Science.gov

Sample records for costs separating wind

  1. Development of a VRLA battery with improved separators, and a charge controller, for low cost photovoltaic and wind powered installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M.; Ruddell, A. J.; Vast, N.; Esteban, J.; Estela, F.

    There are many applications and uses for which it is more advantageous to use solar installations than to extend the electrical network and connect to it. This kind of applications are numerous covering from isolated houses to telephone repeaters and the like. These kind of applications share some common characteristics like being located in remote not easy accessible areas, require relatively low power for operation, and being difficult to maintain. Up to now the use of photovoltaic systems, no matter the impressive growth they are experimenting, suffer from some drawbacks, mainly related with the life expectations and reliability of such systems, and as a consequence of the cost of these systems, when calculated on a lifetime basis. To try to contribute to solve these problems, a project partially founded by the European Commission, has been carried out, with the main objective of increasing the life of these systems, and consequently to make them more attractive from the point of view of cost on a lifetime basis for consumers. Presently, the life of PV systems is limited by its weakest component, the battery. Battery failure modes in PV applications, are related with well known phenomena like corrosion, but also due to the special nature of this installations, with other factors like corrosion and growth in the upper part of the group, induced by the development of acid stratification inside the battery, with the more prone standard flooded types now in major use, and to a lesser extent the new valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) types beginning to be used. The main objectives of this project, were: to develop a new glass microfibre separator material, capable of minimizing acid stratification inside the battery. To develop a new VRLA battery, with a life duration of 800 cycles on cycling at 60% DOD and partial state of charge (PSOC) conditions. To develop a new charge regulator, that takes into account the condition of the battery in the near term, to modify its

  2. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  3. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  4. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions, and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  5. Flow separation on wind turbines blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corten, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    In the year 2000, 15GW of wind power was installed throughout the world, producing 100PJ of energy annually. This contributes to the total electricity demand by only 0.2%. Both the installed power and the generated energy are increasing by 30% per year world-wide. If the airflow over wind turbine blades could be controlled fully, the generation efficiency and thus the energy production would increase by 9%. Power Control To avoid damage to wind turbines, they are cut out above 10 Beaufort (25 m/s) on the wind speed scale. A turbine could be designed in such a way that it converts as much power as possible in all wind speeds, but then it would have to be to heavy. The high costs of such a design would not be compensated by the extra production in high winds, since such winds are rare. Therefore turbines usually reach maximum power at a much lower wind speed: the rated wind speed, which occurs at about 6 Beaufort (12.5 m/s). Above this rated speed, the power intake is kept constant by a control mechanism. Two different mechanisms are commonly used. Active pitch control, where the blades pitch to vane if the turbine maximum is exceeded or, passive stall control, where the power control is an implicit property of the rotor. Stall Control The flow over airfoils is called "attached" when it flows over the surface from the leading edge to the trailing edge. However, when the angle of attack of the flow exceeds a certain critical angle, the flow does not reach the trailing edge, but leaves the surface at the separation line. Beyond this line the flow direction is reversed, i.e. it flows from the trailing edge backward to the separation line. A blade section extracts much less energy from the flow when it separates. This property is used for stall control. Stall controlled rotors always operate at a constant rotation speed. The angle of attack of the flow incident to the blades is determined by the blade speed and the wind speed. Since the latter is variable, it determines

  6. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  7. 2013 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mone, C.; Smith, A.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2015-02-01

    This report uses representative project types to estimate the levelized cost of wind energy (LCOE) in the United States for 2013. Scheduled to be published on an annual basis, it relies on both market and modeled data to maintain a current understanding of wind generation cost trends and drivers. It is intended to provide insight into current component-level costs and a basis for understanding current component-level costs and a basis for understanding variability in the LCOE across the industry. Data and tools developed from this analysis are used to inform wind technology cost projections, goals, and improvement opportunities.

  8. 2014 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mone, Christopher; Stehly, Tyler; Maples, Ben; Settle, Edward

    2015-10-01

    This report uses representative commercial projects to estimate the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for both land-based and offshore wind plants in the United States for 2014. Scheduled to be published on an annual basis, the analysis relies on both market and modeled data to maintain an up-to-date understanding of wind generation cost trends and drivers. It is intended to provide insight into current component-level costs and a basis for understanding variability in the LCOE across the industry. Data and tools developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are used in this analysis to inform wind technology cost projections, goals, and improvement opportunities.

  9. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  10. Cost effective seasonal storage of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.; Keck, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    Seasonal variation of the wind electric potential on the Great Plains could be a significant obstacle to the large scale utilization of wind generated electricity. Wind power densities usually are greatest during the spring, and decrease by at least 30 percent relative to the annual average in many areas during the summer months, when demand is highest. This problem can be overcome by using an oversized wind farm and a compressed air energy storage system (a baseload wind energy system). A minimum volume storage reservoir is needed to transform intermittent wind energy to baseload power, while a larger reservoir can be used to store excess power produced during the spring for either peak power or baseload output during the summer. The yearly average cost of energy increases by about 3 percent for the largest storage reservoir, indicating the seasonal storage of wind energy is economically as well as technically feasible.

  11. Low Cost Geothermal Separators BLISS Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Douglas; Wai, King

    2000-05-26

    A new compact, low cost, and high performance separator is being developed to help reduce the installed and O and M cost of geothermal power generation. This device has been given the acronym ''BLISS'' that stands for ''Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber''. The device is the first of a series of separators, and in the case of injectates, scrubbers to address the cost-reduction needs of the industry. The BLISS is a multi-positional centrifugal separator primarily designed to be simply installed between pipe supports, in a horizontal position. This lower profile reduces the height safety concern for workers, and significantly reduces the total installation cost. The vessel can demand as little as one-quarter (25%) the amount of steel traditionally required to fabricate many large vertical separators. The compact nature and high separating efficiency of this device are directly attributable to a high centrifugal force coupled with boundary layer control. The pseudo isokinetic flow design imparts a self-cleaning and scale resistant feature. This polishing separator is designed to remove moderate amounts of liquid and entrained solids.

  12. 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

  13. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 10% of the overall expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 9035.1... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs...

  14. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 10% of the overall expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 9035.1... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs...

  15. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 10% of the overall expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 9035.1... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs...

  16. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 10% of the overall expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 9035.1... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs...

  17. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 10% of the overall expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 9035.1... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs...

  18. Offshore Wind Balance-of-System Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, Michael; Stehly, Tyler; Maples, Ben; Mone, Christopher

    2015-09-29

    Offshore wind balance-of-system (BOS) costs contribute up to 70% of installed capital costs. Thus, it is imperative to understand the impact of these costs on project economics as well as potential cost trends for new offshore wind technology developments. As a result, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed and recently updated a BOS techno-economic model using project cost estimates created from wind energy industry sources.

  19. Estimation of Separation Buffers for Wind-Prediction Error in an Airborne Separation Assistance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Allen, B. Danette

    2009-01-01

    Wind prediction errors are known to affect the performance of automated air traffic management tools that rely on aircraft trajectory predictions. In particular, automated separation assurance tools, planned as part of the NextGen concept of operations, must be designed to account and compensate for the impact of wind prediction errors and other system uncertainties. In this paper we describe a high fidelity batch simulation study designed to estimate the separation distance required to compensate for the effects of wind-prediction errors throughout increasing traffic density on an airborne separation assistance system. These experimental runs are part of the Safety Performance of Airborne Separation experiment suite that examines the safety implications of prediction errors and system uncertainties on airborne separation assurance systems. In this experiment, wind-prediction errors were varied between zero and forty knots while traffic density was increased several times current traffic levels. In order to accurately measure the full unmitigated impact of wind-prediction errors, no uncertainty buffers were added to the separation minima. The goal of the study was to measure the impact of wind-prediction errors in order to estimate the additional separation buffers necessary to preserve separation and to provide a baseline for future analyses. Buffer estimations from this study will be used and verified in upcoming safety evaluation experiments under similar simulation conditions. Results suggest that the strategic airborne separation functions exercised in this experiment can sustain wind prediction errors up to 40kts at current day air traffic density with no additional separation distance buffer and at eight times the current day with no more than a 60% increase in separation distance buffer.

  20. Cost of wind energy: comparing distant wind resources to local resources in the midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Hoppock, David C; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia

    2010-11-15

    The best wind sites in the United States are often located far from electricity demand centers and lack transmission access. Local sites that have lower quality wind resources but do not require as much power transmission capacity are an alternative to distant wind resources. In this paper, we explore the trade-offs between developing new wind generation at local sites and installing wind farms at remote sites. We first examine the general relationship between the high capital costs required for local wind development and the relatively lower capital costs required to install a wind farm capable of generating the same electrical output at a remote site,with the results representing the maximum amount an investor should be willing to pay for transmission access. We suggest that this analysis can be used as a first step in comparing potential wind resources to meet a state renewable portfolio standard (RPS). To illustrate, we compare the cost of local wind (∼50 km from the load) to the cost of distant wind requiring new transmission (∼550-750 km from the load) to meet the Illinois RPS. We find that local, lower capacity factor wind sites are the lowest cost option for meeting the Illinois RPS if new long distance transmission is required to access distant, higher capacity factor wind resources. If higher capacity wind sites can be connected to the existing grid at minimal cost, in many cases they will have lower costs. PMID:20931984

  1. Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Wiser, R.

    2012-08-01

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions.

  2. Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-06-01

    Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

  3. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 110.8(a)(2); or (2) 2.5% of the total of: (i) The candidate's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs....

  4. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 110.8(a)(2); or (2) 2.5% of the total of: (i) The candidate's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs....

  5. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 110.8(a)(2); or (2) 2.5% of the total of: (i) The candidate's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs....

  6. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 110.8(a)(2); or (2) 2.5% of the total of: (i) The candidate's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs....

  7. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... expenditure limitation pursuant to 11 CFR 110.8(a)(2); or (2) 2.5% of the total of: (i) The candidate's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs....

  8. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  9. Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.

    1997-11-01

    Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

  10. Evaluation of global onshore wind energy potential and generation costs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind potential under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power. PMID:22715929

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  12. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

  13. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

    2012-03-26

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

  14. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  15. Large, low cost composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A woven roving E-glass tape, having all of its structural fibers oriented across the tape width was used in the manufacture of the spar for a wind turbine blade. Tests of a 150 ft composite blade show that the transverse filament tape is capable of meeting structural design requirements for wind turbine blades. Composite blades can be designed for interchangeability with steel blades in the MOD-1 wind generator system. The design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of the 150 ft blade are discussed.

  16. Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

    2014-10-01

    The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

  17. Low cost composite materials for wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, O.

    1980-01-01

    A winding process utilizing a low-cost E-glass fabric called transverse-filament tape for low-cost production of wind turbine generators (WTG) is described. The process can be carried out continuously at high speed to produce large one-piece parts with tapered wall thicknesses on a tapered mandrel. It is being used to manufacture blades for the NASA/DOE 200-ft-diameter MOD-1 WTG and Rockwell/DOE 40-kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS).

  18. Large wind turbine generators. [NASA program status and potential costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large wind turbine portion of the Federal Wind Energy Program consists of two major project efforts: (1) the Mod-0 test bed project for supporting research technology, and (2) the large experimental wind turbines for electric utility applications. The Mod-0 has met its primary objective of providing the entire wind energy program with early operations and performance data. The large experimental wind turbines to be tested in utility applications include three of the Mod-0A (200 kW) type, one Mod-1 (2000 kW), and possibly several of the Mod-2 (2500 kW) designs. This paper presents a description of these wind turbine systems, their programmatic status, and a summary of their potential costs.

  19. Wind turbine generator rotor blade concepts with low cost potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Cahill, T. P.; Griffee, D. G., Jr.; Gewehr, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Four processed for producing blades are examined. Two use filament winding techniques and two involve filling a mold or form to produce all or part of a blade. The processes are described and a comparison is made of cost, material properties, design and free vibration characteristics. Conclusions are made regarding the feasibility of each process to produce low cost, structurally adequate blades.

  20. Separation of wind's influence on harmful cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhizhang; Liang, Dongfang; du, Hanbei; Pang, Yong; Hu, Kaimin; Wang, Jianjian

    2016-07-01

    Wind is an important physical factor involved in Harmful Cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). Its integrated influence was separated to three components: (a) Direct Disturbance Impact (DDI) on cyanbacterial proliferation, (b) Indirect Nutrient Impact (INI) by sediment release and (c) Direct Transportation Impact (DTI) by both gentle wind-induced surface drift and wave-generated Stokes drift. By the combination of field investigation, laboratory experiment and numerical simulation their individual contributions to the severe bloom event in May 2007 in Meiliang Bay, Lake Taihu, was explored. Wind synthetically made 10.5 percent promotion to the bloom on May 28, 2007, but the impact varied with locations. DTI was featured with the strongest contribution of wind's impacts on CyanoHABs, while INI stood at the lowest level and DDI played an intermediate role. From the point of whole Meiliang Bay, the influencing weights of DTI, DDI and INI were approximately 48.55%, 32.30% and 19.15% respectively. DTI exerted the higher promotion in the regions of middle-east (ME), southwest (SW) and southeast (SE), and its actual contribution rate on CyanoHABs ranged from 6.41% to 7.46%. Due to the background nutrient load, INI was characterized by a tiny effect with the contribution rate being 2.18% on average. From the south bay to the north, DDI was detected with a decreasing tendency, with the practical contribution rate generally falling from 4.13% to 2.7%. PMID:27108214

  1. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  2. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a

  3. Hyper-X Stage Separation Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. C.; Holland, S. D.; DiFulvio, M.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Hyper-X research program was developed primarily to flight demonstrate a supersonic combustion ramjet engine, fully integrated with a forebody designed to tailor inlet flow conditions and a free expansion nozzle/afterbody to produce positive thrust at design flight conditions. With a point-designed propulsion system, the vehicle must depend upon some other means for boost to its design flight condition. Clean separation from this initial propulsion system stage within less than a second is critical to the success of the flight. This paper discusses the early planning activity, background, and chronology that developed the series of wind tunnel tests to support multi degree of freedom simulation of the separation process. Representative results from each series of tests are presented and issues and concerns during the process and current status will be highlighted.

  4. Air-flow separation over unsteady breaking wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Gaurav

    2005-11-01

    In air-sea interaction processes, when considering wind stress over small-scale breaking waves, there are few direct quantitative experimental investigations into the role of air-flow separation on the interfacial momentum flux. Reul et. al, (1999), found multiple coherent patches of vorticity downwind of the crest that were strongly influenced by the geometric characteristics of the breaker. However, their breakers were generated by dispersive focusing techniques and, therefore, independent of the wind stress. We present experimental results obtained with particle image velocimetry (PIV) where moderate to strong winds directly generate unsteady small-scale breaking waves, a scenario commonly found in the open ocean. Particular attention has been devoted to capturing the spatio-temporal evolution of the air-water interface. Specifically, texture segmentation algorithms typically used for face recognition (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Cross-Diagonal Texture Matrix (CDTM)) have been combined to yield robust and accurate estimates of the instantaneous breaker geometry.

  5. Transmission cost minimization strategies for wind-electric generating facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.

    1997-12-31

    Integrating wind-electric generation facilities into existing power systems presents opportunities not encountered in conventional energy projects. Minimizing outlet cost requires probabilistic value-based analyses appropriately reflecting the wind facility`s operational characteristics. The wind resource`s intermittent nature permits relaxation of deterministic criteria addressing outlet configuration and capacity required relative to facility rating. Equivalent capacity ratings of wind generation facilities being a fraction of installed nameplate rating, outlet design studies contingency analyses can concentrate on this fractional value. Further, given its non-dispatchable, low capacity factor nature, a lower level of redundancy in outlet facilities is appropriate considering the trifling contribution to output unreliability. Further cost reduction opportunities arise from {open_quotes}wind speed/generator power output{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}wind speed/overhead conductor rating{close_quotes} functions` correlation. Proper analysis permits the correlation`s exploitation to safely increase line ratings. Lastly, poor correlation between output and utility load may permit use of smaller conductors, whose higher (mostly off-peak) losses are economically justifiable.

  6. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Electrolyzer Capital Cost Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.

    2008-12-01

    This study is being performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy and Xcel Energy's Wind-to-Hydrogen Project (Wind2H2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The general aim of the project is to identify areas for improving the production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources. These areas include both technical development and cost analysis of systems that convert renewable energy to hydrogen via water electrolysis. Increased efficiency and reduced cost will bring about greater market penetration for hydrogen production and application. There are different issues for isolated versus grid-connected systems, however, and these issues must be considered. The manner in which hydrogen production is integrated in the larger energy system will determine its cost feasibility and energy efficiency.

  7. Cost analysis of DAWT innovative wind energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, K. M.

    The results of a diffuser augmented wind turbine (DAWT) preliminary design study of three constructional material approaches and cost analysis of DAWT electrical energy generation are presented. Costs are estimated assuming a limited production run (100 to 500 units) of factory-built subassemblies and on-site final assembly and erection within 200 miles of regional production centers. It is concluded that with the DAWT the (busbar) cost of electricity (COE) can range between 2.0 and 3.5 cents/kW-hr for farm and REA cooperative end users, for sites with annual average wind speeds of 16 and 12 mph respectively, and 150 kW rated units. No tax credit incentives are included in these figures. For commercial end users of the same units and site characteristics, the COE ranges between 4.0 and 6.5 cents/kW-hr.

  8. Low cost composite materials for wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weingart, O.

    1980-01-01

    Structural Composites Industries, Inc. (SCI) is developing new composite filament winding technology for low cost production of wind turbine generators (WTG). During 1977 the SCI TFT process was used to fabricate a 9072 kg (20,000 lb) filament-wound D-spar for a NASA/DOE 46 m (150 ft) composite wind turbine blade. In 1978 SCI designed a composite blade for the 91 m (300 ft) dia. NASA/DOE MOD-2 WTG. For the past year SCI has been under contract to NASA-Lewis Research Center to design and build two low cost 18 m (60 ft) blades for the 38 m (125 ft) dia. MOD-OA and to assess the applicability of the techniques developed for larger and smaller blades. SCI is also developing and constructing a 4-kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) for Rockwell International using low cost composites for the 9 m (31 ft) dia. rotor blades, 15 m (50 ft) tower and nacelle.

  9. Larger Turbines and the Future Cost of Wind Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The move to larger turbines has been observed in the United States and around the world. Turbine scaling increases energy capture while reducing general project infrastructure costs and landscape impacts, each of which of can reduce the cost of wind energy. However, scaling in the absence of innovation, can increase turbine costs. The ability of turbine designers and manufacturers to continue to scale turbines, while simultaneously reducing costs, is an important factor in long-term viability of the industry. This research seeks to better understand how technology innovation can allow the continued development of larger turbines on taller towers while also achieving lower cost of energy. Modeling incremental technology improvements identified over the past decade demonstrates that cost reductions on the order of 10%, and capacity factor improvements on the order of 5% (for sites with annual mean wind speed of 7.25 m/s at 50m), are achievable for turbines up to 3.5 MW. However, to achieve a 10% cost reduction and a 10% capacity factor improvement for turbines up to 5 MW, additional technology innovations must be developed and implemented.

  10. Engineering and fabrication cost considerations for cryogenic wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, R. M., Jr.; Davenport, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication cost drivers for cryogenic transonic wind tunnel models are defined. The major cost factors for wind tunnel models are model complexity, tolerances, surface finishes, materials, material validation, and model inspection. The cryogenic temperatures require the use of materials with relatively high fracture toughness but at the same time high strength. Some of these materials are very difficult to machine, requiring extensive machine hours which can add significantly to the manufacturing costs. Some additional engineering costs are incurred to certify the materials through mechanical tests and nondestructive evaluation techniques, which are not normally required with conventional models. When instrumentation such as accelerometers and electronically scanned pressure modules is required, temperature control of these devices needs to be incorporated into the design, which requires added effort. Additional thermal analyses and subsystem tests may be necessary, which also adds to the design costs. The largest driver to the design costs is potentially the additional static and dynamic analyses required to insure structural integrity of the model and support system.

  11. Cost effective use of liquid nitrogen in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Glen E.; Lombard, David S.; Martindale, David L.; Dunn, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of reliquefying from 12 to 19% of the nitrogen exhaust gas from a cryogenic wind tunnel has been developed. Technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of the system depends on performance of an innovative positive displacement expander which requires scale model testing to confirm design studies. The existing cryogenic system at the 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel has been surveyed and extensive upgrades proposed. Upgrades are generally cost effective and may be implemented immediately since they are based on established technology.

  12. Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect

    Chobot, Anthony; Das, Debarshi; Mayer, Tyler; Markey, Zach; Martinson, Tim; Reeve, Hayden; Attridge, Paul; El-Wardany, Tahany

    2012-09-13

    Clipper Windpower, in collaboration with United Technologies Research Center, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, developed a low-cost, deflection-compliant, reliable, and serviceable chain drive speed increaser. This chain and sprocket drivetrain design offers significant breakthroughs in the areas of cost and serviceability and addresses the key challenges of current geared and direct-drive systems. The use of gearboxes has proven to be challenging; the large torques and bending loads associated with use in large multi-MW wind applications have generally limited demonstrated lifetime to 8-10 years [1]. The large cost of gearbox replacement and the required use of large, expensive cranes can result in gearbox replacement costs on the order of $1M, representing a significant impact to overall cost of energy (COE). Direct-drive machines eliminate the gearbox, thereby targeting increased reliability and reduced life-cycle cost. However, the slow rotational speeds require very large and costly generators, which also typically have an undesirable dependence on expensive rare-earth magnet materials and large structural penalties for precise air gap control. The cost of rare-earth materials has increased 20X in the last 8 years representing a key risk to ever realizing the promised cost of energy reductions from direct-drive generators. A common challenge to both geared and direct drive architectures is a limited ability to manage input shaft deflections. The proposed Clipper drivetrain is deflection-compliant, insulating later drivetrain stages and generators from off-axis loads. The system is modular, allowing for all key parts to be removed and replaced without the use of a high capacity crane. Finally, the technology modularity allows for scalability and many possible drivetrain topologies. These benefits enable reductions in drivetrain capital cost by 10.0%, levelized replacement and O&M costs by 26.7%, and overall cost of

  13. Membrane separation cuts disposal costs for wire-products maker

    SciTech Connect

    Nichele, V.B.

    1996-03-01

    To reduce disposal and maintenance costs associated with alkaline washing stations, a manufacturer of wire-welded products installed a membrane-separation wastewater treatment system. The Missouri-based company produces welded-wire products, such as shelves, closet conversions, wire baskets, display racks and coat hangers. The steel parts undergo an extensive cleaning process that consists of five spray-washing stages. An alkaline solution first washes oil and solids from the steel parts, then is washed off the parts. A phosphatizing solution etches the steel parts. Finally, the parts are rinsed thoroughly with potable water before they are powder coated.

  14. Framework for Unified Systems Engineering and Design of Wind Plants (FUSED-Wind) cost models and case analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-10

    Cost and case analyzer components of the FUSED-Wind software. These are small pieces of code which define interfaces between software in order to do wind plant cost of energy on the one hand and analysis of load cases for an aeroelastic code on the other.

  15. Separate valuation subsystems for delay and effort decision costs.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Charlotte; Pessiglione, Mathias; Météreau, Elise; Cléry-Melin, Marie-Laure; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-20

    Decision making consists of choosing among available options on the basis of a valuation of their potential costs and benefits. Most theoretical models of decision making in behavioral economics, psychology, and computer science propose that the desirability of outcomes expected from alternative options can be quantified by utility functions. These utility functions allow a decision maker to assign subjective values to each option under consideration by weighting the likely benefits and costs resulting from an action and to select the one with the highest subjective value. Here, we used model-based neuroimaging to test whether the human brain uses separate valuation systems for rewards (erotic stimuli) associated with different types of costs, namely, delay and effort. We show that humans devalue rewards associated with physical effort in a strikingly similar fashion to those they devalue that are associated with delays, and that a single computational model derived from economics theory can account for the behavior observed in both delay discounting and effort discounting. However, our neuroimaging data reveal that the human brain uses distinct valuation subsystems for different types of costs, reflecting in opposite fashion delayed reward and future energetic expenses. The ventral striatum and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex represent the increasing subjective value of delayed rewards, whereas a distinct network, composed of the anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior insula, represent the decreasing value of the effortful option, coding the expected expense of energy. Together, these data demonstrate that the valuation processes underlying different types of costs can be fractionated at the cerebral level. PMID:20962229

  16. Evaluation of wind energy cost and site selection for a wind-farm in the south of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmemdejahed, M.; Mouhadjer, S.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the wind resource on five sites situated in Algerian Sahara, namely Adrar, Ain Salah, Bordj Badji Mokhtar, Hassi R'Mel and Tindouf. The hourly data used in this study span a period of last five years. The parameters considered are the wind speed. After the evaluation of wind energy, the economic evaluation was conducted for wind farm (18 MW). We select the best site from the five sites and an appropriate wind turbine from nine wind turbine, according to the lowest possible unity cost of energy. Hassi R'Mel is favorable site for installed wind frame In order to reach the rated power 18 MW of the wind farm; our choice is focused on one row of twelve wind turbines (wgt1.5MW) from East South East (ESE) to West North West (WNW), 320 m of distance between each two turbines.

  17. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    This thesis focuses on the study of low-cost steel and bamboo triangular lattice towers for small wind turbines. The core objective is to determine the material properties of bamboo and assess the feasibility of bamboo towers. Using the experimentally determined buckling resistance, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio, a 12 m high triangular lattice tower for a 500W wind turbine has been modeled as a tripod to formulate the analytical solutions for the stresses and tower deflections, which enables design of the tower based on buckling strength of tower legs. The tripod formulation combines the imposed loads, the base distance between the legs and tower height, and cross-sectional dimensions of the tower legs. The tripod model was used as a reference for the initial design of the bamboo tower and extended to finite element analysis. A 12 m high steel lattice tower was also designed for the same turbine to serve as a comparison to the bamboo tower. The primary result of this work indicates that bamboo is a valid structural material. The commercial software package ANSYS APDL was used to carry out the tower analysis, evaluate the validity of the tripod model, and extend the analysis for the tower design. For this purpose, a 12 m high steel lattice tower for a 500 W wind turbine was examined. Comparison of finite element analysis and analytical solution has shown that tripod model can be accurately used in the design of lattice towers. The tower designs were based on the loads and safety requirements of international standard for small wind turbine safety, IEC 61400-2. For connecting the bamboo sections in the lattice tower, a steel-bamboo adhesive joint combined with conventional lashing has been proposed. Also, considering the low durability of bamboo, periodic replacement of tower members has been proposed. The result of this study has established that bamboo could be used to construct cost-effective and lightweight lattice towers for wind turbines of 500 Watt

  18. The ISM Analysis on Influence Factors of Cost Control in the Wind Power Construction Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunna, Wu; Qing, Bian; Ping, Lin

    Cost control in the wind power construction project is essential under the trend of developing wind power in China. In order to carry out cost control effectively, structural interpretation model(ISM) is used to identify and analyze the major factors that affect the implementation of cost control and the hierarchy relationships between each other. In this way, the surface causes, the middle causes and the underlying causes that affect the cost control in the wind power construction project have been found, which provides decision theory for the smooth implementation of cost control in China's current wind power construction projects.

  19. Manufacturing and wetting low-cost microfluidic cell separation devices

    PubMed Central

    Pawell, Ryan S.; Inglis, David W.; Barber, Tracie J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) is a microfluidic size-based particle separation or filter technology with applications in cell separation and enrichment. Currently, there are no cost-effective manufacturing methods for this promising microfluidic technology. In this fabrication paper, however, we develop a simple, yet robust protocol for thermoplastic DLD devices using regulatory-approved materials and biocompatible methods. The final standalone device allowed for volumetric flow rates of 660 μl min−1 while reducing the manufacturing time to <1 h. Optical profilometry and image analysis were employed to assess manufacturing accuracy and precision; the average replicated post height was 0.48% less than the average post height on the master mold and the average replicated array pitch was 1.1% less than the original design with replicated posts heights of 62.1 ± 5.1 μm (mean ± 6 standard deviations) and replicated array pitches of 35.6 ± 0.31 μm. PMID:24404077

  20. Spectral separation of wind sea and swell based on buoy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hao, Zengzhou; Gong, Fang; Wang, Tianyu; Chen, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    Coexistence of swells from distant sources and wind seas generated by local wind field results in complex surface wave condition. Identification and separation analysis of wave components of the wind sea and swell provide a more realistic depiction of the sea state and is important for understanding of the mechanisms of climate variability in the wave field. Spectral separating is one of the most important methods in partitioning waves. Two separating methods including the initial wave steepness method (STPN) and modified wave steepness method (MSTPN) that proposed by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) are described in this paper. And the NDBC buoy observations are applied in this study to investigate STPN and MSTPN. Although MSTPN method is improved from the STPN method, it is still not fit for the swell effect. Considering limitations mentioned above, we use spectral energy proportion (SEP) to describe the swell effect and abstract the valid data according to this index. Finally, we give a description of correlation between significant wave height (SWH) and wind speed under the wind sea condition. From results, it is shown that SWH and wind speed of wind sea have a quasiquadratic fitting relationship. In addition, it shows that MSTPN is a better performance in application as expected. Our work for spectral partitioning algorithms could provide a reference for the future work in satellite spectral data. And a practical method for deriving the SWHs from wind speed of scatterometer will be realized on the basis of the empirical wind and sea relationship.

  1. IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy; Work Package 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, P.; Lensink, S.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The lifetime cost of wind energy is comprised of a number of components including the investment cost, operation and maintenance costs, financing costs, and annual energy production. Accurate representation of these cost streams is critical in estimating a wind plant's cost of energy. Some of these cost streams will vary over the life of a given project. From the outset of project development, investors in wind energy have relatively certain knowledge of the plant's lifetime cost of wind energy. This is because a wind energy project's installed costs and mean wind speed are known early on, and wind generation generally has low variable operation and maintenance costs, zero fuel cost, and no carbon emissions cost. Despite these inherent characteristics, there are wide variations in the cost of wind energy internationally, which is the focus of this report. Using a multinational case-study approach, this work seeks to understand the sources of wind energy cost differences among seven countries under International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 26 - Cost of Wind Energy. The participating countries in this study include Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Due to data availability, onshore wind energy is the primary focus of this study, though a small sample of reported offshore cost data is also included.

  2. Improved, low cost inorganic-organic separators for rechargeable silver-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Several flexible, low-cost inorganic-organic separators with performance characteristics and cycle life equal to, or better than, the Lewis Research Center Astropower separator were developed. These new separators can be made on continuous-production equipment at about one-fourth the cost of the Astropower separator produced the same way. In test cells, these new separators demonstrate cycle life improvement, acceptable operating characteristics, and uniform current density. The various separator formulas, test cell construction, and data analysis are described.

  3. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally. PMID:26274964

  4. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C. F.; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally. PMID:26274964

  5. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S. )

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  6. Launch Vehicle Ascent Stage Separation Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordelon, Wayne; Frost, Alonzo; Pritchett, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The Aerodynamic Research Facility (ARF) LGBB (Liquid Glide-back Booster) Stage Separation Test is part of the Multi-Center Second Generation In-House Tool Development Task. The ARF LGBB Stage Separation Test has been completed at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center). It includes the following: PSP (Project Study Plan) Feasibility Test; Isolated Force/Moment Data; Bimese Configuration Force/Moment Data; Schlieren Video. The LGBB Bimese Reference Configuration Analyses and Test Results In-Work to Develop Tools and Database. Preliminary results showed qualitative agreement with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) aerodynamic predictions. The preliminary results exhibit the complex nature of the stage separation aerothermal problem.

  7. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamic research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions. Research at the NWTC is crucial to understanding how wind turbines function in large, multiple-row wind plants. These conditions impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural components that ultimately effect the useful lifetime of wind turbines. This work also is essential for understanding and maximizing turbine and wind plant energy production. Both turbine lifetime and wind plant energy production are key determinants of the cost of wind-generated electricity.

  8. Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2014-04-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non‐turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

  9. Design and Study of a Low-Cost Laboratory Model Digital Wind Power Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radhakrishnan, Rugmini; Karthika, S.

    2010-01-01

    A vane-type low-cost laboratory model anemometer cum power meter is designed and constructed for measuring low wind energy created from accelerating fluids. The constructed anemometer is a device which records the electrical power obtained by the conversion of wind power using a wind sensor coupled to a DC motor. It is designed for its…

  10. Benefit-cost methodology study with example application of the use of wind generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, R. P.; Justus, C. G.; Mason, R. M.; Robinette, S. L.; Sassone, P. G.; Schaffer, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    An example application for cost-benefit methodology is presented for the use of wind generators. The approach adopted for the example application consisted of the following activities: (1) surveying of the available wind data and wind power system information, (2) developing models which quantitatively described wind distributions, wind power systems, and cost-benefit differences between conventional systems and wind power systems, and (3) applying the cost-benefit methodology to compare a conventional electrical energy generation system with systems which included wind power generators. Wind speed distribution data were obtained from sites throughout the contiguous United States and were used to compute plant factor contours shown on an annual and seasonal basis. Plant factor values (ratio of average output power to rated power) are found to be as high as 0.6 (on an annual average basis) in portions of the central U. S. and in sections of the New England coastal area. Two types of wind power systems were selected for the application of the cost-benefit methodology. A cost-benefit model was designed and implemented on a computer to establish a practical tool for studying the relative costs and benefits of wind power systems under a variety of conditions and to efficiently and effectively perform associated sensitivity analyses.

  11. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  12. Ion Layer Separation and Equilibrium Zonal Winds in Midlatitude Sporadic E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, G. D.; Kane, T. J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In-situ observations of a moderately strong mid-latitude sporadic-E layer show a separation in altitude between distinct sublayers composed of Fe(+), Mg(+), and NO(+). From these observations it is possible to estimate the zonal wind field consistent with diffusive equilibrium near the altitude of the layer. The amplitude of the zonal wind necessary to sustain the layer against diffusive effects is less than 10 meters per second, and the vertical wavelength is less than 10 km.

  13. Minimizing Wind Power Producer's Balancing Costs Using Electrochemical Energy Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.; Tikka, V.; Lassila, J.; Partanen, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines how electrochemical energy storage can be used to decrease the balancing costs of a wind power producer in the Nordic market. Because electrochemical energy storage is developing in both technological and financial terms, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for the most important variables in the wind-storage hybrid system. The system was studied from a wind power producer's point of view. The main result is that there are no technical limitations to using storage for reducing the balancing costs. However, in terms of economic feasibility, installing hybrid wind-storage systems such as the one studied in this paper faces challenges in both the short and long terms.

  14. Cost Estimate for Laser Isotope Separation for RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, K

    2004-11-01

    Isotope enrichment of some elements is required in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) in order to obtain the beam intensities, source efficiencies and/or source lifetime required by RIA. The economics of using Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology as well as ElectroMagnetic (EM) separation technology has been evaluated. It is concluded that such an AVLIS would be about 10 times less expensive than a facility based on electromagnetic separation - $17 M versus $170 M. In addition, the AVLIS facility footprint would be about 10 times smaller, and operations would require about 4 years (including 2 years of startup) versus about 11 years for an EM facility.

  15. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007–2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vitina, Aisma; Lüers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabø, Lief I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arántegui, Roberto; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan H; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems (IEA Wind) Task 26—The Cost of Wind Energy represents an international collaboration dedicated to exploring past, present and future cost of wind energy. This report provides an overview of recent trends in wind plant technology, cost, and performance in those countries that are currently represented by participating organizations in IEA Wind Task 26: Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, and the United States as well as the European Union.

  16. Solar power. [comparison of costs to wind, nuclear, coal, oil and gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, A. L.; Hall, Darwin C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes categories of solar technologies and identifies those that are economic. It compares the private costs of power from solar, wind, nuclear, coal, oil, and gas generators. In the southern United States, the private costs of building and generating electricity from new solar and wind power plants are less than the private cost of electricity from a new nuclear power plant. Solar power is more valuable than nuclear power since all solar power is available during peak and midpeak periods. Half of the power from nuclear generators is off-peak power and therefore is less valuable. Reliability is important in determining the value of wind and nuclear power. Damage from air pollution, when factored into the cost of power from fossil fuels, alters the cost comparison in favor of solar and wind power. Some policies are more effective at encouraging alternative energy technologies that pollute less and improve national security.

  17. Offshore Wind Plant Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Maples, B.; Meadows, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.; Elkington, C.; Clayton, J.

    2012-09-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non-turbine costs associated with offshore turbine sizes ranging from 3 MW to 6 MW and offshore wind plant sizes ranging from 100 MW to 1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US offshore wind plants.

  18. Orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation: Wind tunnel, simulation, and flight test overview and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, D. J.; Denison, D. E.; Elchert, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the approach and landing test phase of the space shuttle program is given from the orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation point of view. The data and analyses used during the wind tunnel testing, simulation, and flight test phases in preparation for the orbiter approach and landing tests are reported.

  19. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2009-02-02

    The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and

  20. Cost of Wind Energy in the United States: Trends from 2007 to 2012 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of recent technology trends observed in the United States including project size, turbine size, rotor diameter, hub height, annual average wind speed, and annual energy production. It also highlights area where system analysis is required to fully understand how these technology trends relate to the cost of wind energy.

  1. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4 -- Balance-of-Station Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, D. A.; Strawmyer, K. R.; Conley, R. M.; Guidinger J. H.; Wilkie, D. C.; Zellman, T. F.

    2001-07-24

    DOE's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program explores the most advanced wind-generating technologies for improving reliability and decreasing energy costs. The first step in the WindPact program is a scaling study to bound the optimum sizes for wind turbines, to define size limits for certain technologies, and to scale new technologies. The program is divided into four projects: Composite Blades for 80-120-meter Rotors; Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics; Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility; and Balance-of-Station Cost. This report discusses balance-of-station costs, which includes the electrical power collector system, wind turbine foundations, communications and controls, meteorological equipment, access roadways, crane pads, and the maintenance building. The report is based on a conceptual 50-megawatt (MW) wind farm site near Mission, South Dakota. Cost comparisons are provided for four sizes of wind turbines: 750 kilowatt (kW), 2.5 MW, 5.0 MW, and 10.0 MW.

  2. Barriers to movement: Modelling energetic costs of avoiding marine wind farms amongst breeding seabirds.

    PubMed

    Masden, Elizabeth A; Haydon, Daniel T; Fox, Anthony D; Furness, Robert W

    2010-07-01

    Proposals for wind farms in areas of known importance for breeding seabirds highlight the need to understand the impacts of these structures. Using an energetic modelling approach, we examine the effects of wind farms as barriers to movement on seabirds of differing morphology. Additional costs, expressed in relation to typical daily energetic expenditures, were highest per unit flight for seabirds with high wing loadings, such as cormorants. Taking species-specific differences into account, costs were relatively higher in terns, due to the high daily frequency of foraging flights. For all species, costs of extra flight to avoid a wind farm appear much less than those imposed by low food abundance or adverse weather, although such costs will be additive to these. We conclude that adopting a species-specific approach is essential when assessing the impacts of wind farms on breeding seabird populations, to fully anticipate the effects of avoidance flights. PMID:20188382

  3. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  4. 75 FR 17872 - High-Cost Universal Service Support, Jurisdictional Separations, and Coalition for Equity in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... in its current rules governing the receipt of universal service high-cost local switching support... governing the receipt of universal service high-cost local switching support (LSS) by small incumbent local... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 36 and 54 High-Cost Universal Service Support, Jurisdictional Separations,...

  5. Design and study of a low-cost laboratory model digital wind power meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rugmini; Karthika, S.

    2010-11-01

    A vane-type low-cost laboratory model anemometer cum power meter is designed and constructed for measuring low wind energy created from accelerating fluids. The constructed anemometer is a device which records the electrical power obtained by the conversion of wind power using a wind sensor coupled to a DC motor. It is designed for its high-reliability, ease of construction and for a wide profile of low-range velocities. The construction of the digital anemometer is an easy task that even unskilled people can manage in a short time. The performance of the digital anemometer is analysed by its capability to convert wind speeds to power.

  6. Integration Costs: Are They Unique to Wind and Solar Energy? Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Hodge, B.; Kirby, B.; Clark, C.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past several years, there has been considerable interest in assessing wind integration costs. This is understandable because wind energy does increase the variability and uncertainty that must be managed on a power system. However, there are other sources of variability and uncertainty that also must be managed in the power system. This paper describes some of these sources and shows that even the introduction of base-load generation can cause additional ramping and cycling. The paper concludes by demonstrating that integration costs are not unique to wind and solar, and should perhaps instead be assessed by power plant and load performance instead of technology type.

  7. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  8. CATCHING THE WIND: A LOW COST METHOD FOR WIND POWER SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our Phase I successes involve the installation of a wind monitoring station in Humboldt County, the evaluation of four different measure-correlate-predict methods for wind site assessment, and the creation of SWEET, an open source software package implementing the prediction ...

  9. System engineering and energy costs of small and medium wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, P K.C.

    1985-07-01

    A preliminary system-level, computational model was developed to allow broad assessment and optimization of wind turbine design and costs analysis at The Wind Energy Research Center, Solar Energy Research Institute under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper briefly describes the basic principles used in the model for energy capture and cost-of-energy (COE), and demonstrates the model's usefulness in determining the effects of rotor and system design modifications. The model's utilization for conducting parametric studies and defining the energy cost of small and medium-sized wind turbines is also shown. Topics of interest to wind turbine engineers and designers include the effects on rotor performance of airfoil geometry, blade pitch angle setting, and the system RPM schedule, etc.

  10. Brain Network Analysis: Separating Cost from Topology Using Cost-Integration

    PubMed Central

    Ginestet, Cedric E.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Bullmore, Ed T.; Simmons, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A statistically principled way of conducting brain network analysis is still lacking. Comparison of different populations of brain networks is hard because topology is inherently dependent on wiring cost, where cost is defined as the number of edges in an unweighted graph. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits and limitations associated with using cost-integrated topological metrics. Our focus is on comparing populations of weighted undirected graphs that differ in mean association weight, using global efficiency. Our key result shows that integrating over cost is equivalent to controlling for any monotonic transformation of the weight set of a weighted graph. That is, when integrating over cost, we eliminate the differences in topology that may be due to a monotonic transformation of the weight set. Our result holds for any unweighted topological measure, and for any choice of distribution over cost levels. Cost-integration is therefore helpful in disentangling differences in cost from differences in topology. By contrast, we show that the use of the weighted version of a topological metric is generally not a valid approach to this problem. Indeed, we prove that, under weak conditions, the use of the weighted version of global efficiency is equivalent to simply comparing weighted costs. Thus, we recommend the reporting of (i) differences in weighted costs and (ii) differences in cost-integrated topological measures with respect to different distributions over the cost domain. We demonstrate the application of these techniques in a re-analysis of an fMRI working memory task. We also provide a Monte Carlo method for approximating cost-integrated topological measures. Finally, we discuss the limitations of integrating topology over cost, which may pose problems when some weights are zero, when multiplicities exist in the ranks of the weights, and when one expects subtle cost-dependent topological differences, which could be masked by cost-integration. PMID:21829437

  11. Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

  12. Wind farm production cost: Optimum turbine size and farm capacity in the actual market

    SciTech Connect

    Laali, A.R.; Meyer, J.L.; Bellot, C.; Louche, A.

    1996-12-31

    Several studies are undertaken in R&D Division of EDF in collaboration with ERASME association in order to have a good knowledge of the wind energy production costs. These studies are performed in the framework of a wind energy monitoring project and concern the influence of a few parameters like wind farm capacity, turbine size and wind speed on production costs, through an analysis of the actual market trend. Some 50 manufacturers and 140 different kind of wind turbines are considered for this study. The minimum production cost is situated at 800/900 kW wind turbine rated power. This point will probably move to more important powers in the future. This study is valid only for average conditions and some special parameters like particular climate conditions or lack of infrastructure for a special site the could modify the results shown on the curves. The variety of wind turbines (rated power as a function of rotor diameter, height and specific rated power) in the actual market is analyzed. A brief analysis of the market trend is also performed. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

    2009-10-01

    The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

  14. URINE SOURCE SEPARATION AND TREATMENT: NUTRIENT RECOVERY USING LOW-COST MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful completion of this P3 Project will achieve the following expected outputs: identification of low-cost materials that can effectively recover ammonium, phosphate, and potassium from urine; material balance calculations for different urine separation and treatment scheme...

  15. Primer: The DOE Wind Energy Program's Approach to Calculating Cost of Energy: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    George, K.; Schweizer, T.

    2008-01-01

    This report details the methodology used by DOE to calculate levelized cost of wind energy and demonstrates the variation in COE estimates due to different financing assumptions independent of wind generation technology.

  16. Isotopic separation of He-3/He-4 from solar wind gases evolved from the lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, William R.; Wittenberg, Layton J.

    The potential benefits of He-3 when utilized in a nuclear fusion reactor to provide clean, safe electricity in the 21st century for the world's inhabitants has been documented. Unfortunately, He is scarce on earth. Large quantities of He-3, perhaps a million tons, are embedded in the lunar regolith, presumably implanted by the solar wind together with other elements, notably He-4, H, C, and N. Several studies have suggested processing the lunar regolith and recovering these valuable solar wind gases. Once released, these gases can be separated for use. The separation of helium isotopes is described in this paper. He-3 constitutes only 400 at. ppm of lunar He, too dilute to separate economically by distillation alone. A 'superfluid' separator is being considered to preconcentrate the He-3. The superfluid separator consists of a porous filter in a tube maintained at a temperature of 2.17 K or less. Although the He-4, which is superfluid below 2.17 K, flows readily through the filter, the He is blocked by the filter, and becomes enriched at the feed end. He can be enriched to about 10 percent in such a system. The enriched product from the superfluid separation serves as a feed to a distillation apparatus operating at a pressure of 9 kPa, with a boiler temperature of 2.4 K, and a condenser temperature of 1.6 K. Under constant flow conditions, a 99.9 percent enriched He product can be produced in this apparatus. The heat rejection load of the refrigeration equipment necessary to cool the separation operations would be conducted during the lunar nights.

  17. Full cost accounting in the analysis of separated waste collection efficiency: A methodological proposal.

    PubMed

    D'Onza, Giuseppe; Greco, Giulio; Allegrini, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Recycling implies additional costs for separated municipal solid waste (MSW) collection. The aim of the present study is to propose and implement a management tool - the full cost accounting (FCA) method - to calculate the full collection costs of different types of waste. Our analysis aims for a better understanding of the difficulties of putting FCA into practice in the MSW sector. We propose a FCA methodology that uses standard cost and actual quantities to calculate the collection costs of separate and undifferentiated waste. Our methodology allows cost efficiency analysis and benchmarking, overcoming problems related to firm-specific accounting choices, earnings management policies and purchase policies. Our methodology allows benchmarking and variance analysis that can be used to identify the causes of off-standards performance and guide managers to deploy resources more efficiently. Our methodology can be implemented by companies lacking a sophisticated management accounting system. PMID:26613351

  18. Economics of online structural health monitoring of wind turbines: Cost benefit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) costs have an average share over the lifetime of the turbine of approximately 20%-25% of the total levelized cost per kWh of electricity produced. Online structural health monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O&M costs and hence reduce the overall cost of wind energy. OSHM and CBM offer the potential to improve turbine blade life cycle management, limit the number of physical inspections, and reduce the potential for missed significant defects. An OSHM system would reduce the need for physical inspections, and have inspections occur only after problem detection takes place. In the economics of wind energy, failures and unplanned outages can cause significant downtime, particularly while waiting for the manufacturing and shipping of major parts. This paper will report a review and assessment of SHM technologies and a cost benefit analysis, which will examine whether the added costs associated with an OSHM system will give an adequate return on the investment. One method in which OSHM reduces costs is, in part, by converting corrective maintenance to preventative maintenance. This paper shows that under both best and worse conditions implementing an OSHM system is cost effective in more than 50% of the trials, which have been performed. Opportunities appear to exist to improve the economic justification for implementing OSHM.

  19. Changing vessel routes could significantly reduce the cost of future offshore wind projects.

    PubMed

    Samoteskul, Kateryna; Firestone, Jeremy; Corbett, James; Callahan, John

    2014-08-01

    With the recent emphasis on offshore wind energy Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) has become one of the main frameworks used to plan and manage the increasingly complex web of ocean and coastal uses. As wind development becomes more prevalent, existing users of the ocean space, such as commercial shippers, will be compelled to share their historically open-access waters with these projects. Here, we demonstrate the utility of using cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to support siting decisions within a CMSP framework. In this study, we assume that large-scale offshore wind development will take place in the US Mid-Atlantic within the next decades. We then evaluate whether building projects nearshore or far from shore would be more cost-effective. Building projects nearshore is assumed to require rerouting of the commercial vessel traffic traveling between the US Mid-Atlantic ports by an average of 18.5 km per trip. We focus on less than 1500 transits by large deep-draft vessels. We estimate that over 29 years of the study, commercial shippers would incur an additional $0.2 billion (in 2012$) in direct and indirect costs. Building wind projects closer to shore where vessels used to transit would generate approximately $13.4 billion (in 2012$) in savings. Considering the large cost savings, modifying areas where vessels transit needs to be included in the portfolio of policies used to support the growth of the offshore wind industry in the US. PMID:24794388

  20. A cost evaluation method for transferring municipalities to solid waste source-separated system.

    PubMed

    Lavee, Doron; Nardiya, Shlomit

    2013-05-01

    Most of Israel's waste is disposed in landfills, threatening scarce land resources and posing environmental and health risks. The aim of this study is to estimate the expected costs of transferring municipalities to solid waste source separation in Israel, aimed at reducing the amount of waste directed to landfills and increasing the efficiency and amount of recycled waste. Information on the expected costs of operating a solid waste source separation system was gathered from 47 municipalities and compiled onto a database, taking into consideration various factors such as costs of equipment, construction adjustments and waste collection and disposal. This database may serve as a model for estimating the costs of entering the waste source separation system for any municipality in Israel, while taking into consideration its specific characteristics, such as size and region. The model was used in Israel for determining municipalities' eligibility to receive a governmental grant for entering an accelerated process of solid waste source separation. This study displays a user-friendly and simple operational tool for assessing municipalities' costs of entering a process of waste source separation, providing policy makers a powerful tool for diverting funds effectively in promoting solid waste source separation. PMID:23465315

  1. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  2. Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

    2012-04-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

  3. Wavelet diagnostics of the flow control of unsteady separation on a 2D Wind Turbine Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhe; Lewalle, Jacques; Wang, Guannan; Glauser, Mark

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a 2D wind turbine airfoil. Unsteadiness was associated with the wake of a cylinder upstream of the airfoil. The experiments were conducted in both the baseline case, and with active closed-loop control on the suction surface of the airfoil. The data consisted of surface pressure time series. Continuous wavelet analysis gave the phase, band-pass filtered signals and envelope of harmonics of the fundamental shedding frequency. Coherence of pairs of signals was also used to map the flow characteristics. For the baseline and controlled case, we will report on the relation between phase of the leading edge fluctuations, unsteady flow separation and lift and drag coefficients. Our goal is to develop a more effective controller. The experiment was funded by DoE through University of Minnesota Wind Energy Consortium. Thanks for the support from the MAE department of Syracuse University.

  4. Influence of the separation of prescription and dispensation of medicine on its cost in Japanese prefectures.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Masayuki; Tashiro, Takao

    2014-07-01

    We studied how the separation of dispensing and prescribing of medicines between pharmacies and clinics (the "separation system") can reduce internal medicine costs. To do so, we obtained publicly available data by searching electronic databases and official web pages of the Japanese government and non-profit public service corporations on the Internet. For Japanese medical institutions, participation in the separation system is optional. Consequently, the expansion rate of the separation system for each of the administrative districts is highly variable. The data were subjected to multiple regression analysis; daily internal medicines were the objective variable and expansion rate of the separation system was the explanatory variable. A multiple regression analysis revealed that the expansion rate of the separation system and the rate of replacing brand name medicine with generic medicine showed a significant negative partial correlation with daily internal medicine costs. Thus, the separation system was as effective in reducing medicine costs as the use of generic medicines. Because of its medical economic efficiency, the separation system should be expanded, especially in Asian countries in which the system is underdeveloped. PMID:24999122

  5. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  6. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking

  7. Design and Development of Low-Cost Wind Tunnel for Educational Purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, T. H.; Dol, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    The presence of wind tunnel is undoubtedly bringing infinite possibilities to studying and understanding complex fluid flows. However, commercial wind tunnel is expensive and only limited to highly-focus researchers or exclusive institutions. This paper discusses the design and development of a low-cost, educational-purposed, open-typed subsonic wind tunnel. In this work, an open-typed subsonic wind tunnel is designed with the aim of achieving turbulent intensity (in the working section) below or equal to 5%, within the budget of RM 1500 and a working speed of 6 m/s - 8 m/s to meet the Reynolds number in the order of 105. The conceptual design was studied using Ansys Fluent 14.5 and the optimal design was then developed and experimentally verified.

  8. Low-cost composite blades for the Mod-0A wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingart, O.

    Low cost approaches to the design and fabrication of blades for a two-bladed 200 kW wind turbine were identified and the applicability of the techniques to larger and smaller blades was assessed. Blade tooling was designed and fabricated. Two complete blades and a partial blade for tool tryout were built. The patented TFT process was used to wind the entire blade. This process allows rapid winding of an axially oriented composite onto a tapered mandrel, with tapered wall thickness. The blade consists of a TFT glass-epoxy airfoil structure filament wound onto a steel root end fitting. The fitting is, in turn, bolted to a conical steel adapter section to provide for mounting attachment to the hub. Structural analysis, blade properties, and cost and weight analysis are described.

  9. Low-cost composite blades for the Mod-0A wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, O.

    1982-01-01

    Low cost approaches to the design and fabrication of blades for a two-bladed 200 kW wind turbine were identified and the applicability of the techniques to larger and smaller blades was assessed. Blade tooling was designed and fabricated. Two complete blades and a partial blade for tool tryout were built. The patented TFT process was used to wind the entire blade. This process allows rapid winding of an axially oriented composite onto a tapered mandrel, with tapered wall thickness. The blade consists of a TFT glass-epoxy airfoil structure filament wound onto a steel root end fitting. The fitting is, in turn, bolted to a conical steel adapter section to provide for mounting attachment to the hub. Structural analysis, blade properties, and cost and weight analysis are described.

  10. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Project cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) cost modeling activities were initiated in phase 1 to establish the ground rules and cost model that would apply to both phase 1 and phase 2 cost analyses. The primary emphasis in phase 1 was development of a cost model for a LAWS instrument for the Japanese Polar Orbiting Platform (JPOP). However, the Space Station application was also addressed in this model, and elements were included, where necessary, to account for Space Station unique items. The cost model presented in the following sections defines the framework for all LAWS cost modeling. The model is consistent with currently available detail, and can be extended to account for greater detail as the project definition progresses.

  11. Stage Separation Wind Tunnel Tests of a Generic Two-Stage-to-Orbit Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordelon, Wayne J., Jr.; Frost, Alonzo L.; Reed, Darren K.

    2003-01-01

    In support of NASA s Space Launch Initiative Program, stage separation wind tunnel tests of a generic two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle were conducted to determine the interference aerodynamic forces and moments and to determine the proximity flow environment. The tests were conducted in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Aerodynamic Research Facility using a manual separation fixture for a Mach number range of 2.74 to 4.96 and separation distances up to 80 percent and 35 percent of the body length in the vehicle X and Z coordinates, respectively. For the TSTO bimese, winged-body vehicle configuration, both wing-to-wing and wing-to-fuselage configurations were tested. Individual-body force and moment, schlieren, and surface pressure data were acquired. The results showed that the proximity aerodynamics were dominated by complex bow shock interactions, and that he booster was statically unstable at several separation positions. As compared to the isolated body, the proximity normal force change with pitch angle was found to be nearly the same, and the proximity axial force increased, in general, by 3% for both bodies.

  12. Surface flow visualization of separated flows on the forebody of an F-18 aircraft and wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Banks, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    A method of in-flight surface flow visualization similar to wind-tunnel-model oil flows is described for cases where photo-chase planes or onboard photography are not practical. This method, used on an F-18 aircraft in flight at high angles of attack, clearly showed surface flow streamlines in the fuselage forebody. Vortex separation and reattachment lines were identified with this method and documented using postflight photography. Surface flow angles measured at the 90 and 270 degrees meridians show excellent agreement with the wind tunnel data for a pointed tangent ogive with an aspect ratio of 3.5. The separation and reattachment line locations were qualitatively similar to the F-18 wind-tunnel-model oil flows but neither the laminar separation bubble nor the boundary-layer transition on the wind tunnel model were evident in the flight surface flows. The separation and reattachment line locations were in fair agreement with the wind tunnel data for the 3.5 ogive. The elliptical forebody shape of the F-18 caused the primary separation lines to move toward the leeward meridian. Little effect of angle of attack on the separation locations was noted for the range reported.

  13. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vitina, Aisma; Luers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabo, Leif I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto; Hand, M. Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  15. Fatigue reliability of wind turbine fleets: The effect of uncertainty of projected costs

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1995-12-31

    The cost of repairing or replacing failed components depends on the number and timing of failures. Although the total probability of individual component failure is sometimes interpreted as the percentage of components likely to fail, this perception is often far from correct. Different amounts of common versus independent uncertainty can cause different numbers of components to be at risk of failure. The FAROW tool for fatigue and reliability analysis of wind turbines makes it possible for the first time to conduct a detailed economic analysis of the effects of uncertainty on fleet costs. By dividing the uncertainty into common and independent parts, the percentage of components expected to fail in each year of operation is estimated. Costs are assigned to the failures and the yearly costs and present values are computed. If replacement cost is simply a constant multiple of the number of failures, the average, or expected cost is the same as would be calculated by multiplying by the probability of individual component failure. However, more complicated cost models require a break down of how many components are likely to fail. This break down enables the calculation of costs associated with various probability of occurrence levels, illustrating the variability in projected costs. Estimating how the numbers of components expected to fail evolves over time is also useful in calculating the present value of projected costs and in understanding the nature of the financial risk.

  16. Understanding Wind Power Costs: The Value of a Comprehensive Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.

    2013-05-01

    The evolution and maturity of the wind industry have often been assessed by considering changes in key metrics including capital costs, capacity factor, turbine pricing, and in some cases electricity sales data. However, wind turbines and plants represent a complex system optimization problem and each of these metrics, in isolation, fails to tell the complete story of technological progress and industry advancement. By contrast, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) provides a more comprehensive and nuanced perspective on industry trends. LCOE can be used to analyze the effect of individual changes (by holding other variables constant) or to understand the complex interactions that might occur for example between turbine costs and productivity. Moreover, LCOE offers a reflection of the total production costs and required revenue for wind plants. This presentation provides examples of how a narrow focus on individual industry metrics can provide inaccurate representations of industry trends while also demonstrating how LCOE captures the array of critical industry variables to provide a greater level of insight.

  17. Construction of low-cost, Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Two sixty-foot, low-cost, wood composite blades for service on 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbines were constructed. The blades were constructed of epoxy resin-bonded Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge sections, and paper honeycombcored, birch plywood faced panels for the afterbody sections. The blades were joined to the wind turbine hub by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs embedded into the root end of the blades. The blades were installed on the 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbine facility at Kahuku, Hawaii, The blades completed nearly 8,000 hours of operation over an 18 month period at an average power of 150 kW prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The blades were replaced because of a corrosion failure of the steel shank on one stud. Inspections showed that the wood composite structure remained in excellent condition.

  18. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  19. Assessment of wind energy potential and cost estimation of wind-generated electricity at hilltops surrounding the city of Maroua in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoga, Dieudonné Kidmo; Bogno, Bachirou; Aillerie, Michel; Raidandi, Danwe; Yamigno, Serge Doka; Hamandjoda, Oumarou; Tibi, Beda

    2016-07-01

    In this work, 28 years of wind data, measured at 10m above ground level (AGL), from Maroua meteorological station is utilized to assess the potential of wind energy at exposed ridges tops of mountains surrounding the city of Maroua. The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of wind-generated electricity using six types of wind turbines (50 to 2000 kW). The Weibull distribution function is employed to estimate Weibull shape and scale parameters using the energy pattern factor method. The considered wind shear model to extrapolate Weibull parameters and wind profiles is the empirical power law correlation. The results show that hilltops in the range of 150-350m AGL in increments of 50, fall under Class 3 or greater of the international system of wind classification and are deemed suitable to outstanding for wind turbine applications. A performance of the selected wind turbines is examined as well as the costs of wind-generated electricity at the considered hilltops. The results establish that the lowest costs per kWh are obtained using YDF-1500-87 (1500 kW) turbine while the highest costs are delivered by P-25-100 (90 kW). The lowest costs (US) per kWh of electricity generated are found to vary between a minimum of 0.0294 at hilltops 350m AGL and a maximum of 0.0366 at hilltops 150m AGL, with corresponding energy outputs that are 6,125 and 4,932 MWh, respectively. Additionally, the matching capacity factors values are 38.05% at hilltops 150m AGL and 47.26% at hilltops 350m AGL. Furthermore, YDF-1500-87 followed by Enercon E82-2000 (2000 kW) wind turbines provide the lowest cost of wind generated electricity and are recommended for use for large communities. Medium wind turbine P-15-50 (50 kW), despite showing the best coefficients factors (39.29% and 48.85% at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, in that order), generates electricity at an average higher cost/kWh of US0.0547 and 0.0440 at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, respectively. P-15-50 is deemed a more advantageous option

  20. 2014 U.S. Offshore Wind Market Report: Industry Trends, Technology Advancement, and Cost Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Aaron; Stehly, Tyler; Walter Musial

    2015-09-29

    2015 has been an exciting year for the U.S. offshore wind market. After more than 15 years of development work, the U.S. has finally hit a crucial milestone; Deepwater Wind began construction on the 30 MW Block Island Wind Farm (BIWF) in April. A number of other promising projects, however, have run into economic, legal, and political headwinds, generating much speculation about the future of the industry. This slow, and somewhat painful, start to the industry is not without precedent; each country in northern Europe began with pilot-scale, proof-of-concept projects before eventually moving to larger commercial scale installations. Now, after more than a decade of commercial experience, the European industry is set to achieve a new deployment record, with more than 4 GW expected to be commissioned in 2015, with demonstrable progress towards industry-wide cost reduction goals. DWW is leveraging 25 years of European deployment experience; the BIWF combines state-of-the-art technologies such as the Alstom 6 MW turbine with U.S. fabrication and installation competencies. The successful deployment of the BIWF will provide a concrete showcase that will illustrate the potential of offshore wind to contribute to state, regional, and federal goals for clean, reliable power and lasting economic development. It is expected that this initial project will launch the U.S. industry into a phase of commercial development that will position offshore wind to contribute significantly to the electric systems in coastal states by 2030.

  1. Design, evaluation, and fabrication of low-cost composite blades for intermediate-size wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Weingart, O.

    1981-09-01

    The low-cost composite blade program is described, involving design, evaluation and fabrication of a pair of low-cost composite rotor blades (LCCB) for the MOD-0A wind turbine. The objectives of the program were to identify low cost approaches to the design and fabrication of blades for a two-bladed 200 kW wind turbine and to assess the applicability of the techniques to larger and smaller blades. In Phase I of the program, several blade designs were developed to the point where reasonably accurate estimates could be made of the structural properties and costs of tooling and fabrication. The most cost-effective design was selected for detailed design in Phase II. Structural analysis of the selected design was performed, with assistance from NASA in some of the more specialized techniques (e.g. flutter analysis). Subelement and subscale specimens were fabricated in Phase I for testing. Blade tooling was designed and fabricated. Major items included a 60 ft D-spar mandrel and its supports, a 60 ft cure oven with a 200 kW heater, and a transverse filament tape (TFT) pre-impregnation station. Two complete blades and a partial blade for tool tryout were built. A 100 ft long ring-winder machine was designed and built.

  2. A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Le; MacDonald, Erin

    2013-10-01

    This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Innovative Low-Cost Program for Neutral Density and Wind Research With Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilinski, M.; Forbes, J.; Grusin, M.; Koehler, C.; Palo, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Atmospheric Neutral Density Explorer (DANDE) is a 50 kg, spherical spacecraft being developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The goal of the DANDE mission is to provide an improved understanding of the satellite drag environment in the lower-thermosphere. To achieve this goal DANDE will measure in-situ neutral density, composition, and horizontal winds between 200 and 350 km. The relationship between composition, density and winds during disturbed atmospheric conditions and the relative effect on satellite drag will be addressed using DANDE measurements. DANDE is an extremely low-cost mission supported in part through the AFRL University Nanosatellite program. A low-cost design is achieved by using commercial technology and accelerometers as well as innovative miniaturized wind and atmospheric temperature spectrometer (WATS) developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. As a secondary payload, this low-cost mission-model will provide a reproducible and reliable method for obtaining global space weather data on launches of opportunity. The result of commissioning such spacecraft into various orbits is continuity of space weather information related to the neutral thermosphere for both scientific analysis and now-casting purposes. Finally, DANDE will provide a way for empirical atmospheric models to be calibrated in near real-time while validating first-principles models through in-situ data. University of Colorado graduate and undergraduate students are designing and integrating the spacecraft to be delivered for environmental testing by summer of 2009.

  4. A low-cost solid–liquid separation process for enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, David A.; Lischeske, James J.; Biddy, Mary J.; Stickel, Jonathan J.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-liquid separation of intermediate process slurries is required in some process configurations for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels. Thermochemically pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries have proven difficult to filter due to formation of very low permeability cakes that are rich in lignin. Treatment of two different slurries with polyelectrolyte flocculant was demonstrated to increase mean particle size and filterability. Filtration flux was greatly improved, and thus scaled filter unit capacity was increased approximately 40-fold compared with unflocculated slurry. Although additional costs were accrued using polyelectrolyte, techno-economic analysis revealed that the increase in filter capacity significantly reduced overall production costs. Fuel production cost at 95% sugar recovery was reduced by $1.35 US per gallon gasoline equivalent for dilute-acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed slurries and $3.40 for slurries produced using an additional alkaline de-acetylation preprocessing step that is even more difficult to natively filter.

  5. A self-packaged two-dimensional thermal wind sensor based on thermopiles for low cost applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.-Q.; Chen, B.; Gu, F.; Qin, M.; Huang, Q.-A.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the design, fabrication and characterization of a low cost micro-machined two-dimensional (2D) wind sensor using thermopiles fabricated on ceramic substrate as sensing elements are presented for the first time. In the sensor, the nickel heaters and four nickel (Ni)/aluminum (Al) thermopiles were directly fabricated on the front surface of the ceramic plate while the back side, as the sensing surface, was exposed to the wind. The whole process is simple and only needs three masks. The sensor substrate is used directly as a packaging board for sensing wind with no need of an extra packaging plate, which is called a self-package. This method reduces the deviation caused by the chip packaging process and has a low manufacturing cost. In order to improve the performance of the wind sensor, modeling and simulation were also performed. Based on the simulation results, the effects of chip size, heater length and heating power on the sensitivity and measurement range of the thermal wind sensor was investigated. The sensor was tested in a wind tunnel in constant power (CP) mode. Measurement results show that the thermal wind sensor can measure wind speeds up to 30 m s-1 and wind direction in a full range of 360°. The proposed sensor can be used for low cost applications with a certain accuracy.

  6. A Wind-powered Rover for a Low-Cost Venus Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benigno, Gina; Hoza, Kathleen; Motiwala, Samira; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Venus, with a surface temperature of 450 C and an atmospheric pressure 90 times higher than that of the Earth, is a difficult target for exploration. However, high-temperature electronics and power systems now being developed make it possible that future missions may be able to operate in the Venus environment. Powering such a rover within the scope of a Discovery class mission will be difficult, but harnessing Venus' surface winds provides a possible way to keep a powered rover small and light. This project scopes out the feasibility of a wind-powered rover for Venus surface missions. Two rover concepts, a land-sailing rover and a wind-turbine-powered rover, were considered. The turbine-powered rover design is selected as being a low-risk and low-cost strategy. Turbine detailed analysis and design shows that the turbine can meet mission requirements across the desired range of wind speeds by utilizing three constant voltage generators at fixed gear ratios.

  7. Design, evaluation, and fabrication of low-cost composite blades for intermediate-size wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, O.

    1981-01-01

    Low cost approaches for production of 60 ft long glass fiber/resin composite rotor blades for the MOD-OA wind turbine were identified and evaluated. The most cost-effective configuration was selected for detailed design. Subelement and subscale specimens were fabricated for testing to confirm physical and mechanical properties of the composite blade materials, to develop and evaluate blade fabrication techniques and processes, and to confirm the structural adequacy of the root end joint. Full-scale blade tooling was constructed and a partial blade for tool and process tryout was built. Then two full scale blades were fabricated and delivered to NASA-LeRC for installation on a MOD-OA wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico for operational testing. Each blade was 60 ft. long with 4.5 ft. chord at root end and 2575 lbs weight including metal hub adapter. The selected blade configuration was a three cell design constructed using a resin impregnated glass fiber tape winding process that allows rapid wrapping of primarily axially oriented fibers onto a tapered mandrel, with tapered wall thickness. The ring winder/transverse filament tape process combination was used for the first time on this program to produce entire rotor blade structures. This approach permitted the complete blade to be wound on stationary mandrels, an improvement which alleviated some of the tooling and process problems encountered on previous composite blade programs.

  8. Composition of solar wind noble gases released by surface oxidation of a metal separate from the Weston meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on a set of experiments intended to test the feasibility of determining elemental and isotopic ratios of the noble gases and nitrogen in the solar wind in metal separates from gas-rich ordinary chondrites. Helium, neon, and argon show clear evidence of a solar wind signature, while no solar component could be identified for xenon and nitrogen. Helium, neon, and argon elemental isotopic ratios appear to depend on depth within the metal grains. The ratios derived indicate that the Weston meteorite did not acquire its solar wind gases from a recent exposure to solar wind, but more probably at a time in the past similar to or even earlier than the exposure time of Apollo 17 breccias. The Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio, in tandem with other recent determinations of this value, indicates that the solar and terrestrial values can no longer be assumed to be equivalent.

  9. Modeling the reliability and maintenance costs of wind turbines using Weibull analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vachon, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    A general description is provided of the basic mathematics and use of Weibull statistical models for modeling component failures and maintenance costs as a function of time. The applicability of the model to wind turbine components and subsystems is discussed with illustrative examples of typical component reliabilities drawn from actual field experiences. Example results indicate the dominant role of key subsystems based on a combination of their failure frequency and repair/replacement costs. The value of the model is discussed as a means of defining (1) maintenance practices, (2) areas in which to focus product improvements, (3) spare parts inventory, and (4) long-term trends in maintenance costs as an important element in project cash flow projections used by developers, investors, and lenders. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, David Luke; Jaramillo, Paulina

    2013-06-01

    Wind power introduces variability into electric power systems. Due to the physical characteristics of wind, most of this variability occurs at inter-hour time-scales and coal units are therefore technically capable of balancing wind. Operators of coal-fired units have raised concerns that additional cycling will be prohibitively costly. Using PJM bid-data, we observe that coal operators are likely systematically under-bidding their startup costs. We then consider the effects of a 20% wind penetration scenario in the coal-heavy PJM West area, both when coal units bid business as usual startup costs, and when they bid costs accounting for the elevated wear and tear that occurs during cycling. We conclude that while 20% wind leads to increased coal cycling and reduced coal capacity factors under business as usual startup costs, including full startup costs shifts the burden of balancing wind onto more flexible units. This shift has benefits for CO2, NOX, and SO2 emissions as well as for the profitability of coal plants, as calculated by our dispatch model.

  11. New coal breaker said to cost less, separate out more sulfur and ash than rotary types

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A second-generation coal breaker that can reduce coal top size to 1/4 inch will cost less and do a better job of separating ash and sulfur from coal, according to the manufacturer Harrison Handling, Inc. The new equipment could make conventional coal breaking and crushing equipment obsolete. Citing test results, a company spokesman describes a 1% reduction in sulfur and 2.5% reduction in ash content and a higher Btu recovery rate. One utility expressed interest in whether the accelerator would handle tramp iron vetter. 3 figures.

  12. A modular and cost-effective superconducting generator design for offshore wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keysan, Ozan; Mueller, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting generators have the potential to reduce the tower head mass for large (∼10 MW) offshore wind turbines. However, a high temperature superconductor generator should be as reliable as conventional generators for successful entry into the market. Most of the proposed designs use the superconducting synchronous generator concept, which has a higher cost than conventional generators and suffers from reliability issues. In this paper, a novel claw pole type of superconducting machine is presented. The design has a stationary superconducting field winding, which simplifies the design and increases the reliability. The machine can be operated in independent modules; thus even if one of the sections fails, the rest can operate until the next planned maintenance. Another advantage of the design is the very low superconducting wire requirement; a 10 MW, 10 rpm design is presented which uses 13 km of MgB2 wire at 30 K. The outer diameter of the machine is 6.63 m and it weighs 184 tonnes including the structural mass. The design is thought to be a good candidate for entering the renewable energy market, with its low cost and robust structure.

  13. IMPROVED WIND AND TURBULENCE MEASUREMENTS USING A LOW-COST 3-D SONIC ANEMOMETER AT A LOW-WIND SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B

    2007-05-11

    A year of data from sonic anemometer and mechanical wind sensors was analyzed and compared at a low-wind site. Results indicate that 15-minute average and peak 1-second wind speeds (u) from the sonic agree well with data derived from a co-located cup anemometer over a wide range of speeds. Wind direction data derived from the sonic also agree closely with those from a wind vane except for very low wind speeds. Values of standard deviation of longitudinal wind speed ({sigma}{sub u}) and wind direction fluctuations ({delta}{sub {theta}}) from the sonic and mechanical sensors agree well for times with u > 2 ms{sup -1} but show significant differences with lower u values. The most significant differences are associated with the standard deviation of vertical wind fluctuations ({sigma}{sub w}): the co-located vertical propeller anemometer yields values increasingly less than those measured by the sonic anemometer as u decreases from 2.5 approaching 0 ms{sup -1}. The combination of u over-estimation and under-estimation of {sigma}{sub w} from the mechanical sensors at low wind speeds causes considerable under-estimation of the standard deviation of vertical wind angle fluctuations ({sigma}{sub {phi}}), an indicator of vertical dispersion. Calculations of {sigma}{sub {phi}} from sonic anemometer measurements are typically 5{sup o} to 10{sup o} higher when the mechanical instruments indicate that {sigma}{sub {phi}} < 5{sup o} or so. The errors in both the propeller anemometer and cup anemometer, caused by their inability to respond to higher frequency (smaller scale) turbulent fluctuations, can therefore lead to large (factors of 2 to 10 or more) errors in the vertical dispersion during stable conditions with light winds.

  14. Simultaneous measurements of the thermospheric wind profile at three separate positions in the dusk auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Larsen, M. F.; Kelley, M. C.; Vickrey, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the present three-dimensional wind field observations in the dusk auroral oval, the F region winds appear to be at the transition from a clockwise vortex centered at dusk to an antisunward flow at the nightside of the polar cap, while the E region winds seem to be part of a gravity wave with a wind amplitude of 125 m/sec. The wave period is found to be close to three hours, on the basis of the ratio of the magnitude of the wind component normal to the direction of wave propagation to the magnitude parallel to the direction of propagation. The observations show that significant energy resides in the divergent motions that are part of the transient response in the E region, at least in this case.

  15. Reliability and cost evaluation of small isolated power systems containing photovoltaic and wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Rajesh

    Renewable energy application in electric power systems is growing rapidly worldwide due to enhanced public concerns for adverse environmental impacts and escalation in energy costs associated with the use of conventional energy sources. Photovoltaics and wind energy sources are being increasingly recognized as cost effective generation sources. A comprehensive evaluation of reliability and cost is required to analyze the actual benefits of utilizing these energy sources. The reliability aspects of utilizing renewable energy sources have largely been ignored in the past due the relatively insignificant contribution of these sources in major power systems, and consequently due to the lack of appropriate techniques. Renewable energy sources have the potential to play a significant role in the electrical energy requirements of small isolated power systems which are primarily supplied by costly diesel fuel. A relatively high renewable energy penetration can significantly reduce the system fuel costs but can also have considerable impact on the system reliability. Small isolated systems routinely plan their generating facilities using deterministic adequacy methods that cannot incorporate the highly erratic behavior of renewable energy sources. The utilization of a single probabilistic risk index has not been generally accepted in small isolated system evaluation despite its utilization in most large power utilities. Deterministic and probabilistic techniques are combined in this thesis using a system well-being approach to provide useful adequacy indices for small isolated systems that include renewable energy. This thesis presents an evaluation model for small isolated systems containing renewable energy sources by integrating simulation models that generate appropriate atmospheric data, evaluate chronological renewable power outputs and combine total available energy and load to provide useful system indices. A software tool SIPSREL+ has been developed which generates

  16. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007 - 2012; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Maureen

    2015-06-15

    This presentation provides a summary of IEA Wind Task 26 report on Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007-2012

  17. A low-cost solid–liquid separation process for enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sievers, David A.; Lischeske, James J.; Biddy, Mary J.; Stickel, Jonathan J.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-liquid separation of intermediate process slurries is required in some process configurations for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels. Thermochemically pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries have proven difficult to filter due to formation of very low permeability cakes that are rich in lignin. Treatment of two different slurries with polyelectrolyte flocculant was demonstrated to increase mean particle size and filterability. Filtration flux was greatly improved, and thus scaled filter unit capacity was increased approximately 40-fold compared with unflocculated slurry. Although additional costs were accrued using polyelectrolyte, techno-economic analysis revealed that the increase in filter capacity significantlymore » reduced overall production costs. Fuel production cost at 95% sugar recovery was reduced by $1.35 US per gallon gasoline equivalent for dilute-acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed slurries and $3.40 for slurries produced using an additional alkaline de-acetylation preprocessing step that is even more difficult to natively filter.« less

  18. Structural optimization procedure of a composite wind turbine blade for reducing both material cost and blade weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weifei; Park, Dohyun; Choi, DongHoon

    2013-12-01

    A composite blade structure for a 2 MW horizontal axis wind turbine is optimally designed. Design requirements are simultaneously minimizing material cost and blade weight while satisfying the constraints on stress ratio, tip deflection, fatigue life and laminate layup requirements. The stress ratio and tip deflection under extreme gust loads and the fatigue life under a stochastic normal wind load are evaluated. A blade element wind load model is proposed to explain the wind pressure difference due to blade height change during rotor rotation. For fatigue life evaluation, the stress result of an implicit nonlinear dynamic analysis under a time-varying fluctuating wind is converted to the histograms of mean and amplitude of maximum stress ratio using the rainflow counting algorithm Miner's rule is employed to predict the fatigue life. After integrating and automating the whole analysis procedure an evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the discrete optimization problem.

  19. Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2006-08-01

    Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

  20. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  1. Isotopic separation of sup 3 He/ sup 4 He from solar wind gases evolved from the lunar regolith

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, W.R. ); Wittenberg, L.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The potential benefits of {sup 3}He when utilized in a nuclear fusion reactor to provide clean, safe electricity in the 21st century for the world's inhabitants has been documented. Unfortunately, He is scarce on earth. Large quantities of {sup 3}He, perhaps a million tonnes, are embedded in the lunar regolith, presumably implanted by the solar wind together with other elements, notably {sup 4}He, H, C and N. Several studies have suggested processing the lunar regolith and recovering these valuable solar wind gases. Once released, these gases can be separated for use. The separation of helium isotopes is described in this paper. {sup 3}He constitutes only 400 at{center dot}ppm of lunar He, too dilute to separate economically by distillation alone. A superfluid'' separator is being considered to preconcentrate the {sup 3}He. The superfluid separator consists of a porous filter in a tube maintained at a temperature of 2.17 K or less. Although the {sup 4}He, which is superfluid below 2.17 K, flows readily through the filter, the He is blocked by the filter, and becomes enriched at the feed end. He can be enriched to about 10% in such a system. The enriched product from the superfluid separation serves as a feed to a distillation apparatus operating at a pressure of 9 kPa, with a boiler temperature of 2.4 K, and a condenser temperature of 1.6 K. Under constant flow conditions, a 99.9% enriched He product can be produced in this apparatus. The heat rejection load of the refrigeration equipment necessary to cool the separation operations would be conducted during the lunar nights.

  2. Isotopic separation of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He from solar wind gases evolved from the lunar regolith

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, W.R.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    The potential benefits of {sup 3}He when utilized in a nuclear fusion reactor to provide clean, safe electricity in the 21st century for the world`s inhabitants has been documented. Unfortunately, He is scarce on earth. Large quantities of {sup 3}He, perhaps a million tonnes, are embedded in the lunar regolith, presumably implanted by the solar wind together with other elements, notably {sup 4}He, H, C and N. Several studies have suggested processing the lunar regolith and recovering these valuable solar wind gases. Once released, these gases can be separated for use. The separation of helium isotopes is described in this paper. {sup 3}He constitutes only 400 at{center_dot}ppm of lunar He, too dilute to separate economically by distillation alone. A ``superfluid`` separator is being considered to preconcentrate the {sup 3}He. The superfluid separator consists of a porous filter in a tube maintained at a temperature of 2.17 K or less. Although the {sup 4}He, which is superfluid below 2.17 K, flows readily through the filter, the He is blocked by the filter, and becomes enriched at the feed end. He can be enriched to about 10% in such a system. The enriched product from the superfluid separation serves as a feed to a distillation apparatus operating at a pressure of 9 kPa, with a boiler temperature of 2.4 K, and a condenser temperature of 1.6 K. Under constant flow conditions, a 99.9% enriched He product can be produced in this apparatus. The heat rejection load of the refrigeration equipment necessary to cool the separation operations would be conducted during the lunar nights.

  3. Definition and preliminary design of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cost estimates for phase C/D of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program are presented. This information provides a framework for cost, budget, and program planning estimates for LAWS. Volume 3 is divided into three sections. Section 1 details the approach taken to produce the cost figures, including the assumptions regarding the schedule for phase C/D and the methodology and rationale for costing the various work breakdown structure (WBS) elements. Section 2 shows a breakdown of the cost by WBS element, with the cost divided in non-recurring and recurring expenditures. Note that throughout this volume the cost is given in 1990 dollars, with bottom line totals also expressed in 1988 dollars (1 dollar(88) = 0.93 1 dollar(90)). Section 3 shows a breakdown of the cost by year. The WBS and WBS dictionary are included as an attachment to this report.

  4. Definition and preliminary design of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    Cost estimates for phase C/D of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program are presented. This information provides a framework for cost, budget, and program planning estimates for LAWS. Volume 3 is divided into three sections. Section 1 details the approach taken to produce the cost figures, including the assumptions regarding the schedule for phase C/D and the methodology and rationale for costing the various work breakdown structure (WBS) elements. Section 2 shows a breakdown of the cost by WBS element, with the cost divided in non-recurring and recurring expenditures. Note that throughout this volume the cost is given in 1990 dollars, with bottom line totals also expressed in 1988 dollars (1 dollar(88) = 0.93 1 dollar(90)). Section 3 shows a breakdown of the cost by year. The WBS and WBS dictionary are included as an attachment to this report.

  5. Static and Wind Tunnel Aero-Performance Tests of NASA AST Separate Flow Nozzle Noise Reduction Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; McDonald, Timothy J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of cold flow model tests to determine the static and wind tunnel performance of several NASA AST separate flow nozzle noise reduction configurations. The tests were conducted by Aero Systems Engineering, Inc., for NASA Glenn Research Center. The tests were performed in the Channels 14 and 6 static thrust stands and the Channel 10 transonic wind tunnel at the FluiDyne Aerodynamics Laboratory in Plymouth, Minnesota. Facility checkout tests were made using standard ASME long-radius metering nozzles. These tests demonstrated facility data accuracy at flow conditions similar to the model tests. Channel 14 static tests reported here consisted of 21 ASME nozzle facility checkout tests and 57 static model performance tests (including 22 at no charge). Fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.4 to 2.0, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Channel 10 wind tunnel tests consisted of 15 tests at Mach number 0.28 and 31 tests at Mach 0.8. The sting was checked out statically in Channel 6 before the wind tunnel tests. In the Channel 6 facility, 12 ASME nozzle data points were taken and 7 model data points were taken. In the wind tunnel, fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.73 to 2.8, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Test results include thrust coefficients, thrust vector angle, core and fan nozzle discharge coefficients, total pressure and temperature charging station profiles, and boat-tail static pressure distributions in the wind tunnel.

  6. The Manuscript that We Finished: Structural Separation Reduces the Cost of Complement Coercion

    PubMed Central

    Lowder, Matthew W.; Gordon, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments examined the effects of sentence structure on the processing of complement coercion, in which an event-selecting verb combines with a complement that represents an entity (e.g., began the memo). Previous work has demonstrated that these expressions impose a processing cost, which has been attributed to the need to type-shift the entity into an event in order for the sentence to be interpretable (e.g., began writing the memo). Both experiments showed that the magnitude of the coercion cost was reduced when the verb and complement appeared in separate clauses (e.g., The memo that was begun by the secretary; What the secretary began was the memo) compared to when the constituents appeared together in the same clause. The moderating effect of sentence structure on coercion is similar to effects that have been reported for the processing of two other types of semantically complex expressions (inanimate subject-verb integration and metonymy). We propose that sentence structure influences the depth at which complex semantic relationships are computed. When the constituents that create the need for a complex semantic interpretation appear in a single clause, readers experience processing difficulty stemming from the need to detect and/or resolve the semantic mismatch. In contrast, the need to engage in additional processing is reduced when the expression is established across a clause boundary or other structure that deemphasizes the complex relationship. PMID:24999707

  7. The manuscript that we finished: structural separation reduces the cost of complement coercion.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Matthew W; Gordon, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments examined the effects of sentence structure on the processing of complement coercion, in which an event-selecting verb combines with a complement that represents an entity (e.g., began the memo). Previous work has demonstrated that these expressions impose a processing cost, which has been attributed to the need to type-shift the entity into an event in order for the sentence to be interpretable (e.g., began writing the memo). Both experiments showed that the magnitude of the coercion cost was reduced when the verb and complement appeared in separate clauses (e.g., The memo that was begun by the secretary; What the secretary began was the memo) compared with when the constituents appeared together in the same clause. The moderating effect of sentence structure on coercion is similar to effects that have been reported for the processing of 2 other types of semantically complex expressions (inanimate subject-verb integration and metonymy). We propose that sentence structure influences the depth at which complex semantic relationships are computed. When the constituents that create the need for a complex semantic interpretation appear in a single clause, readers experience processing difficulty stemming from the need to detect or resolve the semantic mismatch. In contrast, the need to engage in additional processing is reduced when the expression is established across a clause boundary or other structure that deemphasizes the complex relationship. PMID:24999707

  8. Design and evaluation of low-cost laminated wood composite blades for intermediate size wind turbines: Blade design, fabrication concept, and cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, S.; Gaugeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zueck, M.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a program to reduce wind turbine costs, an evaluation was conducted of a laminated wood composite blade for the Mod-OA 200 kW wind turbine. The effort included the design and fabrication concept for the blade, together with cost and load analyses. The blade structure is composed of laminated Douglas fir veneers for the primary spar and nose sections, and honeycomb cored plywood panels for the trailing edges sections. The attachment of the wood blade to the rotor hub was through load takeoff studs bonded into the blade root. Tests were conducted on specimens of the key structural components to verify the feasibility of the concept. It is concluded that the proposed wood composite blade design and fabrication concept is suitable for Mod-OA size turbines (125-ft diameter rotor) at a cost that is very competitive with other methods of manufacture.

  9. Novel, low-cost separator plates and flow-field elements for use in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cells offer promise for a wide range of applications including vehicular (e.g., automotive) and stationary power generation. The performance and cost targets that must be met for PEM technology to be commercially successful varies to some degree with the application. However, in general the cost of PEM fuel cell stacks must be reduced substantially if they are to see widespread use for electrical power generation. A significant contribution to the manufactured cost of PEM fuel cells is the machined carbon plates that traditionally serve as bipolar separator plates and flow-field elements. In addition, carbon separator plates are inherently brittle and suffer from breakage due to shock, vibration, and improper handling. This report describes a bifurcated separator device with low resistivity, low manufacturing cost, compact size and durability.

  10. Turbine endwall two-cylinder program. [wind tunnel and water tunnel investigation of three dimensional separation of fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in an effort to study the three dimensional separation of fluid flow around two isolated cylinders mounted on an endwall. The design and performance of a hydrogen bubble generator for water tunnel tests to determine bulk flow properties and to measure main stream velocity and boundary layer thickness are described. Although the water tunnel tests are behind schedule because of inlet distortion problems, tests are far enough along to indicate cylinder spacing, wall effects and low Reynolds number behavior, all of which impacted wind tunnel model design. The construction, assembly, and operation of the wind tunnel and the check out of its characteristics are described. An off-body potential flow program was adapted to calculate normal streams streamwise pressure gradients at the saddle point locations.

  11. Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

    2004-03-01

    Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

  12. Design and evaluation of low-cost stainless steel fiberglass foam blades for large wind driven generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggert, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost wind turbine blade based on a stainless steel fiberglass foam Budd blade design concept, was evaluated for its principle characteristics, low cost features, and its advantages and disadvantages. A blade structure was designed and construction methods and materials were selected. A complete blade tooling concepts, various technical and economic analysis, and evaluations of the blade design were performed. A comprehensive fatigue test program is conducted to provide data to verify the design stress allowables.

  13. Design and evaluation of low-cost laminated-wood-composite blades for intermediate-size wind turbines: blade design, fabrication concept, and cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lieblein, S.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1982-11-01

    As part of a program to reduce wind turbine costs, an evaluation was conducted of a laminated wood composite blade for the Mod-OA 200-kW wind turbine. The effort included the design and fabrication concept for the blade, together with cost and load analyses. The blade structure is composed of laminated Douglas fir veneers for the primary spar and nose sections, and honeycomb cored plywood panels for the trailing edge sections. The attachment of the wood blade to the rotor hub was through load takeoff studs bonded into the blade root. Tests were conducted on specimens of the key structural components to verify the feasibility of the concept. Fabrication cost was estimated to be about 15,000 to 18,000 per blade in 1982 dollars for a production rate of 100 blades per year. The major conclusion of the investigation was that the proposed wood composite blade design and fabrication concept is suitable for Mod-OA size wind turbines (125-ft diameter rotor) at a cost that is very competitive with other methods of manufacture.

  14. Design and fabrication of a low cost Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine system: Phase 2, volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-03-01

    Described is the successful fabrication, installation, and checkout of 100 kW 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). The turbines are Darrieus-type VAWTs with rotors 17 meters (55 feet) in diameter and 25.15 meters (83 feet) in height. They can produce 100 kW of electric power at a cost of energy as low as 3 cents per kWh, in an 18 mph wind regime using 12% annualized costs. Four turbines were produced; three are installed and are operable at: (1) Wind Systems Test Center, Rocky Flats, Colorado; (2) the US Department of Agriculture Conservation and Production Research Center at Bushland, Texas; and (3) Tisbury Water Authority, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, on the island of Martha's Vineyard. The fourth turbine is stored at Bushland, Texas awaiting selection of an erection site.

  15. Dynamically Adjustable Wind Turbine Blades: Adaptive Turbine Blades, Blown Wing Technology for Low-Cost Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-02

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Caitin is developing wind turbines with a control system that delivers compressed air from special slots located in the surface of its blades. The compressed air dynamically adjusts the aerodynamic performance of the blades, and can essentially be used to control lift, drag, and ultimately power. This control system has been shown to exhibit high levels of control in combination with an exceptionally fast response rate. The deployment of such a control system in modern wind turbines would lead to better management of the load on the system during peak usage, allowing larger blades to be deployed with a resulting increase in energy production.

  16. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2008-05-01

    This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

  17. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. A Framework for Statewide Analysis of Site Suitability, Energy Estimation, Life Cycle Costs, Financial Feasibility and Environmental Assessment of Wind Farms: A Case Study of Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Indraneel

    In the last decade, Midwestern states including Indiana have experienced an unprecedented growth in utility scale wind energy farms. For example, by end of 2013, Indiana had 1.5 GW of wind turbines installed, which could provide electrical energy for as many as half-a-million homes. However, there is no statewide systematic framework available for the evaluation of wind farm impacts on endangered species, required necessary setbacks and proximity standards to infrastructure, and life cycle costs. This research is guided to fill that gap and it addresses the following questions. How much land is suitable for wind farm siting in Indiana given the constraints of environmental, ecological, cultural, settlement, physical infrastructure and wind resource parameters? How much wind energy can be obtained? What are the life cycle costs and economic and financial feasibility? Is wind energy production and development in a state an emission free undertaking? The framework developed in the study is applied to a case study of Indiana. A fuzzy logic based AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) spatial site suitability analysis for wind energy is formulated. The magnitude of wind energy that could be sited and installed comprises input for economic and financial feasibility analysis for 20-25 years life cycle of wind turbines in Indiana. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for uncertainty and nonlinearity in various costs and price parameters. Impacts of incentives and cost variables such as production tax credits, costs of capital, and economies of scale are assessed. Further, an economic input-output (IO) based environmental assessment model is developed for wind energy, where costs from financial feasibility analysis constitute the final demand vectors. This customized model for Indiana is used to assess emissions for criteria air pollutants, hazardous air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) across life cycle events of wind turbines. The findings of the case study include

  19. The influence of the heliospheric current sheet and angular separation on flare-accelerated solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, H. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A complete set of major flares was used to investigate the effect of the heliospheric current sheet on the magnitude of the flare associated disturbance measured at earth. It was also found that the angular separation tended to result in a smaller disturbance. Thirdly, it was determined that flares tend to occur near the heliospheric current sheet.

  20. The influence of the heliospheric current sheet and angular separation on flare accelerated solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, H. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A complete set of major flares was used to investigate the effect of the heliospheric current sheet on the magnitude of the flare associated disturbance measured at Earth. It was also found that the angular separation tended to result in a smaller disturbance. Thirdly, it was determined that flares tend to occur near the heliospheric current sheet.

  1. Fatigue testing of low-cost fiberglass composite wind turbine blade materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Bennett, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The static and fatigue behavior of transverse filament tape (TFT) fiberglass/epoxy and TFT/polyester composites was established by the testing of specimens cut from panels fabricated by a filament winding process used for the construction of large experimental wind turbine blades.

  2. Computational Investigations of Inboard Flow Separation and Mitigation Techniques on Multi-Megawatt Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Raymond

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the NREL 5-MW rotor have been examined using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method, OVERFLOW2. A comprehensive off-body grid independence study has been performed. A strong dependence on the size of the near-body wake grid has been found. Rapid diffusion of the wake appears to generate an overprediction of power and thrust. A large, continuous near-wake grid at minimum of two rotor diameters downstream of the rotor appears to be necessary for accurate predictions of near-body forces. The NREL 5-MW rotor demonstrates significant inboard flow separation up to 30% of span. This separation appears to be highly three-dimensional, with a significant amount of radial flow increasing the size of the separated region outboard. Both integrated aerodynamic coefficients and detailed wake structures for the baseline NREL 5-MW rotor are in excellent agreement with results by Riso at Uinfinity = 8 and 11 m/s. A simple, continuous full-chord fence was applied at the maximum chord location of the blade, within the region of separation. This non-optimized device reduced the boundary-layer cross-flow and resulting separation, and increased rotor power capture by 0.9% and 0.6% at U infinity = 8 and 11 m/s, respectively. Suction side only fences perform similarly in terms of power capture but reduce the increase in rotor thrust. Fence heights from 0.5% to 17.5% of the maximum chord all demonstrate some level of effectiveness, with fences (1-2.5%cmax) showing similar performance gains to taller fences with smaller penalties in thrust. Performance in terms of power capture is not very sensitive to spanwise location when placed within the separation region. Blunt trailing edge modifications to the inboard region of the blade showed a relatively significant effect on rotor power. Over a large range of trailing edge thicknesses from hTE = 10 to 25%c, power was found to increase by 1.4%. Thrust increased proportionally with the thicknesses examined

  3. Experimental investigation of the separated flow past slender bodies in the RAE 5 metre low-speed pressurised wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddes, S. P.; Lean, D. E.; Moir, I. R. M.

    1991-03-01

    Tests carried out on a cone cylinder model in the 5 m low speed wind tunnel provided examples of the pressure distribution near the nose in conditions where significant values of side force occur, showing how this is dependent on roll angle of the nominally axially symmetric body. At values of roll where the side force is at its maximum, comparison of the measured pressure distribution with that predicted theoretically , using an inviscid mathematical model of the separated flow past a slender cone, shows that the major features of the flow are identified reasonably well by the inviscid model and that the development of the side force at least in its major features can be described without the need for appeal to any additional viscous interaction. Further work, however, was necessary to identify the mechanisms giving rise to intermediate values of side force.

  4. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  5. Balancing Performance, Noise, Cost, and Aesthetics in the Southwest Windpower "Storm" Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.; Green, J.; Calley, D.; Lonjaret, J.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of an 1800-watt innovative small wind turbine and discusses the importance of idiosyncratic aerodynamic and aeroacoustic airfoil characteristics for clean airfoils at low Reynolds numbers.

  6. The Manuscript That We Finished: Structural Separation Reduces the Cost of Complement Coercion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowder, Matthew W.; Gordon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments examined the effects of sentence structure on the processing of complement coercion, in which an event-selecting verb combines with a complement that represents an entity (e.g., "began the memo"). Previous work has demonstrated that these expressions impose a processing cost, which has been attributed to the…

  7. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2007-05-01

    This report--the first in what is envisioned to be an ongoing annual series--attempts to fill this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2006.

  8. Wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion on wind energy systems involved with the DOE wind energy program is presented. Some of the problems associated with wind energy systems are discussed. The cost, efficiency, and structural design of wind energy systems are analyzed.

  9. Structural Health and Prognostics Management for Offshore Wind Turbines: Sensitivity Analysis of Rotor Fault and Blade Damage with O&M Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Myrent, Noah J.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2014-07-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling and simulation approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for the detection strategies of rotor imbalance and shear web disbond developed in prior work by evaluating the robustness of key measurement parameters in the presence of varying wind speeds, horizontal shear, and turbulence. Detection strategies were refined for these fault mechanisms and probabilities of detection were calculated. For all three fault mechanisms, the probability of detection was 96% or higher for the optimized wind speed ranges of the laminar, 30% horizontal shear, and 60% horizontal shear wind profiles. The revised cost model provided insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs as they relate to the characteristics of the SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability

  10. Dynamic Distortion in a Short S-Shaped Subsonic Diffuser with Flow Separation. [Lewis 8 by 6 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stumpf, R.; Neumann, H. E.; Giamati, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time varying distortion at the diffuser exit of a subscale HiMAT forebody and inlet was conducted at Mach 0.9 in the Lewis 8 by 6 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. A transitory separation was detected within the subsonic diffuser. Vortex generators were installed to eliminate the flow separation. Results from a study of the instantaneous pressure variations at the diffuser exit are presented. The time unsteady total pressures at the diffuser exit are computer interpolated and presented in the form of a movie showing the transitory separation. Limited data showing the instantaneous distortion levels is also presented.

  11. Dynamic Separation on a Pitching and Surging Airfoil as a Model for Flow over Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley

    2013-11-01

    The flow over a pitching and surging NACA 0018 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 100,000 is investigated using 2D time resolved particle image velocimetry. Sinusoidal pitch experiments between +/-30° at a reduced frequency k =Ωc/2U∞ = . 12 closely simulate the unsteady angle of attack experienced by the blade of a representative commercial vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). The unsteady separation process is analyzed in detail with a focus on development of vorticity at the leading edge. Reduced order modeling techniques are used to deconstruct the flow and identify the evolution of dominant flow structures over the pitching cycle. Surging at the same reduced frequency and Umax/-Umin Umean = . 80 is added to investigate the effect of the Reynolds number variation associated with the rotation of a VAWT blade in a non-rotating, laboratory frame. This research is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF #2645 to the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  13. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  14. The dynamics of resource allocation and costs of reproduction in a sexually dimorphic, wind-pollinated dioecious plant.

    PubMed

    Teitel, Z; Pickup, M; Field, D L; Barrett, S C H

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in resource allocation is expected to change during the life cycle of dioecious plants because of temporal differences between the sexes in reproductive investment. Given the potential for sex-specific differences in reproductive costs, resource availability may contribute to variation in reproductive allocation in females and males. Here, we used Rumex hastatulus, a dioecious, wind-pollinated annual plant, to investigate whether sexual dimorphism varies with life-history stage and nutrient availability, and determine whether allocation patterns differ depending on reproductive commitment. To examine if the costs of reproduction varied between the sexes, reproduction was either allowed or prevented through bud removal, and biomass allocation was measured at maturity. In a second experiment to assess variation in sexual dimorphism across the life cycle, and whether this varied with resource availability, plants were grown in high and low nutrients and allocation to roots, aboveground vegetative growth and reproduction were measured at three developmental stages. Males prevented from reproducing compensated with increased above- and belowground allocation to a much larger degree than females, suggesting that male reproductive costs reduce vegetative growth. The proportional allocation to roots, reproductive structures and aboveground vegetative growth varied between the sexes and among life-cycle stages, but not with nutrient treatment. Females allocated proportionally more resources to roots than males at peak flowering, but this pattern was reversed at reproductive maturity under low-nutrient conditions. Our study illustrates the importance of temporal dynamics in sex-specific resource allocation and provides support for high male reproductive costs in wind-pollinated plants. PMID:25865555

  15. The Cost-Optimal Distribution of Wind and Solar Generation Facilities in a Simplified Highly Renewable European Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kies, Alexander; von Bremen, Lüder; Schyska, Bruno; Chattopadhyay, Kabitri; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the European power system from fossil generation towards renewable sources is driven by different reasons like decarbonisation and sustainability. Renewable power sources like wind and solar have, due to their weather dependency, fluctuating feed-in profiles, which make their system integration a difficult task. To overcome this issue, several solutions have been investigated in the past like the optimal mix of wind and PV [1], the extension of the transmission grid or storages [2]. In this work, the optimal distribution of wind turbines and solar modules in Europe is investigated. For this purpose, feed-in data with an hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 7 km covering Europe for the renewable sources wind, photovoltaics and hydro was used. Together with historical load data and a transmission model , a simplified pan-European power power system was simulated. Under cost assumptions of [3] the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for this simplified system consisting of generation, consumption, transmission and backup units is calculated. With respect to the LCOE, the optimal distribution of generation facilities in Europe is derived. It is shown, that by optimal placement of renewable generation facilities the LCOE can be reduced by more than 10% compared to a meta study scenario [4] and a self-sufficient scenario (every country produces on average as much from renewable sources as it consumes). This is mainly caused by a shift of generation facilities towards highly suitable locations, reduced backup and increased transmission need. The results of the optimization will be shown and implications for the extension of renewable shares in the European power mix will be discussed. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (Wuppertal Institute, Next Energy, University of Oldenburg), that is financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 03SFF0439A). [1] Kies, A. et al.: Kies, Alexander, et al

  16. Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

  17. Design concepts and cost studies for magnetic suspension and balance systems. [wind tunnel apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The application of superconducting magnets for suspension and balance of wind tunnel models was studied. Conceptual designs are presented for magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) configurations compatible with three high Reynolds number cases representing specified combinations of test conditions and model sizes. Concepts in general met initially specified performance requirements such as duty cycle, force and moment levels, model angular displacement and positioning accuracy with nominal design requirements for support subsystems. Other performance requirements, such as forced model sinusoidal oscillations, and control force magnitude and frequency, were modified so as to alleviate the magnitude of magnet, power, and cryogenic design requirements.

  18. Low cost supplemental, wind-heating for rural buildings. Final report, 1 October 1981-31 September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-14

    To obtain the supplemental electric heat, a cheap electric generator or alternator is needed to provide the electricity. Used or rebuilt car alternators are plentiful and relatively cheap. A car alternator requires at least a thousand rpm to operate, but the windmill rotor turns much slower. To obtain the necessary rpm's a 26 inch bicycle wheel, as a pulley for a V-belt, was mounted to the bottom of the rotor. The wheel drove a 4 inch pulley mounted to an 8 inch pulley. The 8 inch then drove the alternator by a second V-belt for a net speed step up of 13:1. The dc for the alternator field came from a 12 V bicycle generator and a full wave bridge. When done right, the bicycle generator does not excite the field until there is sufficient wind (and not before, which would stall-out the rotor). A windmill and car alternator system is basically unstable. The system is always overshooting or undershooting that stable rpm which would match wind speed to rotor rpm to alternator rpm, so that wind energy input just matches electrical heat energy output. The first techniques used to gain stability is shown in Figure 3. It essentially used three separate stages of either type I or II to switch in resistive loads in successive stages. For example, at low wind speeds, the alternator voltage would be low and none of the stages would turn on. As wind speed increased the alternator voltage would increase with the result that the first stage would turn on providing heat. The most successful circuit is shown in Figure 4. It had the advantages of: identical stages using commonly and easily attainable parts; in the field it was very easy to determine and adjust the cut-in threshold of each stage; the diodes not only acted as a heating load themselves; but the diodes also provided automatic overspeed braking by ''short circuiting'' the alternator which causes a steep increase in alternator drag.

  19. Low-cost struvite production using source-separated urine in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Etter, B; Tilley, E; Khadka, R; Udert, K M

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated the possibility of transferring phosphorus from human urine into a concentrated form that can be used as fertilizer in agriculture. The community of Siddhipur in Nepal was chosen as a research site, because there is a strong presence and acceptance of the urine-diverting dry toilets needed to collect urine separately at the source. Furthermore, because the mainly agricultural country is landlocked and depends on expensive, imported fertilizers, the need for nutrient security is high. We found that struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) precipitation from urine is an efficient and simple approach to produce a granulated phosphorus fertilizer. Bittern, a waste stream from salt production, is a practical magnesium source for struvite production, but it has to be imported from India. Calculations show that magnesium oxide produced from locally available magnesite would be a cheaper magnesium source. A reactor with an external filtration system was capable of removing over 90% of phosphorus with a low magnesium dosage (1.1 mol Mg mol P), with coarse nylon filters (pore width up to 160±50 μm) and with only one hour total treatment time. A second reactor setup based on sedimentation only achieved 50% phosphate removal, even when flocculants were added. Given the current fertilizer prices, high volumes of urine must be processed, if struvite recovery should be financially sustainable. Therefore, it is important to optimize the process. Our calculations showed that collecting the struvite and calcium phosphate precipitated spontaneously due to urea hydrolysis could increase the overall phosphate recovery by at least 40%. The magnesium dosage can be optimized by estimating the phosphate concentration by measuring electrical conductivity. An important source of additional revenue could be the effluent of the struvite reactor. Further research should be aimed at finding methods and technologies to recover the nutrients from the effluent. PMID:20980038

  20. Fabrication of low-cost Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1983-01-01

    The wood composite blades were fabricated by using epoxy resin-bonded laminates of Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge spar sections and honeycomb-cored birch plywood panels for the blade trailing edge or afterbody sections. The blade was joined to the wind turbine hub assembly by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs. The wood composite blades were installed in the Mod-OA wind turbine test facility at Kahuku, Hawaii. The wood composite blades have successfully completed high power (average of 150 kW) operations for an eighteen month period (nearly 8,000 hr) before replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The original set of blades was taken out of service because of the failure of the shank on one stud. An inspection of the blades at NASA-Lewis showed that the shank failure was caused by a high stress concentration at a corrosion pit on the shank fillet radius which resulted in fatigue stresses in excess of the endurance limit.

  1. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    To carry out detailed source attribution for air quality assessment it is necessary to distinguish pollutant contributions that arise from local emissions from those attributable to non-local or regional emission sources. Frequently this requires the use of complex models and inversion methods, prior knowledge or assumptions regarding the pollution environment. In this paper we demonstrate how high spatial density and fast response measurements from low-cost sensor networks may facilitate this separation. A purely measurement-based approach to extract underlying pollution levels (baselines) from the measurements is presented exploiting the different relative frequencies of local and background pollution variations. This paper shows that if high spatial and temporal coverage of air quality measurements are available, the different contributions to the total pollution levels, namely the regional signal as well as near and far field local sources, can be quantified. The advantage of using high spatial resolution observations, as can be provided by low-cost sensor networks, lies in the fact that no prior assumptions about pollution levels at individual deployment sites are required. The methodology we present here, utilising measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), has wide applicability, including additional gas phase species and measurements obtained using reference networks. While similar studies have been performed, this is the first study using networks at this density, or using low cost sensor networks.

  2. Characteristics of offshore extreme wind-waves detected by surface drifters with a low-cost GPS wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kosei

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, mo-mentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious dis-asters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal re-gions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and di-rection sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by

  3. Customized airfoils and their impact on VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine) cost of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a family of airfoils specifically designed for use in the equatorial portion of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) blade. An airfoil of that family has been incorporated into the rotor blades of the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed. The airfoil and rotor design process is reviewed. Comparisons with data recently acquired from flow visualization tests and from the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed illustrate the success that was achieved in the design. The economic optimization model used in the design is described and used to evaluate the effect of modifications to the current Test Bed blade. 1 tab., 11 figs., 13 refs.

  4. Development of Low Cost Membranes (Ta, Nb & Cellulose Acetate) for H2/CO2 Separation in WGS Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Seetala, Naidu; Siriwardane, Upali

    2011-12-15

    The main aim of this work is to synthesize low temperature bimetallic nanocatalysts for Water Gas Shift reaction (WGS) for hydrogen production from CO and steam mixture; and develop low-cost metal (Nb/Ta)/ceramic membranes for H2 separation and Cellulose Acetate membranes for CO2 separation. .

  5. Effect of rotor configuration on guyed tower and foundation designs and estimated costs for intermediate site horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, G. R.; Winemiller, J. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Three designs of a guyed cylindrical tower and its foundation for an intermediate size horizontal axis wind turbine generator are discussed. The primary difference in the three designs is the configuration of the rotor. Two configurations are two-blade rotors with teetering hubs - one with full span pitchable blades, the other with fixed pitch blades. The third configuration is a three-bladed rotor with a rigid hub and fixed pitch blades. In all configurations the diameter of the rotor is 38 meters and the axis of rotation is 30.4 meters above grade, and the power output is 200 kW and 400 kW. For each configuration the design is based upon for the most severe loading condition either operating wind or hurricane conditions. The diameter of the tower is selected to be 1.5 meters (since it was determined that this would provide sufficient space for access ladders within the tower) with guy rods attached at 10.7 meters above grade. Completing a design requires selecting the required thicknesses of the various cylindrical segments, the number and diameter of the guy rods, the number and size of soil anchors, and the size of the central foundation. The lower natural frequencies of vibration are determined for each design to ensure that operation near resonance does not occur. Finally, a cost estimate is prepared for each design. A preliminary design and cost estimate of a cantilever tower (cylindrical and not guyed) and its foundation is also presented for each of the three configurations.

  6. Design and evaluation of low cost blades for large wind driven generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggert, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a low cost blade concept based on the NASA-Lewis specifications is discussed. A blade structure was designed and construction methods and materials were selected. Complete blade tooling concepts, various technical and economic analysis, and evaluations of the blade design were performed. A comprehensive fatigue test program was conducted to provide data and to verify the design. A test specimen of the spar assembly, including the root end attachment, was fabricated. This is a full-scale specimen of the root end configuration, 20 ft long. A blade design for the Mod '0' system was completed.

  7. Cost Effective Simulation of the Hybrid Solar/wind and Diesel Energy System in Rural Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Ee. Y.; Barsoum, Nader

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the optimization of a hybrid energy system model. Currently in Sarawak, people living in the rural areas still depend on diesel generators to generate electricity. This increases the demand for fossil fuel, creates noise pollution and toxic gas is emitted to the environment. Hence, hybrid energy systems were introduced to replace this conventional energy system as well as improving the living standard in the villages. In this paper, several hybrid energy system configurations were investigated in order to find out the most cost effective hybrid system through Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewability (Homer) software. Homer simulates, optimizes, and analyzes the sensitivity variables for each of the system configurations.

  8. Separating the influence of projected changes in air temperature and wind on patterns of sea level change and ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.; Yang, Duo; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2015-08-01

    We present ocean model sensitivity experiments aimed at separating the influence of the projected changes in the "thermal" (near-surface air temperature) and "wind" (near-surface winds) forcing on the patterns of sea level and ocean heat content. In the North Atlantic, the distribution of sea level change is more due to the "thermal" forcing, whereas it is more due to the "wind" forcing in the North Pacific; in the Southern Ocean, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing have a comparable influence. In the ocean adjacent to Antarctica the "thermal" forcing leads to an inflow of warmer waters on the continental shelves, which is somewhat attenuated by the "wind" forcing. The structure of the vertically integrated heat uptake is set by different processes at low and high latitudes: at low latitudes it is dominated by the heat transport convergence, whereas at high latitudes it represents a small residual of changes in the surface flux and advection of heat. The structure of the horizontally integrated heat content tendency is set by the increase of downward heat flux by the mean circulation and comparable decrease of upward heat flux by the subgrid-scale processes; the upward eddy heat flux decreases and increases by almost the same magnitude in response to, respectively, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing. Regionally, the surface heat loss and deep convection weaken in the Labrador Sea, but intensify in the Greenland Sea in the region of sea ice retreat. The enhanced heat flux anomaly in the subpolar Atlantic is mainly caused by the "thermal" forcing.

  9. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Myrent, Noah J.; Kusnick, Joshua F.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-04-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

  10. A Four-fluid MHD Model of the Solar Wind/Interstellar Medium Interaction with Turbulence Transport and Pickup Protons as Separate Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a four-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The unique features of the model are: (a) a three-fluid description for the charged components of the solar wind and interstellar plasmas (thermal protons, electrons, and pickup protons), (b) the built-in turbulence transport equations based on Reynolds decomposition and coupled with the mean-flow Reynolds-averaged equations, and (c) a solar corona/solar wind model that supplies inner boundary conditions at 40 au by computing solar wind and magnetic field parameters outward from the coronal base. The three charged species are described by separate energy equations and are assumed to move with the same velocity. The fourth fluid in the model is the interstellar hydrogen which is treated by separate continuity, momentum, and energy equations and is coupled with the charged components through photoionization and charge exchange. We evaluate the effects of turbulence transport and pickup protons on the global heliospheric structure and compute the distribution of plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence parameters throughout the heliosphere for representative solar minimum and maximum conditions. We compare our results with Voyager 1 observations in the outer heliosheath and show that the relative amplitude of magnetic fluctuations just outside the heliopause is in close agreement with the value inferred from Voyager 1 measurements by Burlaga et al. The simulated profiles of magnetic field parameters in the outer heliosheath are in qualitative agreement with the Voyager 1 observations and with the analytical model of magnetic field draping around the heliopause of Isenberg et al.

  11. The plasma centrifuge: A compact, low cost, stable isotope separator. Phase 2 final technical report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, W.

    1996-09-05

    Enriched stable isotopes are required for production of radionuclides as well as for research and diagnostic uses. Science Research Laboratory (SRL) has developed a plasma centrifuge for moderate throughput of enriched stable isotopes, such as {sup 13}C, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O, and {sup 203}Tl, for medical as well as other applications. Dwindling isotope stocks have restricted the use of enriched isotopes and their associated labeled organic molecules in medical imaging to very few research facilities because of high costs of isotope separation. With the introduction of the plasma centrifuge separator, the cost per separated gram of even rarely occurring isotopes ({le} 1% natural abundance) is potentially many times lower than with other separation technologies (cryogenic distillation and calutrons). The centrifuge is a simple, robust, pulsed electrical discharge device that has successfully demonstrated isotope separation of small (mg) quantities of {sup 26}Mg. Based on the results of the Phase 2 program, modest enhancements to the power supplies and cooling systems, a centrifuge separator will have high repetition rate (60 pps) and high duty cycle (60%) to produce in one month kilogram quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes. The centrifuge may be used in stand-alone operation or could be used as a high-throughput pre-separation stage with calutrons providing the final separation.

  12. Boundary layer separation on isolated boattail nozzles. M.S. Thesis; [conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenon of separated flow on a series of circular-arc afterbodies was investigated using the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.95 at 0 deg angle of attack. Both high-pressure air and solid circular cylinders with a diameter equal to the nozzle exit diameter were used to simulate jet exhausts. A detailed data base of boundary layer separation locations was obtained using oil-flow techniques. The results indicate that boundary layer separation is most extensive on steep boattails at high Mach numbers.

  13. Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Delucchi, Mark A.; Cameron, Mary A.; Frew, Bethany A.

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. It uses a new grid integration model and finds low-cost, no-load-loss, nonunique solutions to this problem on electrification of all US energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time series data from a 3D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen), and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050–2055 US electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, reliable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide. PMID:26598655

  14. Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Delucchi, Mark A; Cameron, Mary A; Frew, Bethany A

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. It uses a new grid integration model and finds low-cost, no-load-loss, nonunique solutions to this problem on electrification of all US energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time series data from a 3D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen), and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050-2055 US electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, reliable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide. PMID:26598655

  15. Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, V. J.; Narayanan, S. P.; Ganapathy, C.

    2010-06-01

    Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings, for better efficiency, turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate, the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today, more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines, offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases, the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore, turbines build father

  16. Simultaneous Observations of Evolution in SEP Elemental Composition on Widely-Separated Spacecraft: Comparisons between Ulysses and ACE/Wind in Late 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylka, A. J.; Malandraki, O.; Ng, C. K.; Marsden, R. G.; Tranquille, C.

    2010-12-01

    As demonstrated by numerous studies in Solar Cycle 23, temporal evolution in elemental composition is a powerful tool for investigating the acceleration and transport processes that govern large, gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. Extending such studies to simultaneous observations at widely-separated spacecraft is a key objective of the STEREO mission. However, as of August 2010, the Sun has not produced any sufficiently large SEP events to facilitate such studies. We have therefore undertaken comparisons of simultaneous SEP observations near Earth (by Wind, ACE, and GOES) and at Ulysses. Specifically, we have examined several large SEP events in late 2001, when Ulysses was beyond 2 AU and at high northern solar latitudes, immersed in the fast solar wind. Although the collecting power of the COSPIN/Low Energy Telescope (LET) on Ulysses is only ˜1% as large as that of solar heavy-ion instruments on ACE and Wind (and ˜10% as large as those on STEREO), it nevertheless has provided statistically-meaningful measurements in these events. We compare time evolution in the Fe/O ratio, as well as proton spectra and intensities, and examine how well systematic differences between Ulysses and the near-Earth measurements can be explained by a SEP transport model (Ng, Reames, & Tylka 2003). We also examine solar ions and their spectra in the late decay phase of events, in the so-called “reservoir” regions. We discuss implications of these observations for models of SEP transport. Supported by NASA under grants NNH09AK79I and NNX09AU98G and by European Commission Grant FP7-COMESEP.

  17. C3Winds: A Novel 3D Wind Observing System to Characterize Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Wu, D. L.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Demajistre, R.; Reynolds, E.; Tripoli, G. J.; Oman, L.; Prive, N.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wanzong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds (C3Winds) is a NASA Earth Venture Instrument (EV-I) concept with the primary objective to resolve high-resolution 3D dynamic structures of severe wind events. Rapid evolution of severe weather events highlights the need for high-resolution mesoscale wind observations. Yet mesoscale observations of severe weather dynamics are quite rare, especially over the ocean where extratropical and tropical cyclones (ETCs and TCs) can undergo explosive development. Measuring wind velocity at the mesoscale from space remains a great challenge, but is critically needed to understand and improve prediction of severe weather and tropical cyclones. Based on compact, visible/IR imagers and a mature stereoscopic technique, C3Winds has the capability to measure high-resolution (~2 km) cloud motion vectors and cloud geometric heights accurately by tracking cloud features from two formation-flying CubeSats, separated by 5-15 minutes. Complementary to lidar wind measurements from space, C3Winds will provide high-resolution wind fields needed for detailed investigations of severe wind events in occluded ETCs, rotational structures inside TC eyewalls, and ozone injections associated with tropopause folding events. Built upon mature imaging technologies and long history of stereoscopic remote sensing, C3Winds provides an innovative, cost-effective solution to global wind observations with the potential for increased diurnal sampling via CubeSat constellation.

  18. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chen; Hua, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503302, 51207169, and 51276197), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M562446), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015JM1001).

  19. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  20. Evaluation of Production Cost Savings from Consolidation of Balancing Authorities in the US Western Interconnection under High Wind and Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2014-12-24

    This paper introduces a comprehensive analysis to quantify the potential savings in production cost due to consolidation of 32 US western interconnection Balancing Authorities (BAs). Three simulation scenarios are developed: current Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) BAs structure, full copper-sheet consolidation, and full consolidation with transmission congestion considered. The study uses WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) model that was developed for the year 2020. The model assumes 8% wind and 3% solar energy penetration as percentage of total WECC demand in 2020. Sensitivity analyses are carried out to assess the impact of transmission hurdle rates between WECC BAs on potential benefits. The study shows savings that ranges from $400 Million (2.4% of total one year production cost) to $600 Million (3.2%) per year in thermal units production cost due to consolidation can be achieved. The copper sheet consolidation scenario shows an extra savings of $240 Million (1.4%) per year.

  1. Global Wind Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes a new global wind-power map that has quantified global wind power and may help planners place turbines in locations that can maximize power from the winds and provide widely available low-cost energy. The researchers report that their study can assist in locating wind farms in regions known for strong and consistent…

  2. Beyond cost-of-energy, the value-of-energy metric and value-centric approaches to design, operations, and maintenance of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Kevin

    This thesis is oriented toward developers, owners, operators and investors of renewable energy projects. With increasing demand of renewables, our energy dependence comes down to reducing costs associated with this sector so as to compete with the existing sources. One way of valuing investment potential is to determine and then compare the overall value derived by investing in a particular project. Several engineering and financial levers, one of which is operation and maintenance, affect this value. This thesis provides a useful visual aid to owners and operators by which they can operate and maintain their wind farm so as to achieve maximum value throughout its lifetime. All the necessary components that go into developing a business model of a wind farm project will be discussed. Finally, this tool is valid within the assumptions that are explicitly stated. Real world data and trends are used to provide a practical approach to the optimization.

  3. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  4. Wind Energy Markets, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of the global market for wind energy, including a concise look at wind energy development in key markets including installations, government incentives, and market trends. Topics covered include: an overview of wind energy including the history of wind energy production and the current market for wind energy; key business drivers of the wind energy market; barriers to the growth of wind energy; key wind energy trends and recent developments; the economics of wind energy, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; regional and national analyses of major wind energy markets; and, profiles of key wind turbine manufacturers.

  5. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents an analysis of the technical performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) funded during FY 1979 by the U.S. Department of Energy. Chapter 1 gives an analytic framework with which to evaluate the systems. Chapter 2 consists of a review of each of the nine projects, including project technical overviews, estimates of energy savings, and results of economic analysis. Chapter 3 summarizes technical, economic, and institutional barriers that are likely to inhibit widespread dissemination of SWECS technology.

  7. Wind tunnel investigation on wind turbine wakes and wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Coëffé, J.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between atmospheric boundary layer and wind farms leads to flow modifications, which need to be deeply characterized in order to relate them to wind farm performance. The wake flow produced from a wind farm is the result of a strong interaction between multiple turbine wakes, so that the wind farm configuration turns out to be one of the dominant features to enhance power production. For the present work a wind tunnel investigation was carried out with hot-wire anemometry and velocity measurements performed with multi-hole pressure probes. The tested wind farms consist of miniature three-bladed wind turbine models. Preliminarily, the wake flow generated from a single wind turbine is surveyed, which is characterized by a strong velocity defect lying in proximity of the wind turbine hub height. The wake gradually recovers by moving downstream; the characteristics of the incoming boundary layer and wind turbulence intensity can strongly affect the wake recovery, and thus performance of following wind turbines. An increased turbulence level is typically detected downstream of each wind turbine for heights comparable to the wind turbine blade top-tip. These wake flow fluctuations produce increased fatigue loads on the following wind turbines within a wind farm, which could represent a significant hazard for real wind turbines. Dynamics of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes are also investigated; particular attention is paid to the downstream evolution of the tip helicoidal vortices and to oscillations of the hub vortex. The effect of wind farm layout on power production is deeply investigated. Particular emphasis is placed on studying how the flow adjusts as it moves inside the wind farm and can affect the power production. Aligned and staggered wind farm configurations are analysed, also with varying separation distances in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The present experimental results are being used to test and guide the

  8. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  9. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Polyetherimide, cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this program is to develop polymer membranes useful in the preparation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. During this quarter the first experiment were aimed at developing high performance composite membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Three polymers have been selected as materials for these membranes: polyetherimide cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose. This quarter the investigators worked on polyetherimide and cellulose acetate membranes. The overall structure of these membranes is shown schematically in Figure 1. As shown, a microporous support membrane is first coated with a high flux intermediate layer then with an ultrathin permselective layer and finally, if necessary, a thin protective high flux layer. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. A low-cost mullite-titania composite ceramic hollow fiber microfiltration membrane for highly efficient separation of oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Chen, Mingliang; Dong, Yingchao; Tang, Chuyang Y; Huang, Aisheng; Li, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion is considered to be difficult to treat. In this work, a low-cost multi-layer-structured mullite-titania composite ceramic hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was fabricated and utilized to efficiently remove fine oil droplets from (O/W) emulsion. In order to reduce membrane cost, coal fly ash was effectively recycled for the first time to fabricate mullite hollow fiber with finger-like and sponge-like structures, on which a much more hydrophilic TiO2 layer was further deposited. The morphology, crystalline phase, mechanical and surface properties were characterized in details. The filtration capability of the final composite membrane was assessed by the separation of a 200 mg·L(-1) synthetic (O/W) emulsion. Even with this microfiltration membrane, a TOC removal efficiency of 97% was achieved. Dilute NaOH solution backwashing was used to effectively accomplish membrane regeneration (∼96% flux recovery efficiency). This study is expected to guide an effective way to recycle waste coal fly ash not only to solve its environmental problems but also to produce a high-valued mullite hollow fiber membrane for highly efficient separation application of O/W emulsion with potential simultaneous functions of pure water production and oil resource recovery. PMID:26748205

  11. National Energy with Weather System Simultator (NEWS) Sets Bounds on Cost Effective Wind and Solar PV Deployment in the USA without the Use of Storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. In 2009, we began a large-scale investigation into the characteristics of weather-driven renewables. The project utilized the best available weather data assimilation model to compute high spatial and temporal resolution power datasets for the renewable resources of wind and solar PV. The weather model used is the Rapid Update Cycle for the years of 2006-2008. The team also collated a detailed electrical load dataset for the contiguous USA from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the same three-year period. The coincident time series of electrical load and weather data allows the possibility of temporally correlated computations for optimal design over large geographic areas. The past two years have seen the development of a cost optimization mathematic model that designs electric power systems. The model plans the system and dispatches it on an hourly timescale. The system is designed to be reliable, reduce carbon, reduce variability of renewable resources and move the electricity about the whole domain. The system built would create the infrastructure needed to reduce carbon emissions to 0 by 2050. The advantages of the system is reduced water demain, dual incomes for farmers, jobs for construction of the infrastructure, and price stability for energy. One important simplified test that was run included existing US carbon free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an

  12. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  13. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2011-06-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends in the U.S. wind power market in 2010. The report analyzes trends in wind power capacity, industry, manufacturing, turbines, installed project costs, project performance, and wind power prices. It also describes trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers, and discusses financing issues.

  14. Economics of wind-farm power generation in India

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, C.S.; Kandpal, T.C. . Centre of Energy Studies)

    1990-01-01

    The financial aspects of wind power generation in India are examined. The cost estimate scaling function for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) is empirically obtained. Other cost components have also been examined and effort is made to generate a cost function for wind farms with grid connected HAWT wind energy conversion systems. The cost function is then used to compute the cost of wind generated electricity from the wind farms in India and the results are compared with the reported cost of generation from the wind farms. The potential of wind-farm power generation is discussed in the light of the cost of power generation by selected conventional technologies in India.

  15. Results of an experimental investigation to determine separation characteristics for the Orbiter/747 using a 0.0125-scale model (48-0 AX1318I-1 747) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic separation data obtained from a wind tunnel test of an 0.0125-scale SSV Orbiter model of a VC70-000002 Configuration and a 0.0125-scale 747 model was presented. Separation data was obtained at a Mach number of 0.6 and three incidence angles of 4, 6, and 8 degrees. The orbiter angle of attack was varied from 0 to 14 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and normal separation increments were obtained for fixed 747 angles of attack of 0, 2, and 4 degrees while varying the orbiter angle of attack. Control surface settings on the 747 carrier included rudder deflections of 0 and 10 degrees and horizontal stabilizer deflections of -1 and +5 degrees.

  16. NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in improving energy transfer within a wind turbine-based hydrogen production system. Work was performed by the Wind2H2 Project team at the National Wind Technology Center in partnership with Xcel Energy.

  17. Value of Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.

    2011-04-01

    This study, building on the extensive models developed for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), uses these WECC models to evaluate the operating cost impacts of improved day-ahead wind forecasts.

  18. Advanced wind turbine design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, P.M.; Jaffrey, A.

    1995-09-01

    Garrad Hassan have a project in progress funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to assess the prospects and cost benefits of advanced wind turbine design. In the course of this work, a new concept, the coned rotor design, has been developed. This enables a wind turbine system to operate in effect with variable rotor diameter augmenting energy capture in light winds and shedding loads in storm conditions. Comparisons with conventional design suggest that a major benefit in reduced cost of wind generated electricity may be possible.

  19. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  20. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  1. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  2. Aerodynamic results of wind tunnel separation tests on a 0.01-scale model (32-OTS) space shuttle integrated vehicle in the AEDC-VKF-SWTA (IA57)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The integrated space shuttle vehicle was tested to determine proximity force and moment data for the orbiter/external tank and solid rocket booster (SRB) with and without separation rockets firing for both single and dual booster runs. Data were obtained at points t = 0 sec, t = 1.25 sec, and t = 2 sec on the nominal SRB separation trajectory.

  3. SCALING: Wind Tunnel to Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnels have wide-ranging functionality, including many applications beyond aeronautics, and historically have been the major source of information for technological aerodynamics/aeronautical applications. There are a myriad of scaling issues/differences from flight to wind tunnel, and their study and impacts are uneven and a function of the particular type of extant flow phenomena. Typically, the most serious discrepancies are associated with flow separation. The tremendous ongoing increases in numerical simulation capability are changing and in many aspects have changed the function of the wind tunnel from a (scaled) "predictor" to a source of computational calibration/validation information with the computation then utilized as the flight prediction/scaling tool. Numerical simulations can increasingly include the influences of the various scaling issues. This wind tunnel role change has been occurring for decades as computational capability improves in all aspects. Additional issues driving this trend are the increasing cost (and time) disparity between physical experiments and computations, and increasingly stringent accuracy requirements.

  4. Assessing Wind Farm Reliability Using Weather Dependent Failure Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; McMillan, D.

    2014-06-01

    Using reliability data comprising of two modern, large scale wind farm sites and wind data from two onsite met masts, a model is developed which calculates wind speed dependant failure rates which are used to populate a Markov Chain. Monte Carlo simulation is then exercised to simulate three wind farms which are subjected to controlled wind speed conditions from three separate potential UK sites. The model then calculates and compares wind farm reliability due to corrective maintenance and component failure rates influenced by the wind speed of each of the sites. Results show that the components affected most by changes in average daily wind speed are the control system and the yaw system. A comparison between this model and a more simple estimation of site yield is undertaken. The model takes into account the effects of the wind speed on the cost of operation and maintenance and also includes the impact of longer periods of downtime in the winter months and shorter periods in the summer. By taking these factors into account a more detailed site assessment can be undertaken. There is significant value to this model for operators and manufacturers.

  5. Results of wind tunnel tests at Mach 5 on the .004 scale model 2A configuration space shuttle to determine proximity effects and orbiter control effectiveness during orbiter/external tank abort separation (IAG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garton, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results from tests in the NASA/MSFC Trisonic Wind Tunnel on 0.004-Scale Orbiter and External Tank Force Models in Close Proximity (RTLS Abort Separation Conditions) are presented. The primary test objectives were to obtain data concerning proximity effects on the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by Vehicle 2A Configuration Shuttle Orbiter and External Tank during an abort separation (Return to Launch Site) at a Mach number of 5. Additionally, data on orbiter control effectiveness during such an abort was obtained. Proximity effects were investigated for relative angles of incidence from minus 5 deg to plus 10 deg of the orbiter FRL with respect to the external tank centerline over a range of vertical and longitudinal displacements from the mated position to 2.5 tank diameters below and 3 tank diameters aft of the mated position.

  6. Aerodynamic results of a separation effects test on a 0.010-scale model (52-OTS) of the integrated SSV in the AEDC/VKF 40-by-40 inch supersonic wind tunnel A (IA111), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, E.

    1976-01-01

    Graphical data obtained during experimental wind tunnel aerodynamic investigations of a 0.010 scale model (52-OTS) of the integrated space shuttle vehicle was presented. The purpose of this investigation was to obtain data with the solid rocket booster (SRB) in proximity to the orbiter/external tank (O/ET), over a large O/ET initial angle of attack and sideslip range, as well as data on the SRB alone (greatly separated from the O/ET). A captive trajectory system, which supported the SRB, was used with the tunnel primary sector (supporting the O/ET) to obtain grid type separation effects data. One symmetrical SRB model was used interchangeably to obtain right-hand and left-hand SRB data. The entire investigation was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.5 at unit Reynolds number of 3.95 and 5.9 million per foot.

  7. Reducing the uncertainty in wind speed estimations near the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floors, Rogier; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Karagali, Ioanna; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Simon, Elliot; Courtney, Michael; Ahsbahs, Tobias; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Badger, Merete; Peña, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Many countries plan to meet renewable energy targets by installing near-shore wind farms, because of the high offshore wind speeds and good grid connectivity. Because of the strong relation between mean wind speed and the annual energy production, there is an interest in reducing uncertainty of the estimation of the wind speed in these coastal areas. The RUNE project aims to provide recommendations on the use of lidar systems and mesoscale models results to find the most effective (cost vs. accuracy) solution of estimating near-shore wind resources. Here we show some first results of the RUNE measuring campaign at the west coast of Jutland that started in December 2015. In this campaign, a long-range WindScanner system (a multi-lidar instrumentation) was used simultaneously with measurements from several vertical profiling lidars, a meteorological mast and an offshore buoy. These measurements result in a detailed picture of the flow in a transect across the coastline from approximately 5 km offshore up to 3 km inland. The wind speed obtained from a lidar in a sector-scanning mode and from two time-synchronized lidars that were separated horizontally but focused in the same point, will be compared. Furthermore it will be shown how the resulting horizontal wind speed transects compare with the wind speed measurements from the vertical profiling lidars and the meteorological mast. The behaviour of the coastal gradient in wind speed in this area is discussed. Satellite data for the wind over the RUNE measurement area were also collected. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) winds from Sentinel-1 and TerraSAR-X were retrieved at different spatial resolutions. Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) swath winds were obtained from both METOP-A and B platforms. These were used for direct comparisons with the lidar in sector scanning mode.

  8. Turning to the wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, B.

    1981-10-01

    Consideration is given the economic and technological aspects of both free-stream (horizontal-axis) and cross-wind (vertical-axis) wind energy conversion systems, with attention to operational devices ranging in rotor diameter from 10 to 40 m and in output from 22 to 630 kW. After a historical survey of wind turbine design and applications development, the near-term technical feasibility and economic attractiveness of combined wind/fossil-fueled generator and wind/hydroelectric systems are assessed. Also presented are estimates of wind energy potential extraction in the U.S. and Denmark, the industrial requirements of large-scale implementation, energy storage possibilities such as pumped hydro and flywheels, and cost comparisons of electrical generation by large and small wind systems, coal-fired plants, and light-water fission reactors.

  9. NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

  10. Piezoelectric wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Ravi Anant; Priya, Shashank

    2013-03-01

    In past few years, there has been significant focus towards developing small scale renewable energy based power sources for powering wireless sensor nodes in remote locations such as highways and bridges to conduct continuous health monitoring. These prior efforts have led to the development of micro-scale solar modules, hydrogen fuel cells and various vibration based energy harvesters. However, the cost effectiveness, reliability, and practicality of these solutions remain a concern. Harvesting the wind energy using micro-to-small scale wind turbines can be an excellent solution in variety of outdoor scenarios provided they can operate at few miles per hour of wind speed. The conventional electromagnetic generator used in the wind mills always has some cogging torque which restricts their operation above certain cut-in wind speed. This study aims to develop a novel piezoelectric wind turbine that utilizes bimorph actuators for electro-mechanical energy conversion. This device utilizes a Savonius rotor that is connected to a disk having magnets at the periphery. The piezoelectric actuators arranged circumferentially around the disk also have magnets at the tip which interacts with the magnetic field of the rotating disk and produces cyclical deflection. The wind tunnel experiments were conducted between 2-12 mph of wind speeds to characterize and optimize the power output of the wind turbine. Further, testing was conducted in the open environment to quantify the response to random wind gusts. An attempt was made towards integration of the piezoelectric wind turbine with the wireless sensor node.

  11. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  12. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson

    2011-01-10

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  13. Cost of Federal tax credit programs to develop the market for industrial solar and wind energy technologies. Final report to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California. Volume 2: appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, W. T.; Carey, H.; Dlott, E.; Frantzis, L.; McDonald, M.; Myer, L.; O'Neill, K.; Patel, R.; Perkins, R.

    1981-11-12

    A study was made to estimate the impact tax credits (from Acts passed by Congress) would have on renewable energy investment and to estimate the net costs to the US Treasury of providing these tax credits. The appendices to this study are presented. Some investment and marketing penetration worksheets are presented on wind turbines, solar ponds, flat plates, evacuated tubes, and parabolic troughs. A market penetration and economic analysis program with test written for TI-59 programmable calculator with printer is presented. Data on the average $/kWh for each state are included for energy use (70 to 400/sup 0/F and electricity) and energy resource (total and direct solar and wind). Also included is an energy use processing program written for TI-59 programmable calculator with printer. (MCW)

  14. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Poly(etherimide) and poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream's composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream`s composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Poly(methyl pentene) and poly(etherimide)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of polymer membranes useful in the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas during period 1 October 1985--30 September 1986. During the last year several high performance membranes were developed for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. The heat resistant resins poly(methyl pentene) (TPX), Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, New York, NY and poly(etherimide) (ULTEM, General Electric, Pittsfield, MA) have been selected as polymers with outstanding properties for membrane preparation. The properties of membranes prepared from these polymers are presented. TPX is an example of a moderately selective and highly permeable membrane; the poly(etherimide) membranes are more selective but have lower fluxes. These membranes will cover the range of properties required in our hydrogen separation program and the bulk of our future work will be on these membranes. A few experiments with palladium/silver membranes are also planned, as described in the Test Plan.

  17. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    This report summarizes the development of polymer membranes useful in the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas during period 1 October 1985--30 September 1986. During the last year several high performance membranes were developed for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. The heat resistant resins poly(methyl pentene) (TPX), Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, New York, NY and poly(etherimide) (ULTEM, General Electric, Pittsfield, MA) have been selected as polymers with outstanding properties for membrane preparation. The properties of membranes prepared from these polymers are presented. TPX is an example of a moderately selective and highly permeable membrane; the poly(etherimide) membranes are more selective but have lower fluxes. These membranes will cover the range of properties required in our hydrogen separation program and the bulk of our future work will be on these membranes. A few experiments with palladium/silver membranes are also planned, as described in the Test Plan.

  18. Flexible reserve markets for wind integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Alisha R.

    reserve market, identifying the operational constraints that inhibit a multi-purpose dam facility to meet the desired flexible energy demand. The second study transitions from the hydroelectric facility as the decision maker providing flex reserve services to the wind plant as the decision maker purchasing these services. In this second study, methods for allocating the costs of flex reserve services under different wind policy scenarios are explored that aggregate farms into different groupings to identify the least-cost strategy for balancing the costs of hourly day-ahead forecast errors. The least-cost strategy may be different for an individual wind plant and for the system operator, noting that the least-cost strategy is highly sensitive to cost allocation and aggregation schemes. The latter may also cause cross-subsidies in the cost for balancing wind forecast errors among the different wind farms. The third study builds from the second, with the objective to quantify the amount of flex reserves needed for balancing future forecast errors using a probabilistic approach (quantile regression) to estimating future forecast errors. The results further examine the usefulness of separate flexible markets PJM could use for balancing oversupply and undersupply events, similar to the regulation up and down markets used in Europe. These three studies provide the following results and insights to large-scale wind integration using actual PJM wind farm data that describe the markets and generators within PJM. • Chapter 2 provides an in-depth analysis of the valuable, yet highly-constrained, energy services multi-purpose hydroelectric facilities can provide, though the opportunity cost for providing these services can result in large deviations from the reservoir policies with minimal revenue gain in comparison to dedicating the whole of dam capacity to providing day-ahead, baseload generation. • Chapter 3 quantifies the system-wide efficiency gains and the distributive

  19. Wind Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  20. Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

    2008-06-01

    In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

  1. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  2. Research results for the Tornado Wind-Energy system: analysis and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Tornado Wind Energy System (TWES) concept utilizes a wind driven vortex confined by a hollow tower to create a low pressure core intended to serve as a turbine exhaust reservoir. The turbine inlet flow is provided by a separate ram air supply. Numerous experimental and analytical research efforts have investigated the potential of the TWES as a wind energy conversion system (WECS). The present paper summarizes and analyzes much of theresearch to date on the TWES. A simplified cost analysis incorporating these research results is also included. Based on these analyses, the TWES does not show significant promise of improving on either the performance or the cost of energy attainable by conventional WECS. The prospects for achieving either a system power coefficient above 0.20 or a cost of energy less than $0.50/kWh (1979 dollars) appear to be poor.

  3. Research results for the Tornado wind energy system: analysis and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    The Tornado Wind Energy System (TWES) concept utilizes a wind-driven vortex confined by a hollow tower to create a low-pressure core intended to serve as a turbine exhaust reservoir. The turbine inlet flow is provided by a separate ram air supply. Numerous experimental and analytical research efforts have investigated the potential of the TWES as a wind energy conversion system (WECS). The present paper summarizes and analyzes much of the research to date on the TWES. A simplified cost analysis incorporating these research results is also included. Based on these analyses, the TWES does not show any significant promise of improving on either the performance or the cost of energy attainable by conventional WECS. The prospects for achieving either a system power coefficient above 0.20 or a cost of energy less than $0.50/kWh (1979 dollars) appear to be poor.

  4. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  5. Analysis of wind power ancillary services characteristics with German 250-MW wind data

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, B.

    1999-12-09

    With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, power fluctuations have become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the US, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. This paper analyzes wind power in the context of ancillary services, using data from a German 250 Megawatt Wind project.

  6. Erosion: Wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion refers to the detachment, transport and deposition of sediment by wind. It is a dynamic, physical process where loose, dry, bare soils are transported by strong winds. Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that affects over 500 million ha of land worldwide and creates between 500 an...

  7. Meteorology (Wind)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Wind speed at 50 m (m/s) The average and percent difference minimum and ... are given.   Percent of time for ranges of wind speed at 50 m (percent) Percentage [frequency] of time that wind ... be adjusted to heights from 10 to 300 meters using the Gipe power law. Wind speeds may be adjusted for different terrain by selecting from ...

  8. Wind Energy Resource Assessment for Airborne Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, A.

    2015-12-01

    Google, through its Makani project, is developing a new type of wind energy conversion device called an energy kite. Using a tethered airfoil flying in vertical loops, energy kites access stronger, more consistent wind resources at altitudes between 100-500m AGL. By eliminating mass and cost of the tower, nacelle, and gearbox of a conventional wind turbine, and by increasing the capacity factor of energy generation, energy kites promise to significantly reduce the levelized cost of wind energy. The focus of this presentation will be on the approach Makani has taken to characterize the wind resource at 100-500m, where far less study has taken place compared to the atmosphere accessed by conventional wind turbines.

  9. Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This 2-page fact sheet describes NREL's offshore wind research and development efforts and capabilities. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: (1) Developing offshore design tools and methods; (2) Collaborating with international partners; (3) Testing offshore systems and developing standards; (4) Conducting economic analyses; (5) Characterizing offshore wind resources; and (6) Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers. NREL has developed and maintains a robust, open-source, modular computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool, known as FAST. FAST's state-of-the-art capabilities provide full dynamic system simulation for a range of offshore wind systems. It models the coupled aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, control system, and structural response of offshore wind systems to support the development of innovative wind technologies that are reliable and cost effective. FAST also provides dynamic models of wind turbines on offshore fixed-bottom systems for shallow and transitional depths and floating-platform systems in deep water, thus enabling design innovation and risk reduction and facilitating higher performance designs that will meet DOE's cost of energy, reliability, and deployment objectives.

  10. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    The goal of this program is to develop polymer membranes useful in the preparation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. During this quarter the first experiment were aimed at developing high performance composite membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Three polymers have been selected as materials for these membranes: polyetherimide cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose. This quarter the investigators worked on polyetherimide and cellulose acetate membranes. The overall structure of these membranes is shown schematically in Figure 1. As shown, a microporous support membrane is first coated with a high flux intermediate layer then with an ultrathin permselective layer and finally, if necessary, a thin protective high flux layer. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. WIND-DRIVEN RAIN EROSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion process involves detachment of soil particles from a soil surface and transport of these particles from their original position. The main agents that loosen, break down, and carry the soil particles are wind and water. Wind and water erosion have been separately studied in detail, and ...

  12. A facile and cost-effective method for separation of oil-water mixtures using polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Lead, Jamie R

    2014-12-16

    Catastrophic oil spills and oil from waste waters such as bilge and fracking waters pose major environmental concerns. The limitations of existing cleanup techniques for benign oil remediation has inspired a recent scientific impetus to develop oil-absorbing smart nanomaterials. Magnetic nanocomposites were here designed to allow easy recovery from various systems. In this study, sorption of reference MC252 oil with easy-to-synthesize and low-cost hydrophilic polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide nanoparticles is reported for the first time. The one-step modified polyol synthesis in air directly generates water-soluble nanoparticles. Stable polyvinylpyrrolidone-coatings are known to minimize environmental alterations of nanoparticles from aggregation and other processes. Iron oxide provides effective magnetic actuation, while both PVP and iron oxide have low toxicity. These nanoparticles gave quantitative (near 100%) oil removal under optimized conditions. The facile synthesis and ease of use represents a significant improvement over existing techniques. PMID:25409536

  13. Selective and cost-effective protocol to separate bioactive triterpene acids from plant matrices using alkalinized ethanol: Application to leaves of Myrtaceae species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adélia M. Belem; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Nakamura, Marcos Jun; D’Avila, Luiz Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Triterpenes as betulinic (BA), oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) have increasingly gained therapeutic relevance due to their wide scope of pharmacological activities. To fit large-scale demands, exploitable sources of these compounds have to be found and simple, cost-effective methods to extract them developed. Leaf material represents the best plant sustainable raw material. To obtain triterpene acid-rich extracts from leaves of Eugenia, Psidium and Syzygium species (Myrtaceae) by directly treating the dry plant material with alkalinized hydrated ethanol. This procedure was adapted from earlier methods to effect depolymerization of the leaf cutin. Materials and Methods: Extracts were prepared by shaking the milled dry leaves in freshly prepared 2% NaOH in 95% EtOH solution (1:4 w/v) at room temperature for 6 h. Working up the product in acidic aqueous medium led to clear precipitates in which BA, OA and UA were quantified by gas chromatography. Results: Pigment-free and low-polyphenol content extracts (1.2–2.8%) containing 6–50% of total triterpene acids were obtained for the six species assayed. UA (7–20%) predominated in most extracts, but BA preponderated in Eugenia florida (39%). Carried out in parallel, n-hexane defatted leaves led to up to 9% enhancement of total acids in the extracts. The hydroalcoholate treatment of Myrtaceae species dry leaves proved to be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method to obtain triterpene acids, providing them be resistant to alkaline medium. These combined techniques might be applicable to other plant species and tissues. PMID:26246721

  14. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  15. Wind farm array wake losses

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; McCarthy, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  16. Introduction to wind energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, H.-J.

    2015-08-01

    This article presents the basic concepts of wind energy and deals with the physics and mechanics of operation. It describes the conversion of wind energy into rotation of turbine, and the critical parameters governing the efficiency of this conversion. After that it presents an overview of various parts and components of windmills. The connection to the electrical grid, the world status of wind energy use for electricity production, the cost situation and research and development needs are further aspects which will be considered.

  17. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  18. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  19. Detecting and Mitigating Wind Turbine Clutter for Airspace Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  20. Possible application of laser isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The laser isotope separation process is described and its special economic features discussed. These features are its low cost electric power operation, capital investment costs, and the costs of process materials.

  1. Direct-Drive Contactless Wind Generator with Concentrated Winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, N.; Pugachov, V.; Orlova, S.

    2012-01-01

    A clear trend has emerged in the field of wind power industry concerning the creation of low-, medium-, and even high-power direct-drive wind turbines without the use of gearboxes. Such generators are usually multipolar and mostly excited from permanent magnets. In the low-speed performance, multipolarity means a higher specific torque and reliability as well as lower operating costs, which in the case of high-speed generators is hindered by gearboxes. Multipolarity with a high specific torque can be achieved mainly through the use of permanent magnets of high-energy materials (such as NdFeB) and through design solutions for the armature winding. The authors compare two most common types of wind generator's armature windings: the distributed one, which contains a coil embracing several teeth, and the concentrated armature winding - with one coil for one stator tooth. The comparison (along with the experience in developing the wind turbines) shows that the con-centrated winding version has a number of advantages, the main of them being the multipolarity. This means that the generator with a concentrated winding can be more acceptable for the direct-drive wind turbines, is easier to make and simpler to operate. Another very important advantage of concentrated windings shown in this work is that they allow achievement of a higher specific electromagnetic torque, which means smaller size and weight of such a generator in the low-speed version.

  2. An atmospheric turbulence model for spatiotemporal variability of geographically-diverse, aggregated wind-generated electricity to accelerate wide-scale wind energy deployment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Handschy, M.

    2013-12-01

    During the year 2012, the cumulative wind power capacity installed in the United States could provide roughly 4.4% of electricity demand. Although the wind resource can provide many times over the entire US electrical needs, and costs for onshore wind deployment are continually dropping, the variability of the wind represents one of the greatest remaining barriers to wide-scale wind deployment. This study focuses on the nature of this variability. We quantify the axiom 'geographic diversity reduces variability' (of wind generation) by relating resource variability characteristics to the well-understood physical phenomena of turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. Many existing studies focus on datasets of a few years' duration in a particular geographic area; such results are difficult to generalize. Our approach builds on the fundamental nonlinear characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere to characterize wind speed and power generation correlations between wind plants from local to continental scales. The resulting general principles enable estimation of the benefits of geographic aggregation absent detailed site-specific historical data, thereby enabling more efficient transmission grid models, expediting transmission plans, and providing a framework for evaluating the requirements and benefits of electric storage at higher wind penetrations. To validate these general principles, we compare them to observed inter-station correlations in a number of wind-speed data sets, including a 40-year Canadian dataset that spans the continent of North America, as well as shorter-duration datasets in smaller regions within the United States. This presentation will present general rules for the dependence of correlation between wind turbines on separation and time scale. We suggest these general rules could help shift renewable integration planning from simulation towards optimization.

  3. Operating experience, economics and wind plant optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, E.V.

    1995-09-01

    The Vestas group has installed more than 4,500 wind turbines (640 MW) world-wide. Experience from this development contradicts several myths about the costs of producing wind energy. The paper will document that it Vestas wind projects: (1) wind turbine availability does not decrease with age; (2) service and maintenance costs do not increase with age; (3) that initial investment costs have decreased dramatically over the last ten years. The relative importance of different project costs are discussed, and sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate that O and M costs, wind turbine availability, and financing parameters significantly influence the cost of energy production. New Vestas turbine models are introduced, including V42-600 kW and V60-1500 kW turbines.

  4. Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

  5. Separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, W. L., III; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Goodman, W. L.; Howard, F. G.; Margason, R. J.; Rudy, D. H.; Rumsey, C. L.; Stough, H. P., III; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of flow separation phenomena is provided. Langley has many active research programs in flow separation related areas. Three cases are presented which describe specific examples of flow separation research. In each example, a description of the fundamental fluid physics and the complexity of the flow field is presented along with a method of either reducing or controlling the extent of separation. The following examples are discussed: flow over a smooth surface with an adverse pressure gradient; flow over a surface with a geometric discontinuity; and flow with shock-boundary layer interactions. These results will show that improvements are being made in the understanding of flow separation and its control.

  6. Enhance separations with electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhara, H.S.

    1994-05-01

    To satisfy growing environmental regulations, control energy costs, or just to stay competitive, one must improve existing separation technologies and make them more efficient. New challenges in food processing and requirements for novel purification technologies in the biotech industry also will require more efficient separation techniques. This paper discusses some enhanced separation processes based on the application of an electric field in the combined-fields approach. In a combined-fields approach, the emphasis is on the generation of additional driving forces to work simultaneously with the conventional driving force of the process. Here the authors concentrate on the application of an electric field to generate the additional driving force.

  7. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  8. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  9. Towards high-performance, low-cost quartz sensors with high-density, well-separated, vertically aligned ZnO nanowires by low-temperature, seed-less, single-step, double-sided growth.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Andrea; Medaglia, Pier Gianni; Scarpellini, David; Pizzoferrato, Roberto; Falconi, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Resonant sensors with nanostructured surfaces have long been considered as an emergent platform for high-sensitivity transduction because of the potentially very large sensing areas. Nevertheless, until now only complex, time-consuming, expensive and sub-optimal fabrication procedures have been described; in fact, especially with reference to in-liquid applications, very few devices have been reported. Here, we first demonstrate that, by immersing standard, ultra-low-cost quartz resonators with un-polished silver electrodes in a conventional zinc nitrate/HMTA equimolar nutrient solution, the gentle contamination from the metallic package allows direct growth on the electrodes of arrays of high-density (up to 10 μm⁻²) and well-separated (no fusion at the roots) ZnO nanowires without any seed layer or thermal annealing. The combination of high-density and good separation is ideal for increasing the sensing area; moreover, this uniquely simple, single-step process is suitable for conventional, ultra-low-cost and high-frequency quartzes, and results in devices that are already packaged and ready to use. As an additional advantage, the process parameters can be effectively optimized by measuring the quartz admittance before and after growth. As a preliminary test, we show that the sensitivity to the liquid properties of high-frequency (i.e. high sensitivity) quartzes can be further increased by nearly one order of magnitude and thus show the highest ever reported frequency shifts of an admittance resonance in response to immersion in both ethanol and water. PMID:23924776

  10. Wind height distribution influence on offshore wind farm feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido; Della Morte, Renata; Matarazzo, Antonio; Cozzolino, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilization depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites on land. The higher wind speeds have to compensate the additional cost of offshore developments. However, not only the mean wind speed is different, but the whole flow regime, as can be seen in the vertical wind speed profile. The commonly used models to describe this profile have been developed mainly for land sites, so they have to be verified on the basis of field data. Monin-Obukhov theory is often used for the description of the wind speed profile at a different height with respect to a measurement height. Starting from the former, , the profile is predicted using two parameters, Obukhov length and sea surface roughness. For situations with near-neutral and stable atmospheric stratification and long (>30km) fetch, the wind speed increase with height is larger than what is predicted from Monin-Obukhov theory. It is also found that this deviation occurs at wind speeds important for wind power utilization, mainly at 5-9 ms-1. In the present study the influence of these aspects on the potential site productivity of an offshore wind farm were investigated, namely the deviation from the theory of Monin-Obukhov due to atmospheric stability and the influence of the fetch length on the Charnock model. Both these physical effects were discussed and examined in view of a feasibility study of a site for offshore wind farm in Southern Italy. Available data consisted of time histories of wind speeds and directions collected by National Tidegauge Network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale) at the height of 10m a.s.l. in ports. The theory of Monin-Obukhov was used to extrapolate the data to the height of the wind blades, while the Charnock model was used to extend the wind speed on the sea surface from the friction velocity on the ground. The models described were used to perform calculations for a feasibility study of an offshore wind farm in Southern

  11. A numerical analysis of the unsteady flow past a Savonius wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S. U. K.; Modi, V. J.

    1988-01-01

    A discrete vortex method-based mathematical model is used to predict Savonius wind turbines' performance, giving attention to complex, unsteady flow fields with separating shear layers. An evaluation is made of the effects of such computational parameters as the number of elements representing the rotor blade, the time-step size, the location of the nascent vortices, etc., on the accuracy of the results obtained, as well as the associated cost. Both stationary and rotating Savonius configurations are considered, and a parametric study is used to ascertain starting and dynamic torque histories, power coefficient, wake evolution, etc. Comparisons with wind tunnel data show powerful correlations for the results obtained.

  12. NASA presentation. [wind energy conversion systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a wind energy system is outlined that supplies reliable energy at a cost competitive with other energy systems. A government directed industry program with strong university support is recommended that includes meteorological studies to estimate wind energy potentials and determines favorable regions and sites for wind power installations. Key phases of the overall program are wind energy conversion systems, meteorological wind studies, energy storage systems, and environmental impact studies. Performance testing with a prototype wind energy conversion and storage system is projected for Fiscal 1977.

  13. Status of wind-energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Savino, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The utilization of wind energy is technically feasible as evidenced by the many past demonstrations of wind generators. The cost of energy from the wind has been high compared to fossil fuel systems. A sustained development effort is needed to obtain economical systems. The variability of the wind makes it an unreliable source on a short-term basis. However, the effects of this variability can be reduced by storage systems or connecting wind generators to fossil fuel systems, hydroelectric systems, or dispersing them throughout a large grid network. The NSF and NASA-Lewis Research Center have sponsored programs for the utilization of wind energy.

  14. Status of wind-energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Savino, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The utilization of wind energy is technically feasible as evidenced by the many past demonstrations of wind generators. The cost of energy from the wind has been high compared to fossil fuel systems; a sustained development effort is needed to obtain economical systems. The variability of the wind makes it an unreliable source on a short term basis. However, the effects of this variability can be reduced by storage systems or connecting wind generators to: (1) fossil fuel systems; (2) hydroelectric systems; or (3) dispersing them throughout a large grid network. Wind energy appears to have the potential to meet a significant amount of our energy needs.

  15. Tapping the wind's power over water

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, L.S.

    1992-03-15

    This article describes a new wind power concept. Tethered wind turbines are flown at a height of one to three kilometers above the Massachusetts coast, where they would tap the strong coastal winds and deliver 17 MW of power each to substations on the shore. The cost is about 6.3 cents per kw, but the load factor of 57% justifies the higher cost.

  16. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  17. Solar- and wind-powered irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enochian, R. V.

    1982-02-01

    Five different direct solar and wind energy systems are technically feasible for powering irrigation pumps. However, with projected rates of fossil fuel costs, only two may produce significant unsubsidied energy for irrigation pumping before the turn of the century. These are photovoltaic systems with nonconcentrating collectors (providing that projected costs of manufacturing solar cells prove correct); and wind systems, especially in remote areas where adequate wind is available.

  18. Wind fence enclosures for infrasonic wind noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Abbott, JohnPaul; Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    A large porous wind fence enclosure has been built and tested to optimize wind noise reduction at infrasonic frequencies between 0.01 and 10 Hz to develop a technology that is simple and cost effective and improves upon the limitations of spatial filter arrays for detecting nuclear explosions, wind turbine infrasound, and other sources of infrasound. Wind noise is reduced by minimizing the sum of the wind noise generated by the turbulence and velocity gradients inside the fence and by the area-averaging the decorrelated pressure fluctuations generated at the surface of the fence. The effects of varying the enclosure porosity, top condition, bottom gap, height, and diameter and adding a secondary windscreen were investigated. The wind fence enclosure achieved best reductions when the surface porosity was between 40% and 55% and was supplemented by a secondary windscreen. The most effective wind fence enclosure tested in this study achieved wind noise reductions of 20-27 dB over the 2-4 Hz frequency band, a minimum of 5 dB noise reduction for frequencies from 0.1 to 20 Hz, constant 3-6 dB noise reduction for frequencies with turbulence wavelengths larger than the fence, and sufficient wind noise reduction at high wind speeds (3-6 m/s) to detect microbaroms. PMID:25786940

  19. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and

  20. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  1. Separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Duke, T

    1998-10-01

    The past two years have seen continued development of capillary electrophoresis methods. The separation performance of flowable sieving media now equals, and in some respects exceeds, that provided by gels. The application of microfabrication techniques to separation science is gaining pace. There is a continuing trend towards miniaturization and integration of separation with preparative or analytical steps. Innovative separation methods based on microfabrication technology include electrophoresis in purpose-designed molecular sieves, dielectric, trapping using microelectrodes, and force-free motion in Brownian ratchets. PMID:9818184

  2. Model county ordinance for wind projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    Permitting is a crucial step in the development cycle of a wind project and permits affect the timing, cost, location, feasibility, layout, and impacts of wind projects. Counties often have the lead responsibility for permitting yet few have appropriate siting regulations for wind projects. A model ordinance allows a county to quickly adopt appropriate permitting procedures. The model county wind ordinance developed for use by northwest states is generally applicable across the country and counties seeking to adopt siting or zoning regulations for wind will find it a good starting place. The model includes permitting procedures for wind measurement devices and two types of wind systems. Both discretionary and nondiscretionary standards apply to wind systems and a conditional use permit would be issued. The standards, criteria, conditions for approval, and process procedures are defined for each. Adaptation examples for the four northwest states are provided along with a model Wind Resource Overlay Zone.

  3. Wind Energy Deployment Process and Siting Tools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Regardless of cost and performance, some wind projects cannot proceed to completion as a result of competing multiple uses or siting considerations. Wind energy siting issues must be better understood and quantified. DOE tasked NREL researchers with depicting the wind energy deployment process and researching development considerations. This presentation provides an overview of these findings and wind siting tools.

  4. Optimization of wind fence enclosures for infrasonic wind noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, JohnPaul Russell

    A large porous wind barrier enclosure has been built and tested to optimize wind noise reduction at infrasonic frequencies between 0.01-10 Hz in order to develop a technology that is simple, cost effective, and improves upon the limitations of pipe and porous hose arrays. The effects of varying the fence's porosity, modifying its top condition and bottom gap, doubling the height and diameter, and adding a secondary wind barrier were investigated. A simple mathematical model which estimates the wind noise measured at the center of the enclosure was derived based on the measured turbulence and velocity profiles measure outside the enclosure, inside the enclosure, and incident to its surface. The wind fence enclosure achieves wind noise reduction by minimizing the turbulence and velocity gradients at its center, and by decorrelating and area averaging the pressure fluctuations at its surface. The optimum wind fence has a surface porosity of 40-55%, a porous roof, no bottom gap, is very tall, wide, and is supplemented by a secondary wind barrier. The optimum wind fence can achieve a wind noise reduction of 20-27 dB over the 2-4 Hz frequency band, at least a 5 dB noise reduction for frequencies from 0.1 to 20 Hz, and a constant 4-6 dB of noise reduction for frequencies with turbulence wavelengths larger than the fence. At high wind speeds, 3-6 m/s, the optimized wind fence enclosure reduces wind noise sufficiently to detect microbaroms.

  5. Economics of wind farm layout

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, A.C.; Bain, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    The life cycle cost of energy (COE) is the primary determinant of the economic viability of a wind energy generation facility. The cost of wind turbines and associated hardware is counterbalanced by the energy which can be generated. This paper focuses on the turbine layout design process, considering the cost and energy capture implications of potential spacing options from the viewpoint of a practicing project designer. It is argued that lateral spacings in the range of 1.5 to 5 diameters are all potentially optimal, but only when matched to wind resource characteristics and machine design limits. The effect of wakes on energy capture is quantified while the effect on turbine life and maintenance cost is discussed qualitatively. Careful optimization can lower COE and project designers are encouraged to integrate the concepts in project designs.

  6. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also

  7. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate

  8. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  9. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the

  10. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  11. Char separator

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Francis T.

    1979-01-01

    Particulates removed from the flue gases produced in a fluidized-bed furnace are separated into high-and low-density portions. The low-density portion is predominantly char, and it is returned to the furnace or burned in a separate carbon burnup cell. The high-density portion, which is predominantly limestone products and ash, is discarded or reprocessed. According to another version, the material drained from the bed is separated, the resulting high-and low-density portions being treated in a manner similar to that in which the flue-gas particulates are treated.

  12. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  13. Wind Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Jack Cermak, Director of Fluid Dynamics and Diffusion Laboratory, developed the first wind tunnel to simulate the changing temperatures, directions and velocities of natural winds. In this work, Cermak benefited from NASA technology related to what is known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL).

  14. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also

  15. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented. PMID:17272245

  16. Wind machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, E. E.

    1985-01-15

    To generate power from wind economically, a feathering vane is pivotally mounted perpendicular to a tail vane and shifts the orientation of a sprocket assembly controlled by the tail vane in response to wind velocity. The sprocket assembly changes the orientation of blades which orbit about and rotate the main power shaft so that, as wind velocity changes, the blade orientations are shifted in a compensating direction under the control of the tail vane. A lever shifts the position of the blades to positions that balance wind power and brake the rotation for maintenance purposes. The speed-control mechanism includes a damper to avoid being excessively affected by wind gusts. The main shaft is connected through a speed increaser which has less mass at the high-speed end than the low-speed end to an induction generator when used for cogeneration, the field of the induction generator being excited by the cogeneration frequency.

  17. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  18. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower was held September 9-10, 2003.

  19. The Geography of Wind Energy: Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahart, David E.; Allen, Rodney F.

    1985-01-01

    Today there are many attempts to use wind machines to confront the increasing costs of electricity. Described are activities to help secondary students understand wind energy, its distribution, applications, and limitations. (RM)

  20. Battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Balouskus, R.A.; Feinberg, S.C.; Lundquist, J.T.; Lundsager, C.B.

    1980-09-23

    A battery separator and a method of forming the same is described. The separator has good electrical conductivity and a high degree of inhibition to dendrite formation, and is in the form of a thin sheet formed from a substantially uniform mixture of a thermoplastic rubber and a filler in a volume ratio of from about 1:0.15 to 1:0.6. The thermoplastic rubber is preferably a styrene/elastomer/styrene block copolymer.

  1. Product separator

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  2. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  3. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  4. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10 percent to 30 percent more energy than conventional blades.

  5. Wind for Schools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.

    2007-06-01

    Schools are key to achieving the goal of producing 20% of the nation's electricity demand. Most significantly, schools are training the scientists, technicians, businesspeople, decisionmakers, and teachers of the future. What students learn and believe about wind energy will impact the United States' ability to create markets and policy, develop and improve technology, finance and implement projects, and create change in all of our public and private institutions. In the nearer term, school districts have large facility costs, electrical loads, and utility costs. They are always in search of ways to reduce costs or obtain revenue to improve educational programs. Schools value teaching about the science and technology of renewable energy. They are important opinion leaders, particularly in rural communities. And their financial structures are quite different from other institutions (funding, incentives, restrictions, etc.). Learning objectives: The presentation will use case studies, project experience, and discussion with the audience to convey the current status of wind energy applications and education in U.S. schools and understanding of the elements that create a successful school wind energy project. The presentation will provide attendees with a background in the current level of knowledge and generate discussion on several themes.

  6. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  7. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  8. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Daghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Millstein, Dev; Hansen, Dana; Porter, Kevin; Widiss, Rebecca; Buckley, Michael; Oteri, Frank; Smith, Aaron; Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-08-06

    Wind power capacity additions in the United States rebounded in 2014, and continued growth through 2016 is anticipated. Recent and projected near-term growth is supported by the industry’s primary federal incentive—the production tax credit (PTC)—which is available for projects that began construction by the end of 2014. Wind additions are also being driven by recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technologies, which have resulted in the lowest power sales prices ever seen in the U.S. wind sector. Growing corporate demand for wind energy and state-level policies play important roles as well. Expectations for continued technological advancements and cost reductions may further boost future growth. At the same time, the prospects for growth beyond 2016 are uncertain. The PTC has expired, and its renewal remains in question. Continued low natural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and limited near-term demand from state renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have also put a damper on growth expectations. These trends, in combination with increasingly global supply chains, have limited the growth of domestic manufacturing of wind equipment. What they mean for wind power additions through the end of the decade and beyond will be dictated in part by future natural gas prices, fossil plant retirements, and policy decisions.

  9. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  10. Advanced vehicle separation apparatus. [automatic positioning of models for studies involving separation of aerodynamic shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ospring, M. J.; Mancini, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A method of obtaining test data from two independent models or bodies in a conventional wind tunnel is described. The system makes efficient use of wind tunnel test time with computer control performing complex coordinate transformations necessary for model positioning. The apparatus is designed to be used in any of the three Unitary Wind Tunnels at NASA-Ames Research Center. Mechanical design details and a brief description of the control system for the separation apparatus are presented.

  11. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  12. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  13. Large horizontal axis wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the NASA activities concerning ongoing wind systems oriented toward utility application is presented. First-generation-technology large wind turbines were designed and are in operation at selected utility sites. In order to make a significant energy impact, costs of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour must be achieved. The federal program continues to fund the development by industry of wind turbines which can meet the cost goals of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour. Lower costs are achieved through the incorporation of new technology and innovative system design to reduce weight and increase energy capture.

  14. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  15. SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-10-24

    A process for separating tetravalent plutonium from aqueous solutions and from niobium and zirconium by precipitation on lanthanum oxalate is described. The oxalate ions of the precipitate may be decomposed by heating in the presence of an oxidizing agent, forming a plutonium compound readily soluble in acid. (AEC)

  16. Separation Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes eight-week short-term group designed to help separated or divorced men and women move through related adjustment phase in focused group setting. Discusses constructs that form the foundations of this short-term psychoeducational and support group and presents brief overview of psychological difficulties that occur as result of marital…

  17. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  18. Composite separators and redox flow batteries based on porous separators

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-12

    Composite separators having a porous structure and including acid-stable, hydrophilic, inorganic particles enmeshed in a substantially fully fluorinated polyolefin matrix can be utilized in a number of applications. The inorganic particles can provide hydrophilic characteristics. The pores of the separator result in good selectivity and electrical conductivity. The fluorinated polymeric backbone can result in high chemical stability. Accordingly, one application of the composite separators is in redox flow batteries as low cost membranes. In such applications, the composite separator can also enable additional property-enhancing features compared to ion-exchange membranes. For example, simple capacity control can be achieved through hydraulic pressure by balancing the volumes of electrolyte on each side of the separator. While a porous separator can also allow for volume and pressure regulation, in RFBs that utilize corrosive and/or oxidizing compounds, the composite separators described herein are preferable for their robustness in the presence of such compounds.

  19. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel...

  20. Design of the Wind Eagle Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J. Sr.

    1995-09-01

    The Wind Eagle Turbine has many design features that contribute to a simple, lightweight, low cost and rugged wind machine. It is a down wind, two bladed, rigid hub, free yaw and free pitch machine with full span blade pitch control. Most of the wind community are unaware of the advantages that are inherent in the Wind Eagle concept. It is the intent of this oral presentation to point out and discuss the features of this design so there is a better understanding of this very cost effective machine. Some parts of the Wind Eagle Turbine to be covered include: main spar, spar and blade connection, fiberglass blade, yaw bearing, tower, low speed shaft and shut down.

  1. Forecastability as a Design Criterion in Wind Resource Assessment: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to include the wind power forecasting ability, or 'forecastability,' of a site as a design criterion in wind resource assessment and wind power plant design stages. The Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) methodology is adopted to maximize the capacity factor of a wind power plant. The 1-hour-ahead persistence wind power forecasting method is used to characterize the forecastability of a potential wind power plant, thereby partially quantifying the integration cost. A trade-off between the maximum capacity factor and the forecastability is investigated.

  2. Composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Cheng-Huat

    Researchers in wind energy industry are constantly moving forward to develop higher efficiency wind turbine. One major component for wind turbine design is to have cost effective wind turbine blades. In addition to correct aerodynamic shape and blade geometry, blade performance can be enhanced further through aero-elastic tailoring design and material selections. An analytical tool for blade design has been improved and validated. This analytical tool is utilized to resolve issues related to elastic tailoring design. The investigation looks into two major issues related to the design and fabrication of a bend-twist-coupled blade. Various design parameters for a blade such as materials, laminate lay-up, skin thickness, ply orientation, internal spar, etc. have been examined for designing a bend-twist-coupled blade. The parametric study indicates that the critical design parameters are the ply material, the ply orientation, and the volume fraction ratio between the anisotropic layers and orthotropic layers. To produce a blade having the bend-twist coupling characteristics, the fiber lay-ups at the top and bottom skins of the blade must have a "mirror" lay-up in relation to the middle plane of the blade. Such lay-up causes fiber discontinuation at the seam. The joint design at the seam is one major consideration in fabricating a truly anisotropic blade. A new joint design was proposed and tensile failure tests were carried out for both the old and new joint designs. The tests investigated the effects of different types of joint designs, the laminate lay-up at the joints, and the stacking sequence of the joint retention strength. A major component of a wind turbine blade, D-spar, was designed to maximum coupling. Two D-spars were then fabricated using the new joint design; one of them was subjected to both static and modal testings. Traditionally, wind turbine blades are made of low cost glass material; however, carbon fibers are proposed as alternative material. Our

  3. Wind power parks: 1983 survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, E.M.; Loperena, G.A.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to survey the status of wind parks owned by non-utility organizations which generate electricity for sale to electric utilities under the provisions of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. Both technical (including wind turbine descriptions) and business-related information were gathered from over 100 wind park developers who were interviewed by telephone or in person. Following the survey, the wind parks were screened so that only those already on-line or with very good possibilities of coming on-line by mid-1984 were included. This screening, although subject to judgment, was based primarily on the status of several of the critical milestones necessary for project completion. This document includes descriptions of 85 wind parks established by over 60 developers. Of these, 73 are located in California. This concentration in California is the result of the confluence of tax advantages, financial, institutional, and resource factors currently most favorably found in that state. For the wind parks described in this document, installed generating capacity (based on nameplate ratings) is 87 MW as of July 1983, with plans calling for aggregate installation of some 730 MW by mid-1984. Continued expansion in wind turbine installations over the next several years will require that wind turbines demonstrate high equipment availability with acceptable operating and maintenance costs. If these can be achieved, if the cost effectiveness of the equipment improves by 20%, and if borrowing terms improve, then wind parks could remain economically viable businesses for non-utility owners even after the current tax advantages expire.

  4. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier flight test configuration to determine separation characteristics utilizing 0.0125-scale models (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the LTV 4 x 4 foot high speed wind tunnel (CA26), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on a 0.0125-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and a 0.0125-scale model of the 747 CAM configuration in a 4 x 4-foot High Speed Wind Tunnel were presented. Force and moment data were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6 and for each vehicle in proximity to the other at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7. The proximity effects of each vehicle on the other at separation distances (from the mated configuration) ranging from 1.5 feet to 75 feet were presented; 747 Carrier angles of attack from 0 deg to 6 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg and -5 deg were tested. Model variables included orbiter elevon, aileron and body flap deflections, orbiter tailcone on and off, and 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections.

  5. ACARS wind measurements - An intercomparison with radiosonde, cloud motion and VAS thermally derived winds. [Communications, Addressing and Reporting System VISSR Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, R. J.; Menzel, W. P.; Pecht, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    Statistical comparisons between winds measured by ACARS and winds obtained from radiosondes, geostationary satellite image cloud motions, and VAS are presented. Observations from three separate comparisons reveal over 60 percent of wind vector magnitude differences are within 9 m/s, and 70 percent of the directional differences are within 15 deg. The comparisons indicate that the ACARS system provides an independent source of wind data that complements other sources of wind data for constructing composite wind field analyses.

  6. Wind power finding its competitive edge

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    1993-08-18

    When interviewing the head of the windpower association, one expects to hear a barrage of global warming, acid rain and other pollution horror stories, followed by a call for an expensive federal effort to replace fossil fuels with wind power. But not from Randy Swisher, president of the American Wind Energy Association. This article describes the technological advances made in wind energy during the last decade, and its cost competitiveness with conventional fossil fuels.

  7. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  8. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  9. Separation system

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Leslie S.

    1986-01-01

    A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

  10. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  11. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  12. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  13. Measurement campaign for wind power potential in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnow Jakobsen, Kasper

    2013-04-01

    Experiences and results from a wind resource exploring campaign 2003- in west Greenland. Like many other countries, Greenland is trying to reduce its dependency of fossil fuel by implementing renewable energy. The main challenge is that the people live on the coast in scattered settlements, without power infrastructure. Based on this a wind power potential project was established in 2002, funded by the Greenlandic government and the Technical University of Denmark. We present results and experiences of the campaign. 1 Field campaign There were only a few climate stations in or close to settlements and due to their positioning and instrumentation, they were not usable for wind resource estimation. To establish met stations in Arctic areas with complex topography, there are some challenges to face; mast positioning in complex terrain, severe weather conditions, instrumentation, data handling, installation and maintenance budget. The terrain in the ice free and populated part, mainly consists of mountains of different heights and shapes, separated by deep fjords going from the ice cap to the sea. With a generally low wind resource the focus was on the most exposed positions close to the settlements. Data from the nearest existing climate stations was studied for background estimations of predominant wind directions and extreme wind speeds, and based on that the first 10m masts were erected in 2003. 2 Instruments The first installations used standard NRG systems with low cost NRG instruments. For most of the sites this low cost setup did a good job, but there were some problems with the first design, including instrument and boom strains. In subsequent years, the systems were updated several times to be able to operate in the extreme conditions. Different types of instruments, data logger and boom systems were tested to get better data quality and reliability. Today 11 stations with heights ranging from 10-50m are installed and equipped according to the IEC standard

  14. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  15. Tailored airfoils for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines*

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-08-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system cost-ofenergy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  16. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-11-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  17. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  18. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  19. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  20. Compound Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a new one-step liquid-liquid extraction technique which cuts processing time, reduces costs and eliminates much of the equipment required. Technique employs disposable extraction columns, originally developed as an aid to the Los Angeles Police Department, which allow more rapid detection of drugs as part of the department's drug abuse program. Applications include medical treatment, pharmaceutical preparation and forensic chemistry. NASA waived title to Caltech, and Analytichem International is producing Extubes under Caltech license.

  1. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  3. Numerical investigation of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Suganthi

    A numerical method based on the solution of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations and actuator disk representation of turbine rotor is developed and implemented in the OpenFOAM software suite for aerodynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). The method and the implementation are validated against the 1-D momentum theory, the blade element momentum theory and against experimental data. The model is used for analyzing aerodynamics of a novel dual rotor wind turbine concept and wind farms. Horizontal axis wind turbines suffer from aerodynamic inefficiencies in the blade root region (near the hub) due to several non-aerodynamic constraints (e.g., manufacturing, transportation, cost, etc.). A new dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) concept is proposed that aims at mitigating these losses. A DRWT is designed using an existing turbine rotor for the main rotor (Risoe turbine and NREL 5 MW turbine), while the secondary rotor is designed using a high lift to drag ratio airfoil (the DU 96 airfoil from TU Delft). The numerical aerodynamic analysis method developed as a part of this thesis is used to optimize the design. The new DRWT design gives an improvement of about 7% in aerodynamic efficiency over the single rotor turbine. Wind turbines are typically deployed in clusters called wind farms. HAWTs also suffer from aerodynamic losses in a wind farm due to interactions with wind turbine wakes. An interesting mesoscale meteorological phenomenon called "surface flow convergence" believed to be caused by wind turbine arrays is investigated using the numerical method developed here. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by the pressure gradient set up by wind turbines operating in close proximity in a farm. A conceptual/hypothetical wind farm simulation validates the hypothesis that a pressure gradient is setup in wind farms due to turbines and that it can cause flow veering of the order of 10 degrees. Simulations of a real wind farm (Story County) are also

  4. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  5. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  6. Method for Standardizing Sonic-Boom Model Pressure Signatures Measured at Several Wind-Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Low-boom model pressure signatures are often measured at two or more wind-tunnel facilities. Preliminary measurements are made at small separation distances in a wind tunnel close at hand, and a second set of pressure signatures is measured at larger separation distances in a wind-tunnel facility with a larger test section. In this report, a method for correcting and standardizing the wind-tunnel-measured pressure signatures obtained in different wind tunnel facilities is presented and discussed.

  7. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  8. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  9. Artwork Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Under a grant from California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) used image enhancement techniques to separate x-ray images of paintings when one had been painted on top of another. The technique is derived from computer processing of spacecraft-acquired imagery, and will allow earlier paintings, some of which have been covered for centuries, to be evaluated. JPL developed the program for "subtracting" the top painting and enhancing the bottom one, and believes an even more advanced system is possible.

  10. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  11. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Porter, Kevin; Buckley, Michael; Fink, Sari; Oteri, Frank; Tegen, Suzanne

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry is facing uncertain times. With 2011 capacity additions having risen from 2010 levels and with a further sizable increase expected in 2012, there are – on the surface – grounds for optimism. Key factors driving growth in 2011 included continued state and federal incentives for wind energy, recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technology, and the need to meet an end-of-year construction start deadline in order to qualify for the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. At the same time, the currently-slated expiration of key federal tax incentives for wind energy at the end of 2012 – in concert with continued low natural gas prices and modest electricity demand growth – threatens to dramatically slow new builds in 2013.

  12. Validation of Power Output for the WIND Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.; Clifton, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    Renewable energy integration studies require wind data sets of high quality with realistic representations of the variability, ramping characteristics, and forecast performance for current wind power plants. The Wind Integration National Data Set (WIND) Toolkit is meant to be an update for and expansion of the original data sets created for the weather years from 2004 through 2006 during the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and the Eastern Wind Integration Study. The WIND Toolkit expands these data sets to include the entire continental United States, increasing the total number of sites represented, and it includes the weather years from 2007 through 2012. In addition, the WIND Toolkit has a finer resolution for both the temporal and geographic dimensions. Three separate data sets will be created: a meteorological data set, a wind power data set, and a forecast data set. This report describes the validation of the wind power data set.

  13. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  14. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  15. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  16. Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-01-01

    Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to

  17. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  18. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  19. Battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannoni, R.T.; Kung, J.K.J.; Choi, W.M.

    1987-10-13

    This patent describes a battery system composed of at least one pair of electrodes of opposite polarity, an electrolyte and a separator positioned between electrodes of opposite polarity. The improvement comprises that the separator is a microporous sheet composed of a substantially uniform composition of A. from 7 to 50 weight percent of a polymer mixture, the mixture formed from (a) from about 95 to about 40 weight percent of polyolefin formed from ethylene, propylene or mixtures thereof or a mixture of the polyolefins having a weight average molecular weight of at least about 3,000,000; and (b) from about 5 to about 60 weight percent of a polymeric blend formed from a polyethylene terpolymer and a vinyl or vinylidene halide polymer in a weight ratio of 19:1 to 1:3, the polyethylene terpolymer formed from (1) ethylene monomer, (2) at least one ethylenically unsaturated organic monomer selected from the group consisting of esters of unsaturated C/sub 3/-C/sub 20/ mono- or dicarboxylic acids, vinyl esters of saturated C/sub 2/-C/sub 18/ carboxylic acids, vinyl alkyl ethers wherein the alkyl group has 1-18 carbon atoms, vinyl or vinylidene halides, acrylonitrile, methacrylonitrile, norbornene, alpha-olefins of 3-12 carbon atoms, and vinyl aromatic compounds, and, (3) an additional monomer selected from the group consisting of ethylenically unsaturated C/sub 3/-C/sub 20/ carboxylic acids, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide; B. from 93 to 50 weight percent of a filler which is substantially inert with respect to the battery electrodes and electrolyte; and C. from 0 to 20 weight percent of plasticizer for at least one of the polymers of the composition.

  20. Preview Control for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Ahmet Arda

    The success of wind power as a renewable energy source depends on its cost of energy. Wind turbine control has attracted much attention in the controls community due to its potential impact on the cost of wind power. However, novel methods in the literature have not transitioned well to industry. This is because the potential cost benefits of these methods are not well understood. There is a need for basic research to address this issue. This thesis is one step toward transitioning of advanced control methods in literature to the industry. Particularly, we aim to understand the limits of performance. The potential performance improvements of the advanced methods should be large enough to justify their cost and complexity. We investigate the optimal trade-offs between multiple turbine performance goals. We also explore the use of a novel wind preview sensor in closed-loop control laws. The impact of this novel sensor on the optimal turbine performance is investigated. The specific contributions of this thesis can be grouped in three categories. First, we present a preliminary, nonlinear optimization based controller design and analysis framework. This framework can simplify the design of the advanced multivariable controllers for nonlinear systems. It can also be used to investigate the optimal design trade-offs between nonlinear performance constraints and objectives. Second, engineering insight is provided into turbine design trade-offs. Third, we provide mathematical tools that quantify the limits of turbine performance in presence of preview wind measurements. Optimization tools that can analyze the trade-off between preview time and operating condition dependent turbine performance objectives are presented. In low wind speeds, our results show that simultaneous power capture improvements and structural load reductions can be obtained. In high wind speeds, a short amount of preview wind information can be used to overcome the fundamental performance limitations

  1. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, John P.; Liu, Shu; Ibanez, Eduardo; Pennock, Ken; Reed, Greg; Hanes, Spencer

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  2. Shoosing the appropriate size wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lynette, R.

    1996-12-31

    Within the past several years, wind turbines rated at 400 kW and higher have been introduced into the market, and some manufacturers are developing machines rated at 750 - 1,000+ kW. This raises the question: What is the appropriate size for utility-grade wind turbines today? The answer depends upon the site where the machines will be used and the local conditions. The issues discussed in the paper are: (1) Site-Related (a) Visual, noise, erosion, television interference, interference with aviation (b) Siting efficiency (2) Logistics (a) Adequacy of roads and bridges to accept large vehicles (b) Availability and cost of cranes for erection and maintenance (c) Capability of local repair/overhauls (3) Cost Effectiveness (a) Capital costs (1) Wind Turbine (2) Infrastructure costs (b) Maintenance costs (4) Technical/Financial Risk. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. New separators for nickel-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Flexible separators consisting of a substrate coated with a mixture of a polymer and organic and inorganic additives were cycle tested in nickel-zinc cells. By substituting a rubber-based resin for polyphenylene oxide in the standard inorganic-organic separator, major improvements in both cell life and flexibility were made. Substituting newsprint for asbestos as the substrate shows promise for use on the zinc electrode and reduces separator cost. The importance of ample electrolyte in the cells was noted. Cycle lives and the characteristics of these flexible, low-cost separators were compared with those of a standard microporous polypropylene separator.

  4. Wind farm optimization using evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ituarte-Villarreal, Carlos M.

    In recent years, the wind power industry has focused its efforts on solving the Wind Farm Layout Optimization (WFLO) problem. Wind resource assessment is a pivotal step in optimizing the wind-farm design and siting and, in determining whether a project is economically feasible or not. In the present work, three (3) different optimization methods are proposed for the solution of the WFLO: (i) A modified Viral System Algorithm applied to the optimization of the proper location of the components in a wind-farm to maximize the energy output given a stated wind environment of the site. The optimization problem is formulated as the minimization of energy cost per unit produced and applies a penalization for the lack of system reliability. The viral system algorithm utilized in this research solves three (3) well-known problems in the wind-energy literature; (ii) a new multiple objective evolutionary algorithm to obtain optimal placement of wind turbines while considering the power output, cost, and reliability of the system. The algorithm presented is based on evolutionary computation and the objective functions considered are the maximization of power output, the minimization of wind farm cost and the maximization of system reliability. The final solution to this multiple objective problem is presented as a set of Pareto solutions and, (iii) A hybrid viral-based optimization algorithm adapted to find the proper component configuration for a wind farm with the introduction of the universal generating function (UGF) analytical approach to discretize the different operating or mechanical levels of the wind turbines in addition to the various wind speed states. The proposed methodology considers the specific probability functions of the wind resource to describe their proper behaviors to account for the stochastic comportment of the renewable energy components, aiming to increase their power output and the reliability of these systems. The developed heuristic considers a

  5. AGN Winds and Blazar Phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2012-01-01

    The launch of {\\em Fermi} produced a significant number of AGN detections to allow statistical treatment of their properties. One of the first such systematics was the "Blazar Divide" in FSRQs and BL Lacs according to their gamma-ray spectral index and luminosity. Further data accumulation indicated this separation to be less clear than thought before. An MHD wind model which can model successfully the Seyfert X-ray absorber properties provides the vestiges of an account of the observed blazar classification. We propose to employ this model to model in detail the broad band blazar spectra and their statistical properties in terms of the physical parameters of these MHD winds.

  6. Electrical Collection and Transmission Systems for Offshore Wind Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.; Bowen, A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Wan, Y.

    2007-03-01

    The electrical systems needed for offshore wind farms to collect power from wind turbines--and transmit it to shore--will be a significant cost element of these systems. This paper describes the development of a simplified model of the cost and performance of such systems.

  7. Tool to Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, T.; George, R.; Forsyth, T.

    2002-05-01

    In order to make the Wind Powering America effort a success, homeowners and landowners interested in purchasing grid-connected small wind energy systems must be provided with assistance and education. The Clean Power Estimator (CPE) program is a valuable tool for these individuals. In support of this educational effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is integrating the CPE program with site-specific wind resource data. This paper describes how the CPE program works, how end users can determine the cost-effectiveness of wind for a specific location, and how companies can use the program to identify high-value wind locations.

  8. Evaluation of Wind Profiler Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Palmblad, Robert

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the Applied Meteorology Unit's evaluation of a "Hypersodar" wind profiler located on KSC adjacent to tower 412. The sodar data used for this evaluation were collected during two different periods in March 1999 and November 1998. The evaluation is performed by calculating sodar data availability as a function of height, and bias and Root Mean Square (RMS) differences of wind speed and direction between sodar and tower 313 observations at comparable heights. The RMS differences in wind speed and wind direction from sodar wind solution B at KSC range from 0.65 m s (exp. -1) - 2.04 m s (exp. -1) and 4.5 - 32.3 deg., respectively. Note that these RMS differences are not bias-corrected. The vendor claims that the accuracy of the wind measurements from the sodar is better than 0.5 m s (exp -1) in speed and 10 deg. in direction. The results of the evaluation described here suggest that such accuracy may be attainable though the data available for this comparison made it impossible to confirm the vendor's claims. The sodar was not aligned with true north and was separated by a distance of 3.5 km from tower 313 used for comparisons in this study.

  9. Appendix L: GPRA05 Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program documentation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The wind energy component of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program seeks to reduce the cost and improve the performance of wind technology, and to reduce barriers to its use. The GPRA benefits are based primarily on model projections of the market share for wind technologies, based on their economic characteristics. This document describes the assumptions that are used by the models to calculate those benefits.

  10. Wind energy development in the United States: Can state-level policies promote efficient development of wind energy capacity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Blair S.

    In the absence of strong U.S. federal renewable energy policies, state governments have taken the lead in passing legislation to promote wind energy. Studies have shown that many of these policies, including Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), have aided in the development of wind energy capacity nationwide. This paper seeks to analyze whether these state-level policies have led to an efficient development of U.S. wind energy. For the purposes of this paper, wind energy development is considered efficient if competitive markets enable wind capacity to be built in the most cost effective manner, allowing states to trade wind energy between high wind potential states and low wind potential states. This concept is operationalized by analyzing how state policies that incentivize the in-state development of wind energy impact where wind capacity is developed. A multivariate regression model examining wind capacity in the 48 contiguous United States that had some wind capacity between 1999 and 2008 found these in-state policies are associated with increased wind capacity, controlling for states' wind potential. The results suggest that state-level policies are distorting where wind is developed. These findings support the enactment of a more comprehensive federal energy policy, such as a national RPS, a cap-and-trade program, or a targeted federal transmission policy. These federal policies could spur national markets that would result in the more efficient development of U.S. wind energy.

  11. 77 FR 29633 - Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC, Alta Wind XIII, LLC, Alta Wind XIV, LLC, Alta Wind XV, LLC, Alta Windpower... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207, Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta...

  12. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region

    SciTech Connect

    Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

  13. Integrated roof wind energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suma, A. B.; Ferraro, R. M.; Dano, B.; Moonen, S. P. G.

    2012-10-01

    Wind is an attractive renewable source of energy. Recent innovations in research and design have reduced to a few alternatives with limited impact on residential construction. Cost effective solutions have been found at larger scale, but storage and delivery of energy to the actual location it is used, remain a critical issue. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System is designed to overcome the current issues of urban and larger scale renewable energy system. The system is built up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels that make use of the Venturi Effect to accelerate the wind flow. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a vertical-axis wind turbine in the top of the roof for generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The methods used in this overview of studies include an array of tools from analytical modelling, PIV wind tunnel testing, and CFD simulation studies. The results define the main design parameters for an efficient system, and show the potential for the generation of high amounts of renewable energy with a novel and effective system suited for the built environment.

  14. Damage mitigating control for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Richard A.

    2007-12-01

    In the last few decades the wind industry has made great strides in reducing the cost of energy of utility scale wind turbines. In an attempt to reduce infrastructure costs and improve efficiency, the trend has been to develop larger variations of existing designs. In the past, the wind turbine controller was used primarily for rotor speed control and prevention of catastrophic damage from extreme wind conditions or component failures. The recent trend of wind turbine growing in size has resulted in wind turbines becoming much more flexible, and now the emphasis of wind turbine controls research focuses on how to damp resonances and avoid dangerous excitations that may lead to structural failure. Control of the fatigue loads on the wind turbine structure addresses neglects the fatigue mechanism of the material. The conversion of loads into stresses and those stresses into fatigue damage is a highly nonlinear process and is based on the so-called "cycle-counting" methods. Since the cycle counting methodology is difficult to convert into the time or frequency domains, these components have been generally avoided in controls research. Without modeling the damage dynamics, the wind turbine controller cannot efficiently reduce the fatigue of the structural components. The result is that only small decreases of fatigue damage are realized by current load reduction strategies at the expense of excessive control actuation. This dissertation introduces the concept of Damage Mitigating Control (DMC) as it applies to utility scale Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). The work presented extends earlier work in damage mitigating and life extending control in several ways and then applies then applies this control strategy to reduce the fatigue damage suffered by wind turbines during operation. By modeling fatigue damage dynamics within the wind turbine controller, the life of the turbine can be extended significantly without sacrificing performance.

  15. U.S. Wind Power Development

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of domestic wind power development which provides an understanding of where the industry stands today, how it got there, and where it is going. The advent of state renewable portfolio standards and the 3-year renewal of the production tax credit have driven wind power to record levels. A key objective of the report is to provide a comprehensive view of what is behind these developments, so that industry participants can take advantage of the opportunity offered by wind power. Topics covered include: overview of U.S. wind power including its history, current status, and future prospects; business drivers of the U.S. wind power market; barriers to the growth of the U.S. wind power market; keys to successful wind power project development; economics of U.S. wind power, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; analysis of key state markets for wind power development; and, profiles of major U.S. wind power project developers.

  16. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  17. Aerodynamic results of an abort separation effects test (IA8) conducted in the NASA/ARC 14-foot transonic wind tunnel on a model (6-OTS) of the Rockwell International launch configuration integrated vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 6-OTS 0.015-scale model. The Ames dual sting support separation rig was used to obtain grid-type data for tank-booster abort from orbiter (SSV). Freestream data were obtained for the orbiter to provide a baseline for evaluation of proximity effects. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 1.1, and Reynolds number per foot varying from 2.1 million to 3.9 million. Data are not presented. Because of balance failure, a very substantial portion of the test was run with a dummy balance in the tank boosters configuration.

  18. Catching a steady breeze: Putting wind power to work on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Tennis, M.W.

    1995-03-01

    Wind energy can provide very low-cost, environmentally clean electricity generation. Below, we describe progress we have made in refining our understanding of wind resources in the Midwest, and some considerations regarding the reliability of wind power. Power suppliers interested in wind power should consider using similar approaches.

  19. Educational Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert

    Problems in educational cost accounting and a new cost accounting approach are described in this paper. The limitations of the individualized cost (student units) approach and the comparative cost approach (in the form of fund-function-object) are illustrated. A new strategy, an activity-based system of accounting, is advocated. Borrowed from…

  20. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 September 2003

    Bright wind streaks are present in the lee of craters and other obstacles in this image, located in Sinus Sabaeus, near the Martian equator. These streaks indicate that the local winds blow from the northeast (upper right in the image). The brightness of the streaks indicates that either bright material has been deposited in the lee of the craters, or that the surface has eroded preferentially in the lee of craters, exposing an underlying bright material. Because the streaks are bright regardless of the surrounding surface brightness, the first hypothesis most likely. The streaks probably all represent deposits of the same bright material that settled out of the atmosphere in the wind shelter provided by topographic peaks.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.3, Longitude 14.1 East (345.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the

  1. Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-05-01

    A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

  2. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  3. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon

  4. Flexible separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Device is fabricated from low-cost readily-available commercial-materials by automated methods utilizing conventional paper coating processes. Flexibility of unit prevents cracking and disintegration caused by electrode warpage and dendrite growth, major causes of early battery failure with present separators.

  5. Aerodynamic results of a separation effects test on a 0.01-scale model (52-OTS) of integrated SSV in the AEDC/VKF 40-by-40 inch supersonic wind tunnel A, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H., II

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted, during the period July 18-19, 1974, in the AEDC/VKF Tunnel A facility on a 0.01-scale model (52-OTS) of the integrated space shuttle vehicle, including only one SRB. The purpose of the investigation was to obtain data for close-in proximity (SRB to orbiter/tank) effects with the orbiter/tank combination at relatively high alpha and beta attitudes, and with the SRB separation motors off. The AEDC Captive Trajectory System (CTS), which supported the SRB, was used in conjunction with the tunnel primary sector (supporting the orbiter/tank) to obtain grid type separation effects data. The one symmetrical SRB model was used interchangeably to obtain both right-hand and left-hand SRB data. Free-stream data were also obtained for the orbiter/tank and for the SRB. This data was used to provide baselines for proximity effects. The entire investigation was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.5 with unit Reynolds number ranging from 4.0 to 6.5 million per foot.

  6. Careers in Wind Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liming, Drew; Hamilton, James

    2011-01-01

    As a common form of renewable energy, wind power is generating more than just electricity. It is increasingly generating jobs for workers in many different occupations. Many workers are employed on wind farms: areas where groups of wind turbines produce electricity from wind power. Wind farms are frequently located in the midwestern, western, and…

  7. Prospecting for Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swapp, Andy; Schreuders, Paul; Reeve, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Many people use wind to help meet their needs. Over the years, people have been able to harness or capture the wind in many different ways. More recently, people have seen the rebirth of electricity-generating wind turbines. Thus, the age-old argument about technology being either good or bad can also be applied to the wind. The wind can be a…

  8. A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Raterman, Kevin Thomas; Mc Kellar, Michael George; Turner, Terry Donald; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Stacey, Douglas Edwin; Stokes, B.; Vranicar, J.

    2001-05-01

    Many analysts identify carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Programme cited separation costs from $35 to $264 per tonne of CO2 avoided for a conventional coal fired power plant utilizing existing capture technologies. Because these costs equate to a greater than 40% increase in current power generation rates, it appears obvious that a significant improvement in CO2 separation technology is required if a negative impact on the world economy is to be avoided.

  9. Downscaling surface wind predictions from numerical weather prediction models in complex terrain with WindNinja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, Natalie S.; Forthofer, Jason M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Shannon, Kyle S.; Butler, Bret W.

    2016-04-01

    Wind predictions in complex terrain are important for a number of applications. Dynamic downscaling of numerical weather prediction (NWP) model winds with a high-resolution wind model is one way to obtain a wind forecast that accounts for local terrain effects, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and flows induced by local surface heating and cooling. In this paper we investigate the ability of a mass-consistent wind model for downscaling near-surface wind predictions from four NWP models in complex terrain. Model predictions are compared with surface observations from a tall, isolated mountain. Downscaling improved near-surface wind forecasts under high-wind (near-neutral atmospheric stability) conditions. Results were mixed during upslope and downslope (non-neutral atmospheric stability) flow periods, although wind direction predictions generally improved with downscaling. This work constitutes evaluation of a diagnostic wind model at unprecedented high spatial resolution in terrain with topographical ruggedness approaching that of typical landscapes in the western US susceptible to wildland fire.

  10. Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

    2011-06-01

    This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

  11. Separators - Technology review: Ceramic based separators for secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Tina; Schmid, Robert; Münchgesang, Wolfram; Bazhenov, Vasilii; Schilm, Jochen; Leisegang, Tilmann; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2014-06-01

    Besides a continuous increase of the worldwide use of electricity, the electric energy storage technology market is a growing sector. At the latest since the German energy transition ("Energiewende") was announced, technological solutions for the storage of renewable energy have been intensively studied. Storage technologies in various forms are commercially available. A widespread technology is the electrochemical cell. Here the cost per kWh, e. g. determined by energy density, production process and cycle life, is of main interest. Commonly, an electrochemical cell consists of an anode and a cathode that are separated by an ion permeable or ion conductive membrane - the separator - as one of the main components. Many applications use polymeric separators whose pores are filled with liquid electrolyte, providing high power densities. However, problems arise from different failure mechanisms during cell operation, which can affect the integrity and functionality of these separators. In the case of excessive heating or mechanical damage, the polymeric separators become an incalculable security risk. Furthermore, the growth of metallic dendrites between the electrodes leads to unwanted short circuits. In order to minimize these risks, temperature stable and non-flammable ceramic particles can be added, forming so-called composite separators. Full ceramic separators, in turn, are currently commercially used only for high-temperature operation systems, due to their comparably low ion conductivity at room temperature. However, as security and lifetime demands increase, these materials turn into focus also for future room temperature applications. Hence, growing research effort is being spent on the improvement of the ion conductivity of these ceramic solid electrolyte materials, acting as separator and electrolyte at the same time. Starting with a short overview of available separator technologies and the separator market, this review focuses on ceramic-based separators

  12. Separators - Technology review: Ceramic based separators for secondary batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, Tina; Schmid, Robert; Münchgesang, Wolfram; Bazhenov, Vasilii; Meyer, Dirk C.; Schilm, Jochen; Leisegang, Tilmann

    2014-06-16

    Besides a continuous increase of the worldwide use of electricity, the electric energy storage technology market is a growing sector. At the latest since the German energy transition ('Energiewende') was announced, technological solutions for the storage of renewable energy have been intensively studied. Storage technologies in various forms are commercially available. A widespread technology is the electrochemical cell. Here the cost per kWh, e. g. determined by energy density, production process and cycle life, is of main interest. Commonly, an electrochemical cell consists of an anode and a cathode that are separated by an ion permeable or ion conductive membrane - the separator - as one of the main components. Many applications use polymeric separators whose pores are filled with liquid electrolyte, providing high power densities. However, problems arise from different failure mechanisms during cell operation, which can affect the integrity and functionality of these separators. In the case of excessive heating or mechanical damage, the polymeric separators become an incalculable security risk. Furthermore, the growth of metallic dendrites between the electrodes leads to unwanted short circuits. In order to minimize these risks, temperature stable and non-flammable ceramic particles can be added, forming so-called composite separators. Full ceramic separators, in turn, are currently commercially used only for high-temperature operation systems, due to their comparably low ion conductivity at room temperature. However, as security and lifetime demands increase, these materials turn into focus also for future room temperature applications. Hence, growing research effort is being spent on the improvement of the ion conductivity of these ceramic solid electrolyte materials, acting as separator and electrolyte at the same time. Starting with a short overview of available separator technologies and the separator market, this review focuses on ceramic-based separators

  13. Three-Dimensional Venturi Sensor for Measuring Extreme Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zysko, Jan A.; Perotti, Jose M.; Amis, Christopher; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Eckhoff, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Venturi sensor is being developed as a compact, rugged means of measuring wind vectors having magnitudes of as much as 300 mph (134 m/s). This sensor also incorporates auxiliary sensors for measuring temperature from -40 to +120 F (-40 to +49 C), relative humidity from 0 to 100 percent, and atmospheric pressure from 846 to 1,084 millibar (85 to 108 kPa). Conventional cup-and-vane anemometers are highly susceptible to damage by both high wind forces and debris, due to their moving parts and large profiles. In addition, they exhibit slow recovery times contributing to an inaccurately high average-speed reading. Ultrasonic and hot-wire anemometers overcome some of the disadvantages of the cup and-vane anemometers, but they have other disadvantageous features, including limited dynamic range and susceptibility to errors caused by external acoustic noise and rain. In contrast, the novel 3D Venturi sensor is less vulnerable to wind damage because of its smaller profile and ruggedness. Since the sensor has no moving parts, it provides increased reliability and lower maintenance costs. It has faster response and recovery times to changing wind conditions than traditional systems. In addition, it offers wide dynamic range and is expected to be relatively insensitive to rain and acoustic energy. The Venturi effect in this sensor is achieved by the mirrored double-inflection curve, which is then rotated 360 to create the desired detection surfaces. The curve is optimized to provide a good balance of pressure difference between sensor ports and overall maximum fluid velocity while in the shape. Four posts are used to separate the two shapes, and their size and location were chosen to minimize effects on the pressure measurements. The 3D Venturi sensor has smart software algorithms to map the wind pressure exerted on the surfaces of the design. Using Bernoulli's equation, the speed of the wind is calculated from the differences among the pressure

  14. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining

  15. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  16. 75 FR 23263 - Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC; Alta Wind VI, LLC; Alta Wind VII, LLC; Alta Wind VIII, LLC; Alta Windpower... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 285.207 (2009), Alta Wind I, LLC, Alta Wind...

  17. Membranes and separators for flowing electrolyte batteries-a review

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C.; Assink, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Flowing electrolyte batteries are rechargeable electrochemical storage devices in which externally stored electrolytes are circulated through the cell stack during charge or discharge. The potential advantages that flow batteries offer compared to other secondary batteries include: 1) ease of thermal and electrolyte management, 2) simple electrochemistry, 3) deep cycling capability, and 4) minimal loss of capacity with cycling. However, flow batteries are more complex than other secondary batteries and consequently may cost more and may be less reliable. Flow batteries are being developed for utility load leveling, electric vehicles, solar photovoltaic and wind turbine application. The status of flow batteries has recently been reviewed by Clark et al. The flowing electrolyte batteries place rigorous demands on the performance of separators and membranes. The operating characteristics of the iron/chromium redox battery were changed in order to accommodate the limitations in membrane performance. Low cost alternatives to the presently used membrane must be found before the zinc/ferricyanide battery can be economically feasible. The zinc/bromine battery's efficiency could be improved if a suitably selective membrane were available. It is anticipated that better and less costly membranes to meet these needs will be developed as more is learned about their preparation and performance.

  18. Mod 2 Wind Turbine Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The primary objective in the development of Mod 2 was to design a wind turbine to produce energy for less than 5 cents/kWh based on 1980 cost forecasts. The pricing method used to project the Mod 2 energy costs is the levelized fixed charge rate approach, generally accepted in the electric utility industry as a basis for relative ranking of energy alternatives. This method derives a levelized energy price necessary to recover utility's purchasing, installing, owning, operating, and maintenance costs.

  19. Avoidable waste management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  20. Wind farms production: Control and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fouly, Tarek Hussein Mostafa

    and the time delay of the incident wind speed of the different turbines on the farm, and to simulate the fluctuation in the generated power more accurately and more closer to real-time operation. Recently, wind farms with considerable output power ratings have been installed. Their integrating into the utility grid will substantially affect the electricity markets. This thesis investigates the possible impact of wind power variability, wind farm control strategy, wind energy penetration level, wind farm location, and wind power prediction accuracy on the total generation costs and close to real time electricity market prices. These issues are addressed by developing a single auction market model for determining the real-time electricity market prices.

  1. The 200-kilowatt wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The three 200 kilowatt wind turbines described, compose the first of three separate systems. Proposed wind turbines of the two other systems, although similar in design, are larger in both physical size and rated power generation. The overall objective of the project is to obtain early operation and performance data while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. Several of the key issues addressed include the following: (1) impact of the variable power output (due to varying wind speeds) on the utility grid (2) compatibility with utility requirements (voltage and frequency control of generated power) (3) demonstration of unattended, fail-safe operation (4) reliability of the wind turbine system (5) required maintenance and (6) initial public reaction and acceptance.

  2. Wind power error estimation in resource assessments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Osvaldo; Del Río, Jesús A; Jaramillo, Oscar A; Martínez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the power output is one of the elements that determine the techno-economic feasibility of a renewable project. At present, there is a need to develop reliable methods that achieve this goal, thereby contributing to wind power penetration. In this study, we propose a method for wind power error estimation based on the wind speed measurement error, probability density function, and wind turbine power curves. This method uses the actual wind speed data without prior statistical treatment based on 28 wind turbine power curves, which were fitted by Lagrange's method, to calculate the estimate wind power output and the corresponding error propagation. We found that wind speed percentage errors of 10% were propagated into the power output estimates, thereby yielding an error of 5%. The proposed error propagation complements the traditional power resource assessments. The wind power estimation error also allows us to estimate intervals for the power production leveled cost or the investment time return. The implementation of this method increases the reliability of techno-economic resource assessment studies. PMID:26000444

  3. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  4. Wind Power Error Estimation in Resource Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Osvaldo; del Río, Jesús A.; Jaramillo, Oscar A.; Martínez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the power output is one of the elements that determine the techno-economic feasibility of a renewable project. At present, there is a need to develop reliable methods that achieve this goal, thereby contributing to wind power penetration. In this study, we propose a method for wind power error estimation based on the wind speed measurement error, probability density function, and wind turbine power curves. This method uses the actual wind speed data without prior statistical treatment based on 28 wind turbine power curves, which were fitted by Lagrange's method, to calculate the estimate wind power output and the corresponding error propagation. We found that wind speed percentage errors of 10% were propagated into the power output estimates, thereby yielding an error of 5%. The proposed error propagation complements the traditional power resource assessments. The wind power estimation error also allows us to estimate intervals for the power production leveled cost or the investment time return. The implementation of this method increases the reliability of techno-economic resource assessment studies. PMID:26000444

  5. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck; West, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the most suitable data sets available in the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive for the study of time-dependent stellar winds in early B supergiants. The UV line profile variability in 11 B0 to B3 stars is analyzed, compared and discussed, based on 16 separate data sets comprising over 600 homogeneously reduced high-resolution spectrograms. The targets include 'normal' stars with moderate rotation rates and examples of rapid rotators. A gallery of grey-scale images (dynamic spectra) is presented, which demonstrates the richness and range of wind variability and highlights different structures in the winds of these stars. This work emphasizes the suitability of B supergiants for wind studies, under-pinned by the fact that they exhibit unsaturated wind lines for a wide range of ionization. The wind activity of B supergiants is substantial and has highly varied characteristics. The variability evident in individual stars is classified and described in terms of discrete absorption components, spontaneous absorption, bowed structures, recurrence, and ionization variability and stratification. Similar structures can occur in stars of different fundamental parameters but also different structures may occur in the same star at a given epoch. We discuss the physical phenomena that may be associated with the spectral signatures, and highlight the challenges that these phenomena present to theoretical studies of time-dependent outflows in massive stars. In addition, SEI line-synthesis modelling of the UV wind lines is used to provide further information about the state of the winds in our program stars. Typically the range, implied by the line profile variability, in the product of mass-loss rate and ion fraction (M qi) is a factor of approximately 1.5, when integrated between 0.2 and 0.9 v infinity; it it can however be several times larger over localized velocity regions. At a given effective temperature the mean relative ion ratios can differ by a

  6. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, D.; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the most suitable data sets available in the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive for the study of time-dependent stellar winds in early B supergiants. The UV line profile variability in 11 B0 to B3 stars is analyzed, compared and discussed, based on 16 separate data sets comprising over 600 homogeneously reduced high-resolution spectrograms. The targets include 'normal' stars with moderate rotation rates and examples of rapid rotators. A gallery of grey-scale images (dynamic spectra) is presented, which demonstrates the richness and range of wind variability and highlights different structures in the winds of these stars. This work emphasises the suitability of B supergiants for wind studies, under-pinned by the fact that they exhibit unsaturated wind lines for a wide range of ionization. The wind activity of B supergiants is substantial and has highly varied characteristics. The variability evident in individual stars is classified and described in terms of discrete absorption components, spontaneous absorption, bowed structures, recurrence, and ionization variability and stratification. Similar structures can occur in stars of different fundamental parameters, but also different structures may occur in the same star at a given epoch. We discuss the physical phenomena that may be associated with the spectral signatures, and highlight the challenges that these phenomena present to theoretical studies of time-dependent outflows in massive stars. In addition, SEI line-synthesis modelling of the UV wind lines is used to provide further information about the state of the winds in our program stars. Typically the range, implied by the line profile variability, in the product of mass-loss rate and ion fraction (M (dot) q(sub i)) is a factor of approximately 1.5, when integrated between 0.2 and 0.9 v infinity; it can however be several times larger over localized velocity regions. At a given effective temperature the mean relative ion ratios can

  7. Optimizing wind turbine control system parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, L.L.; Vachon, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    The impending expiration of the levelized period in the Interim Standard Offer Number 4 (ISO4) utility contracts for purchasing wind-generated power in California mandates, more than ever, that windplants be operated in a cost-effective manner. Operating plans and approaches are needed that maximize the net revenue from wind parks--after accounting for operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a design tool that makes it possible to tailor a control system of a wind turbine (WT) to maximize energy production while minimizing the financial consequences of fatigue damage to key structural components. Plans for code enhancements to include expert systems and fuzzy logic are discussed, and typical results are presented in which the code is applied to study the controls of a generic Danish 15-m horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT).

  8. Optimizing wind turbine control system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schluter, Larry L.; Vachon, William A.

    1993-05-01

    The impending expiration of the levelized period in the Interim Standard Offer Number 4 (ISO4) utility contracts for purchasing wind-generated power in California mandates, more than ever, that windplants be operated in a cost-effective manner. Operating plans and approaches are needed that maximize the net revenue from wind parks--after accounting for operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a design tool that makes it possible to tailor a control system of a wind turbine (WT) to maximize energy production while minimizing the financial consequences of fatigue damage to key structural components. Plans for code enhancements to include expert systems and fuzzy logic are discussed, and typical results are presented in which the code is applied to study the controls of a generic Danish 15-m horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT).

  9. The WindStar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandless, Samuel W.; Jones, W. Linwood; Huxtable, Barton D.; Jones, Lawrence P.

    1996-03-01

    The ``WindStar'' project is a cooperative, cost-sharing venture between NASA's Earth Observations Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP), directed by the Stennis Space Center (SSC), and User Systems, Incorporated (USI), a Virginia-based remote sensing technology development company. The project seeks to establish the commercial viability of using twice-a-day satellite scatterometer data to produce marine wind forecasts for commercial television weather broadcasts. The WindStar product will be an animated, two dimensional map of wind speed and direction that evolves in time from the observed ``nowcast'' every 12 hours to a projected ``forecast''. Commercial television stations in coastal areas will incorporate this video into the weather segment of their news broadcasts to advise viewers, with both commercial and recreational interests, of coastal and off-shore conditions. While contributing to improved near shore marine operations for both recreational and commercial boaters, the proposed product would also be of use to commercial fishermen, coastal shipping operations, search and rescue operations, state and local governments, the Coast Guard, and the Navy. Projected new business plans include establishing and maintaining a ``Global Wind History'' archive that can be accessed on Internet.

  10. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  11. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  12. Avian study protocols and wind energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.

    1995-12-01

    This paper identifies the need to develop and use standardized avian study protocols to determine avian impacts at new and existing wind energy facilities. This will allow data collected from various sites to be correlated for better understanding wind energy related avian impacts. Factors contributing to an increased interest in wind energy facilities by electric utilities include: (1) Increased demand for electricity;(2) increased constraints on traditional electrical generating facilities (i.e. hydroelectric and nuclear power plants);(3) improved wind turbine technology. During the 1980`s generous tax credits spawned the development of wind energy facilities, known as wind farms, in California. Commercial scale wind farm proposals are being actively considered in states across the country - Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Wisconsin, Texas, and Vermont to name a few. From the wind farms in California the unexpected issue of avian impacts, especially to birds-of-prey, or raptor, surfaced and continues to plague the wind industry. However, most of the avian studies did not followed a standardized protocol or methodology and, therefore, data is unavailable to analyze and compare impacts at different sites or with differing technologies and configurations. Effective mitigation can not be designed and applied until these differences are understood. The Bonneville Power Administration is using comparable avian study protocols to collect data for two environmental impact statements being prepared for two separate wind farm proposals. Similar protocol will be required for any other avian impact analysis performed by the agency on proposed or existing wind farms. The knowledge gained from these studies should contribute to a better understanding of avian interactions with wind energy facilities and the identification of effective mitigation measures.

  13. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to the top ...

  14. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to ...

  15. Future for Offshore Wind Energy in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.

    2004-06-01

    Until recently, the offshore wind energy potential in the United States was ignored because vast onshore wind resources have the potential to fulfill the electrical energy needs for the entire country. However, the challenge of transmitting the electricity to the large load centers may limit wind grid penetration for land-based turbines. Offshore wind turbines can generate power much closer to higher value coastal load centers. Reduced transmission constraints, steadier and more energetic winds, and recent European success, have made offshore wind energy more attractive for the United States. However, U.S. waters are generally deeper than those on the European coast, and will require new technology. This paper presents an overview of U.S. coastal resources, explores promising deepwater wind technology, and predicts long-term cost-of-energy (COE) trends. COE estimates are based on generic 5-MW wind turbines in a hypothetical 500-MW wind power plant. Technology improvements and volume production are expected to lower costs to meet the U.S. Department of Energy target range of $0.06/kWh for deployment of deepwater offshore wind turbines by 2015, and $0.05/kWh by 2012 for shallow water. Offshore wind systems can diversify the U.S. electric energy supply and provide a new market for wind energy that is complementary to onshore development.

  16. Wind power generation and dispatch in competitive power markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Lisias

    Wind energy is currently the fastest growing type of renewable energy. The main motivation is led by more strict emission constraints and higher fuel prices. In addition, recent developments in wind turbine technology and financial incentives have made wind energy technically and economically viable almost anywhere. In restructured power systems, reliable and economical operation of power systems are the two main objectives for the ISO. The ability to control the output of wind turbines is limited and the capacity of a wind farm changes according to wind speeds. Since this type of generation has no production costs, all production is taken by the system. Although, insufficient operational planning of power systems considering wind generation could result in higher system operation costs and off-peak transmission congestions. In addition, a GENCO can participate in short-term power markets in restructured power systems. The goal of a GENCO is to sell energy in such a way that would maximize its profitability. However, due to market price fluctuations and wind forecasting errors, it is essential for the wind GENCO to keep its financial risk at an acceptable level when constituting market bidding strategies. This dissertation discusses assumptions, functions, and methodologies that optimize short-term operations of power systems considering wind energy, and that optimize bidding strategies for wind producers in short-term markets. This dissertation also discusses uncertainties associated with electricity market environment and wind power forecasting that can expose market participants to a significant risk level when managing the tradeoff between profitability and risk.

  17. Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

  18. Elemental and charge state composition of the fast solar wind observed with SMS instruments on WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Fisk, L. A.; Wilken, B.

    1995-01-01

    The elemental composition and charge state distributions of heavy ions of the solar wind provide essential information about: (1) atom-ion separation processes in the solar atmosphere leading to the 'FIP effect' (the overabundance of low First Ionization potential (FIP) elements in the solar wind compared to the photosphere); and (2) coronal temperature profiles, as well as mechanisms which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. This information is required for solar wind acceleration models. The SWICS instrument on Ulysses measures for all solar wind flow conditions the relative abundance of about 8 elements and 20 charge states of the solar wind. Furthermore, the Ulysses high-latitude orbit provides an unprecedented look at the solar wind from the polar coronal holes near solar minimum conditions. The MASS instrument on the WIND spacecraft is a high-mass resolution solar wind ion mass spectrometer that will provide routinely not only the abundances and charge state of all elements easily measured with SWICS, but also of N, Mg, S. The MASS sensor was fully operational at the end of 1994 and has sampled the in-ecliptic solar wind composition in both the slow and the corotating fast streams. This unique combination of SWICS on Ulysses and MASS on WIND allows us to view for the first time the solar wind from two regions of the large coronal hole. Observations with SWICS in the coronal hole wind: (1) indicate that the FIP effect is small; and (2) allow us determine the altitude of the maximum in the electron temperature profile, and indicate a maximum temperature of approximately 1.5 MK. New results from the SMS instruments on Wind will be compared with results from SWICS on Ulysses.

  19. Cost goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoag, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cost goal activities for the point focusing parabolic dish program are reported. Cost goals involve three tasks: (1) determination of the value of the dish systems to potential users; (2) the cost targets of the dish system are set out; (3) the value side and cost side are integrated to provide information concerning the potential size of the market for parabolic dishes. The latter two activities are emphasized.

  20. U.S. Distributed Wind Sector Finds Support from NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Karin

    2015-02-02

    Small and mid-sized wind turbine manufacturers in the United States have led the international distributed wind market in installed capacity for decades. Continued reductions in the cost of distributed wind systems are essential to successfully compete with currently economical photovoltaic systems. Annual capacity additions in 2013 were particularly low. In an effort to reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of distributed wind systems manufactured in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided funding through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support several projects.

  1. Wind turbines for electric utilities: Development status and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramler, J. R.; Donovan, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The technology and economics of the large, horizontal-axis wind turbines currently in the Federal Wind Energy Program are presented. Wind turbine technology advancements made in the last several years are discussed. It is shown that, based on current projections of the costs of these machines when produced in quantity, they should be attractive for utility application. The cost of electricity (COE) produced at the busbar is shown to be a strong function of the mean wind speed at the installation site. The breakeven COE as a fuel saver is discussed and the COE range that would be generally attractive to utilities is indicated.

  2. Wind turbines for electric utilities - Development status and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramler, J. R.; Donovan, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The technology and economics of the large, horizontal-axis wind turbines currently in the Federal Wind Energy Program are presented. Wind turbine technology advancements made in the last several years are discussed. It is shown that, based on current projections of the costs of these machines when produced in quantity, they should be attractive for utility application. The cost of electricity (COE) produced at the busbar is shown to be a strong function of the mean wind speed at the installation site. The breakeven COE as a 'fuel saver' is discussed and the COE range that would be generally attractive to utilities is indicated.

  3. Optical system design and experimental evaluation of a coherent Doppler wind Lidar system for the predictive control of wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Tauscher, Julian Asche; Beuth, Thorsten; Heussner, Nico; Fox, Maik; Babu, Harsha Umesh; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    The control of wind turbine blade pitch systems by Lidar assisted wind speed prediction has been proposed to increase the electric power generation and reduce the mechanical fatigue load on wind turbines. However, the sticking point of such Lidar systems is the price. Hence, our objective is to develop a more cost efficient Lidar system to support the pitch control of horizontal axis wind turbines and therefore to reduce the material requirement, lower the operation and maintenance costs and decrease the cost of wind energy in the long term. Compared to the state of the art Lidar systems, a laser with a shorter coherence length and a corresponding fiber delay line is introduced for reducing the costs. In this paper we present the experimental evaluation of different sending and receiving optics designs for such a system from a free space laboratory setup.

  4. Proceedings of the fourth biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kottler, Jr., R. J.

    1980-06-01

    Separate abstracts are included for papers presented concerning research and development requirements and utility interface and institutional issues for small-scale systems; design requirements and research and development requirements for large-scale systems; economic and operational requirements of large-scale wind systems; wind characteristics and wind energy siting; international activities; wind energy applications in agriculture; federal commercialization and decentralization plans; and wind energy innovative systems.

  5. Tracking Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  6. The wind program in a typhoon environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Y. S.

    The present wind program in the Republic of China (including Taiwan and the off-shore islands under ROC control) is discussed. The collection of wind data in hopeful windmill sites, especially those on offshore islands and coastal areas is discussed. The installation of experimental small wind machines in the above-mentioned sites is described. For example, some small machines will be set up this year in Quemoy for pumping of irrigation water while others will be used for salt-making in the Southern Coast of Taiwan. An evaluation of available Wind energy in Taiwan is given. The assessment of the effect of typhoon on the safety, cost and operation of wind machines is discussed

  7. Economics of wind energy for utilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, T. F.; Goldenblatt, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    Utility acceptance of this technology will be contingent upon the establishment of both its technical and economic feasibility. This paper presents preliminary results from a study currently underway to establish the economic value of central station wind energy to certain utility systems. The results for the various utilities are compared specifically in terms of three parameters which have a major influence on the economic value: (1) wind resource, (2) mix of conventional generation sources, and (3) specific utility financial parameters including projected fuel costs. The wind energy is derived from modeling either MOD-2 or MOD-0A wind turbines in wind resources determined by a year of data obtained from the DOE supported meteorological towers with a two-minute sampling frequency. In this paper, preliminary results for six of the utilities studied are presented and compared.

  8. New perspectives in offshore wind energy.

    PubMed

    Failla, Giuseppe; Arena, Felice

    2015-02-28

    The design of offshore wind turbines is one of the most fascinating challenges in renewable energy. Meeting the objective of increasing power production with reduced installation and maintenance costs requires a multi-disciplinary approach, bringing together expertise in different fields of engineering. The purpose of this theme issue is to offer a broad perspective on some crucial aspects of offshore wind turbines design, discussing the state of the art and presenting recent theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:25583869

  9. New perspectives in offshore wind energy

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Giuseppe; Arena, Felice

    2015-01-01

    The design of offshore wind turbines is one of the most fascinating challenges in renewable energy. Meeting the objective of increasing power production with reduced installation and maintenance costs requires a multi-disciplinary approach, bringing together expertise in different fields of engineering. The purpose of this theme issue is to offer a broad perspective on some crucial aspects of offshore wind turbines design, discussing the state of the art and presenting recent theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:25583869

  10. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Handman, D.

    1996-10-01

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  11. Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

  12. Design and evaluation of a short coherence length laser-based Doppler wind Lidar system for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Asche-Tauscher, Julian; Fox, Maik; Beuth, Thorsten; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays larger horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are setup in difficult to access locations adding an overhead to the production cost as well as the Operation & Maintenance (O&M) costs. In order to cover those overhead cost, Lidar assisted preview control of wind turbine blade pitch system is prosperous both on research and industry applications. However, there are not a lot of choices to remote sense the wind field inflow. Doppler wind Lidar systems have been proved to be advantageous on such applications. However due to the economical consideration, the state-of-the-art wind Lidar systems are only limited on research. Therefore, developing a cost efficient wind Lidar to support the pitch control of HAWT to reduce the material requirement, lower the O&M cost and decrease the cost of energy (COE) in the long term is our motivation. Our current main focusing of investigations has been laid on the optical design of emitting and receiving system, and the evaluation of the low cost laser system instead of using a high cost fiber laser as a transmitter. The short coherence length lasers brings a higher phase noise into the detection, normally it is not used for the coherent Lidars system. However, such a laser can achieve a higher output power with a low cost which is very important for the market. In order to bring such kind of laser into the application, different sending, receiving, and detection design is simulated and tested. Those testing results are presented in this paper.

  13. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Yang, W.

    2013-07-01

    High operation and maintenance costs still hamper the development of the wind industry despite its quick growth worldwide. To reduce unscheduled downtime and avoid catastrophic failures of wind turbines and their components have been and will be crucial to further raise the competitiveness of wind power. Condition monitoring is one of the key tools for achieving such a goal. To enhance the research and development of advanced condition monitoring techniques dedicated to wind turbines, we present an overview of wind turbine condition monitoring, discuss current practices, point out existing challenges, and suggest possible solutions.

  14. Large horizontal axis wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the NASA activities in large horizontal axis wind turbine development. First generation technology large wind turbines (Mod-0A, Mod-1) have been designed and are in operation at selected utility sites. Second generation machines (Mod-2) are scheduled to begin operations on a utility site in 1980. These machines are estimated to generate electricity at less than 4 cents/kWh when manufactured in modest production rates. Meanwhile, plans are being made to continue developing wind turbines which can meet the cost goals of 2 to 3 cents/kWh.

  15. Laser vibrometry for wind turbines inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.

    2016-04-01

    The maintenance and repair of wind energy converters is a significant cost factor. Therefore it is mandatory to minimise the downtime caused by unnoticed faults. A key contributor to the load on the wind turbine installation and to material fatigue is the plant's unavoidable vibration. We report about a development of a new 1.5 μm laser vibrometer system to measure vibrations of rotating blades of wind turbines up to a distance of several hundred meters - based on a very precise imaged tracking system.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

    2003-09-01

    Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. This study has three objectives: (1) Identify the paramount considerations associated with using a wind turbine tower for hydrogen storage; (2)Propose and analyze a cost-effective design for a hydrogen-storing tower; and (3) Compare the cost of storage in hydrogen towers to the cost of storage in conventional pressure vessels. The paramount considerations associated with a hydrogen tower are corrosion (in the form of hydrogen embrittlement) and structural failure (through bursting or fatigue life degradation). Although hydrogen embrittlement (HE) requires more research, it does not appear to prohibit the use of turbine towers for hydrogen storage. Furthermore, the structural modifications required to store hydrogen in a tower are not cost prohibitive.

  17. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  18. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  19. NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines.

  20. Potential errors in using one anemometer to characterize the wind power over an entire rotor disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Wind data collected at four levels on a 90-m tower in a prospective wind farm area are used to evaluate how well the 10-m wind speed data with and without intermittent vertical profile measurements compare with the 90-m tower data. If a standard, or even predictable, wind speed profile existed, there would be no need for a large, expensive tower. This cost differential becomes even more significant if several towers are needed to study a prospective wind farm.

  1. Relief and Distress after Marital Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.; Thompson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Examined relief and distress as responses to the termination of marriage in a study of 205 individuals soon after their final separation. Results showed that relief is a frequent response to marital separation. Group differences in response were associated with the rewards and costs of ending a marriage. (JAC)

  2. Emergency wind erosion control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  3. CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds(C3Winds) A New Wind Observing System to Study Mesoscale Cloud Dynamics and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Kelly, M.A.; Yee, J.-H.; Boldt, J.; Demajistre, R.; Reynolds, E. L.; Tripoli, G. J.; Oman, L. D.; Prive, N.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wanzong, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds (C3Winds) is a NASA Earth Venture Instrument (EV-I) concept with the primary objective to better understand mesoscale dynamics and their structures in severe weather systems. With potential catastrophic damage and loss of life, strong extratropical and tropical cyclones (ETCs and TCs) have profound three-dimensional impacts on the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic structures, producing complex cloud precipitation patterns, strong low-level winds, extensive tropopause folds, and intense stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Employing a compact, stereo IR-visible imaging technique from two formation-flying CubeSats, C3Winds seeks to measure and map high-resolution (2 km) cloud motion vectors (CMVs) and cloud geometric height (CGH) accurately by tracking cloud features within 5-15 min. Complementary to lidar wind observations from space, the high-resolution wind fields from C3Winds will allow detailed investigations on strong low-level wind formation in an occluded ETC development, structural variations of TC inner-core rotation, and impacts of tropopause folding events on tropospheric ozone and air quality. Together with scatterometer ocean surface winds, C3Winds will provide a more comprehensive depiction of atmosphere-boundary-layer dynamics and interactive processes. Built upon mature imaging technologies and long history of stereoscopic remote sensing, C3Winds provides an innovative, cost-effective solution to global wind observations with potential of increased diurnal sampling via CubeSat constellation.

  4. Ferrofluid separator for nonferrous scrap separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, R.; Mir, L.

    1974-01-01

    Behavior of nonmagnetic objects within separator is essentially function of density, and independent of size or shape of objects. Results show close agreement between density of object and apparent density of ferrofluid required to float it. Results also demonstrate that very high separation rates are achievable by ferrofluid sink-float separation.

  5. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  6. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  7. Intercomparison of state-of-the-art models for wind energy resources with mesoscale models:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bjarke Tobias; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Badger, Jake; Joergensen, Hans E.

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction Mesoscale models are increasingly being used to estimate wind conditions to identify perspective areas and sites where to develop wind farm projects. Mesoscale models are functional for giving information over extensive areas with various terrain complexities where measurements are scarce and measurement campaigns costly. Several mesoscale models and families of models are being used, and each often contains thousands of setup options. Since long-term integrations are expensive and tedious to carry out, only limited comparisons exist. To remedy this problem and for evaluating the capabilities of mesoscale models to estimate site wind conditions, a tailored benchmarking study has been co-organized by the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) and the European Energy Research Alliance Joint Programme Wind Energy (EERA JP WIND). EWEA hosted results and ensured that participants were anonymous. The blind evaluation was performed at the Wind Energy Department of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) with the following objectives: (1) To highlight common issues on mesoscale modelling of wind conditions on sites with different characteristics, and (2) To identify gaps and strengths of models and understand the root conditions for further evaluating uncertainties. 2. Approach Three experimental sites were selected: FINO 3 (offshore, GE), Høvsore (coastal, DK), and Cabauw (land-based, NL), and three other sites without observations based on . The three mast sites were chosen because the availability of concurrent suitable time series of vertical profiles of winds speed and other surface parameters. The participants were asked to provide hourly time series of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, etc., at various vertical heights for a complete year. The methodology used to derive the time series was left to the choice of the participants, but they were asked for a brief description of their model and many other parameters (e.g., horizontal and

  8. Rotary triboelectric nanogenerator based on a hybridized mechanism for harvesting wind energy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yannan; Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Jing, Qingshen; Lin, Zong-Hong; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Zhengyun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-08-27

    Harvesting mechanical energy is becoming increasingly important for its availability and abundance in our living environment. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a simple, cost-effective, and highly efficient approach for generating electricity from mechanical energies in a wide range of forms. Here, we developed a TENG designed for harvesting tiny-scale wind energy available in our normal living environment using conventional materials. The energy harvester is based on a rotary driven mechanical deformation of multiple plate-based TENGs. The operation mechanism is a hybridization of the contact-sliding-separation-contact processes by using the triboelectrification and electrostatic induction effects. With the introduction of polymer nanowires on surfaces, the rotary TENG delivers an open-circuit voltage of 250 V and a short-circuit current of 0.25 mA, corresponding to a maximum power density of ~39 W/m(2) at a wind speed of ~15 m/s, which is capable of directly driving hundreds of electronic devices such as commercial light-emitting diodes (LEDs), or rapidly charging capacitors. The rotary TENG was also applied as a self-powered sensor for measuring wind speed. This work represents a significant progress in the practical application of the TENG and its great potential in the future wind power technology. This technology can also be extended for harvesting energy from ocean current, making nanotechnology reaching our daily life a possibility in the near future. PMID:23768179

  9. Systems Engineering Applications to Wind Energy Research, Design, and Development (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Ning, A.; Scott, G.; Sirnivas, S.; Veers, P.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few decades, wind energy has evolved into a large international industry involving major players in the manufacturing, construction, and utility sectors. Coinciding with the industry's growth, significant innovation in the technology has resulted in larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and more complex designs in all subsystems. However, as the deployment of the technology grows, and its role within the electricity sector becomes more prominent, so has the expectations of the technology in terms of performance, reliability, and cost. The industry currently partitions its efforts into separate paths for turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated to meet a diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs between them. To address these challenges, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has embarked on the Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) initiative to use methods of systems engineering in the research, design, and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field that has a long history of application to complex technical systems. The work completed to date represents a first step in understanding this potential. It reviews systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems and illustrates how these methods can be combined in a WESE framework to meet the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry.

  10. Spatial structure of low-frequency wind noise.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D Keith; Greenfield, Roy J; White, Michael J

    2007-12-01

    The distinguishing spatial properties of low-frequency microphone wind noise (turbulent pressure disturbances) are examined with a planar, 49-element array. Individual, propagating transient pressure disturbances are imaged by wavelet processing to the array data. Within a given frequency range, the wind disturbances are much smaller and less spatially coherent than sound waves. Conventional array processing techniques are particularly sensitive to wind noise when sensor separations are small compared to the acoustic wavelengths of interest. PMID:18247645

  11. Blowdown Wind Tunnels: Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, operation, and performance of blowdown wind tunnels. The use of compressed gas, mechanical piston, or combustion exhaust to provide continuous or short-duration operation from transonic to hypersonic approach velocities is discussed. Also covered are invasive and non-invasive aerothermodynamic instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction techniques, and test reports on aerospace components. Comprehensive coverage of wind tunnel force balancing systems and supersonic wind tunnels are covered in separate bibliographies.

  12. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-01-01

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  13. Wind power. [electricity generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savino, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical background on windmill use, the nature of wind, wind conversion system technology and requirements, the economics of wind power and comparisons with alternative systems, data needs, technology development needs, and an implementation plan for wind energy are presented. Considerable progress took place during the 1950's. Most of the modern windmills feature a wind turbine electricity generator located directly at the top of their rotor towers.

  14. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  15. Diode laser lidar wind velocity sensor using a liquid-crystal retarder for non-mechanical beam-steering.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Iversen, Theis F Q; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-11-01

    We extend the functionality of a low-cost CW diode laser coherent lidar from radial wind speed (scalar) sensing to wind velocity (vector) measurements. Both speed and horizontal direction of the wind at ~80 m remote distance are derived from two successive radial speed estimates by alternately steering the lidar probe beam in two different lines-of-sight (LOS) with a 60° angular separation. Dual-LOS beam-steering is implemented optically with no moving parts by means of a controllable liquid-crystal retarder (LCR). The LCR switches the polarization between two orthogonal linear states of the lidar beam so it either transmits through or reflects off a polarization splitter. The room-temperature switching time between the two LOS is measured to be in the order of 100 μs in one switch direction but 16 ms in the opposite transition. Radial wind speed measurement (at 33 Hz rate) while the lidar beam is repeatedly steered from one LOS to the other every half a second is experimentally demonstrated - resulting in 1 Hz rate estimates of wind velocity magnitude and direction at better than 0.1 m/s and 1° resolution, respectively. PMID:25401817

  16. An Icelandic wind atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  17. Optically broadcasting wind direction indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zysko, Jan A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An optically broadcasting wind direction indicator generates flashes of light which are separated by a time interval that is directly proportional to the angle of the wind direction relative to a fixed direction, such as north. An angle/voltage transducer generates a voltage that is proportional to the wind direction relative to the fixed direction, and this voltage is employed by timing circuitry or a microprocessor that generates pulses for actuating a light source trigger circuit first at the start of the time interval, and then at the end of the time interval. To aid an observer in distinguishing between the beginning and end of the interval, two stop flashes can be provided in quick succession. The time scale is preferably chosen so that each second of the time interval corresponds to 30 deg of direction relative to north. In this manner, an observer can easily correlate the measured time interval to the wind direction by visualizing the numbers on a conventional clock face, each of which correspond to one second of time and 30 deg of angle.

  18. Optically broadcasting wind direction indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zysko, Jan A.

    1994-10-01

    An optically broadcasting wind direction indicator generates flashes of light which are separated by a time interval that is directly proportional to the angle of the wind direction relative to a fixed direction, such as north. An angle/voltage transducer generates a voltage that is proportional to the wind direction relative to the fixed direction, and this voltage is employed by timing circuitry or a microprocessor that generates pulses for actuating a light source trigger circuit first at the start of the time interval, and then at the end of the time interval. To aid an observer in distinguishing between the beginning and end of the interval, two stop flashes can be provided in quick succession. The time scale is preferably chosen so that each second of the time interval corresponds to 30 deg of direction relative to north. In this manner, an observer can easily correlate the measured time interval to the wind direction by visualizing the numbers on a conventional clock face, each of which correspond to one second of time and 30 deg of angle.

  19. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  20. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, R G

    1995-01-01

    Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

  1. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0–100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa‑1 for the best devices.

  2. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures

  3. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boezaart, Arnold; Edmonson, James; Standridge, Charles; Pervez, Nahid; Desai, Neel; Williams, Bruce; Clark, Aaron; Zeitler, David; Kendall, Scott; Biddanda, Bopi; Steinman, Alan; Klatt, Brian; Gehring, J. L.; Walter, K.; Nordman, Erik E.

    2014-06-30

    recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional anemometer cup technology. • During storms, mean Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) increases with height above water; • Sufficient wind resources exist over Lake Michigan to generate 7,684 kWh of power using a 850 kW rated turbine at elevations between 90 - 125 meters, a height lower than originally anticipated for optimum power generation; • Based on initial assessments, wind characteristics are not significantly different at distant (thirty-two mile) offshore locations as compared to near-shore (six mile) locations; • Significant cost savings can be achieved in generation wind energy at lower turbine heights and locating closer to shore. • Siting must be sufficiently distant from shore to minimize visual impact and to address public sentiment about offshore wind development; • Project results show that birds and bats do frequent the middle of Lake Michigan, bats more so than birds; • Based on the wind resource assessment and depths of Lake Michigan encountered during the project, future turbine placement will most likely need to incorporate floating or anchored technology; • The most appropriate siting of offshore wind energy locations will enable direct routing of transmission cables to existing generating and transmission facilities located along the Michigan shoreline; • Wind turbine noise propagation from a wind energy generating facility at a five mile offshore location will not be audible at the shoreline over normal background sound levels.

  4. Baseload, industrial-scale wind power: An alternative to coal in China

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.J.; Williams, R.H.; Xie Shaoxiong; Zhang Shihui

    1996-12-31

    This report presents a novel strategy for developing wind power on an industrial-scale in China. Oversized wind farms, large-scale electrical storage and long-distance transmission lines are integrated to deliver {open_quotes}baseload wind power{close_quotes} to distant electricity demand centers. The prospective costs for this approach to developing wind power are illustrated by modeling an oversized wind farm at Huitengxile, Inner Mongolia. Although storage adds to the total capital investment, it does not necessarily increase the cost of the delivered electricity. Storage makes it possible to increase the capacity factor of the electric transmission system, so that the unit cost for long-distance transmission is reduced. Moreover, baseload wind power is typically more valuable to the electric utility than intermittent wind power, so that storage can be economically attractive even in instances where the cost per kWh is somewhat higher than without storage. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A A ... both of you get through it. How Separation Anxiety Develops Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. ...

  6. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  7. Choosing wind power plant locations and sizes based on electric reliability measures using multiple-year wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.R.; Artig, R.

    1999-07-08

    To project the US potential to meet future electricity demands with wind energy, estimates of available wind resource and costs to access that resource are critical. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) annually estimates the US market penetration of wind in its Annual Energy Outlook series. For these estimates, the EIA uses wind resource data developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for each region of the country. However, the EIA multiplies the cost of windpower by several factors, some as large as 3, to account for resource quality, market factors associated with accessing the resource, electric grid impacts, and rapid growth in the wind industry. This paper examines the rationale behind these additional costs and suggests alternatives.

  8. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  9. Wind speed forecasting for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    With more wind energy being integrated into our grid systems, forecasting wind energy has become a necessity for all market participants. Recognizing the market demands, a physical approach to site-specific hub-height wind speed forecasting system has been developed. This system is driven by the outputs from the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model. A simple interpolation approach benchmarks the forecasting accuracy inherited from GEM. Local, site specific winds are affected on a local scale by a variety of factors including representation of the land surface and local boundary-layer process over heterogeneous terrain which have been a continuing challenge in NWP models like GEM with typical horizontal resolution of order 15-km. In order to resolve these small scale effects, a wind energy industry standard model, WAsP, is coupled with GEM to improve the forecast. Coupling the WAsP model with GEM improves the overall forecasts, but remains unsatisfactory for forecasting winds with abrupt surface condition changes. Subsequently in this study, a new coupler that uses a 2-D RANS model of boundary-layer flow over surface condition changes with improved physics has been developed to further improve the forecasts when winds coming from a water surface to land experience abrupt changes in surface conditions. It has been demonstrated that using vertically averaged wind speeds to represent geostrophic winds for input into the micro-scale models could reduce forecast errors. The hub-height wind speed forecasts could be further improved using a linear MOS approach. The forecasting system has been evaluated, using a wind energy standard evaluation matrix, against data from an 80-m mast located near the north shore of Lake Erie. Coupling with GEM-LAM and a power conversion model using a theoretical power curve have also been investigated. For hub-height wind speeds GEM appears to perform better with a 15-Ian grid than the high resolution GEM-2.5Ian version at the

  10. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-07-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

  11. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and

  12. Could crop height affect the wind resource at agriculturally productive wind farm sites?

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2015-11-07

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length in a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. As a result, these considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.

  13. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  14. Could Crop Height Affect the Wind Resource at Agriculturally Productive Wind Farm Sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderwende, Brian; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2016-03-01

    The collocation of cropland and wind turbines in the US Midwest region introduces complex meteorological interactions that could influence both agriculture and wind-power production. Crop management practices may affect the wind resource through alterations of land-surface properties. We use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the impact of crop height variations on the wind resource in the presence of a large turbine array. A hypothetical wind farm consisting of 121 1.8-MW turbines is represented using the WRF model wind-farm parametrization. We represent the impact of selecting soybeans rather than maize by altering the aerodynamic roughness length in a region approximately 65 times larger than that occupied by the turbine array. Roughness lengths of 0.1 and 0.25 m represent the mature soy crop and a mature maize crop, respectively. In all but the most stable atmospheric conditions, statistically significant hub-height wind-speed increases and rotor-layer wind-shear reductions result from switching from maize to soybeans. Based on simulations for the entire month of August 2013, wind-farm energy output increases by 14 %, which would yield a significant monetary gain. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal size, shape, and crop height of the roughness modification to maximize the economic benefit and minimize the cost of such crop-management practices. These considerations must be balanced by other influences on crop choice such as soil requirements and commodity prices.

  15. Troubleshooting Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L.

    Seventy-six million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States alone. Medical and lost productivity costs of the most common pathogens are estimated to be 5.6-9.4 billion. Product recalls, whether from foodborne illness or spoilage, result in added costs to manufacturers in a variety of ways. These may include expenses associated with lawsuits from real or allegedly stricken individuals and lawsuits from shorted customers. Other costs include those associated with efforts involved in finding the source of the contamination and eliminating it and include time when lines are shut down and therefore non-productive, additional non-routine testing, consultant fees, time and personnel required to overhaul the entire food safety system, lost market share to competitors, and the cost associated with redesign of the factory and redesign or acquisition of more hygienic equipment. The cost associated with an effective quality assurance plan is well worth the effort to prevent the situations described.

  16. Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Genesis Partners LP

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

  17. Long-Term Modeling of Wind Energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Wise, Marshall A.; Lurz, Joshua P.; Barrie, Daniel

    2007-09-30

    An improved representation of wind energy has been developed for the ObjECTS MiniCAM integrated assessment modeling framework. The first version of this wind model was used for the CCTP scenarios, where wind accounts for between 9% and 17% of U.S. electricity generation by 2095. Climate forcing stabilization policies tend to increase projected deployment. Accelerated technological development in wind electric generation can both increase output and reduce the costs of wind energy. In all scenarios, wind generation is constrained by its costs relative to alternate electricity sources, particularly as less favorable wind farm sites are utilized. These first scenarios were based on exogenous resource estimates that do not allow evaluation of resource availability assumptions. A more detailed representation of wind energy is under development that uses spatially explicit resource information and explicit wind turbine technology characteristics.

  18. Wind tunnel flow generation section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, N. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A flow generation section for a wind tunnel test facility is described which provides a uniform flow for the wind tunnel test section over a range of different flow velocities. The throat of the flow generation section includes a pair of opposed boundary walls which are porous to the flowing medium in order to provide an increase of velocity by expansion. A plenum chamber is associated with the exterior side of each of such porous walls to separate the same from ambient pressure. A suction manifold is connected by suction lines with each one of the chambers. Valves are positioned in each of the lines to enable the suction manifold to be independently varied.

  19. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts

  20. Rapid actinide-separation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    1997-12-31

    New high-speed actinide-separation methods have been developed by the Savannah River Site Central Laboratory that can be applied to nuclear materials process samples, waste solutions and environmental samples. As part of a reengineering effort to improve efficiencies and reduce operating costs, solvent extraction methods (TTA, Hexone, TBP and TIOA) used for over thirty years in the SRS Central Laboratory were replaced with new rapid extraction column methods able to handle a variety of difficult sample matrices and actinide levels. Significant costs savings were realized and costly mixed-waste controls were avoided by using applied vacuum and 50-100 micron particle-size resins from Eichrom Industries. TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, UTEVA Resin{reg_sign}, and TRU Resin{reg_sign} columns are used with flow rates of approximately two to three milliliters per minute to minimize sample turnaround times. Single-column, dual-column and sequential-cartridge methods for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium were developed that enable rapid, cost-effective separations prior to alpha-particle counting, thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and laser phosphorescence measurements.

  1. Development of a wind converter and investigation of its operational function. Part 1: Technical description of the wind energy converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molly, J. P.; Steinheber, R.

    1982-11-01

    A 10 kW wind energy converter was developed by using as far possible standard serial production parts. The design criteria and the description of the essential machinery components of the MODA 10 wind energy converter are discussed. For some special load cases the safety calculation of the important components is shown. The blade control system which qualified for small wind energy converters, is explained. Weight and cost of the MODA 10 are considered.

  2. Wind energy developments in the 20th century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargo, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Wind turbine systems for generating electrical power have been tested in many countries. Representative examples of turbines which have produced from 100 to 1250 kW are described. The advantages of wind energy consist of its being a nondepleting, nonpolluting, and free fuel source. Its disadvantages relate to the variability of wind and the high installation cost per kilowatt of capacity of wind turbines when compared to other methods of electric-power generation. High fuel costs and potential resource scarcity have led to a five-year joint NASA-NSF program to study wind energy. The program will study wind energy conversion and storage systems with respect to cost effectiveness, and will attempt to estimate national wind-energy potential and develop techniques for generator site selection. The studies concern a small-systems (50-250 kW) project, a megawatt-systems (500-3000 kW) project, supporting research and technology, and energy storage. Preliminary economic analyses indicate that wind-energy conversion can be competitive in high-average-wind areas.

  3. Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

  4. Exploring wind energy potential off the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingfang; Doyle, James D.; Haack, Tracy; Dvorak, Michael J.; Archer, Cristina L.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2008-10-01

    Wind energy represents the nearest term cost-effective renewable energy source. While efforts have been made to assess wind energy potential over land around the world, offshore wind energy resources are largely unexplored, in part because these regions have relatively sparse wind observations. In this study, the wind energy potential offshore of the California coast is evaluated using a well-tested high-resolution numerical model dataset. We found that along the coastline, the low-level winds exhibit strong spatial variation and are characterized by alternating windspeed maxima and minima near coastal promontories associated with the interaction between the marine boundary layer and coastal topography. Further analysis highlights the enormous and reliable wind energy development potential in these persistent offshore windspeed maxima.

  5. 2014-2015 Offshore Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Aaron

    2015-11-18

    This presentation provides an overview of progress toward offshore wind cost reduction in Europe and implications for the U.S. market. The presentation covers an overview of offshore wind developments, economic and performance trends, empirical evidence of LCOE reduction, and challenges and opportunities in the U.S. market.

  6. Passive cyclic pitch control for horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottrell, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible rotor concept, called the balanced pitch rotor, is described. The system provides passive adjustment of cyclic pitch in response to unbalanced pitching moments across the rotor disk. Various applications are described and performance predictions are made for wind shear and cross wind operating conditions. Comparisons with the teetered hub are made and significant cost savings are predicted.

  7. Methods of attenuating wind turbine ac generator output variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1978-01-01

    Wind speed variation, tower blockage and structural and inertial factors produce unsteady torque in wind turbines. Methods for modifying the turbine torque so that steady torque is delivered to the coupled ac generator are discussed. The method that may evolve will be influenced by the power use that develops and the trade-offs of cost, weight and complexity.

  8. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  9. Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  10. Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, Charles

    2010-09-29

    This report describes a specific type of wind washing where wind can push attic air into the floor cavity between first and second stories of the home through ineffective air barriers separating attic space from the floor cavity.

  11. A novel hybrid (wind-photovoltaic) system sizing procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Hocaoglu, Fatih O.; Gerek, Oemer N.; Kurban, Mehmet

    2009-11-15

    Wind-photovoltaic hybrid system (WPHS) utilization is becoming popular due to increasing energy costs and decreasing prices of turbines and photovoltaic (PV) panels. However, prior to construction of a renewable generation station, it is necessary to determine the optimum number of PV panels and wind turbines for minimal cost during continuity of generated energy to meet the desired consumption. In fact, the traditional sizing procedures find optimum number of the PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost. However, the optimum battery capacity is either not taken into account, or it is found by a full search between all probable solution spaces which requires extensive computation. In this study, a novel description of the production/consumption phenomenon is proposed, and a new sizing procedure is developed. Using this procedure, optimum battery capacity, together with optimum number of PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost can be obtained with good accuracy. (author)

  12. Wind ripple analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akins, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Efficient and economical utilization of wind power will require the ability to measure and ultimately predict the effects fluctuations in the incident wind will have on a wind turbine. In order to quantitatively assess these effects, experimental techniques have been developed which allow analysis of full-scale performance of wind turbines with particular emphasis on the effects caused by turbulence in the incident wind. Examples of these techniques are presented using data from the DOE/Sandia Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) program.

  13. Wind ripple analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akins, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Efficient and economical utilization of wind power will require the ability to measure and ultimately predict the effects fluctuations in the incident wind will have on a wind turbine. In order to quantitatively assesss these effects, experimental techniques have been developed which allow analysis of full-scale performance of wind turbines with particular emphasis on the effects caused by turbulence in the incident wind. Examples of these techniques are presented using data from the DOE/Sandia Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) program.

  14. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  15. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  16. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  17. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  18. Mixer-Ejector Wind Turbine: Breakthrough High Efficiency Shrouded Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-22

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FloDesign Wind Turbine’s innovative wind turbine, inspired by the design of jet engines, could deliver 300% more power than existing wind turbines of the same rotor diameter by extracting more energy over a larger area. FloDesign Wind Turbine’s unique shrouded design expands the wind capture area, and the mixing vortex downstream allows more energy to flow through the rotor without stalling the turbine. The unique rotor and shrouded design also provide significant opportunity for mass production and simplified assembly, enabling mid-scale turbines (approximately 100 kW) to produce power at a cost that is comparable to larger-scale conventional turbines.

  19. Wind selectivity and partial compensation for wind drift among nocturnally migrating passerines

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.

    2012-01-01

    A migrating bird’s response to wind can impact its timing, energy expenditure, and path taken. The extent to which nocturnal migrants select departure nights based on wind (wind selectivity) and compensate for wind drift remains unclear. In this paper, we determine the effect of wind selectivity and partial drift compensation on the probability of successfully arriving at a destination area and on overall migration speed. To do so, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) to simulate full drift and partial compensation migration of juvenile Willow Warblers (Phylloscopus trochilus) along the southwesterly (SW) European migration corridor to the Iberian coast. Various degrees of wind selectivity were tested according to how large a drift angle and transport cost (mechanical energy per unit distance) individuals were willing to tolerate on departure after dusk. In order to assess model results, we used radar measurements of nocturnal migration to estimate the wind selectivity and proportional drift among passerines flying in SW directions. Migration speeds in the IBM were highest for partial compensation populations tolerating at least 25% extra transport cost compared to windless conditions, which allowed more frequent departure opportunities. Drift tolerance affected migration speeds only weakly, whereas arrival probabilities were highest with drift tolerances below 20°. The radar measurements were indicative of low drift tolerance, 25% extra transport cost tolerance and partial compensation. We conclude that along migration corridors with generally nonsupportive winds, juvenile passerines should not strictly select supportive winds but partially compensate for drift to increase their chances for timely and accurate arrival. PMID:22936843

  20. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Energy Finance (WEF), a free online cost of energy calculator developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects. The brochure lists the features of the tool, the inputs and outputs that a user can expect, visuals of the screens and a Cash Flow Results table, and contact information.