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Sample records for cough reflex sensitivity

  1. Cough reflex sensitivity improves with speech language pathology management of refractory chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Speech language pathology is an effective management intervention for chronic cough that persists despite medical treatment. The mechanism behind the improvement has not been determined but may include active cough suppression, reduced cough sensitivity or increased cough threshold from reduced laryngeal irritation. Objective measures such as cough reflex sensitivity and cough frequency could be used to determine whether the treatment response was due to reduced underlying cough sensitivity or to more deliberate control exerted by individual patients. The number of treatments required to effect a response was also assessed. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate subjective and objective measures of cough before, during and after speech language pathology treatment for refractory chronic cough and the mechanism underlying the improvement. Methods Adults with chronic cough (n = 17) were assessed before, during and after speech language pathology intervention for refractory chronic cough. The primary outcome measures were capsaicin cough reflex sensitivity, automated cough frequency detection and cough-related quality of life. Results Following treatment there was a significant improvement in cough related quality of life (Median (IQR) at baseline: 13.5 (6.3) vs. post treatment: 16.9 (4.9), p = 0.002), objective cough frequency (Mean ± SD at baseline: 72.5 ± 55.8 vs. post treatment: 25 ± 27.9 coughs/hr, p = 0.009), and cough reflex sensitivity (Mean ± SD log C5 at baseline: 0.88 ± 0.48 vs. post treatment: 1.65 ± 0.88, p < 0.0001). Conclusions This is the first study to show that speech language pathology management is an effective intervention for refractory chronic cough and that the mechanism behind the improvement is due to reduced laryngeal irritation which results in decreased cough sensitivity, decreased urge to cough and an increased cough threshold. Speech language pathology may be a useful and sustained treatment for refractory

  2. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  3. Effect of taste sensation on cough reflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S; Dalton, Pamela

    2014-02-01

    Cough is among the most common symptoms with which people present for medical attention, but evidence-based treatments remain limited. One issue compromising interpretation of clinical trials of cough preparations is that control formulations often are nearly as effective as those that contain active ingredients. This observation has caused some researchers to propose that one or more nominally inactive ingredients may have some physiological effects. For example, most liquid cough preparations are highly sweetened, and it has been suggested that sweet taste might modulate cough sensitivity. The fact that honey has been used for thousands of years as a cough remedy is consistent with this idea. However, empirical evidence for modulation of cough sensitivity by taste was lacking. Evidence is still sparse, but relevant experiments have now been published: rinsing the mouth with a sweet sucrose solution increased cough thresholds in a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Furthermore, rinsing the mouth with a bitter solution did not affect thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. The underlying mechanisms of cough suppression by sweet taste are still unclear. However, extant data suggest that modulation of cough sensitivity by taste is a promising area for further investigation. Such work may lead to greater understanding of apparent placebo effects in clinical trials and provide empirical support for therapies based on stimulation of taste nerves. PMID:24173385

  4. Role of COX-2 in cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin in patients with sinobronchial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sinobronchial syndrome is a cause of chronic productive cough. Inflammatory mediators are involved in the pathophysiology of chronic productive cough. Accumulating evidences indicate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, one of the inducible isoforms of COX, is a key element in the pathophysiological process of a number of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the role of COX-2 in chronic productive cough in patients with sinobronchial syndrome known as neutrophilic bronchial inflammation. Methods The effect of etodolac, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin was examined in 15 patients with sinobronchial syndrome in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Capsaicin cough threshold, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin eliciting five or more coughs, was measured as an index of airway cough reflex sensitivity. Results The cough threshold was significantly (p < 0.03) increased after two-week treatment with etodolac (200 mg twice a day orally) compared with placebo [37.5 (GSEM 1.3) vs. 27.2 (GSEM 1.3) μM]. Conclusions These findings indicate that COX-2 may be a possible modulator augmenting airway cough reflex sensitivity in patients with sinobronchial syndrome. PMID:20696045

  5. Effect of viral upper respiratory tract infection on cough reflex sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI; common cold) is among the most common medical conditions affecting man, with cough being a typical feature of the associated syndrome. Studies employing capsaicin inhalation challenge to measure cough reflex sensitivity have demonstrated a transient tussive hyperresponsiveness induced by URI that reverts to normal by 4-8 weeks post infection. Mechanisms proposed to explain the induction of cough by URI include a number of infection-associated airway effects, such as enhanced release of cytokines, neurotransmitters, and leukotrienes; increased neural receptor levels; reduced activity of neutral endopeptidases; transient modulation of afferent neural activity; mucus hypersecretion; and, possibly, effects on cholinergic motor pathways. Recent studies evaluating urge-to-cough (UTC), the sensation of irritation preceding the motor act of coughing, have demonstrated that URI induces a transient enhancement of UTC analogous to the effect observed on cough reflex sensitivity. The recently introduced concept of the Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome may provide an explanation for the commonly observed clinical phenomenon of acute viral URI triggering what will develop into chronic, refractory cough in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25383204

  6. Inhibitory effect of cervical trachea and chest wall vibrations on cough reflex sensitivity and perception of urge-to-cough in healthy male never-smokers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-pharmacological options for symptomatic management of cough are desired. Although chest wall mechanical vibration is known to ameliorate cough reflex sensitivity, the effect of mechanical vibrations on perceptions of urge-to-cough has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effect of mechanical vibration of cervical trachea, chest wall and femoral muscle on cough reflex sensitivity, perceptions of urge-to-cough as well as dyspnea. Methods Twenty-four healthy male never-smokers were investigated for cough reflex sensitivity, perceptions of the urge-to-cough and dyspnea with or without mechanical vibration. Cough reflex sensitivity and urge-to-cough were evaluated by the inhalation of citric acid. The perception of dyspnea was evaluated by Borg scores during applications of external inspiratory resistive loads. Mechanical vibration was applied by placing a vibrating tuning fork on the skin surface of cervical trachea, chest wall and femoral muscle. Results Cervical trachea vibration significantly increased cough reflex threshold, as expressed by the lowest concentration of citric acid that elicited five or more coughs (C5), and urge-to-cough threshold, as expressed by the lowest concentration of citric acid that elicited urge-to-cough (Cu), but did not significantly affect dypnea sensation during inspiratory resistive loading. On the other hand, the chest wall vibration not only significantly increased C5 and Cu but also significantly ameliorated the load-response curve of dyspnea sensation. Conclusions Both cervical and trachea vibrations significantly inhibited cough reflex sensitivity and perception of urge-to-cough. These vibration techniques might be options for symptomatic cough management. PMID:24088411

  7. Effect of memantine on cough reflex sensitivity: translational studies in guinea pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Canning, Brendan J; Garner, Rachel; Paterson, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which outpatients in the United States seek medical attention, and yet available therapeutic options for cough lack proven efficacy and are further limited by safety and abuse liabilities. Thus, safe and effective cough suppressants are needed. Recent preclinical studies described the antitussive effects of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The goals of the present study were to compare the antitussive effects of memantine, dextromethorphan, and codeine in guinea pigs; to relate the dose-dependent actions of memantine in these studies to peak plasma concentrations achieved following oral administration; and to provide the first ever evaluation of the antitussive effect of memantine in humans. In guinea pigs, memantine and codeine were comparable in efficacy and potency but both were superior to dextromethorphan in the citric acid cough challenge model. The pharmacokinetic analyses suggest that memantine was active in guinea pigs at micromolar plasma concentrations. Subsequently, 14 healthy volunteers as well as 14 otherwise healthy adults with acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) underwent capsaicin cough challenges 6 hours after ingestion of 20 mg memantine and matched placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover fashion. In healthy volunteers, memantine significantly inhibited cough reflex sensitivity (P = 0.034). In subjects with URI, responsiveness to capsaicin was markedly increased, and in these patients, the inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity by memantine relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.088). These data support further research to investigate the potential of memantine as a clinically useful antitussive. PMID:25525191

  8. Impact of Air Pollution on Age and Gender Related Increase in Cough Reflex Sensitivity of Healthy Children in Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Demoulin-Alexikova, Silvia; Plevkova, Jana; Mazurova, Lenka; Zatko, Tomas; Alexik, Mikulas; Hanacek, Jan; Tatar, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies show higher cough reflex sensitivity (CRS) and cough outcomes in children compared to adults and in females compared to males. Despite close link that exists between cough and environment the potential influence of environmental air pollution on age- and gender -related differences in cough has not been studied yet. Purpose: The purpose of our study was to analyse whether the effects of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) from parental smoking and PM10 from living in urban area are implied in age- and gender-related differences in cough outcomes of healthy, non-asthmatic children. Assessment of CRS using capsaicin and incidence of dry and wet cough was performed in 290 children (mean age 13.3 ± 2.6 years (138 females/152 males). Results: CRS was significantly higher in girls exposed to ETS [22.3 μmol/l (9.8–50.2 μmol/l)] compared to not exposed girls [79.9 μmol/l (56.4–112.2 μmol/l), p = 0.02] as well as compared to exposed boys [121.4 μmol/l (58.2–253.1 μmol/l), p = 0.01]. Incidence of dry cough lasting more than 3 weeks was significantly higher in exposed compared to not exposed girls. CRS was significantly higher in school-aged girls living in urban area [22.0 μmol/l (10.6–45.6 μmol/l)] compared to school-aged girls living in rural area [215.9 μmol/l (87.3–533.4 μmol/l); p = 0.003], as well as compared to teenage girls living in urban area [108.8 μmol/l (68.7–172.9 μmol/l); p = 0.007]. No CRS differences were found between urban and rural boys when controlled for age group. No CRS differences were found between school-aged and teenage boys when controlled for living area. Conclusions: Our results have shown that the effect of ETS on CRS was gender specific, linked to female gender and the effect of PM10 on CRS was both gender and age specific, related to female gender and school-age. We suggest that age and gender related differences in incidence of cough and CRS might be, at least partially

  9. Sweet taste and menthol increase cough reflex thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S; Dalton, Pamela

    2012-06-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  10. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  11. Arnold’s nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter G.; Birring, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Arnold’s nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold’s nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold’s nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  12. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    Coughing is a reflex that keeps your throat and airways clear. Although it can be annoying, coughing helps your body heal or protect itself. Coughs can be either acute or chronic. Acute coughs begin suddenly and usually last no ...

  13. Capsaicin cough sensitivity is related to the older female predominant feature in chronic cough patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Ju-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Min-Hye; Yang, Min-Suk; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Min, Kyung-Up

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study aimed to examine the age and gender distributions among chronic cough patients referred to a tertiary cough clinic in Korea, and to investigate clinical factors related to the demographic findings. Methods Study participants were unselectively recruited from adult chronic cough patients who attended the cough clinic for the first time during one year. To validate their representativeness, their age and gender distributions were compared to the entire chronic cough population, or with those presenting with other chronic disease. Data from the baseline investigations were analyzed to identify clinical factors related to the demographic findings. Results A total of 272 chronic cough patients were included. They had a middle-aged female predominant feature (mean age: 52.8±15.7 years and female 69.1%). Their age and gender distributions were almost identical to the entire chronic cough population, but were distinct from patients with hypertension. Among clinical factors, the older female predominance was associated with enhanced capsaicin cough sensitivity, and also with the presence of 'cough by cold air' symptom. Allotussia and laryngeal paresthesia were highly common in chronic cough patients, affecting 94.8% and 86.8% of them, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated older female predominance among adult chronic cough patients attending a referral cough clinic in Korea. The demographic features were significantly associated with the capsaicin cough responses and also potentially with allotussia (particularly cold air as the trigger). These findings suggest a role of cough reflex sensitization in the pathophysiology of chronic cough in adults. PMID:25228996

  14. [Sensitivity of cough with capsaicin in smokers].

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Cetin Aydin; Celik, Pinar; Havlucu, Yavuz; Coşkun, Evşen; Yorgancioğlu, Arzu; Sakar, Ayşin; Dinç, Gönül

    2008-01-01

    In this study, effect of long term smoking on sensitivity of cough reflex was investigated. Healthy, current smoker male and female was evaluated by capsaicin cough challenge test and they were compared with healthy, non-smoker persons with similar age and gender, prospectively. In current smokers, there were 50 male and 39 female, in non-smoker control group, there were 20 male and 21 female. Mean and log C5 dosage in current smoker and non-smoker groups and mean and log C5 dosage in current smoker according to gender were calculated by using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results of capsaicin cough challenge test in current and non-smoker groups were evaluated by using Pearson Chi-Square test and Fisher's Exact test. In current smokers comparison of results of capsaicin cough challenge test with smoking history (age with first smoking, duration, pocket year and smoking per day) was evaluated by using Mann-Whitney U-test. Mean C5 and mean log C5 dosage were found decreased in current smokers when they were compared to control group (p< 0.00). In current smoker group mean C5 and mean log C5 dosage were found decreased in male (p< 0.002). When the results of capsaicin cough challenge test were compared between current smoker and control groups, sensitivity of cough reflex in concentration with 0.49, 0.98, 1.95, 3.9, 7.8, 15.6 microM was significantly decreased in current smoker group. Also there was a significant correlation between concentration with 0.98, 1.95, 3.9, 7.8, 15.6, 31.2 microM, and duration of smoking and pocket year of smoking. Also there was a correlation between concentration with 15.6, 31.2, 62.5, 125 microM and smoking per day. This results were correlated with hypothesis about inhibition of C-fibers with nicotin or decrease of C-fibers' sensitivity due to induction of neuropeptide wasting. PMID:18330750

  15. Respiratory kinematic and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Brandimore, Alexandra E.; Troche, Michelle S.; Huber, Jessica E.; Hegland, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cough is a defensive behavior that can be initiated in response to a stimulus in the airway (reflexively), or on command (voluntarily). There is evidence to suggest that physiological differences exist between reflex and voluntary cough; however, the output (mechanistic and airflow) differences between the cough types are not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the lung volume, respiratory kinematic, and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults. Methods: Twenty-five participants (14 female; 18–29 years) were recruited for this study. Participants were evaluated using respiratory inductance plethysmography calibrated with spirometry. Experimental procedures included: (1) respiratory calibration, (2) three voluntary sequential cough trials, and (3) three reflex cough trials induced with 200 μM capsaicin. Results: Lung volume initiation (LVI; p = 0.003) and lung volume excursion (LVE; p < 0.001) were significantly greater for voluntary cough compared to reflex cough. The rib cage and abdomen significantly influenced LVI for voluntary cough (p < 0.001); however, only the rib cage significantly impacted LVI for reflex cough (p < 0.001). LVI significantly influenced peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) for voluntary cough (p = 0.029), but not reflex cough (p = 0.610). Discussion: Production of a reflex cough results in significant mechanistic and airflow differences compared to voluntary cough. These findings suggest that detection of a tussigenic stimulus modifies motor aspects of the reflex cough behavior. Further understanding of the differences between reflex and voluntary cough in older adults and in persons with dystussia (cough dysfunction) will be essential to facilitate the development of successful cough treatment paradigms. PMID:26500560

  16. Enhanced cough reflex in a model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco, Joan Antoni; Aguilera, Mònica; Domènech, Anna; Tarrasón, Gema; Prats, Neus; Miralpeix, Montse; De Alba, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Fibrotic lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, are associated with spontaneous dry cough and hypersensitivity to tussive agents. Understanding the pathophysiology driving enhanced cough may help us to define better therapies for patients. We hypothesized that lung fibrosis induced by intratracheal bleomycin would exacerbate the cough reflex induced by tussive agents in guinea pigs. Disease progression in the lungs was characterized at days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after bleomycin administration. Inflammatory and fibrotic markers, as well as neurotrophin levels, were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or lung tissue. Cough sensitivity to citric acid, capsaicin and allylisothiocyanate was evaluated in conscious animals at days 14 and 21 after bleomycin administration. Pulmonary lesions evolved from an early inflammatory phase (from day 1 to day 7) to a fibrotic stage (between days 14 and 28). Fibrosis was related to increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (day 21: saline, 0.26 ng/ml; bleomycin, 0.49 ng/ml). At day 14, we also observed increased cough reflexes to citric acid (163%), capsaicin (125%) and allylisothiocyanate (178%). Cough exacerbation persisted, but at a lower extent, by day 21 for capsaicin (100%) and allylisothiocyanate (54%). Moreover, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, suggested to induce nerve remodelling in chronic cough, were also enhanced (day 1: saline, 14.21 pg/ml; bleomycin, 30.09 pg/ml). In summary, our model of bleomycin-induced cough exacerbation may be a valuable tool to investigate cough hypersensitivity and develop antitussive therapies for fibrotic lung diseases. PMID:26275723

  17. Differences in motor activation of voluntary and reflex cough in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lasserson, D; Mills, K; Arunachalam, R; Polkey, M; Moxham, J; Kalra, L

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To study motor activation patterns of voluntary and reflex cough adjusted for cough flow rates. Methods Surface electromyography (EMG) and cough flow rate were measured in 10 healthy volunteers. Voluntary cough was assessed for 20 efforts in each quintile of increasing cough flow rate. Reflex cough was assessed for 25 efforts produced by nebulised l‐tartaric acid. EMG was recorded over the expiratory (rectus abdominis, obliques, lower intercostals) and accessory (trapezius, pectoralis major, deltoid, latissimus dorsi) muscles. EMG activity, burst duration and onset were compared for each quintile of voluntary cough, and between voluntary and reflex cough matched for cough flow rate. Results EMG activity and burst duration of expiratory and accessory muscles during voluntary cough increased in proportion to cough flow. Expiratory muscles had longer EMG burst duration (difference 68 ms (95% CI 34 to 102), p<0.01) and earlier onset of EMG activity (difference 44 ms (95% CI 20 to 68), p<0.0001) compared with accessory muscles. EMG activity in all muscles was increased (mean 110.2% v 56.1%, p<0.001) and burst duration (mean 206 ms v 280 ms, p = 0.013) decreased in reflex cough compared with voluntary cough of equal flow rate. There were no differences in EMG onset (difference 8 ms (95% CI 25 to −9) or burst duration (difference 27 ms (95% CI 58 to −4) between expiratory and accessory muscles. Conclusions Functional organisation of motor activity differs between voluntary and reflex cough. Voluntary cough is characterised by sequential activation whereas reflex cough is associated with early and simultaneous activation of expiratory and accessory muscles. PMID:16601089

  18. [Pathophysiology, diagnostics and therapy of chronic cough: neuronal reflexes and antitussiva].

    PubMed

    Dinh, Q T; Heck, S; Le, D D; Bals, R; Welte, T

    2013-06-01

    Cough is the number one symptom for patients to visit a physician worldwide. It is an important neuronal reflex which serves to protect the airways from inhaled exogenous microorganisms, thermal and chemical irritants. Moreover, it prevents the airways from mucus retention.The cough reflex is initiated by activation of different cough receptors. These cough receptors can be divided into three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: into the two Aδ-fiber types "rapid-adapting mechanoreceptor" (RAR) and "slow-adapting mechanoreceptor" (SAR), and the C-fiber receptor.The stimulus is detected by cough receptors which conduct the signal to the cerebral cough centre via vagal-sensory neurons. The cough itself is mediated by efferent motoneurons. Hence the cough reflex consists of 5 functionally sequential parts 1: the cough receptors 2, the primary afferent fibres of the N. vagus 345, N. trigeminus and N. glossopharyngeus 1, the cough centre in the medulla oblongata (N. tractus solitarius) 678, the afferent fibres of the N. phrenicus, spinal nerve and N. laryngeus recurrens, as well as the diaphragm and the abdominal, intercostal and laryngeal muscles. The cough receptors are mainly located in the larynx, trachea and main bronchi 2.The event of coughing can be divided into four subsequent parts: After the first phase of fast inspiration with an opened glottis, there is compression with a closed glottis and increasing tracheal pressure, acceleration and ultimately maximum expiration with an opened glottis 9. According to its characteristics, cough can be split into two distinct types, "aspiration cough", which is loud and involuntary, and "urge-to-cough sensation", which describes an irritant, scratchy, and controlled cough of slowly increasing intensity 10.Acute cough mostly develops because of infection of the respiratory system 111213 and ends spontaneously after 4 weeks. In contrast to this, bacterial infection with pathogens like Adenovirus

  19. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers. PMID:26919658

  20. Effect of Trichodesma indicum extract on cough reflex induced by sulphur dioxide in mice.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, K; Murugesan, T; Kumar, Ch Anil; Suba, V; Das, A K; Sinha, S; Arunachalam, G; Manikandan, L

    2002-01-01

    The effect of methanol extract of whole plants of Trichodesma indicum R. Br. has been investigated on sulphur dioxide (SO2) induced cough reflex in Swiss albino mice. The extract has demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) inhibition in frequency of cough in all the tested doses when compared with untreated control group. The effect persisted up to 90 min of its oral administration and also comparable to that of the effect exhibited by the standard drug (Codeine phosphate). This study confirmed the traditional use of this plant in the treatment of cough. Determination of underlying mechanism of beneficial effect is major topic requiring further comprehensive investigation. PMID:11924768

  1. Reflex cough PEF as a predictor of successful extubation in neurological patients*

    PubMed Central

    Kutchak, Fernanda Machado; Debesaitys, Andressa Maciel; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello; Meneguzzi, Carla; Skueresky, Amanda Soares; Alberto, Luiz; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the use of reflex cough PEF as a predictor of successful extubation in neurological patients who were candidates for weaning from mechanical ventilation. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 135 patients receiving mechanical ventilation for more than 24 h in the ICU of Cristo Redentor Hospital, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Reflex cough PEF, the rapid shallow breathing index, MIP, and MEP were measured, as were ventilatory, hemodynamic, and clinical parameters. Results: The mean age of the patients was 47.8 ± 17 years. The extubation failure rate was 33.3%. A reflex cough PEF of < 80 L/min showed a relative risk of 3.6 (95% CI: 2.0-6.7), and the final Glasgow Coma Scale score showed a relative risk of 0.64 (95% CI: 0.51-0.83). For every 1-point increase in a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8, there was a 36% reduction in the risk of extubation failure. Conclusions: Reflex cough PEF and the Glasgow Coma Scale score are independent predictors of extubation failure in neurological patients admitted to the ICU. PMID:26398756

  2. Possible involvement of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ishikawa, Yoko; Hayashi, Shun-Suke; Asato, Megumi; Ohsawa, Masahiro

    2011-02-10

    We examined the involvement of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channels in the peripheral mechanisms of the cough reflex in mice. We also examined the possibility of using ambroxol as an effective antitussive agent, and found that it produced antitussive effects through the inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium channels. The inhalation of fenvalerate, at concentrations of 0.3, 1 and 3μg/ml, for 5min produced coughs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., slightly but significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. However, the number of fenvalerate-induced coughs in tetorodotoxin-treated mice was still significantly greater than those in vehicle (0.4% DMSO) alone inhaled mice. On the other hand, pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., almost completely reduced the number of citric acid (0.25M)-induced coughs to the level in vehicle (saline) alone inhaled mice. Pretreatment with ambroxol, at doses of 10, 30, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o., dose-dependently and significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. The present findings indicate that TTX-resistant sodium channels may play an important role in the enhancement of C-fiber-mediated cough pathways. Furthermore, ambroxol may prove to be a useful cough suppressant. PMID:21130084

  3. New insights in cough.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Ashley; Young, Emma C; Smith, Jacky A

    2010-01-01

    Chronic cough is common, blights patients' lives and is hard to treat. Chronic cough patients demonstrate high objective cough rates and as a group have increased cough reflex sensitivity. However, conventional cough challenge techniques show substantial overlap with normal subjects. This suggests that other important mechanisms have yet to be determined. For the last two decades, chronic cough has been considered to be caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux, post-nasal drip or asthma. However, many patients with these conditions do not have cough, and in those with cough, the response to specific treatments is unpredictable at best. In addition, many chronic cough patients do not have an identifiable cause. This raises questions about the concept of a triad of treatable causes for chronic cough. Our current understanding of the neurophysiology of the cough reflex is largely derived from animal work with limited data in humans. By analogy with chronic pain syndromes, both peripheral and central sensitization may be important mechanisms in chronic cough, and are under active investigation. We need to understand the mechanisms underlying sensitization, how they interact with cough triggers and their relationship with the sensations that drive the urge to cough, and the subsequent motor cough response in chronic cough. Only then will we develop effective interventions. PMID:21030396

  4. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003072.htm Cough To use the sharing features on this page, ... or disorder. Watch this video about: Coughing Some coughs are dry. Others are productive. A productive cough ...

  5. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing helps your body heal or protect itself. Coughs can be either acute or chronic. Acute coughs begin suddenly and usually last no more than 2 to 3 weeks. Acute coughs are the kind you most often get with ...

  6. Reversal of functional disorders by aspiration, expiration, and cough reflexes and their voluntary counterparts.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Gresova, Sona; Peregrim, Igor; Kundrik, Martin; Pallayova, Maria; Jakus, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Agonal gasping provoked by asphyxia can save ~15% of mammals even from untreated ventricular fibrillation (VF), but it fails to revive infants with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Our systematic study of airway reflexes in cats and other animals indicated that in addition to cough, there are two distinct airway reflexes that may contribute to auto-resuscitation. Gasp- and sniff-like spasmodic inspirations (SIs) can be elicited by nasopharyngeal stimulation, strongly activating the brainstem generator for inspiration, which is also involved in the control of gasping. This "aspiration reflex" (AspR) is characterized by SI without subsequent active expiration and can be elicited during agonal gasping, caused by brainstem trans-sections in cats. Stimulation of the larynx can activate the generator for expiration to evoke the expiration reflex (ExpR), manifesting with prompt expiration without preceding inspiration. Stimulation of the oropharynx and lower airways provokes the cough reflex (CR) which results from activating of both generators. The powerful potential of the AspR resembling auto-resuscitation by gasping can influence the control mechanisms of vital functions, mediating reversal of various functional disorders. The AspR in cats interrupted hypoxic apnea, laryngo- and bronchospasm, apneusis and even transient asphyxic coma, and can normalize various hypo- and hyper-functional disorders. Introduction of a nasogastric catheter evoked similar SIs in premature infants and interrupted hiccough attacks in adults. Coughing on demand can prevent anaphylactic shock and resuscitate the pertinent subject. Sniff representing nasal inspiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP) are voluntary counterparts of airway reflexes, and are useful for diagnosis and therapy of various cardio-respiratory and neuromuscular disorders. PMID:23248602

  7. Role of reactive oxygen species and TRP channels in the cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    The cough reflex is evoked by noxious stimuli in the airways. Although this reflex is essential for health, it can be triggered chronically in inflammatory and infectious airway disease. Neuronal transient receptor potential (TRP) channels such as ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are polymodal receptors expressed on airway nociceptive afferent nerves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive compounds are associated with inflammation, from either NADPH oxidase or mitochondria. These reactive compounds cause activation and hyperexcitability of nociceptive afferents innervating the airways, and evidence suggests key contributions of TRPA1 and TRPV1. PMID:27016063

  8. Downregulation of the cough reflex by aclidinium and tiotropium in awake and anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mutolo, Donatella; Cinelli, Elenia; Iovino, Ludovica; Pantaleo, Tito; Bongianni, Fulvia

    2016-06-01

    Long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) have been reported to attenuate cough in preclinical and clinical studies. The present study was performed on rabbits to compare aclidinium and tiotropium efficacy in the downregulation of the cough reflex. This reflex was evoked by citric acid inhalation in unanesthetized animals and by both citric acid inhalation and mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial tree in anesthetized animals 90 min following the inhalation of each drug (nebulizer output always at 1 mL/min). Aclidinium 4 mg/mL and tiotropium 200 μg/mL inhaled in 1 min proved to have similar protective effect on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in anesthetized animals. The total dosage employed for aclidinium and tiotropium was 4 mg and 200 μg, respectively. In awake animals, similar reductions in the cough number were observed following 10-min inhalation of each drug with a slight, not significant tendency to higher antitussive effects for aclidinium. In anesthetized animals, 1-min inhalation of each drug caused similar depressant effects on cough responses induced by both mechanical and chemical stimulation. A complete suppression of cough responses to mechanical stimuli was seen in some preparations. The results strongly suggest that the LAMA-induced downregulation of cough may be mediated not only by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels, as already reported, but also by acid-sensing ion channels and mechanoreceptors. The route of administration along with the more rapid hydrolysis of aclidinium into inactive metabolites minimize potential systemic side effects and give to this drug a very favorable safety profile. PMID:27080033

  9. Predictors of objective cough frequency in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Lee, Kai K; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Yousaf, Nadia; Pavord, Ian D; Galloway, James; Birring, Surinder S

    2016-05-01

    Cough is a common symptom of pulmonary sarcoidosis. This study aimed to quantify cough frequency, and investigate its relationship with cough reflex sensitivity, pulmonary function and health status.32 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis were compared with 40 healthy controls. Cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin, objective 24-h cough counts, cough-specific health status, cough severity and cough triggers were measured. The predictors of cough frequency in sarcoidosis were determined in a multivariate analysis.Objective cough frequency was significantly raised in patients with sarcoidosis compared with healthy controls (p<0.001) and patients with cough had an impaired health status. Patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis had a heightened cough reflex sensitivity compared with healthy controls (p<0.001). Only cough reflex sensitivity was significantly associated with objective cough frequency in multivariate analysis, explaining 42% of the variance (p<0.001). There was no association between cough frequency, lung function, number of organs involved, chest radiograph stage or serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels.Cough is a common and significant symptom in patients with sarcoidosis. Ambulatory objective cough monitoring provides novel insights into the determinants of cough in sarcoidosis, suggesting that cough reflex sensitivity may be more important than lung function and other measures of disease severity, and this should be investigated further. PMID:26846840

  10. Effect of carbocysteine on cough reflex to capsaicin in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishiura, Yoshihisa; Fujimura, Masaki; Yamamori, Chihiro; Nobata, Kouichi; Myou, Shigeharu; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Michishita, Yasukatsu; Takegoshi, Tadayoshi

    2003-01-01

    Aims Cough, one of the main symptoms of bronchial asthma, is a chronic airway inflammatory disease with functionally damaged bronchial epithelium. Recently, we established an animal model with cough hypersensitivity after antigen challenge and clearly showed the protective effect of carbocysteine in this model. This study was designed to investigate the clinical effect of carbocysteine for cough sensitivity in patients with bronchial asthma. Methods The effects of the two orally active mucoregulatory drugs, carbocysteine and ambroxol hydrochloride, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin were examined in 14 patients with stable asthma. Capsaicin cough threshold, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin eliciting five or more coughs, was measured as an index of airway cough sensitivity. Results Geometric mean values of the cough threshold at run-in (baseline) and after 4 weeks’ treatment of placebo, 1500 mg day−1 of carbocysteine and 45 mg day−1 of ambroxol hydrochloride were 12.8 µM (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5, 29.6), 11.0 µM (95% CI 4.4, 27.5), 21.0 µM (95% CI 8.8, 50.2) and 11.6 µM (95% CI 5.8, 23.3), respectively. The cough threshold for carbocysteine was significantly greater than those of ambroxol hydrochloride (P = 0.047) and placebo (P = 0.047), respectively. Conclusions These findings indicate that carbocysteine administration may be a novel therapeutic option for asthmatic patients, especially with cough variant asthma. PMID:12814442

  11. Coughing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Coughing is a sudden expulsion of air from the lungs through the epiglottis at an amazingly fast speed (estimated ... With such a strong force of air, coughing is the body’s mechanism for clearing the breathing passageways ...

  12. Coughing

    MedlinePlus

    ... polio survivors is the inability to take a deep breath due to weakness of the respiratory muscles ... threatening situation. Manually-assisted coughing techniques can provide deep breaths to augment cough flows. Techniques include postural ...

  13. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Cough See complete list of charts. A cough is an annoying symptom that can have many causes. Follow this chart to help ... DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here 1. Has your cough begun recently? Yes Go to Question 12.** No ...

  14. GABAA- and glycine-mediated inhibitory modulation of the cough reflex in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Elenia; Iovino, Ludovica; Bongianni, Fulvia; Pantaleo, Tito; Mutolo, Donatella

    2016-09-01

    Cough-related sensory inputs from rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) and C fibers are processed by second-order neurons mainly located in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Both GABAA and glycine receptors have been proven to be involved in the inhibitory control of second-order cells receiving RAR projections. We investigated the role of these receptors within the caudal NTS in the modulation of the cough reflex induced by either mechanical or chemical stimulation of the tracheobronchial tree in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rabbits. Bilateral microinjections (30-50 nl) of the receptor antagonists bicuculline and strychnine as well as of the receptor agonists muscimol and glycine were performed. Bicuculline (0.1 mM) and strychnine (1 mM) caused decreases in peak abdominal activity and marked increases in respiratory frequency due to decreases in both inspiratory time (Ti) and expiratory time (Te), without concomitant changes in arterial blood pressure. Noticeably, these microinjections induced potentiation of the cough reflex consisting of increases in the cough number associated with decreases either in cough-related Ti after bicuculline or in both cough-related Ti and Te after strychnine. The effects caused by muscimol (0.1 mM) and glycine (10 mM) were in the opposite direction to those produced by the corresponding antagonists. The results show that both GABAA and glycine receptors within the caudal NTS mediate a potent inhibitory modulation of the pattern of breathing and cough reflex responses. They strongly suggest that disinhibition is one important mechanism underlying cough regulation and possibly provide new hints for novel effective antitussive strategies. PMID:27402692

  15. [Sugammadex reversal after extubation under muscle relaxation to prevent cough reflex in a patient with intractable spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Ota, Chiho; Ueta, Kazuyoshi; Imada, Tatsuyuki; Hayashi, Yukio; Mashimo, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    A 40-year-old man (168 cm tall and weighing 71 kg) with intractable pneumothorax was operated for resection of a bulla in the left lung. After insertion of epidural catheter via T 5-6 interspace, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. The duration of surgery was 1h 48 min and rocuronium given during surgery was 110 mg. After completion of surgery, the double-lumen tube was replaced with laryngeal mask airway to prevent cough reflex. However, infusion of sugammadex 200 mg induced mild cough reflex, resulting in air leakage from thoracic drainage. Because air leakage still continued after extubation, reoperation must be done and re-intubation was required. Since rocuronium 50 mg did not provide satisfactory muscle relaxation measured by train of four, additional dose of rocuronium 40 mg was administered and re-intubation was successfully performed without cough reflex. Reoperation lasted for 43 minutes and rocuronium infused was 100 mg. Nasal airway was inserted to prevent airway obstruction by the tongue and extubation was performed under muscle relaxation with infusion of rocuronium 10 mg. And then, immediate administration of sugammadex 400 mg could elicit spontaneous respiration without cough reflex. PMID:23984577

  16. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  17. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  18. How best to measure cough clinically.

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S; Spinou, Arietta

    2015-06-01

    It is possible to measure cough by assessing its severity, frequency, intensity, associated urge and its impact on quality of life. Cough severity can simply be assessed with a Visual Analogue Scale. Cough frequency can be assessed objectively with cough frequency monitors. Validated cough monitors include the Leicester Cough Monitor and the VitaloJAK. Cough reflex sensitivity measurement is better used to investigate the mechanisms of action of antitussive medications, rather than assessing efficacy. Health-Related Quality of Life measures are available to assess the impact of cough; they include the validated Leicester Cough Questionnaire and Cough-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire for adult patients. It is best to assess cough with a combination of subjective and objective tools, to capture its wide-ranging impact. PMID:25819594

  19. Cough Reflex Testing in Dysphagia Following Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Anna; Zeng, Irene S.L.; McLauchlan, Helen; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Background Significant health issues and service delivery costs are associated with post-stroke pneumonia related to dysphagia. Silent aspiration is known to increase pneumonia and mortality in this population. The utility of cough reflex testing (CRT) for reducing pneumonia in acute stroke patients was the subject of this randomised, controlled trial. Methods Patients referred for swallowing evaluation (N = 311) were assigned to either 1) a control group receiving standard evaluation or 2) an experimental group receiving standard evaluation with CRT. Participants in the experimental group were administered nebulised citric acid with test results contributing to clinical decisions. Outcomes for both groups were measured by pneumonia rates at 3 months post evaluation and other clinical indices of swallowing management. Results Analysis of the data identified no significant differences between groups in pneumonia rate (P = 0.38) or mortality (P = 0.15). Results of CRT were shown to influence diet recommendations (P < 0.0001) and referrals for instrumental assessment (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Despite differences in clinical management between groups, the end goal of reducing pneumonia in post stroke dysphagia was not achieved. PMID:23671548

  20. Chronic cough and laryngeal dysfunction improve with specific treatment of cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Nicole M; Vertigan, Anne E; Gibson, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Chronic persistent cough can be associated with laryngeal dysfunction that leads to symptoms such as dysphonia, sensory hyperresponsiveness to capsaicin, and motor dysfunction with paradoxical vocal fold movement and variable extrathoracic airflow obstruction (reduced inspiratory airflow). Successful therapy of chronic persistent cough improves symptoms and sensory hyperresponsiveness. The effects of treatment for chronic cough on laryngeal dysfunction are not known. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate effects of therapy for chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Methods Adults with chronic cough (n = 24) were assessed before and after treatment for chronic persistent cough by measuring quality of life, extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline provocation, capsaicin cough reflex hypersensitivity and fibreoptic laryngoscopy to observe paradoxical vocal fold movement. Subjects with chronic cough were classified into those with (n = 14) or without (n = 10) paradoxical vocal fold movement based on direct observation at laryngoscopy. Results Following treatment there was a significant improvement in cough related quality of life and cough reflex sensitivity in both groups. Subjects with chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement also had additional improvements in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness and paradoxical vocal fold movement. The degree of improvement in cough reflex sensitivity correlated with the improvement in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Conclusion Laryngeal dysfunction is common in chronic persistent cough, where it is manifest as paradoxical vocal fold movement and extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Successful treatment for chronic persistent cough leads to improvements in these features of laryngeal dysfunction. PMID:19292930

  1. Unexplained cough in the adult.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Richard S

    2010-02-01

    Unexplained cough is a diagnosis of exclusion that should not be made until a thorough validated diagnostic evaluation is performed, specific and appropriate validated treatments have been tried and failed, and uncommon causes have been ruled out. When chronic cough remains troublesome after the initial work up, determine that a protocol has been used that has been shown to lead to successful results. If such a protocol has been used, next consider whether or not pitfalls in management have been avoided. If they have been, the frequency of truly unexplained chronic cough usually should not exceed 10%. While patients with truly unexplained coughs have an overly sensitive cough reflex, the mere presence of an overly sensitive cough reflex does not by itself explain why they do not get better, because most patients with chronic cough, even those who respond to treatment and get better, have demonstrable heightened cough sensitivity. Management options include referral to a cough clinic with interdisciplinary expertise, speech therapy, and self-limited trials of drugs, preferentially with those shown to be effective in randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trials in patients with unexplained chronic cough. PMID:20172266

  2. What Is Cough?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cough? A cough is a natural reflex that protects your lungs. ... a slimy substance). This helps prevent infections. A cough also can be a symptom of a medical ...

  3. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  4. Cough in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin; Ing, Alvin; Birring, Surinder S

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) has recently been reported to be a cause of chronic cough. It should be considered when cough remains unexplained following investigations and treatments for common causes. The presence of nocturnal cough, snoring and gastro-oesophageal reflux may be helpful in identifying patients who require further investigation. Daytime somnolence is often absent. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy has been reported to be effective in alleviating cough. Therapy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, if present, should be optimised. The mechanism of the association between OSA and cough is not clear, but airway inflammation, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, increased cough reflex sensitivity and tracheobronchomalacia are possible explanations. Further studies should identify clinical predictors of OSA-cough, establish mechanisms and the optimal therapy. PMID:26068465

  5. Management of chronic refractory cough.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise. PMID:26666537

  6. Cough in the elderly: a novel strategy for preventing aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Ebihara, Takae

    2011-06-01

    Management of cough in the elderly with a deteriorated physical and mental status has received little focus. Since an aged population is rapidly increasing in developed countries, the research in this population are warranted. Cough reflex sensitivity in the elderly was shown to be hypersensitive, normosensitive and hyposensitive. The hypersensitive cough reflex is mostly due to gastro-esophageal reflux in nursing home patients. Impaired cough reflex sensitivity is assumed to play a crucial role in the development of pneumonia in the elderly. A marked depression of cough reflex sensitivity is reported in elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia. The impairment of the cough reflex in patients with aspiration pneumonia can involve both cortical facilitatory pathways for cough and medullary reflex pathways. We found the urge-to-cough in patients with aspiration pneumonia was also down-regulated, suggesting the involvement of supramedullary dysfunction in the etiology of aspiration pneumonia in the elderly. In order to prevent aspiration pneumonia in the elderly, restoration of cough reflex sensitivity is essential. We found several methods to restore cough reflex sensitivity in the elderly. They also improved the swallowing reflex, another important airway protective reflex, in the elderly. In the treatment of aspiration pneumonia, one of the most challenging steps is the start of eating for patients who usually fast at the time of hospitalization. By combining the methods to restore the cough reflex sensitivity and swallowing reflex, we developed a protocol to start eating in the elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia. Using the protocol, we reduced the incidence of re-aspiration due to start of eating in patients with aspiration pneumonia to one third of the patients without the protocol. PMID:20937403

  7. Evidence-based Evaluation and Management of Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Chronic cough is common and has a significant impact on the wellbeing of patients and the use and cost of health care services. Traditionally the approach to chronic cough in patients who are nonsmokers and are not taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor has focused on the diagnosis and management of the upper airway cough syndrome, asthma, and reflux disease. The evaluation of patients with chronic cough frequently involves trials of empiric therapy for these 3 conditions. Chronic cough may be perpetuated by abnormalities of the cough reflex and sensitization of its afferent and central components. PMID:27542423

  8. Capsaicin Cough Sensitivity and the Association with Clinical Parameters in Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-min; Lin, Zhi-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2014-01-01

    Background Cough hypersensitivity has been common among respiratory diseases. Objective To determine associations of capsaicin cough sensitivity and clinical parameters in adults with clinically stable bronchiectasis. Methods We recruited 135 consecutive adult bronchiectasis patients and 22 healthy subjects. History inquiry, sputum culture, spirometry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), Leicester Cough Questionnaire scoring, Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI) assessment and capsaicin inhalation challenge were performed. Cough sensitivity was measured as the capsaicin concentration eliciting at least 2 (C2) and 5 coughs (C5). Results Despite significant overlap between healthy subjects and bronchiectasis patients, both C2 and C5 were significantly lower in the latter group (all P<0.01). Lower levels of C5 were associated with a longer duration of bronchiectasis symptoms, worse HRCT score, higher 24-hour sputum volume, BSI and sputum purulence score, and sputum culture positive for P. aeruginosa. Determinants associated with increased capsaicin cough sensitivity, defined as C5 being 62.5 µmol/L or less, encompassed female gender (OR: 3.25, 95%CI: 1.35–7.83, P<0.01), HRCT total score between 7–12 (OR: 2.57, 95%CI: 1.07–6.173, P = 0.04), BSI between 5–8 (OR: 4.05, 95%CI: 1.48–11.06, P<0.01) and 9 or greater (OR: 4.38, 95%CI: 1.48–12.93, P<0.01). Conclusion Capsaicin cough sensitivity is heightened in a subgroup of bronchiectasis patients and associated with the disease severity. Gender and disease severity, but not sputum purulence, are independent determinants of heightened capsaicin cough sensitivity. Current testing for cough sensitivity diagnosis may be limited because of overlap with healthy subjects but might provide an objective index for assessment of cough in future clinical trials. PMID:25409316

  9. Chronic cough: an update.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vivek N; Lim, Kaiser G

    2013-10-01

    Cough persisting beyond 8 weeks (ie, chronic cough) is one of the most common reasons for an outpatient visit. A protracted cough can negatively affect one's quality of life by causing anxiety, physical discomfort, social isolation, and personal embarrassment. Herein, the anatomy and physiology of the cough reflex are reviewed. Upper airway cough syndrome, asthma, eosinophilic bronchitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease account for most chronic cough after excluding smoking, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, and chronic bronchitis. Many patients have more than one reason for chronic cough. Treating the underlying cause(s) resolves cough in most instances. There are some coughs that seem refractory despite an extensive work-up. The possibility of a hypersensitive cough reflex response has been proposed to explain these cases. Several clinical algorithms to evaluate chronic cough are presented. PMID:24079681

  10. An update on measurement and monitoring of cough: what are the important study endpoints?

    PubMed Central

    Spinou, Arietta

    2014-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the development of tools that assess cough. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for cough severity is widely used in clinical practice because it’s simple and practical. The Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) and the cough-specific quality of life questionnaire (CQLQ) are the most widely used health status questionnaires for adults with chronic cough. They are well validated for assessing the impact of cough. Cough can be assessed objectively with challenge tests that measure the sensitivity of the cough reflex. Cough challenge tests are better used to determine the mechanism of action of therapy, rather than efficacy. Cough frequency monitoring, the preferred tool to objectively assess cough, is increasingly being used as primary end-points in clinical trials. The most widely used cough monitors are the Leicester cough monitor (LCM) and VitaloJak. They are ambulatory devices that consist of a microphone and recording device. Cough frequency monitors do not reflect the intensity or the impact of cough; hence their relationship with subjective measures of cough is weak. Cough should therefore be assessed with a combination of subjective and objective tools. There is a paucity of studies that have investigated the minimal important difference of cough frequency monitors, rendering further investigations needed. PMID:25383207

  11. An update on measurement and monitoring of cough: what are the important study endpoints?

    PubMed

    Spinou, Arietta; Birring, Surinder S

    2014-10-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the development of tools that assess cough. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for cough severity is widely used in clinical practice because it's simple and practical. The Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) and the cough-specific quality of life questionnaire (CQLQ) are the most widely used health status questionnaires for adults with chronic cough. They are well validated for assessing the impact of cough. Cough can be assessed objectively with challenge tests that measure the sensitivity of the cough reflex. Cough challenge tests are better used to determine the mechanism of action of therapy, rather than efficacy. Cough frequency monitoring, the preferred tool to objectively assess cough, is increasingly being used as primary end-points in clinical trials. The most widely used cough monitors are the Leicester cough monitor (LCM) and VitaloJak. They are ambulatory devices that consist of a microphone and recording device. Cough frequency monitors do not reflect the intensity or the impact of cough; hence their relationship with subjective measures of cough is weak. Cough should therefore be assessed with a combination of subjective and objective tools. There is a paucity of studies that have investigated the minimal important difference of cough frequency monitors, rendering further investigations needed. PMID:25383207

  12. Cough in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tully, Timothy; Birring, Surinder S

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder that frequently affects the lungs. Cough is commonly reported by patients and can significantly reduce health-related quality of life. The mechanism of cough is unknown but airway inflammation, mechanical distortion from pulmonary fibrosis and disruption of the vagus nerve are possible. Recent evidence suggests cough reflex hypersensitivity may also be an important mechanism and predictor of the frequency of cough. The investigation of cough should evaluate common causes such as asthma, gastro-oesophageal reflux and rhinitis. In patients with suspected cough due to sarcoidosis, a trial of corticosteroids should be considered. The severity of cough should be evaluated with validated outcome measures such as visual analogue scales, cough severity diary, health-related quality of life questionnaires such as the Leicester Cough Questionnaire and objective cough monitors. Future studies are needed to identify targets for therapeutic development. PMID:26349475

  13. Mechanical induction of cough in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) frequently develop a dry, irritating cough which often proves refractory to anti-tussive therapies. The precise pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for this cough are unknown. We hypothesised that changes in nerves modulating mechanical sensitivity in areas of interstitial fibrosis might lead to enhanced cough response to mechanical stimulation of the chest in IPF. Methods We studied 27 non-smoking subjects with IPF (63% male), mean (SD) age 71.7 (7) years and 30 healthy non-smokers. Quality of life (Leicester Cough Questionnaire), cough symptom scores and cough severity scores (visual analog scales) were recorded. Percussion stimulation was applied over the posterior lung base, upper anterior chest and manubrium sternum at sequential frequencies (20 Hertz (Hz), 40 Hz and 60 Hz) for up to 60 seconds and repeated twice at two minute intervals. The number of subjects achieving two and five-cough responses, total cough counts and cough latency were recorded. In separate experiments, the effect of mechanical stimulation on the pattern of breathing was determined in eight IPF subjects and five control subjects. Results In patients with IPF, we demonstrated strong correlations between subjective cough measurements, particularly the cough symptom score and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (r = -0.86; p < 0.001). Mechanical percussion induced a true cough reflex in 23/27 (85%) IPF subjects, but only 5/30 (17%) controls (p < 0.001). More patients with IPF reached the two-cough response at a lower frequency (20 Hz) posteriorly than at other positions. Highest mean cough totals were seen with stimulation at or above 40 Hz. Mechanical stimulation had no effect on respiratory rate but increased tidal volume in four (50%) subjects with IPF, particularly at higher frequencies. It was associated with increased urge to cough followed by a true cough reflex. Conclusions This study demonstrates that patients with IPF show

  14. Regulation of cough by neuronal Na(+)-K(+) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Canning, Brendan J; Farmer, David G S

    2015-06-01

    The Na(+)-K(+) ATPases play an essential role in establishing the sodium gradients in excitable cells. Multiple isoforms of the sodium pumps have been identified, with tissue and cell specific expression patterns. Because the vagal afferent nerves regulating cough must be activated at sustained high frequencies of action potential patterning to achieve cough initiation thresholds, it is a certainty that sodium pump function is essential to maintaining cough reflex sensitivities in health and in disease. The mechanisms by which Na(+)-K(+) ATPases regulate bronchopulmonary vagal afferent nerve excitability are reviewed as are potential therapeutic strategies targeting the sodium pumps in cough. PMID:26048736

  15. P2X3 receptors and sensitization of autonomic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P; Undem, Bradley J; Birder, Lori A; Grundy, David; Pijacka, Wioletta; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-09-01

    A great deal of basic and applied physiology and pharmacology in sensory and autonomic neuroscience has teased apart mechanisms that drive normal perception of mechanical, thermal and chemical signals and convey them to CNS, the distinction of fiber types and receptors and channels that mediate them, and how they may become dysfunctional or maladaptive in disease. Likewise, regulation of efferent autonomic traffic to control organ reflexes has been well studied. In both afferent and efferent limbs, a wide array of potential therapeutic mechanisms has surfaced, some of which have progressed into clinic, if not full regrastration. One conversation that has been less well progressed relates to how the afferent limb and its sensitization shapes the efferent outputs, and where modulation may offer new therapeutic avenues, especially for poorly addressed and common signs and symptoms of disease. Therapeutics for CV disease (HF, hypertension), respiratory disease (asthma, COPD), urological disease (OAB), GI disease (IBS), and inter alia, have largely focused on the efferent control of effector cells to modulate movement, contraction and secretion; medicinal needs remain with limits to efficacy, AEs and treatment resistance being common. We now must turn, in the quest for improved therapeutics, to understand how sensation from these organs becomes maladapted and sensitized in disease, and what opportunities may arise for improved therapeutics given the abundance of targets, many pharmacologically untapped, on the afferent side. One might look at the treatment resistant hypertension and the emerging benefit of renal denervation; or urinary bladder overactivity / neurogenic bladder and the emergence of neuromodulation, capsaicin instillation or botox injections to attenuate sensitized reflexes, as examples of merely the start of such progress. This review examines this topic more deeply, as applies to four major organ systems all sharing a great need from unsatisfied

  16. Workshop--cough: exercise, speech and music.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, John; Fontana, Giovanni; Gibson, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Twelve distinguished scientists attended the workshop, heard three presentations, and took part in the discussions. Fontana first described his unpublished studies on cough in exercise and during hyperventilation with healthy subjects. Both activities depressed cough induced by inhalation of distilled water aerosol (fog). The possible mechanisms were discussed. Gibson then described the successful use of speech therapy to treat chronic cough, and discussed the possible mechanisms, centering on the role of the larynx and its neural control. A comparison was made with the ability of speech and laughter to precipitate cough. Widdicombe discussed the scanty literature on the effect of singing and playing wind instruments on cough, most of the evidence being anecdotal. In the discussion periods several matters for future study arose. It is usually not clear if the modulation of cough, its depression, enhancement or excitation, arose primarily at peripheral sites (reflexes from the airways), or at a cortical level, or both. Nor is it clear whether the same results would be obtained with provoked cough and with spontaneous cough. But all three aspects of 'behavioual' changes in cough sensitivity (exercise, speech and music) could be further explored, and current techniques should make this possible. PMID:19135543

  17. TRPA1 receptors in cough.

    PubMed

    Grace, Megan S; Belvisi, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    In the early 1990's ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) class were implicated in the afferent sensory loop of the cough reflex and in the heightened cough sensitivity seen in disease. Agonists of the TRPV1 capsaicin receptor such as vanilloids and protons were demonstrated to be amongst the most potent chemical stimuli which cause cough. However, more recently, the TRPA1 receptor (not activated by capsaicin) has become of interest in the cough field because it is known to be activated by ligands such as acrolein which is present in air pollution and the acrid smoke from organic material. TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeant non-selective cation channel with 14 ankyrin repeats in its amino terminus which belongs to the larger TRP family. TRPA1 has been characterised as a thermoreceptor which is activated by cold temperature, environmental irritants and reactive electrophilic molecules which can be generated by oxidant stress and inflammation. TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli and the phenomena known as inflammatory hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Activation of these vagal sensory afferents leads to central reflexes including dyspnoea, changes in breathing pattern and cough. Recently, it has been demonstrated that stimulating TRPA1 channels activates vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibres in the guinea pig and rodent lung, and recent data have shown that TRPA1 ligands cause cough in both animal models and normal volunteers. In summary, due to their activation by a wide range of irritant and chemical substances, either by exogenous agents, endogenously produced mediators during inflammation or by oxidant stress, we suggest TRPA1 channels should be considered as one of the most promising targets currently identified for

  18. Assessment of antitussive efficacy of dextromethorphan in smoking related cough: objective vs. subjective measures

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, James; Wright, Caroline; Thompson, Rachel; Hull, David; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-01-01

    AIMS Using an established model of smokers cough we measured the antitussive effects of dextromethorphan compared with placebo. METHODS The study was a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled, crossover comparison of 22 mg 0.8 ml−1 dextromethorphan delivered pregastrically with matched placebo. Objective and subjective measurements of cough were recorded. Subjective measures included a daily diary record of cough symptoms and the Leicester quality of life questionnaire. Cough frequency was recorded using a manual cough counter. The objective measure of cough reflex sensitivity was the citric acid, dose–response cough challenge. RESULTS Dextromethorphan was significantly associated with an increase in the concentration of citric acid eliciting an average of two coughs/inhalation (C2) when compared with placebo, 1 h post dose by 0.49 mM (95% CI 0.05, 0.45, geometric mean 3.09) compared with placebo 0.24 mM (geometric mean 1.74) P < 0.05 and at 2 h 0.57 mM (95% CI 0.01, 0.43, geometric mean 3.75) compared with placebo 0.34 mM (geometric mean 2.19) P < 0.05). There was a highly significant improvement in the subjective data when compared with baseline. However, there was no significant difference between placebo and active treatment. No correlation was seen between cough sensitivity to citric acid and recorded cough counts or symptoms. When both subjective and objective data were compared with screening data there was evidence of a marked ‘placebo’ effect. CONCLUSIONS The objective measure of cough sensitivity demonstrates dextromethorphan effectively diminishes the cough reflex sensitivity. However, subjective measures do not support this. Other studies support these findings, which may represent a profound sensitivity of the cough reflex to higher influences. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Dextromethorphan is widely used as a cough suppressant in over the counter medications. Its efficacy in altering cough reflex sensitivity has been shown in

  19. Downregulation of cough by exercise and voluntary hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Giovanni A

    2010-01-01

    No information exists on the effects of hyperpnea on the sensory and cognitive aspects of coughing evoked by inhalation of tussigenic agents. The threshold for the cough reflex induced by inhalation of increasing concentrations of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (fog), and the index of cough reflex sensitivity, was assessed in 12 healthy humans in control conditions, during exercise, and during voluntary isocapnic hyperventilation (VIH) to the same level as the exercise. The intensity of the urge-to-cough (UTC), a cognitive component of coughing, was also recorded throughout the trials. The log-log relationship between inhaled fog concentrations and the correspondingly evoked UTC values, an index of the perceptual magnitude of the UTC sensitivity, was also calculated. Cough appearance was always assessed audiovisually. At an exercise level of 80% of anaerobic threshold, the mean cough threshold was increased from a control value of 1.03 +/- 0.65 to 2.25 +/- 1.14 ml/min (p < 0.01), i.e., cough sensitivity was downregulated. With VIH, the mean (+/-SD) threshold increased from 1.03 +/- 0.65 to 2.42 +/- 1.16 ml/min (p < 0.01), a similar downregulation. With exercise and VIH compared with control, mean UTC values at cough threshold were not significantly changed: control, 3.83 +/- 1.11 cm; exercise, 3.12 +/- 0.82 cm; VIH, 4.08 +/- 1.67 cm. Since the slopes of the log fog concentration/log UTC value were approximately halved during exercise and VIH compared with control, the UTC sensitivity to fog was depressed (p < 0.01). The results indicate that the adjustments brought into action by exercise-induced or voluntary hyperventilation exert inhibitory influences on the sensory and cognitive components of fog-induced cough. PMID:20047078

  20. Pathophysiology and therapy of chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, K F

    2005-02-01

    Cough is an essential protective mechanism for the airways and lungs. Cough receptors are situated in the larynx and tracheobronchial tree, and are mediated by rapidly-adapting (irritant) Adelta fibers, although other receptors such as C-fiber receptors may contribute. Cough plasticity and interactions of cough pathways may occur centrally to enhance the cough reflex. The presence of an increased cough reflex as measured by a tussive response to capsaicin or citric acid in patients with a chronic cough indicate that there is sensitisation of the cough reflex. The most common cause of acute cough is that after a common cold, which usually lasts for less than 2 weeks. Cough that persists longer may be due to asthma and its variant forms (cough variant asthma and eosinophilic bronchitis), rhinosinusitis (postnasal drip), gastro-esophageal reflux, bronchiectasis, chronic bronchitis, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy. Chronic persistent cough can contribute to a significant worsening of quality of life measures. Bronchial tumors must be excluded with a chest radiograph. The management of chronic cough includes investigation and treatment of any associated causes, which sometimes leads to control of cough. In a proportion of patients, cough may be idiopathic and remain uncontrolled. Currently-available antitussives such as dextromethorphan or codeine are modestly successful in controlling cough. New antitussives may be developed that act on the sensory receptors or prevent their sensitisation. PMID:15827540

  1. Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise you make when you take a breath after you cough. You may have choking spells or may cough ...

  2. The olivocochlear reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity are independently modulated by auditory cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, Constantino D; Aedo, Cristian; León, Alex; Bowen, Macarena; Jara, Natalia; Terreros, Gonzalo; Robles, Luis; Delano, Paul H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, efferent projections to the cochlear receptor are constituted by olivocochlear (OC) fibers that originate in the superior olivary complex. Medial and lateral OC neurons make synapses with outer hair cells and with auditory nerve fibers, respectively. In addition to the OC system, there are also descending projections from the auditory cortex that are directed towards the thalamus, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus, and superior olivary complex. Olivocochlear function can be assessed by measuring a brainstem reflex mediated by auditory nerve fibers, cochlear nucleus neurons, and OC fibers. Although it is known that the OC reflex is activated by contralateral acoustic stimulation and produces a suppression of cochlear responses, the influence of cortical descending pathways in the OC reflex is largely unknown. Here, we used auditory cortex electrical microstimulation in chinchillas to study a possible cortical modulation of cochlear and auditory nerve responses to tones in the absence and presence of contralateral noise. We found that cortical microstimulation produces two different peripheral modulations: (i) changes in cochlear sensitivity evidenced by amplitude modulation of cochlear microphonics and auditory nerve compound action potentials and (ii) enhancement or suppression of the OC reflex strength as measured by auditory nerve responses, which depended on the intersubject variability of the OC reflex. Moreover, both corticofugal effects were not correlated, suggesting the presence of two functionally different efferent pathways. These results demonstrate that auditory cortex electrical microstimulation independently modulates the OC reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity. PMID:25663383

  3. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control. PMID:23719208

  4. The pholcodine Case. Cough Medicines, IgE-Sensitization, and Anaphylaxis: A Devious Connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian data on pholcodine (PHO) strongly indicates that there is a biological chain from PHO exposure through IgE-sensitization to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). PHO is probably one of the strongest inducer of an IgE antibody response known. Of individuals taking PHO in cough medicines, over-the-counter accessibility to large populations, as many as 20 to 25% may become IgE sensitized. Once sensitized, PHO re-exposure will booster IgE antibody levels and IgE by around 100-fold. PHO is monovalent for 2 non-cross-reacting epitopes the quaternary ammonium ion (QAI), the main allergenic epitope of NMBA, and a non-QAI epitope. Thus, PHO most unlikely would initiate an allergic inflammatory response. Consequently, IgE sensitization is not revealed by obvious clinical signs, neither through tests based on IgE-sensitized effector cells. Therefore, it will escape detection if not assayed serologically. However, when subjected to general anesthesia, and thus the IgE-sensitized individual is administered a bivalent NMBA intravenously, the unrecognized presence of serum IgE antibodies to QAI may increase the risk of anaphylaxis 200- to 300-fold. Severe damages to patient's health can result, and mortality rates of 3 to 10% are reported. The Scandinavian experience indicates that the chain of events can efficiently be avoided by stopping PHO exposure: Within 1 year, the prevalence of IgE sensitization to PHO and QAI decreases significantly, and after 2 to 3 years, the numbers of reported anaphylactic reactions decreases equally so. PMID:23283141

  5. The Pholcodine Case. Cough Medicines, IgE-Sensitization, and Anaphylaxis: A Devious Connection.

    PubMed

    Florvaag, E; Johansson, S G O

    2012-07-01

    : The Scandinavian data on pholcodine (PHO) strongly indicates that there is a biological chain from PHO exposure through IgE-sensitization to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). PHO is probably one of the strongest inducer of an IgE antibody response known. Of individuals taking PHO in cough medicines, over-the-counter accessibility to large populations, as many as 20 to 25% may become IgE sensitized. Once sensitized, PHO re-exposure will booster IgE antibody levels and IgE by around 100-fold. PHO is monovalent for 2 non-cross-reacting epitopes the quaternary ammonium ion (QAI), the main allergenic epitope of NMBA, and a non-QAI epitope. Thus, PHO most unlikely would initiate an allergic inflammatory response. Consequently, IgE sensitization is not revealed by obvious clinical signs, neither through tests based on IgE-sensitized effector cells. Therefore, it will escape detection if not assayed serologically. However, when subjected to general anesthesia, and thus the IgE-sensitized individual is administered a bivalent NMBA intravenously, the unrecognized presence of serum IgE antibodies to QAI may increase the risk of anaphylaxis 200- to 300-fold. Severe damages to patient's health can result, and mortality rates of 3 to 10% are reported. The Scandinavian experience indicates that the chain of events can efficiently be avoided by stopping PHO exposure: Within 1 year, the prevalence of IgE sensitization to PHO and QAI decreases significantly, and after 2 to 3 years, the numbers of reported anaphylactic reactions decreases equally so. PMID:23283141

  6. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  7. How Are Task Reflexivity and Intercultural Sensitivity Related to the Academic Performance of MBA Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubovnikova, Joanne; Napiersky, Uwe; Vlachopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Higher education in business school environments is increasingly focused on how to best equip students with the skills necessary for leadership in the global workplace. This paper examines the impact of two particularly important cognitive capabilities--task reflexivity and intercultural sensitivity, on academic performance in an MBA programme. It…

  8. Update on Pediatric Cough.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of cough in children, the topic has been poorly researched. Although pediatricians recognize that chronic cough in children is different from that in adults, this difference seems less recognizable to other health professionals. During childhood, the respiratory tract and nervous system undergo a series of anatomical and physiological maturation processes that influence the cough reflex. Additionally, immunological responses undergo developmental and memorial processes that make infection and congenital abnormalities the overwhelming cause of cough in children. The lack of comprehensive clinical data regarding chronic cough in children has initially required pediatricians to adopt an adult approach to the problem. In the last 10 years, however, research has led to the reconsideration of the etiology of chronic cough in children. Currently, attention has focused on protracted bacterial bronchitis as a major cause of chronic cough in preschool-aged children and as a possible precursor of bronchiectasis. New research horizons are emerging for both the treatment and prevention of particular causes of chronic cough in children. PMID:26455825

  9. Interactions between limb and environmental mechanics influence stretch reflex sensitivity in the human arm.

    PubMed

    Krutky, Matthew A; Ravichandran, Vengateswaran J; Trumbower, Randy D; Perreault, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    Stretch reflexes contribute to arm impedance and longer-latency stretch reflexes exhibit increased sensitivity during interactions with compliant or unstable environments. This increased sensitivity is consistent with a regulation of arm impedance to compensate for decreased stability of the environment, but the specificity of this modulation has yet to be investigated. Many tasks, such as tool use, compromise arm stability along specific directions, and stretch reflexes tuned to those directions could present an efficient mechanism for regulating arm impedance in a task-appropriate manner. To be effective, such tuning should adapt not only to the mechanical properties of the environment but to those properties in relation to the arm, which also has directionally specific mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the specificity of stretch reflex modulation during interactions with mechanical environments that challenge arm stability. The tested environments were unstable, having the characteristics of a negative stiffness spring. These were either aligned or orthogonal to the direction of maximal endpoint stiffness for each subject. Our results demonstrate preferential increases in reflexes, elicited within 50-100 ms of perturbation onset, to perturbations applied specifically along the direction of the destabilizing environments. This increase occurred only when the magnitude of the environmental instability exceeded endpoint stiffness along the same direction. These results are consistent with task-specific reflex modulation tuned to the mechanical properties of the environment relative to those of the human arm. They demonstrate a highly adaptable, involuntary mechanism that may be used to modulate limb impedance along specific directions. PMID:19906880

  10. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in human neonates: the effect of postmenstrual age

    PubMed Central

    Andriessen, Peter; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Peters, Chris; Vermeulen, Barbara; Wijn, Pieter FF; Blanco, Carlos E

    2005-01-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study in human infants to determine if indices of R–R interval variability, systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability, and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity change with postmenstrual age (PMA: gestational age + postnatal age). The electrocardiogram, arterial SBP and respiration were recorded in clinically stable infants (PMA, 28–42 weeks) in the quiet sleep state in the first days after birth. (Cross-)spectral analyses of R–R interval series and SBP series were performed to calculate the power of low-frequency (LF, indicating baroreceptor reflex activity, 0.04–0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF, indicating parasympathetic activity, individualized between the p-10 and p-90 values of respiratory frequency) fluctuations, and transfer function phase and gain. The mean R–R interval, and LF and HF spectral powers of R–R interval series increased with PMA. The mean SBP increased with PMA, but not the LF and HF spectral powers of SBP series. In the LF range, cross-spectral analysis showed high coherence values (> 0.5) with a consistent negative phase shift between R–R interval and SBP, indicating a ∼3 s lag in R–R interval changes in relation to SBP. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, calculated from LF transfer gain, increased significantly with PMA, from 5 (preterm) to 15 ms mmHg−1 (term). Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity correlated significantly with the (LF and) HF spectral powers of R–R interval series, but not with the LF and HF spectral powers of SBP series. The principal conclusions are that baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and spectral power in R–R interval series increase in parallel with PMA, suggesting a progressive vagal maturation with PMA. PMID:16051623

  11. Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise you ... so hard that you vomit. Anyone can get whooping cough, but it is more common in infants and ...

  12. Evaluation and treatment of chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Genji; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cough is a frustrating and common problem, resulting in significant psychological and physical sequelae as well as enormous financial costs in terms of health care expense and time lost from work. Decreased QoL and depression are common. However, using a systematic approach, including assessing whether the patient uses ACE-I and cigarettes, excluding the presence of red flags and risk factors for life-threatening diseases, and obtaining and normal chest radiograph, more than 90% of cases of chronic cough are diagnosed as being caused by UACS, asthma, or GERD. It is recommended to address these conditions sequentially, starting with UACS. Nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis and pertussis infections are unrecognized by primary care providers and should be considered after UACS, asthma, and GERD have been addressed. Finally, cough hypersensitivity syndrome is a new area of research and has been hypothesized to be the underlying factor in many cases of chronic cough, regardless of the inciting factor. More clinical research is needed to further elucidate the cough reflex pathway and the factors involved in modulating its sensitivity, which may eventually lead to new antitussive therapeutics. PMID:24758953

  13. Speech pathology for chronic cough: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2009-04-01

    Chronic cough may persist despite systematic evaluation and medical treatment of known associated diseases such as asthma, rhinitis, and gastro-esophageal reflux. These patients have refractory chronic cough and many exhibit laryngeal hypersensitivity that is manifest at both a sensory and motor level. Examples of this are heightened sensitivity of the cough reflex to capsaicin, and laryngeal motor dysfunction with hoarse vocal quality and paradoxical vocal cord movement. Chronic cough that persists despite medical treatment may respond to speech pathology intervention. A multidimensional speech pathology treatment programme was designed based upon methods used to treat hyperfunctional voice disorders and paradoxical vocal fold movement. This included education, vocal hygiene training, cough suppression strategies and psychoeducational counseling. When tested in a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 87 patients, participants in the treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in cough, breathing, voice and upper airway symptoms following intervention, as well as improvements in auditory perceptual ratings of voice quality (breathy, rough, strain and glottal fry) and significant improvement in voice acoustic parameters (maximum phonation time, jitter and harmonic-to-noise ratio). Speech pathology intervention can be an effective way to treat refractory chronic cough. PMID:19061964

  14. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function. PMID:27240793

  15. Semantics and types of cough

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kian Fan; Bolser, Don; Davenport, Paul; Fontana, Giovanni; Morice, Alyn; Widdicombe, John

    2010-01-01

    The panel considered the different types of cough in terms of basic mechanisms and clinical manifestations; both experimentally and clinically cough could occur in single efforts and as ‘bouts’ or ‘epochs’. There were different definitions of cough but, provided the definition used was clear, this did not seem to be a major concern. The methods available for determining the nature or type of clinical cough were discussed, in particular automated cough counting in the clinic and more sophisticated methods available in the laboratory. With regard to semantics, there has been great variation in the names used; this applies to nervous sensors for cough, to cough reflexes and epochs, to clinical names for cough, and to cough sounds. Some simplification and uniformity of nomenclature seemed desirable although, provided the use of a name was clear, little confusion probably existed. The panel felt that the cough nomenclature would evolve with time and would prove to be useful for investigators, clinicians and coughers. PMID:19136069

  16. A worldwide survey of chronic cough: a manifestation of enhanced somatosensory response.

    PubMed

    Morice, Alyn H; Jakes, Adam D; Faruqi, Shoaib; Birring, Surinder S; McGarvey, Lorcan; Canning, Brendan; Smith, Jaclyn A; Parker, Sean M; Chung, Kian Fan; Lai, Kefang; Pavord, Ian D; van den Berg, Jan; Song, Woo-Jung; Millqvist, Eva; Farrell, Michael J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Dicpinigaitis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Reports from individual centres suggest a preponderance of females with chronic cough. Females also have heightened cough reflex sensitivity. Here we have reviewed the age and sex of unselected referrals to 11 cough clinics. To investigate the cause of any observed sex dimorphism, functional magnetic resonance imaging of putative cough centres was analysed in normal volunteers. The demographic profile of consecutive patients presenting with chronic cough was evaluated. Cough challenge with capsaicin was undertaken in normal volunteers to construct a concentration-response curve. Subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging during repeated inhalation of sub-tussive concentrations of capsaicin observed areas of activation within the brain and differences in the sexes identified. Of the 10,032 patients presenting with chronic cough, two-thirds (6591) were female (mean age 55 years). The patient profile was largely uniform across centres. The most common age for presentation was 60-69 years. The maximum tolerable dose of inhaled capsaicin was lower in females; however, a significantly greater activation of the somatosensory cortex was observed. Patients presenting with chronic cough from diverse racial and geographic backgrounds have a strikingly homogeneous demographic profile, suggesting a distinct clinical entity. The preponderance of females may be explained by sex-related differences in the central processing of cough sensation. PMID:25186267

  17. Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Whooping Cough Overview Vaccination Matters: Help Protect Families from Whooping Cough is a public health initiative by the American Academy of Family Physicians. It’s ...

  18. Whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Chivima, Brenda

    2014-10-21

    Whooping cough or pertussis is a contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Whooping cough is transmitted via droplets in the air from sneezing or coughing and individuals are considered infectious from just before and up to 21 days after the onset of the cough. Usually it has an incubation period of seven to ten days, and the disease lasts six to eight weeks. PMID:25315570

  19. [Approach of dry cough in community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Duquet, N

    2012-12-01

    Cough is a common symptom, often experienced as troublesome. The cough reflex is a physiological defense of the respiratory tract, most often triggered by irritation or obstruction of the airways. Productive cough can expel bronchial secretions. This cough is certainly useful. An irritating, dry cough however, has no purpose and can justify the temporary use of a cough suppressant to relieve symptoms. The pharmacist is often the first person to whom the patient turns. Persistent cough generally indicates an underlying condition that requires a causal treatment. In this case, the pharmacist should refer the patient to the doctor. This article aims to provide guidelines for dealing with dry cough in the pharmacy. PMID:23350209

  20. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck reflex; Galant reflex; Truncal incurvation; Rooting reflex; Parachute reflex; Grasp reflex ... was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly older infants ...

  1. Changing the paradigm for cough: does 'cough hypersensitivity' aid our understanding?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common reason for patients to seek medication attention. Over the last few decades, we have experienced significant clinical success by applying the paradigm of 'evaluating and treating the causes for chronic cough'. However, we still ask ourselves 'what underlies chronic cough. Indeed in a considerable proportion of patients cough is idiopathic, or unexplained despite vigorous evaluation. Commonly associated conditions such as rhinitis, eosinophilic bronchitis, asthma, or gastroesophageal acidic reflux may not be fundamental to cough, and thus may be triggers rather than causes. The cardinal feature of chronic cough is persistent upregulation the cough reflex, which may be driven by complex interactions between biologic, neurologic, immunologic, genetic, comorbid, and environmental factors. We suggest the new paradigm 'cough hypersensitivity syndrome' should finally bring us further advances in understanding and management of chronic cough. PMID:24527404

  2. Atopic cough and fungal allergy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Haruhiko; Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    We have shown that some patients presenting with chronic bronchodilator-resistant non-productive cough have a global atopic tendency and cough hypersensitivity without nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness, abbreviated as atopic cough (AC). The cough can be treated successfully with histamine H1 antagonists and/or glucocorticoids. Eosinophilic tracheobronchitis and cough hypersensitivity are pathological and physiological characteristics of AC. Fungus-associated chronic cough (FACC) is defined as chronic cough associated with basidiomycetous (BM) fungi found in induced sputum, and recognition of FACC has provided the possibility of using antifungal drugs as new treatment strategies. Bjerkandera adusta is a wood decay BM fungus, which has attracted attention because of its potential role in enhancing the severity of cough symptoms in FACC patients by sensitization to this fungus. Before making a diagnosis of "idiopathic cough" in cases of chronic refractory cough, remaining intractable cough-related laryngeal sensations, such as "a sensation of mucus in the throat (SMIT)," which is correlated with fungal colonization, should be evaluated and treated appropriately in each patient. The new findings, i.e., the detection of environmental mushroom spores that should not be present in the human airways in addition to the good clinical response of patients to antifungal drugs, may lead to the development of novel strategies for treatment of chronic cough. PMID:25383202

  3. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough. PMID:26581078

  4. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough. PMID:26581078

  5. Cough management: a practical approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms for which patients seek medical attention from primary care physicians and pulmonologists. Cough is an important defensive reflex that enhances the clearance of secretions and particles from the airways and protects the lower airways from the aspiration of foreign materials. Therapeutic suppression of cough may be either disease-specific or symptom related. The potential benefits of an early treatment of cough could include the prevention of the vicious cycle of cough. There has been a long tradition in acute cough, which is frequently due to upper respiratory tract infections, to use symptom-related anti-tussives. Suppression of cough (during chronic cough) may be achieved by disease-specific therapies, but in many patients it is often necessary to use symptomatic anti-tussives, too. According to the current guidelines of the American College of Chest Physician on "Cough Suppressants and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy" and additional clinical trials on the most frequent anti-tussive drugs, it should be possible to diagnose and treat cough successfully in a majority of cases. Among drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of cough, peripherally acting anti-tussives such as levodropropizine and moguisteine show the highest level of benefit and should be recommended especially in children. By improving our understanding of the specific effects of these anti-tussive agents, the therapeutic use of these drugs may be refined. The present review provides a summary of the most clinically relevant anti-tussive drugs in addition to their potential mechanism of action. PMID:21985340

  6. Cough management: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Francesco; Virchow, Johann C; Polverino, Mario; Zanasi, Alessandro; Behrakis, Panagiotis K; Kilinç, Gunsely; Balsamo, Rossella; De Danieli, Gianluca; Lanata, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptoms for which patients seek medical attention from primary care physicians and pulmonologists. Cough is an important defensive reflex that enhances the clearance of secretions and particles from the airways and protects the lower airways from the aspiration of foreign materials. Therapeutic suppression of cough may be either disease-specific or symptom related. The potential benefits of an early treatment of cough could include the prevention of the vicious cycle of cough. There has been a long tradition in acute cough, which is frequently due to upper respiratory tract infections, to use symptom-related anti-tussives. Suppression of cough (during chronic cough) may be achieved by disease-specific therapies, but in many patients it is often necessary to use symptomatic anti-tussives, too. According to the current guidelines of the American College of Chest Physician on "Cough Suppressants and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy" and additional clinical trials on the most frequent anti-tussive drugs, it should be possible to diagnose and treat cough successfully in a majority of cases. Among drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of cough, peripherally acting anti-tussives such as levodropropizine and moguisteine show the highest level of benefit and should be recommended especially in children. By improving our understanding of the specific effects of these anti-tussive agents, the therapeutic use of these drugs may be refined. The present review provides a summary of the most clinically relevant anti-tussive drugs in addition to their potential mechanism of action. PMID:21985340

  7. Anatomy and Neurophysiology of Cough

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Chang, Anne B.; Bolser, Donald C.; Smith, Jaclyn A.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; Adams, Todd M.; Altman, Kenneth W.; Barker, Alan F.; Birring, Surinder S.; Blackhall, Fiona; Bolser, Donald, C.; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Braman, Sidney S.; Brightling, Christopher; Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla; Canning, Brendan; Chang, Anne Bernadette; Coeytaux, Remy; Cowley, Terrie; Davenport, Paul; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Ebihara, Satoru; El Solh, Ali A.; Escalante, Patricio; Feinstein, Anthony; Field, Stephen K.; Fisher, Dina; French, Cynthia T.; Gibson, Peter; Gold, Philip; Grant, Cameron; Harding, Susan M.; Harnden, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.; Irwin, Richard S.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Keogh, Karina A.; Lane, Andrew P.; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Lim, Kaiser; Malesker, Mark A.; Mazzone, Peter; Mazzone, Stuart; Molasiotis, Alex; Murad, M. Hassan; Newcombe, Peter; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Oppenheimer, John; Prezant, David; Pringsheim, Tamara; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Rosen, Mark; Rubin, Bruce; Ryu, Jay H.; Smith, Jaclyn; Tarlo, Susan M.; Turner, Ronald B.; Vertigan, Anne; Wang, Gang; Weir, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary C-fibers and a subset of mechanically sensitive, acid-sensitive myelinated sensory nerves play essential roles in regulating cough. These vagal sensory nerves terminate primarily in the larynx, trachea, carina, and large intrapulmonary bronchi. Other bronchopulmonary sensory nerves, sensory nerves innervating other viscera, as well as somatosensory nerves innervating the chest wall, diaphragm, and abdominal musculature regulate cough patterning and cough sensitivity. The responsiveness and morphology of the airway vagal sensory nerve subtypes and the extrapulmonary sensory nerves that regulate coughing are described. The brainstem and higher brain control systems that process this sensory information are complex, but our current understanding of them is considerable and increasing. The relevance of these neural systems to clinical phenomena, such as urge to cough and psychologic methods for treatment of dystussia, is high, and modern imaging methods have revealed potential neural substrates for some features of cough in the human. PMID:25188530

  8. Approach to chronic cough: the neuropathic basis for cough hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom that can be difficult to manage because associated causes may remain elusive and treatment of any associated cause may not provide relief. Current antitussives have limited efficacy and undesirable side-effects. Patients with chronic cough describe sensory symptoms suggestive of upper airway and laryngeal neural dysfunction, and report cough triggered by low-level physical and chemical stimuli supporting the concept of cough reflex hypersensitivity. Mechanisms underlying peripheral and central augmentation of the afferent cough pathways have been identified. Chronic cough is a neuropathic condition that could be secondary to sensory nerve damage caused by inflammatory, infective and allergic factors. Recent success in the treatment of chronic cough with agents used for treating neuropathic pain such as gabapentin and amitryptiline would also support this concept. Research into neuropathic cough may lead to the discovery of more effective antitussives. PMID:25383203

  9. Atopic cough and fungal allergy

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that some patients presenting with chronic bronchodilator-resistant non-productive cough have a global atopic tendency and cough hypersensitivity without nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness, abbreviated as atopic cough (AC). The cough can be treated successfully with histamine H1 antagonists and/or glucocorticoids. Eosinophilic tracheobronchitis and cough hypersensitivity are pathological and physiological characteristics of AC. Fungus-associated chronic cough (FACC) is defined as chronic cough associated with basidiomycetous (BM) fungi found in induced sputum, and recognition of FACC has provided the possibility of using antifungal drugs as new treatment strategies. Bjerkandera adusta is a wood decay BM fungus, which has attracted attention because of its potential role in enhancing the severity of cough symptoms in FACC patients by sensitization to this fungus. Before making a diagnosis of “idiopathic cough” in cases of chronic refractory cough, remaining intractable cough-related laryngeal sensations, such as “a sensation of mucus in the throat (SMIT),” which is correlated with fungal colonization, should be evaluated and treated appropriately in each patient. The new findings, i.e., the detection of environmental mushroom spores that should not be present in the human airways in addition to the good clinical response of patients to antifungal drugs, may lead to the development of novel strategies for treatment of chronic cough. PMID:25383202

  10. Whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Danthis, Michael

    2014-05-13

    The CPD article was relevant to my practice because most upper respiratory tract infections exhibit similar symptoms initially. It is essential to be able to diagnose whooping cough because it is an acute and highly contagious disease. PMID:24802470

  11. Cough: are children really different to adults?

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne B

    2005-01-01

    Worldwide paediatricians advocate that children should be managed differently from adults. In this article, similarities and differences between children and adults related to cough are presented. Physiologically, the cough pathway is closely linked to the control of breathing (the central respiratory pattern generator). As respiratory control and associated reflexes undergo a maturation process, it is expected that the cough would likewise undergo developmental stages as well. Clinically, the 'big three' causes of chronic cough in adults (asthma, post-nasal drip and gastroesophageal reflux) are far less common causes of chronic cough in children. This has been repeatedly shown by different groups in both clinical and epidemiological studies. Therapeutically, some medications used empirically for cough in adults have little role in paediatrics. For example, anti-histamines (in particular H1 antagonists) recommended as a front-line empirical treatment of chronic cough in adults have no effect in paediatric cough. Instead it is associated with adverse reactions and toxicity. Similarly, codeine and its derivatives used widely for cough in adults are not efficacious in children and are contraindicated in young children. Corticosteroids, the other front-line empirical therapy recommended for adults, are also minimally (if at all) efficacious for treating non-specific cough in children. In summary, current data support that management guidelines for paediatric cough should be different to those in adults as the aetiological factors and treatment in children significantly differ to those in adults. PMID:16270937

  12. Cough-related neural processing in the brain: a roadmap for cough dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Ando, Ayaka; Farrell, Michael J; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-11-01

    Cough is a complex respiratory behavior essential for airway protection, consisting of sensory, motor, affective and cognitive attributes. Accordingly, the cough neural circuitry extends beyond a simple pontomedullary reflex arc to incorporate a network of neurons that are also widely distributed throughout the subcortical and cortical brain. Studies have described discrete regional responses in the brain that likely give rise to sensory discriminative processes, voluntary and urge-related cough control mechanisms and aspects of the emotive responses following airways irritation and coughing. Data from these studies highlight the central nervous system as a plausible target for therapeutic intervention and, consistent with this, a careful appraisal of the many and varied clinical disorders of coughing control would argue that more diversified therapies are needed to treat patients with cough dysfunction. In this paper we explore these concepts in detail to highlight unanswered questions and stimulate discussion for potential research of cough in the future. PMID:25301754

  13. Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Adalberto; de Diego, Alfredo; Domingo, Christian; Lamas, Adelaida; Gutierrez, Raimundo; Naberan, Karlos; Garrigues, Vicente; López Vime, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success. PMID:26165783

  14. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  15. Effects of Selective Inhibition of PDE4 by YM976 on Airway Reactivity and Cough in Ovalbumin-Sensitized Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Mokrý, J; Urbanová, A; Medvedová, I; Kertys, M; Mikolka, P; Kosutová, P; Mokrá, D

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes involved in the degradation of cAMP and cGMP. Selective PDE4 inhibitors (e.g., roflumilast) are effective in therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with neutrophil inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a selective PDE4 inhibitor, YM976, on citric acid-induced cough, in vivo and in vitro airway smooth muscle reactivity to histamine, and on inflammatory mediators in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs, with experimentally induced eosinophil inflammation. The YM976 was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg once daily for 7 days. Sensitization with ovalbumin led to a significant increase in the number of coughs, and in vivo and in vitro airway reactivity. Also, increased plasma levels of IL-4, IL-5, and PAF were observed, with a significant increase in the differential count of eosinophils in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The YM976 suppressed the number of coughs, the airway reactivity in tracheal tissue strips, and the IL-4 level. The findings indicate that PDE4 inhibition by YM976 exerts antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects in guinea pigs with ovalbumin-induced eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:27130219

  16. Central administration of nicotine suppresses tracheobronchial cough in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Poliacek, I; Rose, M J; Pitts, T E; Mortensen, A; Corrie, L W; Davenport, P W; Bolser, D C

    2015-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nicotine, which acts peripherally to promote coughing, might inhibit reflex cough at a central site. Nicotine was administered via the vertebral artery [intra-arterial (ia)] to the brain stem circulation and by microinjections into a restricted area of the caudal ventral respiratory column in 33 pentobarbital anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats. The number of coughs induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways; amplitudes of the diaphragm, abdominal muscle, and laryngeal muscles EMGs; and several temporal characteristics of cough were analyzed after administration of nicotine and compared with those during control and recovery period. (-)Nicotine (ia) reduced cough number, cough expiratory efforts, blood pressure, and heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. (-)Nicotine did not alter temporal characteristics of the cough motor pattern. Pretreatment with mecamylamine prevented the effect of (-)nicotine on blood pressure and heart rate, but did not block the antitussive action of this drug. (+)Nicotine was less potent than (-)nicotine for inhibition of cough. Microinjections of (-)nicotine into the caudal ventral respiratory column produced similar inhibitory effects on cough as administration of this isomer by the ia route. Mecamylamine microinjected in the region just before nicotine did not significantly reduce the cough suppressant effect of nicotine. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors significantly modulate functions of brain stem and in particular caudal ventral respiratory column neurons involved in expression of the tracheobronchial cough reflex by a mecamylamine-insensitive mechanism. PMID:25477349

  17. Central administration of nicotine suppresses tracheobronchial cough in anesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M. J.; Pitts, T. E.; Mortensen, A.; Corrie, L. W.; Davenport, P. W.; Bolser, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nicotine, which acts peripherally to promote coughing, might inhibit reflex cough at a central site. Nicotine was administered via the vertebral artery [intra-arterial (ia)] to the brain stem circulation and by microinjections into a restricted area of the caudal ventral respiratory column in 33 pentobarbital anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats. The number of coughs induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways; amplitudes of the diaphragm, abdominal muscle, and laryngeal muscles EMGs; and several temporal characteristics of cough were analyzed after administration of nicotine and compared with those during control and recovery period. (−)Nicotine (ia) reduced cough number, cough expiratory efforts, blood pressure, and heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. (−)Nicotine did not alter temporal characteristics of the cough motor pattern. Pretreatment with mecamylamine prevented the effect of (−)nicotine on blood pressure and heart rate, but did not block the antitussive action of this drug. (+)Nicotine was less potent than (−)nicotine for inhibition of cough. Microinjections of (−)nicotine into the caudal ventral respiratory column produced similar inhibitory effects on cough as administration of this isomer by the ia route. Mecamylamine microinjected in the region just before nicotine did not significantly reduce the cough suppressant effect of nicotine. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors significantly modulate functions of brain stem and in particular caudal ventral respiratory column neurons involved in expression of the tracheobronchial cough reflex by a mecamylamine-insensitive mechanism. PMID:25477349

  18. Airway dynamics, oesophageal pressure and cough.

    PubMed

    Lavietes, M H; Smeltzer, S C; Cook, S D; Modak, R M; Smaldone, G C

    1998-01-01

    This study hypothesizes that: peak supramaximal airflow during cough reflects expiratory muscle effort, and that expiratory muscle function during cough might be assessed from the airflow signal alone. We monitored airflow and oesophageal pressure (Poes) in normal subjects during cough generated under two conditions: 1) voluntarily from functional residual capacity (FRC); and 2) involuntarily after inhalation of citric acid (CA). Maximal expiratory cough flow was quantified as the quotient of maximal flow during a given cough divided by maximal flow at the matched volume of thoracic gas (Vtg) as identified on the maximal expiratory flow-volume curve. We found: flow ratios correlated poorly with Poes; the variance of flow ratios associated with a series of voluntary coughs was poorly explained by Poes. During CA inhalation, when the Vtg compressed during cough could not be controlled, correlation of Poes with flow ratio remained poor. We conclude that to study the motor limb of the cough reflex, measurements of both airflow and oesophageal pressure are required. PMID:9543286

  19. Molecular signaling and targets from itch: lessons for cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Itch is described as an unpleasant sensation that elicits the desire to scratch, which results in the removal of the irritant from the skin. The cough reflex also results from irritation, with the purpose of removing said irritant from the airway. Could cough then be similar to itch? Anatomically, both pathways are mediated by small-diameter sensory fibers. These cough and itch sensory fibers release neuropeptides upon activation, which leads to inflammation of the nerves. Both cough and itch also involve mast cells and their mediators, which are released upon degranulation. This common inflammation and interaction with mast cells are involved in the development of chronic conditions of itch and cough. In this review, we examine the anatomy and molecular mechanisms of itch and compare them to known mechanisms for cough. Highlighting the common aspects of itch and cough could lead to new thoughts and perspectives in both fields. PMID:23497684

  20. Woes of Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... White House Lunch Recipes The Woes of Whooping Cough KidsHealth > For Kids > The Woes of Whooping Cough ... hospital if they get it. How Is Whooping Cough Spread? Pertussis bacteria can live in saliva in ...

  1. Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles... Pregnant? Help Protect Your Baby from Whooping Cough frame support disabled and/or not supported in ... disease. Also available on YouTube. Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Learn more about whooping cough vaccination during pregnancy... ...

  2. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  3. Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whooping cough (pertussis) is an infection of the respiratory system caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis (or B. ... Immunizations Your Child's Immunizations Coughing Pneumonia Lungs and Respiratory System The Woes of Whooping Cough Contact Us Print ...

  4. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis. PMID:17909897

  5. Failure of nebulized irritant, acidic, or hypotonic solutions or external mechanical stimulation of the trachea to consistently induce coughing in healthy, awake dogs.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Tonya E; Hawkins, Eleanor C; Davis, Jennifer L; Robertson, Ian D

    2011-07-01

    A useful approach for evaluating antitussive drugs in humans is to determine the sensitivity of the cough reflex to a standard challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine if methods used to induce coughing in humans would be effective when used on awake, untrained, healthy dogs for future application in therapeutic trials involving dogs with spontaneous disease. Methods tested were: mechanically stimulating the trachea by digital compression as well as by vibration from an electric shaver, neck massager, and palm sander (11 dogs), and administering nebulized irritant (3000 μM capsaicin), acidic (1 M citric acid), and hypotonic (deionized water) solutions using face masks (4 dogs). The threshold for success was defined as induction of at least 2 moderate or strong coughs in at least 75% of the dogs. None of the methods tested was successful. Digital compression induced soft (n = 2) or moderate (n = 1) coughing in 3 of 11 dogs tested. Nebulization of citric acid induced 1 soft cough in 1 of 4 dogs. It was concluded that coughing cannot be successfully induced in awake, healthy dogs using methods that are successful in humans. Other strategies must be developed so that cough sensitivity can be objectively and non-invasively measured in dogs for clinical research purposes. PMID:22211000

  6. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or her hips toward the touch in a dancing movement. Grasp reflex . This reflex occurs if you ... reflex occurs in slightly older infants when the child is held upright and the baby’s body is ...

  7. Adult and paediatric cough guidelines: Ready for an overhaul?

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S; Kavanagh, Joanne; Lai, Kefang; Chang, Anne B

    2015-12-01

    Cough is one of the most common reasons that patients seek medical attention. Cough guidelines from numerous countries and societies are available to assist the clinician to investigate and manage patients with cough. We review some of the recent progress in the field of cough that may lead to revision of these guidelines. In adults with chronic cough, new causes such as obstructive sleep apnoea have been identified. A new terminology, cough hypersensitivity syndrome (CHS), has been proposed for patients with chronic cough, which emphasises cough reflex hypersensitivity as a key feature. New therapeutic options are now available, particularly for patients with refractory or idiopathic chronic cough, which include gabapentin, speech pathology management and morphine. There has been great progress in the assessment of cough with the development of validated quality of life questionnaires and cough frequency monitoring tools. In children, common aetiologies differ from adults and those managed according to guidelines have better outcomes compared to usual care. New diagnostic entities such as protracted bacterial bronchitis have been described. Paediatric-specific cough assessment tools such as the Parent/Child Quality of Life Questionnaire will help improve the assessment of patients. Further research is necessary to improve the evidence base for future clinical guideline recommendations. Guidelines in future should also aim to reach a wider audience that includes primary care physicians, non-specialists and patients. PMID:25681276

  8. Cough variant asthma and atopic cough

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic cough has been reported to be the fifth most common complaint seen by primary care physicians in the world, the third in Italy. Chronic cough in non-smoking, non-treated with ACE-inhibitor adults with normal chest radiogram could be a symptom of asthma and can be sub-classified into: cough-variant asthma, atopic cough, and eosinophilic bronchitis. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of these three disorders. PMID:22958894

  9. A randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate the effects of butamirate and dextromethorphan on capsaicin induced cough in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Wright, Caroline; Thompson, Rachel; Morice, Alyn H

    2014-01-01

    Aims The examination of cough reflex sensitivity through inhalational challenge can be utilized to demonstrate pharmacological end points. Here we compare the effect of butamirate, dextromethorphan and placebo on capsaicin-induced cough in healthy volunteers. Methods In this randomized, placebo-controlled, six way crossover study the effect of dextromethrophan 30 mg, four doses of butamirate and placebo was evaluated on incremental capsaicin challenges performed at baseline and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h following dosing. The primary end point was the area under the curve (AUC(0,12h)) of log10 C5 from pre-dose to 12 h after dosing. Plasma butamirate metabolites were analyzed to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships. Results Thirty-four subjects (13 males, median age 25 years) completed the study. Cough sensitivity decreased from baseline in all arms of the study. Dextromethorphan was superior to placebo (P = 0.01) but butamirate failed to show significant activity with maximum attenuation at the 45 mg dose. There was no apparent relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for butamirate. Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time that dextromethorphan attenuates capsaicin challenge confirming its broad activity on the cough reflex. The lack of efficacy of butamirate could be due to formulation issues at higher doses. PMID:24995954

  10. Asthmatic cough and airway oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-05-31

    The mechanisms of cough in asthma are unclear. Asthma is associated with an oxidative stress. Many reactive oxygen species sensitize or activate sensory C-fibers which are capable to induce cough. It was hypothesized that oxidative stress in the airways might contribute to the cough severity in asthma. Exhaled breath condensate samples were collected in ten healthy and 26 asthmatic subjects. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the subjects filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent cough provocation tests with dry air hyperpnoea and hypertonic saline, among other measurements. Among the asthmatic subjects, high 8-isoprostane was associated with severe cough response to hyperpnoea (p=0.001), low Leicester Cough Questionnaire values (indicating severe subjective cough, p=0.02), and usage of combination asthma drugs (p=0.03-0.04). However, the 8-isoprostane concentrations did not differ significantly between the healthy and the asthmatic subjects. Airway oxidative stress may be associated with experienced cough severity and measured cough sensitivity in asthma. PMID:22546340

  11. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  12. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  13. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Tuberculosis Diagnosis in Adults with Chronic Cough in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Nliwasa, Marriott; MacPherson, Peter; Chisala, Palesa; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Khundi, McEwen; Kaswaswa, Kruger; Mwapasa, Mphatso; Msefula, Chisomo; Sohn, Hojoon; Flach, Clare; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current tuberculosis diagnostics lack sensitivity, and are expensive. Highly accurate, rapid and cheaper diagnostic tests are required for point of care use in low resource settings with high HIV prevalence. Objective To investigate the sensitivity and specificity, and cost of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for tuberculosis diagnosis in adults with chronic cough compared to Xpert® MTB/RIF, fluorescence smear microscopy. Methods Between October 2013 and March 2014, consecutive adults at a primary care clinic were screened for cough, offered HIV testing and assessed for tuberculosis using LAMP, Xpert® MTB/RIF and fluorescence smear microscopy. Sensitivity and specificity (with culture as reference standard), and costs were estimated. Results Of 273 adults recruited, 44.3% (121/273) were HIV-positive and 19.4% (53/273) had bacteriogically confirmed tuberculosis. The sensitivity of LAMP compared to culture was 65.0% (95% CI: 48.3% to 79.4%) with 100% (95% CI: 98.0% to 100%) specificity. The sensitivity of Xpert® MTB/RIF (77.5%, 95% CI: 61.5% to 89.2%) was similar to that of LAMP, p = 0.132. The sensitivity of concentrated fluorescence smear microscopy with routine double reading (87.5%, 95% CI: 73.2% to 95.8%) was higher than that of LAMP, p = 0.020. All three tests had high specificity. The lowest cost per test of LAMP was at batch size of 14 samples (US$ 9.98); this was lower than Xpert® MTB/RIF (US$ 13.38) but higher than fluorescence smear microscopy (US$ 0.65). Conclusion The sensitivity of LAMP was similar to Xpert® MTB/RIF but lower than fluorescence smear microscopy; all three tests had high specificity. These findings support the Malawi policy that recommends a combination of fluorescence smear microscopy and Xpert® MTB/RIF prioritised for people living with HIV, already found to be smear-negative, or being considered for retreatment of tuberculosis. PMID:27171380

  14. Airway inflammation, airway responsiveness and cough before and after inhaled budesonide in patients with eosinophilic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Brightling, C E; Ward, R; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D

    2000-04-01

    Eosinophilic bronchitis is a common cause of chronic cough, characterized by sputum eosinophilia similar to that seen in asthma, but unlike asthma the patients have no objective evidence of variable airflow obstruction or airway hyperresponsiveness. The reason for the different functional associations is unclear. The authors have tested the hypothesis that in eosinophilic bronchitis the inflammation is mainly localized in the upper airway. In an open study the authors measured the lower (provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PC20)) and upper (PC25 MIF50) airway responsiveness to histamine, lower and upper airway inflammation using induced sputum and nasal lavage, in II patients with eosinophilic bronchitis. The authors assessed changes in these measures and in cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin and cough severity after 400 microg of inhaled budesonide for 4 weeks. A nasal eosinophilia was present in only three patients with one having upper airway hyperresponsiveness. Following treatment with inhaled corticosteroids the geometric mean sputum eosinophil count decreased from 12.8% to 2.9% (mean difference 4.4-fold, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14-10.02), the mean +/- sem cough visual analogue score on a 100 mm scale decreased from 27.2 +/- 6.6 mm to 12.6 +/- 5.7 mm (mean difference 14.6, 95% CI 9.1-20.1) and the cough sensitivity assessed as the capsaicin concentration required to cause two coughs (C2) and five coughs (C5) improved (C2 mean difference 0.75 doubling concentrations, 95% CI 0.36-1.1; C5 mean difference 1.3 doubling concentration, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). There was a significant positive correlation between the fold change in sputum eosinophil count and doubling dose change in C5 after inhaled budesonide (r=0.61). It is concluded that upper airway inflammation is not prominent in eosinophilic bronchitis and that inhaled budesonide improves the sputum eosinophilia, cough severity and sensitivity suggesting a

  15. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924

  16. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Carson, D; Boris, L; Mabary, J; Lin, Z; Nicodème, F; Cuttica, M; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E

    2014-01-01

    Cough and throat clearing might be difficult to differentiate when trying to detect them acoustically or manometrically. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing, and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Ten asymptomatic volunteers (seven females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high-resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and two blinded reviewers were compared. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour. There were 50 cough and 50 throat-clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of automated acoustic analysis was 84% and 50% for cough, while the blinded analysis using sound revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 92%. The manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing was similar in terms of qualitative findings; however, cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations and a more vigorous upper esophageal sphincter contraction compared with throat clearing. The acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and poor specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more vigorous pressure changes and a greater rate of repetitive pressurizations in cough. PMID:23442178

  17. [Drug therapy for cough].

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki; Naaranlahti, Toivo

    2016-01-01

    An efficient therapy for cough usually requires identification and treatment of the underlying disease, like asthma. However an underlying disease in cough is not found in all cases and conventional treatment of the underlying disease is ineffective against cough. Drug therapy options are available also for these situations. Honey or menthol can be tried for cough associated with respitatory infections, antihistamines for cough associated with allergic rhinitis, blockers of the leukotriene receptor or muscarinic receptor for asthma-associated cough and morphine for cough associated with a malignant disease. Menthol, blockers of the muscarinic receptor, or dextrometorphan can be tried for prolonged idiopathic cough. Codeine is not necessary in the treatment of cough. Refraining from drug treatment should always be considered. PMID:27089619

  18. TRPV1 and TRPM8 in Treatment of Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is common in the population, and among some there is no evident medical explanation for the symptoms. Such a refractory or idiopathic cough is now often regarded as a neuropathic disease due to dysfunctional airway ion channels, though the knowledge in this field is still limited. Persistent coughing and a cough reflex easily triggered by irritating stimuli, often in combination with perceived dyspnea, are characteristics of this disease. The patients have impaired quality of life and often reduced work capacity, followed by social and economic consequences. Despite the large number of individuals suffering from such a persisting cough, there is an unmet clinical need for effective cough medicines. The cough treatment available today often has little or no effect. Adverse effects mostly follow centrally acting cough drugs comprised of morphine and codeine, which demands the physician's awareness. The possibilities of modulating airway transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels may indicate new ways to treat the persistent cough "without a reason". The TRP ion channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and the TRP melastin 8 (TRPM8) appear as two candidates in the search for cough therapy, both as single targets and in reciprocal interaction. PMID:27483288

  19. Validation of an ambulatory cough detection and counting application using voluntary cough under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While cough is an important defence mechanism of the respiratory system, its chronic presence is bothersome and may indicate the presence of a serious disease. We hereby describe the validation process of a novel cough detection and counting technology (PulmoTrack-CC™, KarmelSonix, Haifa, Israel). Methods Tracheal and chest wall sounds, ambient sounds and chest motion were digitally recorded, using the PulmoTrack® hardware, from healthy volunteers coughing voluntarily while (a) laying supine, (b) sitting, (c) sitting with strong ambient noise, (d) walking, and (e) climbing stairs, a total of 25 minutes per subject. The cough monitoring algorithm was applied to the recorded data to detect and count coughs. The detection algorithm first searches for cough 'candidates' by identifying loud sounds with a cough pattern, followed by a secondary verification process based on detection of specific characteristics of cough. The recorded data were independently and blindly evaluated by trained experts who listened to the sounds and visually reviewed them on a sonogram display. The validation process was based on two methods: (i) Referring to an expert consensus as gold standard, and comparing each cough detected by the algorithm to the expert marking, we marked True and False, positive and negative detections.These values were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the cough monitoring system. (ii) Counting the number of coughs in longer segments (t = 60 sec, n = 300) and plotting the cough count vs. the corresponding experts' count whereby the linear regression equation, the regression coefficient (R2) and the joint-distribution density Bland-Altman plots could be determined. Results Data were recorded from 12 volunteers undergoing the complete protocol. The overall Specificity for cough events was 94% and the Sensitivity was 96%, with similar values found for all conditions, except for the stair climbing stage where the Specificity was 87% with

  20. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  1. Cover Your Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Cover Your Cough Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Posters only available as PDF files. Cover Your Cough, Flyer for Health Care Settings English [324 KB] ...

  2. Pregnancy and Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For Pregnant Women Whooping cough (pertussis) is a very contagious disease that can ...

  3. Coughing up blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastrointestinal tract. Blood that comes up with a cough often looks bubbly because it is mixed with ... conditions, diseases, and medical tests may make you cough up blood. These include: Blood clot in the ...

  4. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  5. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking plenty of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  6. Antitussive effect of naringin on experimentally induced cough in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Li, Peibo; Yang, Hongliang; Fang, Siqi; Su, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of naringin has been investigated in different models of experimentally induced cough in guinea pigs. In contrast to codeine phosphate (6 mg/kg, intravenous administration [i. v.]), naringin (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i. v.) had no central antitussive effect on cough elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Naringin (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol) could not prevent the cough reflex induced by stimulation of the trachea after intracerebroventricular injection (i. c. v.), while codeine phosphate (0.5 µmol) was highly effective. Further characterizing the peripheral mechanism of naringin, we found that its effect (50 mg/kg, i. v.) was not affected by the depletion of sensory neuropeptides, whereas levodropropizine (10 mg/kg, i. v.) lost its capacity to prevent cough in the capsaicin-desensitized guinea pig. Furthermore, pretreatment with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i. p.]) significantly reduced the antitussive effect of pinacidil (5 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s. c.]), but could not antagonize the antitussive effect of naringin (30 mg/kg, s. c.). Our present results suggest that naringin is not a central antitussive drug. And naringin does not exert its peripheral antitussive effect through either the sensory neuropeptides system or the modulation of ATP-sensitive K (+) channels. PMID:20645246

  7. A real – life observational pilot study to evaluate the effects of two-week treatment with montelukast in patients with chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Different conditions make the proximal airways susceptible to tussigenic stimuli in the chronic cough (CC) syndrome. Leukotrienes can be implicated in the inflammatory mechanism at play in it. Montelukast is a selective cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor antagonist with proven effectiveness in patients with asthma. The aim of our real-life pilot study was to use montelukast to relieve cough symptoms in patients with CC allegedly due to the two frequent causes other than asthma – upper airway cough syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Methods 14 consecutive patients with CC were evaluated before and after 2 weeks of treatment with montelukast 10 mg daily. Cough was assessed by validated cough questionnaire. Questionnaires regarding the presence of gastroesophageal reflux were also completed. Cough reflex sensitivity to incremental doubling concentrations of citric acid and capsaicin was measured. Lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness and exhaled breath temperature (EBT), a non-invasive marker of lower airway inflammation, were evaluated to exclude asthma as an underlying cause. Thorough upper-airway examination was also conducted. Cell counts, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined in blood to assess systemic inflammation. Results Discomfort due to cough was significantly reduced after treatment (P < 0.001). Cough threshold for capsaicin increased significantly (P = 0.001) but not for citric acid. The values of lactoferrin and ECP were significantly reduced, but those of MPO rose. EBT and pulmonary function were not significantly affected by the treatment. Conclusion Patients with CC due to upper airway cough syndrome or gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but not asthma reported significant relief of their symptoms after two weeks of treatment with montelukast. ECP, lactoferrin, MPO altered significantly, highlighting their role in the pathological mechanisms in CC. Clinical trial ID at

  8. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Hayashi, M; Terai, T; Fujimori, M

    1993-08-01

    The effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression in elderly patients over the age of 60 yr during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In the first study, 100 patients received a placebo of either 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1.5 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P < 0.01). In the second study, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in Study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P < 0.01) when 2 mg/kg lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 min and 3 min before attempting intubation. The cough reflex was almost entirely suppressed by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 4 micrograms/mL. The results suggest that intravenous administration of lidocaine is effective in suppressing the cough reflex during tracheal intubation in elderly patients under general anesthesia, but that relatively high plasma concentrations of lidocaine may be required for suppression of coughing. PMID:8346830

  9. Chronic cough hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cough has been suggested to be due to three conditions, asthma, post nasal drip, and reflux disease. A different paradigm has evolved in which cough is viewed as the primary condition characterised by afferent neuronal hypersensitivity and different aspects of this syndrome are manifest in the different phenotypes of cough. There are several advantages to viewing cough hypersensitivity as the unifying diagnosis; Communication with patients is aided, aetiology is not restricted and therapeutic avenues opened. Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome is a more applicable label to embrace the clinical manifestations of this disabling disease. PMID:23668427

  10. Cough, pain and dyspnoea: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    Gracely, Richard H; Undem, Bradley J; Banzett, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    The three common symptoms, pain, dyspnoea and cough, share some important features. We felt that the analogies to be made among them could be instructive, possibly suggesting new avenues of research. Each of these symptoms can be profoundly uncomfortable, and can profoundly degrade quality of life. The sign, cough, is often given more prominence than the symptom, urge to cough, but both are important to the patient (the former is of more concern to nearby people). Advances in pain research over the last several decades have pointed the way to new studies of dyspnoea; they may serve as a model for the psychophysical study of the perception of urge to cough, as well as providing models for understanding both central and peripheral sensitization of the afferent pathway. We briefly review here the afferent and central pathways and psychophysics of pain, dyspnoea and urge to cough. PMID:17336558

  11. Antitussive effect of nociceptin/orphanin FQ in experimental cough models.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Bolser, Donald C; Jia, Yanlin; Parra, Leonard E; Mutter, Jennifer C; Wang, Xin; Tulshian, Deen B; Egan, Robert W; Hey, John A

    2002-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids or foreign materials from the airways. However, often cough is non-productive and requires suppression. Opioid mu receptor agonists, such as codeine are commonly used as antitussive agents and are among the most widely administered drugs in the world. Codeine suppresses the responsiveness of one or more components of the central reflex pathway for cough and is an efficacious antitussive drug for cough due to diverse aetiologies. However, opioids produce side effects that include sedation, addiction potential and constipation. Therefore, novel cough suppressant therapies should maintain or improve upon the antitussive efficacy profile of opioids. Moreover, these novel therapies should have a safety profile significantly better than current antitussive therapies. Presently, we discuss preclinical findings showing that activation of the 'opioid-like' receptor (NOP(1)) inhibits cough in the guinea pig and cat. PMID:12099766

  12. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Carlson, Dustin; Boris, Lubomyr; Mabary, Jerry; Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Cuttica, Michael; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough may coexist with throat clearing and it is possible that these two entities may be difficult to differentiate on acoustic monitoring and ambulatory manometry. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Methods Ten asymptomatic volunteers (7 females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and a blinded reviewer were compared against the scripted protocol. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour to determine whether distinct patterns could be identified. Results In total, there were 50 cough and 50 throat clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of acoustic cough monitoring was 84% and 50% for cough; while the blinded analysis based on sound alone revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 90%. The pressure topography manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing began with a decrease in esophageal pressure, followed by a distal excursion of the esophagogastric junction high-pressure zone and an increase in EGJ and UES contractile pressure that was followed immediately by a simultaneous abrupt increase in gastric and esophageal pressure. Cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations, a more pronounced EGJ shift and a more vigorous augmentation of the UES pressure compared with throat clearing. Conclusions The automated acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more

  13. Cough in children.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Adelaida; Ruiz de Valbuena, Marta; Máiz, Luis

    2014-07-01

    Cough during childhood is very common, and is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in daily pediatric practice. The causes differ from those in adults, and specific pediatric guidelines should be followed for correct diagnosis and treatment. The most common cause of cough in children is viral infection producing "normal cough", but all children with persistent cough, i.e. a cough lasting more than 4-8weeks or "chronic cough", must be carefully evaluated in other to rule out specific causes that may include the entire pediatric pulmonology spectrum. The treatment of cough should be based on the etiology. Around 80% of cases can be diagnosed using an optimal approach, and treatment will be effective in 90% of them. In some cases of "nonspecific chronic cough", in which no underlying condition can be found, empirical treatment based on the cough characteristics may be useful. There is no scientific evidence to justify the use of over-the-counter cough remedies (anti-tussives, mucolytics and/or antihistamines), as they could have potentially serious side effects, and thus should not be prescribed in children. PMID:24507905

  14. Overexpression of oxytocin receptors in the hypothalamic PVN increases baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and buffers BP variability in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Lozić, Maja; Greenwood, Michael; Šarenac, Olivera; Martin, Andrew; Hindmarch, Charles; Tasić, Tatjana; Paton, Julian; Murphy, David; Japundžić-Žigon, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus is an important integrative site for neuroendocrine control of the circulation. We investigated the role of oxytocin receptors (OT receptors) in PVN in cardiovascular homeostasis. Experimental Approach Experiments were performed in conscious male Wistar rats equipped with a radiotelemetric device. The PVN was unilaterally co-transfected with an adenoviral vector (Ad), engineered to overexpress OT receptors, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. Control groups: PVN was transfected with an Ad expressing eGFP alone or untransfected, sham rats (Wt). Recordings were obtained without and with selective blockade of OT receptors (OTX), during both baseline and stressful conditions. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular short-term variability were evaluated using the sequence method and spectral methodology respectively. Key Results Under baseline conditions, rats overexpressing OT receptors (OTR) exhibited enhanced BRS and reduced BP variability compared to control groups. Exposure to stress increased BP, BP variability and HR in all rats. In control groups, but not in OTR rats, BRS decreased during stress. Pretreatment of OTR rats with OTX reduced BRS and enhanced BP and HR variability under baseline and stressful conditions. Pretreatment of Wt rats with OTX, reduced BRS and increased BP variability under baseline and stressful conditions, but only increased HR variability during stress. Conclusions and Implications OT receptors in PVN are involved in tonic neural control of BRS and cardiovascular short-term variability. The failure of this mechanism could critically contribute to the loss of autonomic control in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24834854

  15. The melanophore aggregating response of isolated fish scales: a very rapid and sensitive diagnosis of whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J O; Andersson, R G; Askelöf, P; Elwing, H; Granström, M; Grundström, N; Lundström, I; Ohman, L

    1991-08-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) has been found to block noradrenaline-induced pigment aggregation in fish melanophores, and, based on this, a rapid and highly sensitive assay for PT was developed. Some preliminary results have also indicated that it may be possible to detect PT-like activity in saliva samples from patients with clinically suspected pertussis. In the present study the diagnostic value of the fish melanophore method was evaluated in 70 patients suspected of having pertussis; culture, serology and physician diagnosis were used as reference methods. In 60 of the patients, pertussis was verified by at least one of the reference methods. The melanophore test showed PT-like activity in saliva samples from 58 of the patients. Three patients with reference-verified pertussis showed no PT-like activity in the test; among these, one patient had been immunized and had also been treated with erythromycin during 3 days immediately prior to visiting the hospital. The melanophore test has three major advantages: it allows detection of pertussis in the early and curable stage of the disease; it takes only 2 h to perform; and it requires no sophisticated equipment. PMID:1936946

  16. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... area into the arm may be present (these nerves are called brachial plexus). A Moro reflex in an older infant, child, or adult is ... be done to examine the child's muscles and nerves. Diagnostic ... absent reflex, may include: Shoulder x-ray Tests for disorders ...

  17. Chronic cough in subjects with upper airway diseases - analysis of mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Cough is the commonest respiratory symptom leading to a medical consultation. Although acute cough which is usually associated with respiratory viral infection is not a problem to manage, chronic cough is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge as it does not respond to usual treatments. Specific group of chronic coughers are considered to have upper airway diseases, lately categorized as having upper airway cough syndrome. There is an increasing pool of evidence that upper airway diseases have significant involvements in the regulation of cough reflex, indicating that they must be taken into considerations as major triggers of coughing in the patients. Here we summarize current literature and experiences on the pathogenesis of upper airway cough syndrome, and discuss further clinical applications. PMID:23667837

  18. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  19. Cough and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which patients seek medical attention. Cough variant asthma (CVA) is a form of asthma, which presents solely with cough. CVA is one of the most common causes of chronic cough. More importantly, 30 to 40% of adult patients with CVA, unless adequately treated, may progress to classic asthma. CVA shares a number of pathophysiological features with classic asthma such as atopy, airway hyper-responsiveness, eosinophilic airway inflammation and various features of airway remodeling. Inhaled corticosteroids remain the most important form of treatment of CVA as they improve cough and reduce the risk of progression to classic asthma most likely through their prevention of airway remodeling and chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:22081767

  20. Changes in vagal afferent drive alter tracheobronchial coughing in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Simera, Michal; Poliacek, Ivan; Veternik, Marcel; Babalova, Lucia; Kotmanova, Zuzana; Jakus, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral cooling of the vagus nerve (<5°C, blocking mainly conductivity of myelinated fibers) and unilateral vagotomy were employed to reduce cough afferent drive in order to evaluate the effects of these interventions on the temporal features of the cough reflex. Twenty pentobarbitone anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats were used. Cough was induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways. The number of coughs during vagal cooling was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Inspiratory cough efforts were reduced by approximately 30% (p<0.001) and expiratory motor drive by more than 80% (p<0.001). Temporal analysis showed prolonged inspiratory and expiratory phases, the total cycle duration, its active portion, and the interval between maxima of the diaphragm and the abdominal activity during coughing (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the average effects on the cough reflex between cooling of the left or the right vagus nerve. Compared to control, vagal cooling produced no significant difference in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure (p>0.05), however, cold block of vagal conduction reduced respiratory rate (p<0.001). Unilateral vagotomy significantly reduced cough number, cough-related diaphragmatic activity, and relative values of maximum expiratory esophageal pressure (all p<0.05). Our results indicate that reduced cough afferent drive (lower responsiveness) markedly attenuates the motor drive to respiratory pump muscles during coughing and alters cough temporal features. Differences in the effects of unilateral vagal cooling and vagotomy on coughing support an inhibitory role of sensory afferents that are relatively unaffected by cooling of the vagus nerve to 5°C on mechanically induced cough. PMID:27184303

  1. Approach to chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Keya Rani; Landge, Amruta Avinash

    2014-10-01

    Chronic cough does affect quality of life in children. Most of the times it is treated with over-the-counter cough syrups and antibiotics. The etiology of chronic cough is so diverse, that treatment needs to be directed to the specific etiology, rather than treating symptomatically. Grossly, chronic cough is classified as specific and non-specific cough. Allergic conditions, followed by tuberculosis are more commonly encountered etiologies in India. Baseline investigations to be performed are chest radiograph and peak flow metry. If specific cause of cough is not obvious, then therapeutic trial with β2 agonist, followed by peak flowmetry to evaluate reversibility of airway hypersensitivity, is useful to label the child asthmatic or non-asthmatic. Rampant uses of antibiotics need to be avoided for conditions like asthma. If tuberculosis is diagnosed or suspected, it is better to treat the child, rather than giving therapeutic trial. Over-the-counter cough syrups are as good as placebo, and should be avoided. Trial of anti asthma, anti allergic rhinitis and anti reflux therapies are avoided, unless the diagnosis is one of these conditions. If the child is distressed or the case seems to be complicated, it is best to refer the child to a tertiary care centre and keep a close follow up. PMID:24752628

  2. How does rhinovirus cause the common cold cough?

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Samantha K; Sadofsky, Laura R; Morice, Alyn H

    2016-01-01

    Cough is a protective reflex to prevent aspiration and can be triggered by a multitude of stimuli. The commonest form of cough is caused by upper respiratory tract infection and has no benefit to the host. The virus hijacks this natural defence mechanism in order to propagate itself through the population. Despite the resolution of the majority of cold symptoms within 2 weeks, cough can persist for some time thereafter. Unfortunately, the mechanism of infectious cough brought on by pathogenic viruses, such as human rhinovirus, during colds, remains elusive despite the extensive work that has been undertaken. For socioeconomic reasons, it is imperative we identify the mechanism of cough. There are several theories which have been proposed as the causative mechanism of cough in rhinovirus infection, encompassing a range of different processes. Those of which hold most promise are physical disruption of the epithelial lining, excess mucus production and an inflammatory response to rhinovirus infection which may be excessive. And finally, neuronal modulation, the most convincing hypothesis, is thought to potentiate cough long after the original stimulus has been cleared. All these hypotheses will be briefly covered in the following sections. PMID:26835135

  3. Approaching chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-02-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient's daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker's cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis. PMID:26892615

  4. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... The best way to prevent it is through vaccinations. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping ...

  5. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  6. How Is Cough Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), asthma , and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). "UACS" is a term used to describe conditions ... Take your asthma medicines as your doctor prescribes. GERD occurs if acid from your stomach backs up ...

  7. First Aid: Coughing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center The Woes of Whooping Cough Your Lungs & Respiratory System Chilling Out With Colds Flu Center Bronchitis Why Should I Care About Germs? Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  8. What Causes Cough?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause a cough. Other irritants include air pollution, paint fumes, or scented products like perfumes or air fresheners. An allergen is something you're allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, mold, or pollens from trees, grasses, and ...

  9. Approaching chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient’s daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker’s cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis. PMID:26892615

  10. Cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Mirjam J G; Birring, Surinder S; Vancheri, Carlo; Cottin, Vincent; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Russell, Anne-Marie; Wijsenbeek, Marlies S

    2016-09-01

    Many patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) complain of chronic refractory cough. Chronic cough is a distressing and disabling symptom with a major impact on quality of life. During recent years, progress has been made in gaining insight into the pathogenesis of cough in IPF, which is most probably "multifactorial" and influenced by mechanical, biochemical and neurosensory changes, with an important role for comorbidities as well. Clinical trials of cough treatment in IPF are emerging, and cough is increasingly included as a secondary end-point in trials assessing new compounds for IPF. It is important that such studies include adequate end-points to assess cough both objectively and subjectively. This article summarises the latest insights into chronic cough in IPF. It describes the different theories regarding the pathophysiology of cough, reviews the different methods to assess cough and deals with recent and future developments in the treatment of cough in IPF. PMID:27581827

  11. Chronic cough in children.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johana B Castro; Pine, Harold S

    2013-08-01

    The management of chronic cough, a common complaint in children, is challenging for most health care professionals. Millions of dollars are spent every year on unnecessary testing and treatment. A rational approach based on a detailed interview and a thorough physical examination guides further intervention and management. Inexpensive and simple homemade syrups based on dark honey have proved to be an effective measure when dealing with cough in children. PMID:23905830

  12. Neural network based algorithm for automatic identification of cough sounds.

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, V; Abeyratne, U R; Amrulloh, Yusuf; Hukins, Craig; Triasih, Rina; Setyati, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Cough is the most common symptom of the several respiratory diseases containing diagnostic information. It is the best suitable candidate to develop a simplified screening technique for the management of respiratory diseases in timely manner, both in developing and developed countries, particularly in remote areas where medical facilities are limited. However, major issue hindering the development is the non-availability of reliable technique to automatically identify cough events. Medical practitioners still rely on manual counting, which is laborious and time consuming. In this paper we propose a novel method, based on the neural network to automatically identify cough segments, discarding other sounds such a speech, ambient noise etc. We achieved the accuracy of 98% in classifying 13395 segments into two classes, 'cough' and 'other sounds', with the sensitivity of 93.44% and specificity of 94.52%. Our preliminary results indicate that method can develop into a real-time cough identification technique in continuous cough monitoring systems. PMID:24110049

  13. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Queme, Luis F.; Ross, Jessica L.; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders are based in dysfunction of peripheral perfusion and are often comorbid with altered cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction/exercise. We have recently found in mice that 24 h peripheral ischemia induced by a surgical occlusion of the brachial artery (BAO) induces increased paw-guarding behaviors, mechanical hypersensitivity, and decreased grip strength. These behavioral changes corresponded to increased heat sensitivity as well as an increase in the numbers of chemosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents as assessed by an ex vivo forepaw muscles/median and ulnar nerves/dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord (SC) recording preparation. Behaviors also corresponded to specific upregulation of the ADP-responsive P2Y1 receptor in the DRGs. Since group III/IV muscle afferents have separately been associated with regulating muscle nociception and exercise pressor reflexes (EPRs), and P2Y1 has been linked to heat responsiveness and phenotypic switching in cutaneous afferents, we sought to determine whether upregulation of P2Y1 was responsible for the observed alterations in muscle afferent function, leading to modulation of muscle pain-related behaviors and EPRs after BAO. Using an afferent-specific siRNA knockdown strategy, we found that inhibition of P2Y1 during BAO not only prevented the increased mean blood pressure after forced exercise, but also significantly reduced alterations in pain-related behaviors. Selective P2Y1 knockdown also prevented the increased firing to heat stimuli and the BAO-induced phenotypic switch in chemosensitive muscle afferents, potentially through regulating membrane expression of acid sensing ion channel 3. These results suggest that enhanced P2Y1 in muscle afferents during ischemic-like conditions may dually regulate muscle nociception and cardiovascular reflexes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our current results suggest that P2Y1 modulates heat responsiveness and chemosensation in muscle afferents

  14. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  15. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  16. A dangerous cough.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Abhishek Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Patient X is a 48-year-old retired potteries worker who presented to his general practitioner (GP) with a non-productive cough, which had lasted over 1 month, and it was a television advert that he had seen that prompted him to visit his doctor. A cough is the most common presenting complaint for patients when they visit their GP and when considering differential diagnoses it is important to look at a patient's medical, drug and social history. It would have been easy for the GP to dismiss the cough as an exacerbation of the patient's asthma based on his medical history, but on further questioning into the patient's social history an emergency chest x-ray was ordered, which later revealed a bronchial carcinoma. This case highlights the importance of the media in healthcare advertising and describes how a fairly innocent presentation can later turn out to be a more sinister pathology. PMID:23456159

  17. The larynx in cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    About 40% of the population will experience chronic cough at some point during their lives and it tends to be more common in women (Thorax 58:901–7, 2003). Post-nasal drip (or upper airway cough syndrome), gastro-esophageal reflux disease and asthma are considered the most common causes. Yet only a small percentage of patients with these common conditions experience chronic cough. Also there is no agreed measure of post-nasal drip and controversy exists about the diagnosis of reflux above the upper esophageal sphincter (laryngopharyngeal reflux) based on observable changes to the larynx. The approach of the otolaryngologist is to consider the upper and lower airways as a continuum and that a common pathology can have an impact on all these anatomical sites. A multidisciplinary approach is advocated, utilising the skills of the respiratory physician, otolaryngologist, gastroenterologist and speech pathologist. PMID:23732122

  18. Cough: an unmet clinical need

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients worldwide seek medical attention. Thus, the evaluation and treatment of cough result in tremendous financial expenditure and consumption of health care resources. Yet, despite the clinical significance of cough, research efforts aimed at improving diagnostic capabilities and developing more effective therapeutic agents have been, to date, disappointing in their limited scope and outcomes. Acute cough due to the common cold represents the most common type of cough. Currently, available medications for the symptomatic management of acute cough are inadequate due to lack of proven efficacy and/or their association with undesirable or intolerable side effects at anti-tussive doses. Subacute cough, often representing a prolonged post-viral response, is typically refractory to standard anti-tussive therapy. Few clinical trials have evaluated therapeutic options for subacute cough. Diagnostic challenges facing the clinician in the management of chronic cough include the determination of whether symptoms of upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are indeed the underlying cause of cough. Chronic, refractory unexplained (formerly, idiopathic) cough must be distinguished from cough that has not been fully evaluated and treated according to current guideline recommendations. Eagerly awaited are new safe and effective anti-tussive agents for use when cough suppression is desired, regardless of underlying aetiology of cough, as well as practical, validated ambulatory cough counters to aid clinical assessment and future research in the field of cough. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21198555

  19. Cough syrup psychosis.

    PubMed

    Amaladoss, Alfred; O'Brien, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Over-the-counter medications are widely accessible and used. Cough suppressant syrups contain dextromethorphan (DM), which has the potential to be abused, with resultant psychiatric symptoms. This case report describes a young woman presenting with psychotic mania secondary to DM abuse. We also describe the treatment of this toxidrome and include the results of a literature search on this topic. The recognition of cough syrup as an agent of abuse and its toxidrome is important. This will facilitate early diagnostic clarification and promote efficient treatment strategies. PMID:21324299

  20. Ambulatory methods for recording cough.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jaclyn

    2007-01-01

    Recording cough sounds to objectively quantify coughing was first performed using large reel-to-reel tape recorders more than 40 years ago. Coughs were counted manually, which is an extremely laborious and time-consuming process. Current technologies including digital recording techniques, data compression and improvements in digital storage capacity should make the process of recording and counting coughs suitable for automation; however, to date no accurate, objective cough monitoring device is available. Cough sounds are easily distinguishable from other vocalizations by the human ear and hence it is reasonable to assume that coughs sounds should have characteristic, identifying acoustic properties. However, the acoustic features of spontaneously occurring cough sounds are extremely variable. Furthermore, in even the worst cases of cough, the time spent speaking is an order of magnitude greater than the time spent coughing. It follows that even an algorithm that mistakes only a very small proportion of speech as cough will still have an unacceptable false positive rate. There is a clear need for an objective measure of cough for use in clinical practice, clinical research and trials of novel treatments. In the near future automated ambulatory systems with sufficient accuracy to be of clinical use should be available. PMID:17161969

  1. Reflexives in Mohawk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the meanings and uses of two reflexive morphemes in the Mohawk language. Reflexive "atat" is shown to have both reflexive and reciprocal meanings. It is also realized in kinship terms and in the transitive pronominal prefix "yutat." Semi-reflexive "at" has some reflexive functions, and can mark middle voice and…

  2. The utility of the mannitol challenge in the assessment of chronic cough: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Singapuri, Amisha; McKenna, Susan; Brightling, Christopher E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for more objective outcome measures for chronic cough. In this pilot study we sought to investigate the utility of the mannitol challenge as a cough-provocation test in non-asthmatic chronic cough. We studied 16 healthy controls and 13 subjects with chronic cough. We assessed cough severity using a visual analogue score, capsaicin cough sensitivity, health status using the Leicester Cough Questionnaire and the dose of mannitol to cause 2 (C2) or 5 (C5) coughs. In all of the subjects with chronic cough and 6 of the controls we assessed the 1-week repeatability of the mannitol challenge. We found that in those subjects with chronic cough the geometric mean (logSEM) mannitol C2 and C5 was heightened compared to controls (C2: 4 (0.2) versus 16 (0.1); p = 0.04 and C5: 63 (0.1) versus 251 (0.1); p = 0.04). Cough visual analogue score, capsacin-induced cough sensitivity and health status were also altered in chronic cough compared to healthy controls, but in those subjects with chronic cough none of these outcomes was correlated with the mannitol C2 or C5. The repeatability of the mannitol challenge assessed by intraclass correlation was C2 = 0.53 and C5 = 0.59. A cut-off in the dose of mannitol of 62 mg/ml for C2 and 550 mg/ml for C5 had a sensitivity of 69 and 62% and specificity of 69 and 81% respectively to distinguish chronic coughers from healthy controls. In conclusion, the mannitol challenge my have potential as a novel cough challenge test and further work is required to extend our findings and to assess whether it has utility in different causes of chronic cough. PMID:19017380

  3. The utility of the mannitol challenge in the assessment of chronic cough: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Singapuri, Amisha; McKenna, Susan; Brightling, Christopher E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for more objective outcome measures for chronic cough. In this pilot study we sought to investigate the utility of the mannitol challenge as a cough-provocation test in non-asthmatic chronic cough. We studied 16 healthy controls and 13 subjects with chronic cough. We assessed cough severity using a visual analogue score, capsaicin cough sensitivity, health status using the Leicester Cough Questionnaire and the dose of mannitol to cause 2 (C2) or 5 (C5) coughs. In all of the subjects with chronic cough and 6 of the controls we assessed the 1-week repeatability of the mannitol challenge. We found that in those subjects with chronic cough the geometric mean (logSEM) mannitol C2 and C5 was heightened compared to controls (C2: 4 (0.2) versus 16 (0.1); p = 0.04 and C5: 63 (0.1) versus 251 (0.1); p = 0.04). Cough visual analogue score, capsacin-induced cough sensitivity and health status were also altered in chronic cough compared to healthy controls, but in those subjects with chronic cough none of these outcomes was correlated with the mannitol C2 or C5. The repeatability of the mannitol challenge assessed by intraclass correlation was C2 = 0.53 and C5 = 0.59. A cut-off in the dose of mannitol of 62 mg/ml for C2 and 550 mg/ml for C5 had a sensitivity of 69 and 62% and specificity of 69 and 81% respectively to distinguish chronic coughers from healthy controls. In conclusion, the mannitol challenge my have potential as a novel cough challenge test and further work is required to extend our findings and to assess whether it has utility in different causes of chronic cough. PMID:19017380

  4. Chronic Cough: A Gastroenterology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Andrew J.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight recent work and provide recommendations on the approach for diagnosis and management of chronic cough in a gastroenterology clinic. Recent findings Chronic cough is a burdensome symptom affecting a large number of patients and contributes significant cost to the healthcare system. Recent work has shown that select patients may benefit from acid suppressive therapy and even surgery when there is true pathologic evidence of reflux disease with cough. However, judicious use and proper interpretation of diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux in the setting of cough is important to avoid unnecessary or inappropriate therapy. Summary Chronic cough remains a vexing problem for many physicians, including gastroenterologists. It is important that physicians approach refractory cough in a multi-disciplinary manner. Future research is needed to better understand the likely central hypersensitivity response mediating reflux related cough and potential alternative approaches to therapy. PMID:24240130

  5. Cough hypersensitivity syndrome: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Morice, A H; Faruqi, S; Wright, C E; Thompson, R; Bland, J M

    2011-02-01

    We postulate that most patients with chronic cough have a single discrete clinical entity: cough hypersensitivity syndrome. We constructed a questionnaire that elicits the major components of the syndrome. Here we describe the validation of this questionnaire. Following iterative development, the Hull Airway Reflux Questionnaire (HARQ) was administered to patients and normal volunteers. It is self-administered and comprises 14 items with a maximum score of 70. Unselected patients were recruited sequentially from the Hull Cough Clinic. Preclinic questionnaires were compared with those obtained at the clinic. Responsiveness was assessed 2 months after the clinic visit. One hundred eighty-five patients and 70 normal volunteers were included in this study. There was a marked difference in HARQ scores between patients with chronic cough and normal volunteers. The sensitivity (94%) and specificity (95%) of the HARQ was high, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.99. All items of the scale significantly correlated positively with others in the scale and with the total score. On repeatability testing using Cohen's kappa with quadratic weights, significant agreement was noted for all items. Good correlation was observed between the total scores (r = 0.78). The questionnaire was also responsive to treatment; the minimum clinically significant change was estimated to be 16 points. We have demonstrated the HARQ to have good construct and criterion validity. It is both reproducible and responsive to change. It can be used as a diagnostic instrument and demonstrates that chronic cough represents a single coherent entity: cough hypersensitivity syndrome. PMID:21240613

  6. Cough, codeine and confusion.

    PubMed

    O Reilly, David; Thomas, Mathew; Moylett, Edina

    2015-01-01

    Codeine is widely prescribed in clinical practice with over the counter (OTC) preparations of codeine freely available for consumption typically as a component of remedies for the common cold/cough. We describe the first reported case of acute confusional state in a previously healthy 14-year-old girl ultimately attributed to inappropriate codeine use. The usage of codeine in the paediatric setting has been highlighted in recent years with many reported deaths--mostly due to respiratory depression. The risks associated with codeine usage may be particularly unnecessary with OTC cough suppressants as evidence of efficacy is absent. Finally, codeine dependence is a common problem among adults and has been reported locally and internationally among adolescents. The combination of lack of efficacy, risk of acute intoxication and dependence, suggests that the use of OTC codeine preparations may be unwarranted. PMID:26701876

  7. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  8. Reflexive Positioning in a Politically Sensitive Situation: Dealing with the Threats of Researching the West Bank Settler Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Possick, Chaya

    2009-01-01

    For the past 7 years, the author has conducted qualitative research projects revolving around the experiences of West Bank settlers. The political situation in Israel in general, and the West Bank in particular, has undergone rapid and dramatic political, military, and social changes during this period. In highly politically sensitive situations…

  9. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of cough variant asthma].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masaki

    2014-05-01

    Cough variant asthma (CVA) has been recognized as a precursor of asthma or a pre-asthmatic state because of the mildly heightened bronchial responsiveness and efficacy of bronchodilator therapy. Nevertheless, the accumulating evidence indicates that the pathophysiology is different between CVA and bronchial asthma. The most fundamental physiologic feature is a heightened cough response to methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in CVA, while this response is rather reduced in bronchial asthma. The sensitivity of cough receptors located in the superficial layer of the airway wall is normal in CVA as well as bronchial asthma, but heightened in atopic cough. The pathologic feature of CVA is eosinophilic inflammation of the central to peripheral airway, reflected by eosinophilia in induced sputum, biopsied bronchial mucosa, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The diagnosis of CVA has been commonly made based on therapeutic diagnostic procedures, while pathophysiologic diagnosis is ideal. The reason is that measurements of the sensitivity of cough receptors to inhaled capsaicin and cough response to induced bronchoconstriction are not possible at most chest clinics in the world. The efficacy of a beta2-agonist for a patient's coughing is evaluated to make a diagnosis of CVA. When the bronchodilator therapy is judged as efficacious, a tentative diagnosis of CVA is made. Then, induction therapy is initiated for resolution of the cough. The induction therapy consists of beta2-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and inhaled corticosteroids. In some patients whose cough does not subside with the therapy, short-burst oral corticosteroids (1 to 3 weeks) may be added. If the cough still does not subside with the therapy, the patient should be referred to cough specialists. When the cough subsides with the induction therapy, long-term management is recommended using inhaled corticosteroids, because 30% of patients develop typical bronchial asthma within several years

  10. Reflexives in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Maki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconsider reflexives in Japanese through the following three steps: (a) separation of genuine reflexive elements from elements that are confounded as reflexives, (b) classification of reflexive anaphors into subtypes based on their semantic difference, and (c) classification of predicates that occur with…

  11. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  12. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  13. Expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in chronic idiopathic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shaoping; Macedo, Patricia; Hew, Mark; Nassenstein, Christina; Lee, Kang-Yun; Chung, Kian Fan

    2009-01-01

    In patients with chronic idiopathic cough, there is a chronic inflammatory response together with evidence of airway wall remodelling and an increase in airway epithelial nerves expressing TRPV-1. We hypothesised that these changes could result from an increase in growth factors such as TGFβ and neurotrophins. We recruited 13 patients with persistent non-asthmatic cough despite specific treatment of associated primary cause(s), or without associated primary cause, and 19 normal non-coughing volunteers without cough as controls, who underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and bronchial biopsies. There was a significant increase in the levels of TGFβ in BAL fluid, but not of nerve growth factor(NGF) and brain-derived nerve growth factor(BDNF) compared to normal volunteers. Levels of TFGβ gene and protein expression were assessed in bronchial biopsies. mRNA expression for TGFβ was observed in laser-captured airway smooth muscle and epithelial cells, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry was increased in ASM cells in chronic cough patients, associated with an increase in nuclear expression of the transcription factor, smad 2/3. Subbasement membrane thickness was significantly higher in cough patients compared to normal subjects and there was a positive correlation between TGF-β levels in BAL and basement membrane thickening. TGFβ in the airways may be important in the airway remodelling changes observed in chronic idiopathic cough patients, that could in turn lead to activation of the cough reflex. PMID:19463161

  14. [Action mechanisms of cough suppressants and their clinical application].

    PubMed

    Płusa, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled particles or compacted secretions in the respiratory tract cause irritation of mechanoreceptors, subsequent stimulation of afferent fibers of the vagus nerve, triggering the cough reflex. Distribution of drugs used in the treatment of cough takes into account the pharmacokinetic activity, and this mainly affect on bronchial secretions--drugs that act directly, which destroy disulfide bonds mucous glucoproteins using free sulfhydryl groups and digesting enzymes, extracellular DNA, acting indirectly, that modify the secretion of mucus in the way of other mechanisms, as well as acting on the cough reflex (effects on receptors in the bronchial tree). Mucolytics reduce the viscosity of bronchial secretions by interrupting the sulfide bonds in the mucoprotein chain. Mucokinetic drugs are designed to reduce the adhesion of secretions and facilitate the process of mucociliary clearance by enhancing the potency of cilia. One of the ways of the increasing process is the stimulation of secretion by human neutrophil elastase gene and protein expression regulating this process. The pharmacokinetic properties of these drugs show their high clinical utility and effectiveness in the treatment of respiratory secretions dense clutter. This is possible to reduce the viscosity of mucus by bromhexine. This is obtained by acid depolymerization of the polysaccharide fibers in the bronchial secretions. Synergistic effect with antibiotics of these preparations indicates their permanent place in the treatment of patients with respiratory pathology. PMID:24645580

  15. Refractory chronic cough, or the need to focus on the relationship between the larynx and the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this review we question the current way of handling tackle a problem of chronic cough, especially by the excessive number of patients who can not find complete relief from your cough by anatomical diagnosis of universal use. From the field of Otolaryngology new perspectives arise now considering the larynx as a preferential afferent stimuli cough reflex arc. Also the constitution laryngopharyngeal reflux gas and new approaches to non-acid reflux and the local action of pepsin in laryngeal deserving of a joint review, which can illuminate new ways to handle the problem of chronic refractory cough. We believe that the chronic cough syndrome hpersensitivity as more precise label for chronic cough, should place particular emphasis on laryngeal sensory neuropathy as cough and reflux the influence that may have on their maintenance, and thereby causes definitely wide related to the syndrome if the larynx is incorporated, place greater number of afferent nerves of chronic cough, which are sure to cover much of the case of refractory cough remain without a satisfactory solution. The close collaboration between Otolaryngology, Gastroenterology and Pneumology in a patient with refractory chronic cough seems now an unavoidable necessity. PMID:23552099

  16. Analysis of Clinicians' Perceptual Cough Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Laciuga, Helena; Brandimore, Alexandra E; Troche, Michelle S; Hegland, Karen W

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the relationships between subjective descriptors and objective airflow measures of cough. We hypothesized that coughs with specific airflow characteristics would share common subjective perceptual descriptions. Thirty clinicians (speech-language pathologists, otolaryngologists, and neurologists) perceptually evaluated ten cough audio samples with specific airflow characteristics determined by peak expiratory flow rate, cough expired volume, cough duration, and number of coughs in the cough epoch. Participants rated coughs by strength, duration, quality, quantity, and overall potential effectiveness for airway protection. Perception of cough strength and effectiveness was determined by the combination of presence of pre-expulsive compression phase, short peak expiratory airflow rate rise time, high peak expiratory flow rates, and high cough volume acceleration. Perception of cough abnormality was defined predominantly by descriptors of breathiness and strain. Breathiness was characteristic for coughs with either absent compression phases and relatively high expiratory airflow rates or coughs with significantly low expired volumes and reduced peak flow rates. In contrast, excessive strain was associated with prolonged compression phases and low expiratory airflow rates or the absence of compression phase with high peak expiratory rates. The study participants reached greatest agreement in distinguishing between single and multiple coughs. Their assessment of cough strength and effectiveness was less consistent. Finally, the least agreement was shown in determining the quality categories. Modifications of cough airflow can influence perceptual cough evaluation outcomes. However, the inconsistency of cough ratings among our participants suggests that a uniform cough rating system is required. PMID:27115759

  17. Epidemiology of cough in relation to China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common complaints for which patients seek medical attention. Misdiagnosis and mistreatment of cough exist commonly in China. The prevalence of acute cough caused by upper airway infection fluctuates between 9% and 64% in the community, for chronic cough, the prevalence >10% in most surveys, ranging from 7.2%-33%. The common causes of chronic cough are upper airway cough syndrome (previously called as post nasal drip syndrome [PNDS]), cough variant asthma (CVA), gastroesophageal reflux related cough (GERD) and eosinophilic bronchitis (EB). There is a regional discrepancy regarding the prevalence of common causes of cough and distribution of gender among China, UK, USA, the most common cause of chronic cough in China are CVA, followed by UACS, EB and atopic cough (AC), the male is almost equal to female in numbers in China. The risk factors for cough includes cold air, smoking, environmental pollutants, noxious substances and allergens, and unreasonable diet habits. PMID:23835047

  18. Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough infographic . Keep Your Baby's Whooping Cough Vaccine Current Getting the whooping cough vaccine during pregnancy provides ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  19. Effect of expiratory muscle strength training on elderly cough function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeock; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle strength, known as sarcopenia, in the expiratory muscles, along with reductions in lung elastic recoil and chest wall compliance decreases the intrathoacic airway pressure as well as expiratory flow rates and velocity, greatly impacting an elderly person's ability to generate the forces essential for cough. This study examined the effects of a 4-week expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) program on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) and cough function in 18 healthy but sedentary elderly adults. MEP significantly increased after the EMST program from 77.14+/-20.20 to 110.83+/-26.11cmH(2)O. Parameters measured during reflexive coughs produced by capsaicin challenge, indicated that compression phase duration significantly decreased (from 0.35+/-0.19 to 0.16+/-0.17s), peak expiratory flow rate decreased (from 4.98+/-2.18 to 8.00+/-3.05l/s) and post-peak plateau integral amplitude significantly increased (from 3.49+/-2.46 to 6.83+/-4.16l/ss) with the EMST program. EMST seems to be an effective program to increase the expiratory muscle strength in the sedentary elderly, which contribute to an enhanced cough function. PMID:18457885

  20. Coughing and sneezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Tasissa, Abiy; Bush, John

    2010-11-01

    The emergence and explosive spread of virulent viral (e.g., H1N1, SARS) and bacterial (e.g., Tuberculosis) infections is a problem of global interest with enormous human and economic consequences. The nature of contact between infected and non-infected persons greatly influences the outcomes of the disease epidemic; nevertheless, the definition and mechanisms leading to contact remain nebulous. We here examine the manner in which fluid dynamics modeling can assist in our understanding of contact and transmission of respiratory diseases. Particular attention is given to modeling the effluent of discrete exhalation events (e.g., coughing, sneezing) as multiphase thermals, and to predicting the range of pathogen-bearing droplets.

  1. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  2. Microinjection of DLH into the region of the caudal ventral respiratory column in the cat: evidence for an endogenous cough-suppressant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Poliacek, Ivan; Corrie, Lu Wen-Chi; Wang, Cheng; Rose, Melanie J; Bolser, Donald C

    2007-03-01

    The caudal ventral respiratory column (cVRC) contains premotor expiratory neurons that play an important role in cough-related expiratory activity of chest wall and abdominal muscles. Microinjection of d,l-homocysteic acid (DLH) was used to test the hypothesis that local activation of cVRC neurons can suppress the cough reflex. DLH (20-50 mM, 10-30 nl) was injected into the region of cVRC in nine anesthetized spontaneously breathing cats. Repetitive coughing was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the intrathoracic airways. Electromyograms (EMG) were recorded bilaterally from inspiratory parasternal and expiratory transversus abdominis (ABD) and unilaterally from laryngeal posterior cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles. Unilateral microinjection of DLH (1-1.5 nmol) elicited bilateral increases in tonic and phasic respiratory ABD EMG activity, and it altered the respiratory pattern and laryngeal motor activities. However, DLH also decreased cough frequency by 51 +/- 7% compared with control (P < 0.001) and the amplitude of the contralateral (-35 +/- 3%; P < 0.001) and ipsilateral (-34 +/- 5%; P < 0.001) ABD EMGs during postinjection coughs compared with control. The cough alterations were much less pronounced after microinjection of a lower dose of DLH (0.34-0.8 nmol). No cough depression was observed after microinjections of vehicle. These results suggest that an endogenous cough suppressant neuronal network in the region of the cVRC may exist, and this network may be involved in the control of cough reflex excitability. PMID:17138836

  3. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  4. Flow Field of a Human Cough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2005-11-01

    Cough generated infectious aerosols are of interest while developing strategies for the mitigation of disease risks ranging from the common cold to SARS. In this work, the velocity field of human cough was measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The project subjects (total 29) coughed into an enclosure seeded with stage fog for most measurements. Cough flow speed profiles, average widths of the cough jet, waveform, and maximum cough speeds were measured. Maximum cough speeds ranged from 1.5 m/s to 28.8 m/s. No correlation was found for maximum cough flow speeds to height or gender. The slow growth of the width of the cough flow suggests that a cough may penetrate farther into a room than a steady jet of similar volume. The velocity profile was found to scale with the square root of downstream distance.

  5. Night cough and general practice research

    PubMed Central

    Toop, L.J.; Howie, J.G.R.; Paxton, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-four children, aged between three and nine years, presenting with nocturnal cough, were studied on successive nights using an automatic voice activated tape recorder system. Children with a family history of atopy coughed significantly more than children without such a family history. A wide variation in cough frequency was found both between and within subjects. No effects of treatment on cough frequency were demonstrated. Some of the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying night cough are discussed. PMID:3712337

  6. Objective cough frequency in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cough is a common presenting symptom in patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). This study measured cough rates in IPF patients and investigated the association between cough and measures of health related quality of life and subjective cough assessments. In addition, IPF cough rates were related to measures of physiological disease severity and compared to cough rates in health and other respiratory conditions. Methods Nineteen IPF patients, mean age 70.8 years ± 8.6, five female (26.3%) were studied. Subjects performed full pulmonary function testing, 24 hour ambulatory cough recordings, completed a cough related quality of life questionnaire (Leicester Cough Questionnaire) and subjectively scored cough severity with a visual analogue scale. Ambulatory cough recordings were manually counted and reported as number of coughs per hour. Results The 24hr cough rates were high (median 9.4, range 1.5-39.4), with day time rates much higher than night time (median 14.6, range 1.9-56.6 compared to 1.9, range 0-19.2, p = 0.003). Strong correlations were found between objective cough frequency and both the VAS (day r = 0.80, p < 0.001, night r = 0.71, p = 0.001) and LCQ (r = -0.80, p < 0.001), but not with measures of pulmonary function. Cough rates in IPF were higher than healthy subjects (p < 0.001) and asthma patients (p < 0.001) but similar to patients with chronic cough (p = 0.33). Conclusions This study confirms objectively that cough is a major, very distressing and disabling symptom in IPF patients. The strong correlations between objective cough counts and cough related quality of life measures suggest that in IPF patient's, perception of cough frequency is very accurate. PMID:20565979

  7. Cough event classification by pretrained deep neural network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough is an essential symptom in respiratory diseases. In the measurement of cough severity, an accurate and objective cough monitor is expected by respiratory disease society. This paper aims to introduce a better performed algorithm, pretrained deep neural network (DNN), to the cough classification problem, which is a key step in the cough monitor. Method The deep neural network models are built from two steps, pretrain and fine-tuning, followed by a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) decoder to capture tamporal information of the audio signals. By unsupervised pretraining a deep belief network, a good initialization for a deep neural network is learned. Then the fine-tuning step is a back propogation tuning the neural network so that it can predict the observation probability associated with each HMM states, where the HMM states are originally achieved by force-alignment with a Gaussian Mixture Model Hidden Markov Model (GMM-HMM) on the training samples. Three cough HMMs and one noncough HMM are employed to model coughs and noncoughs respectively. The final decision is made based on viterbi decoding algorihtm that generates the most likely HMM sequence for each sample. A sample is labeled as cough if a cough HMM is found in the sequence. Results The experiments were conducted on a dataset that was collected from 22 patients with respiratory diseases. Patient dependent (PD) and patient independent (PI) experimental settings were used to evaluate the models. Five criteria, sensitivity, specificity, F1, macro average and micro average are shown to depict different aspects of the models. From overall evaluation criteria, the DNN based methods are superior to traditional GMM-HMM based method on F1 and micro average with maximal 14% and 11% error reduction in PD and 7% and 10% in PI, meanwhile keep similar performances on macro average. They also surpass GMM-HMM model on specificity with maximal 14% error reduction on both PD and PI. Conclusions In this paper, we

  8. Bronchodilating effect of deep inspirations in asthma and chronic cough.

    PubMed

    V Wasilewski, Nastasia; Fisher, Thomas; Turcotte, Scott E; Fisher, John T; Lougheed, M Diane

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiologic processes distinguishing classic asthma (CA), cough-variant asthma (CVA), and methacholine (MCh)-induced cough but normal airway sensitivity (COUGH) are inadequately understood and may be a result of differences in the ability to bronchodilate following a deep inspiration (DI). The purpose of this study was to compare the bronchodilating effect of DIs in individuals with CA, CVA, and COUGH using high-dose MCh. Individuals aged 18-65 yr with CA or suspected CVA completed high-dose MCh testing to a maximum change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50% from baseline (MAX). Impulse oscillometry (IOS) measurements and partial and maximal-flow volume curves (used to calculate a DI index) were recorded at baseline and at each dose of MCh. Body plethysmography was performed at baseline and MAX. Twenty-eight subjects [25 women, 39.8 ± 11.9 yr (means ± SD)] were studied (n = 11 CA, n = 10 CVA, and n = 7 COUGH). At MAX, the percent change in FEV1 was greater in subjects with CA compared with those with CVA (P < 0.001) and COUGH (P < 0.001), and the percent change in forced vital capacity was greater in those with CA than with COUGH (P = 0.017). Subjects with CA and CVA developed dynamic hyperinflation and gas trapping. In subjects with CA and CVA, all IOS parameters were significantly increased from baseline to MAX, except for central respiratory resistance (R20). In individuals with COUGH, total respiratory resistance, R20, and resonant frequency were significantly increased from baseline. At MAX, the DI index was positive in all groups, suggesting preserved bronchodilation (CA, 0.67 ± 0.97; CVA, 0.51 ± 0.73; COUGH, 0.01 ± 0.36; P = 0.211). We conclude that the bronchodilating effect of DIs is preserved in individuals with CA, CVA, and borderline with COUGH; however, hyperinflation and gas trapping are avoided in subjects with COUGH alone. PMID:26940655

  9. Fundoplication in chronic intractable cough

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway reflux is a common cause of chronic cough and this is often refractory to medical therapy. Surgery in the form of Nissen fundoplication has been highly successful in the treatment of the classic reflux symptoms of heartburn and dyspepsia. There is a paucity of data regarding response to fundoplication in patients presenting with chronic cough. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case notes of patients from the Hull Cough Clinic who had undergone Nissen fundoplication over the past 6 years. Demographic details, duration of symptoms, presence of other symptoms, results of oesophageal studies, outcome and complications were recorded. Patients were contacted by post and asked to complete a questionnaire detailing current symptoms. In a subgroup with continued troublesome cough 24 hour pharyngeal pH measurements were undertaken. Results Forty seven patients underwent fundoplication. The average duration of pre-operative cough was 8 years. Gastro intestinal symptoms were present in the majority. In 30 (64%) patients a positive response to treatment was recorded. Mild dysphagia or bloating was seen in 18 patients following surgery. Four patients needed repeat surgical intervention for modification of fundoplication. One patient developed aspiration pneumonia eight weeks following surgery and died of a myocardial infarction. Two thirds of patients with persisting cough had evidence of airway reflux on pharyngeal pH monitoring. Conclusion In these patients with intractable cough a long term response rate of 63% represents a useful therapeutic option. Treatment failure is more frequent than for classic peptic symptoms and may be related to persistent gaseous reflux. PMID:22812601

  10. Chronic passive cigarette smoke exposure augments bronchopulmonary C-fibre inputs to nucleus tractus solitarii neurones and reflex output in young guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mutoh, T; Joad, J P; Bonham, A C

    2000-01-01

    Children chronically exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (passive cigarette smoke) have more wheeze, cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyper-reactivity and mucous secretion, which may result, in part, from stimulation of the vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibre reflex. Environmental tobacco smoke increases the sensitivity of bronchopulmonary C-fibre endings, but the physiological relevance of this sensitization is unknown. If this exposure augments the reflex responses via a central mechanism, then the responses of higher-order neurones in the reflex pathway and some components of the reflex output should also be augmented. Guinea-pigs were chronically exposed to sidestream tobacco smoke (surrogate for environmental tobacco smoke) or filtered air for 5 days week−1 from age 1 to 6 weeks (age equivalent of human childhood) and were then anaesthetized, paralysed, ventilated and prepared with pneumothoraces. Baseline and left atrial capsaicin (0.5 and 2.0 μg kg−1)- evoked changes in the impulse activity of vagal C-fibre-activated neurones in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), phrenic nerve activity, tracheal pressure, arterial blood pressure and heart rate were compared in the two groups. Sidestream smoke exposure significantly augmented the peak (P = 0.02) and duration (P = 0.01) of the NTS neuronal responses and the prolongation of expiratory time (P = 0.003) at the higher capsaicin dose. Thus, the sensitization of the bronchopulmonary C-fibre endings by chronic exposure to sidestream tobacco smoke is transmitted to the NTS and is associated with a prolonged reflexively evoked expiratory apnoea. The findings may help to explain some related respiratory symptoms in children and be a factor in sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:10673557

  11. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  12. Wavelet augmented cough analysis for rapid childhood pneumonia diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kosasih, Keegan; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Swarnkar, Vinayak; Triasih, Rina

    2015-04-01

    Pneumonia is the cause of death for over a million children each year around the world, largely in resource poor regions such as sub-Saharan Africa and remote Asia. One of the biggest challenges faced by pneumonia endemic countries is the absence of a field deployable diagnostic tool that is rapid, low-cost and accurate. In this paper, we address this issue and propose a method to screen pneumonia based on the mathematical analysis of cough sounds. In particular, we propose a novel cough feature inspired by wavelet-based crackle detection work in lung sound analysis. These features are then combined with other mathematical features to develop an automated machine classifier, which can separate pneumonia from a range of other respiratory diseases. Both cough and crackles are symptoms of pneumonia, but their existence alone is not a specific enough marker of the disease. In this paper, we hypothesize that the mathematical analysis of cough sounds allows us to diagnose pneumonia with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Using a bedside microphone, we collected 815 cough sounds from 91 patients with respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia, asthma, and bronchitis. We extracted wavelet features from cough sounds and combined them with other features such as Mel Cepstral coefficients and non-Gaussianity index. We then trained a logistic regression classifier to separate pneumonia from other diseases. As the reference standard, we used the diagnosis by physicians aided with laboratory and radiological results as deemed necessary for a clinical decision. The methods proposed in this paper achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 63%, respectively, in separating pneumonia patients from non-pneumonia patients based on wavelet features alone. Combining the wavelets with features from our previous work improves the performance further to 94% and 88% sensitivity and specificity. The performance far surpasses that of the WHO criteria currently in common use in

  13. Improvement in health status following cough-suppression physiotherapy for patients with chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit S; Watkin, Gillian; Willig, Briony; Mutalithas, Kugathasan; Bellas, Helene; Garrod, Rachel; Pavord, Ian D; Birring, Surinder S

    2011-01-01

    Cough-suppression physiotherapy is a novel self-help therapy for chronic cough. We evaluated the effectiveness of cough physiotherapy in a pilot prospective observational study. We assessed cough-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) and subjectively reported cough frequency and sleep disturbance in 23 patients with chronic cough refractory to medical therapy, before and after outpatient-based cough-suppression physiotherapy. Cough-suppression physiotherapy consisted of education, counselling, cough control, breathing retraining, and vocal hygiene. There was a significant improvement in cough-specific HRQOL after cough physiotherapy; mean (standard error of mean [SEM]) LCQ total score before 12.4 (0.9) versus after 15.1 (0.9); 95% confidence interval of difference -4.1 to -1.3; p < 0.001. The improvement in cough-specific HRQOL was greater than the LCQ minimal clinically important difference of 1.3. A significant improvement was seen in all LCQ domains: physical (p = 0.001), psychological (p < 0.001) and social (p < 0.04). There was a significant reduction in cough frequency scores (p = 0.002) and sleep disturbance scores (p = 0.02). Our findings suggest cough-suppression physiotherapy may lead to a clinically significant improvement in cough-specific HRQOL in patients with chronic cough. PMID:21990570

  14. How to quantify coughing: correlations with quality of life in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, A; Decalmer, S; Webster, D; Brown, N; McGuinness, K; Woodcock, A; Smith, J

    2008-07-01

    Different methods are used for quantifying coughing in sound recordings, but as yet no method has been shown to be more valid than any other. In the present study, the relationships between three different units of cough were examined and their ability to predict subjective ratings of cough and cough-related quality of life were evaluated. In total, 70 subjects (mean+/-SD age 55+/-11.7 yrs, 51 (73%) females) with chronic unexplained cough (median duration 4.8 yrs, interquartile range 2.5-10.1 yrs) performed fully ambulatory 24-h sound recordings, which were manually counted by trained observers and quantified by 1) explosive phases, 2) cough seconds and 3) cough epochs. Subjects also completed cough visual analogue scales (VAS) and the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). All units of cough were strongly correlated; explosive phases and cough seconds correlated slightly more strongly than cough seconds with cough epochs or explosive phases with cough epochs. LCQ scores correlated moderately with explosive phases and seconds; epochs correlated slightly less well. Cough VAS scores showed a similar pattern. Explosive phases and seconds are interchangeable units of cough, moderately related to subjective measures and cough-related quality of life; epochs are a less satisfactory alternative. PMID:18287128

  15. Chronic dry cough: Diagnostic and management approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mahashur, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Cough is the most common symptom for which medical treatment is sought in the outpatient setting. Chronic dry cough poses a great diagnostic and management challenge due to myriad etiologies. Chronic cough has been commonly considered to be caused by gastroesophageal reflux, post-nasal drip or asthma. However, recent evidences suggest that many patients with these conditions do not have cough, and in those with cough, the response to specific treatments is unpredictable at best. This raises questions about the concept of a triad of treatable causes for chronic cough. This article discusses the mechanism and etiology of cough, along with recent advances in the field of cough, highlighting some of the diagnostic and management challenges. PMID:25624596

  16. Whooping Cough Shot Safe for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158983.html Whooping Cough Shot Safe for Pregnant Women It also offers short-term protection to ... News) -- The whooping cough vaccine is safe for pregnant women, a new study indicates. The researchers also ...

  17. The "Silent Cough" Method for Vocal Hyperfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwitman, Daniel H.; Calcaterra, Thomas C.

    1973-01-01

    A method of silent coughing is recommended as an alternative to coughing and throat clearing which are described as vocally abusive activities that can be directly related to laryngeal disease. (Author/GW)

  18. Whooping Cough Shot Safe for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158983.html Whooping Cough Shot Safe for Pregnant Women It also offers ... MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The whooping cough vaccine is safe for pregnant women, a new ...

  19. Overview of the Management of Cough

    PubMed Central

    French, Cynthia T.; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Gold, Philip M.; Adams, Todd M.; Altman, Kenneth W.; Barker, Alan F.; Birring, Surinder S.; Bolser, Donald C.; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Braman, Sidney S.; Brightling, Christopher; Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla; Canning, Brendan; Chang, Anne Bernadette; Coeytaux, Remy; Cowley, Terrie; Davenport, Paul; Ebihara, Satoru; El Solh, Ali A.; Escalante, Patricio; Field, Stephen K.; Fisher, Dina; Gibson, Peter; Gould, Michael K.; Harding, Susan M.; Harnden, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Keogh, Karina A.; Lane, Andrew P.; Lim, Kaiser; Malesker, Mark A.; Mazzone, Peter; McCrory, Douglas C.; McGarvey, Lorcan; Murad, M. Hassan; Newcombe, Peter; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Oppenheimer, John; Prezant, David; Pringsheim, Tamara; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Rosen, Mark; Rubin, Bruce; Ryu, Jay H.; Smith, Jaclyn; Tarlo, Susan M.; Turner, Ronald B.; Vertigan, Anne; Weir, Kelly; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-01-01

    This overview will demonstrate that cough is a common and potentially expensive health-care problem. Improvement in the quality of care of those with cough has been the focus of study for a variety of disciplines in medicine. The purpose of the Cough Guideline and Expert Panel is to synthesize current knowledge in a form that will aid clinical decision-making for the diagnosis and management of cough across disciplines and also identify gaps in knowledge and treatment options. PMID:25080295

  20. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  1. Efficacy of levodropropizine in pediatric cough.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Francesco; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; De Danieli, Gianluca; Lanata, Luigi; Zanasi, Alessando

    2012-10-01

    Cough in children is among the most common problems managed by pediatricians, and occurs more frequently in preschool than in older children. Most acute episodes of cough are due to viral upper respiratory tract infections. The morbidity associated with acute cough in a child extends also to parents, teachers, and other family members and caregivers. Unfortunately, therapeutic options for acute cough in children are severely limited due to the absence of drugs shown to be effective antitussives with an acceptable safety profile. Agents used in the management of adult cough, such as narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone), the non-narcotic opioid dextromethorphan, first-generation, potentially sedating antihistamines, and decongestants such as pseudoephedrine, have all been deemed inadequate for treatment of acute pediatric cough on a risk/benefit basis. A growing body of evidence suggests that the peripherally acting antitussive, levodropropizine, may be an attractive alternative for the treatment of bothersome acute cough in children. PMID:22771902

  2. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  3. Reversible abnormalities of the Hering Breuer reflex in acrylamide neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, P

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex was compared in anaesthetised rabbits before, during and after the induction of acrylamide neuropathy, and was measured as the tracheal pressure which produced 30 seconds of apnoea. After four weeks of acrylamide (400 mg/kg total dose) there was ataxia and the conduction velocity of hindlimb motor nerves was significantly reduced. At this time there was a marked and reproducible reduction in the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex. The ataxia resolved within a month of stopping acrylamide administration. Three months after the cessation of acrylamide the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex had increased significantly but had not returned to normal. PMID:2993526

  4. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online]. PMID:26892245

  5. [The endonasopalpebral reflex].

    PubMed

    Vinnitskiĭ, A R; Vinnitskaia, N V

    1989-06-01

    The authors describe the endonasopalpebral reflex which is evoked from the nasal mucosa. Reduction of this reflex may be used as a fine index of involvement of the trigeminus in patients with acoustic neuromas. This makes it possible to differentiate this tumour at early stages of its development from neuritis of the acoustic nerve. This is of great importance for this pathological situation. PMID:2781776

  6. Chronic cough due to occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Nowak, Dennis; Wussow, Anke; Fischer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Within the large variety of subtypes of chronic cough, either defined by their clinical or pathogenetic causes, occupational chronic cough may be regarded as one of the most preventable forms of the disease. Next to obstructive airway diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which are sometimes concomitant with chronic cough, this chronic airway disease gains importance in the field of occupational medicine since classic fiber-related occupational airway diseases will decrease in the future. Apart from acute accidents and incidental exposures which may lead to an acute form of cough, there are numerous sources for the development of chronic cough within the workplace. Over the last years, a large number of studies has focused on occupational causes of respiratory diseases and it has emerged that chronic cough is one of the most prevalent work-related airway diseases. Best-known examples of occupations related to the development of cough are coal miners, hard-rock miners, tunnel workers, or concrete manufacturing workers. As chronic cough is often based on a variety of non-occupational factors such as tobacco smoke, a distinct separation into either occupational or personally -evoked can be difficult. However, revealing the occupational contribution to chronic cough and to the symptom cough in general, which is the commonest cause for the consultation of a physician, can significantly lead to a reduction of the socioeconomic burden of the disease. PMID:16722562

  7. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  8. Clinical perspective - cough: an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2015-06-01

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which individuals worldwide seek medical attention. The vast majority of cases of acute cough (<3 weeks duration) are due to acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) (common cold). Fortunately, acute cough is typically transient and self-limited. However, should severe and/or persistent acute cough require pharmacological treatment, satisfactory therapeutic options are scarce. Narcotic antitussives are limited by unacceptable side effects at therapeutic doses, and most over-the-counter (OTC) remedies are not supported by adequate clinical trials. The goal in chronic cough (>8 weeks duration) is to meticulously evaluate and treat all potential underlying etiologies. Despite thorough investigation, a significant minority of patients will suffer refractory, unexplained cough. For this challenging population, safe, effective, non-narcotic antitussive therapies are desperately needed. PMID:25771118

  9. Cough determinants in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Trebbia, Grégoire; Lacombe, Mathieu; Fermanian, Christophe; Falaize, Line; Lejaille, Michèle; Louis, Alain; Devaux, Christian; Raphaël, Jean Claude; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2005-04-15

    Neuromuscular disease leads to cough impairment. Cough augmentation can be achieved by mechanical insufflation (MI) or manually assisted coughing (MAC). Many studies have compared these two methods, but few have evaluated them in combination. In 155 neuromuscular patients, we assessed determinants of peak cough flow (PCF) using stepwise correlation. Maximal inspiratory capacity contributed 44% of the variance (p<0.001), expiratory reserve volume 13%, and maximal expiratory pressure 2%. Thus, augmenting inspiration seems crucial. However, parameters dependent on expiratory muscles independently influence PCF. We measured vital capacity and PCF in 10 neuromuscular patients during cough augmentation by MI, MAC, or both. MI or MAC significantly improved VC and PCF (p<0.01) as compared to the basal condition and VC and PCF were higher during MI plus MAC than during MAC or MI alone (p<0.01). In conclusion, combining MAC and MI is useful for improving cough in neuromuscular patients. PMID:15766917

  10. Concordance and Discriminatory Power of Cough Measurement Devices for Individuals With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul; Okun, Michael S.; Sapienza, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia are two causes of morbidity in Parkinson disease (PD). In PD, impaired airway clearance can lead to penetration of foreign material, resulting in a high prevalence of aspiration pneumonia and death. This study examines three different devices for measurement of peak airflow during voluntary cough in healthy control subjects and those with PD. Two simple and low-cost devices for measuring peak cough airflow were compared with the “gold standard” pneumotachograph. Methods: Thirty-five healthy control subjects and 35 individuals with PD produced voluntary cough at three perceived strengths (weak, moderate, and strong cough) for each of the three devices. Results: A significant difference in mean peak cough airflow was demonstrated for disease (F[1,56] = 4.0, P < .05) and sex (F[1,56] = 9.59, P < .003) across devices. The digital and analog meters were comparable to the gold standard demonstrating no significant difference (statistical) by device (digital vs analog) in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Both devices were discriminative of the presence of PD. Conclusions: The analog and digital peak airflow meters are suitable alternatives to the gold standard pneumotachograph due to their low cost, portability, ease of use, and high sensitivity relative to normative peak cough airflows. Voluntary cough airflow measures may serve as a noninvasive means of screening for aspiration risk in target populations. Additionally, quantification of cough strength through use of predetermined limens for weak, moderate, and strong cough may assist clinicians in better describing and tracking cough strength as a contributing factor to aspiration risk. PMID:24264124

  11. Quality of life and psychosocial aspects of cough.

    PubMed

    Brignall, Kate; Jayaraman, Bhagyashree; Birring, Surinder S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common condition that causes considerable physical and psychological morbidity. The physical symptoms of cough are readily apparent; however, the psychosocial symptoms are often overlooked. Appreciation of the impact of cough on health-related quality of life has led to the development of three validated, cough-specific, health-related quality-of-life questionnaires that assess cough severity: Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ), Cough-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (CQLQ), and Chronic Cough Impact Questionnaire (CCIQ). These tools capture additional information not measured with objective tools and can be used to assess therapy. They should be used in conjunction with other cough severity measures such as cough frequency monitors to obtain a more complete assessment of cough severity. Recent cough guidelines endorse the measurement of cough-specific quality of life and these questionnaires are ideal tools to facilitate this. PMID:17939003

  12. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  13. Gabapentin for Chronic Refractory Cancer Cough.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Shrikant; Kumar, Gaurav; Datta, Soumitra Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Vagal sensory neuropathy or vagal hypersensitivity has been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic cough. Earlier reports have shown gabapentin to be effective in sensory laryngeal neuropathy and symptom conditions that have a proven neural origin. We present a case report of a patient with chronic refractory cough due to a soft tissue mass in the lung that caused compression of the mediastinal structures. The patient was successfully treated with gabapentin with reduction in the cough intensity, duration, and frequency. PMID:26962287

  14. Gabapentin for Chronic Refractory Cancer Cough

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Shrikant; Kumar, Gaurav; Datta, Soumitra Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Vagal sensory neuropathy or vagal hypersensitivity has been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic cough. Earlier reports have shown gabapentin to be effective in sensory laryngeal neuropathy and symptom conditions that have a proven neural origin. We present a case report of a patient with chronic refractory cough due to a soft tissue mass in the lung that caused compression of the mediastinal structures. The patient was successfully treated with gabapentin with reduction in the cough intensity, duration, and frequency. PMID:26962287

  15. Whooping cough in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Garbiras, M; Shabaka, A; Calvo, N; Martin, L; Moreno, M A; Lopez de la Manzanara, V; Sanchez-Fructuoso, A I

    2016-04-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory infection with a severity that varies with age, immune status, and probably with other factors such as the degree of exposure and the virulence of the organism. The most frequent microorganism responsible for whooping cough is Bordetella pertussis. We present the case of a 62-year-old renal transplant recipient presenting with typical and severe manifestations of whooping cough caused by B. pertussis. PMID:26808962

  16. [Chronic cough: common problem, discontended patients].

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki; Purokivi, Minna

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic cough is 10 to 15%. It has a strong negative impact on the patients' quality of life and it often causes depression. Many patients find medications unhelpful. Successful management of chronic cough requires the identification of the underlying condition like chronic rhinosinusitis, asthma, and asthma-like syndrome, and esophageal reflux disease. If the underlying condition cannot be identified or if the drug trials fail to help, the patient probably suffers from idiopathic chronic cough. A new paradigm has been introduced in which chronic cough is regarded as a primary condition. PMID:25558624

  17. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  18. Microinjection of DLH into the region of the caudal ventral respiratory column in the cat: Evidence for an endogenous cough suppressant mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Poliacek, Ivan; Corrie, Lu Wen-Chi; Wang, Cheng; Rose, Melanie J; Bolser, Donald C

    2006-01-01

    The caudal ventral respiratory column (cVRC) contains premotor expiratory neurons that play an important role in cough-related expiratory activity of chest wall and abdominal muscles. Microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid (DLH) was used to test the hypothesis that local activation of cVRC neurons can suppress the cough reflex. DLH (20-50 mM, 10-30 nl) was injected into the region of cVRC in 9 anesthetized spontaneously breathing cats. Repetitive coughing was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the intrathoracic airways. Electromyograms (EMG) were recorded bilaterally from inspiratory parasternal and expiratory transversus abdominis (ABD) and unilaterally from laryngeal posterior cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles. Unilateral microinjection of DLH (1-1.5 nmol) elicited bilateral increases in tonic and phasic respiratory ABD EMG activity, altered the respiratory pattern, and laryngeal motor activities. However, DLH also decreased cough frequency by 51±7% compared to control (p<0.001) and the amplitude of the contralateral (−35±3%, p<0.001) and ipsilateral (−34±5%, p<0.001) ABD EMGs during post injection coughs compared to control. The cough alterations were much less pronounced after microinjection of a lower dose of DLH (0.34-0.8 nmol). No cough depression was observed after microinjections of vehicle. These results suggest that an endogenous cough suppressant neuronal network in the region of the cVRC may exist and this network may be involved in the control of cough reflex excitability. PMID:17138836

  19. Human flexor reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Bhagwan T.; Young, Robert R.

    1971-01-01

    One type of flexor reflex, that recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle in response to electrical stimulation of the sole of the foot, was studied in normal subjects and patients with several neurological disorders. Normally this reflex consists of two components, the second of which is related to the actual withdrawal. The first component, normally of lower threshold, is difficult to evoke in patients with chronic spinal cord or discrete cerebral lesions, whereas it has an unusually low threshold and is very clearly seen in those with Parkinson's disease. In patients with spinal cord disease, the exaggerated flexor reflexes are seen at long latencies after relatively small stimuli. During the early phase of recovery from spinal transection, both components may be seen and are, therefore, spinal in origin. Studies of patients with the sensory neuropathy of Friedreich's ataxia suggest that the afferent fibres responsible for these flexor reflexes are the small myelinated fibres. Recovery curves demonstrate very long-lasting changes in flexor reflex excitability in normal subjects and patients with `spasticity' from spinal lesions. This differs in patients with `spasticity' from lesions rostral to the brain-stem. Examples in man of such physiological phenomena as reciprocal inhibition, local sign, habituation, temporal and spatial summation are discussed. Images PMID:5122389

  20. Coughing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is a sudden expulsion of air from the lungs through the epiglottis at an amazingly fast speed ( ... allowing additional air to pass through into the lungs. Then the epiglottis closes off the windpipe (larynx), ...

  1. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 30. Kraft M. Approach to the patient with respiratory disease. In: ... . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  2. Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  3. Recent additions in the treatment of cough

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, cough is regarded as a challenging clinical problem due to its frequency and often limited therapeutic options. Chronic cough that remains refractory to usual medical treatment causes significant quality of life impairment in people with this problem. Methods We have examined current evidence on recent additions in the treatment of cough, specifically treatment of refractory chronic cough with speech pathology and gabapentin. Relevant randomised control trials, reviews and case reports were identified through a PubMed and SCOPUS search of English-language literature referring to these concepts over the last eight years. Summary Of the one hundred and two articles comprising this review the majority investigated the role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRPA1 in cough and the potential of TRP antagonists as effective anti-tussives. However, these have only been tested in the laboratory and therefore their clinical effectiveness is unknown. Behavioural treatments such as speech pathology have gained momentum and this was evident in the increasing number of articles investigating its positive effect on cough. Investigation on the effectiveness of neuromodulating medications in the treatment of cough have been supported primarily through case series reports and prospective reviews however; their use (particularly gabapentin) has been significantly advanced through recently conducted randomised controlled trials. Conclusions Recent additions in the treatment of chronic cough have been significant as they consider cough to have a unifying diagnosis of cough hypersensitivity with or without the presence of a neuropathic basis. Primarily, effective treatments for chronic cough target these areas and include behavioural treatment such as speech pathology and pharmaceutical treatment with neuromodulating medications such as gabapentin. PMID:25383209

  4. Measuring cough severity: Perspectives from the literature and from patients with chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Margaret; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Nacson, Alise; Nelsen, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to assess severity of cough from patients' perspectives and capture the effects of treatment in clinical trials, a measurement tool must show evidence of validity and reliability. The purpose of this study was to characterize cough severity from patients' perspectives as the initial step in the development of a new patient-reported outcome (PRO) measure for use in clinical trials. Methods This focus groups study included patients with clinician confirmed chronic cough recruited from a large internal medicine clinic in the US. A semi-structured focus group guide was designed to elicit information about patients' experiences with cough severity and their characterization of symptoms. The focus group data were coded to identify concepts and terminology of cough severity. Results Three focus groups were conducted [n = 22; 6 male; mean age 66.1 (± 12.9)]. Etiology included GERD, asthma, bronchitis, post-nasal drip, and other. Three domains of cough severity were identified: frequency, intensity, and disruption. In addition to a single cough, participants in all focus groups described coughing in uncontrollable paroxysms they called "fits," "bouts," "spells," or "episodes." The urge to cough, described as an important sign of impending cough, was considered a component of cough frequency. Participants also described daytime activity and nighttime sleep disruption as an indication of cough severity. Finally, participants described variability in cough severity. Conclusion Results suggest that patients describe cough severity in terms of frequency, intensity, and disruptiveness, indicating these 3 domains should be addressed when evaluating cough severity and outcomes of treatment. PMID:19298650

  5. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    PubMed Central

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Mazzon, Davide; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2015-01-01

    Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment. PMID:26752910

  6. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  7. Efficacy of cough suppressants in children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J A; Novack, A H; Almquist, J R; Rogers, J E

    1993-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that codeine and dextromethorphan are effective in alleviating the symptoms of acute cough, we conducted a randomized, controlled trial. Eligible patients were children 18 months to 12 years of age, seen in private pediatric practices, with significant night cough of less than 14 days' duration. Study patients were randomly selected to receive codeine, dextromethorphan, or placebo at bedtime for 3 consecutive nights. Outcomes were assessed by the use of a parent questionnaire rating the severity of symptoms at the initiation of therapy, and after each night of the study. Every patient had a cough score (range 0 to 4) and composite symptom score (range 0 to 9) computed for each day of the study. One hundred forty-one doses of study medication were evaluated in 49 patients, including 13 children receiving placebo, 19 dextromethorphan, and 17 codeine. Mean cough and composite symptom scores decreased in each of the three treatment groups on each day of the study; there were no significant differences. Regression analysis, with reduction in cough score as the outcome of interest, showed that neither dextromethorphan nor codeine was significantly more effective than placebo (p = 0.41 and 0.70, respectively). Reduction in cough score was positively correlated with the severity of cough at the start of treatment (p = 0.007). Our data suggest that, in the doses used, neither codeine nor dextromethorphan is superior to placebo in treating night cough in children. PMID:8496765

  8. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  9. Whooping cough: identification, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Jackie; Pinfield, Jenny; Rouse, Jo

    Although there is a high uptake of vaccinations providing protection against Bordetella pertussis, the main cause of whooping cough, there has been an increase in the incidence of notifications of the disease in the UK and other developed countries in recent years. The increase in cases of whooping cough is mainly evident in older children and adults. While these individuals may experience persistent and unpleasant symptoms, most notably prolonged cough, symptoms may be mild, in part, because most older children and adults have been vaccinated against the disease. The most significant public health concern relating to whooping cough is that infected older children and adults may transmit the disease to unvaccinated infants who are most vulnerable to the symptoms. This article aims to develop the reader's understanding of whooping cough, including its prevention and management. PMID:24219484

  10. Honey for treatment of cough in children

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question Cough is a very common presentation among sick children in my clinic. There is almost no day without a child being examined for upper respiratory tract infection and cough. While I understand that no medications are recommended for relief of cough—prescribed or over the counter—is it true that honey might help relieve cough symptoms in children? Answer Most prescribed and over-the-counter preparations for cough in children are not effective and might carry the risk of adverse events. A single dose of honey before bedtime was shown in recent studies to diminish cough and the discomfort experienced by children and their parents. Recent evidence also supports administering a few daily doses, but this practice will need further study to assess its effectiveness and safety. PMID:25642485

  11. Capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the response to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough: a prospective, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic cough respond to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids but it is difficult to predict which patients are likely to respond. The primary aim of the present study was to define the capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough. The secondary aim was to assess the ability of the saline test to monitor the healing of cough during corticosteroid treatment. Methods Forty-three patients with chronic cough were recruited. Before therapy, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, histamine airway challenge, and saline test were performed. Those responding to the first saline test repeated it and the nitric oxide measurement during the subsequent visits. The patients used inhaled budesonide, 400 ug twice daily, for twelve weeks. The treatment response was assessed by Leicester Cough Questionnaire at baseline, and at one, four, and twelve weeks. Results Seventy-seven % of the patients demonstrated the minimal important difference in the Leicester Cough Questionnaire indicating a symptomatic response. Neither the response magnitude nor the speed was predicted by the saline test. Histamine challenge showed the strongest predictive ability: The maximal improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score was 5.08 (3.76 – 6.40) points in the histamine positive and 2.78 (1.55 – 4.01) points in the histamine negative subjects (p = 0.006). Baseline nitric oxide level also associated with the improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.02). During the treatment, the cough sensitivity to saline gradually decreased among the budesonide responders but not in the non-responders. Nitric oxide levels decreased very rapidly among the responders. Conclusions Saline test cannot predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough but it may be utilized to monitor the effect of this

  12. [Combatting fever, phlegm and cough].

    PubMed

    Solar Silva, M A

    1991-03-01

    Respiratory viruses and their complications are the most common diseases after dental caries, and the most important single cause of medical consultations. They are the 2nd leading cause of hospitalization and mortality in infants. The challenge in respiratory infections is to prevent complications. Since most respiratory infections are treated in the home, preventive interventions should begin there. Respiratory infections do not depend greatly on environmental conditions, they are not preventable by vaccination, and their course in the great majority of cases is self-limiting and benign. Respiratory viruses are characterized by a symptom complex which represents the reaction of the organism to the viral infection. Although the symptoms may be annoying, they play an important role in preventing bacterial complications. Nasal secretions contain substances that limit the virus and impede secondary bacterial infection. Nasal congestion should be treated only by aiding the evacuation of secretions. Nasal obstruction and resulting respiration through the mouth allow unfiltered air to reach the bronchial passages, causing irritation or contamination. Use of local or systemic decongestants or antihistamines may contribute to complications by decreasing defenses. Treatment of inflamed pharynx or tonsils with antiinflammatories is counterproductive because it too interferes with the body's defenses against viral invasion. Viral laryngitis should be treated only with steam vapor and never with steroids, which diminish the body's antiviral defenses and can produce serious side effects. Coughs are the body's means of evacuating viral secretions and should be aided only by ensuring adequate hydration to maintain the fluidity of the secretions. Expectorants should be used only in cases of chronic bronchitis. Coughs resulting from bronchial obstruction, cases in which bronchial dynamics are hyperactive, and dry and unproductive coughs resulting from pharyngeal irritation are the

  13. The urge-to-cough and cough motor response modulation by the central effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Vovk, Andrea; Duke, Rita K; Bolser, Donald C; Robertson, Erin

    2009-04-01

    The urge-to-cough is a respiratory sensation that precedes the cough motor response. Since affective state modulates the perception of respiratory sensations such as dyspnoea, we wanted to test whether nicotine, an anxiolytic, would modulate the urge-to-cough and hence, the cough motor response. We hypothesized that withdrawal from and administration of nicotine in smoking subjects would modulate their anxiety levels, urge-to-cough and cough motor response to capsaicin stimulation. Twenty smoking (SM) adults (8F, 12M; 22+/-3 years; 2.9+/-2.0 pack years) and matched non-smoking (NS) controls (22+/-2 years) were presented with randomized concentrations of capsaicin (0-200 microM) before and after nicotine (SM only) gum and/or placebo (SM and NS) gum. Subjects rated their urge-to-cough using a Borg scale at the end of each capsaicin presentation. Cough number and cough motor pattern were determined from airflow tracings. Subjects completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires before and after gum administration. SM subjects that withdrew from cigarette smoking for 12 h exhibited an increase in anxiety scores, a greater number of coughs and higher urge-to-cough ratings compared to NS subjects. Administration of nicotine gum reduced anxiety scores, cough number and urge-to-cough ratings to match the NS subjects. There was no effect of placebo gum on any of the measured parameters in the SM and NS groups. The results from this study suggest that modulation of the central neural state with nicotine withdrawal and administration in young smoking adults is associated with a change in anxiety levels which in turn modulates the perceptual and motor response to irritant cough stimulants. PMID:19100331

  14. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  15. Airway irritation and cough evoked by acid: from human to ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation or aspiration of acid solution evokes airway defense responses such as cough and reflex bronchoconstriction, resulting from activation of vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibers and Aδ afferents. The stimulatory effect of hydrogen ion on these sensory nerves is generated by activation of two major types of ion channels expressed in these neurons: a rapidly activating and inactivating current mediated through ASICs, and a slow sustaining current via activation of TRPV1. Recent studies have shown that these acid-evoked responses are elevated during airway inflammatory reaction, revealing the potential convergence of a wide array of inflammatory signaling on these ion channels. Since pH in the airway fluid drops substantially in patients with inflammatory airway diseases, these heightened stimulatory effects of acid on airway sensory nerves may play a part in the manifestation of airway irritation and excessive cough under those pathophysiological conditions. PMID:21543258

  16. Acute cough: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute cough is one of the most common complaints prompting patient visits to healthcare professionals. Despite the broad repercussions of acute cough on patient quality of life, school and work productivity, and public health resources, research on this condition is minimal, as are the available treatment options. Many patients use over-the-counter medicines, which are often ineffective for symptom relief. Some therapies may achieve antitussive activity, but at the expense of unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Unmet needs When considering the treatments currently available for the management of acute cough, the multiple limitations of such treatments are quite apparent. Most of these treatments lack clinically proven efficacy and reliability to support their use. This reinforces the need for the generation of quality scientific data from well-performed clinical trials. Hopefully, the result will be the development of safer, more effective and more reliable therapeutic options in the management of acute cough. Cough assessment and management Acute cough can be due to a variety of causes, and it is worthwhile to consider these pathogenic factors in some detail. It is also important to be familiar with the effects that acute cough has on patients' quality of life, work productivity, and the healthcare system; proper awareness of these effects may contribute to better understanding of the social impact of cough. In reference to the available treatments for the management of acute cough, adequate knowledge of the type of over-the-counter and prescription products in the market, as well as their mode of action and advantages/disadvantages, may provide expanded pharmacotherapeutic opportunities and facilitate better clinical decisions. However, due to the drawbacks of current treatment options, ideas for future cough management and newer products need to be considered and tested. Conclusion In view of the socio-economic impact of acute cough and the

  17. A Cough Aerosol Simulator for the Study of Disease Transmission by Human Cough-Generated Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, William G.; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Szalajda, Jonathan V.; Noti, John D.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles expelled during human coughs are a potential pathway for infectious disease transmission. However, the importance of airborne transmission is unclear for many diseases. To better understand the role of cough aerosol particles in the spread of disease and the efficacy of different types of protective measures, we constructed a cough aerosol simulator that produces a humanlike cough in a controlled environment. The simulated cough has a 4.2 l volume and is based on coughs recorded from influenza patients. In one configuration, the simulator produces a cough aerosol containing particles from 0.1 to 100 µm in diameter with a volume median diameter (VMD) of 8.5 µm and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.9. In a second configuration, the cough aerosol has a size range of 0.1–30 µm, a VMD of 3.4 µm, and a GSD of 2.3. The total aerosol volume expelled during each cough is 68 µl. By generating a controlled and reproducible artificial cough, the simulator allows us to test different ventilation, disinfection, and personal protection scenarios. The system can be used with live pathogens, including influenza virus, which allows isolation precautions used in the healthcare field to be tested without risk of exposure for workers or patients. The information gained from tests with the simulator will help to better understand the transmission of infectious diseases, develop improved techniques for infection control, and improve safety for healthcare workers and patients. PMID:26500387

  18. New developments in reflux-associated cough.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jaclyn; Woodcock, Ashley; Houghton, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is generally considered one of the three main causes of chronic cough, along with asthma and nasal disease. The diagnosis of GORD is often based upon a successful trial of anti-acid treatment however GORD is a complex condition taking many forms. Only recently have studies started to address the different types of GORD in patients with chronic cough and how these may infer the mechanisms linking these common conditions. GORD can be assessed in a number of ways; whilst endoscopy provides evidence of oesophagitis (i.e. erosive disease), 24-h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring may demonstrate abnormal oesophageal acid exposure in the absence of oesophageal damage (i.e. non-erosive disease). The development of oesophageal impedance monitoring now allows the assessment of all reflux events (regardless of degree of acidity) and further classification of reflux by the proximal extension e.g. to upper oesophagus or even pharynx. Chronic cough patients may still be considered to have GORD if there is a significant temporal association between reflux events and coughing. Recent studies have examined the relationships between cough and reflux events, the roles of distal and proximal/pharyngeal reflux and also micro-aspiration in chronic cough patients. Increasing evidence suggests a significant proportion of patients display statistical associations between reflux and cough events, in the absence of an excessive numbers of reflux events either within or outside of the oesophagus. PMID:20024660

  19. Optimal effect-site concentration of remifentanil for preventing cough during removal of the double-lumen endotracheal tube from sevoflurane-remifentanil anesthesia: A prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook Young; Yoo, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Yeop; Kim, Dae Hee; Lee, Jung Dong; Rho, Go Un; Park, Hyungbae; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-06-01

    Opioids are used as a treatment for coughing. Recent studies have reported an antitussive effect of remifentanil during recovery from general anesthesia by suppressed coughing. The coughing reflex may differ throughout the respiratory tract from the larynx to the bronchi. But the proper dose of remifentanil to prevent cough during double-lumen tube (DLT) extubation is unknown.Twenty-five ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, 20 to 65 years of age who were undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lung surgery requiring 1-lung ventilation were enrolled. The effective effect-site concentration (Ce) of remifentanil for 50% and 95% of patients (EC50 and EC95) for preventing cough was determined using the isotonic regression method with a bootstrapping approach, following the Dixon up-and-down method. Recovery profiles and hemodynamic values after anesthesia were compared between patients with cough and patients without cough.EC50 and EC95 of remifentanil was 1.670 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.393-1.806] and 2.275 ng/mL (95% CI 1.950-2.263), respectively. There were no differences in recovery profiles and hemodynamic values after anesthesia between patients with/without cough. No patients suffered respiratory complications during the emergence period.Remifentanil can be a safe and reliable method of cough prevention during emergence from sevoflurane anesthesia after thoracic surgery requiring DLT. EC50 and EC95 of remifentanil that suppresses coughing is 1.670 and 2.275 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:27310976

  20. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  1. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects. PMID:26721248

  2. [Long loop reflexes--a clinically relevant method].

    PubMed

    Claus, D

    1986-02-01

    Late reflex potentials have been know for a long time. On the upper limb it has been proven that these potentials have a transcortical pathway. The electrical stimulation of nerve trunks is easily applicable in clinical practice and produces clear long-loop responses. The typical results can be reproduced for extrapyramidal, cerebellar and pyramidal lesions by this method. The long-loop reflex is sensitive to lesions in the course of the pyramidal tract. PMID:3007315

  3. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates. PMID:25939529

  4. How Is the Cause of Cough Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical history, a physical exam, and test results. Medical History Your doctor will likely ask questions about your ... cough. Your doctor also may ask: About your medical history, including whether you have allergies, asthma , or other ...

  5. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  6. Usefulness of a handheld nebulizer in cough test to screen for silent aspiration.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Yoko; Tohara, Haruka; Nakane, Ayako; Murata, Shino; Mikushi, Shinya; Susa, Chiaki; Takashima, Maho; Umeda, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Ruriko; Uematsu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Cough test to screen for silent aspiration (SA) was reported, and the effectiveness was excellent. However, the device was rather large so that the portability was poor. So, the purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of a handheld nebulizer for the test and verify the reproducibility of the method. The subjects were 160 patients who were suspected of having dysphagia and underwent videofluorography (VF) or videoendoscopy (VE). They inhaled 1.0 % citric acid-physiologic saline orally for 1 min using a handheld nebulizer, and the examiner observed the number of coughs: more than five coughs was considered as negative (normal), while less than four coughs was regarded as positive. Among the subjects, 70 patients administered the cough test and VF or VE twice or more at some intervals. The k coefficient was calculated in reproducibility. Using the results of the VF or VE examination as the standards, for SA detection, the sensitivity was 0.86, specificity was 0.71, positive predictive value was 0.53, and negative predictive value was 0.93. The k coefficient was 0.79. In conclusion, the handheld nebulizer was useful in the cough test to screen for SA. Furthermore, satisfactory reproducibility was shown. PMID:23053789

  7. The Korean Cough Guideline: Recommendation and Summary Statement.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook; Jung, Ji Ye; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Joo-Hee; Park, So Young; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Dong Ah; Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung; Kim, Yee Hyung; Jeong, Ina; Kim, Je Hyeong; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Jinkyeong; Choi, Eun Young; Jung, Ki-Suck; Kim, Hui Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptom of many respiratory diseases. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases organized cough guideline committee and cough guideline was developed by this committee. The purpose of this guideline is to help clinicians to diagnose correctly and treat efficiently patients with cough. In this article, we have stated recommendation and summary of Korean cough guideline. We also provided algorithm for acute, subacute, and chronic cough. For chronic cough, upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), cough variant asthma (CVA), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should be considered. If UACS is suspicious, first generation anti-histamine and nasal decongestant can be used empirically. In CVA, inhaled corticosteroid is recommended in order to improve cough. In GERD, proton pump inhibitor is recommended in order to improve cough. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis, lung cancer, aspiration, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, habit, psychogenic cough, interstitial lung disease, environmental and occupational factor, tuberculosis, obstructive sleep apnea, peritoneal dialysis, and idiopathic cough can be also considered as cause of chronic cough. Level of evidence for treatment is mostly low. Thus, in this guideline, many recommendations are based on expert opinion. Further study regarding treatment for cough is mandatory. PMID:26770230

  8. The Korean Cough Guideline: Recommendation and Summary Statement

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chin Kook; Jung, Ji Ye; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Joo-Hee; Park, So Young; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Dong Ah; Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung; Kim, Yee Hyung; Jeong, Ina; Kim, Je Hyeong; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Jinkyeong; Choi, Eun Young; Jung, Ki-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Cough is one of the most common symptom of many respiratory diseases. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases organized cough guideline committee and cough guideline was developed by this committee. The purpose of this guideline is to help clinicians to diagnose correctly and treat efficiently patients with cough. In this article, we have stated recommendation and summary of Korean cough guideline. We also provided algorithm for acute, subacute, and chronic cough. For chronic cough, upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), cough variant asthma (CVA), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should be considered. If UACS is suspicious, first generation anti-histamine and nasal decongestant can be used empirically. In CVA, inhaled corticosteroid is recommended in order to improve cough. In GERD, proton pump inhibitor is recommended in order to improve cough. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis, lung cancer, aspiration, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, habit, psychogenic cough, interstitial lung disease, environmental and occupational factor, tuberculosis, obstructive sleep apnea, peritoneal dialysis, and idiopathic cough can be also considered as cause of chronic cough. Level of evidence for treatment is mostly low. Thus, in this guideline, many recommendations are based on expert opinion. Further study regarding treatment for cough is mandatory. PMID:26770230

  9. Effect of downsampling and compressive sensing on audio-based continuous cough monitoring.

    PubMed

    Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, Pablo; Lesso, Paul; McKinstry, Brian; Pinnock, Hilary; Rabinovich, Roberto; McCloughan, Lucy; Monge-Álvarez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient cough detection system based on simple decision-tree classification of spectral features from a smartphone audio signal. Preliminary evaluation on voluntary coughs shows that the system can achieve 98% sensitivity and 97.13% specificity when the audio signal is sampled at full rate. With this baseline system, we study possible efficiency optimisations by evaluating the effect of downsampling below the Nyquist rate and how the system performance at low sampling frequencies can be improved by incorporating compressive sensing reconstruction schemes. Our results show that undersampling down to 400 Hz can still keep sensitivity and specificity values above 90% despite of aliasing. Furthermore, the sparsity of cough signals in the time domain allows keeping performance figures close to 90% when sampling at 100 Hz using compressive sensing schemes. PMID:26737716

  10. The cough response to ultrasonically nebulized distilled water in heart-lung transplantation patients

    SciTech Connect

    Higenbottam, T.; Jackson, M.; Woolman, P.; Lowry, R.; Wallwork, J.

    1989-07-01

    As a result of clinical heart-lung transplantation, the lungs are denervated below the level of the tracheal anastomosis. It has been questioned whether afferent vagal reinnervation occurs after surgery. Here we report the cough frequency, during inhalation of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, of 15 heart-lung transplant patients studied 6 wk to 36 months after surgery. They were compared with 15 normal subjects of a similar age and sex. The distribution of the aerosol was studied in five normal subjects using /sup 99m/technetium diethylene triamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) in saline. In seven patients, the sensitivity of the laryngeal mucosa to instilled distilled water (0.2 ml) was tested at the time of fiberoptic bronchoscopy by recording the cough response. Ten percent of the aerosol was deposited onto the larynx and trachea, 56% on the central airways, and 34% in the periphery of the lung. The cough response to the aerosol was strikingly diminished in the patients compared with normal subjects (p less than 0.001), but all seven patients coughed when distilled water was instilled onto the larynx. As expected, the laryngeal mucosa of heart-lung transplant patients remains sensitive to distilled water. However, the diminished coughing when the distilled water is distributed by aerosol to the central airways supports the view that vagal afferent nerves do not reinnervate the lungs after heart-lung transplantation, up to 36 months after surgery.