 field period, l=2 device with a major radius of 16 m and a plasma minor radius of 2 m; and with a conservative wall loading of 2 MW/m2 and an average beta of 3.9%; the estimated cost per kilowatt (electrical) is marginally (7%) greater than Starfire.

  3. Optimization of Heat-Sink Cooling Structure in EAST with Hydraulic Expansion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiejun; Huang, Shenghong; Xie, Han; Song, Yuntao; Zhan, Ping; Ji, Xiang; Gao, Daming

    2011-12-01

    Considering utilization of the original chromium-bronze material, two processing techniques including hydraulic expansion and high temperature vacuum welding were proposed for the optimization of heat-sink structure in EAST. The heat transfer performance of heat-sink with or without cooling tube was calculated and different types of connection between tube and heat-sink were compared by conducting a special test. It is shown from numerical analysis that the diameter of heat-sink channel can be reduced from 12 mm to 10 mm. Compared with the original sample, the thermal contact resistance between tube and heat-sink for welding sample can reduce the heat transfer performance by 10%, while by 20% for the hydraulic expansion sample. However, the welding technique is more complicated and expensive than hydraulic expansion technique. Both the processing technique and the heat transfer performance of heat-sink prototype should be further considered for the optimization of heat-sink structure in EAST.

  4. Efficiency optimization of the classical molecular heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong-Qin; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2011-07-01

    We investigate a three-terminal heat pump through classical molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported an asymmetrical structure is necessary for the molecular heat pump. There exists an optimum pumping efficiency by controlling the asymmetry and the average temperature of the heat pump. The efficiency increases with the decreasing of the temperature difference between the hot and cold heat baths.

  5. Optimization of stability index versus first strike cost

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-05-01

    This note studies the impact of maximizing the stability index rather than minimizing the first strike cost in choosing offensive missile allocations. It does so in the context of a model in which exchanges between vulnerable missile forces are modeled probabilistically, converted into first and second strike costs through approximations to the value target sets at risk, and the stability index is taken to be their ratio. The value of the allocation that minimizes the first strike cost for both attack preferences are derived analytically. The former recovers results derived earlier. The latter leads to an optimum at unity allocation for which the stability index is determined analytically. For values of the attack preference greater than about unity, maximizing the stability index increases the cost of striking first 10--15%. For smaller values of the attack preference, maximizing the index increases the second strike cost a similar amount. Both are stabilizing, so if both sides could be trusted to target on missiles in order to minimize damage to value and maximize stability, the stability index for vulnerable missiles could be increased by about 15%. However, that would increase the cost to the first striker by about 15%. It is unclear why--having decided to strike--he would do so in a way that would increase damage to himself.

  6. Investigation of Cost and Energy Optimization of Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Gordon, Matthew; Bunn, Simon; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-11-17

    Holistic management of water and energy resources through energy and water quality management systems (EWQMSs) have traditionally aimed at energy cost reduction with limited or no emphasis on energy efficiency or greenhouse gas minimization. This study expanded the existing EWQMS framework and determined the impact of different management strategies for energy cost and energy consumption (e.g., carbon footprint) reduction on system performance at two drinking water utilities in California (United States). The results showed that optimizing for cost led to cost reductions of 4% (Utility B, summer) to 48% (Utility A, winter). The energy optimization strategy was successfully able to find the lowest energy use operation and achieved energy usage reductions of 3% (Utility B, summer) to 10% (Utility A, winter). The findings of this study revealed that there may be a trade-off between cost optimization (dollars) and energy use (kilowatt-hours), particularly in the summer, when optimizing the system for the reduction of energy use to a minimum incurred cost increases of 64% and 184% compared with the cost optimization scenario. Water age simulations through hydraulic modeling did not reveal any adverse effects on the water quality in the distribution system or in tanks from pump schedule optimization targeting either cost or energy minimization. PMID:26461069

  7. Sample size calculation in cost-effectiveness cluster randomized trials: optimal and maximin approaches.

    PubMed

    Manju, Md Abu; Candel, Math J J M; Berger, Martijn P F

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, the optimal sample sizes at the cluster and person levels for each of two treatment arms are obtained for cluster randomized trials where the cost-effectiveness of treatments on a continuous scale is studied. The optimal sample sizes maximize the efficiency or power for a given budget or minimize the budget for a given efficiency or power. Optimal sample sizes require information on the intra-cluster correlations (ICCs) for effects and costs, the correlations between costs and effects at individual and cluster levels, the ratio of the variance of effects translated into costs to the variance of the costs (the variance ratio), sampling and measuring costs, and the budget. When planning, a study information on the model parameters usually is not available. To overcome this local optimality problem, the current paper also presents maximin sample sizes. The maximin sample sizes turn out to be rather robust against misspecifying the correlation between costs and effects at the cluster and individual levels but may lose much efficiency when misspecifying the variance ratio. The robustness of the maximin sample sizes against misspecifying the ICCs depends on the variance ratio. The maximin sample sizes are robust under misspecification of the ICC for costs for realistic values of the variance ratio greater than one but not robust under misspecification of the ICC for effects. Finally, we show how to calculate optimal or maximin sample sizes that yield sufficient power for a test on the cost-effectiveness of an intervention. PMID:25019136

  8. Optimized periodic inspection program for heat transfer tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Eugene R.; Kaminski, Stan

    1998-03-01

    Tube failures in aging steam plant surface condensers, feedwater heaters, and oil coolers are a significant reliability problem for the electric power industry. Tube failures can also result in an increase in replacement power costs. In addition, condenser leaks from failed tubes have potentially harmful effects on major components such as steam generators and turbines. To reduce the number of tube failures and consequent leakage, periodic maintenance programs have used the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method of eddy current testing (ET) to inspect the condition of the tubes from the water side. This NDE method can identify tubes that have experienced major degradation and should be plugged to prevent in-service failure. Variability of inspection results and difficulty in inspecting some types of tubing (Monel, carbon steel) have caused many utility sites to question the value of inspection of heat transfer tubing from the water side. Recognizing these problems, advanced ET systems have been developed that use multi-frequency, remote field, and digital data processing techniques to inspect a variety of tubing materials and produce on-site, computer generated inspection reports. These results have been used to determine tube plugging, replacement, and inspection intervals.

  9. Data of cost-optimality and technical solutions for high energy performance buildings in warm climate

    PubMed Central

    Zacà, Ilaria; D’Agostino, Delia; Maria Congedo, Paolo; Baglivo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The data reported in this article refers to input and output information related to the research articles entitled Assessment of cost-optimality and technical solutions in high performance multi-residential buildings in the Mediterranean area by Zacà et al. (Assessment of cost-optimality and technical solutions in high performance multi-residential buildings in the Mediterranean area, in press.) and related to the research article Cost-optimal analysis and technical comparison between standard and high efficient mono residential buildings in a warm climate by Baglivo et al. (Energy, 2015, 10.1016/j.energy.2015.02.062, in press). PMID:26217793

  10. Cost related sensitivity analysis for optimal operation of a grid-parallel PEM fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkh, M. Y.; Tanrioven, M.; Rahman, A.; Alam, M. S.

    Fuel cell power plants (FCPP) as a combined source of heat, power and hydrogen (CHP&H) can be considered as a potential option to supply both thermal and electrical loads. Hydrogen produced from the FCPP can be stored for future use of the FCPP or can be sold for profit. In such a system, tariff rates for purchasing or selling electricity, the fuel cost for the FCPP/thermal load, and hydrogen selling price are the main factors that affect the operational strategy. This paper presents a hybrid evolutionary programming and Hill-Climbing based approach to evaluate the impact of change of the above mentioned cost parameters on the optimal operational strategy of the FCPP. The optimal operational strategy of the FCPP for different tariffs is achieved through the estimation of the following: hourly generated power, the amount of thermal power recovered, power trade with the local grid, and the quantity of hydrogen that can be produced. Results show the importance of optimizing system cost parameters in order to minimize overall operating cost.

  11. The costs and benefits of optimistic explanations and dispositional optimism.

    PubMed

    Tennen, H; Affleck, G

    1987-06-01

    Explanatory style and dispositional optimism have been linked to physical health. In this issue, Peterson and Seligman and Carver and Scheier review an impressive series of studies which together suggest that there may be health risks associated with attributing bad outcomes to internal, stable, and global causes and with failing to maintain a generalized expectancy for good outcomes. We attempt to broaden the scope of these studies by describing the situational constraints on the observed relations and by presenting evidence that there may be health risks, as well as benefits, associated with dispositional optimism and an optimistic explanatory style. PMID:3612476

  12. Cost and Energy Savings Opportunities with Heating, Air Conditioning and Lighting Systems in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electric Energy Association, New York, NY.

    Great potential exists for saving energy and operating costs with a wide variety of heat conservation systems. Two major electric services--space conditioning and lighting--afford cost and energy savings opportunities. These services are detailed in checklist fashion in this brochure, with the suggestions included under space conditioning…

  13. Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

    2008-06-01

    The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

  14. Thermal performance analysis of optimized hexagonal finned heat sinks in impinging air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kenan; Yeşildal, Faruk; Karabey, Altuǧ; Yakut, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal performance analysis of hexagonal finned heat sinks which optimized according to the experimental design and optimization method of Taguchi were investigated. Experiments of air jet impingement on heated hexagonal finned heat sinks were carried out adhering to the L18(21*36) orthogonal array test plan. Optimum geometries were determined and named OH-1, OH-2. Enhancement efficiency with the first law of thermodynamics was analyzed for optimized heat sinks with 100, 150, 200 mm heights of hexagonal fin. Nusselt correlations were found out and variations of enhancement efficiency with Reynolds number presented in η-Re graphics.

  15. Entransy and exergy analyses for optimizations of heat-work conversion with carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chul Ho; Kim, Kyoung Hoon

    2016-06-01

    The concept of entransy has been newly proposed in terms of the analogy between heat and electrical conduction and could be useful in analyzing and optimizing the heat-work conversion systems. This work presents comparative analyses of entransy and exergy for optimizations of heat-work conversion. The work production and heat transfer processes in Carnot cycle system are investigated with the formulations of exergy destruction, entransy loss, work entransy, entransy dissipation, and efficiencies for both cases of dumping and non-dumping of used source fluid. The effects of source and condensation temperatures on the system performance are systematically investigated for optimal condition of producing maximum work or work entransy.

  16. Coupled heating/forming optimization of knitted reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancrace, Johann

    The feasibility of knitted fabric reinforcement for highly flexible composites has been investigated for the thermoforming process. The composite sheets were made through compression molding before being shaped. We used thermoplastic elastomers as matrices: Thermoplastic Elastomers and Thermoplastic Olefins. The knit reinforcement was provided by jersey knitted fabrics of polyester fibers. We first introduced the fundamentals involved in the study. The manufacturing is presented through compression molding and thermoforming. The latter is a two-step process: IR heating and plug/pressure assisted deformations. For the IR heating phase, several material properties have been characterized: the emissivity of matrices, absorption, reflection and transmission of radiations in the composite structure have been studied. We particularly paid attention to the reflection on the composite surfaces. The non-reflected or useful radiations leading to the heating are quantified and simulated for three emitter-composite configurations. It has been found that the emitter temperatures and the angle of incidence have significant roles in the IR heating phase. Thermal properties such as calorific capacity and thermal conductivity of the composites were also presented. Thermograms were carried out with an IR camera. Equipment and Thermogram acquisitions were both presented. Optimization of emitters was performed for a three emitter system. The objective function method has been illustrated. Regarding mechanical purposes, the characterizations of the matrices, reinforcements and flexible composites have been carried out. The studied loadings were uniaxial traction, pure shear and biaxial inflation. For the uniaxial extension, both the reinforcement and the composite were found highly anisotropic regarding the orientation of the loading toward the coursewise of the fabric. The resulting strains and stresses to rupture are also found anisotropic. However, for pure shear loading we observed

  17. Optimizing Experimental Designs Relative to Costs and Effect Sizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headrick, Todd C.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    A general model is derived for the purpose of efficiently allocating integral numbers of units in multi-level designs given prespecified power levels. The derivation of the model is based on a constrained optimization problem that maximizes a general form of a ratio of expected mean squares subject to a budget constraint. This model provides more…

  18. Robust optimization for water distribution systems least cost design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Lina; Housh, Mashor; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the least cost design problem of a water distribution system is to find its minimum cost with discrete diameters as decision variables and hydraulic controls as constraints. The goal of a robust least cost design is to find solutions which guarantee its feasibility independent of the data (i.e., under model uncertainty). A robust counterpart approach for linear uncertain problems is adopted in this study, which represents the uncertain stochastic problem as its deterministic equivalent. Robustness is controlled by a single parameter providing a trade-off between the probability of constraint violation and the objective cost. Two principal models are developed: uncorrelated uncertainty model with implicit design reliability, and correlated uncertainty model with explicit design reliability. The models are tested on three example applications and compared for uncertainty in consumers' demands. The main contribution of this study is the inclusion of the ability to explicitly account for different correlations between water distribution system demand nodes. In particular, it is shown that including correlation information in the design phase has a substantial advantage in seeking more efficient robust solutions.

  19. The Cost-Optimal Size of Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, D. E.

    2000-07-01

    The paper answers the question, what is the optimum vehicle size — in terms of LEO payload capability — for a future reusable launch vehicle ? It is shown that there exists an optimum vehicle size that results in minimum specific transportation cost. The optimum vehicle size depends on the total annual cargo mass (LEO equivalent) enviseaged, which defines at the same time the optimum number of launches per year (LpA). Based on the TRANSCOST-Model algorithms a wide range of vehicle sizes — from 20 to 100 Mg payload in LEO, as well as launch rates — from 2 to 100 per year — have been investigated. It is shown in a design chart how much the vehicle size as well as the launch rate are influencing the specific transportation cost (in MYr/Mg and USS/kg). The comparison with actual ELVs (Expendable Launch Vehicles) and Semi-Reusable Vehicles (a combination of a reusable first stage with an expendable second stage) shows that there exists only one economic solution for an essential reduction of space transportation cost: the Fully Reusable Vehicle Concept, with rocket propulsion and vertical take-off. The Single-stage Configuration (SSTO) has the best economic potential; its feasibility is not only a matter of technology level but also of the vehicle size as such. Increasing the vehicle size (launch mass) reduces the technology requirements because the law of scale provides a better mass fraction and payload fraction — practically at no cost. The optimum vehicle design (after specification of the payload capability) requires a trade-off between lightweight (and more expensive) technology vs. more conventional (and cheaper) technology. It is shown that the the use of more conventional technology and accepting a somewhat larger vehicle is the more cost-effective and less risky approach.

  20. Cost-Based Optimization of a Papermaking Wastewater Regeneration Recycling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Feng, Xiao; Chu, Khim H.

    2010-11-01

    Wastewater can be regenerated for recycling in an industrial process to reduce freshwater consumption and wastewater discharge. Such an environment friendly approach will also lead to cost savings that accrue due to reduced freshwater usage and wastewater discharge. However, the resulting cost savings are offset to varying degrees by the costs incurred for the regeneration of wastewater for recycling. Therefore, systematic procedures should be used to determine the true economic benefits for any water-using system involving wastewater regeneration recycling. In this paper, a total cost accounting procedure is employed to construct a comprehensive cost model for a paper mill. The resulting cost model is optimized by means of mathematical programming to determine the optimal regeneration flowrate and regeneration efficiency that will yield the minimum total cost.

  1. Optimal production policy for a remanufacturing system with virtual inventory cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    This paper deals with a cost management problem of a remanufacturing system with stochastic demand. We model the system with consideration for two types of inventories. One is the actual product inventory in the factory. The other is the virtual inventory that is being used by the customer. For this virtual inventory, it should be required to consider an operational cost that we need in order to observe and check the quantity of the inventory. We call this the virtual inventory cost and model the system by including it. We define the state of the remanufacturing system by the two inventory levels. It is assumed that the cost function is composed of various cost factors such as holding, backlog and manufacturing costs. We obtain the optimal policy that minimizes the expected average cost per period. Numerical results reveal the effects of the factors on the optimal policy.

  2. Improvements in Mechanical Properties of 319 Al Alloy Engine Blocks Through Cost-Effective Solution Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, A.; Ravindran, C.; MacKay, R.

    2014-08-01

    The use of Al engine blocks has increased significantly to improve vehicle fuel efficiency. However, the gray cast iron cylinder liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores which necessitates the optimization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. This study compared the microstructure of T4-treated Al billet castings of varying cooling rate to that of the cylinder region of T4-treated (current production schedule) Al engine blocks. The aim of this study was to develop a cost-effective small scale heat treatment optimization method for engine block production. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggest that the microstructure and hardness at the top, middle, and bottom of the cylinder were similar to those of each representative billet casting, indicating that heat treatment resulted in successful replication of the engine block locations. In addition, tensile testing revealed that the YS and UTS increased slightly following T4 treatment for all billet castings, which was also observed at the middle of the engine block cylinder bridge. As such, this method can be an effective forerunner for future heat treatment optimization in Al engine block production.

  3. "Body-In-The-Loop": Optimizing Device Parameters Using Measures of Instantaneous Energetic Cost

    PubMed Central

    Felt, Wyatt; Selinger, Jessica C.; Donelan, J. Maxwell; Remy, C. David

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates methods for the online optimization of assistive robotic devices such as powered prostheses, orthoses and exoskeletons. Our algorithms estimate the value of a physiological objective in real-time (with a body “in-the-loop”) and use this information to identify optimal device parameters. To handle sensor data that are noisy and dynamically delayed, we rely on a combination of dynamic estimation and response surface identification. We evaluated three algorithms (Steady-State Cost Mapping, Instantaneous Cost Mapping, and Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search) with eight healthy human subjects. Steady-State Cost Mapping is an established technique that fits a cubic polynomial to averages of steady-state measures at different parameter settings. The optimal parameter value is determined from the polynomial fit. Using a continuous sweep over a range of parameters and taking into account measurement dynamics, Instantaneous Cost Mapping identifies a cubic polynomial more quickly. Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search uses a similar technique to iteratively approach the optimal parameter value using estimates of the local gradient. To evaluate these methods in a simple and repeatable way, we prescribed step frequency via a metronome and optimized this frequency to minimize metabolic energetic cost. This use of step frequency allows a comparison of our results to established techniques and enables others to replicate our methods. Our results show that all three methods achieve similar accuracy in estimating optimal step frequency. For all methods, the average error between the predicted minima and the subjects’ preferred step frequencies was less than 1% with a standard deviation between 4% and 5%. Using Instantaneous Cost Mapping, we were able to reduce subject walking-time from over an hour to less than 10 minutes. While, for a single parameter, the Instantaneous Cost Gradient Search is not much faster than Steady-State Cost Mapping, the

  4. Predicting the performance and cost of ORC waste-heat-recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krazinski, J.L.; Bushby, H.M.; Buyco, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems have been designed and tested for the recovery of waste heat from low-temperature sources. These systems use organic working fluids, rather than steam, in the cycle. A computer code was developed to predict the power outputs and costs of these systems. Six organic fluids and steam are considered in this paper. The thermophysical properties of the seven fluids are compared and their impact upon the system design is discussed. System costs are presented for exhaust-gas heat sources with maximum temperatures of 500 to 1000F. The power outputs in these cases range from approximately 500 kW to 2500 kW. Certain organic fluids are restricted to the lower-heat-source temperatures because of thermal-stability limitations. For the heat-source temperatures at which the various fluids were used, however, similar system costs and power-output levels were obtained for the six organic fluids.

  5. Measured performance results: low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The measured performance of seven low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado is summarized. During the summer and fall of 1981, SERI monitored a variety of low-cost solar water heating system designs and components. Five systems had site-built collectors, and four included low-cost tank-in-jacket heat exchanger/storage tank components. Two were air-to-water systems. The five liquid-based systems included a drain-down design, a propylene glycol-charged thermosiphon system, and three pumped-glycol systems. The pumped-liquid systems performed the best, with system efficiencies greater than 20% and solar fractions between 40% and 70%. Tjhe air-to-water systems did not perform as well because of leakage in the collectors and heat exchangers. The thermosiphon system performed at lower efficiency because the collector flows were low.

  6. Integrated energy, economic, and environmental assessment for the optimal solar absorption cooling and heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Yin

    Buildings in the United States are responsible for 41% of the primary energy use and 30% of carbon dioxide emissions. Due to mounting concerns about climate change and resource depletion, meeting building heating and cooling demand with renewable energy has attracted increasing attention in the energy system design of green buildings. One of these approaches, the solar absorption cooling and heating (SACH) technology can be a key solution to addressing the energy and environmental challenges. SACH system is an integration of solar thermal heating system and solar thermal driven absorption cooling system. So far, SACH systems still remain at the demonstration and testing stage due to not only its high cost but also complicated system characteristics. This research aims to develop a methodology to evaluate the life cycle energy, economic and environmental performance of SACH systems by high-fidelity simulations validated by experimental data. The developed methodology can be used to assist the system design. In order to achieve this goal, the study includes four objectives as follows: * Objective 1: Develop the evaluation model for the SACH system. The model includes three aspects: energy, economy, and environment from a life cycle point of view. * Objective 2: Validate the energy system model by solar experiments performance data. * Objective 3: Develop a fast and effective multi-objective optimization methodology to find the optimal system configuration which achieves the maximum system benefits on energy, economy and environment. Statistic techniques are explored to reveal the relations between the system key parameters and the three evaluation targets. The Pareto front is generated by solving this multi-objective optimization problem. * Objective 4: Apply the developed assessment methodology to different building types and locations. Furthermore, this study considered the influence of the input uncertainties on the overall system performance. The sensitivity

  7. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  8. Cost-Optimal Design of a 3-Phase Core Type Transformer by Gradient Search Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, R.; Das, A.; Sensarma, A. K.; Sanyal, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    3-phase core type transformers are extensively used as power and distribution transformers in power system and their cost is a sizable proportion of the total system cost. Therefore they should be designed cost-optimally. The design methodology for reaching cost-optimality has been discussed in details by authors like Ramamoorty. It has also been discussed in brief in some of the text-books of electrical design. The paper gives a method for optimizing design, in presence of constraints specified by the customer and the regulatory authorities, through gradient search technique. The starting point has been chosen within the allowable parameter space the steepest decent path has been followed for convergence. The step length has been judiciously chosen and the program has been maneuvered to avoid local minimal points. The method appears to be best as its convergence is quickest amongst different optimizing techniques.

  9. Defense Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Cost/Schedule Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.D. . Joint Integration Office); Beaulieu, D.H. ); Wolaver, R.W.; Carson, P.H. Corp., Boulder, CO )

    1986-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide the DOE information with which it can establish the most efficient program for the long management and disposal, in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a comprehensive review of waste characteristics, existing and projected waste inventories, processing and transportation options, and WIPP requirements was made. Cost differences between waste management alternatives were analyzed and compared to an established baseline. The result of this study is an information package that DOE can use as the basis for policy decisions. As part of this study, a comprehensive list of alternatives for each element of the baseline was developed and reviewed with the sites. The principle conclusions of the study follow. A single processing facility for RH TRU waste is both necessary and sufficient. The RH TRU processing facility should be located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Shielding of RH TRU to contact handled levels is not an economic alternative in general, but is an acceptable alternative for specific waste streams. Compaction is only cost effective at the ORNL processing facility, with a possible exception at Hanford for small compaction of paint cans of newly generated glovebox waste. It is more cost effective to ship certified waste to WIPP in 55-gal drums than in canisters, assuming a suitable drum cask becomes available. Some waste forms cannot be packaged in drums, a canister/shielded cask capability is also required. To achieve the desired disposal rate, the ORNL processing facility must be operational by 1996. Implementing the conclusions of this study can save approximately $110 million, compared to the baseline, in facility, transportation, and interim storage costs through the year 2013. 10 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Optimized Heat Pipe Backup Cooling System Tested with a Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendeman, Carl L.; Tarau, Calin; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Anderson, William G.; Garner, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor by bypassing the heat during stops. In a previous NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for the Stirling RPS. In 2012, one of these VCHPs was successfully tested at NASA Glenn Research Center with a Stirling convertor as an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) backup cooling system. The prototype; however, was not optimized and did not reflect the final heat rejection path. ACT through further funding has developed a semioptimized prototype with the finalized heat path for testing at Glenn with a Stirling convertor. The semioptimized system features a two-phase radiator and is significantly smaller and lighter than the prior prototype to reflect a higher level of flight readiness. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the GPHS during stoppage with a small temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. This small temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the multilayer insulation (MLI). The VCHP passively allows the Stirling convertor to be turned off multiple times during a mission with potentially unlimited off durations. Having the ability to turn the Stirling off allows for the Stirling to be reset and reduces vibrations on the platform during sensitive measurements or

  11. A KBE-enabled design framework for cost/weight optimization study of aircraft composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; La Rocca, G.; van Tooren, M. J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Traditionally, minimum weight is the objective when optimizing airframe structures. This optimization, however, does not consider the manufacturing cost which actually determines the profit of the airframe manufacturer. To this purpose, a design framework has been developed able to perform cost/weight multi-objective optimization of an aircraft component, including large topology variations of the structural configuration. The key element of the proposed framework is a dedicated knowledge based engineering (KBE) application, called multi-model generator, which enables modelling very different product configurations and variants and extract all data required to feed the weight and cost estimation modules, in a fully automated fashion. The weight estimation method developed in this research work uses Finite Element Analysis to calculate the internal stresses of the structural elements and an analytical composite plate sizing method to determine their minimum required thicknesses. The manufacturing cost estimation module was developed on the basis of a cost model available in literature. The capability of the framework was successfully demonstrated by designing and optimizing the composite structure of a business jet rudder. The study case indicates the design framework is able to find the Pareto optimal set for minimum structural weight and manufacturing costin a very quick way. Based on the Pareto set, the rudder manufacturer is in conditions to conduct both internal trade-off studies between minimum weight and minimum cost solutions, as well as to offer the OEM a full set of optimized options to choose, rather than one feasible design.

  12. Effective reentry methods reduce costs and optimize production

    SciTech Connect

    Szutiak, G.; Walker, D.

    1996-10-21

    Favorable oil prices and tax incentives have spawned an increase in reentry drilling, adding new life to fields once abandoned in Canada. (The provincial government in Alberta has stimulated reentry drilling in western Canada by its tax royalty relief and incentives.) A review of four reentry projects covering 19 horizontal wells in western Canada illustrates a number of planning considerations that can save an operator money while ensuring optimization of the production. The paper recommends several standard steps in planning and executing slim hole reentries drawn from these projects.

  13. The environmental cost of subsistence: Optimizing diets to minimize footprints.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Jessica A; Davis, Kyle F; Emery, Kyle A; Leach, Allison M; Galloway, James N; Pace, Michael L

    2016-05-15

    The question of how to minimize monetary cost while meeting basic nutrient requirements (a subsistence diet) was posed by George Stigler in 1945. The problem, known as Stigler's diet problem, was famously solved using the simplex algorithm. Today, we are not only concerned with the monetary cost of food, but also the environmental cost. Efforts to quantify environmental impacts led to the development of footprint (FP) indicators. The environmental footprints of food production span multiple dimensions, including greenhouse gas emissions (carbon footprint), nitrogen release (nitrogen footprint), water use (blue and green water footprint) and land use (land footprint), and a diet minimizing one of these impacts could result in higher impacts in another dimension. In this study based on nutritional and population data for the United States, we identify diets that minimize each of these four footprints subject to nutrient constraints. We then calculate tradeoffs by taking the composition of each footprint's minimum diet and calculating the other three footprints. We find that diets for the minimized footprints tend to be similar for the four footprints, suggesting there are generally synergies, rather than tradeoffs, among low footprint diets. Plant-based food and seafood (fish and other aquatic foods) commonly appear in minimized diets and tend to most efficiently supply macronutrients and micronutrients, respectively. Livestock products rarely appear in minimized diets, suggesting these foods tend to be less efficient from an environmental perspective, even when nutrient content is considered. The results' emphasis on seafood is complicated by the environmental impacts of aquaculture versus capture fisheries, increasing in aquaculture, and shifting compositions of aquaculture feeds. While this analysis does not make specific diet recommendations, our approach demonstrates potential environmental synergies of plant- and seafood-based diets. As a result, this study

  14. Integration of safety engineering into a cost optimized development program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A six-segment management model is presented, each segment of which represents a major area in a new product development program. The first segment of the model covers integration of specialist engineers into 'systems requirement definition' or the system engineering documentation process. The second covers preparation of five basic types of 'development program plans.' The third segment covers integration of system requirements, scheduling, and funding of specialist engineering activities into 'work breakdown structures,' 'cost accounts,' and 'work packages.' The fourth covers 'requirement communication' by line organizations. The fifth covers 'performance measurement' based on work package data. The sixth covers 'baseline requirements achievement tracking.'

  15. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  16. Cost optimization for maintaining the survivability of terrestrial objects of a satellite control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlachev, E. N.

    2011-12-01

    A methodological approach is proposed for determining optimal costs while maintaining required survivability of terrestrial objects of a satellite control system. The costs are calculated taking into account their distribution between the power and means, ensuring lesser vulnerability of the object, and the power and means spent on its reconstruction after damage. A problem of nonlinear programming with certain contingencies is formulated and solved to calculate the costs.

  17. Process industry demand for more efficient, more cost-effective heat exchanger tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Thors, P.

    1987-01-01

    In the future the process industry will see a bigger selection of enhanced heat transfer tubes, one of the reasons being the continued production of special patented technology involved in making them. Here the author mentions only some of the factors that might influence the increased usage of these enhanced tubes. In using more efficient tubing in a heat exchanger the designer has available the options to increase the total heat duty per unit volume, lower operating costs by reducing the mean temperature difference at a given heat duty, save material, or reduce the size and/or pumping power, among others. This can be achieved, for example, by replacing plain tubes with appropriate enhanced tubes in retubing applications, where old heat exchangers need to be upgraded and total efficiency improved. When a new heat exchanger is to be built, it is easier for the designer to include the more efficient tubing to utilize all the benefits of the increased thermal performance.

  18. The shutdown reactor: Optimizing spent fuel storage cost

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have indicated that the most prudent way to store fuel at a shutdown reactor site safely and economically is through the use of a dry storage facility licensed under 10CFR72. While such storage is certainly safe, is it true that the dry ISFSI represents the safest and most economical approach for the utility? While no one is really able to answer that question definitely, as yet, Holtec has studied this issue for some time and believes that both an economic and safety case can be made for an optimization strategy that calls for the use of both wet and dry ISFSI storage of spent fuel at some plants. For the sake of brevity, this paper summarizes some of Holtec`s findings with respect to the economics of maintaining some fuel in wet storage at a shutdown reactor. The safety issue, or more importantly the perception of safety of spent fuel in wet storage, still varies too much with the eye of the beholder, and until a more rigorous presentation of safety analyses can be made in a regulatory setting, it is not practically useful to argue about how many angels can sit on the head of a safety-related pin. Holtec is prepared to present such analyses, but this does not appear to be the proper venue. Thus, this paper simply looks at certain economic elements of a wet ISFSI at a shutdown reactor to make a prima facie case that wet storage has some attractiveness at a shutdown reactor and should not be rejected out of hand. Indeed, an optimization study at certain plants may well show the economic vitality of keeping some fuel in the pool and converting the NRC licensing coverage from 10CFR50 to 10CFR72. If the economics look attractive, then the safety issue may be confronted with a compelling interest.

  19. Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1996-06-01

    In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it`s true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area.

  20. Optimal management of a stochastically varying population when policy adjustment is costly.

    PubMed

    Boettiger, Carl; Bode, Michael; Sanchirico, James N; Lariviere, Jacob; Hastings, Alan; Armsworth, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Ecological systems are dynamic and policies to manage them need to respond to that variation. However, policy adjustments will sometimes be costly, which means that fine-tuning a policy to track variability in the environment very tightly will only sometimes be worthwhile. We use a classic fisheries management problem, how to manage a stochastically varying population using annually varying quotas in order to maximize profit, to examine how costs of policy adjustment change optimal management recommendations. Costs of policy adjustment (changes in fishing quotas through time) could take different forms. For example, these costs may respond to the size of the change being implemented, or there could be a fixed cost any time a quota change is made. We show how different forms of policy costs have contrasting implications for optimal policies. Though it is frequently assumed that costs to adjusting policies will dampen variation in the policy, we show that certain cost structures can actually increase variation through time. We further show that failing to account for adjustment costs has a consistently worse economic impact than would assuming these costs are present when they are not. PMID:27411252

  1. Multi-objective optimization approach for cost management during product design at the conceptual phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasad, K. G.; Venkata Subbaiah, K.; Narayana Rao, K.

    2014-03-01

    The effective cost management during the conceptual design phase of a product is essential to develop a product with minimum cost and desired quality. The integration of the methodologies of quality function deployment (QFD), value engineering (VE) and target costing (TC) could be applied to the continuous improvement of any product during product development. To optimize customer satisfaction and total cost of a product, a mathematical model is established in this paper. This model integrates QFD, VE and TC under multi-objective optimization frame work. A case study on domestic refrigerator is presented to show the performance of the proposed model. Goal programming is adopted to attain the goals of maximum customer satisfaction and minimum cost of the product.

  2. Multi-Objective Optimization of Heat Load and Run Time for CEBAF Linacs Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Cody; Terzic, Balsa; Hofler, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) consists of two linear accelerators (Linacs) connected by arcs. Within each Linac, there are 200 niobium cavities that use superconducting radio frequency (SRF) to accelerate electrons. The gradients for the cavities are selected to optimize two competing objectives: heat load (the energy required to cool the cavities) and trip rate (how often the beam turns off within an hour). This results in a multidimensional, multi-objective, nonlinear system of equations that is not readily solved by analytical methods. This study improved a genetic algorithm (GA), which applies the concept of natural selection. The primary focus was making this GA more efficient to allow for more cost-effective solutions in the same amount of computation time. Two methods used were constraining the maximum value of the ob-jectives and also utilizing previously simulated solutions as the initial generation. A third method of interest involved refining the GA by combining the two objectives into a single weighted-sum objective, which collapses the set of optimal solutions into a single point. By combining these methods, the GA can be made 128 times as effective, reducing computation time from 30 min to 12 sec. This is crucial for when a cavity must be turned off, a new solution needs to be computed quickly. This work is of particular interest since it provides an efficient algorithm that can be easily adapted to any Linac facility.

  3. Optimized Heat Interception for Cryogen Tank Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, E. R.; Miller, F. K.

    2007-01-01

    We consider means for using the cooling available in boil-off gas to intercept heat conducted through the support structure of a cryogen tank. A one-dimensional model of the structure coupled to a gas stream gives an analytical expression for heat leak in terms of flow rate for temperature independent properties and laminar flow. A numerical model has been developed for heat transfer on a thin cylindrical tube with an attached vent line. The model is used to determine the vent path layout that will minimize heat flow into the cryogen tank. The results are useful for a number of applications, but the one of interest in this study is the minimization of the boil-off in large cryopropellant tanks in low Earth and low lunar orbit.

  4. Reconstruction of the unknown optimization cost functions from experimental recordings during static multi-finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xun; Terekhov, Alexander V; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the research is to reconstruct the unknown cost (objective) function(s) presumably used by the neural controller for sharing the total force among individual fingers in multifinger prehension. The cost function was determined from experimental data by applying the recently developed Analytical Inverse Optimization (ANIO) method (Terekhov et al. 2010). The core of the ANIO method is the Theorem of Uniqueness that specifies conditions for unique (with some restrictions) estimation of the objective functions. In the experiment, subjects (n = 8) grasped an instrumented handle and maintained it at rest in the air with various external torques, loads, and target grasping forces applied to the object. The experimental data recorded from 80 trials showed a tendency to lie on a 2-dimensional hyperplane in the 4-dimensional finger-force space. Because the constraints in each trial were different, such a propensity is a manifestation of a neural mechanism (not the task mechanics). In agreement with the Lagrange principle for the inverse optimization, the plane of experimental observations was close to the plane resulting from the direct optimization. The latter plane was determined using the ANIO method. The unknown cost function was reconstructed successfully for each performer, as well as for the group data. The cost functions were found to be quadratic with nonzero linear terms. The cost functions obtained with the ANIO method yielded more accurate results than other optimization methods. The ANIO method has an evident potential for addressing the problem of optimization in motor control. PMID:22104742

  5. A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Le; MacDonald, Erin

    2013-10-01

    This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of idealized ORC in domestic combined heat and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is used, amongst the others, in geothermal facilities, in waste heat recovery or in domestic combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The paper presents optimization of an idealized ORC equivalent of the Carnot cycle with non-zero temperature difference in heat exchangers and with energy dissipation caused by the viscous fluid flow. In this analysis the amount of heat outgoing from the ORC is given. Such a case corresponds to the application of an ORC in domestic CHP. This assumption is different from the most of ORC models where the incoming amount of heat is given.

  7. Multi-objective optimization of a plain fin-and-tube heat exchanger using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Du; Qin, Qian Zuo

    2014-04-01

    In the present paper, a plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger (PFTHE) is considered for optimization with air and water as working fluid, four geometric variables are taken as parameters for optimization, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) was used to search for the optimal structure sizes of the PFTHE, the maximum total heat transfer rate and the minimum total pressure drop are taken as objective functions in GA, respectively. Performance of the optimized result was evaluated and correspondingly the total heat transfer rate, the total pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient and the local Nusselt number, j-factor and friction factor ξ are calculated respectively. Results show that the total heat transfer rate of the optimized heat exchanger increased by about 2.1-9.2% comparing with the original one, the heat transfer coefficient increased by about 8.2-14.7% and the total pressure drop decreased by about 4.4-8% in the range of Re = 1200-14000.

  8. Vertical and lateral flight optimization algorithm and missed approach cost calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrieta Mendoza, Alejandro

    Flight trajectory optimization is being looked as a way of reducing flight costs, fuel burned and emissions generated by the fuel consumption. The objective of this work is to find the optimal trajectory between two points. To find the optimal trajectory, the parameters of weight, cost index, initial coordinates, and meteorological conditions along the route are provided to the algorithm. This algorithm finds the trajectory where the global cost is the most economical. The global cost is a compromise between fuel burned and flight time, this is determined using a cost index that assigns a cost in terms of fuel to the flight time. The optimization is achieved by calculating a candidate optimal cruise trajectory profile from all the combinations available in the aircraft performance database. With this cruise candidate profile, more cruises profiles are calculated taken into account the climb and descend costs. During cruise, step climbs are evaluated to optimize the trajectory. The different trajectories are compared and the most economical one is defined as the optimal vertical navigation profile. From the optimal vertical navigation profile, different lateral routes are tested. Taking advantage of the meteorological influence, the algorithm looks for the lateral navigation trajectory where the global cost is the most economical. That route is then selected as the optimal lateral navigation profile. The meteorological data was obtained from environment Canada. The new way of obtaining data from the grid from environment Canada proposed in this work resulted in an important computation time reduction compared against other methods such as bilinear interpolation. The algorithm developed here was evaluated in two different aircraft: the Lockheed L-1011 and the Sukhoi Russian regional jet. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB, and the validation was performed using Flight-Sim by Presagis and the FMS CMA-9000 by CMC Electronics -- Esterline. At the end of this work a

  9. Modeling, research and development of the system for optimal heat consumption of a building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalnogov, Vladislav N.; Chamchiyan, Yuri E.; Suranov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    The work sets out the technical, software and organizational and methodological solutions for automated management and optimization of a building's heat consumption. It shows the results of modeling and research on the effectiveness of the automated system of heat consumption control of the main building of Ulyanovsk State Technical University.

  10. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-29

    Texas A&M University is operating a high-efficiency combined heat and power (CHP) system at its district energy campus in College Station, Texas. Texas A&M received $10 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for this project. Private-sector cost share totaled $40 million.

  11. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques. [using low cost heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The integration of low-cost commercial heat pipes in the design of a NASA candidate standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output resulted in a 44% weight reduction. Part temperatures were also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A complete 350- watt modular power converter was built and tested to evaluate thermal performance of the redesigned supply.

  12. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management.

  13. MULTI-SCALE MODELING AND APPROXIMATION ASSISTED OPTIMIZATION OF BARE TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bacellar, Daniel; Ling, Jiazhen; Aute, Vikrant; Radermacher, Reinhard; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers are very common in air-conditioning, heat pump and refrigeration applications. In these heat exchangers, there is a great benefit in terms of size, weight, refrigerant charge and heat transfer coefficient, by moving from conventional channel sizes (~ 9mm) to smaller channel sizes (< 5mm). This work investigates new designs for air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers with tube outer diameter ranging from 0.5 to 2.0mm. The goal of this research is to develop and optimize the design of these heat exchangers and compare their performance with existing state of the art designs. The air-side performance of various tube bundle configurations are analyzed using a Parallel Parameterized CFD (PPCFD) technique. PPCFD allows for fast-parametric CFD analyses of various geometries with topology change. Approximation techniques drastically reduce the number of CFD evaluations required during optimization. Maximum Entropy Design method is used for sampling and Kriging method is used for metamodeling. Metamodels are developed for the air-side heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop as a function of tube-bundle dimensions and air velocity. The metamodels are then integrated with an air-to-refrigerant heat exchanger design code. This integration allows a multi-scale analysis of air-side performance heat exchangers including air-to-refrigerant heat transfer and phase change. Overall optimization is carried out using a multi-objective genetic algorithm. The optimal designs found can exhibit 50 percent size reduction, 75 percent decrease in air side pressure drop and doubled air heat transfer coefficients compared to a high performance compact micro channel heat exchanger with same capacity and flow rates.

  14. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  15. Study, optimization, and design of a laser heat engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Laser heat engine concepts, proposed for satellite applications, were analyzed to determine which engine concepts best meet the requirements of high efficiency (50 percent or better) continuous operation in space. The best laser heat engine for a near-term experimental demonstration, selected on the basis of high overall operating efficiency, high power-to-weight characteristics, and availability of the required technology, is an Otto/Diesel cycle piston engine using a diamond window to admit CO2 laser radiation. The technology with the greatest promise of scaling to megawatt power levels in the long term is the energy exchanger/gas turbine combination.

  16. Evidence for Composite Cost Functions in Arm Movement Planning: An Inverse Optimal Control Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berret, Bastien; Chiovetto, Enrico; Nori, Francesco; Pozzo, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    An important issue in motor control is understanding the basic principles underlying the accomplishment of natural movements. According to optimal control theory, the problem can be stated in these terms: what cost function do we optimize to coordinate the many more degrees of freedom than necessary to fulfill a specific motor goal? This question has not received a final answer yet, since what is optimized partly depends on the requirements of the task. Many cost functions were proposed in the past, and most of them were found to be in agreement with experimental data. Therefore, the actual principles on which the brain relies to achieve a certain motor behavior are still unclear. Existing results might suggest that movements are not the results of the minimization of single but rather of composite cost functions. In order to better clarify this last point, we consider an innovative experimental paradigm characterized by arm reaching with target redundancy. Within this framework, we make use of an inverse optimal control technique to automatically infer the (combination of) optimality criteria that best fit the experimental data. Results show that the subjects exhibited a consistent behavior during each experimental condition, even though the target point was not prescribed in advance. Inverse and direct optimal control together reveal that the average arm trajectories were best replicated when optimizing the combination of two cost functions, nominally a mix between the absolute work of torques and the integrated squared joint acceleration. Our results thus support the cost combination hypothesis and demonstrate that the recorded movements were closely linked to the combination of two complementary functions related to mechanical energy expenditure and joint-level smoothness. PMID:22022242

  17. Optimization for performance-based design under seismic demands, including social costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Oscar; Foschi, Ricardo O.; Ascheri, Juan P.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Grossman, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    Performance-based design in earthquake engineering is a structural optimization problem that has, as the objective, the determination of design parameters for the minimization of total costs, while at the same time satisfying minimum reliability levels for the specified performance criteria. Total costs include those for construction and structural damage repairs, those associated with non-structural components and the social costs of economic losses, injuries and fatalities. This paper presents a general framework to approach this problem, using a numerical optimization strategy and incorporating the use of neural networks for the evaluation of dynamic responses and the reliability levels achieved for a given set of design parameters. The strategy is applied to an example of a three-story office building. The results show the importance of considering the social costs, and the optimum failure probabilities when minimum reliability constraints are not taken into account.

  18. Admitting the Inadmissible: Adjoint Formulation for Incomplete Cost Functionals in Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Salas, Manuel D.

    1997-01-01

    We derive the adjoint equations for problems in aerodynamic optimization which are improperly considered as "inadmissible." For example, a cost functional which depends on the density, rather than on the pressure, is considered "inadmissible" for an optimization problem governed by the Euler equations. We show that for such problems additional terms should be included in the Lagrangian functional when deriving the adjoint equations. These terms are obtained from the restriction of the interior PDE to the control surface. Demonstrations of the explicit derivation of the adjoint equations for "inadmissible" cost functionals are given for the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Learning Task-Optimal Registration Cost Functions for Localizing Cytoarchitecture and Function in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Mert R.; Vercauteren, Tom; Holt, Daphne J.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl; Golland, Polina; Fischl, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Image registration is typically formulated as an optimization problem with multiple tunable, manually set parameters. We present a principled framework for learning thousands of parameters of registration cost functions, such as a spatially-varying tradeoff between the image dissimilarity and regularization terms. Our approach belongs to the classic machine learning framework of model selection by optimization of cross-validation error. This second layer of optimization of cross-validation error over and above registration selects parameters in the registration cost function that result in good registration as measured by the performance of the specific application in a training data set. Much research effort has been devoted to developing generic registration algorithms, which are then specialized to particular imaging modalities, particular imaging targets and particular postregistration analyses. Our framework allows for a systematic adaptation of generic registration cost functions to specific applications by learning the “free” parameters in the cost functions. Here, we consider the application of localizing underlying cytoarchitecture and functional regions in the cerebral cortex by alignment of cortical folding. Most previous work assumes that perfectly registering the macro-anatomy also perfectly aligns the underlying cortical function even though macro-anatomy does not completely predict brain function. In contrast, we learn 1) optimal weights on different cortical folds or 2) optimal cortical folding template in the generic weighted sum of squared differences dissimilarity measure for the localization task. We demonstrate state-of-the-art localization results in both histological and functional magnetic resonance imaging data sets. PMID:20529736

  20. Choosing a cost functional and a difference scheme in the optimal control of metal solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albu, A. V.; Zubov, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal control of solidification in metal casting is considered. The underlying mathematical model is based on a three-dimensional two-phase initial-boundary value problem of the Stefan type. The study is focused on choosing a cost functional in the optimal control of solidification and choosing a difference scheme for solving the direct problem. The results of the study are described and analyzed.

  1. Optimization criteria of a Bose Brayton heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, Guo-Xing

    2012-01-01

    An irreversible cycle model of the quantum Bose Brayton engine is established, in which finite-time processes and irreversibilities in two adiabatic processes are taken into account. Based on the model, expressions for the power output and the efficiency are derived. By using a numerical computation, the optimal relationship between the power output and the efficiency of an irreversible Bose Brayton engine is obtained. The optimal regions of the power output and the efficiency are determined. It is found that the influences of the irreversibility and the quantum degeneracy on the main performance parameters of the Bose Brayton engine are remarkable. The results obtained in the present paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and the performance improvement of a real Brayton engine.

  2. Cost versus life cycle assessment-based environmental impact optimization of drinking water production plants.

    PubMed

    Capitanescu, F; Rege, S; Marvuglia, A; Benetto, E; Ahmadi, A; Gutiérrez, T Navarrete; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2016-07-15

    Empowering decision makers with cost-effective solutions for reducing industrial processes environmental burden, at both design and operation stages, is nowadays a major worldwide concern. The paper addresses this issue for the sector of drinking water production plants (DWPPs), seeking for optimal solutions trading-off operation cost and life cycle assessment (LCA)-based environmental impact while satisfying outlet water quality criteria. This leads to a challenging bi-objective constrained optimization problem, which relies on a computationally expensive intricate process-modelling simulator of the DWPP and has to be solved with limited computational budget. Since mathematical programming methods are unusable in this case, the paper examines the performances in tackling these challenges of six off-the-shelf state-of-the-art global meta-heuristic optimization algorithms, suitable for such simulation-based optimization, namely Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2), Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II), Indicator-based Evolutionary Algorithm (IBEA), Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm based on Decomposition (MOEA/D), Differential Evolution (DE), and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The results of optimization reveal that good reduction in both operating cost and environmental impact of the DWPP can be obtained. Furthermore, NSGA-II outperforms the other competing algorithms while MOEA/D and DE perform unexpectedly poorly. PMID:27107954

  3. An optimality criterion for sizing members of heated structures with temperature constraints. [considering aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. V.; Shore, C. P.; Narayanaswami, R.

    1977-01-01

    A thermal optimality criterion is presented for sizing members of heated structures with multiple temperature constraints. The optimality criterion is similar to an existing optimality criterion for design of mechanically loaded structures with displacement constraints. Effectiveness of the thermal optimality criterion is assessed by applying it to one- and two-dimensional thermal problems where temperatures can be controlled by varying the material distribution in the structure. Results obtained from the optimality criterion agree within 2 percent with results from a closed-form solution and with results from a mathematical programming technique. The thermal optimality criterion augments existing optimality criteria for strength and stiffness related constraints and offers the possibility of extension of optimality techniques to sizing structures with combined thermal and mechanical loading.

  4. Optimal actuator location of minimum norm controls for heat equation with general controlled domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Yashan; Yang, Dong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study optimal actuator location of the minimum norm controls for a multi-dimensional heat equation with control defined in the space L2 (Ω × (0 , T)). The actuator domain is time-varying in the sense that it is only required to have a prescribed Lebesgue measure for any moment. We select an optimal actuator location so that the optimal control takes its minimal norm over all possible actuator domains. We build a framework of finding the Nash equilibrium so that we can develop a sufficient and necessary condition to characterize the optimal relaxed solutions for both actuator location and corresponding optimal control of the open-loop system. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal classical solutions are therefore concluded. As a result, we synthesize both optimal actuator location and corresponding optimal control into a time-varying feedbacks.

  5. Developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991 to 92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  6. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-24

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  7. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charge pattern optimization for energy cost and battery longevity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashash, Saeid; Moura, Scott J.; Forman, Joel C.; Fathy, Hosam K.

    This paper examines the problem of optimizing the charge pattern of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), defined as the timing and rate with which the PHEV obtains electricity from the power grid. The optimization goal is to simultaneously minimize (i) the total cost of fuel and electricity and (ii) the total battery health degradation over a 24-h naturalistic drive cycle. The first objective is calculated for a previously-developed stochastic optimal PHEV power management strategy, whereas the second objective is evaluated through an electrochemistry-based model of anode-side resistive film formation in lithium-ion batteries. The paper shows that these two objectives are conflicting, and trades them off using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm. As a result, a Pareto front of optimal charge patterns is obtained. The effects of electricity price and trip schedule on the optimal Pareto points and the PHEV charge patterns are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Simulation and Optimization of the Heat Exchanger for Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. Q.; Huang, C.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, Y. P.; Chu, P. Q.; Zheng, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order to enhance the exhaust waste heat recovery efficiency of the automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG) system, a three-segment heat exchanger with folded-shaped internal structure for the TEG system is investigated in this study. As the major effect factors of the performance for the TEG system, surface temperature, and thermal uniformity of the heat exchanger are analyzed in this research, pressure drop along the heat exchanger is also considered. Based on computational fluid dynamics simulations and temperature distribution, the pressure drop along the heat exchanger is obtained. By considering variable length and thickness of folded plates in each segment of the heat exchanger, response surface methodology and optimization by a multi-objective genetic algorithm is applied for surface temperature, thermal uniformity, and pressure drop for the folded-shaped heat exchanger. An optimum design based on the optimization is proposed to improve the overall performance of the TEG system. The performance of the optimized heat exchanger in different engine conditions is discussed.

  9. Optimal design of the pulse tube refrigerator with slit-type heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Taekyung; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2010-09-01

    A single-stage inline pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) with tapered slit-type heat exchangers utilized as the aftercooler and the cold end heat exchanger has been designed, fabricated and investigated. Simple energy conservation equation is applied for the design of the tapered slit-type heat exchangers with which the PTR is optimized. The air-cooled aftercoolers with different slit configurations have been compared in this paper with regard to its cooling capacity. The optimized PTRs driven by a single-piston linear compressor achieve the lowest temperature of 53.1 K and 53.5 K, and the cooling capacity of 3.0 W at 60 K and 3.5 W at 60 K, respectively. The result shows that the tapered slit-type heat exchangers can replace the mesh-type heat exchanger, but the geometric configuration of slits and the compressible volume should be carefully considered for optimum performance of the cooler.

  10. Cost optimization of DNAPL source and plume remediation under uncertainty using a semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, Michael; Liu, Xiaoyi; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Parker, Jack; Kim, Ungtae

    2010-04-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) spills represent a potential long-term source of aquifer contamination, and successful low-cost remediation may require a combination of both plume management and source treatment. In addition, substantial uncertainty exists in many of the parameters that control field-scale behavior of DNAPL sources and plumes. For these reasons, cost optimization of DNAPL cleanup needs to consider multiple treatment options and their associated costs while also gauging the influence of prediction uncertainty on expected costs. In this paper, we present a management methodology for field-scale DNAPL source and plume management under uncertainty. Using probabilistic methods, historical data and prior information are combined to produce a set of equally likely realizations of true field conditions (i.e., parameter sets). These parameter sets are then used in a simulation-optimization framework to produce DNAPL cleanup solutions that have the lowest possible expected net present value (ENPV) cost and that are suitably cautious in the presence of high uncertainty. For simulation, we utilize a fast-running semi-analytic field-scale model of DNAPL source and plume evolution that also approximates the effects of remedial actions. The degree of model prediction uncertainty is gauged using a restricted maximum likelihood method, which helps to produce suitably cautious remediation strategies. We test our methodology on a synthetic field-scale problem with multiple source architectures, for which source zone thermal treatment and electron donor injection are considered as remedial actions. The lowest cost solution found utilizes a combination of source and plume remediation methods, and is able to successfully meet remediation constraints for a majority of possible scenarios. Comparisons with deterministic optimization results show that not taking into account uncertainty can result in optimization strategies that are not aggressive enough and result

  11. Multiobjective genetic algorithm conjunctive use optimization for production, cost, and energy with dynamic return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Richard C.; Forghani, Ali; Fayad, Hala

    2014-04-01

    Many real water resources optimization problems involve conflicting objectives for which the main goal is to find a set of optimal solutions on, or near to the Pareto front. E-constraint and weighting multiobjective optimization techniques have shortcomings, especially as the number of objectives increases. Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms (MGA) have been previously proposed to overcome these difficulties. Here, an MGA derives a set of optimal solutions for multiobjective multiuser conjunctive use of reservoir, stream, and (un)confined groundwater resources. The proposed methodology is applied to a hydraulically and economically nonlinear system in which all significant flows, including stream-aquifer-reservoir-diversion-return flow interactions, are simulated and optimized simultaneously for multiple periods. Neural networks represent constrained state variables. The addressed objectives that can be optimized simultaneously in the coupled simulation-optimization model are: (1) maximizing water provided from sources, (2) maximizing hydropower production, and (3) minimizing operation costs of transporting water from sources to destinations. Results show the efficiency of multiobjective genetic algorithms for generating Pareto optimal sets for complex nonlinear multiobjective optimization problems.

  12. Constrained Optimization Problems in Cost and Managerial Accounting--Spreadsheet Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amlie, Thomas T.

    2009-01-01

    A common problem addressed in Managerial and Cost Accounting classes is that of selecting an optimal production mix given scarce resources. That is, if a firm produces a number of different products, and is faced with scarce resources (e.g., limitations on labor, materials, or machine time), what combination of products yields the greatest profit…

  13. Energy cost based design optimization method for medium temperature CPC collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horta, Pedro; Osório, Tiago; Collares-Pereira, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    CPC collectors, approaching the ideal concentration limits established by non-imaging optics, can be designed to have such acceptance angles enabling fully stationary designs, useful for applications in the low temperature range (T < 100°C). Their use in the medium temperature range (100°C < T < 250°C) typically requires higher concentration factors in turn requiring seasonal tracking strategies. Considering the CPC design options in terms of effective concentration factor, truncation, concentrator height, mirror perimeter, seasonal tracking, trough spacing, etc., an energy cost function based design optimization method is presented in this article. Accounting for the impact of the design on its optical (optical efficiency, Incidence Angle Modifier, diffuse acceptance) and thermal performances (dependent on the concentration factor), the optimization function integrates design (e.g. mirror area, frame length, trough spacing/shading), concept (e.g. rotating/stationary components, materials) and operation (e.g. O&M, tilt shifts and tracking strategy) costs into a collector specific energy cost function, in €/(kWh.m2). The use of such function stands for a location and operating temperature dependent design optimization procedure, aiming at the lowest solar energy cost. Illustrating this approach, optimization results will be presented for a (tubular) evacuated absorber CPC design operating in Morocco.

  14. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    PubMed Central

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost – even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free. PMID:26857747

  15. Incorporation of Fixed Installation Costs into Optimization of Groundwater Remediation with a New Efficient Surrogate Nonlinear Mixed Integer Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Christine; Wan, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Optimization of nonlinear water resources management issues which have a mixture of fixed (e.g. construction cost for a well) and variable (e.g. cost per gallon of water pumped) costs has been not well addressed because prior algorithms for the resulting nonlinear mixed integer problems have required many groundwater simulations (with different configurations of decision variable), especially when the solution space is multimodal. In particular heuristic methods like genetic algorithms have often been used in the water resources area, but they require so many groundwater simulations that only small systems have been solved. Hence there is a need to have a method that reduces the number of expensive groundwater simulations. A recently published algorithm for nonlinear mixed integer programming using surrogates was shown in this study to greatly reduce the computational effort for obtaining accurate answers to problems involving fixed costs for well construction as well as variable costs for pumping because of a substantial reduction in the number of groundwater simulations required to obtain an accurate answer. Results are presented for a US EPA hazardous waste site. The nonlinear mixed integer surrogate algorithm is general and can be used on other problems arising in hydrology with open source codes in Matlab and python ("pySOT" in Bitbucket).

  16. Thermal performance of low-cost retrofitted solar space heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slote, J.

    The thermal performance of 10 similar, low-cost, shop-built, south-wall, active air solar space-heating systems is evaluated for 10 days of the 1979-80 heating season. The design of the systems, built by Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) workers as a part of the Kansas City Solar Utilization/Economic Development and Employment (SUEDE) Project, is outlined. In addition, the equipment and procedures used to monitor the system are detailed, and several practical problems encountered in monitoring are discussed. Performance data are correlated to the designs of the individual systems, with the consistent features of the more successful systems receiving special attention.

  17. Optimization of storage in passive solar heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahm, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    The search for a simple method of estimating the optimum amount of storage for passive solar space heating system designs and the results of that search are described. The project goals, and why the project is important are described. The major project results are presented in the order of their importance with respect to meeting the project goal. A narrative description of the project is given. Here the various approaches attempted are described, giving the reasons for failure in those areas that were not successful. The Appendices contain the bulk of data generated by this project. Most of the data is presented in graphical form. (MHR)

  18. Optimal Scale of a Public Elementary School with Commuting Costs-A Case Study of Taipei County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, H.-L.; Yuan, M.-C.

    2005-01-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of commuting costs while determining the optimal school scale. It is found that, without commuting costs, the elementary schools in Taipei county are characterized by increasing returns to scale, and that the average public cost curve is L-shaped. However, ignoring the costs of commuting implies that the…

  19. Accounting for the variable nature of heat loads in optimizing cogeneration combined heat and power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kler, A. M.; Potanina, Yu. M.; Maximov, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the statement of the problem of how to optimize the parameters of CHP plants with due regard for variable operating conditions. The results are presented of solving the problem of the optimization of such parameters using various criteria for its efficiency.

  20. 4E analysis and multi objective optimization of a micro gas turbine and solid oxide fuel cell hybrid combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Katebi, Arash

    2014-02-01

    Energy, exergy, economic and environmental (4E) analysis and optimization of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine (SOFC-MGT) system for use as combined generation of heat and power (CHP) is investigated in this paper. The hybrid system is modeled and performance related results are validated using available data in literature. Then a multi-objective optimization approach based on genetic algorithm is incorporated. Eight system design parameters are selected for the optimization procedure. System exergy efficiency and total cost rate (including capital or investment cost, operational cost and penalty cost of environmental emissions) are the two objectives. The effects of fuel unit cost, capital investment and system power output on optimum design parameters are also investigated. It is observed that the most sensitive and important design parameter in the hybrid system is fuel cell current density which has a significant effect on the balance between system cost and efficiency. The selected design point from the Pareto distribution of optimization results indicates a total system exergy efficiency of 60.7%, with estimated electrical energy cost 0.057 kW-1 h-1, and payback period of about 6.3 years for the investment.

  1. Reconstruction of the unknown optimization cost functions from experimental recordings during static multi-finger prehension

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xun; Terekhov, Alexander V.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the research is to reconstruct the unknown cost (objective) function(s) presumably used by the neural controller for sharing the total force among individual fingers in multi-finger prehension. The cost function was determined from experimental data by applying the recently developed Analytical Inverse Optimization (ANIO) method (Terekhov et al 2010). The core of the ANIO method is the Theorem of Uniqueness that specifies conditions for unique (with some restrictions) estimation of the objective functions. In the experiment, subjects (n=8) grasped an instrumented handle and maintained it at rest in the air with various external torques, loads, and target grasping forces applied to the object. The experimental data recorded from 80 trials showed a tendency to lie on a 2-dimensional hyperplane in the 4-dimensional finger-force space. Because the constraints in each trial were different, such a propensity is a manifestation of a neural mechanism (not the task mechanics). In agreement with the Lagrange principle for the inverse optimization, the plane of experimental observations was close to the plane resulting from the direct optimization. The latter plane was determined using the ANIO method. The unknown cost function was reconstructed successfully for each performer, as well as for the group data. The cost functions were found to be quadratic with non-zero linear terms. The cost functions obtained with the ANIO method yielded more accurate results than other optimization methods. The ANIO method has an evident potential for addressing the problem of optimization in motor control. PMID:22104742

  2. Residential heating costs: a comparison of geothermal, solar and conventional resources

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomster, C.H.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1980-08-01

    The costs of residential heating throughout the United States using conventional, solar, and geothermal energy were determined under current and projected conditions. These costs are very sensitive to location - being dependent on the local prices of conventional energy supplies, local solar insolation, cimate, and the proximity and temperature of potential geothermal resources. The sharp price increases in imported fuels during 1979 and the planned decontrol of domestic oil and natural gas prices have set the stage for geothermal and solar market penetration in the 1980's.

  3. Utility reduces fuel cost with heat recovery, industrial byproduct fuel, cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    A 50-MW North Dakota power plant is refurbished to recover major waste-heat sources. Use of agricultural byproduct fuel and cogeneration also helps to cut future costs. The plant is saving on fuel costs by burning 150-200 tons/day of sunflower seed hulls from a local processing plant. The hulls are pulverized and mixed with the primary fuel, North Dakota lignite. At the same time, the processing plant that supplies the sunflower hulls buys steam from the power plant, thus giving the utility some of the economic benefits of cogeneration.

  4. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

  5. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of $6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities. This publication details specifications of the parabolic trough solar system and highlights 5 years of measured performance data.

  6. Exotic properties and optimal control of quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Congjie; Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    A quantum heat engine of a specific type is studied. This engine contains a single particle confined in the infinite square well potential with variable width and consists of three processes: the isoenergetic process (which has no classical analogs) as well as the isothermal and adiabatic processes. It is found that the engine possesses exotic properties in its performance. The efficiency takes the maximum value when the expansion ratio of the engine is appropriately set, and, in addition, the lower the temperature is, the higher the maximum efficiency becomes, highlighting aspects of the influence of quantum effects on thermodynamics. A comment is also made on the relevance of this engine to that of Carnot.

  7. Metal and Glass Manufactures Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2004-05-01

    Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with regulatory and competitive pressures to control emissions and reduce operating costs, metal and glass manufacturers are considering a variety of options for reducing overall energy consumption. As 38% of the energy used in U.S. industrial plants is consumed for process heating applications, metal and glass manufacturers are discovering that process heating technologies provide significant opportunities for improving industrial productivity, energy efficiency, and global competitiveness. This fact sheet is the first in a series to describe such opportunities that can be realized in industrial systems by conducting plant-wide assessments (PWA).

  8. Integrating Sequencing Technologies in Personal Genomics: Optimal Low Cost Reconstruction of Structural Variants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Bjornson, Robert D.; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Kong, Yong; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of human genome re-sequencing is obtaining an accurate assembly of an individual's genome. Recently, there has been great excitement in the development of many technologies for this (e.g. medium and short read sequencing from companies such as 454 and SOLiD, and high-density oligo-arrays from Affymetrix and NimbelGen), with even more expected to appear. The costs and sensitivities of these technologies differ considerably from each other. As an important goal of personal genomics is to reduce the cost of re-sequencing to an affordable point, it is worthwhile to consider optimally integrating technologies. Here, we build a simulation toolbox that will help us optimally combine different technologies for genome re-sequencing, especially in reconstructing large structural variants (SVs). SV reconstruction is considered the most challenging step in human genome re-sequencing. (It is sometimes even harder than de novo assembly of small genomes because of the duplications and repetitive sequences in the human genome.) To this end, we formulate canonical problems that are representative of issues in reconstruction and are of small enough scale to be computationally tractable and simulatable. Using semi-realistic simulations, we show how we can combine different technologies to optimally solve the assembly at low cost. With mapability maps, our simulations efficiently handle the inhomogeneous repeat-containing structure of the human genome and the computational complexity of practical assembly algorithms. They quantitatively show how combining different read lengths is more cost-effective than using one length, how an optimal mixed sequencing strategy for reconstructing large novel SVs usually also gives accurate detection of SNPs/indels, how paired-end reads can improve reconstruction efficiency, and how adding in arrays is more efficient than just sequencing for disentangling some complex SVs. Our strategy should facilitate the sequencing of human genomes at

  9. Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - Second Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V. C.; Craddick, William G

    2007-09-01

    Since the 1980s various attempts have been made to apply the efficiency of heat pumps to water heating. The products generated in the 80s and 90s were not successful, due in part to a lack of reliability and difficulties with installation and servicing. At the turn of the century, EnvironMaster International (EMI) produced a heat pump water heater (HPWH) based on a design developed by Arthur D. Little (ADL), with subsequent developmental assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ADL. This design was a drop-in replacement for conventional electric water heaters. In field and durability testing conducted by ORNL, it proved to be reliable and saved on average more than 50% of the energy used by the best conventional electric water heater. However, the retail price set by EMI was very high, and it failed in the market. ORNL was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. Several cost saving opportunities were found. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. After some experimentation, a prototype unit was built with a double-wall coil inserted into the tank. When tested it achieved an energy factor (EF) of 2.12 to 2.2 using DOE-specified test procedures. A.O. Smith contacted ORNL in May 2006 expressing their interest in the ORNL design. The prototype unit was shipped to A.O. Smith to be tested in their laboratory. After they completed their test, ORNL analyzed the raw test data provided by A.O. Smith and calculated the EF to be approximately 1.92. The electric resistance heating elements of a conventional electric water heater are typically retained in a heat pump water heater to provide auxiliary heating capacity in periods of high

  10. Optimization of hydrous ferrous sulfate dehydration by microwave heating using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Tao; Liu, Bing-Guo; Chen, Guo; Peng, Jin-Hui; Srinivasakannan, C

    2012-01-01

    The work relates to assessing the ability of the microwave for dehydration of large amount of waste hydrous ferrous sulfate generated from the titanium pigment process industry. The popular process optimization tool of response surface methodology with central composite design was adopted to estimate the effect of dehydration. The process variables were chosen to be power input, duration of heating and the bed thickness, while the response variable being the weight loss. An increase in all the three process variables were found to significantly increase the weight loss, while the effect of interaction among the parameters were found to be insignificant. The optimized process conditions that contribute to the maximum weight loss were identified to be a power input of 960 W, duration of heating of 14 min and bed thickness of 5 cm, resulting in a weight loss of 31.44%. The validity of the optimization process was tested with the repeat runs at optimized conditions. PMID:24432588

  11. Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A.

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is

  12. Optimization of microchannel heat sink using genetic algorithm and Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Garg, Harry; Lall, Arun K.

    2016-04-01

    Active cooling using microchannel is a challenging area. The optimization and miniaturization of the devices is increasing the heat loads and affecting the operating performance of the system. The microchannel based cooling systems are widely used and overcomes most of the limitations of the existing solutions. Microchannels help in reducing dimensions and therefore finding many important applications in the microfluidics domain. The microchannel performance is related to the geometry, material and flow conditions. Optimized selection of controllable parameters is a key issue while designing the microchannel based cooling system. The proposed work presents a simulation based study according to Taguchi design of experiment with Reynolds number, aspect ratio and plenum length as input parameters to determine SN ratio. The objective of this study is to maximize the heat transfer. Mathematical models based on these parameters were developed which helps in global optimization using Genetic Algorithm. Genetic algorithm further employed to optimize the input parameters and generates global solution points for the proposed work. It was concluded that the optimized value for heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number was 2620.888 W/m2K and 3.4708 as compare to values obtained through SN ratio based parametric study i.e. 2601.3687 W/m2K and 3.447 respectively. Hence an error of 0.744% and 0.68% was detected in heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number respectively.

  13. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  16. Solar energy for process heat: Design/cost studies of four industrial retrofit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. L.; Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Five specific California plants with potentially attractive solar applications were identified in a process heat survey. These five plants were visited, process requirements evaluated, and conceptual solar system designs were generated. Four DOE (ERDA) sponsored solar energy system demonstration projects were also reviewed and compared to the design/cost cases included in this report. In four of the five cases investigated, retrofit installations providing significant amounts of thermal energy were found to be feasible. The fifth was rejected because of the condition of the building involved, but the process (soap making) appears to be an attractive potential solar application. Costs, however, tend to be high. Several potential areas for cost reduction were identified including larger collector modules and higher duty cycles.

  17. A theory for optimal heat transfer in a partitioned convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Bao, Yun; She, Zhen-Su

    2015-11-01

    We report a theory explaining recent observation of significant enhancement of heat transfer in a partitioned Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where vertical adiabatic boards are inserted into the enclosure with narrow channel left open between partition boards and the cooling/heating plates. An enhancement of heat transfer of up to 2.7 times is observed compared to normal RBC cell without partitions. It is found that laminar wall jet is formed in the narrow horizontal channel, which makes the thermal boundary layer thinner. Two asymptotic trends, a channel flow and a boundary layer, describe the motions of the jets in the horizontal channel, and the competition between them gives rise to an optimized state for the global heat transfer, with an optimal width of the sub-cell W/H =0.038-0.083 for Γ = 1, and an optimal spacing of the horizontal channel b/H =0.011 for Γ = 5. The former (channel) yields a heat flux linearly proportional to b for small b, whereas the latter (boundary layer) follows -2/3-law for large b. We suggest that the partitioned RBC provides a vehicle for heat enhancement with a wide range of industrial applications. This work was supported by National Nature Science Fund of China under Grant No. 11372362.

  18. Development of GIS-Based Decision Support System for Optimizing Transportation Cost in Underground Limestone Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sungchan; Park, Jihwan; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Sangho; Choi, Youngmin

    2014-05-01

    In mining industry, large amount of cost has been invested in early stages of mine development such as prospecting, exploration, and discovery. Recent changes in mining, however, also raised the cost in operation, production, and environmental protection because ore depletion at shallow depth caused large-scale, deep mining. Therefore, many mining facilities are installed or relocated underground to reduce transportation cost as well as environmental pollution. This study presents GIS-based decision support system that optimizes transportation cost from various mining faces to mine facility in underground mines. The development of this system consists of five steps. As a first step, mining maps were collected which contains underground geo-spatial informations. In mine maps, then, mine network and contour data were converted to GIS format in second step for 3D visualization and spatial analysis. In doing so, original tunnel outline data were digitized with ground level, and converted to simplified network format, and surface morphology, contours were converted to digital elevation model (DEM). The next step is to define calculation algorithm of transportation cost. Among the many component of transportation cost, this study focused on the fuel cost because it can be easily estimated if mining maps are available by itself. The cost were calculated by multiplication of the number of blasting, haulage per blasting, distance between mining faces to facility, fuel cost per liter, and two for downhill and uphill, divided by fuel efficiency of mining trucks. Finally, decision support system, SNUTunnel was implemented. For the application of SNUTunnel in actual underground mine, Nammyeong Development Corporation, Korea, was selected as study site. This mine produces limestone with high content of calcite for paper, steel manufacture, or desulfurization, and its development is continuously ongoing to reach down to deeper calcite ore body, so the mine network is expanding

  19. Taguchi Approach to Design Optimization for Quality and Cost: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Dean, Edwin B.

    1990-01-01

    Calibrations to existing cost of doing business in space indicate that to establish human presence on the Moon and Mars with the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) will require resources, felt by many, to be more than the national budget can afford. In order for SEI to succeed, we must actually design and build space systems at lower cost this time, even with tremendous increases in quality and performance requirements, such as extremely high reliability. This implies that both government and industry must change the way they do business. Therefore, new philosophy and technology must be employed to design and produce reliable, high quality space systems at low cost. In recognizing the need to reduce cost and improve quality and productivity, Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have initiated Total Quality Management (TQM). TQM is a revolutionary management strategy in quality assurance and cost reduction. TQM requires complete management commitment, employee involvement, and use of statistical tools. The quality engineering methods of Dr. Taguchi, employing design of experiments (DOE), is one of the most important statistical tools of TQM for designing high quality systems at reduced cost. Taguchi methods provide an efficient and systematic way to optimize designs for performance, quality, and cost. Taguchi methods have been used successfully in Japan and the United States in designing reliable, high quality products at low cost in such areas as automobiles and consumer electronics. However, these methods are just beginning to see application in the aerospace industry. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the Taguchi methods for improving quality and reducing cost, describe the current state of applications and its role in identifying cost sensitive design parameters.

  20. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The computational techniques are described which are utilized at Lewis Research Center to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. Cycle performance, and engine weight can be calculated along with costs and installation effects as opposed to fuel consumption alone. Almost any conceivable turbine engine cycle can be studied. These computer codes are: NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  1. Effects of Pr on Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Budišić, Marko; Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers Pr and Rayleigh number up to Ra ~109 . The presence of two local maxima of Nu with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same Ra leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport where the Nusselt number Nu is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. For Pr <= 7 , optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber whereas for Pr > 7 at high-enough Ra the optimal structure occurs at the larger maximal wavenumber. Three regions are observed in the optimal mean temperature profiles, T y : 1.) d T / dy < 0 in the boundary layers, 2.) d T / dy > 0 (Pr <= 7) or d T / dy < 0 (Pr > 7) in the central region, and 3.) d T / dy > 0 between the boundary layers and central region. We also search for a signature of these optimal structures in a fully-developed turbulent flow by employing modal decompositions such as the proper orthogonal decomposition and the Koopman mode decomposition. Partial support from NSF-DMS grant 1147523 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  3. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  4. Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - First Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V. C.; Tomlinson, J. J.

    2007-09-01

    Until now the heat pump water heater (HPWH) has been a technical success but a market failure because of its high initial cost. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. ORNL was also tasked to verify the technical feasibility of the cost saving opportunities where necessary and appropriate. The objective was to retain most of the HPWH s energy saving performance while reducing cost and simple payback period to approximately three years in a residential application. Several cost saving opportunities were found. Immersing the HPWH condenser directly into the tank allowed the water-circulating pump to be eliminated and a standard electric resistance storage water heater to be used. In addition, designs could be based on refrigerator compressors. Standard water heaters and refrigerator compressors are both reliable, mass produced, and low cost. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water heater tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. The sleeve contour causes the bayonet-style condenser to helix while being pushed into the tank, enabling a condenser of sufficient heat transfer surface area to be inserted. Based on this design, ORNL fabricated the first laboratory prototype and completed preliminary laboratory tests in accordance with the DOE Simulated Use Test Procedure. Hardening during double-wall condenser fabrication was not overcome, so the prototype is single-walled with a liner. The prototype unit was found to have an energy factor of 2.02, verifying that the low-cost design retains most of the HPWH s energy saving performance. Industry involvement is being sought to resolve the fabrication issue and quantify progress on reducing cost and

  5. Study, optimization, and design of a laser heat engine. [for satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussig, R. T.; Cassady, P. E.; Zumdieck, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Laser heat engine concepts, proposed for satellite applications, are analyzed to determine which engine concept best meets the requirements of high efficiency (50 percent or better), continuous operation in space using near-term technology. The analysis of laser heat engines includes the thermodynamic cycles, engine design, laser power sources, collector/concentrator optics, receiving windows, absorbers, working fluids, electricity generation, and heat rejection. Specific engine concepts, optimized according to thermal efficiency, are rated by their technological availability and scaling to higher powers. A near-term experimental demonstration of the laser heat engine concept appears feasible utilizing an Otto cycle powered by CO2 laser radiation coupled into the engine through a diamond window. Higher cycle temperatures, higher efficiencies, and scalability to larger sizes appear to be achievable from a laser heat engine design based on the Brayton cycle and powered by a CO laser.

  6. Optimization of Insertion Cost for Transfer Trajectories to Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, K. C.; Wilson, R. S.; Lo, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work is the development of efficient techniques to optimize the cost associated with transfer trajectories to libration point orbits in the Sun-Earth-Moon four body problem, that may include lunar gravity assists. Initially, dynamical systems theory is used to determine invariant manifolds associated with the desired libration point orbit. These manifolds are employed to produce an initial approximation to the transfer trajectory. Specific trajectory requirements such as, transfer injection constraints, inclusion of phasing loops, and targeting of a specified state on the manifold are then incorporated into the design of the transfer trajectory. A two level differential corrections process is used to produce a fully continuous trajectory that satisfies the design constraints, and includes appropriate lunar and solar gravitational models. Based on this methodology, and using the manifold structure from dynamical systems theory, a technique is presented to optimize the cost associated with insertion onto a specified libration point orbit.

  7. Cost optimization for series-parallel execution of a collection of intersecting operation sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgui, Alexandre; Levin, Genrikh; Rozin, Boris; Kasabutski, Igor

    2016-05-01

    A collection of intersecting sets of operations is considered. These sets of operations are performed successively. The operations of each set are activated simultaneously. Operation durations can be modified. The cost of each operation decreases with the increase in operation duration. In contrast, the additional expenses for each set of operations are proportional to its time. The problem of selecting the durations of all operations that minimize the total cost under constraint on completion time for the whole collection of operation sets is studied. The mathematical model and method to solve this problem are presented. The proposed method is based on a combination of Lagrangian relaxation and dynamic programming. The results of numerical experiments that illustrate the performance of the proposed method are presented. This approach was used for optimization multi-spindle machines and machining lines, but the problem is common in engineering optimization and thus the techniques developed could be useful for other applications.

  8. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  9. Affordable Design: A Methodolgy to Implement Process-Based Manufacturing Cost into the Traditional Performance-Focused Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Han P.; Samareh, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the use of process-based manufacturing and assembly cost models in a traditional performance-focused multidisciplinary design and optimization process. The use of automated cost-performance analysis is an enabling technology that could bring realistic processbased manufacturing and assembly cost into multidisciplinary design and optimization. In this paper, we present a new methodology for incorporating process costing into a standard multidisciplinary design optimization process. Material, manufacturing processes, and assembly processes costs then could be used as the objective function for the optimization method. A case study involving forty-six different configurations of a simple wing is presented, indicating that a design based on performance criteria alone may not necessarily be the most affordable as far as manufacturing and assembly cost is concerned.

  10. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Muñoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost γ γ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast fast and slow fast PAC spectrometers.

  11. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  12. Optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation from inaccurate data

    SciTech Connect

    Magaril-Il'yaev, G G; Osipenko, Konstantin Yu

    2009-06-30

    The problem of optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation in the entire space at a fixed instant of time from inaccurate observations of this solution at some other instants of time is investigated. Explicit expressions for an optimal recovery method and its error are given. The solution of a similar problem with a priori information about the temperature distribution at some instants of time is also given. In all cases the optimal method uses information about at most two observations. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  13. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, Robert C; Hudson II, Carl Randy

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

  14. Distributed Bees Algorithm Parameters Optimization for a Cost Efficient Target Allocation in Swarms of Robots

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the Distributed Bees Algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA’s control parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots’ distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  15. Distributed bees algorithm parameters optimization for a cost efficient target allocation in swarms of robots.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the distributed bees algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA's control parameters by means of a genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots' distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  16. Inverse optimal design of the radiant heating in materials processing and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A.G.; Lee, K.H.; Viskanta, R.

    1998-12-01

    Combined convective, conductive, and radiative heat transfer is analyzed during heating of a continuously moving load in the industrial radiant oven. A transient, quasi-three-dimensional model of heat transfer between a continuous load of parts moving inside an oven on a conveyor belt at a constant speed and an array of radiant heaters/burners placed inside the furnace enclosure is developed. The model accounts for radiative exchange between the heaters and the load, the conduction in the load, and convective heat transfer between the moving load and oven environment. The thermal model developed has been used to construct a general framework for an inverse optimal design of an industrial oven as an example. In particular, the procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares optimization algorithm has been developed to obtain the optimal temperatures of the heaters/burners that need to be specified to achieve a prescribed temperature distribution of the surface of a load. The results of calculations for several sample cases are reported to illustrate the capabilities of the procedure developed for the optimal inverse design of an industrial radiant oven.

  17. The evolution of cost efficient swimming in marine mammals: limits to energetic optimization

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    Mammals re-entered the oceans less than 60 million years ago. The transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle required extreme morphological and behavioural modifications concomitant with fundamentally different locomotor mechanisms for moving on land and through water. Energetic transport costs typically reflect such different locomotor modes, but can not be discerned from the fossil record. In this study the energetic challenges associated with changing from terrestrial to aquatic locomotion in primitive marine mammals are examined by comparing the transport, maintenance and locomotor costs of extant mammals varying in degree of aquatic specialization. The results indicate that running and swimming specialists have converged on an energetic optimum for locomotion. An allometric expression, COTTOT = 7.79 mass-0.29 (r2 = 0.83, n = 6 species), describes the total cost of transport in J kg-1m-1 for swimming marine mammals ranging in size from 21 kg to 15,000 kg. This relation is indistinguishable from that describing total transport costs in running mammals. In contrast, the transitional lifestyle of semi-aquatic mammals, similar to that of ancestral marine mammals, incurs costs that are 2.4 to 5.1 times higher than locomotor specialists. These patterns suggest that primitive marine mammals confronted an energetic hurdle before returning to costs reminiscent of their terrestrial ancestry, and may have reached an evolutionary limit for energetic optimization during swimming.

  18. Optimal pricing policies for services with consideration of facility maintenance costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Ruey Huei; Lin, Yi-Fang

    2012-06-01

    For survival and success, pricing is an essential issue for service firms. This article deals with the pricing strategies for services with substantial facility maintenance costs. For this purpose, a mathematical framework that incorporates service demand and facility deterioration is proposed to address the problem. The facility and customers constitute a service system driven by Poisson arrivals and exponential service times. A service demand with increasing price elasticity and a facility lifetime with strictly increasing failure rate are also adopted in modelling. By examining the bidirectional relationship between customer demand and facility deterioration in the profit model, the pricing policies of the service are investigated. Then analytical conditions of customer demand and facility lifetime are derived to achieve a unique optimal pricing policy. The comparative statics properties of the optimal policy are also explored. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effects of parameter variations on the optimal pricing policy.

  19. Low cost silicon process development. Phase III: process optimization and evaluation. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.; Newman, C.; Messina, L.

    1980-03-01

    The goal of the Low Cost Silicon Process Development project is to determine technical and economic feasibility of a tribromosilane-based process for the production of Solar Cell Grade Silicon. To accomplish this project goal, three principal tasks have been defined: (1) an experimental chemistry task; (2) a mini-plant design and construction task; and (3) a mini-plant operation and evaluation task. The scope of the experimental chemistry task includes optimization of the process with design verification studies at bench scale level. The mini-plant design task is focused on construction of a flexible, cost effective mini-plant. The final task is concerned with the generation of sufficient high quality process data through mini-plant operation to support an accurate assessment of the potential of the process for meeting DOE silicon material quality and cost goals. Progress is reported.

  20. Power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-03-01

    The finite-time thermodynamic method based on probability analysis can more accurately describe various performance parameters of thermodynamic systems. Based on the relation between optimal efficiency and power output of a generalized Carnot heat engine with a finite high-temperature heat reservoir (heat source) and an infinite low-temperature heat reservoir (heat sink) and with the only irreversibility of heat transfer, this paper studies the problem of power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory, puts forward a model of the coupling heat engine which can be run periodically and obtains the effects of the finite-time thermodynamic characteristics of the coupling relation between chemical reaction and heat engine on the power optimization. The results show that the first order reaction kinetics model can use fuel more effectively, and can provide heat engine with higher temperature heat source to increase the power output of the heat engine. Moreover, the power fluctuation bounds of the chemically driven heat engine are obtained by using the probability analysis method. The results may provide some guidelines for the character analysis and power optimization of the chemically driven heat engines.

  1. Time, entropy generation, and optimization in low-dissipation heat devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo Hernández, A.; Medina, A.; Roco, J. M. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new results obtained from the Carnot-like low-dissipation model of heat devices when size- and time-constraints are taken into account, in particular those obtained from the total cycle time and the contact times of the working system with the external heat reservoirs. The influence of these constraints and of the characteristic time scale of the model on the entropy generation allows for a clear and unified interpretation of different energetic properties for both heat engines and refrigerators (REs). Some conceptual subtleties with regard to different optimization criteria, especially for REs, are discussed. So, the different status of power input, cooling power, and the unified figure of merit χ are analyzed on the basis of their absolute or local role as optimization criteria.

  2. Heat transfer optimization for air-mist cooling between a stack of parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Roy J.

    2010-06-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the upper limit heat transfer between a stack of parallel plates subject to multiphase cooling by air-mist flow. The model predicts the optimal separation distance between the plates based on the development of the boundary layers for small and large separation distances, and for dilute mist conditions. Simulation results show the optimal separation distance to be strongly dependent on the liquid-to-air mass flow rate loading ratio, and reach a limit for a critical loading. For these dilute spray conditions, complete evaporation of the droplets takes place. Simulation results also show the optimal separation distance decreases with the increase in the mist flow rate. The proposed theoretical model shall lead to a better understanding of the design of fins spacing in heat exchangers where multiphase spray cooling is used.

  3. Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-07-01

    A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total system mass is achieved. Such CCGT space power systems incorporate a nuclear reactor heat source with its radiation shield; the rotating turbo-alternator, consisting of the compressor, turbine and the electric generator (three phase AC alternator); and the heat rejection subsystem, principally the space radiator, which enables the hot gas working fluid, emanating from either the turbine or a regenerative heat exchanger, to be cooled to compressor inlet conditions. Numerical mass models for all major subsystems and components developed during the course of this work are included in this report. The power systems modeled are applicable to future interplanetary missions within the Solar System and planetary surface power plants at mission destinations, such as our Moon, Mars, the Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), or Saturn's moon Titan. The detailed governing equations for the thermodynamic processes of the Brayton cycle have been derived and successfully programmed along with the heat transfer processes associated with cycle heat exchangers and the space radiator. System performance and mass results have been validated against a commercially available non-linear optimization code and also against data from existing ground based power plants.

  4. Cost-effective river rehabilitation planning: optimizing for morphological benefits at large spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Simone D; Hermoso, Virgilio; Linke, Simon; Bunn, Stuart E; Possingham, Hugh P

    2014-01-01

    River rehabilitation aims to protect biodiversity or restore key ecosystem services but the success rate is often low. This is seldom because of insufficient funding for rehabilitation works but because trade-offs between costs and ecological benefits of management actions are rarely incorporated in the planning, and because monitoring is often inadequate for managers to learn by doing. In this study, we demonstrate a new approach to plan cost-effective river rehabilitation at large scales. The framework is based on the use of cost functions (relationship between costs of rehabilitation and the expected ecological benefit) to optimize the spatial allocation of rehabilitation actions needed to achieve given rehabilitation goals (in our case established by the Swiss water act). To demonstrate the approach with a simple example, we link costs of the three types of management actions that are most commonly used in Switzerland (culvert removal, widening of one riverside buffer and widening of both riversides) to the improvement in riparian zone quality. We then use Marxan, a widely applied conservation planning software, to identify priority areas to implement these rehabilitation measures in two neighbouring Swiss cantons (Aargau, AG and Zürich, ZH). The best rehabilitation plans identified for the two cantons met all the targets (i.e. restoring different types of morphological deficits with different actions) rehabilitating 80,786 m (AG) and 106,036 m (ZH) of the river network at a total cost of 106.1 Million CHF (AG) and 129.3 Million CH (ZH). The best rehabilitation plan for the canton of AG consisted of more and better connected sub-catchments that were generally less expensive, compared to its neighbouring canton. The framework developed in this study can be used to inform river managers how and where best to spend their rehabilitation budget for a given set of actions, ensures the cost-effective achievement of desired rehabilitation outcomes, and helps

  5. Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

    2001-11-15

    We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

  6. Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-06-01

    Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

  7. Life span and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mourocq, Emeline; Bize, Pierre; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Bradley, Russell; Charmantier, Anne; de la Cruz, Carlos; Drobniak, Szymon M; Espie, Richard H M; Herényi, Márton; Hötker, Hermann; Krüger, Oliver; Marzluff, John; Møller, Anders P; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Phillips, Richard A; Radford, Andrew N; Roulin, Alexandre; Török, János; Valencia, Juliana; van de Pol, Martijn; Warkentin, Ian G; Winney, Isabel S; Wood, Andrew G; Griesser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here, we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life history as well as social and ecological factors. Most individuals adopted the species-specific Optimal AFR and both the mean and Optimal AFR of species correlated positively with life span. Interspecific deviations of the Optimal AFR were associated with indices reflecting a change in LRS or survival as a function of AFR: a delayed AFR was beneficial in species where early AFR was associated with a decrease in subsequent survival or reproductive output. Overall, our results suggest that a delayed onset of reproduction beyond maturity is an optimal strategy explained by a long life span and costs of early reproduction. By providing the first empirical confirmations of key predictions of life-history theory across species, this study contributes to a better understanding of life-history evolution. PMID:26763090

  8. Potential escalation of heat-related working costs with climate and socioeconomic changes in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Sultan, Benjamin; Vautard, Robert; Braconnot, Pascale; Wang, Huijun J; Ducharne, Agnes

    2016-04-26

    Global climate change will increase the frequency of hot temperatures, impairing health and productivity for millions of working people and raising labor costs. In mainland China, high-temperature subsidies (HTSs) are allocated to employees for each working day in extremely hot environments, but the potential heat-related increase in labor cost has not been evaluated so far. Here, we estimate the potential HTS cost in current and future climates under different scenarios of socioeconomic development and radiative forcing (Representative Concentration Pathway), taking uncertainties from the climate model structure and bias correction into account. On average, the total HTS in China is estimated at 38.6 billion yuan/y (US $6.22 billion/y) over the 1979-2005 period, which is equivalent to 0.2% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Assuming that the HTS standards (per employee per hot day) remain unchanged throughout the 21st century, the total HTS may reach 250 billion yuan/y in the 2030s and 1,000 billion yuan/y in 2100. We further show that, without specific adaptation, the increased HTS cost is mainly determined by population growth until the 2030s and climate change after the mid-21st century because of increasingly frequent hot weather. Accounting for the likely possibility that HTS standards follow the wages, the share of GDP devoted to HTS could become as high as 3% at the end of 21st century. PMID:27044089

  9. Potential escalation of heat-related working costs with climate and socioeconomic changes in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Sultan, Benjamin; Vautard, Robert; Braconnot, Pascale; Wang, Huijun J.; Ducharne, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change will increase the frequency of hot temperatures, impairing health and productivity for millions of working people and raising labor costs. In mainland China, high-temperature subsidies (HTSs) are allocated to employees for each working day in extremely hot environments, but the potential heat-related increase in labor cost has not been evaluated so far. Here, we estimate the potential HTS cost in current and future climates under different scenarios of socioeconomic development and radiative forcing (Representative Concentration Pathway), taking uncertainties from the climate model structure and bias correction into account. On average, the total HTS in China is estimated at 38.6 billion yuan/y (US $6.22 billion/y) over the 1979–2005 period, which is equivalent to 0.2% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Assuming that the HTS standards (per employee per hot day) remain unchanged throughout the 21st century, the total HTS may reach 250 billion yuan/y in the 2030s and 1,000 billion yuan/y in 2100. We further show that, without specific adaptation, the increased HTS cost is mainly determined by population growth until the 2030s and climate change after the mid-21st century because of increasingly frequent hot weather. Accounting for the likely possibility that HTS standards follow the wages, the share of GDP devoted to HTS could become as high as 3% at the end of 21st century. PMID:27044089

  10. Impact of Coverage-Dependent Marginal Costs on Optimal HPV Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Marc D.; McGoff, Kevin; Herzog, David P.; Sivakoff, David J.; Myers, Evan R.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of vaccinating males against the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains a controversial subject. Many existing studies conclude that increasing female coverage is more effective than diverting resources into male vaccination. Recently, several empirical studies on HPV immunization have been published, providing evidence of the fact that marginal vaccination costs increase with coverage. In this study, we use a stochastic agent-based modeling framework to revisit the male vaccination debate in light of these new findings. Within this framework, we assess the impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs of vaccine distribution on optimal immunization strategies against HPV. Focusing on the two scenarios of ongoing and new vaccination programs, we analyze different resource allocation policies and their effects on overall disease burden. Our results suggest that if the costs associated with vaccinating males are relatively close to those associated with vaccinating females, then coverage-dependent, increasing marginal costs may favor vaccination strategies that entail immunization of both genders. In particular, this study emphasizes the necessity for further empirical research on the nature of coverage-dependent vaccination costs. PMID:25979280

  11. The Cost of Leg Forces in Bipedal Locomotion: A Simple Optimization Study

    PubMed Central

    Rebula, John R.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2015-01-01

    Simple optimization models show that bipedal locomotion may largely be governed by the mechanical work performed by the legs, minimization of which can automatically discover walking and running gaits. Work minimization can reproduce broad aspects of human ground reaction forces, such as a double-peaked profile for walking and a single peak for running, but the predicted peaks are unrealistically high and impulsive compared to the much smoother forces produced by humans. The smoothness might be explained better by a cost for the force rather than work produced by the legs, but it is unclear what features of force might be most relevant. We therefore tested a generalized force cost that can penalize force amplitude or its n-th time derivative, raised to the p-th power (or p-norm), across a variety of combinations for n and p. A simple model shows that this generalized force cost only produces smoother, human-like forces if it penalizes the rate rather than amplitude of force production, and only in combination with a work cost. Such a combined objective reproduces the characteristic profiles of human walking (R2 = 0.96) and running (R2 = 0.92), more so than minimization of either work or force amplitude alone (R2 = −0.79 and R2 = 0.22, respectively, for walking). Humans might find it preferable to avoid rapid force production, which may be mechanically and physiologically costly. PMID:25707000

  12. Optimization and stabilization of gold nanoparticles by using herbal plant extract with microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Akbar; Ramesh, Kumaraswamy; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we have synthesized the gold nanoparticles by using Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, a medicinal plant. The gold nanoparticles were synthesized rapidly by the involvement of microwave heating. By changing of plant extract concentration, gold solution concentration, microwave heating time and power of microwave heating the optimized condition was identified. The surface Plasmon resonance found at 520 nm confirmed the gold nanoparticles synthesis. The spherical sized nanoparticles in the size range of 16-30 nm were confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The stability of the nanoparticles is very well proved in the invitro stability tests. The biochemical like alkaloids and flavonoids play a vital role in the nanoparticles synthesis was identified using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Combining the phytochemical and microwave heating, the rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles is the novel process for the medically applicable gold nanoparticles production.

  13. Optimal design of an automotive magnetorheological brake considering geometric dimensions and zero-field friction heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an optimal design of a magnetorheological (MR) brake for a middle-sized passenger car which can replace a conventional hydraulic disc-type brake. In the optimization, the required braking torque, the temperature due to zero-field friction of MR fluid, the mass of the brake system and all significant geometric dimensions are considered. After describing the configuration, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is derived on the basis of the field-dependent Bingham and Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the MR fluid. The optimal design of the MR brake is then analyzed taking into account available space, mass, braking torque and steady heat generated by zero-field friction torque of the MR brake. The optimization procedure based on the finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is proposed to obtain optimal geometric dimensions of the MR brake. Based on the proposed procedure, optimal solutions of single and multiple disc-type MR brakes featuring different types of MR fluid are achieved. From the results, the most effective MR brake for the middle-sized passenger car is identified and some discussions on the performance improvement of the optimized MR brake are described.

  14. Optimization of an inclined elliptic impinging jet with cross flow for enhancing heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Man-Woong; Lee, Ki-Don; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a parametric study and optimization of a single impinging jet with cross flow to enhance heat transfer with two design variables. The fluid flow and heat transfer have been analyzed using three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a uniform heat flux condition being applied to the impingement plate. The aspect ratio of the elliptic jet hole and the angle of inclination of the jet nozzle are chosen as the two design variables, and the area-averaged Nusselt number on a limited target plate is set as the objective function. The effects of the design variables on the heat transfer performance have been evaluated, and the objective function has been found to be more sensitive to the angle of inclination of the jet nozzle than to the aspect ratio of the elliptic jet hole. The optimization has been performed by using the radial basis neural network model. Through the optimization, the area-averaged Nusselt number increased by 7.89% compared to that under the reference geometry.

  15. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2015-06-01

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototype network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.

  16. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2014-12-01

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototype network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.

  17. Learning Near-Optimal Cost-Sensitive Decision Policy for Object Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianfu; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2015-05-01

    Many popular object detectors, such as AdaBoost, SVM and deformable part-based models (DPM), compute additive scoring functions at a large number of windows in an image pyramid, thus computational efficiency is an important consideration in real time applications besides accuracy. In this paper, a decision policy refers to a sequence of two-sided thresholds to execute early reject and early accept based on the cumulative scores at each step. We formulate an empirical risk function as the weighted sum of the cost of computation and the loss of false alarm and missing detection. Then a policy is said to be cost-sensitive and optimal if it minimizes the risk function. While the risk function is complex due to high-order correlations among the two-sided thresholds, we find that its upper bound can be optimized by dynamic programming efficiently. We show that the upper bound is very tight empirically and thus the resulting policy is said to be near-optimal. In experiments, we show that the decision policy outperforms state-of-the-art cascade methods significantly, in several popular detection tasks and benchmarks, in terms of computational efficiency with similar accuracy of detection. PMID:26353325

  18. Statistical optimization for succinic acid production from E. coli in a cost-effective medium.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Lata; Isar, Jasmine; Dutt, Kakoli; Saxena, Rajendra K

    2007-08-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for optimization of medium components and cultural parameters in cost effective cane molasses based medium for attaining high yield of succinic acid. The important factors obtained by "one-variable-at-a-time-approach" (cane molasses, corn steep liquor, sodium carbonate, and inoculum density) were further optimized by RSM. The optimum values of the parameters obtained through RSM (cane molasses 12.5%, corn steep liquor 7.5%, and sodium carbonate 25 mM) led to almost double yield of succinic acid (15.2 g/l in 36 h) as against "one-variable-at-a-time-approach" (7.1 g/l in 36 h) in 500-ml anaerobic bottles containing 300-ml cane molasses based medium. Subsequently, in 10-l bioreactor succinic acid production from Escherichia coli was further improved to 26.2 g/l in 30 h under conditions optimized through RSM. This fermentation-derived succinic acid will definitely help in replacing existing environmentally hazardous and cost-intensive chemical methods for the production of succinic acid. PMID:18025577

  19. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics. PMID:26457709

  20. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics. PMID:26457709

  1. Bioregenerative food system cost based on optimized menus for advanced life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Geoffrey C R.; Olabi, Ammar; Hunter, Jean B.; Dixon, Mike A.; Lasseur, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Optimized menus for a bioregenerative life support system have been developed based on measures of crop productivity, food item acceptability, menu diversity, and nutritional requirements of crew. Crop-specific biomass requirements were calculated from menu recipe demands while accounting for food processing and preparation losses. Under the assumption of staggered planting, the optimized menu demanded a total crop production area of 453 m2 for six crew. Cost of the bioregenerative food system is estimated at 439 kg per menu cycle or 7.3 kg ESM crew-1 day-1, including agricultural waste processing costs. On average, about 60% (263.6 kg ESM) of the food system cost is tied up in equipment, 26% (114.2 kg ESM) in labor, and 14% (61.5 kg ESM) in power and cooling. This number is high compared to the STS and ISS (nonregenerative) systems but reductions in ESM may be achieved through intensive crop productivity improvements, reductions in equipment masses associated with crop production, and planning of production, processing, and preparation to minimize the requirement for crew labor.

  2. Optimization on the performance of a harmonic quantum Brayton heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2003-11-01

    The cycle model of an irreversible quantum heat engine working with many noninteracting harmonic oscillators is established. The engine cycle consists of two adiabatic and two constant-frequency processes and is referred to as the harmonic quantum Brayton cycle. The general performance characteristics of the cycle are investigated, based on the quantum master equation and semigroup approach. Expressions for several important performance parameters, such as the efficiency, power output, and rate of the entropy production, are derived. By using numerical solutions, the power output of the heat engine subject to finite cycle duration is optimized. The maximum power output and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal regions of the efficiency and the optimal ranges of temperatures of the working substance and times spent on the two constant-frequency processes are determined. Moreover, the optimal performance of the cycle in the high-temperature limit is compared with that of a classical Brayton heat engine working with an ideal gas. The results obtained here show that in the high-temperature limit, a harmonic quantum Brayton cycle may be equivalent to a classical Brayton cycle.

  3. Optimal analysis of the performance of an irreversible quantum heat engine with spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2005-01-01

    It is considered that the cycle of a quantum heat engine using many non-interacting spin-1/2 systems as the working substance is composed of two adiabatic and two isomagnetic field processes and is referred to as a spin quantum Brayton engine cycle. Based on the quantum master equation and semi-group approach, expressions for the efficiency and power output of the cycle are derived. By using numerical solutions, the power output of the heat engine subject to finite cycle duration is optimized. The maximum power output and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal region of the efficiency and the optimal ranges of temperatures of the working substance and times spent on the two isomagnetic field processes are determined, so that the general optimum performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed. Moreover, the optimal performance of the cycle in the high-temperature limit is also analysed in detail. The results obtained here are further generalized, so that they may be directly used to describe the performance of a quantum Brayton heat engine using spin-J systems as the working substance.

  4. Energy and Cost Optimized Technology Options to Meet Energy Needs of Food Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Srivastava, Viraj; Hoffman, Michael G.; Wagner, Anne W.; Thornton, John

    2015-04-02

    ABSTRACT Combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) distributed generation (DG) systems can provide electricity, heat, and cooling power to buildings and industrial processes directly onsite, while significantly increasing energy efficiency, security of energy supply, and grid independence. Fruit, vegetable, dairy and meat processing industries with simultaneous requirements for heat, steam, chilling and electricity, are well suited for the use of such systems to supply base-load electrical demand or as peak reducing generators with heat recovery in the forms of hot water, steam and/or chilled water. This paper documents results and analysis from a pilot project to evaluate opportunities for energy, emission, and cost for CCHP-DG and energy storage systems installed onsite at food processing facilities. It was found that a dairy processing plant purchasing 15,000 MWh of electricity will need to purchase 450 MWh with the integration of a 1.1 MW CCHP system. Here, the natural gas to be purchased increased from 190,000 MMBtu to 255,000 MMBtu given the fuel requirements of the CCHP system. CCHP systems lower emissions, however, in the Pacific Northwest the high percentage of hydro-power results in CO2 emissions from CCHP were higher than that attributed to the electric utility/regional energy mix. The value of this paper is in promoting and educating financial decision makers to seriously consider CCHP systems when building or upgrading facilities. The distributed generation aspect can reduce utility costs for industrial facilities and show non-wires solution benefits to delay or eliminate the need for upgrades to local electric transmission and distribution systems.

  5. Unified trade-off optimization for general heat devices with nonisothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) for general heat engines and refrigerators with nonisothermal processes is conducted under the trade-off criterion. The specific heat of the working medium has significant impacts on the optimal configurations of heat devices. For cycles with constant specific heat, the bounds of the efficiency and COP are found to be the same as those obtained through the endoreversible Carnot ones. However, they are independent of the cycle time durations. For cycles with nonconstant specific heat, whose dimensionless contact time approaches infinity, the general alternative upper and lower bounds of the efficiency and COP under the trade-off criteria have been proposed under the asymmetric limits. Furthermore, when the dimensionless contact time approaches zero, the endoreversible Carnot model is recovered. In addition, the efficiency and COP bounds of different kinds of actual heat engines and refrigerators have also been analyzed. This paper may provide practical insight for designing and operating actual heat engines and refrigerators.

  6. Unified trade-off optimization for general heat devices with nonisothermal processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) for general heat engines and refrigerators with nonisothermal processes is conducted under the trade-off criterion. The specific heat of the working medium has significant impacts on the optimal configurations of heat devices. For cycles with constant specific heat, the bounds of the efficiency and COP are found to be the same as those obtained through the endoreversible Carnot ones. However, they are independent of the cycle time durations. For cycles with nonconstant specific heat, whose dimensionless contact time approaches infinity, the general alternative upper and lower bounds of the efficiency and COP under the trade-off criteria have been proposed under the asymmetric limits. Furthermore, when the dimensionless contact time approaches zero, the endoreversible Carnot model is recovered. In addition, the efficiency and COP bounds of different kinds of actual heat engines and refrigerators have also been analyzed. This paper may provide practical insight for designing and operating actual heat engines and refrigerators. PMID:25974458

  7. Design Optimization and the Limits of Steady-State Heating Efficiency for Conventional Single-Speed Air-Source Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-06-06

    The ORNL Heat Pump Model and an optimizing program were used to explore the limits of steady-state heating efficiency for conventional air-source heat pumps. The method used allows for the simultaneous optimization of ten selected design variables, taking proper account of their interactions, while constraining other parameters to chosen limits or fixed values. Designs were optimized for a fixed heating capacity, but the results may be scaled to other capacities. Substantial performance improvement is predicted compared to today's state of the art heat pump. With increased component efficiencies that are expected in the near future and with modest increases in heat exchanger area, a 28% increase in heating efficiency is predicted; for long-term improvements with considerably larger heat exchangers, a 56% increase is possible. The improved efficiencies are accompanied by substantial reductions in the requirements for compressor and motor size. The predicted performance improvements are attributed not only to improved components and larger heat exchangers but also to the use of an optimizing design procedure. Deviations from the optimized design may be necessary to make use of available component sizes and to maintain good cooling-mode performance while improving the heating efficiency. Sensitivity plots (i.e., COP as a function of one or more design parameters) were developed to explore design flexibilities and to evaluate their consequences. The performance of the optimized designs was compared to that of modified ideal cycles to assess the factors that limit further improvement. It is hoped that the design methods developed will be useful to designers in the heat pump industry.

  8. Simulation and optimization of a pulsating heat pipe using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, Ali; Godarzi, Ali Abbasi; Saber, Mohammad; Shafii, Mohammad Behshad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach has been presented to simulate and optimize the pulsating heat pipes (PHPs). The used pulsating heat pipe setup was designed and constructed for this study. Due to the lack of a general mathematical model for exact analysis of the PHPs, a method has been applied for simulation and optimization using the natural algorithms. In this way, the simulator consists of a kind of multilayer perceptron neural network, which is trained by experimental results obtained from our PHP setup. The results show that the complex behavior of PHPs can be successfully described by the non-linear structure of this simulator. The input variables of the neural network are input heat flux to evaporator (q″), filling ratio (FR) and inclined angle (IA) and its output is thermal resistance of PHP. Finally, based upon the simulation results and considering the heat pipe's operating constraints, the optimum operating point of the system is obtained by using genetic algorithm (GA). The experimental results show that the optimum FR (38.25 %), input heat flux to evaporator (39.93 W) and IA (55°) that obtained from GA are acceptable.

  9. Impact of overall and particle surface heat transfer coefficients on thermal process optimization in rotary retorts.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Abakarov, A; Almonacid, S; Teixeira, A

    2008-10-01

    This study attempts to examine the significance of recent research that has focused on efforts to estimate values for global and surface heat transfer coefficients under forced convection heating induced by end-over-end rotation in retorting of canned peas in brine. The study confirms the accuracy of regression analysis used to predict values for heat transfer coefficients as a function of rotating speed and headspace, and uses them to predict values over a range of process conditions, which make up the search domain for process optimization. These coefficients were used in a convective heat transfer model to establish a range of lethality-equivalent retort temperature-time processes for various conditions of retort temperature, rotating speed, and headspace. Then, they were coupled with quality factor kinetics to predict the final volume average and surface quality retention resulting from each process and to find the optimal thermal process conditions for canned fresh green peas. Results showed that maximum quality retention (surface and volume average retention) was achieved with the shortest possible process time (made possible with highest retort temperature), and reached the similar level in all cases with small difference between surface and volume average quality retention. The highest heat transfer coefficients (associated with maximum rotating speed and headspace) showed a 10% reduction in process time over that required with minimum rotating speed and headspace. The study concludes with a discussion of the significance of these findings and degree to which they were expected. PMID:19019110

  10. Optimization of a heat-pipe-cooled space radiator for use with a reactor-powered Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.; French, Edward P.

    1987-01-01

    The design optimization of a reactor-Stirling heat-pipe-cooled radiator is presented. The radiator is a self-deploying concept that uses individual finned heat pipe 'petals' to reject waste heat from a Stirling engine. Radiator optimization methodology is presented, and the results of a parametric analysis of the radiator design variables for a 100-kW(e) system are given. The additional steps of optiminzing the radiator resulted in a net system mass savings of 3 percent.

  11. Calculation of the specific heat of optimally K-doped BaFe₂As₂.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyungju; Coh, Sinisa; Cohen, Marvin L

    2015-08-26

    The calculated specific heat of optimally K-doped BaFe2As2 in density functional theory is about five times smaller than that found in the experiment. We report that by adjusting the potential on the iron atom to be slightly more repulsive for electrons improves the calculated heat capacity as well as the electronic band structure of Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2. In addition, structural and magnetic properties are moved in the direction of experimental values. Applying the same correction to the antiferromagnetic state, we find that the electron-phonon coupling is strongly enhanced. PMID:26241358

  12. Calculation of the specific heat of optimally K-doped BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyungju; Coh, Sinisa; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2015-08-01

    The calculated specific heat of optimally K-doped BaFe2As2 in density functional theory is about five times smaller than that found in the experiment. We report that by adjusting the potential on the iron atom to be slightly more repulsive for electrons improves the calculated heat capacity as well as the electronic band structure of Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2. In addition, structural and magnetic properties are moved in the direction of experimental values. Applying the same correction to the antiferromagnetic state, we find that the electron-phonon coupling is strongly enhanced.

  13. Inverse problems and optimal experiment design in unsteady heat transfer processes identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, Eugene A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental-computational methods for estimating characteristics of unsteady heat transfer processes are analyzed. The methods are based on the principles of distributed parameter system identification. The theoretical basis of such methods is the numerical solution of nonlinear ill-posed inverse heat transfer problems and optimal experiment design problems. Numerical techniques for solving problems are briefly reviewed. The results of the practical application of identification methods are demonstrated when estimating effective thermophysical characteristics of composite materials and thermal contact resistance in two-layer systems.

  14. Optimization of PHEV Power Split Gear Ratio to Minimize Fuel Consumption and Operation Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhe

    A Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is a vehicle powered by a combination of an internal combustion engine and an electric motor with a battery pack. The battery pack can be charged by plugging the vehicle to the electric grid and from using excess engine power. The research activity performed in this thesis focused on the development of an innovative optimization approach of PHEV Power Split Device (PSD) gear ratio with the aim to minimize the vehicle operation costs. Three research activity lines have been followed: • Activity 1: The PHEV control strategy optimization by using the Dynamic Programming (DP) and the development of PHEV rule-based control strategy based on the DP results. • Activity 2: The PHEV rule-based control strategy parameter optimization by using the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II). • Activity 3: The comprehensive analysis of the single mode PHEV architecture to offer the innovative approach to optimize the PHEV PSD gear ratio.

  15. Nonlinear control and online optimization of the burn condition in ITER via heating, isotopic fueling and impurity injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Mark D.; Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    The ITER tokamak, the next experimental step toward the development of nuclear fusion reactors, will explore the burning plasma regime in which the plasma temperature is sustained mostly by fusion heating. Regulation of the fusion power through modulation of fueling and external heating sources, referred to as burn control, is one of the fundamental problems in burning plasma research. Active control will be essential for achieving and maintaining desired operating points, responding to changing power demands, and ensuring stable operation. Most existing burn control efforts use either non-model-based control techniques or designs based on linearized models. These approaches must be designed for particular operating points and break down for large perturbations. In this work, we utilize a spatially averaged (zero-dimensional) nonlinear model to synthesize a multi-variable nonlinear burn control strategy that can reject large perturbations and move between operating points. The controller uses all of the available actuation techniques in tandem to ensure good performance, even if one or more of the actuators saturate. Adaptive parameter estimation is used to improve the model parameter estimates used by the feedback controller in real-time and ensure asymptotic tracking of the desired operating point. In addition, we propose the use of a model-based online optimization algorithm to drive the system to a state that minimizes a given cost function, while respecting input and state constraints. A zero-dimensional simulation study is presented to show the performance of the adaptive control scheme and the optimization scheme with a cost function weighting the fusion power and temperature tracking errors.

  16. Simultaneous optimization of the cavity heat load and trip rates in linacs using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzić, Balša; Hofler, Alicia S.; Reeves, Cody J.; Khan, Sabbir A.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Benesch, Jay; Freyberger, Arne; Ranjan, Desh

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based optimization is used to simultaneously minimize two competing objectives guiding the operation of the Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility linacs: cavity heat load and radio frequency cavity trip rates. The results represent a significant improvement to the standard linac energy management tool and thereby could lead to a more efficient Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility configuration. This study also serves as a proof of principle of how a genetic algorithm can be used for optimizing other linac-based machines.

  17. Heat treatment optimization of alumina/aluminum metal matrix composites using the Taguchi approach

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. )

    1992-03-01

    The paper describes the use of the Taguchi approach for optimizing the heat treatment process of alumina-reinforced Al-6061 metal-matrix composites (MMCs). It is shown that the use of the Taguchi method makes it possible to test a great number of factors simultaneously and to provide a statistical data base that can be used for sensitivity and optimization studies. The results of plotting S/N values versus vol pct, solutionizing time, aging time, and aging temperature showed that the solutionizing time and the aging temperature significantly affect both the yield and the ultimate tensile strength of alumina/Al MMCs. 11 refs.

  18. Systems and methods for energy cost optimization in a building system

    DOEpatents

    Turney, Robert D.; Wenzel, Michael J.

    2016-09-06

    Methods and systems to minimize energy cost in response to time-varying energy prices are presented for a variety of different pricing scenarios. A cascaded model predictive control system is disclosed comprising an inner controller and an outer controller. The inner controller controls power use using a derivative of a temperature setpoint and the outer controller controls temperature via a power setpoint or power deferral. An optimization procedure is used to minimize a cost function within a time horizon subject to temperature constraints, equality constraints, and demand charge constraints. Equality constraints are formulated using system model information and system state information whereas demand charge constraints are formulated using system state information and pricing information. A masking procedure is used to invalidate demand charge constraints for inactive pricing periods including peak, partial-peak, off-peak, critical-peak, and real-time.

  19. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Muñoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost μ-μ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  20. Advanced Targeting Cost Function Design for Evolutionary Optimization of Control of Logistic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan; Davendra, Donald; Oplatkova, Zuzana

    2010-06-01

    This research deals with the optimization of the control of chaos by means of evolutionary algorithms. This work is aimed on an explanation of how to use evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and how to properly define the advanced targeting cost function (CF) securing very fast and precise stabilization of desired state for any initial conditions. As a model of deterministic chaotic system, the one dimensional Logistic equation was used. The evolutionary algorithm Self-Organizing Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) was used in four versions. For each version, repeated simulations were conducted to outline the effectiveness and robustness of used method and targeting CF.

  1. Vehicle path-planning in three dimensions using optics analogs for optimizing visibility and energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Neil C.; Lewis, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Path planning is an important issue for space robotics. Finding safe and energy-efficient paths in the presence of obstacles and other constraints can be complex although important. High-level (large-scale) path planning for robotic vehicles was investigated in three-dimensional space with obstacles, accounting for: (1) energy costs proportional to path length; (2) turn costs where paths change trajectory abruptly; and (3) safety costs for the danger associated with traversing a particular path due to visibility or invisibility from a fixed set of observers. Paths optimal with respect to these cost factors are found. Autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles were considered operating either in a space environment around satellites and space platforms, or aircraft, spacecraft, or smart missiles operating just above lunar and planetary surfaces. One class of applications concerns minimizing detection, as for example determining the best way to make complex modifications to a satellite without being observed by hostile sensors; another example is verifying there are no paths (holes) through a space defense system. Another class of applications concerns maximizing detection, as finding a good trajectory between mountain ranges of a planet while staying reasonably close to the surface, or finding paths for a flight between two locations that maximize the average number of triangulation points available at any time along the path.

  2. Determining the optimal approach to improving trauma triage decisions: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Deepika; Barnato, Amber E; Rosengart, Matthew R; Angus, Derek C; Smith, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the optimal target of a future intervention to improve physician decision making in trauma triage. Study Design A comparison of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of current practice versus hypothetical interventions targeting either physicians’ decisional thresholds (attitudes towards transferring patients to trauma centers) or perceptual sensitivity (ability to identify patients who meet guidelines for transfer). Methods Taking the societal perspective, we constructed a Markov decision model. We drew estimates of triage patterns, mortality, utilities, and costs from the literature. We assumed that an intervention to change decisional threshold would reduce under-triage but also increase over-triage more than an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity. We performed a series of one-way sensitivity analyses, and studied the most influential variables in a Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ICER of an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity was $62,799/ quality-adjusted life years (QALY)-gained compared with current practice. The ICER of an intervention to change decisional threshold was $104,975/QALY-gained compared with an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity. These findings were most sensitive to the relative cost of hospitalizing patients with moderate-severe injuries and their relative risk of dying at non-trauma centers. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY-gained, there was a 62% likelihood that an intervention to change perceptual sensitivity was the most cost-effective alternative. Conclusions Even a minor investment in changing decision making in trauma triage could greatly improve the quality of care provided. The optimal intervention depends on the characteristics of the individual trauma systems. PMID:22435966

  3. Cost analysis of water and sediment diversions to optimize land building in the Mississippi River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Melissa A.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Mohrig, David; Huang, Hongtai; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Wonsuck; Parker, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Land loss in the Mississippi River delta caused by subsidence and erosion has resulted in habitat loss and increased exposure of settled areas to storm surge risks. There is debate over the most cost-efficient and geomorphologically feasible projects to build land by river diversions, namely, whether a larger number of small, or a lesser number of large, engineered diversions provide the most efficient outcomes. This study uses an optimization framework to identify portfolios of diversions that are efficient for three general restoration objectives: maximize land built, minimize cost, and minimize water diverted. The framework links the following models: (1) a hydraulic water and sediment diversion model that, for a given structural design for a diversion, estimates the volume of water and sediment diverted; (2) a geomorphological land-building model that estimates the amount of land built over a time period, given the volume of water and sediment; and (3) a statistical model of investment cost as a function of diversion depth and width. An efficient portfolio is found by optimizing one objective subject to constraints on achievement of the other two; then by permuting those constraints, we find distinct portfolios that represent trade-offs among the objectives. Although the analysis explores generic relationships among size, cost, and land building (and thus does not consider specific project proposals or locations), the results demonstrate that large-scale land building (>200 km2) programs that operate over a time span of 50 years require deep diversions because of the enhanced efficiency of sand extraction per unit water. This conclusion applies whether or not there are significant scale economies or diseconomies associated with wider and deeper diversions.

  4. Designing cost-effective biopharmaceutical facilities using mixed-integer optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songsong; Simaria, Ana S; Farid, Suzanne S; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2013-01-01

    Chromatography operations are identified as critical steps in a monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification process and can represent a significant proportion of the purification material costs. This becomes even more critical with increasing product titers that result in higher mass loads onto chromatography columns, potentially causing capacity bottlenecks. In this work, a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) model was created and applied to an industrially relevant case study to optimize the design of a facility by determining the most cost-effective chromatography equipment sizing strategies for the production of mAbs. Furthermore, the model was extended to evaluate the ability of a fixed facility to cope with higher product titers up to 15 g/L. Examination of the characteristics of the optimal chromatography sizing strategies across different titer values enabled the identification of the maximum titer that the facility could handle using a sequence of single column chromatography steps as well as multi-column steps. The critical titer levels for different ratios of upstream to dowstream trains where multiple parallel columns per step resulted in the removal of facility bottlenecks were identified. Different facility configurations in terms of number of upstream trains were considered and the trade-off between their cost and ability to handle higher titers was analyzed. The case study insights demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach, combining MINLP models with visualization tools, is a valuable decision-support tool for the design of cost-effective facility configurations and to aid facility fit decisions. 2013. PMID:23956206

  5. Thermoeconomic analysis method for optimization of combined heat and power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, J.L.; Tuna, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, a thermoeconomic analysis method based on the second Law of Thermodynamics and applied to analyze four cogeneration system is presented. The objective of the developed technique is to minimize the operating costs of the cogeneration plant, namely Exergetic Manufacturing Cost (EMC), assuming a fixed rate of electricity production and process steam in exergy base. In this study a comparison is made between four configurations. The cogeneration system consisted of a gas turbine with a heat recovery steam generator, without supplementary firing, has the lowest EMC.

  6. Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1987-10-31

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis.

  7. [Multi-objective optimization of extraction process for red ginseng based upon extraction efficiency and cost control].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi; Zhu, Jie-Qiang; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Kang, Li-Yuan; Li, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    It is the objective of this study to optimize the extraction process of red ginseng to minimize the unit cost of extracting effective ingredients. The relation between the target variables of total quantity of ginsenosides and first extraction time, first extraction solution amount, second extraction time, second extract solution amount were studied with Box-Behnken experimental design method. At the same we also considered the cost of extraction solution and energy usage. The objective function was set as unit cost of target (total quantity of ginsenosides or its purity) for the multi-objective optimization of extraction process. As a result, the optimal process parameters were found as first extraction time (108.7 min), first extraction solution amount folds (12), second extraction time (30 min), second extraction solution amount folds (8) to minimize the unit cost. It indicated that this approach could potentially be used to optimize industrial extraction process for manufacturing Chinese medicine. PMID:25276970

  8. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes. PMID:26871037

  9. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes.

  10. An Optimal Control Approach for an Overall Cryogenic Plant Under Pulsed Heat Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaćın, Luis Gómez; Bradu, Benjamin; Viñuela, Enrique Blanco; Maekawa, Ryuji; Chalifour, Michel

    This work deals with the optimal management of a cryogenic plant composed by parallel refrigeration plants, which provide supercritical helium to pulsed heat loads. First, a data reconciliation approach is proposed to estimate precisely the refrigerator variables necessary to deduce the efficiency of each refrigerator. Second, taking into account these efficiencies, an optimal operation of the system is proposed and studied. Finally, while minimizing the power consumption of the refrigerators, the control system maintains stable operation of the cryoplant under pulsed heat loads. The management of the refrigerators is carried out by an upper control layer, which balances the relative production of cooling power in each refrigerator. In addition, this upper control layer deals with the mitigation of malfunctions and faults in the system. The proposed approach has been validated using a dynamic model of the cryoplant developed with EcosimPro software, based on first principles (mass and energy balances) and thermo-hydraulic equations.

  11. Performance optimization of total momentum filtering double-resonance energy selective electron heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ze-Min; Chen, Lin-Gen; Ge, Yan-Lin; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model for energy selective electron (ESE) heat pumps operating with two-dimensional electron reservoirs is established in this study. In this model, a double-resonance energy filter operating with a total momentum filtering mechanism is considered for the transmission of electrons. The optimal thermodynamic performance of the ESE heat pump devices is also investigated. Numerical calculations show that the heating load of the device with two resonances is larger, whereas the coefficient of performance (COP) is lower than the ESE heat pump when considering a single-resonance filter. The performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps in the total momentum filtering condition are generally superior to those with a conventional filtering mechanism. In particular, the performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps considering a conventional filtering mechanism are vastly different from those of a device with total momentum filtering, which is induced by extra electron momentum in addition to the horizontal direction. Parameters such as resonance width and energy spacing are found to be associated with the performance of the electron system.

  12. Optimization of the heat output of wall convectors with using an unconventional slumped glass cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulhavy, Petr; Kleckova, Jitka; Petru, Michal; Havlicek, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with study of a new shape of the glass cover of heat convectors. Design of the heat convectors is characterized by the low water volume, highly variable geometry, adjustable heat output and the pressure losses that arise when the fluid flow through the exchanger. Based on a new concept of a slumped glass cover of the exchanger have been created some numerical models and also carried out experiments in order to find and optimize an appropriate shape. The glass materials are very specific mainly due to their specific shaping abilities and technological capabilities of manufacturing. The aim is to determine an appropriate shape and a curvature of the glass body and also the position and size of the exchanger. It has been found a significant dependence of the heat exchanger position on to the total heat output of an entire device. Simultaneously has been proved also the dependence of a shape of the cover plate, to the total heat output, that is more considerably for natural than for the forced convection.

  13. Ecological optimization and performance study of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S. K.; Kaushik, S. C.; Salhotra, R.

    2002-10-01

    The concept of finite time thermodynamics is used to determine the ecological function of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engine cycles. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus power loss (irreversibility), which is the ambient temperature times, the entropy generation rate. The ecological function is maximized with respect to cycle temperature ratio and the expressions for the corresponding power output and thermal efficiency are derived at the optimal operating conditions. The effect of different operating parameters, the effectiveness on the hot, cold and the regenerative side heat exchangers, the cycle temperature ratio, heat capacitance ratio and the internal irreversibility parameter on the maximum ecological function are studied. It is found that the effect of regenerator effectiveness is more than the hot and cold side heat exchangers and the effect of the effectiveness on cold side heat exchanger is more than the effectiveness on the hot side heat exchanger on the maximum ecological function. It is also found that the effect of internal irreversibility parameter is more than the other parameters not only on the maximum ecological function but also on the corresponding power output and the thermal efficiency.

  14. Thermodynamic optimization of a solar system for cogeneration of water heating/purification and absorption cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovsapian, Zohrob O.

    This dissertation presents a contribution to understanding the behavior of solar powered air conditioning and refrigeration systems with a view to determining the manner in which refrigeration rate; mass flows, heat transfer areas, and internal architecture are related. A cogeneration system consisting of a solar concentrator, a cavity-type receiver, a gas burner, and a thermal storage reservoir is devised to simultaneously produce water heating/purification and cooling (absorption refrigerator system). A simplified mathematical model, which combines fundamental and empirical correlations, and principles of classical thermodynamics, mass and heat transfer, is developed. An experimental setup was built to adjust and validate the numerical results obtained with the mathematical model. The proposed model is then utilized to simulate numerically the system transient and steady state response under different operating and design conditions. A system global optimization for maximum performance (or minimum exergy destruction) in the search for minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum system second law efficiency is performed with low computational time. Appropriate dimensionless groups are identified and the results presented in normalized charts for general application. The numerical results show that the three way maximized system second law efficiency, etaII,max,max,max, occurs when three system characteristic mass flow rates are optimally selected in general terms as dimensionless heat capacity rates, i.e., (Psisps , Psiwxwx, PsiHs)opt ≅ (1.43, 0.17, 0.19). The minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum second law efficiencies found with respect to the optimized operating parameters are sharp and, therefore important to be considered in actual design. As a result, the model is expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design, and optimization of solar energy systems in the context of distributed power generation.

  15. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  16. Optimization of a fin-plate heat exchanger for cooling avionic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, R. J.; Karam, R. D.

    1980-07-01

    This paper deals with an engineering evaluation of multichanneled cold plates of the type used in avionics components temperature control. The equations of flow and heat transfer are solved in view of the constraints of the geometric parameters, and the results are optimized in terms of minimizing the temperature difference between the components and the cooling air. An example is given to illustrate application of the theory.

  17. Feet, heat and scallops: what is the cost of anthropogenic disturbance in bivalve aquaculture?

    PubMed

    Robson, Anthony A; Halsey, Lewis G; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The effects of unnatural disturbances on the behaviour and energetics of animals are an important issue for conservation and commercial animal production. Biologging enables estimation of the energy costs of these disturbances, but not specifically the effect these costs have on growth; a key outcome measure for animal farming enterprises. We looked at how natural and anthropogenically induced activity and energy expenditure of king scallops Pecten maximus varies with temperature. These data were then used to model growth time of king scallops reared in an aquaculture facility under different temperatures and anthropogenic disturbance levels. The scallops exhibited a typical total metabolic rate (MR)-temperature curve, with a peak reached at a middling temperature. The percentage of their total MR associated with spinning and swimming, behavioural responses to disturbance, was considerable. Interestingly, as temperature increased, the activity MR associated with a given level of activity decreased; a hitherto unreported relationship in any species. The model results suggest there is a trade-off in the ambient temperature that should be set by hatcheries between the optimal for scallop growth if completely undisturbed versus mitigating against the energy costs elicited by anthropogenic disturbance. Furthermore, the model indicates that this trade-off is affected by scallop size. Aquaculture facilities typically have controls to limit the impact of human activities, yet the present data indicate that hatcheries may be advised to consider whether more controls could further decrease extraneous scallop behaviours, resulting in enhanced scallop yields and improved financial margins. PMID:27069659

  18. Feet, heat and scallops: what is the cost of anthropogenic disturbance in bivalve aquaculture?

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Lewis G.; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The effects of unnatural disturbances on the behaviour and energetics of animals are an important issue for conservation and commercial animal production. Biologging enables estimation of the energy costs of these disturbances, but not specifically the effect these costs have on growth; a key outcome measure for animal farming enterprises. We looked at how natural and anthropogenically induced activity and energy expenditure of king scallops Pecten maximus varies with temperature. These data were then used to model growth time of king scallops reared in an aquaculture facility under different temperatures and anthropogenic disturbance levels. The scallops exhibited a typical total metabolic rate (MR)–temperature curve, with a peak reached at a middling temperature. The percentage of their total MR associated with spinning and swimming, behavioural responses to disturbance, was considerable. Interestingly, as temperature increased, the activity MR associated with a given level of activity decreased; a hitherto unreported relationship in any species. The model results suggest there is a trade-off in the ambient temperature that should be set by hatcheries between the optimal for scallop growth if completely undisturbed versus mitigating against the energy costs elicited by anthropogenic disturbance. Furthermore, the model indicates that this trade-off is affected by scallop size. Aquaculture facilities typically have controls to limit the impact of human activities, yet the present data indicate that hatcheries may be advised to consider whether more controls could further decrease extraneous scallop behaviours, resulting in enhanced scallop yields and improved financial margins. PMID:27069659

  19. Performance of an optimally contact-cooled high-heat-load mirror at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Khounsary, A.; Lai, B.; McNulty, I.; Yun, W.

    1998-11-18

    X-ray undulator beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons facilities use either a monochromator or a mirror as the first optical element. In this paper, the thermal and optical performance of an optimally designed contact-cooled high-heat-load x-ray mirror used as the first optical element on the 2ID undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is reported. It is shown that this simple and economical mirror design can comfortably handle the high heat load of undulator beamlines and provide good performance with long-term reliability and ease of operation. Availability and advantages of such mirrors can make the mirror-first approach to high-heat-load beamline design an attractive alternative to monochromator-first beamlines in many circumstances.

  20. Optimization of ohmic heating applications for pectin methylesterase inactivation in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Demirdöven, Aslıhan; Baysal, Taner

    2014-09-01

    Ohmic heating (OH) which is among to electro-thermal methods and helps to inactivate microorganisms and enzymes was used in this study as thermal treatment on orange juice production for pectin methylesterase (PME) inactivation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimization of OH conditions. The effects of voltage gradient and temperature (independent variables) were investigated on PME activity (response) of orange juice. After optimization orange juice was produced and compared with untreated control juices and conventional thermally heated juices on the aspect of PME inactivation and some quality characteristics. Reduction of PME activities was found approximately 96 % in OH groups where conventional thermally heated juice has 88.3 % reduction value. Total pectin content was increased 1.72-2 % after OH applications. Ascorbic acid contents of OH samples were found between 43.08-45.20 mg/100 mL where conventional thermally heated juice has 42.9 mg/100 mL. As a result, it was determined that OH can be applied as a thermal treatment on orange juice production in moderate temperatures for PME inactivation and may improve functional properties of orange juice. PMID:25190836

  1. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K. -I.

    2016-01-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers. PMID:26887527

  2. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K.-I.

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers.

  3. Managing simulation-based training: A framework for optimizing learning, cost, and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Noah Joseph

    This study provides a management framework for optimizing training programs for learning, cost, and time when using simulation based training (SBT) and reality based training (RBT) as resources. Simulation is shown to be an effective means for implementing activity substitution as a way to reduce risk. The risk profile of 22 US Air Force vehicles are calculated, and the potential risk reduction is calculated under the assumption of perfect substitutability of RBT and SBT. Methods are subsequently developed to relax the assumption of perfect substitutability. The transfer effectiveness ratio (TER) concept is defined and modeled as a function of the quality of the simulator used, and the requirements of the activity trained. The Navy F/A-18 is then analyzed in a case study illustrating how learning can be maximized subject to constraints in cost and time, and also subject to the decision maker's preferences for the proportional and absolute use of simulation. Solution methods for optimizing multiple activities across shared resources are next provided. Finally, a simulation strategy including an operations planning program (OPP), an implementation program (IP), an acquisition program (AP), and a pedagogical research program (PRP) is detailed. The study provides the theoretical tools to understand how to leverage SBT, a case study demonstrating these tools' efficacy, and a set of policy recommendations to enable the US military to better utilize SBT in the future.

  4. Influence of biomass cofiring on the optimal coefficient of the cogeneration share in a district heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Gładysz, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents a modified algorithm for choosing the optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems taking into account additional benefits concerning the promotion of highefficiency cogeneration and biomass cofiring. The optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration depends first of all on the share of the heat required for preparing the hot tap water. The final result of investigations is an empirical equation describing the influence of the ratio of the heat flux for the production of hot tap water to the maximum flux for space heating and ventilation, as well as the share of chemical energy of biomass in the fuel mixture on the optimal value of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems. The approach presented in the paper may be applied both in back-pressure combined heat and power (CHP) plants and in extraction-condensing CHP plants.

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis and Optimization of a High Temperature Triple Absorption Heat Transformer

    PubMed Central

    Khamooshi, Mehrdad; Yari, Mortaza; Egelioglu, Fuat; Salati, Hana

    2014-01-01

    First law of thermodynamics has been used to analyze and optimize inclusively the performance of a triple absorption heat transformer operating with LiBr/H2O as the working pair. A thermodynamic model was developed in EES (engineering equation solver) to estimate the performance of the system in terms of the most essential parameters. The assumed parameters are the temperature of the main components, weak and strong solutions, economizers' efficiencies, and bypass ratios. The whole cycle is optimized by EES software from the viewpoint of maximizing the COP via applying the direct search method. The optimization results showed that the COP of 0.2491 is reachable by the proposed cycle. PMID:25136702

  6. Surrogates for numerical simulations; optimization of eddy-promoter heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, Anthony T.; Patera, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Although the advent of fast and inexpensive parallel computers has rendered numerous previously intractable calculations feasible, many numerical simulations remain too resource-intensive to be directly inserted in engineering optimization efforts. An attractive alternative to direct insertion considers models for computational systems: the expensive simulation is evoked only to construct and validate a simplified, input-output model; this simplified input-output model then serves as a simulation surrogate in subsequent engineering optimization studies. A simple 'Bayesian-validated' statistical framework for the construction, validation, and purposive application of static computer simulation surrogates is presented. As an example, dissipation-transport optimization of laminar-flow eddy-promoter heat exchangers are considered: parallel spectral element Navier-Stokes calculations serve to construct and validate surrogates for the flowrate and Nusselt number; these surrogates then represent the originating Navier-Stokes equations in the ensuing design process.

  7. Multiobjective optimization of water distribution systems accounting for economic cost, hydraulic reliability, and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyan; Maier, Holger R.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, three objectives are considered for the optimization of water distribution systems (WDSs): the traditional objectives of minimizing economic cost and maximizing hydraulic reliability and the recently proposed objective of minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is particularly important to include the GHG minimization objective for WDSs involving pumping into storages or water transmission systems (WTSs), as these systems are the main contributors of GHG emissions in the water industry. In order to better understand the nature of tradeoffs among these three objectives, the shape of the solution space and the location of the Pareto-optimal front in the solution space are investigated for WTSs and WDSs that include pumping into storages, and the implications of the interaction between the three objectives are explored from a practical design perspective. Through three case studies, it is found that the solution space is a U-shaped curve rather than a surface, as the tradeoffs among the three objectives are dominated by the hydraulic reliability objective. The Pareto-optimal front of real-world systems is often located at the "elbow" section and lower "arm" of the solution space (i.e., the U-shaped curve), indicating that it is more economic to increase the hydraulic reliability of these systems by increasing pipe capacity (i.e., pipe diameter) compared to increasing pumping power. Solutions having the same GHG emission level but different cost-reliability tradeoffs often exist. Therefore, the final decision needs to be made in conjunction with expert knowledge and the specific budget and reliability requirements of the system.

  8. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2014-12-23

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototypemore » network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.« less

  9. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2015-06-16

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototypemore » network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.« less

  10. Optimization of low-cost biosurfactant production from agricultural residues through response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ebadipour, N; Lotfabad, T Bagheri; Yaghmaei, S; RoostaAzad, R

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface tension and interfacial tension. Biosurfactants are produced by various microorganisms. They are promising replacements for chemical surfactants because of biodegradability, nontoxicity, and their ability to be produced from renewable sources. However, a major obstacle in producing biosurfactants at the industrial level is the lack of cost-effectiveness. In the present study, by using corn steep liquor (CSL) as a low-cost agricultural waste, not only is the production cost reduced but a higher production yield is also achieved. Moreover, a response surface methodology (RSM) approach through the Box-Behnken method was applied to optimize the biosurfactant production level. The results found that biosurfactant production was improved around 2.3 times at optimum condition when the CSL was at a concentration of 1.88 mL/L and yeast extract was reduced to 25 times less than what was used in a basic soybean oil medium (SOM). The predicted and experimental values of responses were in reasonable agreement with each other (Pred-R(2) = 0.86 and adj-R(2) = 0.94). Optimization led to a drop in raw material price per unit of biosurfactant from $47 to $12/kg. Moreover, the biosurfactant product at a concentration of 84 mg/L could lower the surface tension of twice-distilled water from 72 mN/m to less than 28 mN/m and emulsify an equal volume of kerosene by an emulsification index of (E24) 68% in a two-phase mixture. These capabilities made these biosurfactants applicable in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR), hydrocarbon remediation, and all other petroleum industry surfactant applications. PMID:25748124

  11. Profile shape optimization in multi-jet impingement cooling of dimpled topologies for local heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Deepchand Singh; Pattamatta, Arvind

    2015-04-01

    The present study deals with shape optimization of dimples on the target surface in multi-jet impingement heat transfer. Bezier polynomial formulation is incorporated to generate profile shapes for the dimple profile generation and a multi-objective optimization is performed. The optimized dimple shape exhibits higher local Nusselt number values compared to the reference hemispherical dimpled plate optimized shape which can be used to alleviate local temperature hot spots on target surface.

  12. Cost and surface optimization of a remote photovoltaic system for two kinds of panels' technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, S.; Arnaud, G.; Colin, H.; Montignac, F.; Mansilla, C.; Vinard, M.

    2011-10-01

    Stand alone photovoltaic (PV) systems comprise one of the promising electrification solutions to cover the demand of remote consumers, especially when it is coupled with a storage solution that would both increase the productivity of power plants and reduce the areas dedicated to energy production. This short communication presents a multi-objective design of a remote PV system coupled to battery and hydrogen storages systems simultaneously minimizing the total levelized cost and the occupied area, while fulfilling a constraint of consumer satisfaction. For this task, a multi-objective code based on particle swarm optimization has been used to find the best combination of different energy devices. Both short and mid terms based on forecasts assumptions have been investigated. An application for the site of La Nouvelle in the French overseas island of La Réunion is proposed. It points up a strong cost advantage by using Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin layer (HIT) rather than crystalline silicon (c-Si) cells for the short term. However, the discrimination between these two PV cell technologies is less obvious for the mid term: a strong constraint on the occupied area will promote HIT, whereas a strong constraint on the cost will promote c-Si.

  13. Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Yong X. Tao; Yimin Zhu

    2012-04-26

    It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher initial costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches. From scientific and technical point of view, the potential for wide applications of GSHP especially HGSHP in hot and humid climate is significant, especially towards building zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, this report presents gathering and analyzing data on the costs and benefits of GSHP/HGSHP systems utilized in southern states using a representative sample of building applications. The report outlines the detailed analysis to conclude that the application of GSHP in Florida (and hot and humid climate in general) shows a good potential.

  14. Ecological Optimization and Parametric Study of an Irreversible Regenerative Modified Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sudhir K.; Kaushik, Subhash C.; Tiwari, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    An ecological optimization along with a detailed parametric study of an irreversible regenerative Brayton heat engine with isothermal heat addition have been carried out with external as well as internal irreversibilities. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus the power loss (irreversibility) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation rate. The external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between the heat engine and the external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to nonisentropic compression and expansion processes in the compressor and the turbine respectively and the regenerative heat loss. The ecological function is found to be an increasing function of the isothermal-, sink- and regenerative-side effectiveness, isothermal-side inlet temperature, component efficiencies and sink-side temperature while it is found to be a decreasing function of the isobaric-side temperature and effectiveness and the working fluid heat capacitance rate. The effects of the isobaric-side effectiveness are found to be more than those of the other parameters and the effects of turbine efficiency are found to be more than those of the compressor efficiency on all the performance parameters of the cycle.

  15. Stacked Micro Heat Exchange System for Optimized Thermal Coupling of MicroTEGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, N.; Grab, M.; Glatz, W.; Hierold, C.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents modeling and experimental results of micro thermoelectric generators (μTEGs) integrated into a multilayer micro heat exchange system. The multilayer configuration benefits from low heat transfer resistances at small fluid flow rates and at the same time from low required pumping powers. The compact stacked power device allows for high net output power per volume, and therefore a reduction in size, weight, and cost compared with conventional large-scale heat exchangers. The influence of the boundary conditions and the system design parameters on the net output power of the micro heat exchange system was investigated by simulation. The theoretical results showed a major impact of the microchannel dimensions and the μTEG thickness on the overall output performance of the system. By adapting the applied fluid flow rate, the system's net power output can be maximized for varying operating temperatures. Experimental measurements of the cross-flow micro heat exchange system were in good agreement with the performed simulations. A net μTEG output power of 62.9 mW/cm2 was measured for a double-layer system at an applied water inlet temperature difference of 60 K with a Bi2Te3 μTEG ( ZT of 0.12), resulting in a net volumetric efficiency factor of 37.2 W/m3/K2.

  16. Finite-Horizon Approximate Optimal Guaranteed Cost Control of Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Application to Mars Entry Guidance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Mao-Mao; Guo, Lei

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the finite-horizon optimal guaranteed cost control (GCC) problem for a class of time-varying uncertain nonlinear systems. The aim of this problem is to find a robust state feedback controller such that the closed-loop system has not only a bounded response in a finite duration of time for all admissible uncertainties but also a minimal guaranteed cost. A neural network (NN) based approximate optimal GCC design is developed. Initially, by modifying the cost function to account for the nonlinear perturbation of system, the optimal GCC problem is transformed into a finite-horizon optimal control problem of the nominal system. Subsequently, with the help of the modified cost function together with a parametrized bounding function for all admissible uncertainties, the solution to the optimal GCC problem is given in terms of a parametrized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (PHJB) equation. Then, a NN method is developed to solve offline the PHJB equation approximately and thus obtain the nearly optimal GCC policy. Furthermore, the convergence of approximate PHJB equation and the robust admissibility of nearly optimal GCC policy are also analyzed. Finally, by applying the proposed design method to the entry guidance problem of the Mars lander, the achieved simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed controller. PMID:25163073

  17. Thermodynamic optimization of mixed refrigerant Joule- Thomson systems constrained by heat transfer considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, J. F.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    Mixed refrigerant (MR) working fluids can significantly increase the cooling capacity of a Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle. The optimization of MRJT systems has been the subject of substantial research. However, most optimization techniques do not model the recuperator in sufficient detail. For example, the recuperator is usually assumed to have a heat transfer coefficient that does not vary with the mixture. Ongoing work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has shown that the heat transfer coefficients for two-phase flow are approximately three times greater than for a single phase mixture when the mixture quality is between 15% and 85%. As a result, a system that optimizes a MR without also requiring that the flow be in this quality range may require an extremely large recuperator or not achieve the performance predicted by the model. To ensure optimal performance of the JT cycle, the MR should be selected such that it is entirely two-phase within the recuperator. To determine the optimal MR composition, a parametric study was conducted assuming a thermodynamically ideal cycle. The results of the parametric study are graphically presented on a contour plot in the parameter space consisting of the extremes of the qualities that exist within the recuperator. The contours show constant values of the normalized refrigeration power. This ‘map’ shows the effect of MR composition on the cycle performance and it can be used to select the MR that provides a high cooling load while also constraining the recuperator to be two phase. The predicted best MR composition can be used as a starting point for experimentally determining the best MR.

  18. Optimal sizing of heating systems that store and use thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, H. N.

    1981-06-01

    An analysis of the factors that enter into the sizing of thermal energy storage (TES) space heating systems is given. These TES systems, having to fulfill the same thermal comfort functions as conventional space heating systems, have different operating characteristics and more severe constraints, and therefore require different and more critical sizing procedures. Thermal energy storage heating systems offer social and private benefits, and the achievement of these benefits depends in large part on proper sizing. Proper sizing is a probabilistic rather than a deterministic procedure, and is utility-specific as well. Analysis of experimental data obtained in field studies of TEST in New England provided information on the accuracy of equipment-sizing procedures used by vendors and on the consequences of undersizing and oversizing. Based on simulation studies and other techniques, additional useful sizing information was developed. The information implies the need for an upward adjustment of the sizing factor if the sizing is to be optimal for US climatological conditions and living habits. A summary and a general theoretical analysis of the information presented in this report are then combined to provide guidelines for optimally sizing TES systems.

  19. Thermophilic Thermotoga maritima ribose-5-phosphate isomerase RpiB: optimized heat treatment purification and basic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Myung, Suwan; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2012-04-01

    The open reading frame TM1080 from Thermotoga maritima encoding ribose-5-phosphate isomerase type B (RpiB) was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After optimization of cell culture conditions, more than 30% of intracellular proteins were soluble recombinant RpiB. High-purity RpiB was obtained by heat pretreatment through its optimization in buffer choice, buffer pH, as well as temperature and duration of pretreatment. This enzyme had the maximum activity at 70°C and pH 6.5-8.0. Under its suboptimal conditions (60°C and pH 7.0), k(cat) and K(m) values were 540s(-1) and 7.6mM, respectively; it had a half lifetime of 71h, resulting in its turn-over number of more than 2×10(8)mol of product per mol of enzyme. This study suggests that it is highly feasible to discover thermostable enzymes from exploding genomic DNA database of extremophiles with the desired stability suitable for in vitro synthetic biology projects and produce high-purity thermoenzymes at very low costs. PMID:22333529

  20. Optimization of magnetic refrigerators by tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Bennett, Lawrence; Della Torre, Edward

    A new reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) experimental device has been designed, built and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Gadolinium turnings were used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a higher temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this work show that there is an optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in an AMR system. It is expected that such optimization and the results provided herein will permit the future design and development of more efficient room-temperature magnetic refrigeration systems.

  1. Shape optimization of a printed-circuit heat exchanger to enhance thermal-hydraulic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. M.; Kim, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) is recently considered as a recuperator for the high temperature gas cooled reactor. In this work, the zigzag-channels of a PCHE have been optimized by using three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis and response surface approximation (RSA) modeling technique to enhance thermal-hydraulic performance. Shear stress transport turbulence model is used as a turbulence closure. The objective function is defined as a linear combination of the functions related to heat transfer and friction loss of the PCHE, respectively. Three geometric design variables viz., the ratio of the radius of the fillet to hydraulic diameter of the channels, the ratio of wavelength to hydraulic diameter of the channels, and the ratio of wave height to hydraulic diameter of the channels, are used for the optimization. Design points are selected through Latin-hypercube sampling. The optimal design is determined through the RSA model which uses RANS derived calculations at the design points. The results show that the optimum shape enhances considerably the thermal-hydraulic performance than a reference shape. (authors)

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  3. Energy and Cost Optimized Technology Options to Meet Energy Needs of Food Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Srivastava, Viraj; Hoffman, Michael G.; Wagner, Anne W.; Thornton, John

    2015-05-01

    Full Paper Submission for: Combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) distributed generation (DG) systems can provide electric power and, heating and cooling capability to commercial and industrial facilities directly onsite, while increasing energy efficiency, security of energy supply, grid independence and enhancing the environmental and economic situation for the site. Food processing industries often have simultaneous requirements for heat, steam, chilling and electricity making them well suited for the use of such systems to supply base-load or as peak reducing generators enabling reduction of overall energy use intensity. This paper documents analysis from a project evaluating opportunities enabled by CCHPDG for emission and cost reductions and energy storage systems installed onsite at food processing facilities. In addition, this distributed generation coupled with energy storage demonstrates a non-wires solution to delay or eliminate the need for upgrades to electric distribution systems. It was found that a dairy processing plant in the Pacific Northwest currently purchasing 15,000 MWh/yr of electricity and 190,000 MMBtu/yr of gas could be provided with a 1.1 MW CCHP system reducing the amount of electric power purchased to 450 MWh/yr while increasing the gas demand to 255,000 MMBtu/yr. The high percentage of hydro-power in this region resulted in CO2 emissions from CCHP to be higher than that attributed to the electric utility/regional energy mix. The value of this work is in documenting a real-world example demonstrating the value of CCHP to facility owners and financial decision makers to encourage them to more seriously consider CCHP systems when building or upgrading facilities.

  4. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the computational techniques employed in determining the optimal propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. The computer programs used to perform calculations for all the factors that enter into the selection process of determining the optimum combinations of airplanes and engines are examined. Attention is given to the description of the computer codes including NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. A process is illustrated by which turbine engines can be evaluated as to fuel consumption, engine weight, cost and installation effects. Examples are shown as to the benefits of variable geometry and of the tradeoff between fuel burned and engine weights. Future plans for further improvements in the analytical modeling of engine systems are also described.

  5. A risk-reduction approach for optimal software release time determination with the delay incurred cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui; Li, Yan-Fu; Zhang, Jun-Guang; Li, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Most existing research on software release time determination assumes that parameters of the software reliability model (SRM) are deterministic and the reliability estimate is accurate. In practice, however, there exists a risk that the reliability requirement cannot be guaranteed due to the parameter uncertainties in the SRM, and such risk can be as high as 50% when the mean value is used. It is necessary for the software project managers to reduce the risk to a lower level by delaying the software release, which inevitably increases the software testing costs. In order to incorporate the managers' preferences over these two factors, a decision model based on multi-attribute utility theory (MAUT) is developed for the determination of optimal risk-reduction release time.

  6. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  7. Neural-network-based online HJB solution for optimal robust guaranteed cost control of continuous-time uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding; Wang, Fei-Yue; Li, Hongliang; Yang, Xiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the infinite horizon optimal robust guaranteed cost control of continuous-time uncertain nonlinear systems is investigated using neural-network-based online solution of Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. By establishing an appropriate bounded function and defining a modified cost function, the optimal robust guaranteed cost control problem is transformed into an optimal control problem. It can be observed that the optimal cost function of the nominal system is nothing but the optimal guaranteed cost of the original uncertain system. A critic neural network is constructed to facilitate the solution of the modified HJB equation corresponding to the nominal system. More importantly, an additional stabilizing term is introduced for helping to verify the stability, which reinforces the updating process of the weight vector and reduces the requirement of an initial stabilizing control. The uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is analyzed by using the Lyapunov approach as well. Two simulation examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of the present control approach. PMID:25415951

  8. BPM Button Optimization to Minimize Distortion Due to Trapped Mode Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron,P.; Blednyk, A.; Kosciuk, B.; Pinayev, I.; Ravindranath, I.; Singh, O

    2009-05-04

    The outer circumference of a BPM button and the inner circumference of the button housing comprise a transmission line. This transmission line typically presents an impedance of a few tens of ohms to the beam, and couples very weakly to the 50 ohm coaxial transmission line that comprises the signal path out of the button. The modes which are consequently excited and trapped often have quality factors of several hundred, permitting resonant excitation by the beam. The thermal distortion resulting from trapped mode heating is potentially problematic for achieving the high precision beam position measurements needed to provide the sub-micron beam position stability required by light source users. We present a button design that has been optimized via material selection and component geometry to minimize both the trapped mode heating and the resulting thermal distortion.

  9. Modeling of Optimization and Control of EBW Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2009-11-01

    We present a modeling of Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) by recently coupled AMR (Antenna---Mode-conversion---Ray-tracing) and LUKE (3D Fokker-Planck) codes. The electrostatic EBW is a promising candidate for localized heating and current drive in high-β plasmas, where the standard electron cyclotron O- and X-waves are cutoff. EBW heating and current drive is simulated here in spherical tokamak conditions, particularly in typical NSTX and MAST equilibria and also in equilibria predicted by transport modeling. The EBW injection parameters are varied in order to find optimized scenarios and a possible way to control the deposition location and the driven current. This task is rather challenging because EBW ray trajectories and N spectra are strongly dependent on the plasma parameters.

  10. Text line detection based on cost optimized local text line direction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yandong; Sun, Yufang; Bauer, Peter; Allebach, Jan P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Text line detection is a critical step for applications in document image processing. In this paper, we propose a novel text line detection method. First, the connected components are extracted from the image as symbols. Then, we estimate the direction of the text line in multiple local regions. This estimation is, for the first time, to our knowledge, formulated in a cost optimization framework. We also propose an efficient way to solve this optimization problem. Afterwards, we consider symbols as nodes in a graph, and connect symbols based on the local text line direction estimation results. Last, we detect the text lines by separating the graph into subgraphs according to the nodes' connectivities. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method is very robust to non-uniform skew within text lines, variability of font sizes, and complex structures of layout. Our new method works well for documents captured with flat-bed and sheet-fed scanners, mobile phone cameras, and with other general imaging assets.

  11. Weaving time into system architecture: satellite cost per operational day and optimal design lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Joseph H.; Hastings, Daniel E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2004-03-01

    An augmented perspective on system architecture is proposed (diachronic) that complements the traditional views on system architecture (synchronic). This paper proposes to view in a system architecture the flow of service (or utility) that the system will provide over its design lifetime. It suggests that the design lifetime is a fundamental component of system architecture although one cannot see it or touch it. Consequently, cost, utility, and value per unit time metrics are introduced. A framework is then developed that identifies optimal design lifetimes for complex systems in general, and space systems in particular, based on this augmented perspective of system architecture and on these metrics. It is found that an optimal design lifetime for a satellite exists, even in the case of constant expected revenues per day over the system's lifetime, and that it changes substantially with the expected Time to Obsolescence of the system and the volatility of the market the system is serving in the case of a commercial venture. The analysis thus proves that it is essential for a system architect to match the design lifetime with the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is/will be operating in. It is also shown that as the uncertainty in the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is operating in increases, the value of having the option to upgrade, modify, or extend the lifetime of a system at a later point in time increases depending on how events unfold.

  12. Optimization and simulation of low-temperature combustion and heat transfer in an Uhde carbonization furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yongfa; Wang, Ying; Chen, Lei; Liu, Gaihuan

    2015-12-01

    The temperature distribution inside a low-temperature combustion chamber with circuited flame path during the low temperature pyrolysis of lignite was simulated using the computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The temperature distribution in the Uhde combustion chamber showed that the temperature is very non-uniform and could therefore not meet the requirements for industrial heat transfer. After optimizing the furnace, by adding a self-made gas-guide structure to the heat transfer section as well as adjusting the gas flow size in the flame path, the temperature distribution became uniform, and the average temperature (550-650 °C) became suitable for industrial low-temperature pyrolysis. The Realizable k-epsilon model, P-1 model, and the Non-premixed model were used to calculate the temperature distribution for the combustion of coke-oven gas and air inside the combustion chamber. Our simulation is consistent with our experimental results within an error range of 40-80 °C. The one-dimensional unsteady state heat conduction differential equation ρ nolimits_{coal} Cnolimits_{coal} partial T/partial t = partial /partial x(λ partial T/partial x) can be used to calculate the heat transfer process. Our results can serve as a first theoretical base and may enable technological advances with regard to lignite pyrolysis.

  13. Intermittent cryogen spray cooling for optimal heat extraction during dermatologic laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2002-09-01

    Fast heat extraction is critically important to obtain the maximal benefit of cryogen spray cooling (CSC) during laser therapy of shallow skin lesions, such as port wine stain birthmarks. However, a film of liquid cryogen can build up on the skin surface, impairing heat transfer due to the relatively low thermal conductivity and higher temperature of the film as compared to the impinging spray droplets. In an attempt to optimize the cryogen mass flux, while minimally affecting other spray characteristics, we apply a series of 10 ms spurts with variable duty cycles. Heat extraction dynamics during such intermittent cryogen sprays were measured using a custom-made metal-disc detector. The highest cooling rates were observed at moderate duty cycle levels. This confirms the presence, and offers a practical way to eliminate the adverse effect of liquid cryogen build-up on the sprayed surface. On the other hand, lower duty cycles allow a substantial reduction in the average rate of heat extraction, enabling less aggressive and more efficient CSC for treatment of deeper targets, such as hair follicles.

  14. Scheduling Multilevel Deadline-Constrained Scientific Workflows on Clouds Based on Cost Optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malawski, Maciej; Figiela, Kamil; Bubak, Marian; Deelman, Ewa; Nabrzyski, Jarek

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a cost optimization model for scheduling scientific workflows on IaaS clouds such as Amazon EC2 or RackSpace. We assume multiple IaaS clouds with heterogeneous virtual machine instances, with limited number of instances per cloud and hourly billing. Input and output data are stored on a cloud object store such as Amazon S3. Applications are scientific workflows modeled as DAGs as in the Pegasus Workflow Management System. We assume that tasks in the workflows are grouped into levels of identical tasks. Our model is specified using mathematical programming languages (AMPL and CMPL) and allows us to minimize themore » cost of workflow execution under deadline constraints. We present results obtained using our model and the benchmark workflows representing real scientific applications in a variety of domains. The data used for evaluation come from the synthetic workflows and from general purpose cloud benchmarks, as well as from the data measured in our own experiments with Montage, an astronomical application, executed on Amazon EC2 cloud. We indicate how this model can be used for scenarios that require resource planning for scientific workflows and their ensembles.« less

  15. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The computational techniques utilized to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements are described. The characteristics and use of the following computer codes are discussed: (1) NNEP - a very general cycle analysis code that can assemble an arbitrary matrix fans, turbines, ducts, shafts, etc., into a complete gas turbine engine and compute on- and off-design thermodynamic performance; (2) WATE - a preliminary design procedure for calculating engine weight using the component characteristics determined by NNEP; (3) POD DRG - a table look-up program to calculate wave and friction drag of nacelles; (4) LIFCYC - a computer code developed to calculate life cycle costs of engines based on the output from WATE; and (5) INSTAL - a computer code developed to calculate installation effects, inlet performance and inlet weight. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight, and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  16. Optimal-Flow Minimum-Cost Correspondence Assignment in Particle Flow Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Matov, Alexandre; Edvall, Marcus M.; Yang, Ge; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2011-01-01

    A diversity of tracking problems exists in which cohorts of densely packed particles move in an organized fashion, however the stability of individual particles within the cohort is low. Moreover, the flows of cohorts can regionally overlap. Together, these conditions yield a complex tracking scenario that can not be addressed by optical flow techniques that assume piecewise coherent flows, or by multiparticle tracking techniques that suffer from the local ambiguity in particle assignment. Here, we propose a graph-based assignment of particles in three consecutive frames to recover from image sequences the instantaneous organized motion of groups of particles, i.e. flows. The algorithm makes no a priori assumptions on the fraction of particles participating in organized movement, as this number continuously alters with the evolution of the flow fields in time. Graph-based assignment methods generally maximize the number of acceptable particles assignments between consecutive frames and only then minimize the association cost. In dense and unstable particle flow fields this approach produces many false positives. The here proposed approach avoids this via solution of a multi-objective optimization problem in which the number of assignments is maximized while their total association cost is minimized at the same time. The method is validated on standard benchmark data for particle tracking. In addition, we demonstrate its application to live cell microscopy where several large molecular populations with different behaviors are tracked. PMID:21720496

  17. Increasing photoactivity of titanium dioxide immobilized on glass plate with optimization of heat attachment method parameters.

    PubMed

    Behnajady, Mohammad A; Modirshahla, Nasser; Mirzamohammady, Maryam; Vahid, Behrouz; Behnajady, Bahram

    2008-12-30

    In the present work the optimization of heat attachment method for increasing photoactivity of immobilized TiO2 on glass plate was investigated. Results show that sonication time, TiO2 suspension dosage, immobilization temperature, solvent type and immobilization replications are very effective on the photoactivity of immobilized TiO2 on glass plate on the removal of C.I. Acid Red 88 (AR88) and optimizing these parameters increases the photoactivity of immobilized catalyst. In other step, the effect of operational parameters such as light intensity and initial concentration of AR88 on the removal of AR88 was investigated with four times immobilized TiO2 on glass plate. Results show that removal rate decreases with increasing initial concentration of AR88 but increases with increasing UV-light intensity. PMID:18440135

  18. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Bathaee, M; Bahrampour, A R

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained. PMID:27627280

  19. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, October 1995--November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This document is the October/November 1995 project status report of the Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling is discussed, as well as advanced residential solar hot water systems. A paper to be presented at the 1996 International Solar Energy Conference is included. The subject of this paper is rating and certification of domestic water heating systems.

  20. Optimal operation of a concurrent-flow corn dryer with a drying heat pump using superheated steam

    SciTech Connect

    Moraitis, C.S.; Akritidis, C.B.

    1998-07-01

    A numerical model of a concurrent-flow dryer of corn using superheated steam as drying medium is solved applying a shooting technique, so as to satisfy boundary conditions imposed by the optimal design of a drying heat pump. The drying heat pump is based on the theory of minimum energy cycles. The solution of the model proves the applicability of the heat pump to a concurrent-flow dryer, achieving a Specific Energy Consumption as low as 1080 kJ/kg.

  1. Optimization of heat transfer in a high-energy booster rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpley, C.; Lewis, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This article describes the performance optimization of a high-energy booster rocket powered by the proton/antiproton annihilation reaction. This procedure can be used to evaluate and optimize new concepts for advanced high-energy propulsion systems as well as to improve performance in nuclear thermal engines if coupled with a neutronics code. The analysis includes a one-speed estimation of the gamma radiation transport in the engine shield and an analysis of the heat transfer to the hydrogen working fluid as it flows through the engine. The engine performance model is optimized using the method of feasible directions concept as implemented in the CONMIN Fortran package. CONMIN is used to explore the performance limit of this conceptual design and develop sensitivity information from which conclusions are drawn about the direction of future work. The optimized engine has a specific impulse of 1037 s. The total launch system mass as designed is 890,000 kg, which includes a payload of 50,000 kg. 16 refs.

  2. Insecticide Resistance and Malaria Vector Control: The Importance of Fitness Cost Mechanisms in Determining Economically Optimal Control Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Zachary S.; Dickinson, Katherine L.; Kramer, Randall A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of insecticide resistance in harmful arthropods has economic implications, not only for the control of agricultural pests (as has been well studied), but also for the control of disease vectors, such as malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes. Previous economic work on insecticide resistance illustrates the policy relevance of knowing whether insecticide resistance mutations involve fitness costs. Using a theoretical model, this article investigates economically optimal strategies for controlling malaria-transmitting mosquitoes when there is the potential for mosquitoes to evolve resistance to insecticides. Consistent with previous literature, we find that fitness costs are a key element in the computation of economically optimal resistance management strategies. Additionally, our models indicate that different biological mechanisms underlying these fitness costs (e.g., increased adult mortality and/or decreased fecundity) can significantly alter economically optimal resistance management strategies. PMID:23448053

  3. Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings: Today's Trends in Project Finance, Clean Fuel Fleets, Combined Heat& Power, Emissions Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-07-01

    The Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings covers today's trends in project finance, combined heat& power, clean fuel fleets and emissions trading. The guide is directed at campus facilities and business managers and contains general guidance, contact information and case studies from colleges and universities across the country.

  4. Efficiency optimization of a closed indirectly fired gas turbine cycle working under two variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheshu; Wu, Jieer

    2011-08-01

    Indirectly or externally fired gas turbines (IFGT or EFGT) are interesting technologies under development for small and medium scale combined heat and power (CHP) supplies in combination with micro gas turbine technologies. The emphasis is primarily on the utilization of the waste heat from the turbine in a recuperative process and the possibility of burning biomass even "dirty" fuel by employing a high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) to avoid the combustion gases passing through the turbine. In this paper, finite time thermodynamics is employed in the performance analysis of a class of irreversible closed IFGT cycles coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. Based on the derived analytical formulae for the dimensionless power output and efficiency, the efficiency optimization is performed in two aspects. The first is to search the optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the efficiency optimization among the hot- and cold-side of the heat reservoirs and the high temperature heat exchangers for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the maximum efficiency between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat reservoir for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of the two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters on the optimum heat conductance distribution, the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching and the maximum power output, which include the inlet temperature ratio of the two heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the gas turbine, and the total pressure recovery coefficient, are provided by numerical examples. The power plant configuration under optimized operation condition leads to a smaller size, including the compressor, turbine, two heat reservoirs and the HTHE.

  5. Optimal single quantum dot heat-to-pure-spin-current converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddhiraju, Siddharth; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2015-12-01

    We delve into the conditions under which a quantum dot thermoelectric setup may be tuned to realize an optimal heat-to-pure-spin-current converter. It is well known that a heat-to-pure-spin-current converter may be realized using a non-interacting quantum dot with a spin-split energy spectrum under particle hole symmetry conditions. However, with the inclusion of Coulomb interaction U, ubiquitous in typical quantum dot systems, the relevant transport physics is expected to be altered. In this work, we provide a detailed picture of thermoelectric pure spin currents at various Coulomb interaction parameters U and describe the conditions necessary for an exact cancelation of charge transport between energy levels ɛ and their Coulomb-charged partner levels ɛ + U, so as to yield the largest terminal pure spin currents. A non-trivial aspect pointed out here is that at sufficiently large values of U (≥ U0), pure spin currents tend to optimize at points other than where the particle-hole symmetry occurs. It is also ascertained that a global maximum of pure spin current is generated at a typical value of the interaction parameter U. These optimum conditions may be easily realized using a typical gated quantum dot thermoelectric transport setup.

  6. A dynamic model for the optimization of oscillatory low grade heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Markides, Christos N.; Smith, Thomas C. B.

    2015-01-22

    The efficiency of a thermodynamic system is a key quantity on which its usefulness and wider application relies. This is especially true for a device that operates with marginal energy sources and close to ambient temperatures. Various definitions of efficiency are available, each of which reveals a certain performance characteristic of a device. Of these, some consider only the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the working fluid, whereas others contain additional information, including relevant internal components of the device that are not part of the thermodynamic cycle. Yet others attempt to factor out the conditions of the surroundings with which the device is interfacing thermally during operation. In this paper we present a simple approach for the modeling of complex oscillatory thermal-fluid systems capable of converting low grade heat into useful work. We apply the approach to the NIFTE, a novel low temperature difference heat utilization technology currently under development. We use the results from the model to calculate various efficiencies and comment on the usefulness of the different definitions in revealing performance characteristics. We show that the approach can be applied to make design optimization decisions, and suggest features for optimal efficiency of the NIFTE.

  7. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylander, Marissa N.; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Stafford, Roger J.; Hazle, John D.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2006-07-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  8. Correction of the photoelectron heating efficiency within the global ionosphere-thermosphere model using Retrospective Cost Model Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, A. G.; Goel, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Bernstein, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    Many physics-based models are used to study and monitor the terrestrial upper atmosphere. Each of these models has internal parameterizations that introduce bias if they are not tuned for a specific set of run conditions. This study uses Retrospective Cost Model Refinement (RCMR) to remove internal model bias in the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) through parameter estimation. RCMR is a low-cost method that uses the error between truth data and a biased estimate to improve the biased model. Neutral mass density measurements are used to estimate an appropriate photoelectron heating efficiency, which is shown to drive the modeled thermosphere closer to the real thermosphere. Observations from the Challenging Mini-Payload (CHAMP) satellite taken under active and quiet solar conditions show that RCMR successfully drives the GITM thermospheric mass density to the observed values, removing model bias and appropriately accounting for missing physical processes in the thermospheric heating through the photoelectron heating efficiency.

  9. The Optimized Operation of Gas Turbine Combined Heat and Power Units Oriented for the Grid-Connected Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shu; Ge, Xiaolin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, according to various grid-connected demands, the optimization scheduling models of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) units are established with three scheduling modes, which are tracking the total generation scheduling mode, tracking steady output scheduling mode and tracking peaking curve scheduling mode. In order to reduce the solution difficulty, based on the principles of modern algebraic integers, linearizing techniques are developed to handle complex nonlinear constrains of the variable conditions, and the optimized operation problem of CHP units is converted into a mixed-integer linear programming problem. Finally, with specific examples, the 96 points day ahead, heat and power supply plans of the systems are optimized. The results show that, the proposed models and methods can develop appropriate coordination heat and power optimization programs according to different grid-connected control.

  10. Toward a new spacecraft optimal design lifetime? Impact of marginal cost of durability and reduced launch price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelgrove, Kailah B.; Saleh, Joseph Homer

    2016-10-01

    The average design lifetime of satellites continues to increase, in part due to the expectation that the satellite cost per operational day decreases monotonically with increased design lifetime. In this work, we challenge this expectation by revisiting the durability choice problem for spacecraft in the face of reduced launch price and under various cost of durability models. We first provide a brief overview of the economic thought on durability and highlight its limitations as they pertain to our problem (e.g., the assumption of zero marginal cost of durability). We then investigate the merging influence of spacecraft cost of durability and launch price, and we identify conditions that give rise cost-optimal design lifetimes that are shorter than the longest lifetime technically achievable. For example, we find that high costs of durability favor short design lifetimes, and that under these conditions the optimal choice is relatively robust to reduction in launch prices. By contrast, lower costs of durability favor longer design lifetimes, and the optimal choice is highly sensitive to reduction in launch price. In both cases, reduction in launch prices translates into reduction of the optimal design lifetime. Our results identify a number of situations for which satellite operators would be better served by spacecraft with shorter design lifetimes. Beyond cost issues and repeat purchases, other implications of long design lifetime include the increased risk of technological slowdown given the lower frequency of purchases and technology refresh, and the increased risk for satellite operators that the spacecraft will be technologically obsolete before the end of its life (with the corollary of loss of value and competitive advantage). We conclude with the recommendation that, should pressure to extend spacecraft design lifetime continue, satellite manufacturers should explore opportunities to lease their spacecraft to operators, or to take a stake in the ownership

  11. Optimal performance of heat engines with a finite source or sink and inequalities between means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2016-07-01

    Given a system with a finite heat capacity and a heat reservoir, and two values of initial temperatures, T+ and T-(optimal work extraction larger: when the reservoir is an infinite source at T+ and the system is a sink at T-, or, when the reservoir is an infinite sink at T- and the system acts as a source at T+? It is found that in order to compare the total extracted work, and the corresponding efficiency in the two cases, we need to consider three regimes as suggested by an inequality, the so-called arithmetic mean-geometric mean inequality, involving the arithmetic and the geometric means of the two temperature values T+ and T-. In each of these regimes, the efficiency at total work obeys certain universal bounds, given only in terms of the ratio of initial temperatures. The general theoretical results are exemplified for thermodynamic systems for which internal energy and temperature are power laws of the entropy. The conclusions may serve as benchmarks in the design of heat engines, where we can choose the nature of the finite system, so as to tune the total extractable work and/or the corresponding efficiency.

  12. Optimal performance of heat engines with a finite source or sink and inequalities between means.

    PubMed

    Johal, Ramandeep S

    2016-07-01

    Given a system with a finite heat capacity and a heat reservoir, and two values of initial temperatures, T_{+} and T_{-}(optimal work extraction larger: when the reservoir is an infinite source at T_{+} and the system is a sink at T_{-}, or, when the reservoir is an infinite sink at T_{-} and the system acts as a source at T_{+}? It is found that in order to compare the total extracted work, and the corresponding efficiency in the two cases, we need to consider three regimes as suggested by an inequality, the so-called arithmetic mean-geometric mean inequality, involving the arithmetic and the geometric means of the two temperature values T_{+} and T_{-}. In each of these regimes, the efficiency at total work obeys certain universal bounds, given only in terms of the ratio of initial temperatures. The general theoretical results are exemplified for thermodynamic systems for which internal energy and temperature are power laws of the entropy. The conclusions may serve as benchmarks in the design of heat engines, where we can choose the nature of the finite system, so as to tune the total extractable work and/or the corresponding efficiency. PMID:27575093

  13. Optimal performance of periodically driven, stochastic heat engines under limited control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michael; Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-04-01

    We consider the performance of periodically driven stochastic heat engines in the linear response regime. Reaching the theoretical bounds for efficiency and efficiency at maximum power typically requires full control over the design and the driving of the system. We develop a framework which allows us to quantify the role that limited control over the system has on the performance. Specifically, we show that optimizing the driving entering the work extraction for a given temperature protocol leads to a universal, one-parameter dependence for both maximum efficiency and maximum power as a function of efficiency. In particular, we show that reaching Carnot efficiency (and, hence, Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency at maximum power) requires to have control over the amplitude of the full Hamiltonian of the system. Since the kinetic energy cannot be controlled by an external parameter, heat engines based on underdamped dynamics can typically not reach Carnot efficiency. We illustrate our general theory with a paradigmatic case study of a heat engine consisting of an underdamped charged particle in a modulated two-dimensional harmonic trap in the presence of a magnetic field.

  14. Optimization of a low-cost truly preemptive multitasking PC diagnostic workstation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Andriole, K P; Avrin, D E; Arenson, R L

    1997-08-01

    The Windows 95/NT operating systems (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA) currently provide the only low-cost truly preemptive multitasking environment and as such become an attractive diagnostic workstation platform. The purpose of this project is to test and optimize display station graphical user interface (GUI) actions previously designed on the pseudomultitasking Macintosh (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) platform, and image data transmission using time slicing/ dynamic prioritization assignment capabilities of the new Windows platform. A diagnostic workstation in the clinical environment must process two categories of events: user interaction with the GUI through keyboard/mouse input, and transmission of incoming data files. These processes contend for central processing units (CPU) time resulting in GUI "lockout" during image transmission or delay in transmission until GUI "quiet time." WinSockets and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocal (TCP/IP) communication protocol software (Microsoft) are implemented using dynamic priority timeslicing to ensure that GUI delays at the time of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file transfer do not exceed 1/10 second. Assignment of thread priority does not translate into an absolute fixed percentage of CPU time. Therefore, the relationship between dynamic priority assignment by the processor, and the GUI and communication application threads will be more fully investigated to optimize CPU resource allocation. These issues will be tested using 10 MB/sec Ethernet and 100 MB/sec fast and wide Ethernet transmission. Preliminary results of typical clinical files (10 to 30 MB) over Ethernet show no visually perceptible interruption of the GUI, suggesting that the new Windows PC platform may be a viable diagnostic workstation option. PMID:9268871

  15. Real-time combined heat and power operational strategy using a hierarchical optimization algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, K.; Cho, H.; Luck, R.; Mago, P. J.

    2011-06-01

    Existing attempts to optimize the operation of combined heat and power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This article considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short-term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm (i.e. a hierarchical controller that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step). In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying (i.e. measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ‘measured’ values as initial conditions). The simulation environment presented in this article features non-linear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. Finally, the results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions has the potential to yield significant savings when compared with conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

  16. Asymptotically Optimal Motion Planning for Learned Tasks Using Time-Dependent Cost Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Chris; Ye, Gu; Alterovitz, Ron

    2015-01-01

    In unstructured environments in people’s homes and workspaces, robots executing a task may need to avoid obstacles while satisfying task motion constraints, e.g., keeping a plate of food level to avoid spills or properly orienting a finger to push a button. We introduce a sampling-based method for computing motion plans that are collision-free and minimize a cost metric that encodes task motion constraints. Our time-dependent cost metric, learned from a set of demonstrations, encodes features of a task’s motion that are consistent across the demonstrations and, hence, are likely required to successfully execute the task. Our sampling-based motion planner uses the learned cost metric to compute plans that simultaneously avoid obstacles and satisfy task constraints. The motion planner is asymptotically optimal and minimizes the Mahalanobis distance between the planned trajectory and the distribution of demonstrations in a feature space parameterized by the locations of task-relevant objects. The motion planner also leverages the distribution of the demonstrations to significantly reduce plan computation time. We demonstrate the method’s effectiveness and speed using a small humanoid robot performing tasks requiring both obstacle avoidance and satisfaction of learned task constraints. Note to Practitioners Motivated by the desire to enable robots to autonomously operate in cluttered home and workplace environments, this paper presents an approach for intuitively training a robot in a manner that enables it to repeat the task in novel scenarios and in the presence of unforeseen obstacles in the environment. Based on user-provided demonstrations of the task, our method learns features of the task that are consistent across the demonstrations and that we expect should be repeated by the robot when performing the task. We next present an efficient algorithm for planning robot motions to perform the task based on the learned features while avoiding obstacles. We

  17. User manual for GEOCITY: A computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume 1: Main text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, H. D.; Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.

    1982-09-01

    The cost of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir was calculated. The GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, and fan-coil units. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. The life cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end users are calculated by discounted cash flow analysis.

  18. A PC program to optimize system configuration for desired reliability at minimum cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hills, Steven W.; Siahpush, Ali S.

    1994-01-01

    High reliability is desired in all engineered systems. One way to improve system reliability is to use redundant components. When redundant components are used, the problem becomes one of allocating them to achieve the best reliability without exceeding other design constraints such as cost, weight, or volume. Systems with few components can be optimized by simply examining every possible combination but the number of combinations for most systems is prohibitive. A computerized iteration of the process is possible but anything short of a super computer requires too much time to be practical. Many researchers have derived mathematical formulations for calculating the optimum configuration directly. However, most of the derivations are based on continuous functions whereas the real system is composed of discrete entities. Therefore, these techniques are approximations of the true optimum solution. This paper describes a computer program that will determine the optimum configuration of a system of multiple redundancy of both standard and optional components. The algorithm is a pair-wise comparative progression technique which can derive the true optimum by calculating only a small fraction of the total number of combinations. A designer can quickly analyze a system with this program on a personal computer.

  19. Heat, electricity, or transportation? The optimal use of residual and waste biomass in Europe from an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Steubing, Bernhard; Zah, Rainer; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The optimal use of forest energy wood, industrial wood residues, waste wood, agricultural residues, animal manure, biowaste, and sewage sludge in 2010 and 2030 was assessed for Europe. An energy system model was developed comprising 13 principal fossil technologies for the production of heat, electricity, and transport and 173 bioenergy conversion routes. The net environmental benefits of substituting fossil energy with bioenergy were calculated for all approximately 1500 combinations based on life cycle assessment (LCA) results. An optimization model determines the best use of biomass for different environmental indicators within the quantified EU-27 context of biomass availability and fossil energy utilization. Key factors determining the optimal use of biomass are the conversion efficiencies of bioenergy technologies and the kind and quantity of fossil energy technologies that can be substituted. Provided that heat can be used efficiently, optimizations for different environmental indicators almost always indicate that woody biomass is best used for combined heat and power generation, if coal, oil, or fuel oil based technologies can be substituted. The benefits of its conversion to SNG or ethanol are significantly lower. For non-woody biomass electricity generation, transportation, and heating yield almost comparable benefits as long as high conversion efficiencies and optimal substitutions are assured. The shares of fossil heat, electricity, and transportation that could be replaced with bioenergy are also provided. PMID:22091634

  20. Shellfish mariculture facility which employs passive solar heating and heat pump systems. Performance and cost analysis study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zoto, G.A.; Krabach, M.H.

    1984-06-01

    This report incorporates operations data such as clam growth rates, clam biomass buildup, water volume, and algal food requirements compiled while developing a year-round production schedule for production of hard clam seed. The facility includes a passive solar hatchery and heat pump. Three major areas which affect development of energy-efficient mariculture are addressed: biological operation parameters, energy requirements, and system economics. (LEW)

  1. Cost-benefit study of consumer product take-back programs using IBM's WIT reverse logistics optimization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerakamolmal, Pitipong; Lee, Yung-Joon; Fasano, J. P.; Hale, Rhea; Jacques, Mary

    2002-02-01

    In recent years, there has been increased focus by regulators, manufacturers, and consumers on the issue of product end of life management for electronics. This paper presents an overview of a conceptual study designed to examine the costs and benefits of several different Product Take Back (PTB) scenarios for used electronics equipment. The study utilized a reverse logistics supply chain model to examine the effects of several different factors in PTB programs. The model was done using the IBM supply chain optimization tool known as WIT (Watson Implosion Technology). Using the WIT tool, we were able to determine a theoretical optimal cost scenario for PTB programs. The study was designed to assist IBM internally in determining theoretical optimal Product Take Back program models and determining potential incentives for increasing participation rates.

  2. Optimization of a one-step heat-inducible in vivo mini DNA vector production system.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Sum, Chi Hong; Wettig, Shawn; Slavcev, Roderick A

    2014-01-01

    While safer than their viral counterparts, conventional circular covalently closed (CCC) plasmid DNA vectors offer a limited safety profile. They often result in the transfer of unwanted prokaryotic sequences, antibiotic resistance genes, and bacterial origins of replication that may lead to unwanted immunostimulatory responses. Furthermore, such vectors may impart the potential for chromosomal integration, thus potentiating oncogenesis. Linear covalently closed (LCC), bacterial sequence free DNA vectors have shown promising clinical improvements in vitro and in vivo. However, the generation of such minivectors has been limited by in vitro enzymatic reactions hindering their downstream application in clinical trials. We previously characterized an in vivo temperature-inducible expression system, governed by the phage λ pL promoter and regulated by the thermolabile λ CI[Ts]857 repressor to produce recombinant protelomerase enzymes in E. coli. In this expression system, induction of recombinant protelomerase was achieved by increasing culture temperature above the 37°C threshold temperature. Overexpression of protelomerase led to enzymatic reactions, acting on genetically engineered multi-target sites called "Super Sequences" that serve to convert conventional CCC plasmid DNA into LCC DNA minivectors. Temperature up-shift, however, can result in intracellular stress responses and may alter plasmid replication rates; both of which may be detrimental to LCC minivector production. We sought to optimize our one-step in vivo DNA minivector production system under various induction schedules in combination with genetic modifications influencing plasmid replication, processing rates, and cellular heat stress responses. We assessed different culture growth techniques, growth media compositions, heat induction scheduling and temperature, induction duration, post-induction temperature, and E. coli genetic background to improve the productivity and scalability of our system

  3. Self-Heating Effects and Analog Performance Optimization of Fin-Type Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsunaki; Beppu, Nobuyasu; Chen, Kunro; Oda, Shunri; Uchida, Ken

    2013-04-01

    The self-heating effects (SHEs) of bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) fin-type field-effect transistors (FinFETs) and their impacts on circuit performance have been investigated on the basis of a realistic thermal conductivity of silicon. The heat dissipation via interconnect wires and interface thermal resistance in the high-κ gate stack were incorporated in simulations. It is shown that the depth of the shallow trench isolation (STI) of bulk FinFETs cannot be decreased to less than 100 nm owing to the increase in off-state leakage current. We observed that the thermal resistance Rth of SOI FinFETs greatly decreases upon thinning the buried oxide (BOX) layer. When the BOX thickness tBOX is less than 50 nm, the Rth of SOI FinFETs is smaller than that of bulk FinFETs with an STI thickness of 100 nm, indicating a lower operation temperature of the thin-BOX SOI FinFETs than that of bulk FinFETs. The lower operation temperature of the 5-nm BOX SOI FinFET was confirmed under a practical bias condition for analog operations. In fin width, Wfin, versus Rth characteristics, a strong Wfin dependence of Rth was observed only in the bulk FinFETs, implying that fluctuations in Wfin result in the variability of the operation temperature of the bulk FinFETs. Analog performance has been analyzed by calculating the cutoff frequency fT and the maximum oscillation frequency fmax. We demonstrated that both fT and fmax can be maximized in SOI FinFETs by optimizing tBOX with regard to electrical and thermal properties. Better analog performance, and hence the optimization of tBOX, are indispensable for the device design of a FinFET-based system-on-a-chip (SoC) platform.

  4. Performance optimization of minimally nonlinear irreversible heat engines and refrigerators under a trade-off figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    A performance optimization for minimally nonlinear heat engines and refrigerators is conducted under an optimization criterion of Ω. The results show that under tight-coupling conditions, the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) bounds in asymmetric dissipation limits are the same as those obtained by de Tomas et al. [Phys. Rev. E 87, 012105 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.012105] for low dissipation heat devices. The efficiency bounds for heat engines under nontight-coupling conditions are also analyzed and the experimental results lie between theoretical results obtained under different coupling strengths. For refrigerators, the theoretical results are also in good agreement with some observed results. The efficiency and COP bounds under the Ω criterion are refined, which are closer to real heat engines and refrigerators.

  5. Optimal thermionic energy conversion with established electrodes for high-temperature topping and process heating

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1980-07-01

    Advantages of thermionic energy conversion (TEC) have been counted and are recounted with emphasis on high-temperature service in coal-combustion products. Efficient, economical, nonpolluting utilization of coal here and now is a critically important national goal. And TEC can augment this capability not only by the often proposed topping of steam power plants but also by higher-temperature topping and process heating. For these applications, applied-research-and-technology (ART) work reveals that optimal TEC with approx. 1000-to approx. 1100 K collectors is possible using well-established tungsten electrodes. Such TEC with 1800 K emitters could approach 26.6% efficiency at 27.4 W/cm/sup 2/ with approx. 1000 K collectors and 21.7% at 22.6 W/cm/sup 2/ with approx. 1100 K collectors. These performances require 1.5- and 1.7-eV collector work functions (not the 1-eV ultimate) with nearly negligible interelectrode losses. Such collectors correspond to tungsten electrode systems in approx. 0.9-to approx. 6-torr cesium pressures with 1600-to-1900 K emitters. Because higher heat-rejection temperatures for TEC allow greater collector work functions, interelectrode-loss reduction becomes an increasingly important target for applications aimed at elevated temperatures. Studies of intragap modifications and new electrodes that will allow better electron emission and collection with lower cesium pressures are among the TEC-ART approaches to reduced interelectrode losses. These solutions will provide very effective TEC to serve directly in coal-combustion products for high-temperature topping and process heating. In turn this will help to use coal-and to use it well.

  6. Optimal number of minimal repairs with cumulative repair cost limit for a two-unit system with failure rate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Min-Tsai; Yan, Huey

    2016-01-01

    A discrete replacement model is presented that includes a cumulative repair cost limit for a two-unit system with failure rate interactions between the units. We assume a failure in unit 1 causes the failure rate in unit 2 to increase, whereas a failure in unit 2 causes a failure in unit 1, resulting in a total system failure. If unit 1 fails and the cumulative repair cost till to this failure is less than a limit L, then unit 1 is repaired. If there is a failure in unit 1 and the cumulative repair cost exceeds L or the number of failures equals n, the entire system is preventively replaced. The system is also replaced at a total failure, and such replacement cost is higher than the preventive replacement cost. The long-term expected cost per unit time is derived using the expected costs as the optimality criterion. The minimum-cost policy is derived, and existence and uniqueness are proved.

  7. Towards thermal design optimization of tubular digesters in cold climates: a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Perrigault, Thibault; Weatherford, Vergil; Martí-Herrero, Jaime; Poggio, Davide

    2012-11-01

    A cold climate, low cost, tubular digester is monitored and temperatures from different parts of the slurry, greenhouse, and adobe walls are presented, discussing the thermal performance of the digester. The slurry exhibits a vertical gradient of 6°C, with a mean value of 24.5°C, while the ambient temperature varies from 10°C to 30°C, showing the efficiency of the system as a solar heat collector with thermal inertia. A simple time-dependent thermal model is developed using inputs of solar radiation, wind velocity, ambient temperature, and digester geometry. The model outputs include temperatures of the slurry, the biogas, its holding membrane and the greenhouse air, wall and cover. Radiative, convective and conductive heat transfer phenomena are considered between all system elements. The model has 0.47°C (2%) standard error for the average slurry temperature. This model can be used to predict the influence of geometry and materials on the performance of the digester. PMID:22989653

  8. Cost of locomotion and heat balance during rest and running from 0 to 55 degrees C in a patas monkey.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, S A

    1980-11-01

    A young patas monkey was run on a treadmill for 15-20 min at speeds in excess of 15 km times h-1 over a range of laboratory air temperatures from 0 to 55 degrees C. Cost of locomotion for the monkey was 83% that predicted for a running mammal of similar weight, 4 kg. At the highest steady-state running of speeds, the patas monkey's energy expenditure was 11 times the resting rate. Heat storage and respiratory evaporation during running each accounted for less than 16% of the heat production. Cutaneous evaporation, mainly sweating, was the major means of heat loss at high ambient temperatures and during heavy exercise. Maximum sweat rates of 0.5 mg times cm-2 times min-1 found in these experiments approach the sweat rates of humans. Whole-body dry thermal conductance increased 2-3 times the rest value at a given temperature. Environmentally gained heat contributed about two-thirds of the total heat load on the patas monkey at rest at 53 degrees C. At these same temperatures, environmental and metabolic heat loads were about equal when the animal ran at moderately high speeds (11-13.4 km times h-1). PMID:7429901

  9. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  10. Screening and optimization of low-cost medium for Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 culture using RSM

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanjie; He, Yanhui; Wu, Zhansheng; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 was isolated from salinized soils from Xinjiang Province. We optimized the composition of the low-cost medium of P. putida Rs-198 based on its bacterial concentration, as well as its phosphate-dissolving and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing capabilities using the response surface methodology (RSM), and a mathematical model was developed to show the effect of each medium component and its interactions on phosphate dissolution and IAA production. The model predicted a maximum phosphate concentration in medium containing 63.23 mg/L inorganic phosphate with 49.22 g/L corn flour, 14.63 g/L soybean meal, 2.03 g/L K2HPO4, 0.19 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. The maximum IAA concentration (18.73 mg/L) was predicted in medium containing 52.41 g/L corn flour, 15.82 g/L soybean meal, 2.40 g/L K2HPO4, 0.17 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. These predicted values were also verified through experiments, with a cell density of 1013 cfu/mL, phosphate dissolution of 64.33 mg/L, and IAA concentration of 18.08 mg/L. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values of each model justifies the validity of both the response models. The study aims to provide a basis for industrialized fermentation using P. putida Rs-198. PMID:25763026

  11. An optimal cost effectiveness study on Zimbabwe cholera seasonal data from 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Tridip; Mukhopadhyay, Soumalya; Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of cholera outbreak is a serious issue in underdeveloped and developing countries. In Zimbabwe, after the massive outbreak in 2008-09, cholera cases and deaths are reported every year from some provinces. Substantial number of reported cholera cases in some provinces during and after the epidemic in 2008-09 indicates a plausible presence of seasonality in cholera incidence in those regions. We formulate a compartmental mathematical model with periodic slow-fast transmission rate to study such recurrent occurrences and fitted the model to cumulative cholera cases and deaths for different provinces of Zimbabwe from the beginning of cholera outbreak in 2008-09 to June 2011. Daily and weekly reported cholera incidence data were collected from Zimbabwe epidemiological bulletin, Zimbabwe Daily cholera updates and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Zimbabwe (OCHA, Zimbabwe). For each province, the basic reproduction number ([Formula: see text]) in periodic environment is estimated. To the best of our knowledge, this is probably a pioneering attempt to estimate [Formula: see text] in periodic environment using real-life data set of cholera epidemic for Zimbabwe. Our estimates of [Formula: see text] agree with the previous estimate for some provinces but differ significantly for Bulawayo, Mashonaland West, Manicaland, Matabeleland South and Matabeleland North. Seasonal trend in cholera incidence is observed in Harare, Mashonaland West, Mashonaland East, Manicaland and Matabeleland South. Our result suggests that, slow transmission is a dominating factor for cholera transmission in most of these provinces. Our model projects [Formula: see text] cholera cases and [Formula: see text] cholera deaths during the end of the epidemic in 2008-09 to January 1, 2012. We also determine an optimal cost-effective control strategy among the four government undertaken interventions namely promoting hand-hygiene & clean water distribution, vaccination, treatment

  12. Choice and optimization of ratio of components to develop fast-mounted thermostable heat-insulating constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginova, N. A.; Grigor'ev, S. V.; Lapin, E. E.; Pogorelov, S. I.; Ryzhenkov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Fast-mounted heat-insulating constructions based on foamed synthetic rubbers, polyethylene, and polyurethane are characterized by a thermostability up to 150°C and emit toxic substances when burnt. However, there is a need for heat insulation of surfaces with higher coolant temperatures, such as pipelines, equipment of nuclear and thermal power plants, and heating systems with remote heat sources. One of the most promising types of heat insulation materials for creation of fast-mounted heat insulation constructions is the syntactic foams or thin-film multilayer heat-insulating coatings (TFMHIC), which are created using hollow microspheres and various types of binders. The formation of TFMHIC on the heat-insulating surface is carried out mostly by means of spraying methods that have well proven themselves at coating on flat and cylindrical surfaces of large area, but they turned out ineffective for cylindrical surfaces with a diameter of 300 mm and less, since they are characterized by a large degree of carryover of composite material. This article analyzed the binders and microspheres promising to create the fast-mounted heat-insulating constructions based on TFMHIC with high thermostability. Based on the analysis, a conclusion is drawn that organicsilicon binding and glass microspheres are promising for use in the heat-insulating constructions with thermostability up to 300°C. The results of experimental research are given that point to the possibility of predicting the optimal composition of heat-insulating material characterized by a high degree of filling with microspheres with maintaining the mechanical strength, by means of performing the analysis of rheological characteristics of nonpolymerized liquid compositions of heat-insulation material. The index of tensile strength in bending was the criterion for evaluating the mechanical strength of heat-insulating material. The critical volume concentrations of filling the heat-insulating material with glass

  13. Virtual Grower: Software to Calculate Heating Costs of Greenhouse Production in the US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouses are used in many climates either for season extension or year-round production, and can be expensive to heat. Greenhouse users and growers are often faced with management decisions that rely on an understanding of how temperature settings, heating systems, fuel types, and construction d...

  14. Cost-Effective Control of Chronic Viral Diseases: Finding the Optimal Level of Screening and Contact Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Benjamin; Brandeau, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) afflict millions of people worldwide. A key public health challenge in managing such diseases is identifying infected, asymptomatic individuals so that they can receive antiviral treatment. Such treatment can benefit both the treated individual (by improving quality and length of life) and the population as a whole (through reduced transmission). We develop a compartmental model of a chronic, treatable infectious disease and use it to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of different levels of screening and contact tracing. We show that: 1) the optimal strategy is to get infected individuals into treatment at the maximal rate until the incremental health benefits balance the incremental cost of controlling the disease; 2) as one reduces the disease prevalence by moving people into treatment (which decreases the chance that they will infect others), one should increase the level of contact tracing to compensate for the decreased effectiveness of screening; 3) as the disease becomes less prevalent, it is optimal to spend more per case identified; and 4) the relative mix of screening and contact tracing at any level of disease prevalence is such that the marginal efficiency of contact tracing (cost per infected person found) equals that of screening if possible (e.g., when capacity limitations are not binding). We also show how to determine the cost-effective equilibrium level of disease prevalence (among untreated individuals), and we develop an approximation of the path of the optimal prevalence over time. Using this, one can obtain a close approximation of the optimal solution without having to solve an optimal control problem. We apply our methods to an example of hepatitis B virus. PMID:20043926

  15. Combined heat and power systems for commercial buildings: investigating cost, emissions, and primary energy reduction based on system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Amanda D.

    Combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity and useful heat from fuel. When power is produced near a building which consumes power, transmission losses are averted, and heat which is a byproduct of power production may be useful to the building. That thermal energy can be used for hot water or space heating, among other applications. This dissertation focuses on CHP systems using natural gas, a common fuel, and systems serving commercial buildings in the United States. First, the necessary price difference between purchased electricity and purchased fuel is analyzed in terms of the efficiencies of system components by comparing CHP with a conventional separate heat and power (SHP) configuration, where power is purchased from the electrical grid and heat is provided by a gas boiler. Similarly, the relationship between CDE due to electricity purchases and due to fuel purchases is analyzed as well as the relationship between primary energy conversion factors for electricity and fuel. The primary energy conversion factor indicates the quantity of source energy necessary to produce the energy purchased at the site. Next, greenhouse gas emissions are investigated for a variety of commercial buildings using CHP or SHP. The relationship between the magnitude of the reduction in emissions and the parameters of the CHP system is explored. The cost savings and reduction in primary energy consumption are evaluated for the same buildings. Finally, a CHP system is analyzed with the addition of a thermal energy storage (TES) component, which can store excess thermal energy and deliver it later if necessary. The potential for CHP with TES to reduce cost, emissions, and primary energy consumption is investigated for a variety of buildings. A case study is developed for one building for which TES does provide additional benefits over a CHP system alone, and the requirements for a water tank TES device are examined.

  16. Structural cost optimization of photovoltaic central power station modules and support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, P. D.; Stolte, W. J.; Marsh, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of photovoltaic module structural support concepts for photovoltaic central power stations and their associated costs are presented. The objective of the study has been the identification of structural cost drivers. Parametric structural design and cost analyses of complete array systems consisting of modules, primary support structures, and foundations were performed. Area related module cost was found to be constant with design, size, and loading. A curved glass module concept was evaluated and found to have the potential to significantly reduce panel structural costs. Conclusions of the study are: array costs do not vary greatly among the designs evaluated; panel and array costs are strongly dependent on design loading; and the best support configuration is load dependent

  17. Application of a Multi-Objective Optimization Method to Provide Least Cost Alternatives for NPS Pollution Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maringanti, Chetan; Chaubey, Indrajeet; Arabi, Mazdak; Engel, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants such as phosphorus, nitrogen, sediment, and pesticides are the foremost sources of water contamination in many of the water bodies in the Midwestern agricultural watersheds. This problem is expected to increase in the future with the increasing demand to provide corn as grain or stover for biofuel production. Best management practices (BMPs) have been proven to effectively reduce the NPS pollutant loads from agricultural areas. However, in a watershed with multiple farms and multiple BMPs feasible for implementation, it becomes a daunting task to choose a right combination of BMPs that provide maximum pollution reduction for least implementation costs. Multi-objective algorithms capable of searching from a large number of solutions are required to meet the given watershed management objectives. Genetic algorithms have been the most popular optimization algorithms for the BMP selection and placement. However, previous BMP optimization models did not study pesticide which is very commonly used in corn areas. Also, with corn stover being projected as a viable alternative for biofuel production there might be unintended consequences of the reduced residue in the corn fields on water quality. Therefore, there is a need to study the impact of different levels of residue management in combination with other BMPs at a watershed scale. In this research the following BMPs were selected for placement in the watershed: (a) residue management, (b) filter strips, (c) parallel terraces, (d) contour farming, and (e) tillage. We present a novel method of combing different NPS pollutants into a single objective function, which, along with the net costs, were used as the two objective functions during optimization. In this study we used BMP tool, a database that contains the pollution reduction and cost information of different BMPs under consideration which provides pollutant loads during optimization. The BMP optimization was performed using a NSGA

  18. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

  19. Optimization of the design and mode of operation of a QD laser for reducing the heat-to-bitrate ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E. Savelyev, A. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Gordeev, N. Yu.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Zubov, F. I.; Korenev, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Heat dissipation under the high-speed modulation of quantum dot edge-emitting lasers is considered. It is shown that, for a given laser diode, there is a bias current at which the heat-to-bitrate ratio is minimized. Moreover, there exists a certain optimal optical loss of the laser cavity at which the lowest heat-to-bitrate ratio is provided for any design of edge-emitting lasers that can be fabricated from an epitaxial structure. The heat-to-bitrate ratio and the corresponding bitrate are numerically calculated and analytical expressions are derived. It is demonstrated that the heat-to-bitrate ratio of quantum dot edge-emitting lasers can be less than 0.4 pJ/bit at a bitrate exceeding 10 Gbit/s.

  20. Heat pump employing optimal refrigerant compressor for low pressure ratio applications

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; two refrigerant heat exchangers; one for effecting the heat exchange with the fluid and a second refrigerant-heat exchange fluid heat exchanger for effecting a low pressure ratio of compression of the refrigerant; a rotary compressor for compressing the refrigerant with low power consumption at the low pressure ratio; at least one throttling valve connecting at the inlet side of heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit serially connecting the above elements; refrigerant in the circuit; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant.

  1. Heat Treatment Optimizations for Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Racetrack Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G. L.

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is developing Wind-and-React (W&R) Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) accelerator magnet technology for insert coils, to surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb-based magnets, and eventually develop hybrid systems that can approach 20 T dipole fields. The Bi-2212 technology is being developed in close collaboration with industry, and has been partly supported by the US Very High Field Superconducting Magnet Collaboration (VHFSMC). Steady improvements were made over the last several years, with coil HTS-SC08 reaching 2636 A, or about 85% of its witness sample critical current (Ic). Though this is still a factor 3 to 4 too low to be competitive with Nb-based materials, it is expected that the required Ic can be achieved through further conductor optimizations. Recent developments include the commissioning of infrastructure for the reaction of coils at LBNL. Earlier coils were fabricated and tested at LBNL, but were reacted at the wire manufacturer. We describe in detail the furnace calibrations and heat treatment optimizations that enable coil reactions at temperatures approaching 890°C with a homogeneity of ±1°C in a pure oxygen flow. We reacted two new coils at LBNL, and tested the performance of coil HTS-SC10 at 4.2 K in self-field using a superconducting transformer system. We find that its performance is consistent with witness samples, and comparable to coil HTS-SC08, which is an identical coil that was reacted at Oxford Instruments Superconductor Technology (OST), thereby validating the in-house reaction process

  2. Electromagnetic optimization of dual-mode antennas for radiometry-controlled heating of superficial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rolfsnes, Hans O.; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Juang, Titania; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2005-04-01

    The large variance of survival in the treatment of large superficial tumors indicates that the efficacy of current therapies can be dramatically improved. Hyperthermia has shown significant enhancement of response when used in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Control of temperature is a critical factor for treatment quality (and thus effectiveness), since the response of tumor and normal cells is significantly different over a range of just a few degrees (41-45°). For diffuse spreading tumors, microwave conformal arrays have been shown to be a sound solution to deposit the power necessary to reach the goal temperature throughout the targeted tissue. Continuous temperature monitoring is required for feedback control of power to compensate for physiologic (e.g. blood perfusion and dielectric properties) changes. Microwave radiometric thermometry has been proposed to complement individual fluoroptic probes to non-invasively map superficial and sub-surface temperatures. The challenge is to integrate the broadband antenna used for radiometric sensing with the high power antenna used for power deposition. A modified version of the dual concentric conductor antenna presented previously is optimized for such use. Several design challenges are presented including preventing unwanted radiating modes and thermal and electromagnetic coupling between the two antennas, and accommodating dielectric changes of the target tissue. Advanced 3D and planar 2D simulation software are used to achieve an initial optimized design, focused on maintaining appropriate radiation efficiency and pattern for both heating and radiometry antennas. A cutting edge automated measurement system has been realized to characterize the antennas in a tissue equivalent material and to confirm the simulation results. Finally, the guidelines for further development and improvement of this initial design are presented together with a preliminary implementation of the feedback program to be used

  3. Optimal Weighting of Costs and Probabilities in a Risky Motor Decision-Making Task Requires Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neyedli, Heather F.; Welsh, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that people choose to aim toward an "optimal" endpoint when faced with a movement task with externally imposed payoffs. This optimal endpoint is modeled based on the magnitude of the payoffs and the probability of hitting the different payoff regions (endpoint variability). Endpoint selection, however, has only been…

  4. Robust optimization for nonlinear time-delay dynamical system of dha regulon with cost sensitivity constraint in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Chongyang; Chang, Liang; Xie, Jun; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2016-09-01

    Time-delay dynamical systems, which depend on both the current state of the system and the state at delayed times, have been an active area of research in many real-world applications. In this paper, we consider a nonlinear time-delay dynamical system of dha-regulonwith unknown time-delays in batch culture of glycerol bioconversion to 1,3-propanediol induced by Klebsiella pneumonia. Some important properties and strong positive invariance are discussed. Because of the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentrations of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium points for the time-delay system, a quantitative biological robustness for the concentrations of intracellular substances is defined by penalizing a weighted sum of the expectation and variance of the relative deviation between system outputs before and after the time-delays are perturbed. Our goal is to determine optimal values of the time-delays. To this end, we formulate an optimization problem in which the time delays are decision variables and the cost function is to minimize the biological robustness. This optimization problem is subject to the time-delay system, parameter constraints, continuous state inequality constraints for ensuring that the concentrations of extracellular and intracellular substances lie within specified limits, a quality constraint to reflect operational requirements and a cost sensitivity constraint for ensuring that an acceptable level of the system performance is achieved. It is approximated as a sequence of nonlinear programming sub-problems through the application of constraint transcription and local smoothing approximation techniques. Due to the highly complex nature of this optimization problem, the computational cost is high. Thus, a parallel algorithm is proposed to solve these nonlinear programming sub-problems based on the filled function method. Finally, it is observed that the obtained optimal estimates for the time-delays are highly satisfactory

  5. Investigation of low-cost ablative heat shield fabrication for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Improvements in the processes and design to reduce the manufacturing costs for low density ablative panels for the space shuttle are discussed. The areas that were studied included methods of loading honeycomb core, alternative reinforcement concepts, and the use of reusable subpanels. A review of previous studies on the fabrication of low-cost ablative panels and on permissible defects that do not affect thermal performance was conducted. Considerable differences in the quoted prices for ablative panels, even though the various contractors had reported similar fabrication times were discovered. How these cost differences arise from different estimating criteria and which estimating assumptions and other costs must be included in order to arrive at a realistic price are discussed.

  6. Comparison and Validation of Operational Cost in Smart Houses with the Introduction of a Heat Pump or a Gas Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoji, Tsubasa; Tahara, Hayato; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Yona, Atsushi; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2015-02-01

    Due to the concerns of global warming and the depletion of energy resources, renewable energies such as wind generation (WG) and photovoltaic generation (PV) are gaining attention in distribution systems. Efficient electric equipment such as heat pumps (HP) not only contribute low levels of carbon to society, but are also beneficial for consumers. In addition, gas instruments such as the gas engine (GE) and fuel cells (FC) are expected to reduce electricity cost by exhaust heat. Thus, it is important to clarify which systems (HP or GE) are more beneficial for consumers throughout the year. This paper compares the operational cost for the smart house between using the HP and the GE. Current electricity and gas prices are used to calculate the cost of the smart house. The system considered in this research comprises a PV, battery, solar collector (SC), uncontrolled load and either an HP or a GE. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, MATLAB is used for simulations.

  7. Modelling and optimization of transient processes in line focusing power plants with single-phase heat transfer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noureldin, K.; González-Escalada, L. M.; Hirsch, T.; Nouri, B.; Pitz-Paal, R.

    2016-05-01

    A large number of commercial and research line focusing solar power plants are in operation and under development. Such plants include parabolic trough collectors (PTC) or linear Fresnel using thermal oil or molten salt as the heat transfer medium (HTM). However, the continuously varying and dynamic solar condition represent a big challenge for the plant control in order to optimize its power production and to keep the operation safe. A better understanding of the behaviour of such power plants under transient conditions will help reduce defocusing instances, improve field control, and hence, increase the energy yield and confidence in this new technology. Computational methods are very powerful and cost-effective tools to gain such understanding. However, most simulation models described in literature assume equal mass flow distributions among the parallel loops in the field or totally decouple the flow and thermal conditions. In this paper, a new numerical model to simulate a whole solar field with single-phase HTM is described. The proposed model consists of a hydraulic part and a thermal part that are coupled to account for the effect of the thermal condition of the field on the flow distribution among the parallel loops. The model is specifically designed for large line-focusing solar fields offering a high degree of flexibility in terms of layout, condition of the mirrors, and spatially resolved DNI data. Moreover, the model results have been compared to other simulation tools, as well as experimental and plant data, and the results show very good agreement. The model can provide more precise data to the control algorithms to improve the plant control. In addition, short-term and accurate spatially discretized DNI forecasts can be used as input to predict the field behaviour in-advance. In this paper, the hydraulic and thermal parts, as well as the coupling procedure, are described and some validation results and results of simulating an example field are

  8. Areal density optimizations for heat-assisted magnetic recording of high-density media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is hoped to be the future recording technique for high-density storage devices. Nevertheless, there exist several realization strategies. With a coarse-grained Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch model, we investigate in detail the benefits and disadvantages of a continuous and pulsed laser spot recording of shingled and conventional bit-patterned media. Additionally, we compare single-phase grains and bits having a bilayer structure with graded Curie temperature, consisting of a hard magnetic layer with high TC and a soft magnetic one with low TC, respectively. To describe the whole write process as realistically as possible, a distribution of the grain sizes and Curie temperatures, a displacement jitter of the head, and the bit positions are considered. For all these cases, we calculate bit error rates of various grain patterns, temperatures, and write head positions to optimize the achievable areal storage density. Within our analysis, shingled HAMR with a continuous laser pulse moving over the medium reaches the best results and thus has the highest potential to become the next-generation storage device.

  9. Development of low cost components for residential heating technology. Final report, January 1990-October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, R.; Loria, B.

    1993-01-19

    A conceptual vent isolation device based on a venturi ejector design was evaluated for use on residential heating appliances. The design was tested on a forced warm air furnace of an upflow configuration and found to perform the required venting function, but only at air supply pressures which were in excess of design limitations. Over 60 different pieces of information for 108 warm air furnace models, 100 boiler models, and 54 direct heating equipment models were collected and assembled in three matrixes. The information relates to construction and performances details for each model reviewed.

  10. Application of the cost-per-good-die metric for process design co-optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhaveri, Tejas; Arslan, Umut; Rovner, Vyacheslav; Strojwas, Andrzej; Pileggi, Larry

    2010-03-01

    The semiconductor industry has pursued a rapid pace of technology scaling to achieve an exponential component cost reduction. Over the years the goal of technology scaling has been distilled down to two discrete targets. Process engineers focus on sustaining wafer costs, while manufacturing smaller dimensions whereas design engineers work towards creating newer IC designs that can feed the next generation of electronic products. In doing so, the impact of process choices made by manufacturing community on the design of ICs and vice-versa were conveniently ignored. Hoever, with the lack of cost effective lithography solutions at the forefront, the process and design communities are struggling to minimize IC die costs by following the described traditional scaling practices. In this paper we discuss a framework for quantifying the economic impact of design and process decisions on the overall product by comparing the cost-per-good-die. We discuss the intricacies involved in computing the cost-per-good-die as we make design and technology choices. We also discuss the impact of design and lithography choices for the 32nm and 22nm technology node. The results demonstrate a strong volume dependence on the optimum design style and corresponding lithography and strategy. Most importantly, using this framework process and design engineers can collaborate to define design style and lithography solutions that will lead to continued IC cost scaling.

  11. cost and benefits optimization model for fault-tolerant aircraft electronic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The factors involved in economic assessment of fault tolerant systems (FTS) and fault tolerant flight control systems (FTFCS) are discussed. Algorithms for optimization and economic analysis of FTFCS are documented.

  12. Candidate alloys for cost-effective, high-efficiency, high-temperature compact/foil heat-exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal D; Maziasz, Philip J; Shingledecker, John P; Pint, Bruce A; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2007-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems operate at high temperatures (up to 1000 C and 650 C, respectively), which makes them especially attractive sources for combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration. However, improvements in the efficiency of heat exchange in these fuel cells require both development and careful processing of advanced cost-effective alloys for use in such high-temperature service conditions. The high-temperature properties of both sheet and foil forms of several alloys being considered for use in compact heat-exchangers (recuperators) have been characterized. Mechanical and creep-rupture testing, oxidation studies, and microstructural studies have been performed on commercially available sheet and foil forms of alloy 347, alloys 625, HR230, HR120, and the new AL20-25+Nb. These studies have led to a mechanistic understanding of the responses of these alloys to anticipated service conditions, and suggest that these alloys developed for gas- and micro-turbine recuperator applications are also suitable for use in fuel cell heat-exchangers. Additional work is still required to achieve foil forms with creep life comparable to thicker-section wrought product forms of the same alloys.

  13. Feeling the Heat: The Impact of Rising Energy Costs on Colleges & Universities in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Chris; Johnson, Gina

    2006-01-01

    This report is the result of a survey conducted in late 2005 of higher education institution chief financial officers throughout the U.S. Midwest region concerning their plans to manage what was expected to be a substantial increase in the price of energy in advance of the 2005-06 heating season. Although the winter turned out to be one of the…

  14. Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  15. Are specialized endotracheal tubes and heat-and-moisture exchangers cost-effective in preventing ventilator associated pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Gentile, Michael A; Siobal, Mark S

    2010-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common and serious complication of mechanical ventilation via an artificial airway. As with all nosocomial infections, VAP increases costs, morbidity, and mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU). VAP prevention is a multifaceted priority of the intensive care team, and can include the use of specialized artificial airways and heat-and-moisture exchangers (HME). Substantial evidence supports the use of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that allow subglottic suctioning; silver-coated and antiseptic-impregnated ETTs; ETTs with thin-walled polyurethane cuffs; and HMEs, but these devices also can have adverse effects. Controversy still exists regarding the evidence, cost-effectiveness, and disadvantages and risks of these devices. PMID:20105344

  16. Production of low-cost polyesters by microwaving heating of carboxylic acids and polyol blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous issues such as price uncertainty, manufacturing costs, environmental disposal, and geo-political issues affect the petroleum-based polymer industry. As an alternative, increasing interest in the development of biodegradable non-petroleum-based polymers has risen steadily since the 1980s. Ho...

  17. A Low-Cost Thermistor Device for Measurements of Metabolic Heat in Yeast Cells in Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1980-01-01

    Provides illustrated directions for the construction and use of a low-cost thermistor device. Attached to a servo-type millivolt chart recorder, the device will record minute temperature changes and will simulate data obtained from an oxygen polarograph. Includes results of experiments with baker's yeast. (Author/CS)

  18. Geothermal Heat Pumps as a Cost Saving and Capital Renewal Too!

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.J.

    1998-11-06

    An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk, Louisiana energy savings performance contract (ESPC) has verified the financial value of geothermal heat pump (GHP)-centered ESPCS to the federal government. The Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has responded by issuing an RFP for the "National GHP-Technology-Specific Super ESPC Procurement." Federal agency sites anywhere in the nation will be able to implement GHP-centered ESPC projects as delivery orders against the awarded contracts.

  19. HTGR high temperature process heat design and cost status report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    Information is presented concerning the 850/sup 0/C IDC reactor vessel; primary cooling system; secondary helium system; steam generator; heat cycle evaluations for the 850/sup 0/C IDC plant; 950/sup 0/C DC reactor vessel; 950/sup 0/C DC steam generator; direct and indirect cycle reformers; methanation plant; thermochemical pipeline; methodology for screening candidate synfuel processes; ECCG process; project technical requirements; process gas explosion assessment; HTGR program economic guidelines; and vendor respones.

  20. Cost optimization of a real-time GIS-based management system for hazardous waste transportation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhong, Yilong; Zhou, Qing; Lin, Che-Jen; Chen, Chunyi

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the design and cost analysis of a real-time, geographical information system (GIS) based management system for hazardous waste transportation are described. The implementation of such a system can effectively prevent illegal dumping and perform emergency responses during the transportation of hazardous wastes. A case study was conducted in Guangzhou, China to build a small-scale, real-time management system for waste transportation. Two alternatives were evaluated in terms of system capability and cost structure. Alternative I was the building of a complete real-time monitoring and management system in a governing agency; whereas alternative II was the combination of the existing management framework with a commercial Telematics service to achieve the desired level of monitoring and management. The technological framework under consideration included locating transportation vehicles using a global positioning system (GPS), exchanging vehicle location data via the Internet and Intranet, managing hazardous waste transportation using a government management system and responding to emergencies during transportation. Analysis of the cost structure showed that alternative II lowered the capital and operation cost by 38 and 56% in comparison with alternative I. It is demonstrated that efficient management can be achieved through integration of the existing technological components with additional cost benefits being achieved by streamlined software interfacing. PMID:20103571

  1. Reduction of liquid hydrogen boiloff: Optimal reliquefaction system design and cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The refrigeration cycles investigated are referred to as Joule-Thomson cycles because they depend on the J-T effect to produce the low temperatures. Two basic competitive refrigeration cycles were evaluated. The first vents a portion of cold H2 gas to achieve the required precooling; the second uses LN2 for precooling. Both open loop and closed loop cycles were evaluated as well as combinations of venting to supplement the LN2 precooling. All cycles use a H2 compressor to achieve the desired high pressure (1325 psig). The heat compression was removed by cooling water. The high pressure H2 gas was cooled in counter flow heat exchangers by flowing cold H2 to the compressor. Further cooling was achieved for cycles using LN2 by passing H2 vapors through a LN2 heat exchanger. Finally, the high pressure H2 gas was expanded through a J-T valve where a portion of H2 was liquefied. The low pressure H2 gas flow back through the heat exchangers to the compressor is that portion not liquefied and makes up hydrogen gas from the dewar.

  2. Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsufumi; Aoki, Kagari; Watanabe, Yuuki Y.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2013-01-01

    Flying and terrestrial animals should spend energy to move while supporting their weight against gravity. On the other hand, supported by buoyancy, aquatic animals can minimize the energy cost for supporting their body weight and neutral buoyancy has been considered advantageous for aquatic animals. However, some studies suggested that aquatic animals might use non-neutral buoyancy for gliding and thereby save energy cost for locomotion. We manipulated the body density of seals using detachable weights and floats, and compared stroke efforts of horizontally swimming seals under natural conditions using animal-borne recorders. The results indicated that seals had smaller stroke efforts to swim a given speed when they were closer to neutral buoyancy. We conclude that neutral buoyancy is likely the best body density to minimize the cost of transport in horizontal swimming by seals. PMID:23857645

  3. ANALYSIS OF SAFETY RELIEF VALVE PROOF TEST DATA TO OPTIMIZE LIFECYCLE MAINTENANCE COSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert; Harris, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Proof test results were analyzed and compared with a proposed life cycle curve or hazard function and the limit of useful life. Relief valve proof testing procedures, statistical modeling, data collection processes, and time-in-service trends are presented. The resulting analysis of test data allows for the estimation of the PFD. Extended maintenance intervals to the limit of useful life as well as methodologies and practices for improving relief valve performance and reliability are discussed. A generic cost-benefit analysis and an expected life cycle cost reduction concludes that $90 million maintenance dollars might be avoided for a population of 3000 valves over 20 years.

  4. Optimizing Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods for Protein Quality, Cost, and Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jacklyn; Callaghan, Meghan

    2016-03-01

    This article describes current research on the development of alternative ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) in the treatment of severe acute malnutrition. An innovative and versatile linear programming tool has been developed to facilitate the creation of therapeutic formulas that are determined acceptable on multiple levels: costs, ingredient acceptability, availability and stability, nutrient requirements, and personal preferences. The formulas are analyzed for ease of production by Washington University team members and for organoleptic properties acceptability to target populations. In the future, RUTF products that are cost-effective, acceptable, sustainable, and widely available will become a reality. PMID:26864957

  5. The effect of using a heat recovery absorber on the performance and operating cost of the solar ammonia absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Saghiruddin; Siddiqui, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    Economic analysis of ordinary and evacuated tubular type flat-plate collectors have been carried out for operating absorption cycles with and without heat recovery absorber. Water-ammonia, NaSCN-NH{sub 3} and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} have been selected as the working fluids in the cycles. Use of a heat recovery absorber, in addition to the primary absorber in the conventional absorption cycles, lead to improvement in the system performances by about 20--30% in the H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3} and 33--36% in the NaSCN-NH{sub 3} and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} mixtures. Subsequently, there is a considerable amount of reduction in the cost of the solar collector required to operate them. For the set of operating conditions, in this theoretical study, the cost reduces to about 25% in the H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3} and 30% in the NaSCN and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} cycles.

  6. Selection and costing of heat exchangers. Shell-and-tube type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-12-01

    ESDU 94042 extends the information in ESDU 92013 which, when a shell-and-tube exchanger is found appropriate and is costed, provides the results for a datum design with fixed average values of fluid pressure, tube diameter, shell length-to-diameter ratio, baffle pitch and for a particular shell type, and shell and tube materials. It provides factors derived from an analysis of manufacturer's data to be applied to the cost results from ESDU 92013 to account for variations in those parameters and features. Additional guidance on the configuration and use of shell-and-tube exchangers is given. The performance of the exchangers is calculated using the effectiveness-NTU method and graphs of those data are included for E-shells in series. The data are incorporated in ESDUpac A9213 which is a Fortran program that implements the selection and costing method of ESDU 92013. It is provided on disc in the software volume compiled to run under DOS with a user-friendly interface that prompts on screen for input data.

  7. Cost and benefits design optimization model for fault tolerant flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, J.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements and specifications for a method of optimizing the design of fault-tolerant flight control systems are provided. Algorithms that could be used for developing new and modifying existing computer programs are also provided, with recommendations for follow-on work.

  8. Identifying Cost-Effective Water Resources Management Strategies: Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a public-domain software application designed to aid decision makers with integrated water resources management. The tool allows water resource managers and planners to screen a wide-range of management practices for c...

  9. Optimize Resources and Help Reduce Cost of Ownership with Dell[TM] Systems Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining secure, convenient administration of the PC system environment can be a significant drain on resources. Deskside visits can greatly increase the cost of supporting a large number of computers. Even simple tasks, such as tracking inventory or updating software, quickly become expensive when they require physically visiting every…

  10. Teleconferencing: Cost optimization of satellite and ground systems for continuing progressional education and medical services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D.; Lusignan, B.

    1972-01-01

    A set of analytical capabilities that are needed to assess the role satellite communications technology will play in public and other services was developed. It is user oriented in that it starts from descriptions of user demand and develops the ability to estimate the cost of satisfying that demand with the lowest cost communications system. To ensure that the analysis could cope with the complexities of the real users, two services were chosen as examples, continuing professional education and medical services. Telecommunications costs are effected greatly by demographic factors, involving distribution of users in urban areas and distances between towns in rural regions. For this reason the analytical tools were exercised on sample locations. San Jose, California and Denver, Colorado were used to represent an urban area and the Rocky Mountain states were used to represent a rural region. In assessing the range of satellite system costs, two example coverage areas were considered, one appropriate to cover the contiguous forty-eight states, a second appropriate to cover about one-third that area.

  11. Structural optimization procedure of a composite wind turbine blade for reducing both material cost and blade weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weifei; Park, Dohyun; Choi, DongHoon

    2013-12-01

    A composite blade structure for a 2 MW horizontal axis wind turbine is optimally designed. Design requirements are simultaneously minimizing material cost and blade weight while satisfying the constraints on stress ratio, tip deflection, fatigue life and laminate layup requirements. The stress ratio and tip deflection under extreme gust loads and the fatigue life under a stochastic normal wind load are evaluated. A blade element wind load model is proposed to explain the wind pressure difference due to blade height change during rotor rotation. For fatigue life evaluation, the stress result of an implicit nonlinear dynamic analysis under a time-varying fluctuating wind is converted to the histograms of mean and amplitude of maximum stress ratio using the rainflow counting algorithm Miner's rule is employed to predict the fatigue life. After integrating and automating the whole analysis procedure an evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the discrete optimization problem.

  12. Standardized elemental basis for gas-turbine engine heat exchangers is the key factor for their cost reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudarev, A. V.; Soudarev, B. V.; Kondratiev, V. V.; Lazarev, M. V.

    2001-07-01

    The competitiveness of the small gas turbine units (GTUs) (Ne<300 kW) in the world power market is dependent on both the maintenance expenses and the capital costs of production. Reduction in the maintenance expenditures could be achieved by increasing the plant efficiency. This task could be solved by some methods: increasing the cycle inlet temperature TIT, getting the cycle more complex (use of heat regeneration and compressed air intermediate cooling), cutting the power consumption on heat-stressed parts cooling. Putting the above into effect is linked with introduction of novel structural materials, a sharp increase in the mass-size values and the plant manufacture expenditures, in particular, at provision of its self-regulation. In connection with the above, the development of the combined metal-ceramic airheaters and standardization of the elemental basis of the metal gas-gas heat exchangers will promote reduction in the expenditures of the maintenance and the manufacture of the small-size independent power GTEs.

  13. An approach for optimal allocation of safety resources: using the knapsack problem to take aggregated cost-efficient preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Reniers, Genserik L L; Sörensen, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    On the basis of the combination of the well-known knapsack problem and a widely used risk management technique in organizations (that is, the risk matrix), an approach was developed to carry out a cost-benefits analysis to efficiently take prevention investment decisions. Using the knapsack problem as a model and combining it with a well-known technique to solve this problem, bundles of prevention measures are prioritized based on their costs and benefits within a predefined prevention budget. Those bundles showing the highest efficiencies, and within a given budget, are identified from a wide variety of possible alternatives. Hence, the approach allows for an optimal allocation of safety resources, does not require any highly specialized information, and can therefore easily be applied by any organization using the risk matrix as a risk ranking tool. PMID:23551066

  14. Optimizing the preventive maintenance scheduling by genetic algorithm based on cost and reliability in National Iranian Drilling Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmard, Habibollah; Koraeizadeh, Abd al-Wahhab

    2016-06-01

    The present research aims at predicting the required activities for preventive maintenance in terms of equipment optimal cost and reliability. The research sample includes all offshore drilling equipment of FATH 59 Derrick Site affiliated with National Iranian Drilling Company. Regarding the method, the research uses a field methodology and in terms of its objectives, it is classified as an applied research. Some of the data are extracted from the documents available in the equipment and maintenance department of FATH 59 Derrick site, and other needed data are resulted from experts' estimates through genetic algorithm method. The research result is provided as the prediction of downtimes, costs, and reliability in a predetermined time interval. The findings of the method are applicable for all manufacturing and non-manufacturing equipment.

  15. Universal power optimized work for reciprocating internally reversible Stirling-like heat engine cycles with regeneration and linear external heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, David A.

    1998-09-01

    When bounded by two infinite thermal reservoirs, the theory of irreversible thermodynamics for reciprocating externally irreversible cycles yields to an optimum efficiency at maximum power output of η=1-(TL/TH)0.5 for internally reversible Stirling-like cycles using regeneration and linear heat transfer modes is in contrast to the upper limit for Stirling cycles of η=1-(TL/TH) obtained from classical thermodynamics. This optimum behavior is, however, only based on cycle temperature bounds. For reciprocating cycles one must go a step further and minimize cycle time. While executing this new step for finite thermal reservoirs, it was discovered that, for the general family of reciprocating Stirling-like cycles, the finite-time optimum work output (Wopt) at maximum power is less than (and in the limit of ideal regeneration, infinite reservoirs and of no internal irreversibility, is equal to) exactly one-half of the work of the externally reversible cycle operating at maximum thermal efficiency (Carnot work, Wrev) between the same temperature limits (i.e., Wopt⩽1/2Wrev). To accomplish this the analysis goes beyond earlier works to use time symmetry to better optimize overall cycle power. Because this procedure results in the concurrent employment of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, it ensures optimal allocation of thermal conductances at the hot and cold ends while simultaneously achieving both minimization of internal entropy generation and maximization of specific cycle work for a given set of operating temperatures. Based on linear heat transfer laws, this expression for optimum work is shown to be independent of heat conductances. Finally, the analysis establishes that the maximum power attainable for a Stirling-like reciprocating cycle operating between two temperature bounds is always less than (and in the limit of power optimized Carnot conditions, equal to) one-half of that obtained for the continuous counterpart of the same cycle operating

  16. Developing an Onboard Traffic-Aware Flight Optimization Capability for Near-Term Low-Cost Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Ballin, Mark G.; Koczo, Stefan, Jr.; Vivona, Robert A.; Henderson, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests (TASAR) combines Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) IN and airborne automation to enable user-optimal in-flight trajectory replanning and to increase the likelihood of Air Traffic Control (ATC) approval for the resulting trajectory change request. TASAR is designed as a near-term application to improve flight efficiency or other user-desired attributes of the flight while not impacting and potentially benefiting ATC. Previous work has indicated the potential for significant benefits for each TASAR-equipped aircraft. This paper will discuss the approach to minimizing TASAR's cost for implementation and accelerating readiness for near-term implementation.

  17. Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

    2012-01-01

    DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

  18. Optimality of Upper-Arm Reaching Trajectories Based on the Expected Value of the Metabolic Energy Cost.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Yoshiaki; Nishii, Jun

    2015-08-01

    When we move our body to perform a movement task, our central nervous system selects a movement trajectory from an infinite number of possible trajectories under constraints that have been acquired through evolution and learning. Minimization of the energy cost has been suggested as a potential candidate for a constraint determining locomotor parameters, such as stride frequency and stride length; however, other constraints have been proposed for a human upper-arm reaching task. In this study, we examined whether the minimum metabolic energy cost model can also explain the characteristics of the upper-arm reaching trajectories. Our results show that the optimal trajectory that minimizes the expected value of energy cost under the effect of signal-dependent noise on motor commands expresses not only the characteristics of reaching movements of typical speed but also those of slower movements. These results suggest that minimization of the energy cost would be a basic constraint not only in locomotion but also in upper-arm reaching. PMID:26079750

  19. Automatic differentiation for gradient-based optimization of radiatively heated microelectronics manufacturing equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, C.D.; Spence, P.A.; Meza, J.C.; Plantenga, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic differentiation is applied to the optimal design of microelectronic manufacturing equipment. The performance of nonlinear, least-squares optimization methods is compared between numerical and analytical gradient approaches. The optimization calculations are performed by running large finite-element codes in an object-oriented optimization environment. The Adifor automatic differentiation tool is used to generate analytic derivatives for the finite-element codes. The performance results support previous observations that automatic differentiation becomes beneficial as the number of optimization parameters increases. The increase in speed, relative to numerical differences, has a limited value and results are reported for two different analysis codes.

  20. The optimization of fin-tube heat exchanger with longitudinal vortex generators using response surface approximation and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuehong; Liu, DanDan; Zhao, Min; Lu, YanLi; Song, Xiaoyong

    2015-11-01

    Delta winglet works better than other vortex generators in improving the performance of fin-tube heat exchangers. In this paper, Response Surface Approximation is used to study the effects of the fin pitch, the ratio of the longitudinal tube pitch to transverse tube pitch, the ratio of both sides V 1 , V h of delta winglets and the attack angle of delta winglets on the performance of fin-tube heat exchanger. Firstly, Twenty-nine numerical group experiments including five times repeated experiments at the central point are conducted. Then, the analyses of variable (ANOVA) and regression are performed to verify the accuracy of the polynomial coefficients. Finally, the optimization of the fin-tube heat exchanger using the Genetic Algorithm is conducted and the best performance of j/f (1/3) is found to be 0.07945, which is consistent with the numerical result.

  1. Low cost anisotropic etching of monocrystalline Si (1 0 0): Optimization using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Khuram; Khan, Sohail Aziz; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2012-10-01

    Reduced surface reflectance and enhanced light trapping is required by any high efficiency solar cell. Anisotropic etching was done on silicon (1 0 0) by using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide TMAH, (CH3)4NOH, solution at 85 °C. Process variables considered were solution concentration and time proposed by response surface methodology (RSM). An effective surface texture was resulted with reflectance less than 8% without antireflection coating. The antireflection mechanism was also co-related with the etch rate of Si. Optimized values predicted by RSM for time and TMAH concentration were 5 min and 3.50% respectively. The technique and optimization of parameters by using response surface methodology (RSM) could be valuable in the texturization process for high-efficiency Si solar cells.

  2. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

  3. User manual for GEOCITY: A computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, H. D.; Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.

    1982-09-01

    A model to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir is discussed. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factor or commercial building. All the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output are included. The indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual are given.

  4. Investment and operating costs of binary cycle geothermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, B.; Brugman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Typical investment and operating costs for geothermal power plants employing binary cycle technology and utilizing the heat energy in liquid-dominated reservoirs are discussed. These costs are developed as a function of reservoir temperature. The factors involved in optimizing plant design are discussed. A relationship between the value of electrical energy and the value of the heat energy in the reservoir is suggested.

  5. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following tasks: (1) solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; (2) solar cooling with solid desiccant; (3) liquid desiccant cooling system development; (4) solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; (5) generic solar domestic water heating systems; (6) advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; (7) management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and (8) the field monitoring workshop.

  6. Fuzzy Stochastic Optimal Guaranteed Cost Control of Bio-Economic Singular Markovian Jump Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhang, Qingling; Zhu, Baoyan

    2015-11-01

    This paper establishes a bio-economic singular Markovian jump model by considering the price of the commodity as a Markov chain. The controller is designed for this system such that its biomass achieves the specified range with the least cost in a finite-time. Firstly, this system is described by Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model. Secondly, a new design method of fuzzy state-feedback controllers is presented to ensure not only the regularity, nonimpulse, and stochastic singular finite-time boundedness of this kind of systems, but also an upper bound achieved for the cost function in the form of strict linear matrix inequalities. Finally, two examples including a practical example of eel seedling breeding are given to illustrate the merit and usability of the approach proposed in this paper. PMID:25608319

  7. Identifying and monitoring urban heat island in Bucharest using satellite time series and low cost meteorological sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandric, Ionut; Onose, Diana; Vanau, Gabriel; Ioja, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    The present study is focusing on the identification of urban heat island in Bucharest using both remote sensing products and low cost temperature sensors. The urban heat island in Bucharest was analyzed through a network of sensors located in 56 points (47 inside the administrative boundary of the city, 9 outside) 2009-2011. The network lost progressively its initial density, but was reformed during a new phase, 2013-2015. Time series satellite images from MODIS were intersected with the sensors for both phases. Statistical analysis were conducted to identify the temporal and spatial pattern of extreme temperatures in Bucharest. Several environmental factors like albedou, presence and absence of vegetation were used to fit a regression model between MODIS satellite products sensors in order to upscale the temperatures values recorded by MODIS For Bucharest, an important role for air temperature values in urban environments proved to have the local environmental conditions that leads to differences in air temperature at Bucharest city scale between 3-5 °C (both in the summer and in the winter). The UHI maps shows a good correlation with the presence of green areas. Differences in air temperature between higher tree density areas and isolated trees can reach much higher values, averages over 24 h periods still are in the 3-5 °C range The results have been obtained within the project UCLIMESA (Urban Heat Island Monitoring under Present and Future Climate), ongoing between 2013 and 2015 in the framework of the Programme for Research-DevelopmentInnovation for Space Technology and Advanced Research (STAR), administrated by the Romanian Space Agency Keywords: time series, urban heat island

  8. Simple and low cost method for metal-based micro-capillary channels for heat exchanger use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbonnaya, E.; Champagne, C.; Weiss, L.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we present an alternative, low cost method for the fabrication of a heat exchanger utilizing metal-based microchannels using the UV-LiGA technique. Lithography is used to pattern dry film negative photoresist (Ordyl P-50100) on the substrate. The resist is laminated over the substrate and exposed with a UV source. The use of dry film resist allows for simple and inexpensive microchannel patterns without requiring advanced cleanroom equipment. Following the lithography process, electrodeposition of metals is used to fill the recesses patterned in the resist. In this work, nickel has been electroplated into the bounding resist structure. After electroplating, the remaining resist is dissolved leaving free standing metal structures. The fabricated exchanger is then evaluated based on thermal absorption of simulated waste heat sources and capillary action of the metal channels themselves. Channels are fabricated to heights of 60, 70 and 90 μm respectively on copper substrate using these methods. Working fluid mass transfer rate from the heated microchannel heat exchanger (MHE) is utilized as a basic metric of operation. The mass transfer rate recorded from the nickel-based MHE is 2.19, 2.81 and 3.20 mg s-1 respectively for the different channel heights. This implies an effective thermal power consumption rate of 1.66, 2.13 and 2.42 kW m-2 respectively. By contrast, an MHE fabricated with 115 and 142 μm tall channels on silicon substrate is shown to evaporate up to 2.84 and 3.04 mg s-1 respectively, giving an effective thermal power consumption of 2.15 and 2.31 kW m-2 respectively. An investigation of working fluid contact angle with the electroplated nickel surface is also presented. The surface is found to be a porous structure stemming from the electroplating process.

  9. Reducing the Cost of RLS: Waste Heat from Crop Production Can Be Used for Waste Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamparter, Richard; Flynn, Michael; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of plant-based life support systems has traditionally suffered from the limitations imposed by the high energy demand of controlled environment growth chambers. Theme types of systems are typically less than 2% efficient at converting electrical energy into biomass. The remaining 98% of supplied energy is converted to thermal energy. Traditionally this thermal energy is discharged to the ambient environment as waste heat. This paper describes an energy efficient plant-based life support system which has been designed for use at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. At the South Pole energy is not lost to the environment. What is lost is the ability to extract useful work from it. The CELSS Antarctic Analog Program (CAAP) has developed a system which is designed to extract useful work from the waste thermal energy generated from plant growth lighting systems. In the CAAP system this energy is used to purify Station Sewage.

  10. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions; Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt-recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

    2014-06-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for 15 Chicagoland single family housing archetypes. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these 15 housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost effectiveness.

  12. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

    2014-06-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  13. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Thomas E.; Reiss, Timo O.; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example—broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of Iz → Ix over resonance offsets of ±20 kHz and RF variability of ±5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform Iz to greater than 0.98 Ix, with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2°, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  14. Induction hardening: Differences to a conventional heat treatment process and optimization of its parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, A.; Ressel, G.; Prevedel, P.; Raninger, P.; Panzenböck, M.; Marsoner, S.; Ebner, R.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining similar mechanical properties with faster heating processes than the conventional ones has been of interest for several years. In the present study, investigations were performed in terms of the influences of such fast heat-treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. This investigation compares an inductive with a conventional furnace heat treating process of a 50CrMo4 steel, however only the austenitizing treatment was changed and subsequent quenching and tempering was done in the same way. To this end experiments with a middle frequency generator, using different heating rates and austenitizing temperatures, were conducted and followed by oil quenching of the workpieces. The resulting structures were characterized regarding their microstructures and mechanical properties in order to gather a better understanding of the differences between the inductive and the conventional heat treating process. As a main result it was found, that the fast austenitized samples exhibited worse ductility than the conventional treated material.

  15. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    DOEpatents

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  16. Optimization and cost-saving in tagmentation-based mate-pair library preparation and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kaori; Nishimura, Osamu; Itomi, Kazu; Tanegashima, Chiharu; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2015-05-01

    In de novo genome sequencing, mate-pair reads are crucial for scaffolding assembled contigs. However, preparation of mate-pair libraries is not a trivial task, even when using one of the latest approaches, the Nextera Mate Pair Sample Prep Kit from Illumina. To reduce cost and enhance library yield and fidelity when using this kit, we have modified the manufacturer's protocol based on (i) variable tagmentation conditions, (ii) intensive DNA shearing to decrease library insert length, and (iii) sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq with >150 cycles. Finally, we provide additional suggestions for further improvement in the application of this kit. PMID:25967904

  17. The cost of model reference adaptive control - Analysis, experiments, and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, R. S.; Haftka, R. T.; Cudney, H. H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the performance of Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) is studied in numerical simulations and verified experimentally with the objective of understanding how differences between the plant and the reference model affect the control effort. MRAC is applied analytically and experimentally to a single degree of freedom system and analytically to a MIMO system with controlled differences between the model and the plant. It is shown that the control effort is sensitive to differences between the plant and the reference model. The effects of increased damping in the reference model are considered, and it is shown that requiring the controller to provide increased damping actually decreases the required control effort when differences between the plant and reference model exist. This result is useful because one of the first attempts to counteract the increased control effort due to differences between the plant and reference model might be to require less damping, however, this would actually increase the control effort. Optimization of weighting matrices is shown to help reduce the increase in required control effort. However, it was found that eventually the optimization resulted in a design that required an extremely high sampling rate for successful realization.

  18. A low-cost culture medium for the production of Nannochloropsis gaditana biomass optimized for aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Rodríguez, J; Cerón-García, M C; González-López, C V; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Contreras-Gómez, A; Molina-Grima, E

    2013-09-01

    Nannochloropsis gaditana is a microalga with a high nutritional value and a protein and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content that makes it interesting as a feed in aquaculture. To maximize its productivity and nutritional value in large-scale culture, a well-known commercial medium was optimized to the most favorable nutrient level using commercial fertilizers. Optimal growth conditions were obtained in the alternative fertilizer-based medium at a nitrogen concentration of 11.3 mM, a phosphorus concentration of 0.16 mM, and a micronutrient concentration of 30 μL L(-1). This alternative medium allowed to obtain a biomass concentration similar to that achieved when using the commercial formula but with a reduction in Cu, Fe, and Mo content of 71%, 89%, and 99%, respectively. A maximum biomass productivity of 0.51 g L(-1) d(-1) was obtained. The eicosapentaenoic acid and protein contents of the biomass were 2.84% and 44% of dry weight, respectively. PMID:23863872

  19. The Cost-Optimal Distribution of Wind and Solar Generation Facilities in a Simplified Highly Renewable European Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kies, Alexander; von Bremen, Lüder; Schyska, Bruno; Chattopadhyay, Kabitri; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the European power system from fossil generation towards renewable sources is driven by different reasons like decarbonisation and sustainability. Renewable power sources like wind and solar have, due to their weather dependency, fluctuating feed-in profiles, which make their system integration a difficult task. To overcome this issue, several solutions have been investigated in the past like the optimal mix of wind and PV [1], the extension of the transmission grid or storages [2]. In this work, the optimal distribution of wind turbines and solar modules in Europe is investigated. For this purpose, feed-in data with an hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 7 km covering Europe for the renewable sources wind, photovoltaics and hydro was used. Together with historical load data and a transmission model , a simplified pan-European power power system was simulated. Under cost assumptions of [3] the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for this simplified system consisting of generation, consumption, transmission and backup units is calculated. With respect to the LCOE, the optimal distribution of generation facilities in Europe is derived. It is shown, that by optimal placement of renewable generation facilities the LCOE can be reduced by more than 10% compared to a meta study scenario [4] and a self-sufficient scenario (every country produces on average as much from renewable sources as it consumes). This is mainly caused by a shift of generation facilities towards highly suitable locations, reduced backup and increased transmission need. The results of the optimization will be shown and implications for the extension of renewable shares in the European power mix will be discussed. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (Wuppertal Institute, Next Energy, University of Oldenburg), that is financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 03SFF0439A). [1] Kies, A. et al.: Kies, Alexander, et al

  20. Cost-benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions.

    PubMed

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-11-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints. PMID:17991990

  1. Minimum Cost Multi-way Data Association for Optimizing Multitarget Tracking of Interacting Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chiwoo; Woehl, Taylor J.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a general formulation for a minimum cost data association problem which associates data features via one-to-one, m-to-one and one-to-n links with minimum total cost of the links. A motivating example is a problem of tracking multiple interacting nanoparticles imaged on video frames, where particles can aggregate into one particle or a particle can be split into multiple particles. Many existing multitarget tracking methods are capable of tracking non-interacting targets or tracking interacting targets of restricted degrees of interactions. The proposed formulation solves a multitarget tracking problem for general degrees of inter-object interactions. The formulation is in the form of a binary integer programming problem. We propose a polynomial time solution approach that can obtain a good relaxation solution of the binary integer programming, so the approach can be applied for multitarget tracking problems of a moderate size (for hundreds of targets over tens of time frames). The resulting solution is always integral and obtains a better duality gap than the simple linear relaxation solution of the corresponding problem. The proposed method was validated through applications to simulated multitarget tracking problems and a real multitarget tracking problem.

  2. Cost-effective approach to ethanol production and optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Uncu, Oya Nihan; Cekmecelioglu, Deniz

    2011-04-01

    Food wastes disposed from residential and industrial kitchens have gained attention as a substrate in microbial fermentations to reduce product costs. In this study, the potential of simultaneously hydrolyzing and subsequently fermenting the mixed carbohydrate components of kitchen wastes were assessed and the effects of solid load, inoculum volume of baker's yeast, and fermentation time on ethanol production were evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). The enzymatic hydrolysis process was complete within 6h. Fermentation experiments were conducted at pH 4.5, a temperature of 30°C, and agitated at 150 rpm without adding the traditional fermentation nutrients. The statistical analysis of the model developed by RSM suggested that linear effects of solid load, inoculum volume, and fermentation time and the quadratic effects of inoculum volume and fermentation time were significant (P<0.05). The verification experiments indicated that the developed model could be successfully used to predict ethanol concentration at >90% accuracy. An optimum ethanol concentration of 32.2g/l giving a yield of 0.40g/g, comparable to yields reported to date, was suggested by the model with 20% solid load, 8.9% inoculum volume, and 58.8h of fermentation. The results indicated that the production costs can be lowered to a large extent by using kitchen wastes having multiple carbohydrate components and eliminating the use of traditional fermentation nutrients from the recipe. PMID:21220196

  3. Global optimal vaccination in the SIR model: properties of the value function and application to cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Laguzet, Laetitia; Turinici, Gabriel

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on optimal vaccination policies for an Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model; the impact of the disease is minimized with respect to the vaccination strategy. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem and we show that the value function is the unique viscosity solution of an Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. This allows to find the best vaccination policy. At odds with existing literature, it is seen that the value function is not always smooth (sometimes only Lipschitz) and the optimal vaccination policies are not unique. Moreover we rigorously analyze the situation when vaccination can be modeled as instantaneous (with respect to the time evolution of the epidemic) and identify the global optimum solutions. Numerical applications illustrate the theoretical results. In addition the pertussis vaccination in adults is considered from two perspectives: first the maximization of DALY averted in presence of vaccine side-effects; then the impact of the herd immunity on the cost-effectiveness analysis is discussed on a concrete example. PMID:25771436

  4. Optimal Materials and Deposition Technique Lead to Cost-Effective Solar Cell with Best-Ever Conversion Efficiency (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the SJ3 solar cell was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Based on NREL and Solar Junction technology, the commercial SJ3 concentrator solar cell - with 43.5% conversion efficiency at 418 suns - uses a lattice-matched multijunction architecture that has near-term potential for cells with {approx}50% efficiency. Multijunction solar cells have higher conversion efficiencies than any other type of solar cell. But developers of utility-scale and space applications crave even better efficiencies at lower costs to be both cost-effective and able to meet the demand for power. The SJ3 multijunction cell, developed by Solar Junction with assistance from foundational technological advances by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has the highest efficiency to date - almost 2% absolute more than the current industry standard multijunction cell-yet at a comparable cost. So what did it take to create this cell having 43.5% efficiency at 418-sun concentration? A combination of materials with carefully designed properties, a manufacturing technique allowing precise control, and an optimized device design.

  5. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  6. Optimization and Thermoeconomics Research of a Large Reclaimed Water Source Heat Pump System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-ping; Du, Fang-hui

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a large reclaimed water source heat pump system (RWSHPS) and elaborates on the composition of the system and its design principles. According to the characteristics of the reclaimed water and taking into account the initial investment, the project is divided into two stages: the first stage adopts distributed heat pump heating system and the second adopts the combination of centralized and decentralized systems. We analyze the heating capacity of the RWSHPS, when the phase II project is completed, the system can provide hydronic heating water with the supply and return water temperature of 55°C/15°C and meet the hydronic heating demand of 8 million square meters of residential buildings. We make a thermal economics analysis by using Thermal Economics theory on RWSHPS and gas boiler system, it is known that the RWSHPS has more advantages, compared with the gas boiler heating system; both its thermal efficiency and economic efficiency are relatively high. It provides a reference for future applications of the RWSHPS. PMID:24089607

  7. Optimizing breast cancer follow-up: diagnostic value and costs of additional routine breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Hirschauer, Elke; Schmidt, Werner; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2011-02-01

    A total of 2,546,325 breast cancer survivors are estimated to live in the United States. The organized breast cancer follow-up programs do not generally include breast ultrasound in asymptomatic women. The purpose of our prospective study was to investigate the efficacy of breast ultrasound in detecting previously occult recurrences. A total of 735 eligible patients with a history of breast cancer were recruited. We assessed the same patient population before (routine follow-up program) and after (study follow-up program) the introduction of an additional ultrasound examination. In the routine follow-up program 245 of 735 patients (33.3% [95% confidence-interval (CI): 29.9-36.7]) had an ultrasound due to abnormal local or mammographic findings. 490 of 735 patients (66.7% [95% CI: 63.3-70.1]) were initially considered asymptomatic and received an additional ultrasound exclusively within the study follow-up program. All positive examination results were followed by accelerated core needle biopsy. The routine follow-up program led to a biopsy in 66 of 735 patients (9.0%) revealing a recurrent cancer in 27 cases (3.7%). The study follow-up program with the additional ultrasound led to another 21 biopsies raising the total number of patients who had to undergo a biopsy from 9.0% (95% CI: 6.9-11.1) to 11.8% (95% CI: 9.5-14.2). Finally, we diagnosed a previously occult malignant lesion in an additional six patients following this protocol. Therefore, the rate of detected recurrences rose from 3.7% (95% CI: 2.3-5.0) in the routine follow-up program to 4.5% (95% CI: 3.0-6.0) in the study follow-up program (p = 0.041). Negative side effects were the additional costs (the costs per detected malignancy in the routine follow-up program were $2455.69; the costs for each additionally detected malignancy in the study follow-up program were $7580.30), the higher overall biopsy rate (9.0 vs. 11.8%) and the elevated benign biopsies rate (59.1% vs. 71.4%). Regarding these results, the

  8. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Willigan, Rhonda

    2009-09-30

    The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

  9. Optimization and economic evaluation of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation from gasification of corn stover and distillers grains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Demirel, Yasar; Jones, David D; Hanna, Milford A

    2010-05-01

    Thermochemical gasification is one of the most promising technologies for converting biomass into power, fuels and chemicals. The objectives of this study were to maximize the net energy efficiency for biomass gasification, and to estimate the cost of producing industrial gas and combined heat and power (CHP) at a feedrate of 2000kg/h. Aspen Plus-based model for gasification was combined with a CHP generation model, and optimized using corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) as the biomass feedstocks. The cold gas efficiencies for gas production were 57% and 52%, respectively, for corn stover and DDGS. The selling price of gas was estimated to be $11.49 and $13.08/GJ, respectively, for corn stover and DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were as high as 37% and 88%, respectively, for corn stover and 34% and 78%, respectively, for DDGS. The selling price of electricity was estimated to be $0.1351 and $0.1287/kWh for corn stover and DDGS, respectively. Overall, high net energy efficiencies for gas and CHP production from biomass gasification can be achieved with optimized processing conditions. However, the economical feasibility of these conversion processes will depend on the relative local prices of fossil fuels. PMID:20096571

  10. Characterization and Optimization of EDELWEISS-III FID800 Heat Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, J.; De Jesus, M.; Juillard, A.; Queguiner, E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results from a dedicated study of the heat signals as observed by the EDELWEISS FID800 (Full Interdigit Detector) Ge bolometers. We show how, with a combined set of measurements, we constructed a coherent thermal model and extracted the relevant heat capacities and thermal conductances at play in our detectors, as well as the origin of the heat signal. Eventually, we show that our heat energy resolution could potentially be improved by a factor of five leading to nuclear recoil energy thresholds ranging from 400 to 100 eVnr, depending on the applied voltage across the crystal, which would provide great sensitivity to low-mass dark matter down to 0.5 GeV.

  11. Thermal Optimization of the Heat Exchanger in an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Tong, N. Q.

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in thermoelectric technologies have made exhaust-based thermoelectric generators (TEGs) promising to recover waste heat. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger in exhaust-based TEGs is studied in this work. In terms of interface temperature and thermal uniformity, the thermal characteristics of heat exchangers with different internal structures, lengths, and materials are discussed. Following computational fluid dynamics simulations, infrared experiments are carried out on a high-performance production engine with a dynamometer. Simulation and experimental results show that a plate-shaped heat exchanger made of brass with fishbone-shaped internal structure and length of 600 mm achieves a relatively ideal thermal performance, which is practically helpful to enhance the thermal performance of the TEG.

  12. Reduction of fine particle emissions from wood combustion with optimized condensing heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Gröhn, Arto; Suonmaa, Valtteri; Auvinen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2009-08-15

    In this study, we designed and built a condensing heat exchanger capable of simultaneous fine particle emission reduction and waste heat recovery. The deposition mechanisms inside the heat exchanger prototype were maximized using a computer model which was later compared to actual measurements. The main deposition mechanisms were diffusio- and thermophoresis which have previously been examined in similar conditions only separately. The obtained removal efficiency in the experiments was measured in the total number concentration and ranged between 26 and 40% for the given pellet stove and the heat exchanger. Size distributions and number concentrations were measured with a TSI Fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The computer model predicts that there exists a specific upper limit for thermo- and diffusiophoretic deposition for each temperature and water vapor concentration in the flue gas. PMID:19746724

  13. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, August--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Computer codes have been developed to predict the velocity and temperature profiles in the natural convection boundary layer on the inside of the vertical walls of the wrap-around heat exchanger tank. A brief description of several of the methods considered is given. Heat and mass transfer results for these various methods are compared for one sample case with the results of an accurate finite difference solution obtained with Keller`s box method.

  14. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  15. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  16. Using stress relaxation tests for evaluating and optimizing postweld heat treatments of alloy 625 welds

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, M.J.; Messler, N.Y.R.W. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) is a solid-solution-strengthened, nickel based, chromium-molybdenum alloy used for its high strength and excellent corrosion resistance, Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance and, to a lesser extent, strength can be enhanced by precipitation of intergranular carbides by appropriate heat treatment. In welded structures, dissolution of carbides near the fusion line in the heat-affected zone renders denuded regions susceptible to preferential SCC attack that is greatly aggravated by residual stresses. To reduce the propensity for SCC in weldments, manufacturing practice typically includes methods for reducing residual stresses, usually using postweld heat treatments (PWHT). With appropriate heat treatment, grain boundary carbides can be restored and welding-induced residual stresses can be reduced at the same time. A series of heat treatments was performed between 1,050 and 1,800 F (566 and 9826 C) to determine effectiveness in relieving welding-induced stresses. Stress relaxation testing of all-weld-metal specimens was compared to residual stress measurements in full-scale weldments using a hole-drilling strain gauge technique. The much simpler stress relaxation method provided an excellent measure of residual stresses and proved to be an expeditious way to select optimum postweld heat treatments for reducing those welding-induced stresses.

  17. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  18. System-Cost-Optimized Smart EVSE for Residential Application: Final Technical Report including Manufacturing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Charles

    2015-05-15

    In the 2nd quarter of 2012, a program was formally initiated at Delta Products to develop smart-grid-enabled Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) product for residential use. The project was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under award DE-OE0000590. Delta products was the prime contractor to DOE during the three year duration of the project. In addition to Delta Products, several additional supplier-partners were engaged in this research and development (R&D) program, including Detroit Edison DTE, Mercedes Benz Research and Development North America, and kVA. This report summarizes the program and describes the key research outcomes of the program. A technical history of the project activities is provided, which describes the key steps taken in the research and the findings made at successive stages in the multi-stage work. The evolution of an EVSE prototype system is described in detail, culminating in prototypes shipped to Department of Energy Laboratories for final qualification. After the program history is reviewed, the key attributes of the resulting EVSE are described in terms of functionality, performance, and cost. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of this EVSE to meet or exceed DOE's targets for this program, including: construction of a working product-intent prototype of a smart-grid-enabled EVSE, with suitable connectivity to grid management and home-energy management systems, revenue-grade metering, and related technical functions; and cost reduction of 50% or more compared to typical market priced EVSEs at the time of DOE's funding opportunity announcement (FOA), which was released in mid 2011. In addition to meeting all the program goals, the program was completed within the original budget and timeline established at the time of the award. The summary program budget and timeline, comparing plan versus actual values, is provided for reference, along with several supporting explanatory notes. Technical information

  19. Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Eric W

    2011-01-17

    The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to -Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

  20. Recent improvements in optimizing use of dispersants as a cost-effective oil spill countermeasure technique

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.S.; Indrebo, G.

    1996-12-31

    Several oil spill incidents during recent years have demonstrated that the physico-chemical properties of spilled oil and the effectiveness of available combat methods are, in addition to the prevailing environmental and weather conditions, key factors that determine the consequences of an oil spill. Pre-spill analyses of the feasibility and effectiveness of different response strategies, such as mechanical recovery and dispersants, for actual oils under various environmental conditions should therefore be an essential part of any oil spill contingency planning to optimize the overall {open_quotes}Net Environmental Benefit{close_quotes} of a combat operation. During the four-year research program ESCOST ({open_quotes}ESSO-SINTEF Coastal Oil Spill Treatment Program{close_quotes}), significant improvements have been made in oil spill combat methods and in tools for use in contingency planning and decision-making during oil spill operations. This paper will present an overview of the main findings obtained with respect to oil weathering and oil spill dispersant treatment.

  1. Optimizing Mouse Surgery with Online Rectal Temperature Monitoring and Preoperative Heat Supply. Effects on Post-Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Holderied, Alexander; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Body temperature affects outcomes of tissue injury. We hypothesized that online body core temperature recording and selective interventions help to standardize peri-interventional temperature control and the reliability of outcomes in experimental renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). We recorded core temperature in up to seven mice in parallel using a Thermes USB recorder and ret-3-iso rectal probes with three different protocols. Setup A: Heating pad during ischemia time; Setup B: Heating pad from incision to wound closure; Setup C: A ventilated heating chamber before surgery and during ischemia time with surgeries performed on a heating pad. Temperature profile recording displayed significant declines upon installing anesthesia. The profile of the baseline experimental setup A revealed that <1% of the temperature readings were within the target range of 36.5 to 38.5°C. Setup B and C increased the target range readings to 34.6 ± 28.0% and 99.3 ± 1.5%, respectively. Setup C significantly increased S3 tubular necrosis, neutrophil influx, and mRNA expression of kidney injury markers. In addition, using setup C different ischemia times generated a linear correlation with acute tubular necrosis parameters at a low variability, which further correlated with the degree of kidney atrophy 5 weeks after surgery. Changing temperature control setup A to C was equivalent to 10 minutes more ischemia time. We conclude that body temperature drops quickly in mice upon initiating anesthesia. Immediate heat supply, e.g. in a ventilated heating chamber, and online core temperature monitoring can help to standardize and optimize experimental outcomes. PMID:26890071

  2. Modelling of the District Heating System's Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigants, Girts; Blumberga, Dagnija; Vīgants, Ģirts; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2011-01-01

    The development of a district heating systems calculation model means improvement in the energy efficiency of a district heating system, which makes it possible to reduce the heat losses, thus positively affecting the tariffs on thermal energy. In this paper, a universal approach is considered, based on which the optimal flow and temperature conditions in a district heating system network could be calculated. The optimality is determined by the least operational costs. The developed calculation model has been tested on the Ludza district heating system based on the technical parameters of this system.

  3. Optimization of Fin Distribution to Improve the Temperature Uniformity of a Heat Exchanger in a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Wu, Cheng; Tang, Zebo; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are currently a topic of interest for energy recovery in vehicles. By applying TEGs to the outside surface of the exhaust tailpipe, a small amount of electrical power can be generated because of the temperature difference between the hot exhaust gases and the automobile coolant. The amount of power is anticipated to be a few hundred watts based on the expected temperature difference and the properties of the thermoelectric materials used in TEGs. It is well know that, for thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature uniformity of the heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power generation. In the current research, the temperature uniformity of a heat exchanger was improved by optimizing the fin distribution to maximize the electric power generated for a given vehicle TEG. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the heat exchanger was constructed to assess the influence of different fin distributions on the temperature uniformity and the pressure drop in the exhaust system. For the fin distributions, four factors were considered: the length of, spacing between, angle of, and thickness of the fins. Based on these four factors, a design of experiments study using the orthogonal experimental method was conducted to analyze the sensitivity to the design variables and build a database to set up a surrogate model using the Kriging response surface method. A multi-island genetic algorithm was used to optimize the fin distribution based on this surrogate model. To validate the accuracy of the CFD model, a generic heat exchanger module was manufactured and a related testbed constructed, then the temperature distribution on the surface of the exchanger was measured to compare with the results obtained by CFD.

  4. The optimization of H.264/AVC baseline decoder on low-cost TriMedia DSP processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sung-Wen; Yang, Ya-Ting; Li, Chia-Ying; Tung, Yi-Shin; Wu, Ja-Ling

    2004-11-01

    The emerging video coding standard, H.264/AVC, exhibits the unprecedented coding performance. Comparing to traditional coders, e.g., MPEG-2 and MEPG-4 ASP, about half bitrate saving is shown in the official verification test. Such outstanding performance makes it become the video compression candidate for the upcoming HD-DVD. As a side effect, it was also blamed that H.264/AVC is much more logically complex and requires more computation power than any of the existing standards. A low-cost and efficient implementation of the international standard hence plays an important role of its success. In this paper, we realize an H.264/AVC baseline decoder by a low-cost DSP processor, i.e., Philips" TriMedia TM-1300, and illustrate that less computation demand for H.264/AVC decoding becomes feasible by using effective software core. To this end, we first consider different approaches and take advantage of SIMD instruction set to optimize critical time-consuming coding modules, such as the fractional motion compensation, spatial prediction and inverse transform. Next, we also present some other optimization approaches for entropy decoding and in-loop deblocking filtering, even though they cannot get benefits from utilizing SIMD. In our experiments, by exploiting appropriate instruction level parallelism and efficient algorithms, the decoding speed can be improved by a factor of 8~10; a CIF video sequence can be decoded at up to 19.74~28.97 fps on a 166-MHz TriMedia TM-1300 processor compared to 2.40~2.98 fps by the standard reference software.

  5. Heat trap - An optimized far infrared field optics system. [for astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, D. A.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Winston, R.; Stiening, R.

    1976-01-01

    The article deals with the design and performance of a heat trap IR system designed to maximize the concentration and efficient reception of far IR and submillimeter wavelength radiation. The test object is assumed to be extended and/or viewed at wavelengths much longer than the detector, and the entrance aperture is limited to the size of the telescope Airy diffraction disk. The design of lenses, cavity, bolometers, light collectors, and mirrors for the system is discussed. Advantages and feasibility of arrays of heat traps are considered. Beam patterns, flux concentration, and performance variation with wavelength are dealt with. The heat trap is recommended for sensing all types of far IR sources and particularly for extended far IR sources.-

  6. Modeling optimal process conditions for UV-heat inactivation of foodborne pathogens in liquid foods.

    PubMed

    Gayán, Elisa; Serrano, María Jesús; Álvarez, Ignacio; Condón, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    The combination of ultraviolet radiation and heat (UV-H treatment) has been demonstrated as a promising strategy to overcome the limited UV germicidal effect in fruit juices. Nonetheless, there are so far no data regarding the efficacy of the combined process for the inactivation of bacterial foodborne pathogens in other liquid foods with different pH and composition. In this investigation, the optimum UV-H processing conditions for the inactivation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and S. aureus in chicken and vegetable broth, in addition to juices, were determined. From these data models that accurately predict the most advantageous UV-H treatment temperature and the expected synergistic lethal effect from UV and heat resistance data separately were constructed. Equations demonstrated that the optimum UV-H treatment temperature mostly depended on heat resistance, whereas the maximum synergistic lethal effect also was affected by the UV resistance of the microorganism of concern in a particular food. PMID:27554141

  7. Gait, estimated net cost of transport and heat production at different speeds in three-day-event horses.

    PubMed

    Schroter, R C; Baylis, E; Marlin, D J

    1996-07-01

    Heart rate and gait characteristics (stride length and frequency) were studied in 6 horses subjected to a standardised incremental exercise test, involving moving at the trot and increasing speeds up to a fast gallop and subsequently during the steeplechase phase of a 3-day-event. The studies were performed in hot conditions. Appropriate scaling, based on hindleg length (hh), stride length (L), stride frequency (f) and speed (Sp) for nondimensional stride length (lambda = (L/hh), nondimensional stride frequency (phi = f(hh/g)1/2) and nondimensional velocity (û = Sp/(ghh)1/2), where g is the gravitational acceleration, demonstrated that there were no major differences in characteristics over the full range studied lambda = 2.3 û0.68. However, there were subtle differences in some horses that could endow a benefit in locomotory efficiency when compared to others exercising at the same absolute speed. There were clear changes in the relationship between nondimensional stride length and frequency with increasing speed, from trot to canter (at û approximately 1.4) and to full gallop (at û approximately 2.3); when trotting, lambda was less than 2.2 and the transition from canter to gallop took place at lambda approximately 3.2. The cost of transport/kg/m, estimated from the heart rates measured continuously during each study, decreased with increasing speed and bodyweight. In some animals, there appeared to be a weak minimum around the canter-gallop transition speed. When interpreted as oxygen cost, using published values for the oxygen consumption-heart rate relationship, the cost fell from an average of 0.201 ml/kg/m at the trot to 0.161 mlO2/kg/m when galloping during the incremental exercise tests. During the steeplechase, the cost was approximately 7.5% higher than at the same speed in the exercise tests; this was probably due to jumping effort. Estimated power consumption increased linearly with speed. In the steeplechase, power consumption was also 7.5% higher

  8. Optimization of solar assisted heat pump systems via a simple analytic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analytic method for calculating the optimum operating temperature of the collector/storage subsystem in a solar assisted heat pump is presented. A tradeoff exists between rising heat pump coefficient of performance and falling collector efficiency as this temperature is increased, resulting in an optimum temperature whose value increases with increasing efficiency of the auxiliary energy source. Electric resistance is shown to be a poor backup to such systems. A number of options for thermally coupling the system to the ground are analyzed and compared.

  9. Optimal Mandates and The Welfare Cost of Asymmetric Information: Evidence from The U.K. Annuity Market*

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Much of the extensive empirical literature on insurance markets has focused on whether adverse selection can be detected. Once detected, however, there has been little attempt to quantify its welfare cost, or to assess whether and what potential government interventions may reduce these costs. To do so, we develop a model of annuity contract choice and estimate it using data from the U.K. annuity market. The model allows for private information about mortality risk as well as heterogeneity in preferences over different contract options. We focus on the choice of length of guarantee among individuals who are required to buy annuities. The results suggest that asymmetric information along the guarantee margin reduces welfare relative to a first best symmetric information benchmark by about £127 million per year, or about 2 percent of annuitized wealth. We also find that by requiring that individuals choose the longest guarantee period allowed, mandates could achieve the first-best allocation. However, we estimate that other mandated guarantee lengths would have detrimental effects on welfare. Since determining the optimal mandate is empirically difficult, our findings suggest that achieving welfare gains through mandatory social insurance may be harder in practice than simple theory may suggest. PMID:20592943

  10. Statistical optimization of microchannel heat sink (MCHS) geometry cooled by different nanofluids using RSM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Gorji, M.; Pourmehran, O.; Hatami, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an analytical investigation of the heat transfer for the microchannel heat sink (MCHS) cooled by different nanofluids (Cu, Al2O3, Ag, TiO2 in water and ethylene glycol as base fluids) is studied by the porous media approach and the Galerkin method and results are compared with numerical procedure. Response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to obtain the desirability of the optimum design of the channel geometry. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluid are calculated by the Patel et al. and Khanafer et al. model, respectively, and MCHS is considered as a porous medium, as proposed by Kim and Kim. In addition, to deal with nanofluid heat transfer, a model based on the Brownian motion of nanoparticles is used. The effects of the nanoparticles volume fraction, nanoparticle type and size, base fluid type, etc., on the temperature distribution, velocity and Nusselt number are considered. Results show that, by increasing the nanoparticles volume fraction, the Brownian movement of the particles, which carries the heat and distributes it to the surroundings, increases and, consequently, the difference between coolant and wall temperature becomes less.

  11. Computational model for optimizing longitudinal fin heat transfer in laminar internal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Landram, C.S.

    1990-11-01

    Optimal configurations are identified, based on a numerical model, for fully developed laminar internal flows whose base boundary walls have perpendicular fins extending longitudinally into the fluid. The optimum coolant flow channel, formed between each fin, has an aspect ratio dependent on the coolant to wall thermal conductivity ratio and on the fin to channel width ratio, which is optimally about unity. A base thickness exists which minimizes the base hot-spot temperature, and its value is dependent on the fin to channel width ratio. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  13. Ultrasound-assisted heating extraction of pectin from grapefruit peel: optimization and comparison with the conventional method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Xiaobin; Xu, Yuting; Cao, Yongqiang; Jiang, Zhumao; Ding, Tian; Ye, Xingqian; Liu, Donghong

    2015-07-01

    The extraction of pectin from grapefruit peel by ultrasound-assisted heating extraction (UAHE) was investigated using response surface methodology and compared with the conventional heating extraction (CHE). The optimized conditions were power intensity of 12.56 W/cm(2), extraction temperature of 66.71°C, and sonication time of 27.95 min. The experimental optimized yield was 27.34%, which was well matched with the predicted value (27.46%). Compared with CHE, UAHE provided higher yield increased by 16.34% at the temperature lowered by 13.3°C and the time shortened by 37.78%. Image studies showed that pectin extracted by UAHE showed better color and more loosen microstructure compared to that extracted by CHE, although Fourier Transform Infrared Analysis indicated insignificant difference in their chemical structures. Furthermore, UAHE pectin possessed lower viscosity, molecular weight and degree of esterification, but higher degree of branching and purity than CHE pectin, indicating that the former was preliminarily modified during the extraction process. PMID:25704690

  14. Electricity and combined heat and power from municipal solid waste; theoretically optimal investment decision time and emissions trading implications.

    PubMed

    Tolis, Athanasios; Rentizelas, Athanasios; Aravossis, Konstantin; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias

    2010-11-01

    Waste management has become a great social concern for modern societies. Landfill emissions have been identified among the major contributors of global warming and climate changes with significant impact in national economies. The energy industry constitutes an additional greenhouse gas emitter, while at the same time it is characterized by significant costs and uncertain fuel prices. The above implications have triggered different policies and measures worldwide to address the management of municipal solid wastes on the one hand and the impacts from energy production on the other. Emerging methods of energy recovery from waste may address both concerns simultaneously. In this work a comparative study of co-generation investments based on municipal solid waste is presented, focusing on the evolution of their economical performance over time. A real-options algorithm has been adopted investigating different options of energy recovery from waste: incineration, gasification and landfill biogas exploitation. The financial contributors are identified and the impact of greenhouse gas trading is analysed in terms of financial yields, considering landfilling as the baseline scenario. The results indicate an advantage of combined heat and power over solely electricity production. Gasification, has failed in some European installations. Incineration on the other hand, proves to be more attractive than the competing alternatives, mainly due to its higher power production efficiency, lower investment costs and lower emission rates. Although these characteristics may not drastically change over time, either immediate or irreversible investment decisions might be reconsidered under the current selling prices of heat, power and CO(2) allowances. PMID:20516003

  15. Economical Speed and Energetically Optimal Transition Speed Evaluated by Gross and Net Oxygen Cost of Transport at Different Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Daijiro; Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen cost of transport per unit distance (CoT; mL·kg-1·km-1) shows a U-shaped curve as a function of walking speed (v), which includes a particular walking speed minimizing the CoT, so called economical speed (ES). The CoT-v relationship in running is approximately linear. These distinctive walking and running CoT-v relationships give an intersection between U-shaped and linear CoT relationships, termed the energetically optimal transition speed (EOTS). This study investigated the effects of subtracting the standing oxygen cost for calculating the CoT and its relevant effects on the ES and EOTS at the level and gradient slopes (±5%) in eleven male trained athletes. The percent effects of subtracting the standing oxygen cost (4.8 ± 0.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) on the CoT were significantly greater as the walking speed was slower, but it was not significant at faster running speeds over 9.4 km·h-1. The percent effect was significantly dependent on the gradient (downhill > level > uphill, P < 0.001). The net ES (level 4.09 ± 0.31, uphill 4.22 ± 0.37, and downhill 4.16 ± 0.44 km·h-1) was approximately 20% slower than the gross ES (level 5.15 ± 0.18, uphill 5.27 ± 0.20, and downhill 5.37 ± 0.22 km·h-1, P < 0.001). Both net and gross ES were not significantly dependent on the gradient. In contrast, the gross EOTS was slower than the net EOTS at the level (7.49 ± 0.32 vs. 7.63 ± 0.36 km·h-1, P = 0.003) and downhill gradients (7.78 ± 0.33 vs. 8.01 ± 0.41 km·h-1, P < 0.001), but not at the uphill gradient (7.55 ± 0.37 vs. 7.63 ± 0.51 km·h-1, P = 0.080). Note that those percent differences were less than 2.9%. Given these results, a subtraction of the standing oxygen cost should be carefully considered depending on the purpose of each study. PMID:26383249

  16. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating, and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-10-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991 to 1992 fifteen month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  17. Optimized Heat Pipe Backup Cooling System Tested with a Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Schwendeman, Carl L.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Anderson, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is an attractive energy system for select space missions, and with the addition of a VCHP, it becomes even more versatile. The ASRG is powered through thermal energy from decaying radioisotopes acting as General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS). A Stirling engine converts the thermal energy to electrical energy and cools the GPHS [2]. The Stirling convertor must operate continuously to maintain acceptable temperatures of the GPHS and protect their cladding. The addition of alkali metal VCHP allows the Stirling to cycle on and off during a mission and can be used as a backup cooling system. The benefits of being able to turn the Stirling off are: allowing for a restart of the Stirling and reducing vibrations for sensitive measurements. The VCHP addition should also increase the efficiency of the Stirling by providing a uniform temperature distribution at the heat transfer interface into the heater head.

  18. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Mani, Sudhagar; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-01-01

    Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

  19. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for October and November 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report describes progress on 3 projects: Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling and experiments for solar thermal storage; Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems; and Incident angle modifiers (IAMs) by the Monte Carlo method for cylindrical solar collectors. IAMs are used to correct for effects such as shading, back plane reflectance, inter-reflection, etc. Summaries are given for the first two projects; however, a full draft report is given for the third.

  20. Expert Meeting. Optimized Heating Systems Using Condensing Boilers and Baseboard Convectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.

    2013-01-01

    On August 11, 2011, in Denver, CO, a Building America Expert Meeting was held in conjunction with the Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting, to review and discuss results and future plans for research to improve the performance of hydronic heating systems using condensing boilers and baseboard convectors. A meeting objective was to provide an opportunity for other Building America teams and industry experts to provide feedback and specific suggestions for the planned research.