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Sample records for cotton fibers evidence

  1. Cotton fiber tips have diverse morphologies and show evidence of apical cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Michael R; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers arise through highly anisotropic expansion of a single seed epidermal cell. We obtained evidence that apical cell wall synthesis occurs through examining the tips of young elongating Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) and G. barbadense (Gb) fibers. We characterized two tip types in Gh fiber (hemisphere and tapered), each with distinct apical diameter, central vacuole location, and distribution of cell wall components. The apex of Gh hemisphere tips was enriched in homogalacturonan epitopes, including a relatively high methyl-esterified form associated with cell wall pliability. Other wall components increased behind the apex including cellulose and the α-Fuc-(1,2)-β-Gal epitope predominantly found in xyloglucan. Gb fibers had only one narrow tip type featuring characters found in each Gh tip type. Pulse-labeling of cell wall glucans indicated wall synthesis at the apex of both Gh tip types and in distal zones. Living Gh hemisphere and Gb tips ruptured preferentially at the apex upon treatment with wall degrading enzymes, consistent with newly synthesized wall at the apex. Gh tapered tips ruptured either at the apex or distantly. Overall, the results reveal diverse cotton fiber tip morphologies and support primary wall synthesis occurring at the apex and discrete distal regions of the tip. PMID:27301434

  2. Cotton fiber tips have diverse morphologies and show evidence of apical cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stiff , Michael R.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers arise through highly anisotropic expansion of a single seed epidermal cell. We obtained evidence that apical cell wall synthesis occurs through examining the tips of young elongating Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) and G. barbadense (Gb) fibers. We characterized two tip types in Gh fiber (hemisphere and tapered), each with distinct apical diameter, central vacuole location, and distribution of cell wall components. The apex of Gh hemisphere tips was enriched in homogalacturonan epitopes, including a relatively high methyl-esterified form associated with cell wall pliability. Other wall components increased behind the apex including cellulose and the α-Fuc-(1,2)-β-Gal epitope predominantly found in xyloglucan. Gb fibers had only one narrow tip type featuring characters found in each Gh tip type. Pulse-labeling of cell wall glucans indicated wall synthesis at the apex of both Gh tip types and in distal zones. Living Gh hemisphere and Gb tips ruptured preferentially at the apex upon treatment with wall degrading enzymes, consistent with newly synthesized wall at the apex. Gh tapered tips ruptured either at the apex or distantly. Overall, the results reveal diverse cotton fiber tip morphologies and support primary wall synthesis occurring at the apex and discrete distal regions of the tip. PMID:27301434

  3. Ultrastructural and Chemical Evidence That the Cell Wall of Green Cotton Fiber Is Suberized 1

    PubMed Central

    Yatsu, L. Y.; Espelie, Karl E.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Green cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers were shown by electron microscopy to have numerous thin concentric rings around the lumen of the cell. These rings possessed a lamellar fine structure characteristic of suberin. LiA1D4 depolymerization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed the presence of a suberin polymer in the green cotton with the major aliphatic monomers being ω-hydroxydocosanoic acid (70%) and docosanedoic acid (25%). Ordinary white cotton was shown by chemical and ultrastructural examination to be encircled by a thin cuticular polymer containing less than 0.5% of the aliphatic components found in green cotton. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663251

  4. COTTON FIBER CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual cotton production exceeds 25 million metric tons and accounts for more than 40 percent of the textile fiber consumed worldwide. A key textile fiber for over 5000 years, this complex carbohydrate is also one of the leading crops to benefit from genetic engineering. Cotton Fiber Chemistry and...

  5. PHOTOBIOLOGY IMPACT ON COTTON FIBER LENGTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are single elongated cells that extend from the seed coat during development, and fiber length is important to textile quality. It was hypothesized that elongating cotton fibers would be as responsive to far-red light (FR) as elongating cells in seedling hypocot...

  6. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  7. Estimation of ovular fiber production in cotton

    SciTech Connect

    Van`t Hof, J.

    1998-09-01

    The present invention is a method for rendering cotton fiber cells that are post-anthesis and pre-harvest available for analysis of their physical properties. The method includes the steps of hydrolyzing cotton fiber cells and separating cotton fiber cells from cotton ovules thereby rendering the cells available for analysis. The analysis of the fiber cells is through any suitable means, e.g., visual inspection. Visual inspection of the cells can be accomplished by placing the cells under an instrument for detection, such as microscope or other means. 4 figs.

  8. Estimation of ovular fiber production in cotton

    DOEpatents

    Van't Hof, Jack

    1998-09-01

    The present invention is a method for rendering cotton fiber cells that are post-anthesis and pre-harvest available for analysis of their physical properties. The method includes the steps of hydrolyzing cotton fiber cells and separating cotton fiber cells from cotton ovules thereby rendering the cells available for analysis. The analysis of the fiber cells is through any suitable means, e.g., visual inspection. Visual inspection of the cells can be accomplished by placing the cells under an instrument for detection, such as microscope or other means.

  9. Fiber sample presentation system for spectrophotometer cotton fiber color measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) is used to class U.S. cotton for fiber color, yielding the industry accepted, cotton-specific color parameters Rd and +b. The HVI examines a 9 square inch fiber sample, and it is also used to test large AMS standard cotton “biscuits” or rectangles. Much inte...

  10. IMPROVED SPECTROPHOTOMETER FIBER SAMPLING SYSTEM FOR COTTON FIBER COLOR MEASUREMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton in the U.S. is classified for color using the Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI), and the parameters Rd and +b are used to designate color grades for cotton fiber. However, Rd and +b are cotton-specific color parameters, and the need existed to demonstrate the relationships of Rd and +b to...

  11. A Statistical Analysis of Cotton Fiber Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Anindya; Das, Subhasis; Majumder, Asha

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports a statistical analysis of different cotton fiber properties, such as strength, breaking elongation, upper half mean length, length uniformity index, short fiber index, micronaire, reflectance and yellowness measured from 1200 cotton bales. The uni-variate, bi-variate and multi-variate statistical analysis have been invoked to elicit interrelationship between above-mentioned properties taking them up singularly, pairwise and multiple way, respectively. In multi-variate analysis all cotton fiber properties are simultaneously considered for multi-dimensional techniques of principal factor analysis.

  12. Fiber quality challenges facing the cotton industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton industry is in the midst of an exciting time with increased domestic consumption, but also facing pressure from other crops and the global marketplace. In order to ensure the US cotton crop remains the fiber of choice for the world it is important to keep an eye on the challenges to fibe...

  13. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  14. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  15. The Impact of Drought on Cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum) Fiber Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate moisture during the growing season has been shown to reduce cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) lint yields. Little is known, however, as to how in-season growing conditions alter cotton fiber quality. Here, we show the impact of irrigation on cotton fiber quality. Cotton was grown in large repli...

  16. Natural cotton and flax fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The origins of cotton (Gossypium barbadense L. or Gossypium hirsutum L.) and flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) are somewhat of a mystery. Cotton currently maintains a 65 % share of the consumer textile market while flax maintains about 2-3 %. Cellulose is a major component in these crops ranging from ...

  17. Molecular development of the mid-stage elongating cotton fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is one of the leading natural textile fibers and is the leading value added crop in the USA. The annual business revenue from the cotton industry exceeds $120 billion. The growth of the cotton fiber is divided into four unique, yet overlapping stages; initiation, elongation, secondary w...

  18. Coloration of cotton fibers using nano chitosan.

    PubMed

    Wijesena, Ruchira N; Tissera, Nadeeka D; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2015-12-10

    A method of coloration of cotton fabrics with nano chitosan is proposed. Nano chitosan were prepared using crab shell chitin nanofibers through alkaline deacetylation process. Average nano fiber diameters of nano chitosan were 18 nm to 35 nm and the lengths were in the range of 0.2-1.3 μm according to the atomic force microscope study. The degree of deacetylation of the material was found to be 97.3%. The prepared nano chitosan dyed using acid blue 25 (2-anthraquinonesulfonic acid) and used as the coloration agent for cotton fibers. Simple wet immersion method was used to color the cotton fabrics by nano chitosan dispersion followed by acid vapor treatment. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope study of the treated cotton fiber revealed that the nano chitosan were consistently deposited on the cotton fiber surface and transformed in to a thin polymer layer upon the acid vapor treatment. The color strength of the dyed fabrics could be changed by changing the concentration of dyed nano chitosan dispersion. PMID:26428115

  19. Application of near infrared spectroscopy in cotton fiber micronaire measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term “micronaire” describes an important cotton fiber property by characterizing the fiber maturity and fineness. In practice, micronaire is regularly measured in laboratories with well established high volume instrumentation (HVITM) protocol. Most often, cotton breeders/geneticists sent cotton ...

  20. Fiber properties of saw and roller ginned naturally colored cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally colored cottons have economic and environmental appeal because they do not require dyeing. Naturally colored cottons do not have the same fiber length and strength as white cotton cultivars. To determine the optimal ginning process for colored fiber two Upland (G. hirsutim) colors were r...

  1. Fiber and yarn properties improve with new cotton variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottons containing two different parents (FM832 and MD51neOK) and their progeny were selected to cover a cotton breeding succession and to determine breeding influences on fiber results. The objective of this study was to evaluate fibers produced by cotton parents and their progeny using results ge...

  2. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  3. Regulation of auxin on secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules. Mature fibers exhibit thickened secondary walls composed of nearly pure cellulose. Cotton fiber development is divided into four overlapping phases, 1) initiation sta...

  4. Genomic landscape of fiber genes in fibered and non-fibered cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is the largest single cell in the plant kingdom. It is the best model to study cell function, differentiation, maturation, and cell death. Cotton fiber transcriptome can be clustered into two types of regions: conservative areas and recombination hotspots. This study was to investig...

  5. Glycoproteome of Elongating Cotton Fiber Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravanan; Kumar, Krishan; Pandey, Pankaj; Rajamani, Vijayalakshmi; Padmalatha, Kethireddy Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Reddy, Vanga Siva

    2013-01-01

    Cotton ovule epidermal cell differentiation into long fibers primarily depends on wall-oriented processes such as loosening, elongation, remodeling, and maturation. Such processes are governed by cell wall bound structural proteins and interacting carbohydrate active enzymes. Glycosylation plays a major role in the structural, functional, and localization aspects of the cell wall and extracellular destined proteins. Elucidating the glycoproteome of fiber cells would reflect its wall composition as well as compartmental requirement, which must be system specific. Following complementary proteomic approaches, we have identified 334 unique proteins comprising structural and regulatory families. Glycopeptide-based enrichment followed by deglycosylation with PNGase F and A revealed 92 unique peptides containing 106 formerly N-linked glycosylated sites from 67 unique proteins. Our results showed that structural proteins like arabinogalactans and carbohydrate active enzymes were relatively more abundant and showed stage- and isoform-specific expression patterns in the differentiating fiber cell. Furthermore, our data also revealed the presence of heterogeneous and novel forms of structural and regulatory glycoproteins. Comparative analysis with other plant glycoproteomes highlighted the unique composition of the fiber glycoproteome. The present study provides the first insight into the identity, abundance, diversity, and composition of the glycoproteome within single celled cotton fibers. The elucidated composition also indirectly provides clues about unicellular compartmental requirements underlying single cell differentiation. PMID:24019148

  6. COMMERCIAL COTTON VARIETY SPINNING STUDY DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND DISTRIBUTIONS OF COTTON FIBER AND YARN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) of the USDA-ARS, located in Clemson, SC has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. The five year study, began in 2001, utilized commercial variety cotton grown, harvested and ginned in ...

  7. Commercial cotton variety spinning study descriptive statistics and distributions of cotton fiber and yarn.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) of the USDA-ARS, located in Clemson, SC, has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. The five year study, began in 2001, utilized commercial variety cotton grown, harvested and ginned in e...

  8. Improving NIR model for the prediction of cotton fiber strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber strength is an important quality characteristic that is directly related to the manufacturing of quality consumer goods. Currently, two types of instruments have been implemented to assess cotton fiber strength, namely, the automation oriented high volume instrument (HVI) and the labora...

  9. Properties study of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guozhong; Yu Yanzhen; Zhao Zhongjian; Li Jianquan; Li Changchun

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript addresses treating cotton stalk fiber surface with styrene acrylic emulsion, which improves the interfacial combined state of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite effectively and improves its mechanical properties notably. Mixes less slag, ordinary Portland cement, etc., to modify gypsum base. The electron microscope was utilized to analyze and research on the effect on composite properties of the abovementioned mixtures.

  10. Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning machinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning equipment in cotton gins occurs, but the quantity of material lost, factors affecting fiber and seed loss, and the mechanisms that cause material loss are not well understood. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different factors on...

  11. DISTRIBUTION OF FIBER ELONGATION GENES IN THE UPLAND COTTON GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on cotton fiber transcriptome EST analysis, at least 36,000 genes are needed to produce a fiber. To understand where these genes are located in chromosomes and how they interact is crucial for improving fiber yield and quality. Our goals were to put all the fiber ESTs into integrated genetic...

  12. Phytohormone regulation of cotton fiber development in vitro.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our team is interested in the regulation of two time points in cotton fiber development: initiation of fiber growth from ovule epidermal cells and the transition from fiber elongation to secondary wall biogenesis. These two developmental phases determine key properties of fiber quality and yield. C...

  13. Molecular landscape of cotton fiber in early elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are the dominant source of natural fibers used in the textile industry and contribute significantly to the world economy. Adverse environmental conditions negatively affect fiber characteristics, especially when the fibers are in the elongation phase of development. Improvement in the...

  14. Effect of Mechanical Actions on Cotton Fiber Quality and Foreign-Matter Particle Attachment to Cotton Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of various machine-fiber interactions during harvesting and ginning on fiber quality and attachment between foreign-matter particles and fibers were studied to develop new and less damaging methods for removing foreign-matter particles from cotton fiber. In total, the study involved 75 s...

  15. Predicting cotton stelometer fiber strength by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strength of cotton fibers is one of several important end-use characteristics. In routine programs, it has been mostly assessed by automation-oriented high volume instrument (HVI) system. An alternative method for cotton strength is near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Although previous NIR models ...

  16. Chemically induced mutation to improve fiber traits in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern Upland Cotton has a narrow germplasm base that often limits the success of breeding programs. Chemically induced mutations can be used to develop improved mutant populations and individual mutants with improved fiber traits that can be exploited by cotton breeders. About 5,000 seeds of the ge...

  17. Fiber properties of saw and roller ginned naturally colored cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally colored cottons have economic and environmental appeal because they do not require dyeing, but their fibers are not as long as white cottons. To determine the best ginning process two Upland (/G. hirsutim/) colors were roller and saw ginned following a complete block experimental design. ...

  18. Attachment Mechanisms Between Cotton Fibers and Foreign-matter Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop a fundamental understanding of the requirements for removing foreign matter from bulk cotton fiber, a video microscope was used to collect images of foreign-matter particles in lint from smooth-leaf and hairy-leaf cottons. A method is given for categorizing the particles accordin...

  19. Comparison of two reference methods for detemining cotton fiber moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture is an important quality and processing property for the cotton industry. The standard reference method for determining the moisture content in cotton fiber is the ASTM oven method (gravimetric weight loss). Several concerns have expressed on its ability to measure the actual moisture cont...

  20. Spindle speed effects on cotton fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 to...

  1. Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is a woody, perennial, indeterminate plant with the C3 photosynthesis pathway, that is grown in warm and some temperate climates for fiber, but also for its seed from which oil and protein are important products. Of the four cultivated forms of cotton, the dominant species in production is Go...

  2. Evaluation of modern cotton harvest systems on irrigated cotton: Fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Picker and stripper harvest systems were evaluated on production-scale irrigated cotton on the High Plains of Texas over three harvest seasons. Observations on fiber quality using High Volume Instrument (HVI) and Advanced Fiber Information Systems (AFIS) were made on multiple cultivars harvested fro...

  3. 7 CFR 28.601 - Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.601 Official cotton...

  4. 7 CFR 28.601 - Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.601 Official cotton...

  5. 7 CFR 28.601 - Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.601 Official cotton...

  6. 7 CFR 28.601 - Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.601 Official cotton...

  7. 7 CFR 28.601 - Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official cotton standards for fiber fineness and... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Official Cotton Standards of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.601 Official cotton...

  8. Fiber properties of first and second sympodial position cotton bolls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the nature of fiber properties variation in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) canopies is critical for designing production systems that will provide more uniform fiber to textile mills. Our objective was to compare first branch node position bolls (FP1) and second branch node position bo...

  9. Assessment of recovered cotton fiber and trash contents in lint cotton waste by ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lint cleaning at cotton processing facilities is performed in order to reduce the non-lint materials to the smallest level with nminimal fiber damgae. The resultant waste contains some degree of cotton fiber having equal quality to the fiber in the bale, and hence is of great concern for operating ...

  10. 49 CFR 176.901 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Subpart O-Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, Polymeric Beads, and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.901 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin...

  11. 49 CFR 176.903 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Subpart O-Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, Polymeric Beads, and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.903 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with...

  12. 49 CFR 176.901 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, and Asbestos § 176.901 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch. (a) Unless...

  13. 49 CFR 176.903 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Subpart O-Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, Polymeric Beads, and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.903 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with...

  14. 49 CFR 176.901 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Subpart O-Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, Polymeric Beads, and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.901 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin...

  15. 49 CFR 176.901 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, and Asbestos § 176.901 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch. (a) Unless...

  16. 49 CFR 176.901 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles, and Asbestos § 176.901 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with rosin or pitch. (a) Unless...

  17. Infrared imaging of cotton fibers using a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrational spectroscopy studies can be used to examine the quality and structure of cotton fibers. An emerging area of research relates to the imaging of cotton fibers. Herein, we report the use of a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscope to image developing cotton fibers. Studies were perfor...

  18. 49 CFR 176.903 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal... § 176.903 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal. Cotton or vegetable fibers being transported on a vessel may not be stowed in the same hold with coal. They may be stowed in adjacent holds if...

  19. 49 CFR 176.903 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal... § 176.903 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal. Cotton or vegetable fibers being transported on a vessel may not be stowed in the same hold with coal. They may be stowed in adjacent holds if...

  20. 49 CFR 176.903 - Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal... § 176.903 Stowage of cotton or vegetable fibers with coal. Cotton or vegetable fibers being transported on a vessel may not be stowed in the same hold with coal. They may be stowed in adjacent holds if...

  1. Fiber moisture content measurements of lint and seed cotton by a small microwave instrument

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The timely and accurate measurement of cotton fiber moisture content is important, as deviations in moisture fiber content can impact the fiber quality and processing of cotton fiber. The Mesdan Aqualab is a small, modular, microwave-based fiber moisture measurement instrument for samples with mode...

  2. Soil Potassium Deficiency Reduces Cotton Fiber Strength by Accelerating and Shortening Fiber Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia-Shuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Meng, Yali; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Low potassium (K)-induced premature senescence in cotton has been observed worldwide, but how it affects cotton fiber properties remain unclear. We hypothesized that K deficiency affects cotton fiber properties by causing disordered fiber development, which may in turn be caused by the induction of a carbohydrate acquisition difficulty. To investigate this issue, we employed a low-K-sensitive cotton cultivar Siza 3 and a low-K-tolerant cultivar Simian 3 and planted them in three regions of different K supply. Data concerning lint yield, Pn and main fiber properties were collected from three years of testing. Soil K deficiency significantly accelerated fiber cellulose accumulation and dehydration processes, which, together with previous findings, suggests that the low-K induced carbohydrate acquisition difficulty could cause disordered fiber development by stimulating the expression of functional proteins such as CDKA (cyclin-dependent kinase). As a result, fiber strength and lint weight were reduced by up to 7.8% and 2.1%, respectively. Additional quantitative analysis revealed that the degree of accelerated fiber development negatively correlated with fiber strength. According to the results of this study, it is feasible to address the effects of soil K deficiency on fiber properties using existing cultivation strategies to prevent premature senescence of cotton plants. PMID:27350236

  3. Variability in cotton fiber yield, fiber quality, and soil properties in a southeastern coastal plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To maximize profitability, cotton (GossypiumhirsutumL.) producers must attempt to control the quality of the crop while maximizing yield. The objective of this research was to measure the intrinsic variability present in cotton fiber yield and quality. The 0.5-ha experimental site was located in a...

  4. De-esterified Pectins in the Cell Walls of Cotton Fiber: A Study of Fiber Mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the wild-type cotton (DP 5690), the cell walls of elongating cotton fibers are bilayered, with the outer layer enriched in de-esterified homogalacturonan (HGA), and an inner layer enriched in xyloglucans and cellulose. This bilayer is conspicuously absent in the cell walls of the ovule epidermal...

  5. UV/visible/near-infrared reflectance spectroscopic determination of cotton fiber and trash content in lint cotton waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lint cleaning at cotton processing facilities is performed in order to remove the non-lint materials with minimal fiber damage. The resultant waste contains some degree of cotton fiber having good equal qualities, and hence is of great concern for operating cost. Traditional methods for measuring no...

  6. Cotton Benzoquinone Reductase: Up-regulation During Early Cotton Fiber Developement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzoquinone reductase (BR; EC 1.6.5.7) is an enzyme that catalyzes the bivalent redox reactions of quinones without the production of free radical intermediates. Using 2-D PAGE comparisons, two proteins were found to be up-regulated in wild-type cotton ovules during the fiber initiation stage but ...

  7. Electrokinetic and hemostatic profiles of nonwoven cellulosic/ synthetic fiber blends with unbleached cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greige cotton contains waxes and pectin on the outer surface of the fiber that are removed from bleached cotton, but present added potential for wound dressing functionality. Innovations to mechanically clean and sterilize greige cotton (or non-bleached cotton) do not remove these exterior componen...

  8. Comprehensive investigation of NIR technique in cotton fiber quality assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared spectroscopy, with an extension to UV and visible region, has been considerably applied for the qualitative and quantitative measurements of key color and physical characteristics in cotton fibers. However, the results have been inconsistent, mostly due to the use of different spectral...

  9. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in developing cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in diverse physiological processes. Previously, we discovered superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in extracellular protein preparations from fiber-bearing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seeds. We sho...

  10. The R3-MYB Gene GhCPC Negatively Regulates Cotton Fiber Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bingliang; Zhu, Yichao; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) fibers are single-cell trichomes that arise from the outer epidermal layer of seed coat. Here, we isolated a R3-MYB gene GhCPC, identified by cDNA microarray analysis. The only conserved R3 motif and different expression between TM-1 and fuzzless-lintless mutants suggested that it might be a negative regulator in fiber development. Transgenic evidence showed that GhCPC overexpression not only delayed fiber initiation but also led to significant decreases in fiber length. Interestingly, Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed an interaction complex, in which GhCPC and GhTTG1/4 separately interacted with GhMYC1. In transgenic plants, Q-PCR analysis showed that GhHOX3 (GL2) and GhRDL1 were significantly down regulated in −1–5 DPA ovules and fibers. In addition, Yeast one-hybrid analysis demonstrated that GhMYC1 could bind to the E-box cis-elements and the promoter of GhHOX3. These results suggested that GhHOX3 (GL2) might be downstream gene of the regulatory complex. Also, overexpression of GhCPC in tobacco led to differential loss of pigmentation. Taken together, the results suggested that GhCPC might negatively regulate cotton fiber initiation and early elongation by a potential CPC-MYC1-TTG1/4 complex. Although the fibers were shorter in transgenic cotton lines than in the wild type, no significant difference was detected in stem or leaf trichomes, even in cotton mutants (five naked seed or fuzzless), suggesting that fiber and trichome development might be regulated by two sets of genes sharing a similar model. PMID:25646816

  11. Bridging classical and molecular genetics of cotton fiber quality and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is the single most important natural fiber in the world and represents a vital agricultural commodity in the global economy. Ninety percent of cotton’s value resides in the lint fiber. Cotton fiber quality, defined by the physical properties of the lint fibers, is an important part of the cot...

  12. Recent developments and applications of cotton genomic resources for fiber improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton farmers have experienced a plateau in fiber yield, fiber quality, and other agronomic traits since the late 20th century. Most commercial cotton cultivars lack genetic diversity, making them vulnerable to natural threats. To date, much of the genetic potential of cotton has not been exploit...

  13. 49 CFR 176.900 - Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Bales of cotton or vegetable fibers showing contact with oil or grease may not be accepted for... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles,...

  14. 49 CFR 176.900 - Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... may not be transported by vessel. (c) Bales of cotton or vegetable fibers showing contact with oil or... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Subpart O-Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor...

  15. 49 CFR 176.900 - Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Bales of cotton or vegetable fibers showing contact with oil or grease may not be accepted for... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles,...

  16. 49 CFR 176.900 - Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Bales of cotton or vegetable fibers showing contact with oil or grease may not be accepted for... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Cotton and Vegetable Fibers, Motor Vehicles,...

  17. Distribution and organization of gene-rich islands for fiber development in the cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is an extremely elongated cell derived from epidermal layer of cotton seed coat and it is an ideal model for studies of plant cell initiation/differentiation, cell elongation and cell wall biogenesis. Genetic improvement of cotton fiber yield and quality relies largely on the knowledge...

  18. Effect of Machine-Fiber Interaction on Cotton Fiber Quality and Foreign-Matter Particle Attachment to the Fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in fiber quality and attachment forces between foreign-matter particles and fibers were studied at multi stages from the time of harvest through lint cleaning to develop new and less damaging methods for removing foreign-matter particles from cotton fiber. In total, the study involved 75 sam...

  19. Cotton fiber: a powerful single-cell model for cell wall and cellulose research

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, Candace H.; Betancur, Lissete; Stiff, Michael R.; Tuttle, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Cotton fibers are single-celled extensions of the seed epidermis. They can be isolated in pure form as they undergo staged differentiation including primary cell wall synthesis during elongation and nearly pure cellulose synthesis during secondary wall thickening. This combination of features supports clear interpretation of data about cell walls and cellulose synthesis in the context of high throughput modern experimental technologies. Prior contributions of cotton fiber to building fundamental knowledge about cell walls will be summarized and the dynamic changes in cell wall polymers throughout cotton fiber differentiation will be described. Recent successes in using stable cotton transformation to alter cotton fiber cell wall properties as well as cotton fiber quality will be discussed. Futurec prospects to perform experiments more rapidly through altering cotton fiberwall properties via virus-induced gene silencing will be evaluated. PMID:22661979

  20. Fiber Quality Evaluation - Current and Future Trends/Instrinsic Value of Fiber Quality in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main systems in the world for measuring basic cotton fiber quality parameters are described in this chapter. Definitions, working principles as well as the fiber parameters, which a given system can measure are presented. The measurement systems described in the chapters are, HVI, AFIS, Uster ...

  1. UV/visible/near-infrared reflectance spectroscopic determination of cotton fiber and trash content in lint cotton waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongliang; Gamble, Gary R.; Thibodeaux, Devron

    2010-04-01

    Lint cleaning at cotton processing facilities is performed in order to remove the non-lint materials with minimal fiber damage. The resultant waste contains some degree of cotton fiber having good equal qualities, and hence is of great concern for operating cost. Traditional methods for measuring non-lint trash are labor intensive and time consuming. UV / visible / NIR technique was examined for its feasibility in determining the portions of cotton fiber and trash. Overall result indicated that NIR prediction was limited to screening purpose for probable reasons as heterogeneous trash distribution, relatively small sampling, and gravimetric reference method.

  2. Effects of Soil Salinity on Sucrose Metabolism in Cotton Fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Jingran; Luo, Junyu; Zhao, Xinhua; Dong, Helin; Ma, Yan; Sui, Ning; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Cotton (Gosspium hirsutum L.) is classified as a salt tolerant crop. However, its yield and fiber quality are negatively affected by soil salinity. Studies on the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism under different soil salinity levels are lacking. Therefore, field experiments, using two cotton cultivars, CCRI-79 (salt-tolerant) and Simian 3 (salt-sensitive), were conducted in 2013 and 2014 at three different salinity levels (1.15 dS m-1 [low soil salinity], 6.00 dS m-1 [medium soil salinity], and 11.46 dS m-1 [high soil salinity]). The objective was to elucidate the effects of soil salinity on sucrose content and the activity of key enzymes that are related to sucrose metabolism in cotton fiber. Results showed that as the soil salinity increased, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate declined; the decreases in cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by the increase in soil salinity were more in Simian 3 than those in CCRI-79. With increase in soil salinity, activities of sucrose metabolism enzymes sucrose phophate synthase (SPS), acidic invertase, and alkaline invertase were decreased, whereas sucrose synthase (SuSy) activity increased. However, the changes displayed in the SuSy and SPS activities in response to increase in soil salinity were different and the differences were large between the two cotton cultivars. These results illustrated that suppressed cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism under high soil salinity were mainly due to the change in SPS, SuSy, and invertase activities, and the difference in cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in fiber for the two cotton cultivars in response to soil salinity was determined mainly by both SuSy and SPS activities. PMID:27227773

  3. Effects of Soil Salinity on Sucrose Metabolism in Cotton Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingran; Luo, Junyu; Zhao, Xinhua; Dong, Helin; Ma, Yan; Sui, Ning; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Cotton (Gosspium hirsutum L.) is classified as a salt tolerant crop. However, its yield and fiber quality are negatively affected by soil salinity. Studies on the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism under different soil salinity levels are lacking. Therefore, field experiments, using two cotton cultivars, CCRI-79 (salt-tolerant) and Simian 3 (salt-sensitive), were conducted in 2013 and 2014 at three different salinity levels (1.15 dS m-1 [low soil salinity], 6.00 dS m-1 [medium soil salinity], and 11.46 dS m-1 [high soil salinity]). The objective was to elucidate the effects of soil salinity on sucrose content and the activity of key enzymes that are related to sucrose metabolism in cotton fiber. Results showed that as the soil salinity increased, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate declined; the decreases in cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by the increase in soil salinity were more in Simian 3 than those in CCRI-79. With increase in soil salinity, activities of sucrose metabolism enzymes sucrose phophate synthase (SPS), acidic invertase, and alkaline invertase were decreased, whereas sucrose synthase (SuSy) activity increased. However, the changes displayed in the SuSy and SPS activities in response to increase in soil salinity were different and the differences were large between the two cotton cultivars. These results illustrated that suppressed cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism under high soil salinity were mainly due to the change in SPS, SuSy, and invertase activities, and the difference in cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in fiber for the two cotton cultivars in response to soil salinity was determined mainly by both SuSy and SPS activities. PMID:27227773

  4. Antibacterial cotton fibers treated with silver nanoparticles and quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chan Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Soojung; Lee, Jintae; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Roh, Changhyun; Lee, Jaewoong

    2016-10-20

    Cotton fibers were treated chemically with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTAC), a quaternary ammonium salt, and coated with silver nanoparticles/3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (3-MPTMS) to increase the antibacterial efficacy. The coating process was accomplished by soaking the cotton fibers into a GTAC solution followed by a dry-cure method, and silver colloid/3-MPTMS solution was then applied at 43°C for 90min. The properties of the cotton fibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis. SEM showed a rough surface when the cotton fibers were treated with GTAC/3-MPTMS/silver nanoparticles due to the increasing surface attachment. The existence of silver and 3-MPTMS on the cotton fibers was confirmed by XPS. The cotton fibers treated with both GTAC and silver nanoparticles showed synergistic antibacterial properties against P. aeruginosa. PMID:27474649

  5. Gene-rich islands for fiber development in the cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is an economically important seed trichome and the world's leading natural fiber used in the manufacture of textiles. As a step towards elucidating the genomic organization and distribution of gene networks responsible for cotton fiber development, we investigated the distribution of f...

  6. Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjana, A. R. Mahesh, S. S. Divakara, S. Somashekar, R.

    2014-04-24

    Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

  7. Developing fiber specific promoter-reporter transgenic lines to study the effect of abiotic stresses on fiber development in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environment...

  8. Dissecting Functions of KATANIN and WRINKLED1 in Cotton Fiber Development by Virus-Induced Gene Silencing1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Ye, Jian; Geng, Yun-Feng; Sun, Yan-Wei; Gao, Shi-Qiang; Zhang, Bi-Pei; Chen, Wen; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Most of the world’s natural fiber comes from cotton (Gossypium spp.), which is an important crop worldwide. Characterizing genes that regulate cotton yield and fiber quality is expected to benefit the sustainable production of natural fiber. Although a huge number of expressed sequence tag sequences are now available in the public database, large-scale gene function analysis has been hampered by the low-efficiency process of generating transgenic cotton plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) has recently been reported to trigger virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in cotton leaves. Here, we extended the utility of this method by showing that TRV-VIGS can operate in reproductive organs as well. We used this method to investigate the function of KATANIN and WRINKLED1 in cotton plant development. Cotton plants with suppressed KATANIN expression produced shorter fibers and elevated weight ratio of seed oil to endosperm. By contrast, silencing of WRINKLED1 expression resulted in increased fiber length but reduced oil seed content, suggesting the possibility to increase fiber length by repartitioning carbon flow. Our results provide evidence that the TRV-VIGS system can be used for rapid functional analysis of genes involved in cotton fiber development. PMID:22837356

  9. Fruiting Branch K+ Level Affects Cotton Fiber Elongation Through Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiashuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fiber length. As one of the primary osmotica, K+ contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fiber elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fiber length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha-1) on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibers were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (Vmax) is the parameter that best reflects the change in fiber elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analyzed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K+ was the major osmotic factor affecting fiber length, and malate was likely facilitating K+ accumulation into fibers, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K+ absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fiber length in late season bolls. PMID:26834777

  10. Fruiting Branch K(+) Level Affects Cotton Fiber Elongation Through Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiashuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fiber length. As one of the primary osmotica, K(+) contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fiber elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fiber length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha(-1)) on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibers were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (V max) is the parameter that best reflects the change in fiber elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analyzed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K(+) was the major osmotic factor affecting fiber length, and malate was likely facilitating K(+) accumulation into fibers, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K(+) absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fiber length in late season bolls. PMID:26834777

  11. Potential of near infrared spectroscopy in the prediction of cotton fiber strength indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite relatively low correlation between 2 cotton strength readings from the automation oriented HVI and laboratory based Stelometer device, the present study demonstrates the consistence of cotton fiber strength measurements between the two methods if the strength readings were modified by cotton...

  12. Leaf content, seed moisture and module storage time of seed cotton influence cotton fiber quality and aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed in South Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf content, seed moisture and module storage time of seed cotton influence cotton fiber quality and aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed in South Texas. Crop Science ... Cotton is the most important natural fiber used to produce apparel, home furnishing, and industrial products. The quality of th...

  13. Systematic application of DNA fiber-FISH technique in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Wenpan; Jiang, Yanqin; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on extended DNA (fiber-FISH) is a powerful tool in high-resolution physical mapping. To introduce this technique into cotton, we developed the technique and tested it by deliberately mapping of telomere and 5S rDNA. Results showed that telomere-length ranged from 0.80 kb to 37.86 kb in three species, G. hirsutum, G. herbaceum and G. arboreum. However, most of the telomeres (>91.0%) were below 10 kb. The length of 5S rDNA was revealed as 964 kb in G. herbaceum whereas, in G. arboreum, it was approximately three times longer (3.1 Mb). A fiber-FISH based immunofluorescence method was also described to assay the DNA methylation. Using this technique, we revealed that both telomere and 5S rDNA were methylated at different levels. In addition, we developed a BAC molecule-based fiber-FISH technique. Using this technique, we can precisely map BAC clones on each other and evaluated the size and location of overlapped regions. The development and application of fiber-FISH technique will facilitate high-resolution physical mapping and further directed sequencing projects for cotton. PMID:24086609

  14. Developing Fiber Specific Promoter-Reporter Transgenic Lines to Study the Effect of Abiotic Stresses on Fiber Development in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junping; Burke, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environmental stresses on fiber development is poorly understood due to technical difficulties associated with the study of developing fiber tissues and lack of genetic materials to study fiber development. To address this important question and provide the need for scientific community, we have generated transgenic cotton lines harboring cotton fiber specific promoter (CFSP)-reporter constructs from six cotton fiber specific genes (Expansin, E6, Rac13, CelA1, LTP, and Fb late), representing genes that are expressed at different stages of fiber development. Individual CFSP::GUS or CFSP::GFP construct was introduced into Coker 312 via Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Transgenic cotton lines were evaluated phenotypically and screened for the presence of selectable marker, reporter gene expression, and insertion numbers. Quantitative analysis showed that the patterns of GUS reporter gene activity during fiber development in transgenic cotton lines were similar to those of the native genes. Greenhouse drought and heat stress study showed a correlation between the decrease in promoter activities and decrease in fiber length, increase in micronaire and changes in other fiber quality traits in transgenic lines grown under stressed condition. These newly developed materials provide new molecular tools for studying the effects of abiotic stresses on fiber development and may be used in study of cotton fiber development genes and eventually in the genetic manipulation of fiber quality. PMID:26030401

  15. [Spatial distribution characteristics of China cotton fiber quality and climatic factors based on GIS].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zong-Wei; Gu, Sheng-Hao; Mao, Li-Li; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Li-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Guo

    2012-12-01

    By using geographical information system (GIS), the cotton fiber quality data from 2005 to 2011 and the daily meteorological data from 1981 to 2010 at 82 sites (counties and cities) in China major cotton production regions were collected and treated with spatial interpolation. The spatial information system of cotton fiber quality in China major cotton production regions was established based on GIS, and the spatial distribution characteristics of the cotton fiber quality and their relationships with the local climatic factors were analyzed. In the northwest region (especially Xinjiang) of China, due to the abundant sunlight, low precipitation, and low relative humidity, the cotton fiber length, micronaire, and grade ranked the first. In the Yangtze River region and Yellow River region, the specific strength of cotton fiber was higher, and in the Yangtze River region, the cotton fiber length and specific strength were higher, while the micronaire and grade were lower than those in the Yellow River region. The cotton fiber quality was closely related to the climate factors such as temperature, sunlight, rainfall, and humidity. PMID:23479881

  16. Measurement comparison of cotton fiber micronaire and its components by portable near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR) Instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton fiber classing and quality assessment property, and changes in fiber micronaire can impact downstream fiber processing and dye consistency in the textile manufacturing industry. Micronaire is a function of two fiber components—fiber maturity and fineness. Historically, m...

  17. Comparison of cotton fiber micronaire and its components by portable near infrared spectroscopy instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton fiber classing and quality assessment property, and changes in fiber micronaire can impact downstream fiber processing and dye consistency in the textile manufacturing industry. Micronaire is a function of two fiber components—fiber maturity and fineness. Historically, m...

  18. Variation in surface chemical constituents of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber as a function of maturity.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Gary R

    2003-12-31

    Modern cotton yarn production technology has made it imperative that new predictors of yarn spinning efficiency be determined. Surface frictional forces play a large role in spinning efficiency, yet little is known about the chemical constituents comprising the cotton fiber surface or their respective roles in inter-fiber frictional behavior. Major cotton fiber surface chemical components including pectin, wax, soluble salts, and sugars were quantified, and their respective relationships to cotton fiber maturity, as measured by micronaire, determined for 87 cotton samples exhibiting large variations in age, micronaire, genetics, and growing region. In the case of pectin and wax, inverse relationships with micronaire were found, whereas salts and sugars exhibit linear relationships with micronaire. Using these mathematical relationships, it will be possible to develop predictive models of whether spinning performance of different cottons is affected by deviations of the chemical constituents from the determined relationships. PMID:14690385

  19. Fiber Longitudinal Measurements for Predicting White Speck Contents of Dyed Cotton Fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber Image Analysis System (FIAS) was developed to provide an automatic method for measuring cotton maturity from fiber snippets or cross-sections . An uncombed cotton bundle is chopped and sprayed on a microscopic slide. The snippets are imaged sequentially on an microscope and measured with custo...

  20. Fiber and yarn properties from high-speed roller ginning of upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding has improved upland cotton fiber properties. New high-speed roller ginning technology has advanced to the point that processing capacities have approached that of saw ginning. Producers seeking a better price for their upland cotton are interested in fiber property and textile m...

  1. Properties of thermoplastic composites with cotton and guayule biomass residues as fiber fillers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of using residual plant fibers from agricultural waste streams as reinforcement in thermoplastic composites. Three groups of plant fibers evaluated included cotton burrs, sticks, and linters from cotton gin waste (CGW), guayule whole plant, and gu...

  2. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  3. Development of secondary cell wall in cotton fibers as examined with Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our presentation will focus on continuing efforts to examine secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers using infrared Spectroscopy. Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-...

  4. Distribution and evolution of cotton fiber development genes in the fibreless Gossypium raimondii genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers represent the largest single cell in the plant kingdom, and they have been used as a model to study cell function, differentiation, maturation, and cell death. The cotton fiber transcriptome can be clustered into two genomic regions: conserved and recombination hotspots. Genetic link...

  5. Distribution of fiber development genes and transcription factors between At and Dt subgenomes in tetraploid cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the worlds leading natural material used in the manufacture of textiles, cotton fibers are important seed trichomes derived from individual cells of the epidermal layer of the seed coat. Cotton fiber development is determined by large numbers of genes and transcription factors. However, little ...

  6. Preliminary comparisons of portable near infrared (nir) instrumentation for laboratory measurements of cotton fiber micronaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key quality and processing parameter for cotton fiber. A program was implemented to determine the capabilities of portable Near Infrared (NIR) instrumentation to monitor cotton fiber micronaire both in the laboratory and in/near the field. Previous evaluations on one NIR unit demon...

  7. Relationship of ginning energy use ginning rate and fiber quality in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton genotypes that gin faster and with less energy presumably gin more gently with less stress on the fiber and less damage. The objective of this research was to determine if ginning energy and ginning rate affect the fiber qualities of Upland cotton genotypes. Thirty four conventional and twelv...

  8. Cotton revenue apportioned between lint yield and fiber quality: a precision agriculture perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of cotton fiber quality has been emphasized by breeders, ginners, and textile processors but has not aroused much attention among growers. Whereas many studies have shown in-field variation of cotton fiber quality, the variation observed is usually small compared to that of lint yield, ca...

  9. A comparative study on cotton fiber length parameters’ effects on modeling yarn property

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber length is one of the key properties of cotton and has important influences on yarn production and yarn quality. Various parameters have been developed to characterize cotton fiber length in the past decades. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of these parameters and their ...

  10. Analysis of fiber quality traits in a seven-parent upland cotton diallel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to raising yields, improving the quality of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber has become an increasingly important component of the value of cotton, especially for marketing in the international trade. The objectives of this study were to identify sources of variation for fiber quali...

  11. Preliminary study of relating cotton fiber tenacity and elongation with crystallinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fundamental understanding of the relationship between cotton fiber strength (or tenacity) / elongation and structure is important, as cotton breeders could modify their varieties for enhancing end-use qualities. In this study, the Stelometer instrument was employed to measure bundle fiber tenacity a...

  12. Polysaccharide and glycoprotein distribution in the epidermis of cotton ovules during early fiber initiation and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton fiber is a model system to study cell wall biosynthesis because the fiber cell elongates (~3 cm in ~20 days) without mitosis. In this study, developing cotton ovules, examined from 1 day before anthesis (DBA) to 2 days post-anthesis (DPA), that would be difficult to investigate via class...

  13. COTTON FIBERS: PROPERTIES AND INTERACTION WITH FLAX FIBERS IN BLENDS (FOCUS ON ROTOR SPUN YARN)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FASHION DICTATES WHAT FIBERS AND YARNS WILL BE UTILIZED TO MAKE APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE FASHION ITEMS. IN RECENT YEARS, THERE HAS BEEN AN INCREASE IN FLAX/COTTON BLENDS, PARTICULARLY IN APPAREL. TRADITIONALLY, FLAX HAS BEEN SPUN AS "LONG LINE" STAPLE LENGTH, AS WOULD BE THE CASE IN THE SPINNING ...

  14. Measurements of cotton fiber maturity and fineness: method comparisons and fiber growth analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity (degree of secondary wall development) and fineness (linear density) are important cotton fiber quality and processing properties. Most maturity and fineness measurements are slow, laborious, require chemicals, and/or require expensive instruments. The Cottonscope is a small-footprint instr...

  15. Genetic variation for agronomic and fiber quality traits in a population derived from high-quality cotton germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic improvement of fiber quality is necessary to meet the requirements of processors and users of cotton fiber. To foster genetic improvement of cotton fiber quality, adequate genetic variation for the quantitatively inherited physical properties of cotton is required. Additionally, knowledge of...

  16. Identification of cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci using intraspecific crosses derived from two near-isogenic lines differing in fiber bundle strength.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber properties are very important to the yarn quality. Modern high-speed textile operations around the world require long, strong and fine cotton fibers. The objective of this research was to identify stable fiber quantitative trait loci (QTL) that could be used in cotton breeding through m...

  17. Comparative fiber property and transcriptome analyses reveal key genes potentially related to high fiber strength in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) line MD52ne

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Individual fiber strength is an important quality attribute that greatly influences the strength of the yarn spun from cotton fibers. Fiber strength is usually measured from bundles of fibers due to the difficulty of reliably measuring strength from individual cotton fibers. However, bun...

  18. Registration of TTU-0782 upland cotton germplasm line with superior fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A germplasm line of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) designated as TTU 0782 with improved fiber quality was developed. It possesses longer fiber length, higher fiber bundle strength, high uniformity index, low short fiber content, high maturity ratio, and low nep counts. Spinning tests also ind...

  19. Rapid and routine assessment of cotton fiber cellulose maturity: current and future trends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is a type of natural cellulose I and the end-use qualities depend on the amount of cellulose component deposited. The term fiber maturity has been used to describe the degree of cellulosic development or the secondary cell wall thickening of fibers. Useful information about fiber maturi...

  20. Detection and validation of one stable fiber strength QTL on c9 in tetraploid cotton.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Wang, Y; Zhang, G; Wang, X; Wu, L; Ke, H; Liu, H; Ma, Z

    2016-08-01

    Fiber strength is an essential trait of fiber property in cotton, and it is quantitatively inherited. Identification of stable quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to fiber strength would provide the key basis for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in cotton breeding. In this study, four interspecific hybridization populations were established with a common G. barbadense parent Pima 90-53 and two G. hirsutum parents (CCRI 8 and Handan 208), each of which had fiber strength characteristic. Based on the phenotypic data of fiber strength from seven environments, a stable QTL, qFS-c9-1, was detected and validated on c9 in a marker interval between SSR markers NAU2395 and NAU1092. The QTL explaining 14.4-17.9 % of the phenotypic variation was firstly detected in two populations (CCRI 8 × Pima 90-53, BC1F1 and BC1F2) and its derived lines in four environments. And it accounting for 12.1-14.8 % of the phenotypic variation was further confirmed in two populations (Handan 208 × Pima 90-53, BC1F1, and F2) under one environment. In silico mapping using three sequenced cotton genomes indicated that homologous genes, anchored by NAU2395 and NAU1092, were aligned to the G. arboreum genome within a physical distance between 81.10 Mbps and 87.07 Mbps. In that interval, several genes were confirmed in literatures to associate with fiber development. Among these genes, seven genes were further selected for an expression analysis through fiber development transcriptome database, revealing unique expression patterns across different stages of fiber development between CCRI 8 and Pima 90-53. The genes underlying qFS-c9-1 were favorable to fine mapping and cloning. The current study results provided valuable evidence for mapping stable QTL of fiber strength utilizing multiple populations and environments, as well as map-based cloning the candidate gene underlying the QTL for future prospective research directions. PMID:27119657

  1. The effect of cellulases on the biodegradation and morphology of naturally colored cotton fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.R.; Lee, I.; Woodward, J.; Fox, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    We have investigated the effect of cellulases on the biodegradation and structure of natural colored cotton (Foxfibre{reg_sign}). Compared to the white cotton and palo verde (sage green) varieties, buffalo (mocha brown) and coyote (reddish brown) varieties were quite resistant to hydrolysis by Trichoderma reesei celluclast and purified cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) under the conditions of the assay, but binding of CBH I to buffalo cotton was unaffected. Sodium hydroxide extracts of all the colored cotton varieties were found to be strong inhibitors of cellulase activity and the buffalo cotton was labile in that the inhibitory effect decreased over time in the presence of cellulase; incubation of {beta}-glucosidase with the extract also decreased the inhibition. The chemical composition of the inhibitor is currently under investigation. Atomic force microscopy of the colored cotton fibers with bound cellulase components should prove useful in the context of elucidating the effect of binding on the morphology of cellulose fibers.

  2. Mechanical interlocking of cotton fibers on slightly textured surfaces of metallic cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youqiang; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yonggang

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical interlocking is widely applied in industry and general lives of human beings. In this work, we realized the control of locking or sliding states of cotton fibers on the metal surfaces with slightly different textures through traditional machining. Three types of sliding states, i.e., locking, one-way sliding, and two-way sliding have been achieved. It is found that the locking or sliding of the cotton fibers on the metallic cylinder depends on the friction coefficient and the ratio of cotton fiber diameter, 2r, to the height of the rough peaks, h, of metal surfaces. When the critical ratio h/r exceeds 1, the cotton fibers could tightly attach to the metallic surface through mechanical interlocking. This work provided a convenient and universal method for the control of interlocking or sliding of fiber-based materials on textured surfaces.

  3. Mechanical interlocking of cotton fibers on slightly textured surfaces of metallic cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youqiang; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interlocking is widely applied in industry and general lives of human beings. In this work, we realized the control of locking or sliding states of cotton fibers on the metal surfaces with slightly different textures through traditional machining. Three types of sliding states, i.e., locking, one-way sliding, and two-way sliding have been achieved. It is found that the locking or sliding of the cotton fibers on the metallic cylinder depends on the friction coefficient and the ratio of cotton fiber diameter, 2r, to the height of the rough peaks, h, of metal surfaces. When the critical ratio h/r exceeds 1, the cotton fibers could tightly attach to the metallic surface through mechanical interlocking. This work provided a convenient and universal method for the control of interlocking or sliding of fiber-based materials on textured surfaces. PMID:27156720

  4. Mechanical interlocking of cotton fibers on slightly textured surfaces of metallic cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youqiang; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interlocking is widely applied in industry and general lives of human beings. In this work, we realized the control of locking or sliding states of cotton fibers on the metal surfaces with slightly different textures through traditional machining. Three types of sliding states, i.e., locking, one-way sliding, and two-way sliding have been achieved. It is found that the locking or sliding of the cotton fibers on the metallic cylinder depends on the friction coefficient and the ratio of cotton fiber diameter, 2r, to the height of the rough peaks, h, of metal surfaces. When the critical ratio h/r exceeds 1, the cotton fibers could tightly attach to the metallic surface through mechanical interlocking. This work provided a convenient and universal method for the control of interlocking or sliding of fiber-based materials on textured surfaces. PMID:27156720

  5. Understanding the Relationship between Cotton Fiber Properties and Non-Cellulosic Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Willats, William G. T.; Meulewaeter, Frank; Selbig, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like cotton fibers, which are of both biological and industrial importance. To this end, we attempted to study cotton fiber characteristics together with glycan arrays using regression based approaches. Taking advantage of the comprehensive microarray polymer profiling technique (CoMPP), 32 cotton lines from different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength, elongation and micronaire were measured. The relationship between the two datasets was established in an integrative manner using linear regression methods. In the conducted analysis, we demonstrated the usefulness of regression based approaches in establishing a relationship between glycan measurements and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan probes. Moreover, homogalacturonan and callose were shown to be significant predictors for fiber length. The role of these polysaccharides was already pointed out in previous cell wall elongation studies. Additional relationships were predicted for fiber strength and elongation which will need further experimental validation. PMID:25383868

  6. Protection of cellulose synthesis in detached cotton fibers by polyethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, N.C.; Delmer, D.P.

    1980-11-01

    Detachment of the cotton fiber cell from the ovule results in loss of over 90% of the in vivo capacity for synthesis of (/sup 14/C)cellulose from (/sup 14/C)glucose. However, over 50% of the capacity for cellulose synthesis in the detached fiber population is protected when polyethylene glycol 4000 is present during detachment and incubation. Radioautography shows that approximately full capacity is restored in about half the fibers, whereas the other half of the population are incapable of cellulose synthesis from supplied glucose. The rate of cellulose synthesis in such fibers has a pH optimum of 6 and the optimum polyethylene glycol 4000 concentration is 0.06 molal (-9 bars). Cellulose synthesis in such detached fibers is synergistically stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ and inhibited by K/sup +/. Evidence is presented which indicates that the protection by polyethylene glycol 4000 is due to its ability to promote membrane resealing, which seems to be required for protecting cellulose synthesis in the detached fiber; however, the requirement for membrane integrity is not exclusively involved in the maintenance of an energy generating system for the synthesis. The possibility that a membrane potential may be required for maintaining an active cellulose synthesizing system is discussed.

  7. Improvement of a Harvester Based, Multispectral, Seed Cotton Fiber Quality Sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multispectral sensor for in-situ seed cotton fiber quality measurement was developed and tested at Texas A&M University. Results of initial testing of the sensor using machine harvested seed cotton have shown promise. Improvements have been made to the system and the measurement method to meet t...

  8. Comparison of NIR and FT-IR spectral models in the prediction of cotton fiber strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strength quality in cotton fibers is one of several important end-use characteristics. In routine programs, it has been mostly assessed by automation-oriented high volume instrument (HVI) system. An alternative method for cotton strength is near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Although previous NIR mod...

  9. VARIATION IN SURFACE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF COTTON FIBER AS A FUNCTION OF MATURITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MODERN COTTON YARN PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY HAS MADE IT IMPERATIVE THAT NEW PREDICTORS OF YARN SPINNING EFFICIENCY BE DETERMINED. SURFACE FRICTIONAL FORCES PLAY A LARGE ROLE IN SPINNING EFFICIENCY, YET LITTLE IS KNOWN ABOUT THE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS COMPRISING THE COTTON FIBER SURFACE OR THEIR RESPEC...

  10. The Impact of Short Fiber Content on the Quality of Cotton Ring Spun Yarn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was carried to obtain a quantitative assessment of how the presence of short fiber (< 12.5 mm long) in raw cotton affect the quality of ring yarn spun from the mix. Properties of the raw cotton were measured on HVI and AFIS instruments and by the manual Suter-Webb Array method. Twenty-nine...

  11. Effect of cotton fiber properties on properties of hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven mechanically pre-cleaned greige cottons of significantly different fiber length, length uniformity or micronaire were processed into nonwoven fabrics using a commercial-grade hydroentanglement system of fabric formation. Results have shown that the pre-cleaned greige cotton of considerably di...

  12. Test cross evaluation of upland cotton accessions for selected fiber properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas A&M AgriLife Research released several upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm lines that exhibit near extra-long and extra-long staple (ELS) upper half mean length (UHML) fibers, similar to those produced by pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) and significantly longer than those of ...

  13. Cotton fiber cell wall development for three cultivars: an Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy examination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An examination of FT-IR vibrational band development in spectra of cotton fiber at different developmental dates (18 – 40 days post-anthesis; DPA) will be presented in this talk. Results from three cotton cultivars will be presented. Two of the cultivars are nearly identical genetic lines, which ha...

  14. Influence of Cotton Fiber Quality on the Strength Properties of Cotton Fabrics Treated with Flame-resistant and Easy Care Finishes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cotton fabrics treated with modern flame-resistant and easy-care finishes cannot meet the high performance standards required by the military, and are being replaced by fabrics made from synthetic fibers, or blends of cotton with synthetic fibers. The objective of this study was to evaluate th...

  15. Genetics of Cotton Fiber Initiation: Inheritance Studies on Three Fiberless Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber initiation, or the protuberate expansion of individual cells in the epidermis of cotton ovules, is a key component of lint percentage. Ovular trichomes are classified as either lint or fuzz based on the timing of fiber initiation. Initiation of lint fiber begins at anthesis and continues for ...

  16. Near infrared measurement of cotton fiber micronaire, maturity and fineness--a comparative investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key cotton fiber quality property is micronaire, which is an air flow resistance measurement that is highly correlated to the fiber’s maturity and fineness. Fiber maturity and fineness can impact the downstream processing of the fiber into yarn and fabric and the fiber’s dyeability. Previous studi...

  17. Use of FTIR spectroscopy technique in the determination of cotton fiber maturity and crystallinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber consists of natural cellulose I component and its end-use qualities depend on the amount of cellulose deposited during the growth. The term fiber maturity has been used to describe the degree of cellulosic development or the secondary cell wall thickening of fibers. Useful information a...

  18. A cotton fiber associated cyclin-dependent kinase A gene: Characterization and chromosomal location

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cotton fiber cell normally originates and elongates as a single ovular epidermal cell. The cessation of fiber cell division and ensuing elongation imply that the cell cycle is differentially regulated in fiber cells. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in the regulation of cell cy...

  19. A comparison of two cotton cultivars differing in maturity for within-canopy fiber properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in spinning technologies require improvements in fiber quality. Both genotype and the environment under which cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) bolls develop influence the physical characteristics of fibers. In addition, fiber surface sugar and salt content have recently been found to influenc...

  20. COTTON FIBER MOISTURE MEASUREMENT—FROM the BALE to the LABORATORY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture is an important quality, processing, and marketing parameter for cotton fiber. The accurate and precise measurement of fiber moisture continues to be an issue of importance in the global marketplace. There are several commercially available moisture measurement instruments for fiber moist...

  1. Preliminary study of linear density, tenacity, and crystallinity of cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An investigation of the relationships among fiber linear density, tenacity, and structure is important to help cotton breeders modify varieties for enhanced fiber end-use qualities. This study employed the Stelometer instrument, which is the traditional fiber tenacity reference method and might stil...

  2. Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Hogue, M.G.

    2002-02-07

    Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

  3. New Uses for Immobilized Enzymes and Substrates on Cotton and Cellulose Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The design, preparation, and application of both immobilized enzymes and enzyme substrates on cotton fibers for biomedical and specialty applications includes antibacterial fabrics, decontamination wipes, debridement and chronic wound dressing prototypes, and protease detection devices. The molecula...

  4. Stable transformation and expression of GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene to improve fiber length and micronaire value in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Kamran S.; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Bashir, Aftab; Aftab, Asia; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Cotton fiber is multigenic trait controlled by number of genes. Previous studies suggest that one of these genes may be responsible for switching cotton fiber growth on and off to influence the fiber quality produced from a cotton seed. In the present study, the Gossypium hirsutum GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene was introduced into local cotton variety NIAB 846 by using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation. The neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene was used as a selection marker for screening of putative transgenic cotton plants. Integration and expression of the fiber expansin gene in cotton plants was confirmed with molecular techniques including Southern blot analyses, real-time PCR. Cellulose assay was used for measurement of cellulose contents of transgenic cotton fiber. The data collected from 3 years of field performance of the transgenic cotton plants expressing GhEXPA8 showed that significant improvement has been made in fiber lengths and micronaire values as compared to control G. hirsutum variety NIAB 846 cotton plants. Statistical techniques were also used for analysis of fiber and agronomic characteristics. The results of this study support improvement of cotton fiber through genetic modification. PMID:26583018

  5. Examination of cotton fibers and common contaminants using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical imaging of cotton fibers and common contaminants in fibers is presented. Chemical imaging was performed with an infrared microscope equipped with a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In a...

  6. Phytohormonal networks promote differentiation of fiber initials on pre-anthesis cotton ovules grown in vitro and in planta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of cotton (Gossypium sp.) ovule epidermal cells differentiating into fiber initials is an important factor affecting cotton yield and fiber quality. Despite extensive efforts in determining the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber initial differentiation, only a few genes responsible for...

  7. Functional analyses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) immature fiber (im) mutant reveal that fiber cell wall development is associated with sensitivity to stress.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cotton fiber maturity refers the degree of fiber cell wall development and is an important factor for determining commercial value of cotton. The molecular mechanism regulating the fiber cell wall development has not been well characterized. Microscopic image analysis of the cross-sect...

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Short Fiber Mutants Ligon-lintless 1 And 2 Reveals Common Mechanisms Pertinent to Fiber Elongation in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular processes affecting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber development is important for developing tools aimed at improving fiber quality. Short fiber cotton mutants Ligon-lintless 1 (Li1) and Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) are naturally occurring, monogenic mutations residing on diff...

  9. New molecular tools to study fiber develop and the effect of environmental stresses: development of transgenic cotton lines harboring fiber specific

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Cotton fibers are differentiated elongated epidermal cell of the seed coat. Fiber development consists of four distinct but overlapping stages, fiber initiation, cell elongation, secondary cell wall deposition, and matura...

  10. Unravel the key genes potentially related to high strength of cotton fiber by comparative phenotypic and genomic analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The demand of high strength of cotton fibers has been increased dramatically with the advent of modern high speed spinning technology for producing yarn. Bundle fiber strength is affected by fiber-to-fiber interactions in addition to the individual fiber strength. The bundle fiber strength is not al...

  11. Use of fiber and fuzz mutants to detect QTL for yield components, seed, and fiber traits of Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the world’s leading fiber crop and an important source of protein and oil. The purpose of this research was to detect QTL or molecular markers associated with yield components, fiber, and seed traits within multiple fuzzless loci genetic backgrounds. Two F2 populations dev...

  12. Comparisons of minicard ratings to ion chromatography sugar profiles in cotton fiber water extract and minicard sticky spot material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific levels and ratios of the carbohydrates melezitose and trehalulose deposited on the surface of cotton fibers are indicators of whitefly or aphid contamination. These deposits could cause stickiness problems during cotton ginning and textile processing. The concept of cotton stickiness is hi...

  13. Composite Nonwovens Made of Cotton and Other Plant Fibers: Mechanical and Thermal Characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composite nonwoven samples have been prepared from blends of fibers containing cotton and other fibers, such as bagasse, kenaf or ramie. The nonwoven structure has been stabilized with synthetic or bioderived polymers. Mechanical and thermal characteristics of nonwovens (tensile strength, modulus an...

  14. Cotton fiber properties relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that cotton fibers readily exchange moisture content with their surrounding atmosphere. As moisture exchange progresses, several physical properties of the fiber are significantly affected. In this study, the effects of relative humidity (RH), a factor that affects the atmospheric m...

  15. Comparative relationship of fiber strength and yarn tenacity in four cotton cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High volume instrumentation (HVITM) measurement is a primary and routine tool of providing fiber properties to cotton researchers. There have been considerable studies designed to derive yarn quality from acquired fiber quality data by various means, including HVI. There is also of desired informati...

  16. LONG-TERM STORAGE EFFECTS ON FIBER QUALITY OF POLYETHYLENE FILM WRAPPED COTTON BALES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one year bale storage test was initiated to determine the effects of two different long-term storage conditions on baled fiber quality. Fiber quality will eventually be evaluated by textile processing the stored cotton through to dyed cloth. Ten bales were stored in an approved warehouse and ten...

  17. Divergent selection for fiber length and bundle strength and correlated responses in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton breeders must develop cultivars to meet the demand for longer, stronger, and more uniform fibers. In the current study, two cycles of divergent selection for fiber upper-half mean length (UHML) and bundle strength (Str) were conducted within five diverse parental combinations selected based o...

  18. USING PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION TO OBTAIN COTTON FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE BEARD TESTING METHOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beard testing method for measuring cotton fiber length is based on the fibrogram theory. However, in the instrumental implementations, the engineering complexity alters the original fiber length distribution observed by the instrument. This causes challenges in obtaining the entire original le...

  19. THERMAL INSULATION PROPERTIES OF NONWOVEN SEMI-DISPOSABLE BLANKETS FROM RECYCLED POLYESTER/COTTON FIBERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recycled polyester fibers and cotton fibers that require no chemical processing were used to produce a low-cost, semi-durable, nonwoven thermal blanket. Thermal blankets were given carboxylic acid finish to improve structural stability during use and laundering. A Steady-State Heat Flow meter FOX ...

  20. Comparative properties of cellulose nano-crystals from native and mercerized cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable aqueous suspensions of cellulose nano-crystals (CNCs) were fabricated from both native and mercerized cotton fibers by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, followed by high-pressure homogenization. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry and Wide-angle X-Ray Diffraction data showed that the fibers had b...

  1. Linkage Map Construction and QTL Analysis of Agronomic and Fiber Quality Traits in Cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The superior fiber properties of Gossypium barbadense L. serve as a source of novel variation for improving fiber quality in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.), but introgression from G. barbadense has been largely unsuccessful due to hybrid breakdown and a lack of genetic and genomic resources. In an e...

  2. Variation analysis for fiber quality traits among different positions in eight Upland cotton cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equivalency of fiber quality within a plant of upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is very important. There are several traits within a plant that can be used to measure fiber quality and five of those traits will be investigated. Eight representative upland cultivars were grown at the Plant Scien...

  3. Evaluation of cotton chromosome substitution lines crossed with high fiber strength lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton chromosome substitution lines (CS-B16, CS-B22sh, CS-B25) and TM-1 were crossed with eight strong fiber lines. These 12 parents and their F2 hybrids were grown at Mississippi State in two locations with replicated field plots in 2006. Agronomic and fiber traits were measured and analyzed...

  4. Influence of seed cotton extractors and cleaning rate on gin turnout and fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas High Plains cotton has improved over the last ten years with regard to yield and high volume instrument (HVI) fiber quality. Harvesting and ginning practices are needed which preserve fiber quality and maximize return to the producer. The objective of this work is to investigate the influence ...

  5. Cotton Fiber Quality Characterization with Vis-NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy: Toward an Optimal Sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this research are to (1) assess the performance of the Vis-NIR method for predicting cotton fiber quality parameters with different calibration methods, and (2) determine useful spectral wavebands and bandwidths for predicting various fiber quality parameters. This study is direct...

  6. SOURCES OF FIBER STRENGTH IN THE U.S. COTTON CROP FROM 1980-2000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) crop has shown remarkable improvements in fiber strength until the late 1990's. At the same time concerns about the lack of genetic diversity have been raised. The objective of this study was to discern the source of improved fiber strength and decline durin...

  7. Experience of the fibrotest for measuring cotton fiber length and strength properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fibrotest is a device developed by Textechno for measuring cotton fiber length and strength properties. The Fibrotest provides abundant information, including more than 20 length and strength parameters in absolute and relative modes, and displays fibrogram, load-elongation curve, and fiber bea...

  8. Delineating the glycoproteome of elongating cotton fiber cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravanan; Pandey, Pankaj; Kumar, Krishan; Rajamani, Vijayalakshmi; Padmalatha, Kethireddy Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Reddy, Vanga Siva

    2015-01-01

    The data presented here delineates the glycoproteome component in the elongating cotton fiber cells attained using complementary proteomic approaches followed by protein and N-linked glycosylation site identification (Kumar et al., 2013) [1]. Utilizing species specific protein sequence databases in proteomic approaches often leads to additional information that may not be obtained using cross-species databases. In this context we have reanalyzed our glycoproteome dataset with the Gossypium arboreum, Gossypium raimondii (version 2.0) and Gossypium hirsutum protein databases that has led to the identification of 21 N-linked glycosylation sites and 18 unique glycoproteins that were not reported in our previous study. The 1D PAGE and solution based glycoprotein identification data is publicly available at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013) [2] using the dataset identifier PXD000178 and the 2D PAGE based protein identification and glycopeptide approach based N-linked glycosylation site identification data is available at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013) [2] using the dataset identifier PXD002849. PMID:26693171

  9. Cotton Fiber Cell Walls of Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense Have Differences Related to Loosely-Bound Xyloglucan

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Utku; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Singh, Bir; Brown, Virginia L.; Hahn, Michael G.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber is an important natural textile fiber due to its exceptional length and thickness. These properties arise largely through primary and secondary cell wall synthesis. The cotton fiber of commerce is a cellulosic secondary wall surrounded by a thin cuticulated primary wall, but there were only sparse details available about the polysaccharides in the fiber cell wall of any cotton species. In addition, Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) fiber was known to have an adhesive cotton fiber middle lamella (CFML) that joins adjacent fibers into tissue-like bundles, but it was unknown whether a CFML existed in other commercially important cotton fibers. We compared the cell wall chemistry over the time course of fiber development in Gh and Gossypium barbadense (Gb), the two most important commercial cotton species, when plants were grown in parallel in a highly controlled greenhouse. Under these growing conditions, the rate of early fiber elongation and the time of onset of secondary wall deposition were similar in fibers of the two species, but as expected the Gb fiber had a prolonged elongation period and developed higher quality compared to Gh fiber. The Gb fibers had a CFML, but it was not directly required for fiber elongation because Gb fiber continued to elongate rapidly after CFML hydrolysis. For both species, fiber at seven ages was extracted with four increasingly strong solvents, followed by analysis of cell wall matrix polysaccharide epitopes using antibody-based Glycome Profiling. Together with immunohistochemistry of fiber cross-sections, the data show that the CFML of Gb fiber contained lower levels of xyloglucan compared to Gh fiber. Xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity was also higher in Gb fiber. In general, the data provide a rich picture of the similarities and differences in the cell wall structure of the two most important commercial cotton species. PMID:23457548

  10. Specific expression of a beta-tubulin gene (GhTub1) in developing cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Sun, Jie; Li, Chunhong; Zhu, Yongqing; Xia, Guixian

    2003-06-01

    A cDNA library was constructed using poly (A)(+) RNA isolated from -1-15 DPA fibers of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The cDNA encoding a beta-tubulin isoform (designated as GhTub1) was identified through EST search. Northern blot analysis using 3'-UTR of the cDNA as a gene-specific probe was performed to investigate the expression levels of GhTub1 in various organs and in the developing fibers. The results showed that GhTub1 gene was specifically expressed in cotton fiber cells. During fiber development, GhTub1 transcripts accumulated highly at the stage of cell rapid elongation with the highest expression appearing at the time when fiber expansion reaches the peak rate. To probe the in vivo function of GhTub1, its cDNA was cloned in the yeast expression vector pREP1 and transformed into the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Overexpression of GhTub1 in yeast cells caused severe changes in the cell morphology. These results suggest that GhTub1 may play a role in the polar elongation of cotton fibers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the fiber-specific transcript accumulation of a cotton beta-tubulin gene. PMID:18763138

  11. Chemical imaging of secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers using a mid-infrared focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market demands for cotton varieties with improved fiber properties also call for the development of fast, reliable analytical methods for monitoring fiber development and measuring their properties. Currently, cotton breeders rely on instrumentation that can require significant amounts of sample, w...

  12. Metabolomic and transcriptomic insights into how cotton fiber transitions to secondary wall sythesis, represses lignification, and prolongs elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber morphogenesis reflects extreme elongation and staged cell wall differentiation in an easily isolated single cell. Uncovering the cellular control mechanisms can lead to strategies for producing improved cotton fiber for textiles and other uses. To identify potential controls of the high...

  13. Transposable elements play an important role during cotton genome evolution and fiber cell development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Gai; Zhu, Yuxian

    2016-02-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) usually occupy largest fractions of plant genome and are also the most variable part of the structure. Although traditionally it is hallmarked as "junk and selfish DNA", today more and more evidence points out TE's participation in gene regulations including gene mutation, duplication, movement and novel gene creation via genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The recently sequenced genomes of diploid cottons Gossypium arboreum (AA) and Gossypium raimondii (DD) together with their allotetraploid progeny Gossypium hirsutum (AtAtDtDt) provides a unique opportunity to compare genome variations in the Gossypium genus and to analyze the functions of TEs during its evolution. TEs accounted for 57%, 68.5% and 67.2%, respectively in DD, AA and AtAtDtDt genomes. The 1,694 Mb A-genome was found to harbor more LTR(long terminal repeat)-type retrotransposons that made cardinal contributions to the twofold increase in its genome size after evolution from the 775.2 Mb D-genome. Although the 2,173 Mb AtAtDtDt genome showed similar TE content to the A-genome, the total numbers of LTR-gypsy and LTR-copia type TEs varied significantly between these two genomes. Considering their roles on rewiring gene regulatory networks, we believe that TEs may somehow be involved in cotton fiber cell development. Indeed, the insertion or deletion of different TEs in the upstream region of two important transcription factor genes in At or Dt subgenomes resulted in qualitative differences in target gene expression. We suggest that our findings may open a window for improving cotton agronomic traits by editing TE activities. PMID:26687725

  14. Transcript profiling by microarray and marker analysis of the short cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber mutant Ligon lintless-1 (Li1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber length is very important to the quality of textiles. Understanding the genetics and physiology of cotton fiber elongation can provide valuable tools to the cotton industry by targeting genes or other molecules responsible for fiber elongation. Ligon Lintless-1 (Li1) is a monogenic mutan...

  15. GhLTPG1, a cotton GPI-anchored lipid transfer protein, regulates the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and cotton fiber elongation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ting; Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jun; Xue, Hongwei; Zuo, Kaijing

    2016-01-01

    The cotton fibers are seed trichomes that elongate from the ovule epidermis. Polar lipids are required for the quick enlargement of cell membrane and fiber cell growth, however, how lipids are transported from the ovules into the developing fibers remains less known. Here, we reported the functional characterization of GhLTPG1, a GPI-anchored lipid transport protein, during cotton fiber elongation. GhLTPG1 was abundantly expressed in elongating cotton fibers and outer integument of the ovules, and GhLTPG1 protein was located on cell membrane. Biochemical analysis showed that GhLTPG1 specifically bound to phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphates (PtdIns3P, PtdIns4P and PtdIns5P) in vitro and transported PtdInsPs from the synthesis places to the plasma membranes in vivo. Expression of GhLTPG1 in Arabidopsis caused an increased number of trichomes, and fibers in GhLTPG1-knockdown cotton plants exhibited significantly reduced length, decreased polar lipid content, and repression of fiber elongation-related genes expression. These results suggested that GhLTPG1 protein regulates the cotton fiber elongation through mediating the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates. PMID:27311358

  16. GhLTPG1, a cotton GPI-anchored lipid transfer protein, regulates the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and cotton fiber elongation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ting; Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jun; Xue, Hongwei; Zuo, Kaijing

    2016-01-01

    The cotton fibers are seed trichomes that elongate from the ovule epidermis. Polar lipids are required for the quick enlargement of cell membrane and fiber cell growth, however, how lipids are transported from the ovules into the developing fibers remains less known. Here, we reported the functional characterization of GhLTPG1, a GPI-anchored lipid transport protein, during cotton fiber elongation. GhLTPG1 was abundantly expressed in elongating cotton fibers and outer integument of the ovules, and GhLTPG1 protein was located on cell membrane. Biochemical analysis showed that GhLTPG1 specifically bound to phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphates (PtdIns3P, PtdIns4P and PtdIns5P) in vitro and transported PtdInsPs from the synthesis places to the plasma membranes in vivo. Expression of GhLTPG1 in Arabidopsis caused an increased number of trichomes, and fibers in GhLTPG1-knockdown cotton plants exhibited significantly reduced length, decreased polar lipid content, and repression of fiber elongation-related genes expression. These results suggested that GhLTPG1 protein regulates the cotton fiber elongation through mediating the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates. PMID:27311358

  17. Impact of drought and high temperature stresses on cotton fiber development and fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is the number one cash crop in the Texas High Plains. About 25% US cotton is produced in this region. However, increasingly shortage in water supply for irrigation has made cotton growers to either reduce water usage and/or grow cotton on dry-land conditions. Drought combined with frequent ...

  18. The evolution of spinnable cotton fiber entailed prolonged development and a novel metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hovav, Ran; Udall, Joshua A; Chaudhary, Bhupendra; Hovav, Einat; Flagel, Lex; Hu, Guanjing; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2008-02-01

    A central question in evolutionary biology concerns the developmental processes by which new phenotypes arise. An exceptional example of evolutionary innovation is the single-celled seed trichome in Gossypium ("cotton fiber"). We have used fiber development in Gossypium as a system to understand how morphology can rapidly evolve. Fiber has undergone considerable morphological changes between the short, tightly adherent fibers of G. longicalyx and the derived long, spinnable fibers of its closest relative, G. herbaceum, which facilitated cotton domestication. We conducted comparative gene expression profiling across a developmental time-course of fibers from G. longicalyx and G. herbaceum using microarrays with approximately 22,000 genes. Expression changes between stages were temporally protracted in G. herbaceum relative to G. longicalyx, reflecting a prolongation of the ancestral developmental program. Gene expression and GO analyses showed that many genes involved with stress responses were upregulated early in G. longicalyx fiber development. Several candidate genes upregulated in G. herbaceum have been implicated in regulating redox levels and cell elongation processes. Three genes previously shown to modulate hydrogen peroxide levels were consistently expressed in domesticated and wild cotton species with long fibers, but expression was not detected by quantitative real time-PCR in wild species with short fibers. Hydrogen peroxide is important for cell elongation, but at high concentrations it becomes toxic, activating stress processes that may lead to early onset of secondary cell wall synthesis and the end of cell elongation. These observations suggest that the evolution of long spinnable fibers in cotton was accompanied by novel expression of genes assisting in the regulation of reactive oxygen species levels. Our data suggest a model for the evolutionary origin of a novel morphology through differential gene regulation causing prolongation of an ancestral

  19. Cotton-derived bulk and fiber aerogels grafted with nitrogen-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yibin; He, Xiaodong; Ding, Yujie; Peng, Qingyu; Zhao, Wenqi; Shi, Enzheng; Wu, Shiting; Cao, Anyuan

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional graphene-based structures such as graphene aerogels or foams have shown applications in energy, environmental matters, and many other areas. Here, we present a method to convert raw cotton into functional aerogels containing a significant amount of nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) sheets grafted on carbonized cellulose fibers. Urea was introduced into raw cotton as a molecular template as well as a nitrogen source to synthesize mushroom-like N-graphene sheets strongly attached to cotton skeletons. The excellent processability of raw cotton allows us to configure bulk or meter-long fiber shaped aerogels, with high porosity and flexibility. Synergistic effects stemming from the integration of N-graphene and carbonized cotton skeletons promise potential applications as conductive electrodes for supercapacitors, with a measured specific capacitance of 107.5 F g-1 in a two-electrode system. Our results indicate a low-cost and scalable approach toward high-performance graphene-based aerogels and electrodes via biomass templating.Three-dimensional graphene-based structures such as graphene aerogels or foams have shown applications in energy, environmental matters, and many other areas. Here, we present a method to convert raw cotton into functional aerogels containing a significant amount of nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) sheets grafted on carbonized cellulose fibers. Urea was introduced into raw cotton as a molecular template as well as a nitrogen source to synthesize mushroom-like N-graphene sheets strongly attached to cotton skeletons. The excellent processability of raw cotton allows us to configure bulk or meter-long fiber shaped aerogels, with high porosity and flexibility. Synergistic effects stemming from the integration of N-graphene and carbonized cotton skeletons promise potential applications as conductive electrodes for supercapacitors, with a measured specific capacitance of 107.5 F g-1 in a two-electrode system. Our results

  20. Rapid measurement of cotton fiber maturity and fineness by image analysis microscopy using the Cottonscope®

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two of the important cotton fiber quality and processing parameters are fiber maturity and fineness. Fiber maturity is the degree of development of the fiber’s secondary wall, and fiber fineness is a measure of the fiber’s linear density and can be expressed as mass per unit length. A well-known m...

  1. Variations and relationship of quality and NIR spectral characteristics of cotton fibers collected from multi-location field performance trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High volume instrumentation (HVITM) and advanced fiber information system (AFIS) measurements are increasingly being utilized as primary and routine means of acquiring fiber quality data by cotton breeders and fiber processors. There is amount of information regarding fiber and yarn qualities, but l...

  2. Mapping of fiber quality QTLs reveals useful variation and footprints of cotton domestication using introgression lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Wen; Zhu, Xie-Fei; Feng, Liu-Chun; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Fiber quality improvement is a driving force for further cotton domestication and breeding. Here, QTLs for fiber quality were mapped in 115 introgression lines (ILs) first developed from two intraspecific populations of cultivated and feral cotton landraces. A total of 60 QTLs were found, which explained 2.03-16.85% of the phenotypic variance found in fiber quality traits. A total of 36 markers were associated with five fiber traits, 33 of which were found to be associated with QTLs in multiple environments. In addition, nine pairs of common QTLs were identified; namely, one pair of QTLs for fiber elongation, three pairs for fiber length, three pairs for fiber strength and two pairs for micronaire (qMICs). All common QTLs had additive effects in the same direction in both IL populations. We also found five QTL clusters, allowing cotton breeders to focus their efforts on regions of QTLs with the highest percentages of phenotypic variance. Our results also reveal footprints of domestication; for example, fourteen QTLs with positive effects were found to have remained in modern cultivars during domestication, and two negative qMICs that had never been reported before were found, suggesting that the qMICs regions may be eliminated during artificial selection. PMID:27549323

  3. Mapping of fiber quality QTLs reveals useful variation and footprints of cotton domestication using introgression lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-Wen; Zhu, Xie-Fei; Feng, Liu-Chun; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Fiber quality improvement is a driving force for further cotton domestication and breeding. Here, QTLs for fiber quality were mapped in 115 introgression lines (ILs) first developed from two intraspecific populations of cultivated and feral cotton landraces. A total of 60 QTLs were found, which explained 2.03–16.85% of the phenotypic variance found in fiber quality traits. A total of 36 markers were associated with five fiber traits, 33 of which were found to be associated with QTLs in multiple environments. In addition, nine pairs of common QTLs were identified; namely, one pair of QTLs for fiber elongation, three pairs for fiber length, three pairs for fiber strength and two pairs for micronaire (qMICs). All common QTLs had additive effects in the same direction in both IL populations. We also found five QTL clusters, allowing cotton breeders to focus their efforts on regions of QTLs with the highest percentages of phenotypic variance. Our results also reveal footprints of domestication; for example, fourteen QTLs with positive effects were found to have remained in modern cultivars during domestication, and two negative qMICs that had never been reported before were found, suggesting that the qMICs regions may be eliminated during artificial selection. PMID:27549323

  4. Light-induced surface graft polymerizations initiated by an anthraquinone dye on cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Jingyuan; Sun, Gang

    2014-11-01

    Anthraquinone and its derivatives could serve as photo-sensitizers and generate radicals and reactive oxygen species in polymers under exposure of UVA or day light. Such a property was utilized in development of novel light-induced surface radical graft polymerizations on cotton fibers that were dyed with an anthraquinone derivative, 2-ethylanthraquinone. Several functional monomers were directly grafted onto the dyed cotton fibers upon UVA exposure. The chemical and morphological structures and thermal properties of the grafted fibers were confirmed and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reaction conditions including concentrations of the photosensitizer, the amount of monomers, as well as UVA irradiation time could influence grafting efficiencies. More interestingly, the surface graft polymerization did not significantly change the light active functions of the agent, evidenced by the light-active antimicrobial functions of the grafted fibers. PMID:25129730

  5. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles in textile finish aqueous system and their antimicrobial properties on cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by a simple and environmentally benign procedure using poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) as reducing agent and stabilizer in the textile finish aqueous system, and their antimicrobial properties on greige (mechanically cleaned) and bleached cotton fibers were i...

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy in the assessment of cotton fiber qualities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is one of the most important agricultural commodities in the world. Its production and profitability are determined by at least three main factors including genotype, environment, and production practices that interact to one another and ultimately affects the yield and quality of cotto...

  7. FT-IR examination of the development of secondary cell wall in cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The secondary cell wall development of cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering was examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Generally, a progressive intensity increase for bands assigned to cellulose Iß was ...

  8. 49 CFR 176.900 - Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Packaging and stowage of cotton and vegetable fibers; general. 176.900 Section 176.900 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL...

  9. Release notice of MD 9ne and MD25 high fiber quality cotton germplasm lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MD 9ne and MD 25 are non-commercial breeding lines of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) released by the USDA-ARS at Stoneville, MS. One parent of MD 9ne was a strain of MD 51ne that had high fiber quality genes introduced from the Species Polycross. The other parent was MD 15. The parents of MD 25 a...

  10. Comparison of nir methods for measuring cotton fiber maturity and fineness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity and fineness are important cotton fiber properties, as they can impact the fiber’s downstream processability and dye performance. Maturity and fineness are often indicated indirectly by the fiber’s micronaire. Maturity and fineness can be measured directly, but most available methods are ...

  11. Comprehensive analysis of TCP transcription factors and their expression during cotton (Gossypium arboreum) fiber early development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qinglian; Wang, Kunbo; Jones, Don C.; Zhang, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors implicated to perform a variety of physiological functions during plant growth and development. In the current study, we performed for the first time the comprehensive analysis of TCP gene family in a diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum, including phylogenetic analysis, chromosome location, gene duplication status, gene structure and conserved motif analysis, as well as expression profiles in fiber at different developmental stages. Our results showed that G. arboreum contains 36 TCP genes, distributing across all of the thirteen chromosomes. GaTCPs within the same subclade of the phylogenetic tree shared similar exon/intron organization and motif composition. In addition, both segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication contributed significantly to the expansion of GaTCPs. Many these TCP transcription factor genes are specifically expressed in cotton fiber during different developmental stages, including cotton fiber initiation and early development. This suggests that TCP genes may play important roles in cotton fiber development. PMID:26857372

  12. The relationship between cotton canopy temperature and yield, fiber quality and water-use efficiency.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop canopy temperature (Tc) is associated with transpiration and Tc has been used in crop water stress detection. This study investigates the effect of surface drip and furrow irrigation regimes on cotton Tc. It outlines the relationship between Tc and lint yield, fiber quality and total water-use ...

  13. Proteomics profiling of fiber development and domestication in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Hu, Guanjing; Koh, Jin; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Pathak, Dharminder; Chen, Sixue; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2014-12-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses were performed to detail the evolutionary consequences of strong directional selection for enhanced fiber traits in modern upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Using two complementary proteomic approaches, 2-DE and iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, fiber proteomes were examined for four representative stages of fiber development. Approximately 1,000 protein features were characterized using each strategy, collectively resulting in the identification and functional categorization of 1,223 proteins. Unequal contributions of homoeologous proteins were detected for over a third of the fiber proteome, but overall expression was balanced with respect to the genome-of-origin in the allopolyploid G. hirsutum. About 30% of the proteins were differentially expressed during fiber development within wild and domesticated cotton. Notably, domestication was accompanied by a doubling of protein developmental dynamics for the period between 10 and 20 days following pollination. Expression levels of 240 iTRAQ proteins and 293 2-DE spots were altered by domestication, collectively representing multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis and destination, defense and stress response. Analyses of homoeolog-specific expression indicate that duplicated gene products in cotton fibers can be differently regulated in response to selection. These results demonstrate the power of proteomics for the analysis of crop domestication and phenotypic evolution. PMID:25156487

  14. Natural cellulose fibers from switchgrass with tensile properties similar to cotton and linen.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2007-08-01

    We report the production and characteristics of natural cellulose fibers obtained from the leaves and stems of switchgrass. In this paper, the composition, structure and properties of fibers obtained from the leaves and stem of switchgrass have been studied in comparison to the common natural cellulose fibers, such as cotton, linen and kenaf. The leaves and stems of switchgrass have tensile properties intriguingly similar to that of linen and cotton, respectively. Fibers were obtained from the leaves and stems of switchgrass using a simple alkaline extraction and the structure and properties of the fibers were studied. Fibers obtained from switchgrass leaves have crystallinity of 51%, breaking tenacity of 5.5 g per denier (715 MPa) and breaking elongation of 2.2% whereas the corresponding values for fibers obtained from switchgrass stems are 46%, 2.7 g per denier and 6.8%, respectively. Switchgrass is a relatively easy to grow and high yield biomass crop that can be source to partially substitute the natural and synthetic fibers currently in use. We hope that this research will stimulate interests in using switchgrass as a novel fiber crop in addition to being promoted as a potential source for biofuels. PMID:17221888

  15. Use of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy in direct, non-destructive, and rapid assessment of developmental cotton fibers grown in planta and in culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are routinely harvested from cotton plants (in planta), and their end-use qualities depend on their development stages. Cotton fibers are also cultured at controlled laboratory environments, so that cotton researchers can investigate many aspects of experimental protocols in cotton bre...

  16. AUTOMATED COTTON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINATION OF FIBER QUALITY SPATIAL VARIABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of accurate prescription maps for site-specific management of crops requires knowledge of the spatially registered crop profitability. In cotton (Gossypium L. sps.), the quality of the crop alters the price paid for the lint, and hence is an important determinant of the net profit. Cotto...

  17. Measurements of seed coat fragments in cotton fibers and fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed coat fragments (SCF) are parts of a seed coat that have been broken from the surface of either mature or immature seeds during mechanical processing. SCF can cause spinning problems and fabric defects, which ultimately cause losses to the cotton industry. The objective of this study was to dev...

  18. Laboratory ginning and blending impacts on cotton fiber micronaire measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire, a critical cotton quality parameter, is normally measured in a conditioned laboratory, but increasing interest has been shown in new technologies that can measure micronaire both in and outside of the laboratory. Near Infrared (NIR) technology has demonstrated its ability to measure cot...

  19. Preliminary field measurement of cotton fiber micronaire by portable NIR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The decline of the U.S. textile industry has led to the dramatic increase in the export of U.S. cotton. Improved quality measurement systems are needed to successfully compete in the global marketplace. One key need is the development of new breeder/producer quality tools for field and at-line mea...

  20. Relationships of cotton fiber properties to ring-spun yarn quality on selected High Plains cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the adequacy of High Volume Instruement (HVI) and Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS) fiber quality parameters for predicting quality parameters of ring-spun yarns considering differences in harvest method. Fiber properties measured using the HVI (...

  1. Quantitative estimate of the effect of cellulase components during degradation of cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Shan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Yang, Hong; Gao, Pei-Ji

    2004-03-15

    A comprehensive mechanistic kinetic model for enzymatic degradation of cotton fibers has been established based on a complete factorial experiment in combination with multivariate stepwise regression analysis. The analysis of the statistical parameter value in the model suggests that the enzymatic degradation of cotton fiber is a progressive and heterogeneous process that includes, at least, two courses that occur sequentially and then progress in parallel. Cellulose fibers were first depolymerized or solubilized by the synergism between cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) and endoglucanase I (EGI), and then the oligomers obtained were randomly hydrolyzed into glucose by EGI and beta-glucosidase. The proposed model can be applied to the quantitative estimation of the effects of three cellulase components, CBHI, EGI, and beta-glucosidase separately, or in combination during the entire process of cellulose degradation. The validity of the proposed model has been verified by a filter paper activity assay. Its other applicability was also discussed. PMID:14980825

  2. Performance of the Cottonscan Instrument for Measuring the Average Fiber Linear Density (Fineness) of Cotton Lint Samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper explores the CottonscanTM instrument, a new technology designed for routine measurement of the average linear density (fineness) of cotton fiber. A major international inter-laboratory trial of the CottonscanTM system is presented. This expands the range of cottons and laboratories fro...

  3. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: COTTON GINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of air pollutants from cotton gins. Cotton gins separate cotton fibers from cottonseed and trash. During the 1976 crop year, 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power metric tons of lint cotton were ginned. Particulates composed of cotton dust, cotton lint, fine-lea...

  4. MOLECULAR TAGGING OF A MAJOR QTL FOR FIBER STRENGTH IN UPLAND COTTON AND INTO MARKER ASSISTED SELECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber is a basic raw material in the textile industry. The changes in spinning technology have in common the requirement of unique and often greater cotton fiber quality, especially strength, for processing. We used a G. anomalum introgression line, 7235, characterized as good fiber quality properti...

  5. Molecular markers associated with the immature fiber (im) gene affecting the degree of fiber cell wall thickening in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber fineness and maturity measured indirectly as micronaire (MIC) are important properties of determining fiber grades in the textile market. To understand the genetic control and molecular mechanisms of fiber fineness and maturity, we studied two near isogenic lines (NILs), Gossypium hirs...

  6. Elevated growing degree days influence transition stage timing during cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber development and result in increased fiber strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing degree days required for cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) growth and development were recorded for four growing seasons and compared with fiber quality measurements and gene expression data indicative of different stages of fiber development. Comparative fiber bundle strength differences betw...

  7. Understanding the cotton fiber elongation process using short fiber mutants, the Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) and -2 (Li2) as an experiment model system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. Understanding the molecular basis of fiber elongation would provide a means for improvement of fiber length. Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) and Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) are monogenic and dominant m...

  8. Temperature regime and carbon dioxide enrichment alter cotton boll development and fiber properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Davidonis, G.H.; Johnson, A.S.; Vinyard, B.T.

    1999-10-01

    Temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO{sub 2}] affect cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) growth and development, but the interaction of these two factors on bill and fiber properties has not been studied. An experiment was conducted in naturally lit plant growth chambers to determine the influence of temperature and atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] on cotton (cv. DPL-51) boll and fiber growth parameters. Five temperature regimes were evaluated: the 1995 temperature at Mississippi State, MS; the 1995 temperature minus 2 C; and the 1995 temperature plus 2, 5, and 7 C. Daily and seasonal variation and amplitudes were maintained. Atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] treatments were 360 (ambient) and 720 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1}. Boll number, boll growth, and fiber properties were measured. Boll size and maturation periods decreased as temperature increased. Boll growth increased with temperature to 25 C and then declined at the highest temperature. Boll maturation period, size, and growth rates were not affected by atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. The most temperature-sensitive aspect of cotton development is boll retention. Almost no bolls were retained to maturity at 1995 plus 5 or 7 C, but squares and bolls were continuously produced even at those high temperatures. Therefore, the upper limit for cotton boll survival is 32 C, or 5 C warmer than the 1995 US Mid-South ambient temperatures. The 720 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] had about 40% more squares and bolls across temperatures than the 360 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} [CO{sub 2}]. Fibers were longer when bolls grew at less than optimal temperatures (25 C) for boll growth. As temperature increased, fiber length distributions were more uniform. Fiber fineness and maturity increased linearly with the increase in temperature up to 26 C, but decreased at 32 C. Short-fiber content declined linearly from 17 to 26 C, but was higher at higher temperature. As for boll growth and developmental parameters, elevated

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing of fiber-related genes in cotton.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Haigler, Candace H; Robertson, Dominique Niki

    2015-01-01

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) is a useful method for transient downregulation of gene expression in crop plants. The geminivirus Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV) has been modified to serve as a VIGS vector for persistent gene silencing in cotton. Here the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is described as a marker for identifying silenced tissues in reproductive tissues, a procedure that requires the use of transgenic plants. Suggestions are given for isolating and cloning combinations of target and marker sequences so that the total length of inserted foreign DNA is between 500 and 750 bp. Using this strategy, extensive silencing is achieved with only 200-400 bp of sequence homologous to an endogenous gene, reducing the possibility of off-target silencing. Cotyledons can be inoculated using either the gene gun or Agrobacterium and will continue to show silencing throughout fruit and fiber development. CLCrV is not transmitted through seed, and VIGS is limited to genes expressed in the maternally derived seed coat and fiber in the developing seed. This complicates the use of GFP as a marker for VIGS because cotton fibers must be separated from unsilenced tissue in the seed to determine if they are silenced. Nevertheless, fibers from a large number of seeds can be rapidly screened following placement into 96-well plates. Methods for quantifying the extent of silencing using semiquantitative RT-PCR are given. PMID:25740368

  10. Modification and characterization of cellulosic cotton fibers for efficient immobilization of urease.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; El-Sokkary, A M A

    2012-01-01

    Cotton fibers were first grafted by polyacrylonitril in the presence of KMnO(4) and oxalic acid as a combined redox initiator. Moreover, modification of the grafted cotton fibers was done by changing the nitrile group (-CN) into hydrazidine group through the reaction with hydrazine hydrate, then the fibers were activated by glutaraldehyde to introduce free aldehyde groups which were able to react with amino groups of urease to form Schiff's base, and result in cotton fibers immobilized urease. The efficiency of the immobilization was evaluated by examining the relative enzymatic activity of enzyme before and after the immobilization of urease. The results showed that the optimum temperature of immobilized urease was 35°C, which was higher than that of the free enzyme (30°C), and the immobilized urease exhibited a higher relative activity than that of free urease over 35°C. The optimal pH for immobilized urease was 6.5, which was lower than that of the free urease (pH 7.0), and the immobilization resulted in stabilization of enzyme over a wider pH range. The kinetic constant value (K(m)) of immobilized urease was higher than that of the free urease. However, the thermal and operational stabilities of immobilized urease have been improved greatly. PMID:22564966

  11. Integrated metabolomics and genomics analysis provides new insights into the fiber elongation process in Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) mutant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait characteristic that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. The cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber mutation, Ligon lintless-2, is controlled by a single dominant gene (Li2) and results in extremely shortened lint fibers on mature ...

  12. Mapping by sequencing in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) line MD52ne identified candidate genes for fiber strength and its related quality attributes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber strength, length, maturity and fineness determine the market value of cotton fibers and the quality of spun yarn. Cotton fiber strength has been recognized as a critical quality attribute in the modern textile industry. Fine mapping along with quantitative trait loci (QTL) validation and candi...

  13. Yield and fiber quality of five pairs of near-isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) lines expressing the fuzzless/linted and fuzzy/linted seed phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fuzzless cotton often has traits desirable to the cotton industry, including longer fibers, reduced short fiber content, fewer neps, and improved ginning efficiency. This two-year field study described yield and fiber properties of five pairs of fuzzy and fuzzless near-isogenic lines, developed from...

  14. Effect of Waterlogging on Carbohydrate Metabolism and the Quality of Fiber in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Jie; Chen, Yinglong; Wang, Youhua; Meng, Yali; Chen, Binglin; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Transient waterlogging occurs frequently in the Yangtze River and adversely affects cotton fiber quality. However, the carbohydrate metabolic mechanism that affects fiber quality after waterlogging remains undescribed. Here, the effects of five waterlogging levels (0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 days) were assessed during flowering and boll formation to characterize the carbohydrates, enzymes and genes that affect the fiber quality of cotton after waterlogging. The cellulose and sucrose contents of cotton fibers were significantly decreased after waterlogging for 6 (WL6), 9 (WL9), and 12 d (WL12), although these properties were unaffected after 3 (WL3) and 6 days at the fruiting branch 14–15 (FB14–15). Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) was the most sensitive to waterlogging among the enzymes tested. SPS activity was decreased by waterlogging at FB6–7, whereas it was significantly enhanced under WL3–6 at FB10–15. Waterlogging down-regulated the expression of fiber invertase at 10 days post anthesis (DPA), whereas that of expansin, β-1,4-glucanase and endoxyloglucan transferase (XET) was up-regulated with increasing waterlogging time. Increased mRNA levels and activities of fiber SuSy at each fruiting branch indicated that SuSy was the main enzyme responsible for sucrose degradation because it was markedly induced by waterlogging and was active even when waterlogging was discontinued. We therefore concluded that the reduction in fiber sucrose and down-regulation of invertase at 10 DPA led to a markedly shorter fiber length under conditions WL6–12. Significantly decreased fiber strength at FB6–11 for WL6–12 was the result of the inhibition of cellulose synthesis and the up-regulation of expansin, β-1,4-glucanase and XET, whereas fiber strength increased under WL3–6 at FB14–15 due to the increased cellulose content of the fibers. Most of the indictors tested revealed that WL6 resulted in the best compensatory performance, whereas exposure to waterlogged

  15. Effect of Waterlogging on Carbohydrate Metabolism and the Quality of Fiber in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Kuai, Jie; Chen, Yinglong; Wang, Youhua; Meng, Yali; Chen, Binglin; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Transient waterlogging occurs frequently in the Yangtze River and adversely affects cotton fiber quality. However, the carbohydrate metabolic mechanism that affects fiber quality after waterlogging remains undescribed. Here, the effects of five waterlogging levels (0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 days) were assessed during flowering and boll formation to characterize the carbohydrates, enzymes and genes that affect the fiber quality of cotton after waterlogging. The cellulose and sucrose contents of cotton fibers were significantly decreased after waterlogging for 6 (WL6), 9 (WL9), and 12 d (WL12), although these properties were unaffected after 3 (WL3) and 6 days at the fruiting branch 14-15 (FB14-15). Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) was the most sensitive to waterlogging among the enzymes tested. SPS activity was decreased by waterlogging at FB6-7, whereas it was significantly enhanced under WL3-6 at FB10-15. Waterlogging down-regulated the expression of fiber invertase at 10 days post anthesis (DPA), whereas that of expansin, β-1,4-glucanase and endoxyloglucan transferase (XET) was up-regulated with increasing waterlogging time. Increased mRNA levels and activities of fiber SuSy at each fruiting branch indicated that SuSy was the main enzyme responsible for sucrose degradation because it was markedly induced by waterlogging and was active even when waterlogging was discontinued. We therefore concluded that the reduction in fiber sucrose and down-regulation of invertase at 10 DPA led to a markedly shorter fiber length under conditions WL6-12. Significantly decreased fiber strength at FB6-11 for WL6-12 was the result of the inhibition of cellulose synthesis and the up-regulation of expansin, β-1,4-glucanase and XET, whereas fiber strength increased under WL3-6 at FB14-15 due to the increased cellulose content of the fibers. Most of the indictors tested revealed that WL6 resulted in the best compensatory performance, whereas exposure to waterlogged conditions for more than 6

  16. Adsorption behaviour of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic profile.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Sallam, H B; Abo Farha, S A; Gamal, A M; Mahmoud, G E A

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber from aqueous solution by using parameters, such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial dye concentration and the effect of sodium sulphate, tetrasodium edate and trisodium citrate. The extent of dye adsorption increased with increasing contact time, temperature and solution concentration. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. It was found that the Langmuir equation fit better than the Freundlich equation. The results show that the presence of SE and SC significantly enhance the dye adsorption onto cotton fiber. In addition, the adsorption data obtained at different temperatures of DY50 onto cotton fiber were applied to pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to pseudo second-order kinetics with good correlation. Also, free energy of adsorption (ΔG(#)), enthalpy (ΔH(#)), and entropy (ΔS(#)) changes were determined to predict the nature of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The activation energy, Ea, is ranged between 1.9 and 3.9kJmol(-1) indicated that the adsorption process is a physisorption. This low value of Ea generally indicates diffusion controlled process. PMID:24882703

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and anti-inflammatory activity of diclofenac-bound cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Roberta; Trombino, Sonia; Ferrarelli, Teresa; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Vincenzo; Mancuso, Cesare; Picci, Nevio

    2010-07-12

    In the present work, we report on the synthesis of cellulose cotton fibers covalently linked to diclofenac moieties and the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of this new biomaterial. In spite of recent progress in experimental and clinical medicine, the problem of chronic wounds treatment is still debated. In fact, conventional methods are based on the use of ointment-soaked bandages, but several physical and biological factors contribute to making the efficacy of this method quite low. For this reason, we developed the idea to using modified cotton gauzes to prevent inflammation during wound healing. In this light, diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was covalently linked to the cellulose backbone of hydrophilic cotton fibers by a heterogeneous synthesis to produce a functionalized biopolymer with a satisfactory degree of substitution and anti-inflammatory activity. Diclofenac was directly linked to fiber microfibril hydroxylic groups using THF with thionyl chloride. The obtained biopolymer was characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to confirm ester linkages. Finally, the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in a well-established in vivo model. The results suggested that these biomaterials possess an excellent anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, so they can be efficiently employed in biomedical fields for chronic wound management to ensure a valid protection against inflammation. PMID:20536117

  18. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  19. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Renhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  20. Preliminary evidence of oxidation in standard oven drying of cotton: attenuated total reflectance/ Fourier transform spectroscopy, colorimetry, and particulate matter formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture is paramount to cotton fiber properties dictating harvesting, ginning, storage and spinning as well as others. Currently, oven drying in air is often utilized to generate the percentage of moisture in cotton fibers. Karl Fischer Titration another method for cotton moisture, has been compa...

  1. Molecular analysis of late-stage fiber development in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is the world's most important textile and the number one value-added crop. It plays a crucial role in the economy of Texas – supporting close to 50,000 jobs and supplying $2 billion to the state economy. Its role is even more evident in the South Plains of Texas, which supplies approximately...

  2. Functional analyses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) immature fiber (im) mutant infer that fiber cell wall development is associated with stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotton fiber maturity is an important factor for determining the commercial value of cotton. How fiber cell wall development affects fiber maturity is not well understood. A comparison of fiber cross-sections showed that an immature fiber (im) mutant had lower fiber maturity than its near isogenic wild type, Texas marker-1 (TM-1). The availability of the im mutant and TM-1 provides a unique way to determine molecular mechanisms regulating cotton fiber maturity. Results Transcriptome analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the im mutant fibers grown under normal stress conditions were similar to those in wild type cotton fibers grown under severe stress conditions. The majority of these DEGs in the im mutant were related to stress responses and cellular respiration. Stress is known to reduce the activity of a classical respiration pathway responsible for energy production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Both energy productions and ROS levels in the im mutant fibers are expected to be reduced if the im mutant is associated with stress responses. In accord with the prediction, the transcriptome profiles of the im mutant showed the same alteration of transcriptional regulation that happened in energy deprived plants in which expressions of genes associated with cell growth processes were reduced whereas expressions of genes associated with recycling and transporting processes were elevated. We confirmed that ROS production in developing fibers from the im mutant was lower than that from the wild type. The lower production of ROS in the im mutant fibers might result from the elevated levels of alternative respiration induced by stress. Conclusion The low degree of fiber cell wall thickness of the im mutant fibers is associated with deregulation of the genes involved in stress responses and cellular respiration. The reduction of ROS levels and up-regulation of the genes involved in alternative respirations suggest that

  3. Recent progress in Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study of compositional, structural, and physical attributes of developmental cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are natural plant products and their end-use qualities depend on their stages of development. In general, the quantity of natural fiber cellulose I (ß 1'4 linked glucose residues) increases rapidly, thus it leads to compositional, structural, and physical attribute variations among the...

  4. Secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers as examined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The selected harvesting points coincide with secondary cell wall (SCW) development in the fibers. Progressive but moderat...

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with cotton fiber development in a chromosomal substitution line (CS-B22sh)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the impediments in the genetic improvement of cotton fiber is the paucity of information about genes associated with fiber development. Availability of chromosome arm substitution line CS-B22sh (chromosome 22 short arm substitution from 3-79 (Gossypium barbadense) into a TM-1 (G. hirsutum ba...

  6. High photocatalytic activity of immobilized TiO2 nanorods on carbonized cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Xuan, Jin; Leung, Michael K H

    2013-12-15

    In this study, TiO2 nanorods were successfully immobilized on carbon fibers by a facile pyrolysis of natural cotton in nitrogen atmosphere followed by a one-pot hydrothermal method. Carbonized cotton fibers (CCFs) and TiO2-CCFs composites were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Results implied that the band gap narrowing of TiO2 was achieved after integration of CCFs. Dye adsorption isotherm indicated that the maximum dye adsorption capacity (qm) of CCFs-1000 (13.4 mg/g) was 2 times higher than that of cotton fibers and qm of TiO2-CCFs-1000 (9.0mg/g) was 6-7 times higher than that of TiO2 nanorods. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanorods prepared with 3 mL Ti(OBu)4 showed the highest photocatalytic activity. TiO2-CCFs-1000 exhibited higher activity than TiO2 immobilized on CCFs-400, CCFs-600 and CCFs-800. Good photostability of TiO2-CCFs-1000 was found for dye degradation under visible light irradiation. The enhancement of photocatalytic dye degradation was due to the high adsorptivity of dye molecules, enhanced light adsorption and effective separation of electron-hole pairs. This work provides a low-cost and sustainable approach to immobilize nanostructured TiO2 on carbon fibers for environmental remediation. PMID:24220193

  7. Sequencing of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1) provides a resource for fiber improvement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Hu, Yan; Jiang, Wenkai; Fang, Lei; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Jiedan; Zhang, Jinbo; Saski, Christopher A; Scheffler, Brian E; Stelly, David M; Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Wan, Qun; Liu, Bingliang; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Sen; Pan, Mengqiao; Wang, Yangkun; Wang, Dawei; Ye, Wenxue; Chang, Lijing; Zhang, Wenpan; Song, Qingxin; Kirkbride, Ryan C; Chen, Xiaoya; Dennis, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Danny J; Peterson, Daniel G; Thaxton, Peggy; Jones, Don C; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Huaitong; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Gaofu; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Yue; Xiang, Dan; Li, Xinghe; Ding, Jian; Zuo, Qiyang; Tao, Linna; Liu, Yunchao; Li, Ji; Lin, Yu; Hui, Yuanyuan; Cao, Zhisheng; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Jiang, Zhi; Zhou, Baoliang; Guo, Wangzhen; Li, Ruiqiang; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Upland cotton is a model for polyploid crop domestication and transgenic improvement. Here we sequenced the allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1 genome by integrating whole-genome shotgun reads, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences and genotype-by-sequencing genetic maps. We assembled and annotated 32,032 A-subgenome genes and 34,402 D-subgenome genes. Structural rearrangements, gene loss, disrupted genes and sequence divergence were more common in the A subgenome than in the D subgenome, suggesting asymmetric evolution. However, no genome-wide expression dominance was found between the subgenomes. Genomic signatures of selection and domestication are associated with positively selected genes (PSGs) for fiber improvement in the A subgenome and for stress tolerance in the D subgenome. This draft genome sequence provides a resource for engineering superior cotton lines. PMID:25893781

  8. Laboratory and outside the laboratory measurements of ginned and ot ginned cotton for fiber micronaire and maturity by portable Near Infrared (NIR) Instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton quality assessment property, impacting downstream fiber processing and dye consistency. A component of micronaire is fiber maturity (degree of secondary wall development). Historically, micronaire and maturity are measured in a laboratory under tight environmental condit...

  9. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R. F.; Earl, H. J.; Timper, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  10. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality.

    PubMed

    Davis, R F; Earl, H J; Timper, P

    2014-06-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  11. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  12. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  13. The Li2 Mutation Results in Reduced Subgenome Expression Bias in Elongating Fibers of Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Naoumkina, Marina; Thyssen, Gregory; Fang, David D.; Hinchliffe, Doug J.; Florane, Christopher; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Page, Justin T.; Udall, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) technology was used to evaluate the effects of the Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) short fiber mutation on transcriptomes of both subgenomes of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) as compared to its near-isogenic wild type. Sequencing was performed on 4 libraries from developing fibers of Li2 mutant and wild type near-isogenic lines at the peak of elongation followed by mapping and PolyCat categorization of RNA-seq data to the reference D5 genome (G. raimondii) for homeologous gene expression analysis. The majority of homeologous genes, 83.6% according to the reference genome, were expressed during fiber elongation. Our results revealed: 1) approximately two times more genes were induced in the AT subgenome comparing to the DT subgenome in wild type and mutant fiber; 2) the subgenome expression bias was significantly reduced in the Li2 fiber transcriptome; 3) Li2 had a significantly greater effect on the DT than on the AT subgenome. Transcriptional regulators and cell wall homeologous genes significantly affected by the Li2 mutation were reviewed in detail. This is the first report to explore the effects of a single mutation on homeologous gene expression in allotetraploid cotton. These results provide deeper insights into the evolution of allotetraploid cotton gene expression and cotton fiber development. PMID:24598808

  14. Small RNA sequencing and degradome analysis of developing fibers of short fiber mutants Ligon-lintles-1 (Li1) and -2 (Li2) revealed a role for miRNAs and their targets in cotton fiber elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. Understanding the molecular basis of fiber elongation would provide a means for improvement of fiber length. Ligon-lintless-1 (Li1) and -2 (Li2) are monogenic and dominant mutations that ...

  15. Variations and Transmission of QTL Alleles for Yield and Fiber Qualities in Upland Cotton Cultivars Developed in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Qian, Neng; Zhu, Xiefei; Chen, Hong; Wang, Sen; Mei, Hongxian; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-01-01

    Cotton is the world’s leading cash crop, and genetic improvement of fiber yield and quality is the primary objective of cotton breeding program. In this study, we used various approaches to identify QTLs related to fiber yield and quality. Firstly, we constructed a four-way cross (4WC) mapping population with four base core cultivars, Stoneville 2B, Foster 6, Deltapine 15 and Zhongmiansuo No.7 (CRI 7), as parents in Chinese cotton breeding history and identified 83 QTLs for 11 agronomic and fiber quality traits. Secondly, association mapping of agronomical and fiber quality traits was based on 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using a general linear model (GLM). For this, 81 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions including the four core parents and their derived cultivars were grown in seven diverse environments. Using these approaches, we successfully identified 180 QTLs significantly associated with agronomic and fiber quality traits. Among them were 66 QTLs that were identified via linkage disequilibrium (LD) and 4WC family-based linkage (FBL) mapping and by previously published family-based linkage (FBL) mapping in modern Chinese cotton cultivars. Twenty eight and 44 consistent QTLs were identified by 4WC and LD mapping, and by FBL and LD mapping methods, respectively. Furthermore, transmission and variation of QTL-alleles mapped by LD association in the three breeding periods revealed that some could be detected in almost all Chinese cotton cultivars, suggesting their stable transmission and some identified only in the four base cultivars and not in the modern cultivars, suggesting they were missed in conventional breeding. These results will be useful to conduct genomics-assisted breeding effectively using these existing and novel QTL alleles to improve yield and fiber qualities in cotton. PMID:23468939

  16. Introgression of genes for cotton leaf curl virus resistance and increased fiber strength from Gossypium stocksii into upland cotton (G. hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Nazeer, W; Ahmad, S; Mahmood, K; Tipu, A L; Mahmood, A; Zhou, B

    2014-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus disease is a major hurdle for successful cotton production in Pakistan. There has been considerable economic loss due to this disease during the last decade. It would be desirable to have cotton varieties resistant to this disease. We explored the possibility of transferring virus resistant genes from the wild species Gossypium stocksii into MNH-786, a cultivar of G. hirsutum. Hybridization was done under field condition at the Cotton Research Station, Multan, during 2010-11. Boll shedding was controlled by application of exogenous hormones. F1 seeds were treated with 0.03% colchicine solution for 6 h and germinated. Cytological observations at peak squaring/flowering stage showed that these plants were hexaploid, having 2n = 6x = 78 chromosomes. The F1 plants showed intermediate expression for leaf size, leaf area, petiole length, bracteole number and size, bracteole area, bracteole dentation, flower size, pedicel size, and petal number and size. Moreover it possessed high fiber strength of 54.4 g/tex, which is 54% greater than that of the check variety, i.e. MNH-786 (G. hirsutum). The F1 population did not show any symptom of CLCuVD in the field, tested by grafting with CLCuVD susceptible rootstock (var. S12). We conclude that it is possible to transfer CLCuVD resistance and high fiber strength from G. stocksii to G. hirsutum. PMID:24634169

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Short Fiber Mutant Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) Reveals Critical Genes and Key Pathways in Cotton Fiber Elongation and Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenhua; Fang, Lei; Xiang, Dan; Hu, Yan; Feng, Hao; Chang, Lijing; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-01-01

    For efficient spinning and superior fabric production, long fiber length is a desired trait for cotton production. To unveil the molecular basis of the cotton fiber length regulation, a short fiber mutant, Ligon lintless-1 (Li1), is selected to compare with its corresponding wild type (WT). Li1 is a monogenic dominant cotton mutant causing extremely short fibers (<6mm) on mature seeds with visible pleiotropic effects on vegetative growth and development. In this research, we compared the transcriptome of fiber bearing ovules at 1 DPA, 3 DPA, 8 DPA and leaf between Li1 mutant and WT. A total of 7,852 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in ovules and leaves, which mainly participated in sugar, secondary metabolite and lipid metabolism pathways based on KEGG analysis. The common DEGs at 1 DPA and 3 DPA were involved in the responses to endogenous stimulus, signal transduction and long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis. For 3 DPA, 8 DPA and leaf, the common DEGs were involved in the responses to auxin and receptor kinases related pathway. Further analysis showed that 37 genes involved in very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis were suppressed in Li1 mutant during fiber fast elongation development. Most of the DEGs involved in cell wall metabolism, such cellulose synthase, expansin family, and glycosyl hydrolase were differentially expressed at 3 DPA and 8 DPA. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of fiber elongation, and offer novel genes as potential objects for fiber length improvement. PMID:26600249

  18. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Song, Xianliang; Naoumkina, Marina; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fang, David D

    2014-07-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary independently between different cell types and developmental stages. Our objective was to determine the relationship between mitochondrial gene copy number and transcript abundance in the elongating fiber cells of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). We compared RNA and DNA from cotton fiber cells at five developmental time points from early elongation through secondary cell wall thickening from the Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) short fiber mutant and its wild type near isogenic line (NIL) DP5690. Mitochondrial gene copy number decreased from 3 to 8-DPA in the developing cotton fiber cells while transcript levels remained low. As secondary cell wall biosynthesis began in developing fibers, the expression levels and copy numbers of mitochondrial genes involved in energy production and respiration were up-regulated in wild type cotton DP5690. However, the short fiber mutant Li2, failed to increase expression of these genes, which include three subunits of ATP synthase, atp1, atp8 and atp9 and two cytochrome genes cox1 and cob. At the same time, Li2 failed to increase the copy numbers of these highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, we found that when mitochondrial genes were highly transcribed, they also had very high copy numbers. This observation suggests that in developing cotton fibers, increased mitochondrial sublimon replication may support increases in gene transcription. PMID:24768176

  19. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton seed trichomes are the globally most important source of natural fibers. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process...

  20. Phytohormonal networks promote differentiation of fiber initials on pre-anthesis cotton ovules grown in vitro and in planta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Hinchliffe, Doug J; Triplett, Barbara A; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Stelly, David M; Yeater, Kathleen M; Moon, Hong S; Gilbert, Matthew K; Thyssen, Gregory N; Turley, Rickie B; Fang, David D

    2015-01-01

    The number of cotton (Gossypium sp.) ovule epidermal cells differentiating into fiber initials is an important factor affecting cotton yield and fiber quality. Despite extensive efforts in determining the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber initial differentiation, only a few genes responsible for fiber initial differentiation have been discovered. To identify putative genes directly involved in the fiber initiation process, we used a cotton ovule culture technique that controls the timing of fiber initial differentiation by exogenous phytohormone application in combination with comparative expression analyses between wild type and three fiberless mutants. The addition of exogenous auxin and gibberellins to pre-anthesis wild type ovules that did not have visible fiber initials increased the expression of genes affecting auxin, ethylene, ABA and jasmonic acid signaling pathways within 1 h after treatment. Most transcripts expressed differentially by the phytohormone treatment in vitro were also differentially expressed in the ovules of wild type and fiberless mutants that were grown in planta. In addition to MYB25-like, a gene that was previously shown to be associated with the differentiation of fiber initials, several other differentially expressed genes, including auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA) involved in auxin signaling, ACC oxidase involved in ethylene biosynthesis, and abscisic acid (ABA) 8'-hydroxylase an enzyme that controls the rate of ABA catabolism, were co-regulated in the pre-anthesis ovules of both wild type and fiberless mutants. These results support the hypothesis that phytohormonal signaling networks regulate the temporal expression of genes responsible for differentiation of cotton fiber initials in vitro and in planta. PMID:25927364

  1. Phytohormonal Networks Promote Differentiation of Fiber Initials on Pre-Anthesis Cotton Ovules Grown In Vitro and In Planta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jin; Hinchliffe, Doug J.; Triplett, Barbara A.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Stelly, David M.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Moon, Hong S.; Gilbert, Matthew K.; Thyssen, Gregory N.; Turley, Rickie B.; Fang, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The number of cotton (Gossypium sp.) ovule epidermal cells differentiating into fiber initials is an important factor affecting cotton yield and fiber quality. Despite extensive efforts in determining the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber initial differentiation, only a few genes responsible for fiber initial differentiation have been discovered. To identify putative genes directly involved in the fiber initiation process, we used a cotton ovule culture technique that controls the timing of fiber initial differentiation by exogenous phytohormone application in combination with comparative expression analyses between wild type and three fiberless mutants. The addition of exogenous auxin and gibberellins to pre-anthesis wild type ovules that did not have visible fiber initials increased the expression of genes affecting auxin, ethylene, ABA and jasmonic acid signaling pathways within 1 h after treatment. Most transcripts expressed differentially by the phytohormone treatment in vitro were also differentially expressed in the ovules of wild type and fiberless mutants that were grown in planta. In addition to MYB25-like, a gene that was previously shown to be associated with the differentiation of fiber initials, several other differentially expressed genes, including auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA) involved in auxin signaling, ACC oxidase involved in ethylene biosynthesis, and abscisic acid (ABA) 8'-hydroxylase an enzyme that controls the rate of ABA catabolism, were co-regulated in the pre-anthesis ovules of both wild type and fiberless mutants. These results support the hypothesis that phytohormonal signaling networks regulate the temporal expression of genes responsible for differentiation of cotton fiber initials in vitro and in planta. PMID:25927364

  2. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of CuO nanostructures templated by cotton fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yunling; Li, Yan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Qingjun; An, Dongmin

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Flower-like and corn-like CuO nanostructures were synthesized by a simple method. ► Cotton fibers purchased from commercially are used as template. ► The concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution is an important parameter. -- Abstract: Flower-like and corn-like CuO nanostructures composed of CuO nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via ultrasound-assisted template method, respectively, by controlling the initial concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution. Here, cotton fibers were used as template agent. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The results demonstrated that the initial concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution was an important parameter for determining whether CuO nanoparticles assembled into flower-like structures or corn-like structures. The mechanism of forming different nanostructures of CuO was discussed.

  3. Electrokinetic and Hemostatic Profiles of Nonwoven Cellulosic/Synthetic Fiber Blends with Unbleached Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Vincent; Graves, Elena; Bopp, Alvin; Prevost, Nicolette; Santiago, Michael; Condon, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Greige cotton contains waxes and pectin on the outer surface of the fiber that are removed when bleached, but these components present potential wound dressing functionality. Cotton nonwovens blended with hydrophobic and hydrophilic fibers including viscose, polyester, and polypropylene were assessed for clotting activity with thromboelastography (TEG) and thrombin production. Clotting was evaluated based on TEG measurements: R (time to initiation of clot formation), K (time from end of R to a 20 mm clot), α (rate of clot formation according to the angle tangent to the curve as K is reached), and MA (clot strength). TEG values correlate to material surface polarity as measured with electrokinetic parameters (ζplateau, Δζ and swell ratio). The material surface polarity (ζplateau) varied from −22 to −61 mV. K values and thrombin concentrations were found to be inversely proportional to ζplateau with an increase in material hydrophobicity. An increase in the swell ratios of the materials correlated with decreased K values suggesting that clotting rates following fibrin formation increase with increasing material surface area due to swelling. Clot strength (MA) also increased with material hydrophobicity. Structure/function implications from the observed clotting physiology induced by the materials are discussed. PMID:25459983

  4. GTPase activity and biochemical characterization of a recombinant cotton fiber annexin

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.; Brown, R.M. Jr. . Dept. of Botany)

    1999-03-01

    A cDNA encoding annexin was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified. The authors then investigated some biochemical properties of the recombinant annexin based on the current understanding of plant annexins. An add-back experiment was performed to study the effect of the recombinant annexin on [beta]-glucan synthase activity, but no effect was found. However, it was found that the recombinant annexin could display ATPase/GTPase activities. The recombinant annexin showed much higher GTPase than ATPase activity. Mg[sup 2+] was essential for these activities, whereas a high concentration of Ca[sup 2+] was inhibitory. A photolabeling assay showed that this annexin could bind GTP more specifically than ATP. The GTP-binding site on the annexin was mapped into the carboxyl-terminal fourth repeat of annexin from the photolabeling experiment using domain-deletion mutants of this annexin. Northern-blot analysis showed that the annexin gene was highly expressed in the elongation stages of cotton fiber differentiation, suggesting a role of this annexin in cell elongation.

  5. The Effects of Fruiting Positions on Cellulose Synthesis and Sucrose Metabolism during Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Fiber Development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yina; Wang, Youhua; Liu, Jingran; Lv, Fengjuan; Chen, Ji; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) boll positions on a fruiting branch vary in their contribution to yield and fiber quality. Fiber properties are dependent on deposition of cellulose in the fiber cell wall, but information about the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism between these fruiting positions is lacking. Therefore, two cotton cultivars with different sensitivities to low temperature were tested in 2010 and 2011 to quantify the effect of fruit positions (FPs) on fiber quality in relation to sucrose content, enzymatic activities and sucrose metabolism. The indices including sucrose content, sucrose transformation rate, cellulose content, and the activities of the key enzymes, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), acid invertase (AI) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) which inhibit cellulose synthesis and eventually affect fiber quality traits in cotton fiber, were determined. Results showed that as compared with those of FP1, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate of FP3 were all decreased, and the variations of cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by FPs in Sumian 15 were larger than those in Kemian 1. Under FP effect, activities of SPS and AI in sucrose regulation were decreased, while SuSy activity in sucrose degradation was increased. The changes in activities of SuSy and SPS in response to FP effect displayed different and large change ranges between the two cultivars. These results indicate that restrained cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in distal FPs are mainly attributed to the changes in the activities of these enzymes. The difference in fiber quality, cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in response to FPs in fiber cells for the two cotton cultivars was mainly determined by the activities of both SuSy and SPS. PMID:24586807

  6. Comparative genetic analysis of lint yield and fiber quality among single, three-way, and double crosses in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decisions on the appropriate crossing systems to employ for genetic improvement of quantitative traits are critical in cotton breeding. Determination of genetic variance for lint yield and fiber quality in three different crossing schemes, i.e., single cross (SC), three-way cross (TWC), and double ...

  7. Involvement of Extracellular Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase in Cotton Fiber Primary and Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CSDs) that catalyze the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be involved in lignification of secondary walls in spinach, pine and aspen. In cotton fibers, hydrogen peroxide was proposed to be involved in the induction of seco...

  8. 19 CFR 10.609 - Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods. 10.609 Section 10.609 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican...

  9. 19 CFR 10.609 - Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods. 10.609 Section 10.609 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican...

  10. 19 CFR 10.609 - Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transshipment of non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel goods. 10.609 Section 10.609 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican...