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Sample records for counterpropagating surface acoustic

  1. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  3. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  4. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  5. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  6. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  7. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  8. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  9. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  10. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Parent, Philippe; Reinholdtsen, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  11. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  12. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  13. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  14. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  15. Ultrafast magnetoelastic probing of surface acoustic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janušonis, J.; Chang, C. L.; Jansma, T.; Gatilova, A.; Vlasov, V. S.; Lomonosov, A. M.; Temnov, V. V.; Tobey, R. I.

    2016-07-01

    We generate in-plane magnetoelastic waves in nickel films using the all-optical transient grating technique. When performed on amorphous glass substrates, two dominant magnetoelastic excitations can be resonantly driven by the underlying elastic distortions, the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave and the surface skimming longitudinal wave. An applied field, oriented in the sample plane, selectively tunes the coupling between magnetic precession and one of the elastic waves, thus demonstrating selective excitation of coexisting, large-amplitude magnetoelastic waves. Analytical calculations based on the Green's function approach corroborate the generation of multiple surface acoustic transients with disparate decay dynamics.

  16. Surface area measurement utilizing an acoustic bridge

    PubMed

    Torigoe; Ishii

    2000-05-01

    A new method is proposed for measuring the surface area of an object. The acoustic conductance of a cavity is proportional to the surface area of the cavity inner wall. The surface area of an object thus can be known from the measurement of the acoustic impedance of a chamber in which the object is placed. In order to measure the acoustic impedance accurately; the proposed method employs the acoustic bridge technique. The experimental device is composed of the following elements so arranged that their electric equivalents form a bridge circuit: a measuring chamber in which an object under test is placed and whose volume can be adjusted; a reference chamber whose inner surface area can be varied; a loudspeaker (the signal source) mounted between the two chambers; and a bypass channel at the midpoint of which a microphone (the null detector) is installed. This bridge balances when the volume and the inner surface area of each chamber become equal. The surface area of the object can then be known from the inner surface area of the reference chamber. Several experiments were performed with this device and the success of the proposed method was verified. PMID:10830378

  17. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  18. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOEpatents

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  19. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  20. Isomorphic surface acoustic waves on multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.

    2001-03-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years over the investigation of bulk acoustic waves (BAWs) which propagate along certain directions in anisotropic crystals with a minimum of diffraction. One application of these BAWs is for multichannel acousto-optic devices. The fact that the beams propagate with the minimum diffraction implies that the channels in such a device can be closely packed. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are constrained to be within roughly one acoustic wavelength from the surface, the possibility exists to deposit thin films of isotropic or anisotropic material on the substrate and embue the aggregate multilayer structure with properties not present in the beginning substrate material. The characteristic investigated in this article is the velocity anisotropy which, as is known, predominates SAW diffraction. Specifically, we present a method whereby self-collimating SAWs can be generated on surfaces even though the substrate material itself does not exhibit this behavior. We discuss the particular case of a ZnO layer on (001)-cut <110>-propagating GaAs for which a fair amount of slowness surface data exists. Finally, using angular spectrum of plane waves diffraction theory, we present data which substantiate the claim that self-collimating can more accurately be viewed as isomorphic because the SAW beam profile can propagate without changing its shape.

  1. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  2. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement. PMID:26172647

  3. Upper surface blowing aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryle, D. M., Jr.; Braden, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance at cruise, and noise effects due to variations in nacelle and wing geometry and mode of operation are studied using small aircraft models that simulate upper surface blowing (USB). At cruise speeds ranging from Mach .50 to Mach .82, the key determinants of drag/thrust penalties are found to be nozzle aspect ratio, boattailing angle, and chordwise position; number of nacelles; and streamlined versus symmetric configuration. Recommendations are made for obtaining favorable cruise configurations. The acoustic studies, which concentrate on the noise created by the jet exhaust flow and its interaction with wing and flap surfaces, isolate several important sources of USB noise, including nozzle shape, exit velocity, and impingement angle; flow pathlength; and flap angle and radius of curvature. Suggestions for lessening noise due to trailing edge flow velocity, flow pathlength, and flow spreading are given, though compromises between some design options may be necessary.

  4. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  5. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  6. Raising Photoemission Efficiency with Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, F. Hassani, C.E. Korman, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, M. Poelker, K.E.L. Surles-Law

    2012-07-01

    We are developing a novel technique that may help increase the efficiency and reduce costs of photoelectron sources used at electron accelerators. The technique is based on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in piezoelectric materials, such as GaAs, that are commonly used as photocathodes. Piezoelectric fields produced by the traveling SAW spatially separate electrons and holes, reducing their probability of recombination, thereby enhancing the photoemission quantum efficiency of the photocathode. Additional advantages could be increased polarization provided by the enhanced mobility of charge carriers that can be controlled by the SAW and the ionization of optically-generated excitons resulting in the creation of additional electron-hole pairs. It is expected that these novel features will reduce the cost of accelerator operation. A theoretical model for photoemission in the presence of SAW has been developed, and experimental tests of the technique are underway.

  7. Nonlinear surface acoustic waves in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Ronald Edward

    Model equations developed by Hamilton, Il'inskii, and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 639-651 (1999)] are used to perform theoretical and numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in a variety of nonpiezoelectric cubic crystals. The basic theory underlying the model equations is outlined, quasilinear solutions of the equations are derived, and expressions are developed for the shock formation distance and nonlinearity coefficient. A time-domain equation corresponding to the frequency-domain model equations is derived and shown to reduce to a time-domain equation introduced previously for Rayleigh waves [E. A. Zabolotskaya, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)]. Numerical calculations are performed to predict the evolution of initially monofrequency surface waves in the (001), (110), and (111) planes of the crystals RbCl, KCl, NaCl, CaF2, SrF2, BaF2, C (diamond), Si, Ge, Al, Ni, Cu in the moverline 3m point group, and the crystals Cs-alum, NH4- alum, and K-alum in the moverline 3 point group. The calculations are based on measured second- and third- order elastic constants taken from the literature. Nonlinearity matrix elements which describe the coupling strength of harmonic interactions are shown to provide a powerful tool for characterizing waveform distortion. Simulations in the (001) and (110) planes show that in certain directions the velocity waveform distortion may change in sign, generation of one or more harmonies may be suppressed and shock formation postponed, or energy may be transferred rapidly to the highest harmonics and shock formation enhanced. Simulations in the (111) plane show that the nonlinearity matrix elements are generally complex-valued, which may lead to asymmetric distortion and the appearance of low frequency oscillations near the peaks and shocks in the velocity waveforms. A simple transformation based on the phase of the nonlinearity matrix is shown to provide a reasonable approximation of asymmetric waveform

  8. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  9. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit. PMID:22247694

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Vibration Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit. PMID:22247694

  11. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  12. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  13. Acoustic physics of surface-attached biochemical species

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this Commentary, we discuss the paper Quantitative Determination of Size and Shape of Surface-Bound DNA Using an Acoustic Wave Sensor [Tsortos et al., Biophys. J. 94(7), 2706–2715 (2008)]. The paper under discussion presents a novel theory that uses the response of a Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave device to characterize surface-attached double- and triple-strand DNA. The authors relate the length and curvature of the DNA strands to the interfacial viscosity using classical polymer theory. In this Commentary, we discuss their results in the broader context of acoustic wave detection of biochemical interactions and some of the factors involved when probing “soft” surfaces. Specifically, we present a review of interfacial coupling and slip, and discuss how these phenomena can affect biosensors employing acoustic wave detection techniques. PMID:19404427

  14. Acoustic physics of surface-attached biochemical species.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jonathan S; Thompson, Michael

    2008-08-01

    In this Commentary, we discuss the paper Quantitative Determination of Size and Shape of Surface-Bound DNA Using an Acoustic Wave Sensor [Tsortos et al., Biophys. J. 94(7), 2706-2715 (2008)]. The paper under discussion presents a novel theory that uses the response of a Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave device to characterize surface-attached double- and triple-strand DNA. The authors relate the length and curvature of the DNA strands to the interfacial viscosity using classical polymer theory. In this Commentary, we discuss their results in the broader context of acoustic wave detection of biochemical interactions and some of the factors involved when probing "soft" surfaces. Specifically, we present a review of interfacial coupling and slip, and discuss how these phenomena can affect biosensors employing acoustic wave detection techniques. PMID:19404427

  15. Universal Quantum Transducers Based on Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, M. J. A.; Kessler, E. M.; Giedke, G.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.; Lukin, M. D.; Cirac, J. I.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a universal, on-chip quantum transducer based on surface acoustic waves in piezoactive materials. Because of the intrinsic piezoelectric (and/or magnetostrictive) properties of the material, our approach provides a universal platform capable of coherently linking a broad array of qubits, including quantum dots, trapped ions, nitrogen-vacancy centers, or superconducting qubits. The quantized modes of surface acoustic waves lie in the gigahertz range and can be strongly confined close to the surface in phononic cavities and guided in acoustic waveguides. We show that this type of surface acoustic excitation can be utilized efficiently as a quantum bus, serving as an on-chip, mechanical cavity-QED equivalent of microwave photons and enabling long-range coupling of a wide range of qubits.

  16. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  17. Anisotropic Swirling Surface Acoustic Waves from Inverse Filtering for On-Chip Generation of Acoustic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological sample actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. However, only the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves have been explored so far. In this paper, we expand the SAW toolbox with a wave family named "swirling surface acoustic waves" which are the 2D anisotropic analogue of bulk acoustic vortices. Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. After the rigorous mathematical definition of these waves, we synthesize them experimentally through the inverse filtering technique revisited for surface waves. For this purpose, we design a setup combining arrays of interdigitated transducers and a multichannel electronic that enables one to synthesize any prescribed wave field compatible with the anisotropy of the substrate in a region called the "acoustic scene." This work opens prospects for the design of integrated acoustic vortex generators for on-chip selective acoustic tweezing.

  18. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  19. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  20. Fabrication, operation and flow visualization in surface-acoustic-wave-driven acoustic-counterflow microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can be used to drive liquids in portable microfluidic chips via the acoustic counterflow phenomenon. In this video we present the fabrication protocol for a multilayered SAW acoustic counterflow device. The device is fabricated starting from a lithium niobate (LN) substrate onto which two interdigital transducers (IDTs) and appropriate markers are patterned. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel cast on an SU8 master mold is finally bonded on the patterned substrate. Following the fabrication procedure, we show the techniques that allow the characterization and operation of the acoustic counterflow device in order to pump fluids through the PDMS channel grid. We finally present the procedure to visualize liquid flow in the channels. The protocol is used to show on-chip fluid pumping under different flow regimes such as laminar flow and more complicated dynamics characterized by vortices and particle accumulation domains. PMID:24022515

  1. Fabrication, Operation and Flow Visualization in Surface-acoustic-wave-driven Acoustic-counterflow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can be used to drive liquids in portable microfluidic chips via the acoustic counterflow phenomenon. In this video we present the fabrication protocol for a multilayered SAW acoustic counterflow device. The device is fabricated starting from a lithium niobate (LN) substrate onto which two interdigital transducers (IDTs) and appropriate markers are patterned. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel cast on an SU8 master mold is finally bonded on the patterned substrate. Following the fabrication procedure, we show the techniques that allow the characterization and operation of the acoustic counterflow device in order to pump fluids through the PDMS channel grid. We finally present the procedure to visualize liquid flow in the channels. The protocol is used to show on-chip fluid pumping under different flow regimes such as laminar flow and more complicated dynamics characterized by vortices and particle accumulation domains. PMID:24022515

  2. TeO2 slow surface acoustic wave Bragg cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shi-Kay

    1991-08-01

    A newly discovered slow acoustic surface wave (SAW) on a (-110) cut TeO2 surface is reported focusing on its properties studied using a PC based numerical method. It is concluded that the slow SAW is rather tolerant to crystal surface orientation errors and has unusually deep penetration of its shear component into the thickness of substrate, about 47 wavelengths for a half amplitude point. The deep shear field is considered to be beneficial for surface acoustooptic interaction with free propagating focused laser beams. Rotation of the substrate about the z-axis makes it possible to adjust a slow SAW velocity with the potential advantage of trading acoustic velocity for less acoustic attenuation. Wider-bandwidth long signal processing time Bragg cells may be feasible utilizing this trade-off. The slow SAW device is characterized by an extremely low power consumption which might be useful for compact portable or avionics signal processing equipment applications.

  3. A surface-acoustic-wave-based cantilever bio-sensor.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Giorgio; Signore, Giovanni; Agostini, Matteo; Beltram, Fabio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-06-15

    A scalable surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW-) based cantilevered device for portable bio-chemical sensing applications is presented. Even in the current, proof-of-principle implementation this architecture is shown to outperform commercial quartz-crystal microbalances in terms of sensitivity. Adhesion of analytes on a functionalized surface of the cantilever shifts the resonant frequency of a SAW-generating transducer due to the stress-induced variation of the speed of surface acoustic modes. We discuss the relevance of this approach for diagnostics applications based on miniaturized devices. PMID:25643594

  4. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  5. Acoustic surface waveguides for acoustic emission monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.R.; He, Y.; Superfesky, M. . Constructed Facilities Center)

    1994-09-01

    Acoustic surface waveguides are developed to enhance the transmission of acoustic emission (AE) signals in high attenuating fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) structures. In this paper, the design of the surface waveguide system and the source location technique are described. Experimental results of using a surface waveguide for AE monitoring of a FRP composite pressure pipe are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide system. A metal wire was selected as a waveguide, and pencil breaks and electronic pulses were used as artificial AE signals. The results indicate that the use of the surface waveguide can significantly increase the AE monitoring range. Also, a high transmission efficiency was experimentally determined for the epoxy joints developed to attach the surface waveguide to the FRP pipe. The proposed surface waveguide appears to be a promising technique for AE monitoring on existing FRP pressure vessels and storage tanks.

  6. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-01-01

    Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh-environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity. PMID:23708273

  7. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

  8. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensormore » with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.« less

  9. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  10. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  11. Surface acoustic wave/silicon monolithic sensor/processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.; Nouhi, A.; Kilmer, R.; Fathimulla, M. A.; Mehter, E.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for sputter deposition of piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) is described. An argon-ion milling system was converted to sputter zinc oxide films in an oxygen atmosphere using a pure zinc oxide target. Piezoelectric films were grown on silicon dioxide and silicon dioxide overlayed with gold. The sputtered films were evaluated using surface acoustic wave measurements, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and resistivity measurements. The effect of the sputtering conditions on the film quality and the result of post-deposition annealing are discussed. The application of these films to the generation of surface acoustic waves is also discussed.

  12. A pseudo-spin surface-acoustic-wave quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C H W

    2003-07-15

    A modification to the surface-acoustic-wave quantum computer is described. The use of pseudo-spin qubits is introduced as a way to simplify the fabrication and programming of the computer. A form of optical readout that relies on the electrons in each surface-acoustic-wave minimum recombining with holes in a two-dimensional hole gas is suggested as a means to measure the output. The suggested modification would allow the quantum computer to be made smaller and to operate faster. PMID:12869323

  13. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of counterpropagating Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2015-08-01

    We analyse theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of two incoherent counterpropagating Airy beams interacting in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. For a large enough nonlinearity strength the interaction between the two Airy beams leads to light-induced waveguiding. The stability of the waveguide is determined by the crystal length, the nonlinearity strength and the beam’s intensities and is improved when comparing to the situation using Gaussian beams. We further identify the threshold above which the waveguide is no longer static but evolves dynamically either time-periodically or even chaotically. Above the stability threshold, each Airy-soliton moves erratically between privileged output positions that correspond to the spatial positions of the lobes of the counterpropagating Airy beam. These results suggest new ways of creating dynamically varying waveguides, optical logic gates and chaos-based computing.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of counterpropagating Airy beams

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We analyse theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of two incoherent counterpropagating Airy beams interacting in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. For a large enough nonlinearity strength the interaction between the two Airy beams leads to light-induced waveguiding. The stability of the waveguide is determined by the crystal length, the nonlinearity strength and the beam’s intensities and is improved when comparing to the situation using Gaussian beams. We further identify the threshold above which the waveguide is no longer static but evolves dynamically either time-periodically or even chaotically. Above the stability threshold, each Airy-soliton moves erratically between privileged output positions that correspond to the spatial positions of the lobes of the counterpropagating Airy beam. These results suggest new ways of creating dynamically varying waveguides, optical logic gates and chaos-based computing. PMID:26315530

  16. Acoustic shadows help gleaning bats find prey, but may be defeated by prey acoustic camouflage on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clare, Elizabeth L; Holderied, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual abilities of animals, like echolocating bats, are difficult to study because they challenge our understanding of non-visual senses. We used novel acoustic tomography to convert echoes into visual representations and compare these cues to traditional echo measurements. We provide a new hypothesis for the echo-acoustic basis of prey detection on surfaces. We propose that bats perceive a change in depth profile and an 'acoustic shadow' cast by prey. The shadow is more salient than prey echoes and particularly strong on smooth surfaces. This may explain why bats look for prey on flat surfaces like leaves using scanning behaviour. We propose that rather than forming search images for prey, whose characteristics are unpredictable, predators may look for disruptions to the resting surface (acoustic shadows). The fact that the acoustic shadow is much fainter on rougher resting surfaces provides the first empirical evidence for 'acoustic camouflage' as an anti-predator defence mechanism. PMID:26327624

  17. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  18. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2013-05-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals. The acoustic signals (of nominal frequency 200 kHz) are forward scattered from the underside of surface waves that are generated in a wave tank and scaled to model smooth ocean swell. An inverse processing algorithm is designed and implemented to reconstruct the surface displacement profiles of the waves over one complete period. The inverse processing uses the surface scattered pulses collected at the receiver, an initial wave profile (two are considered), and a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to iteratively adjust the surface until it is considered optimized or reconstructed. Two physical length scales over which information can be known about the surface are confirmed. An outer length scale, the Fresnel zone surrounding each specular reflection point, is the only region where optimized surfaces resulting from each initial profile converge within a resolution set by the inner length scale, a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse. The statistical confidence of each optimized surface is also highest within a Fresnel zone. Future design considerations are suggested such as an array of receivers that increases the region of surface reconstruction by a factor of 2 to 3. PMID:23654368

  19. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  20. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  1. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  2. Radiation dominated acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun; Ai, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Acoustophoresis-based particle manipulation in microfluidics has gained increasing attention in recent years. Despite the fact that experimental studies have been extensively performed to demonstrate this technique for various microfluidic applications, numerical simulation of acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has still been largely unexplored. In this work, a numerical model taking into account the acoustic-piezoelectric interaction was developed to simulate the generation of a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field and predict the acoustic pressure field in the liquid. Acoustic radiation dominated particle tracing was performed to simulate acoustophoresis of particles with different sizes undergoing a SSAW field. A microfluidic device composed of two interdigital transducers (IDTs) for SAW generation and a microfluidic channel was fabricated for experimental validation. Numerical simulations could well capture the focusing phenomenon of particles to the pressure nodes in the experimental observation. Further comparison of particle trajectories demonstrated considerably quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results with fitting in the applied voltage. Particle switching was also demonstrated using the fabricated device that could be further developed as an active particle sorting device. PMID:26070191

  3. Generation and characterization of surface layers on acoustically levitated drops.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Bauerecker, Sigurd; Cammenga, Heiko K

    2007-06-15

    Surface layers of natural and technical amphiphiles, e.g., octadecanol, stearic acid and related compounds as well as perfluorinated fatty alcohols (PFA), have been investigated on the surface of acoustically levitated drops. In contrast to Langmuir troughs, traditionally used in the research of surface layers at the air-water interface, acoustic levitation offers the advantages of a minimized and contact-less technique. Although the film pressure cannot be directly adjusted on acoustically levitated drops, it runs through a wide pressure range due to the shrinking surface of an evaporating drop. During this process, different states of the generated surface layer have been identified, in particular the phase transition from the gaseous or liquid-expanded to the liquid-condensed state of surface layers of octadecanol and other related amphiphiles. Characteristic parameters, such as the relative permeation resistance and the area per molecule in a condensed surface layer, have been quantified and were found comparable to results obtained from surface layers generated on Langmuir troughs. PMID:17376468

  4. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  5. Acoustic Bubble Removal from Boiling Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The object of the study was the investigation of the forces generated by standing acoustic waves on vapor bubbles, both far and near boundaries. In order to accomplish this objective, in view of the scarcity of publications on the topic, it has been necessary to build an edifice of knowledge about vapor bubbles in sound and flow fields from the ground up, as it were. We have addressed problems of gradually greater difficulty as follows: 1. In the first place, the physics of an stationary isolated bubble subject to a sound field in an unbounded liquid was addressed; 2. The case of bubbles translating in a stationary pressure field was then considered; 3. This was followed by a study of the combined effects of sound and translation, 4. And of a neighboring boundary 5. Finally, a new method to deal with nonspherical bubbles was developed- In addition to the work on vapor bubbles, some studies on gas bubbles were conducted in view of NASA's interest in the phenomenon of sonoluminescence.

  6. Observations of acoustic surface waves in outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic surface waves have been detected propagating outdoors under natural conditions. Two critical experimental conditions were employed to ensure the conclusive detection of these waves. First, acoustic pulses rather than a continuous wave source allowed an examination of the waveform shape and avoided the masking of wave arrivals. Second, a snow cover provided favorable ground impedance conditions for surface waves to exist. The acoustic pulses were generated by blank pistol shots fired 1 m above the snow. The resultant waveforms were measured using a vertical array of six microphones located 60 m away from the source at heights between 0.1 and 4.75 m. A strong, low frequency ``tail'' following the initial arrival was recorded near the snow surface. This tail, and its exponential decay with height (z) above the surface (~e-αz), are diagnostic features of surface waves. The measured attenuation coefficient α was 0.28 m-1. The identification of the surface wave is confirmed by comparing the measured waveforms with waveforms predicted by the theoretical evaluation of the explicit surface wave pole term using residue theory.

  7. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M. Oudich, Mourad

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  8. Synchronized photonic modulators driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Poveda, A; Hey, R; Biermann, K; Tahraoui, A; Santos, P V; Gargallo, B; Muñoz, P; Cantarero, A; de Lima, M M

    2013-09-01

    Photonic modulators are one of the most important elements of integrated photonics. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized a tunable photonic modulator consisting of two 180°-dephased output waveguide channels, driven by a surface acoustic wave in the GHz frequency range built on (Al,Ga)As. Odd multiples of the fundamental driven frequency are enabled by adjusting the applied acoustic power. A good agreement between theory and experimental results is achieved. The device can be used as a building block for more complex integrated functionalities and can be implemented in several material platforms. PMID:24104040

  9. Counter-propagating wave interaction for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Bosch, J. G.; ten Kate, G. L.; Shamdasani, V.; Entrekin, R.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Most techniques for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging require linear propagation to detect nonlinear scattering of contrast agent microbubbles. Waveform distortion due to nonlinear propagation impairs their ability to distinguish microbubbles from tissue. As a result, tissue can be misclassified as microbubbles, and contrast agent concentration can be overestimated; therefore, these artifacts can significantly impair the quality of medical diagnoses. Contrary to biological tissue, lipid-coated gas microbubbles used as a contrast agent allow the interaction of two acoustic waves propagating in opposite directions (counter-propagation). Based on that principle, we describe a strategy to detect microbubbles that is free from nonlinear propagation artifacts. In vitro images were acquired with an ultrasound scanner in a phantom of tissue-mimicking material with a cavity containing a contrast agent. Unlike the default mode of the scanner using amplitude modulation to detect microbubbles, the pulse sequence exploiting counter-propagating wave interaction creates no pseudoenhancement behind the cavity in the contrast image.

  10. Optimizing surface acoustic wave sensors for trace chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, G.C.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Heller, E.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes several recent advances for fabricating coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for applications requiring trace chemical detection. Specifically, we have demonstrated that high surface area microporous oxides can provide 100-fold improvements in SAW sensor responses compared with more typical polymeric coatings. In addition, we fabricated GaAs SAW devices with frequencies up to 500 MHz to provide greater sensitivity and an ideal substrate for integration with high-frequency electronics.

  11. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  12. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  13. Reducing extrinsic damping of surface acoustic waves at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelda, Dhruv; Sadhu, Jyothi; Ghossoub, Marc G.; Ertekin, Elif; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz range can be generated using absorption from an ultrafast laser in a patterned metallic grating on a substrate. Reducing the attenuation at these frequencies can yield better sensors as well as enable them to better probe phonon and electron-phonon interactions near surfaces. It is not clear from existing experiments which mechanisms dominate damping at high frequencies. We calculate damping times of SAWs due to various mechanisms in the 1-100 GHz range to find that mechanical loading of the grating on the substrate dominates dissipation by radiating energy from the surface into the bulk. To overcome this and enable future measurements to probe intrinsic damping, we propose incorporating distributed acoustic Bragg reflectors in the experimental structure. Layers of alternating materials with contrasting acoustic impedances embedded a wavelength away from the surface serve to reflect energy back to the surface. Using numerical simulations, we show that a single Bragg reflector is sufficient to increase the energy density at the surface by more than five times. We quantify the resulting damping time to find that it is longer than the intrinsic damping time. The proposed structure can enable future measurements of intrinsic damping in SAWs at ˜100 GHz.

  14. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  15. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2016-05-01

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma, we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area, the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area, there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the spin-electron acoustic waves.

  16. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  17. Prospects for coupling Surface Acoustic Waves to superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Recent years have seen great development in the quantum control of mechanical resonators. These usually consist of membranes, cantilevers or suspended beams, whose vibrational modes can be cooled to the quantum ground state. This presentation will focus on a different kind of micromechanical system, where the motion is not confined to a mode with fixed boundaries, but propagates along the surface of a microchip. These modes are known as Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), and superficially resemble ripples on water, moving with low loss along the surfaces of solids. On a piezoelectric substrate, electrode gratings known as Interdigital Transducers (IDTs) can be used to convert power between the electric and acoustic domains. Devices based on this effect are of profound technological importance as filters and analog signal processors in the RF domain. In the realm of quantum information processing, SAWs have primarily been used to transport carriers and excitons through piezoelectric semiconductors, in the electric potential wells propagating along with the mechanical wave. Our approach, however, is different in that we aim to explore the mechanical wave itself as a carrier of quantum information. We have previously shown that a single-electron transistor can be used as a local probe for SAWs, with encouraging sensitivity levels. Building on this, we now investigate the prospects for coupling a SAW beam directly to a superconducting qubit. By merging a circuit model for an IDT with a quasi-classical description of a transmon qubit, we estimate that the qubit can couple to an acoustic transmission line with approximately the same strength as to an electrical one. This type of coupling opens for acoustic analogs of recent experiments in microwave quantum optics, including the generation of non-classical acoustic states.

  18. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  19. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  20. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  1. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  2. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  3. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  4. Surface acoustic wave-driven planar light-emitting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, Marco; De Simoni, Giorgio; Piazza, Vincenzo; Beltram, Fabio; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2004-10-01

    Electroluminescence emission controlled by means of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in planar light-emitting diodes (pLEDs) is demonstrated. Interdigital transducers for SAW generation were integrated onto pLEDs fabricated following the scheme which we have recently developed [Cecchini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 636 (2003)]. Current-voltage, light-voltage, and photoluminescence characteristics are presented at cryogenic temperatures. We argue that this scheme represents a valuable building block for advanced optoelectronic architectures.

  5. Space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sardella, G.

    1973-01-01

    Space manufacturing of transducers in a vibration free environment is discussed. Fabrication of the masks, and possible manufacturing of the surface acoustic wave components aboard a space laboratory would avoid the inherent ground vibrations and the frequency limitation imposed by a seismic isolator pad. The manufacturing vibration requirements are identified. The concepts of space manufacturing are analyzed. A development program for manufacturing transducers is recommended.

  6. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    PubMed Central

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163–185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171–195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  7. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)], 10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs.

  8. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, L; Gallaire, F

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  9. The surface variational principle applied to an acoustic cavity.

    PubMed

    Franco, F; Cunefare, K A

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents the development and application of the Surface Variational Principle (SVP) for the evaluation of axisymmetric interior acoustic domains. The interior form of the SVP is first developed in the same manner as the existing exterior form. Then, the surface pressure and normal velocity are represented with a Ritz expansion using basis functions that span the entire wetted surface of the object of interest. The resultant formulation is used to analyze the interior acoustic response of a harmonically forced, right circular elastic cylinder. This validation model was chosen as both the structural and acoustic responses can be solved analytically. Results are presented for two models: one with a length to radius ratio of 2.4, and another with a ratio of 12.3. The SVP is shown to well reproduce the analytical solution for this geometry, and displays the asymptotic convergence expected of its variational formulation. The SVP formulation developed here is not restricted to right-circular cylindrical geometries, and may, indeed, be readily applied to any axisymmetric body. PMID:11425122

  10. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  11. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Bonneau, Lenaic; Andreotti, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  12. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  13. Interfacial destabilization and atomization driven by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Aisha; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2008-07-01

    Surface acoustic wave atomization is a rapid means for generating micron and submicron aerosol droplets. Little, however, is understood about the mechanisms by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory, and simple numerical modeling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Using a millimeter-order fluid drop exposed to surface acoustic waves as it sits atop a single-crystal lithium niobate piezoelectric substrate, large aerosol droplets on the length scale of the parent drop dimension are ejected through a whipping and pinch-off phenomenon, which occurs at the asymmetrically formed crest of the drop due to leakage of acoustic radiation at the Rayleigh angle. Smaller micron order droplets, on the other hand, are formed due to the axisymmetric breakup of cylindrical liquid jets that are ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. The 10μm droplet dimension correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a simple scaling argument involving a viscous-capillary dominant force balance. The results are further supported by numerical solution of the evolution equation governing the interfacial profile of a sessile drop along which an acoustic pressure wave is imposed. Viscous and capillary forces dominate in the bulk of the parent drop, but inertia is dominant in the ejected jets and within a thin boundary layer adjacent to the substrate where surface and interfacial accelerations are large. With the specific exception of parent drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension prior to atomization, the free surface of the drop is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency—even if the exciting frequency of the surface acoustic wave is several orders of magnitude larger—contrary to

  14. An oxygen pressure sensor using surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) piezoelectric devices are finding widespread applications in many arenas, particularly in the area of chemical sensing. We have developed an oxygen pressure sensor based on coating a SAW device with an oxygen binding agent which can be tailored to provide variable sensitivity. The coating is prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer which is then sprayed onto the surface of the SAW device. Experimental data shows the feasibility of tailoring sensors to measure the partial pressure of oxygen from 2.6 to 67 KPa (20 to 500 torr). Potential applications of this technology are discussed.

  15. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect.

  16. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangqian; Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor. PMID:26473865

  17. Optimization of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangqian; Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO₃, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor. PMID:26473865

  18. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films.

    PubMed

    Rambach, R W; Taiber, J; Scheck, C M L; Meyer, C; Reboud, J; Cooper, J M; Franke, T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  19. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    PubMed Central

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  20. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics. PMID:25479504

  1. On-demand droplet splitting using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Ho; Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-16

    We demonstrated the operation of an acoustomicrofluidic device composed of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel and a slanted-finger interdigitated transducer (SF-IDT), for the on-demand splitting of droplets in an active, accurate, rapid, and size-controllable manner. A narrow beam of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that emanated from the SF-IDT exerted an acoustic radiation force (ARF) on the droplet's water-oil interface due to the acoustic contrast between the two fluids. The ARF split the mother droplet into two or more daughter droplets of various volumes in a split ratio that was readily controlled by varying the applied voltage or the flow rate. Theoretical estimates of the ARF acting on the droplet interface were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the droplet splitting properties and size control. The versatility of the acoustomicrofluidic device operation was demonstrated by selectively pushing/placing a suspended polystyrene particle into a specific/preferred split daughter droplet using the direct ARF acting on the particle. PMID:27435869

  2. Cell separation using tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Peng, Zhangli; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Geri, Michela; Li, Sixing; Li, Peng; Chen, Yuchao; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Separation of cells is a critical process for studying cell properties, disease diagnostics, and therapeutics. Cell sorting by acoustic waves offers a means to separate cells on the basis of their size and physical properties in a label-free, contactless, and biocompatible manner. The separation sensitivity and efficiency of currently available acoustic-based approaches, however, are limited, thereby restricting their widespread application in research and health diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves (taSSAW), which are oriented at an optimally designed inclination to the flow direction in the microfluidic channel. We demonstrate that this design significantly improves the efficiency and sensitivity of acoustic separation techniques. To optimize our device design, we carried out systematic simulations of cell trajectories, matching closely with experimental results. Using numerically optimized design of taSSAW, we successfully separated 2- and 10-µm-diameter polystyrene beads with a separation efficiency of ∼99%, and separated 7.3- and 9.9-µm-polystyrene beads with an efficiency of ∼97%. We illustrate that taSSAW is capable of effectively separating particles–cells of approximately the same size and density but different compressibility. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the present technique for biological–biomedical applications by sorting MCF-7 human breast cancer cells from nonmalignant leukocytes, while preserving the integrity of the separated cells. The method introduced here thus offers a unique route for separating circulating tumor cells, and for label-free cell separation with potential applications in biological research, disease diagnostics, and clinical practice. PMID:25157150

  3. Control of Laser High-Harmonic Generation with Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, S. L.; Kohl, I.; Madsen, J. B.; Simmons, J.; Terry, N.; Titensor, J.; Wang, Q.; Peatross, J.

    2001-09-01

    Relatively weak counterpropagating light is shown to disrupt the emission of laser high-harmonic generation. Harmonic orders ranging from the teens to the low thirties produced by a 30-femtosecond pulse in a narrow argon jet are ``shut down'' with a contrast as high as 2 orders of magnitude by a chirped 1-picosecond counterpropagating laser pulse (60 times less intense). Alternatively, under poor phase-matching conditions, the counterpropagating light boosts harmonic production by similar contrast through quasiphase matching where out-of-phase emission is suppressed.

  4. Potential of surface acoustic wave biosensors for early sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Csete, Marie; Hunt, William D

    2013-08-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis is a difficult problem for intensivists and new biomarkers for early diagnosis have been difficult to come by. Here we discuss the potential of adapting a technology from the electronics industry, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, for diagnosis of multiple markers of sepsis in real time, using non-invasive assays of exhaled breath condensate. The principles and advantages of the SAW technology are reviewed as well as a proposed plan for adapting this flexible technology to early sepsis detection. PMID:23471596

  5. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  6. Hydrogen Adsorption Studies Using Surface Acoustic Waves on Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    A.B. Phillips; G. Myneni; B.S. Shivaram

    2005-06-13

    Vanadium nanoparticles, on the order of 20 nm, were deposited on a quartz crystal surface acoustic wave resonator (SAW) using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser deposition system. Due to the high Q and resonant frequency of the SAW, mass changes on the order of 0.1 nanogram can be quantitatively measured. Roughly 60 nanogram of V was deposited on the SAW for these experiments. The SAW was then moved into a hydrogen high pressure cell.At room temperature and 1 atmosphere of hydrogen pressure, 1 wt% H, or H/V {approx} 0.5 (atomic ratio) absorption was measured.

  7. Surface Acoustic Waves on Piezoelectrics: The KGBS Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, Fred S.

    2003-10-01

    In December of 1968 Jeffrey Bleustein of Yale University published an article in Applied Physics Letters predicting the existence of a new type of transverse surface acoustic wave that could propagate on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal. This was followed within 20 days by an article published in Soviet Physics JETP Letters by Yuri Gulyaev in January of 1969 predicting the same basic property. The wave took on the name Bleustein-Gulyaev or BG-wave, joining the names of Rayleigh, Love, Sezawa, and Stonely for distinct types of surface acoustic waves. But is there more to the story than this? Did Kagonov and Sklovskaya anticipate this development in a publication as early as 1966? Also, what about the work of Shimizu, Nakamura, and Ohta, who in April of 1969 published both theoretical and experimental verification of the existence of such a wave independent of the knowledge of the Bleustein and Gulyaev papers? This presentation explores the early roots and characteristics of what could be called the KGBS wave.

  8. Piezoelectric tube rotation effect owing to surface acoustic wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Sergey V.; Sotnikov, Andrei; Schmidt, Hagen

    2016-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that a macroscopic cylindrical solid shaped like a piezoelectric tube can be rotated due to the excitation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with different amplitudes propagating in opposite directions along the solid's surface. A unidirectional SAW transducer covering the whole cylindrical surface has been used for ac voltage excitation of waves with unequal amplitudes in both directions. The pattern of such a transducer consists of a periodic comb structure with two electrodes of different width per period. An external torque is not applied to the tube and, from the outside, its movement looks like a motion under the action of an internal force. The observed mechanical response of the piezoelectric cylindrical tube to excitation of waves is due to an angular momentum of SAWs, the value of which has been directly calculated from experimental results.

  9. Transport Powder and Liquid Samples by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Louyeh, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    Sample transport is an important requirement for In-situ analysis of samples in NASA planetary exploration missions. Tests have shown that powders or liquid drops on a surface can be transported by surface acoustic waves (SAW) that are generated on the surface using interdigital transducers. The phenomena were investigated experimentally and to generate SAWs interdigital electrodes were deposited on wafers of 128 deg rotated Y-cut LiNbO?. Transporting capability of the SAW device was tested using particles of various sizes and drops of various viscosities liquids. Because of different interaction mechanisms with the SAWs, the powders and the liquid drops were observed to move in opposite directions. In the preliminary tests, a speed of 180 mm/s was achieved for powder transportation. The detailed experimental setup and results are presented in this paper. The transporting mechanism can potentially be applied to miniaturize sample analysis system or " lab-on-chip" devices.

  10. Acoustic shadows help gleaning bats find prey, but may be defeated by prey acoustic camouflage on rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Elizabeth L; Holderied, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual abilities of animals, like echolocating bats, are difficult to study because they challenge our understanding of non-visual senses. We used novel acoustic tomography to convert echoes into visual representations and compare these cues to traditional echo measurements. We provide a new hypothesis for the echo-acoustic basis of prey detection on surfaces. We propose that bats perceive a change in depth profile and an ‘acoustic shadow’ cast by prey. The shadow is more salient than prey echoes and particularly strong on smooth surfaces. This may explain why bats look for prey on flat surfaces like leaves using scanning behaviour. We propose that rather than forming search images for prey, whose characteristics are unpredictable, predators may look for disruptions to the resting surface (acoustic shadows). The fact that the acoustic shadow is much fainter on rougher resting surfaces provides the first empirical evidence for ‘acoustic camouflage’ as an anti-predator defence mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07404.001 PMID:26327624

  11. Acoustically Induced Microparticle Orbiting and Clustering on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.; Tarimala, S.; Roberts, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Behavior of colloidal particles in the bulk solution or at interfaces under the effect of high-frequency acoustics is critical to many seemingly different applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to improved mixing in microfluidic channels and from accelerated contaminant extractions to surface cleaning, drug delivery and microelectronics. It can be detrimental or beneficial, depending on the application. In medical research, flow cytometry and microfluidics, for example, acoustically induced clustering of tracer particles and/or their sticking to the walls of channels, vessels, or tubes often becomes a problem. On the other hand, it can be tailored to enhance processes such as mixing in microfluidic devices, particle separation and sizing, and power generation microdevices. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, microscopic visualization experiments were performed in which polystyrene fluorescent (468/508 nm wavelength) microspheres with a mean diameter of 2.26-µm and density of 1.05 g/cm3, were suspended in either de-ionized water or a 0.1M NaCl solution. The freshly-prepared colloidal suspension was injected into a parallel-plate glass flow cell, which was subjected to high-frequency acoustics (200-500 kHz) through a piezoelectric transducer attached to one of the cell's outer walls. When the suspending medium is de-ionized water, acoustic stimulation of the cell at 313 kHz induced three distinct particle behaviors: 1) entrainment and bulk transport via wavelength-scale Rayleigh streaming, 2) transport via direct radiation forces to concentrate at nodal or anti-nodal planes, and 3) entrapment via boundary layer vorticular microstreaming resulting in mobile particles orbiting deposited particles. This latter phenomenon is intriguing. It occurs at specific frequencies and the shape of the orbits is determined by the applied frequency, whereas the rotation speed is proportional to the applied amplitude. At the higher ionic strength, on the other

  12. Reconstructing transient acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object with a uniform surface velocity distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the general formulations for reconstructing the transient acoustic field generated by an arbitrary object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity in free space. These formulations are derived from the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral theory that correlates the transient acoustic pressure at any field point to those on the source surface. For a class of acoustic radiation problems involving an arbitrarily oscillating object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity, for example, a loudspeaker membrane, the normal surface velocity is frequency dependent but is spatially invariant. Accordingly, the surface acoustic pressure is expressible as the product of the surface velocity and the quantity that can be solved explicitly by using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral equation. This surface acoustic pressure can be correlated to the field acoustic pressure using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation. Consequently, it is possible to use nearfield acoustic holography to reconstruct acoustic quantities in entire three-dimensional space based on a single set of acoustic pressure measurements taken in the near field of the target object. Examples of applying these formulations to reconstructing the transient acoustic pressure fields produced by various arbitrary objects are demonstrated. PMID:25096086

  13. Tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Steven Lin, Sz-Chin; Yang, Shikuan; Huang, Po-Hsun; Nama, Nitesh; Zhao, Yanhui; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Guo, Feng; Wang, Wei; Gu, Yeyi; Mallouk, Thomas E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-23

    Patterning of nanowires in a controllable, tunable manner is important for the fabrication of functional nanodevices. Here we present a simple approach for tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW). This technique allows for the construction of large-scale nanowire arrays with well-controlled patterning geometry and spacing within 5 s. In this approach, SSAWs were generated by interdigital transducers, which induced a periodic alternating current (ac) electric field on the piezoelectric substrate and consequently patterned metallic nanowires in suspension. The patterns could be deposited onto the substrate after the liquid evaporated. By controlling the distribution of the SSAW field, metallic nanowires were assembled into different patterns including parallel and perpendicular arrays. The spacing of the nanowire arrays could be tuned by controlling the frequency of the surface acoustic waves. Additionally, we observed 3D spark-shaped nanowire patterns in the SSAW field. The SSAW-based nanowire-patterning technique presented here possesses several advantages over alternative patterning approaches, including high versatility, tunability, and efficiency, making it promising for device applications. PMID:23540330

  14. Tunable Nanowire Patterning Using Standing Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Yang, Shikuan; Huang, Po-Hsun; Nama, Nitesh; Zhao, Yanhui; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Guo, Feng; Wang, Wei; Gu, Yeyi; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Patterning of nanowires in a controllable, tunable manner is important for the fabrication of functional nanodevices. Here we present a simple approach for tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW). This technique allows for the construction of large-scale nanowire arrays with well-controlled patterning geometry and spacing within 5 seconds. In this approach, SSAWs were generated by interdigital transducers (IDTs), which induced a periodic alternating current (AC) electric field on the piezoelectric substrate and consequently patterned metallic nanowires in suspension. The patterns could be deposited onto the substrate after the liquid evaporated. By controlling the distribution of the SSAW field, metallic nanowires were assembled into different patterns including parallel and perpendicular arrays. The spacing of the nanowire arrays could be tuned by controlling the frequency of the surface acoustic waves. Additionally, we observed 3D spark-shape nanowire patterns in the SSAW field. The SSAW-based nanowire-patterning technique presented here possesses several advantages over alternative patterning approaches, including high versatility, tunability, and efficiency, making it promising for device applications. PMID:23540330

  15. Electromagnetically Induced Guiding of Counter-propagating Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = G. Shvets; A. Pukhov

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of counter-propagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counter-propagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  16. Collective Lipid Bilayer Dynamics Excited by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, T.; Schülein, F. J. R.; Nicolas, J. D.; Osterhoff, M.; Beerlink, A.; Krenner, H. J.; Müller, M.; Wixforth, A.; Salditt, T.

    2014-09-01

    We use standing surface acoustic waves to induce coherent phonons in model lipid multilayers deposited on a piezoelectric surface. Probing the structure by phase-controlled stroboscopic x-ray pulses we find that the internal lipid bilayer electron density profile oscillates in response to the externally driven motion of the lipid film. The structural response to the well-controlled motion is a strong indication that bilayer structure and membrane fluctuations are intrinsically coupled, even though these structural changes are averaged out in equilibrium and time integrating measurements. Here the effects are revealed by a timing scheme with temporal resolution on the picosecond scale in combination with the sub-nm spatial resolution, enabled by high brilliance synchrotron x-ray reflectivity.

  17. Fabrication of new Interdigital Transducers for Surface Acoustic Wave Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissi, L. El; Jaouad, A.; Vandormael, D.; Francis, L. A.

    We investigate high-performance interdigital transducers (IDTs) for the generation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on AT-cut quartz, where the metal fingers are embedded in the substrate. Three micromachining techniques are used to manufacture SAW structures, namely an inductively coupled plasma, a laser etching and a reactive ion etching. An evaporated layer of Al and a Ni thick electroplating are used to grow the metals in the micromachining structures. A chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) technique is used to remove the exceeding metal and keep a flat surface. The electrical characterizations indicate that the fabricated devices are suited for sensing proposes with a low insertion loss and a linear phase. Results are reported emphasizing the efficiency of the Ni damascene process to manufacture SAW sensors with the embedded structures.

  18. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  19. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  20. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-07-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  1. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Greens function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Greens function decreases with increasing source frequency andor jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Greens function in the absence of the surface, and flight effect are also investigated.

  2. Traveling surface spin-wave resonance spectroscopy using surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, P. G.; Moriyama, T.; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent gigahertz-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) traveling on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal can, via the magnetoelastic interaction, resonantly excite traveling surface spin waves in an adjacent thin-film ferromagnet. These excited surface spin waves, traveling with a definite in-plane wave-vector q ∥ enforced by the SAW, can be detected by measuring changes in the electro-acoustical transmission of a SAW delay line. Here, we provide a demonstration that such measurements constitute a precise and quantitative technique for spin-wave spectroscopy, providing a means to determine both isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the spin-wave dispersion and damping. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this spectroscopic technique by measuring the spin-wave properties of a Ni thin film for a large range of wave vectors, | q ∥ | = 2.5 × 104-8 × 104 cm-1, over which anisotropic dipolar interactions vary from being negligible to quite significant.

  3. Interaction of surface acoustic waves with moving vortex structures in superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Gutlyansky, E. D.

    2007-07-15

    A method is proposed for describing a moving film vortex structure and its interaction with surface acoustic waves. It is shown that the moving vortex structure can amplify (generate) surface acoustic waves. In contrast to a similar effect in semiconductor films, this effect can appear when the velocity of the vortex structure is much lower than the velocity of the surface acoustic waves. A unidirectional collective mode is shown to exist in the moving vortex structure. This mode gives rise to an acoustic analogue of the diode effect that is resonant in the velocity of the vortex structure. This acoustic effect is manifested as an anomalous attenuation of the surface acoustic waves in the direction of the vortex-structure motion and as the absence of this attenuation for the propagation in the opposite direction.

  4. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  5. Spatial selective manipulation of microbubbles by tunable surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Lili; Cai, Feiyan; Li, Fei; Wang, Chen; Huang, Xiaowei; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Junru; Meng, Long; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic device based on a pair of slant-finger interdigital transducers (SFITs) is developed to achieve a selective and flexible manipulation of microbubbles (MBs) by surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The resonance frequency of SAWs generated by the SFITs depends on the location of its parallel pathway; the particles at different locations of the SAWs' pathway can be controlled selectively by choosing the frequency of the excitation signal applied on the SFITs. By adjusting the input signal continuously, MBs can be transported along the acoustic aperture precisely. The displacement of MBs has a linear relationship with the frequency shift. The resolution of transportation is 15.19 ± 2.65 μm when the shift of input signal frequency is at a step of 10 kHz. In addition, the MBs can be controlled in a two-dimensional plane by combining variations of the frequency and the relative phase of the excitation signal applied on the SFITs simultaneously. This technology may open up the possibility of selectively and flexibly manipulating MBs using a simple one-dimensional device. PMID:27462381

  6. Experimental and numerical studies on standing surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Yuliang; Guo, Feng; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuchao; Rufo, Joseph; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    Standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) are commonly used in microfluidics to manipulate cells and other micro/nano particles. However, except for a simple one-dimensional (1D) harmonic standing waves (HSW) model, a practical model that can predict particle behaviour in SSAW microfluidics is still lacking. Herein, we established a two-dimensional (2D) SSAW microfluidic model based on the basic theory in acoustophoresis and our previous modelling strategy to predict the acoustophoresis of microparticles in SSAW microfluidics. This 2D SSAW microfluidic model considers the effects of boundary vibrations, channel materials, and channel dimensions on the acoustic propagation; as an experimental validation, the acoustophoresis of microparticles under continuous flow through narrow channels made of PDMS and silicon was studied. The experimentally observed motion of the microparticles matched well with the numerical predictions, while the 1D HSW model failed to predict many of the experimental observations. Particularly, the 1D HSW model cannot account for particle aggregation on the sidewall in PDMS channels, which is well explained by our 2D SSAW microfluidic model. Our model can be used for device design and optimization in SSAW microfluidics. PMID:26698361

  7. Spatial selective manipulation of microbubbles by tunable surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Lili; Cai, Feiyan; Li, Fei; Wang, Chen; Huang, Xiaowei; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Junru; Meng, Long; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-05-01

    A microfluidic device based on a pair of slant-finger interdigital transducers (SFITs) is developed to achieve a selective and flexible manipulation of microbubbles (MBs) by surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The resonance frequency of SAWs generated by the SFITs depends on the location of its parallel pathway; the particles at different locations of the SAWs' pathway can be controlled selectively by choosing the frequency of the excitation signal applied on the SFITs. By adjusting the input signal continuously, MBs can be transported along the acoustic aperture precisely. The displacement of MBs has a linear relationship with the frequency shift. The resolution of transportation is 15.19 ± 2.65 μm when the shift of input signal frequency is at a step of 10 kHz. In addition, the MBs can be controlled in a two-dimensional plane by combining variations of the frequency and the relative phase of the excitation signal applied on the SFITs simultaneously. This technology may open up the possibility of selectively and flexibly manipulating MBs using a simple one-dimensional device. PMID:27462381

  8. Primary acoustic signal structure during free falling drop collision with a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    Consistent optical and acoustic techniques have been used to study the structure of hydrodynamic disturbances and acoustic signals generated as a free falling drop penetrates water. The relationship between the structures of hydrodynamic and acoustic perturbations arising as a result of a falling drop contacting with the water surface and subsequent immersion into water is traced. The primary acoustic signal is characterized, in addition to stably reproduced features (steep leading edge followed by long decay with local pressure maxima), by irregular high-frequency packets, which are studied for the first time. Reproducible experimental data are used to recognize constant and variable components of the primary acoustic signal.

  9. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  10. Multilayer magnetostrictive structure based surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Talbi, A.; Tiercelin, N.; Bou Matar, O.

    2014-03-01

    This study addresses the experimental and theoretical investigations of guided elastic waves propagation in piezo-magnetic multi-layered structure. The structure is composed of a 20×TbCo2(5nm)/FeCo(5nm) nanostructured multi-layer deposited between two Aluminum (Al) Inter-Digitals Transducers forming a surface acoustic wave delay line, on a Y-cut LiNbO3 substrate. We compare the calculated and measured phase velocity variation under the action of the external magnetic field orientation and magnitude. We find quantitative agreement between the measured and modeled phase velocity shift for all external magnetic field configurations (hard axis and easy axis) and for different shape modes of elastic waves at their first and third harmonic operation frequencies. The shear horizontal mode exhibits a maximum phase velocity shift close to 20% for a ratio close to 1 between magneto-elastic film thickness and wavelength.

  11. Surface acoustic wave coding for orthogonal frequency coded devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Kozlovski, Nikolai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and systems for coding SAW OFC devices to mitigate code collisions in a wireless multi-tag system. Each device producing plural stepped frequencies as an OFC signal with a chip offset delay to increase code diversity. A method for assigning a different OCF to each device includes using a matrix based on the number of OFCs needed and the number chips per code, populating each matrix cell with OFC chip, and assigning the codes from the matrix to the devices. The asynchronous passive multi-tag system includes plural surface acoustic wave devices each producing a different OFC signal having the same number of chips and including a chip offset time delay, an algorithm for assigning OFCs to each device, and a transceiver to transmit an interrogation signal and receive OFC signals in response with minimal code collisions during transmission.

  12. A radioisotope-powered surface acoustic wave transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, S.; Lal, A.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a 63Ni radioisotope-powered pulse transponder that has a SAW (surface acoustic wave) device as the frequency transmission frequency selector. Because the frequency is determined by a SAW device, narrowband detection with an identical SAW device enables the possibility for a long-distance RF-link. The SAW transponders can be buried deep into structural constructs such as steel and concrete, where changing batteries or harvesting vibration or EM energy is not a reliable option. RF-released power to radioisotope- released power amplification is 108, even when regulatory safe amounts of 63Ni are used. Here we have achieved an 800 µW pulse (315 MHz, 10 µs pause) across a 50 Ω load every 3 min, using a 1.5 milli-Ci 63Ni source.

  13. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  14. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  15. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O. Komarov, Kirill A.; Pustovoit, Vladislav I.

    2015-05-15

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C{sub 6v}, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  16. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) acoustophoresis: now and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Mao, Xiaole; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-08-21

    On-chip manipulation of micro-objects has long been sought to facilitate fundamental biological studies and point-of-care diagnostic systems. In recent years, research on surface acoustic wave (SAW) based micro-object manipulation (i.e., SAW acoustophoresis) has gained significant momentum due to its many advantages, such as non-invasiveness, versatility, simple fabrication, easy operation, and convenient integration with other on-chip units. SAW acoustophoresis is especially useful for lab-on-a-chip applications where a compact and non-invasive biomanipulation technique is highly desired. In this Focus article, we discuss recent advancements in SAW acoustophoresis and provide some perspectives on the future development of this dynamic field. PMID:22781941

  17. Laser generation and detection of surface acoustic waves - Elastic properties of surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubrand, A.; Hess, P.

    1992-01-01

    A noncontact all-optical method for surface photoacoustics is described. The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) were excited employing a KrF laser and detected with a Michelson interferometer using a 633-nm HeNe laser. Due to an active stabilization scheme developed for the interferometer a surface displacement of 0.2 A could be detected. The materials investigated included pure materials such as polycrystalline aluminum, and crystalline silicon; films of gold, silver, aluminum, iron, and nickel on fused silica; and a Si:H on Si(100). In the case of pure materials the shape of the acoustic pulse and the phase velocity were determined. The dispersion of the SAW phase velocity observed for the film systems was used to extract information on the film thickness, density, and transverse and longitudinal sound velocity. Models for the theoretical treatment of film systems and the calculation of dispersion curves are presented.

  18. Scattering from faceted surfaces in optimized room acoustics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Rendell R.; Svensson, U. Peter; de Rycker, Nicolas

    2002-11-01

    To minimize the computational demands of including scattering in auralization, it is appropriate to study how many orders of scattering are necessary. For this purpose, studying edge diffraction is especially appropriate as an elementary form of surface scattering. In a previous study [Torres et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 600-610 (2001)], it was found that higher orders and combinations of edge diffraction components were not usually as significant as first-order diffraction components. The primary reason was that the reference geometry (a large concert-hall stagehouse) was conservatively composed of large flat walls with dimensions larger than most wavelengths of interest. In that case, significant edge-diffractions occurred at relatively low frequencies (below about 150 Hz). Other realistic reflecting surfaces in rooms, however, also include smaller-scale surface irregularities, e.g., facets for which higher-frequency wavelengths are typically a similar order or larger. This study examines a smaller test geometry consisting of reflector panel arrays similar to those found in concert halls, and we compare computations with various orders of diffraction. Studies of diffraction order are done to determine when inclusion of higher orders is necessary or may be neglected for applications such as interactive auralization.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  1. Surface acoustic wave velocity and elastic constants of cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Riobóo, Rafael J.; Cuscó, Ramon; Prieto, Carlos; Kopittke, Caroline; Novikov, Sergei V.; Artús, Luis

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution surface Brillouin scattering measurements on cubic GaN layers grown on GaAs substrate. By using a suitable scattering geometry, scattering by surface acoustic waves is recorded for different azimuthal angles, and the surface acoustic wave velocities are determined. A comparison of experimental results with numerical simulations of the azimuthal dependence of the surface wave velocity shows good agreement and allows a consistent set of elastic constants for c-GaN to be determined.

  2. Simulation of surface acoustic wave motor with spherical slider.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Kurosawa, M K; Higuchi, T

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor using spherical-shaped sliders was demonstrated by Kurosawa et al. (1994). It was necessary to modify the previous simulation models for usual ultrasonic motors because of this slider shape and the high frequency vibration. A conventional ultrasonic motor has a flat contact surface slider and a hundredth driving frequency; so, the tangential motion caused by the elasticity of the slider and stator with regard to the spherical slider of the SAW motor requires further investigation. In this paper, a dynamic simulation model for the SAW motor is proposed. From the simulation result, the mechanism of the SAW motor was clarified (i.e., levitation and contact conditions were repeated during the operation). The transient response of the motor speed was simulated. The relationships between frictional factor and time constant and vibration velocity of the stator and the slider speed were understood. The detailed research regarding the elastic deformation caused by preload would be helpful to construct an exact simulation model for the next work. PMID:18238497

  3. The patterning mechanism of carbon nanotubes using surface acoustic waves: the acoustic radiation effect or the dielectrophoretic effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Guo, Jinhong; Liu, Yan Jun; Ai, Ye

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a simple technique capable of assembling and patterning suspended CNTs using a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field. Individual CNTs could be assembled into larger CNT bundles and patterned in periodic positions on a substrate surface. The mechanism of the SSAW-based patterning technique has been investigated using both numerical simulation and experimental study. It has been found that the acoustic radiation effect due to the acoustic pressure field and the dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect induced by the electric field co-existing in the patterning process however play different roles depending on the properties of the suspended particles and the suspension medium. In the SSAW-based patterning of highly conductive CNTs with high aspect ratio geometry, the positive DEP effect dominates over the acoustic radiation effect. In contrast, the acoustic radiation effect dominates over the DEP effect when manipulating less conductive, spherical or low aspect ratio particles or biological cells. These results provide a meaningful insight into the mechanism of SSAW-based patterning, which is of great help to guide the effective use of this patterning technique for various applications. PMID:26239679

  4. Double aperture focusing transducer for controlling microparticle motions in trapezoidal microchannels with surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Tjeung, Ricky; Ervin, Hannah; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for controlling the motion of microparticles suspended in an aqueous solution, which fills in a microchannel fabricated into a piezoelectric substrate, using propagating surface acoustic waves. The cross-sectional shape of this microchannel is trapezoidal, preventing the formation of acoustic standing waves across the channel width and therefore allowing the steering of microparticles. The induced acoustic streaming transports these particles to eliminate the use of external pumps for fluid actuation.

  5. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  6. Surface crack detection for Al plate using the surface acoustic waves and neural network identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jianfei; Shen, Zhonghua; Xu, Baiqiang; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    This paper utilized the Finite Element Method to investigate the transient scattering of Rayleigh wave by a surface crack in a plate. The incident wave models the guided waves generated by a pulsed line source laser irradiation on the top surface of the plate. The pulsed laser is assumed to be transient heat source, and the surface acoustic wave is calculated based on the thermoelastic theory. We have computed the different results of the Al plates with the varied depth surface-breaking crack, then attained the temporal characteristics of reflected waves and transmitted waves which are generated by the initial surface acoustic waves interacted with the surface breaking cracks with different depth. The artificial neural networks (ANN) are applied to establish the mapping relationship between the characteristic of the reflected waveform and the crack depth. The results of crack damage detection for Al plates show that the method developed in this paper can be applied to online structural damage detection and health monitoring for various industrial structures.

  7. Temporal coherence and correlation of counterpropagating twin photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, A.; Corti, T.; Brambilla, E.

    2015-11-01

    This work analyzes the temporal coherence and correlation of counterpropagating twin photons generated in a quasiphase matched nonlinear crystal by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We find out different pictures depending on the pump pulse duration relative to two characteristic temporal scales, determined, respectively, by the temporal separation between the counterpropagating and the co-propagating wave packets. When the pump duration is intermediate between the two scales, we show a transition from a highly entangled state to an almost separable state, with strongly asymmetric spectral properties of the photons.

  8. Electromagnetically induced guiding of counterpropagating lasers in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, G.; Pukhov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of counterpropagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order of the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counterpropagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. On-chip droplet production regimes using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Brenker, Jason C; Collins, David J; Van Phan, Hoang; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-04-26

    Aqueous droplets suspended in an immiscible carrier fluid are a key tool in microfluidic chemical analysis platforms. The approaches for producing droplets in microfluidic devices can be divided into three general categories: batch emulsification, continuous production and tailored on-demand production. The major distinctions between each category are the rate of production and the degree of control over the droplet formation process in terms of the size and quantity. On-demand methods are highly desirable when, for example, small numbers or even single droplets of one sample type are required at a time. Here, we present a method for the on-demand production of femtolitre droplets, utilising a pressure source generated by high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW). An increase in the continuous phase flow rate is enabled by a quasi-3D feature at the droplet production nozzle. A wide range of accessible flow rates permits the identification of different physical regimes in which droplets of different dimensions are produced. In the system investigated droplets measuring as little as 200 fl have been produced, ∼1/60th of the minimum volume previously reported. The experimental findings are supported by a numerical model which demonstrates the link between the number of droplets formed and the pulse length used. PMID:27045939

  10. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis. PMID:22742654

  11. High-frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nanaostructures characterized by coherent extreme ultraviolet beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, M.; Li, Q.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Yang, R.; Anderson, E.; Nelson, K.

    2009-03-02

    We study ultrahigh frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nickel-on-sapphire nanostructures. The use of ultrafast, coherent, extreme ultraviolet beams allows us to extend optical measurements of propagation dynamics of surface acoustic waves to frequencies of nearly 50 GHz, corresponding to wavelengths as short as 125 nm. We repeat the measurement on a sequence of nanostructured samples to observe surface acoustic wave dispersion in a nanostructure series for the first time. These measurements are critical for accurate characterization of thin films using this technique.

  12. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    PubMed

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  13. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  14. Miniature inhalation therapy platform using surface acoustic wave microfluidic atomization.

    PubMed

    Qi, Aisha; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Morton, David A V; McIntosh, Michelle P; Spiccia, Leone

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary drug administration requires direct delivery of drug formulations into the lower pulmonary tract and alveoli of the lung in the form of inhaled particles or droplets, providing a distinct advantage over other methods for the treatment of respiratory diseases: the drug can be delivered directly to the site of inflammation, thus reducing the need for systemic exposure and the possibility of adverse effects. However, it is difficult to produce droplets of a drug solution within a narrow monodisperse size range (1-10 microm) needed for deposition in the lower pulmonary tract and alveoli. Here, we demonstrate the use of surface acoustic wave microfluidic atomization as an efficient means to generate appropriate aerosols containing a model drug, the short-acting beta2 agonist salbutamol, for the treatment of asthma. The mean aerosol diameter produced, 2.84+/-0.14 microm, lies well within the optimum size range, confirmed by a twin-stage impinger lung model, demonstrating that approximately 70 to 80% of the drug supplied to the atomizer is deposited within the lung. Our preliminary study explores how to control the aerosol diameter and lung delivery efficiency through the surface tension, viscosity, and input power, and also indicates which factors are irrelevant-like the fluid density. Even over a modest power range of 1-1.5 W, SAW atomization provides a viable and efficient generic nebulization platform for the delivery of drugs via the pulmonary route for the treatment of various diseases. The control offered over the aerosol size, low power requirements, high delivery efficiency, and the miniaturization of the system together suggest the proposed platform represents an attractive alternative to current nebulizers compatible with microfluidic technologies. PMID:19606295

  15. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data. PMID:24743157

  16. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  17. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  18. Frequency-selective surface acoustic invisibility for three-dimensional immersed objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Guenneau, Sébastien; Enoch, Stefan; Alù, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    This paper is focused on the study of acoustic metasurface cloaking, based on the use of appropriate ultrathin pseudosurfaces that may act as cloaking devices for a finite range of frequencies. The technique consists in tailoring the appropriate acoustic surface impedance which cancels the scattered field of a diffracting spherical obstacle placed in the trajectory of an impinging acoustical wave. Our numerical simulations of both near and far fields show a significant reduction of scattering cross section for a moderately broad range of frequencies, confirming the effectiveness of surface cloaks (easier to manufacture and less cumbersome than their bulk counterpart). We also go one step further by proposing a realistic structure obtained by quasiperiodically patterning the surface of a spherical layer. The effective properties of the metasurface are obtained in the framework of homogenization theory and confirm this realistic route to surface cloaking for acoustic waves.

  19. Surface acoustic wave devices as passive buried sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Rétornaz, T.; Alzuaga, S.; Baron, T.; Martin, G.; Laroche, T.; Ballandras, S.; Griselin, M.; Simonnet, J.-P.

    2011-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are currently used as passive remote-controlled sensors for measuring various physical quantities through a wireless link. Among the two main classes of designs—resonator and delay line—the former has the advantage of providing narrow-band spectrum informations and hence appears compatible with an interrogation strategy complying with Industry-Scientific-Medical regulations in radio-frequency (rf) bands centered around 434, 866, or 915 MHz. Delay-line based sensors require larger bandwidths as they consists of a few interdigitated electrodes excited by short rf pulses with large instantaneous energy and short response delays but is compatible with existing equipment such as ground penetrating radar (GPR). We here demonstrate the measurement of temperature using the two configurations, particularly for long term monitoring using sensors buried in soil. Although we have demonstrated long term stability and robustness of packaged resonators and signal to noise ratio compatible with the expected application, the interrogation range (maximum 80 cm) is insufficient for most geology or geophysical purposes. We then focus on the use of delay lines, as the corresponding interrogation method is similar to the one used by GPR which allows for rf penetration distances ranging from a few meters to tens of meters and which operates in the lower rf range, depending on soil water content, permittivity, and conductivity. Assuming propagation losses in a pure dielectric medium with negligible conductivity (snow or ice), an interrogation distance of about 40 m is predicted, which overcomes the observed limits met when using interrogation methods specifically developed for wireless SAW sensors, and could partly comply with the above-mentioned applications. Although quite optimistic, this estimate is consistent with the signal to noise ratio observed during an experimental demonstration of the interrogation of a delay line buried at a depth of 5

  20. Interface nano-confined acoustic waves in polymeric surface phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Travagliati, Marco; Nardi, Damiano; Giannetti, Claudio; Ferrini, Gabriele; Banfi, Francesco; Gusev, Vitalyi; Pingue, Pasqualantonio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-01-12

    The impulsive acoustic dynamics of soft polymeric surface phononic crystals is investigated here in the hypersonic frequency range by near-IR time-resolved optical diffraction. The acoustic response is analysed by means of wavelet spectral methods and finite element modeling. An unprecedented class of acoustic modes propagating within the polymer surface phononic crystal and confined within 100 nm of the nano-patterned interface is revealed. The present finding opens the path to an alternative paradigm for characterizing the mechanical properties of soft polymers at interfaces and for sensing schemes exploiting polymers as embedding materials.

  1. Numerical study of acoustophoretic motion of particles in a PDMS microchannel driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Mao, Zhangming; Kähler, Christian J; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-06-21

    We present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic motion of particles suspended in a liquid-filled PDMS microchannel on a lithium niobate substrate acoustically driven by surface acoustic waves. We employ a perturbation approach where the flow variables are divided into first- and second-order fields. We use impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS microchannel walls and we model the acoustic actuation by a displacement function from the literature based on a numerical study of piezoelectric actuation. Consistent with the type of actuation, the obtained first-order field is a horizontal standing wave that travels vertically from the actuated wall towards the upper PDMS wall. This is in contrast to what is observed in bulk acoustic wave devices. The first-order fields drive the acoustic streaming, as well as the time-averaged acoustic radiation force acting on suspended particles. We analyze the motion of suspended particles driven by the acoustic streaming drag and the radiation force. We examine a range of particle diameters to demonstrate the transition from streaming-drag-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Finally, as an application of our numerical model, we demonstrate the capability to tune the position of the vertical pressure node along the channel width by tuning the phase difference between two incoming surface acoustic waves. PMID:26001199

  2. Numerical study of acoustophoretic motion of particles in a PDMS microchannel driven by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Mao, Zhangming; Kähler, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic motion of particles suspended in a liquid-filled PDMS microchannel on a lithium niobate substrate acoustically driven by surface acoustic waves. We employ a perturbation approach where the flow variables are divided into first- and second-order fields. We use impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS microchannel walls and we model the acoustic actuation by a displacement function from the literature based on a numerical study of piezoelectric actuation. Consistent with the type of actuation, the obtained first-order field is a horizontal standing wave that travels vertically from the actuated wall towards the upper PDMS wall. This is in contrast to what is observed in bulk acoustic wave devices. The first-order fields drive the acoustic streaming, as well as the time-averaged acoustic radiation force acting on suspended particles. We analyze the motion of suspended particles driven by the acoustic streaming drag and the radiation force. We examine a range of particle diameters to demonstrate the transition from streaming-drag-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Finally, as an application of our numerical model, we demonstrate the capability to tune the position of the vertical pressure node along the channel width by tuning the phase difference between two incoming surface acoustic waves. PMID:26001199

  3. Coherent reflection from surface gravity water waves during reciprocal acoustic transmissions.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Song, Aijun; Smith, Kevin B

    2012-10-01

    During a recent experiment in Kauai, Hawaii, reciprocal transmissions were conducted between two acoustic transceivers mounted on the seafloor at a depth of 100 m. The passage of moving surface wave crests was shown to generate focused and intense coherent acoustic returns, which had increasing or decreasing delay depending on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of surface wave crests. It is shown that a rough surface two-dimensional parabolic equation model with an evolving sea surface can produce qualitative agreement with data for the dynamic surface returns. PMID:23039567

  4. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices. PMID:26346448

  5. RGB representation of two-dimensional multi-spectral acoustic data for object surface profile imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinhua; Wada, Yuji; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-10-01

    Conventionally, acoustic imaging has been performed using a single frequency or a limited number of frequencies. However, the rich information on surface profiles, structures hidden under surfaces and material properties of objects may exhibit frequency dependence. In this study, acoustic imaging on object surface was conducted over a wide frequency range with a fine frequency step, and a method for displaying the acquired multi-spectral acoustic data was proposed. A complicated rigid surface with different profiles was illuminated by sound waves sweeping over the frequency range from 1 to 20 kHz with a 30 Hz step. The reflected sound was two-dimensionally recorded using a scanning microphone, and processed using a holographic reconstruction method. The two-dimensional distributions of obtained sound pressure at each frequency were defined as ‘multi-spectral acoustic imaging data’. Next, the multi-spectral acoustic data were transformed into a single RGB-based picture for easy understanding of the surface characteristics. The acoustic frequencies were allocated to red, green and blue using the RGB filter technique. The depths of the grooves were identified by their colours in the RGB image.

  6. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  7. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P.; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving “acoustic tweezers” in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  8. Controllable interaction of counterpropagating solitons in three-level media

    SciTech Connect

    Pusch, Andreas; Hamm, Joachim M.; Hess, Ortwin

    2010-08-15

    We examine the dynamics of counterpropagating self-induced transparency solitons in three-level media. In a multilevel system, self-induced transparency gives rise to soliton solutions if the propagation is unidirectional, but the collision of counterpropagating pulses destroys the integrability of the underlying equations. We consider the collision of a rightward and a leftward moving self-induced transparency solitary wave by solving the full Maxwell-Bloch equations numerically using a finite-difference time-domain approach. Depending on pulse duration, amplitude and relative polarizations of the initial solitary waves we observe different regimes of interaction. For high group velocities and orthogonal polarizations, secondary solitary waves are born during the interaction, whereas the collision of solitary waves with the same polarization never produces secondary solitary waves but leaves behind a population grating in the interaction region. Because the crucial parameters can be controlled, an experimental confirmation of the predicted interaction regimes should be feasible.

  9. Dynamic Response of X-37 Hot Structure Control Surfaces Exposed to Controlled Reverberant Acoustic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rice, Chad E.

    2004-01-01

    This document represents a compilation of three informal reports from reverberant acoustic tests performed on X-37 hot structure control surfaces in the NASA Langley Research Center Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility. The first test was performed on a carbon-silicone carbide flaperon subcomponent on February 24, 2004. The second test was performed on a carbon-carbon ruddervator subcomponent on May 27, 2004. The third test was performed on a carbon-carbon flaperon subcomponent on June 30, 2004.

  10. Finite difference computation of acoustic scattering by small surface inhomogeneities and discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Ju, Hongbin

    2009-09-01

    The use of finite difference schemes to compute the scattering of acoustic waves by surfaces made up of different materials with sharp surface discontinuities at the joints would, invariably, result in the generations of spurious reflected waves of numerical origin. Spurious scattered waves are produced even if a high-order scheme capable of resolving and supporting the propagation of the incident wave is used. This problem is of practical importance in jet engine duct acoustic computation. In this work, the basic reason for the generation of spurious numerical waves is first examined. It is known that when the governing partial differential equations of acoustics are discretized, one should only use the long waves of the computational scheme to represent or simulate the physical waves. The short waves of the computational scheme have entirely different propagation characteristics. They are the spurious numerical waves. A method by which high wave number components (short waves) in the wave scattering process is intentionally removed so as to minimize the scattering of spurious numerical waves is proposed. This method is implemented in several examples from computational aeroacoustics to illustrate its effectiveness, accuracy and efficiency. This method is also employed to compute the scattering of acoustic waves by scatterers, such as rigid wall acoustic liner splices, with width smaller than the computational mesh size. Good results are obtained when comparing with computed results using much smaller mesh size. The method is further extended for applications to computations of acoustic wave reflection and scattering by very small surface inhomogeneities with simple geometries.

  11. Nonequilibrated Counterpropagating Edge Modes in the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivnin, Anna; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ronen, Yuval; Baum, Yuval; Heiblum, Moty; Umansky, Vladimir; Mahalu, Diana

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that density reconstruction at the edge of a two-dimensional electron gas takes place for hole-conjugate states in the fractional quantum Hall effect (such as v =2 /3 , 3 /5 , etc.). Such reconstruction leads, after equilibration between counterpropagating edge channels, to a downstream chiral current edge mode accompanied by upstream chiral neutral modes (carrying energy without net charge). Short equilibration length prevented thus far observation of the counterpropagating current channels—the hallmark of density reconstruction. Here, we provide evidence for such nonequilibrated counterpropagating current channels, in short regions (l =4 μ m and l =0.4 μ m ) of fractional filling v =2 /3 and, unexpectedly, v =1 /3 , sandwiched between two regions of integer filling v =1 . Rather than a two-terminal fractional conductance, the conductance exhibited a significant ascension towards unity quantum conductance (GQ=e2/h ) at or near the fractional plateaus. We attribute this conductance rise to the presence of a nonequilibrated channel in the fractional short regions.

  12. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses using multiple receivers.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2014-08-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals collected at multiple receivers. The transmitted signals are of nominal frequency 300 kHz and are reflected off surface gravity waves that are paddle-generated in a wave tank. An inverse processing algorithm reconstructs 50 surface wave shapes over a length span of 2.10 m. The inverse scheme uses a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to determine wave shapes. The surface reconstruction algorithm is self-starting in that source and receiver geometry and initial estimates of wave shape are determined from the same acoustic signals used in the inverse processing. A high speed camera provides ground-truth measurements of the surface wave field for comparison with the acoustically derived surface waves. Within Fresnel zone regions the statistical confidence of the inversely optimized surface profile exceeds that of the camera profile. Reconstructed surfaces are accurate to a resolution of about a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse only within Fresnel zones associated with each source and receiver pair. Multiple isolated Fresnel zones from multiple receivers extend the spatial extent of accurate surface reconstruction while overlapping Fresnel zones increase confidence in the optimized profiles there. PMID:25096095

  13. Acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers: Receptivity by way of surface-temperature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    The Goldstein-Ruban theory has been extended within the framework of Zavol'skii et al. to study the acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers. We consider the receptivity produced in a region of localized, small-amplitude variation in the surface temperature and compare it with the receptivity that is induced through a similar mechanism by a variation in the suction velocity at the surface. It is found that the orientation of the acoustic wave can have a significant impact on the receptivity process, with the maximum receptivity at a given sound-pressure level being produced by upstream oriented acoustic waves. At sufficiently low Mach numbers, the variation of receptivity with the acoustic-wave orientation can be predicted analytically and is the same for both surface suction and surface heating. However, as a result of the acoustic refraction across the mean boundary layer, the above dependence can become rather complex and, also, dependent on the type of surface nonuniformity. The results also suggest that the receptivity caused by temperature nonuniformities may turn out to be more significant than that produced by the mean-flow perturbations associated with strip suction.

  14. Nano-optomechanical system based on microwave frequency surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere Ayalew

    Cavity optomechnics studies the interaction of cavity confined photons with mechanical motion. The emergence of sophisticated nanofabrication technology has led to experimental demonstrations of a wide range of novel optomechanical systems that exhibit strong optomechanical coupling and allow exploration of interesting physical phenomena. Many of the studies reported so far are focused on interaction of photons with localized mechanical modes. For my doctoral research, I did experimental investigations to extend this study to propagating phonons. I used surface travelling acoustic waves as the mechanical element of my optomechanical system. The optical cavities constitute an optical racetrack resonator and photonic crystal nanocavity. This dissertation discusses implementation of this surface acoustic wave based optomechanical system and experimental demonstrations of important consequences of the optomechanical coupling. The discussion focuses on three important achievements of the research. First, microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers were co-integrated with an optical racetrack resonator on a piezoelectric aluminum nitride film deposited on an oxidized silicon substrate. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength was achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this paradigm were investigated for efficient optmechanical coupling. Second, the optomechanical coupling was pushed further into the sideband resolved regime by integrating the high frequency surface acoustic wave transducers with a photonic crystal nanocavity. This device was used to demonstrate optomecahnically induced transparency and absorption, one of the interesting consequences of cavity optomechanics. Phase coherent interaction of the acoustic wave with multiple nanocavities was also explored. In a related experiment, the photonic crystal nanoscavity was placed inside an acoustic

  15. On-chip manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Kiraly, Brian; Yue, Hongjun; Li, Sixing; Chiang, I-Kao; Shi, Jinjie; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    Techniques that can dexterously manipulate single particles, cells, and organisms are invaluable for many applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. Here, we demonstrate standing surface acoustic wave based “acoustic tweezers” that can trap and manipulate single microparticles, cells, and entire organisms (i.e., Caenorhabditis elegans) in a single-layer microfluidic chip. Our acoustic tweezers utilize the wide resonance band of chirped interdigital transducers to achieve real-time control of a standing surface acoustic wave field, which enables flexible manipulation of most known microparticles. The power density required by our acoustic device is significantly lower than its optical counterparts (10,000,000 times less than optical tweezers and 100 times less than optoelectronic tweezers), which renders the technique more biocompatible and amenable to miniaturization. Cell-viability tests were conducted to verify the tweezers’ compatibility with biological objects. With its advantages in biocompatibility, miniaturization, and versatility, the acoustic tweezers presented here will become a powerful tool for many disciplines of science and engineering. PMID:22733731

  16. Surface Roughness Evaluation Based on Acoustic Emission Signals in Robot Assisted Polishing

    PubMed Central

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Marín, Marta María; Teti, Roberto; Rubio, Eva María

    2014-01-01

    The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE) signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state. PMID:25405509

  17. Acoustic wave device using plate modes with surface-parallel displacement

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1992-01-01

    Solid-state acoustic sensors for monitoring conditions at a surface immersed in a liquid and for monitoring concentrations of species in a liquid and for monitoring electrical properties of a liquid are formed by placing interdigital input and output transducers on a piezoelectric substrate and propagating acoustic plate modes therebetween. The deposition or removal of material on or from, respectively, a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the mechanical properties of a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the electrical characteristics of the solution, create perturbations in the velocity and attenuation of the acoustic plate modes as a function of these properties or changes in them.

  18. Acoustic wave device using plate modes with surface-parallel displacement

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1992-05-26

    Solid-state acoustic sensors for monitoring conditions at a surface immersed in a liquid and for monitoring concentrations of species in a liquid and for monitoring electrical properties of a liquid are formed by placing interdigital input and output transducers on a piezoelectric substrate and propagating acoustic plate modes there between. The deposition or removal of material on or from, respectively, a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the mechanical properties of a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the electrical characteristics of the solution, create perturbations in the velocity and attenuation of the acoustic plate modes as a function of these properties or changes in them. 6 figs.

  19. Acoustic wave device using plate modes with surface-parallel displacement

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1988-04-29

    Solid-state acoustic sensors for monitoring conditions at a surface immersed in a liquid and for monitoring concentrations of species in a liquid and for monitoring electrical properties of a liquid are formed by placing interdigital input and output transducers on a piezoelectric substrate and propagating acoustic plate modes therebetween. The deposition or removal of material on or from, respectively, a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the mechanical properties of a thin film in contact with the surface, or changes in the electrical characteristics of the solution, create perturbations in the velocity and attenuation of the acoustic plate modes as a function of these properties or changes in them. 6 figs.

  20. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  1. X33 cut quartz for temperature compensated SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Richard T.

    1986-07-01

    An X-cut, 33.44 degree quartz crystal for propagating surface acoustic waves with a temperature stability in the order of - 0.0209 ppm/sq.cm. is described. The crystal orientation requires only a single rotation (33.44 degrees) from the crystal axes. This orientation is substantially simpler than previously reported cuts with comparable temperature stability which typically require three rotations. The X-cut orientation has a surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of 3175 m/sec, an electromechanical coupling of 0.0004, and a power flow angle of 2.7 degrees.

  2. Differentiation of red wines using an electronic nose based on surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    García, M; Fernández, M J; Fontecha, J L; Lozano, J; Santos, J P; Aleixandre, M; Sayago, I; Gutiérrez, J; Horrillo, M C

    2006-02-15

    An electronic nose, utilizing the principle of surface acoustic waves (SAW), was used to differentiate among different wines of the same variety of grapes which come from the same cellar. The electronic nose is based on eight surface acoustic wave sensors, one is a reference sensor and the others are coated by different polymers by spray coating technique. Data analysis was performed by two pattern recognition methods; principal component analysis (PCA) and probabilistic neuronal network (PNN). The results showed that electronic nose was able to identify the tested wines. PMID:18970446

  3. Adjustable, rapidly switching microfluidic gradient generation using focused travelling surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Im, Sunghyuk; Hang Ha, Byung; Ho Jung, Jin; Ahmad Ansari, Mubashshir; Jin Sung, Hyung

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate a simple device to generate chemical concentration gradients in a microfluidic channel using focused travelling surface acoustic waves (F-TSAW). A pair of curved interdigitated metal electrodes deposited on the surface of a piezoelectric (LiNbO{sub 3}) substrate disseminate high frequency sound waves when actuated by an alternating current source. The F-TSAW produces chaotic acoustic streaming flow upon its interaction with the fluid inside a microfluidic channel, which mixes confluent streams of chemicals in a controlled fashion for an adjustable and rapidly switching gradient generation.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  5. Beam distortion detection and deflectometry measurements of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Higuet, Julien; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    Gigahertz acoustic waves propagating on the surface of a metal halfspace are detected using different all-optical detection schemes, namely, deflectometry and beam distortion detection techniques. Both techniques are implemented by slightly modifying a conventional reflectometric setup. They are then based on the measurement of the reflectivity change but unlike reflectometric measurements, they give access to the sample surface displacement. A semi-analytical model, taking into account optical, thermal, and mechanical processes responsible for acoustic waves generation, allows analyzing the physical content of the detected waveforms. PMID:22129002

  6. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Florian; Roach, Paul; Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Newton, Michael I.; McHale, Glen; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-12-01

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported.

  7. Surface-acoustic-wave device incorporating conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcroft, B.; Roberts, G. G.; Barraud, A.; Richard, J.

    1987-04-01

    Surface-acoustic-wave devices incorporating conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films are reported for the first time. Excellent characteristics have been obtained using a mixed valence charge transfer salt of a substituted pyridinium tetracyanoquinodimethane. The control afforded by the deposition technique has enabled the fractional change in surface wave velocity due to the electrical effects to be distinguished from those due to mass loading. The resistivity of the organic surface layer is measured to be 2 ohm-cm.

  8. Separation of biological cells in a microfluidic device using surface acoustic waves (SAWs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ye; Marrone, Babetta L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based microfluidic device has been developed to separate heterogeneous particle or cell mixtures in a continuous flow using acoustophoresis. The microfluidic device is comprised of two components, a SAW transducer and a microfluidic channel made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The SAW transducer was fabricated by patterning two pairs of interdigital electrodes on a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) piezoelectric substrate. When exciting the SAW transducer by AC signals, a standing SAW is generated along the cross-section of the channel. Solid particles immersed in the standing SAW field are accordingly pushed to the pressure node arising from the acoustic radiation force acting on the particles, referring to the acoustic particle-focusing phenomenon. Acoustic radiation force highly depends on the particle properties, resulting in different acoustic responses for different types of cells. A numerical model, coupling the piezoelectric effect in the solid substrate and acoustic pressure in the fluid, was developed to provide a better understanding of SAW-based particle manipulation. Separation of two types of fluorescent particles has been demonstrated using the developed SAW-based microfluidic device. An efficient separation of E. coli bacteria from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples has also been successfully achieved. The purity of separated E. coli bacteria and separated PBMCs were over 95% and 91%, respectively, obtained by a flow cytometric analysis. The developed microfluidic device can efficiently separate E. coli bacteria from biological samples, which has potential applications in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis.

  9. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  10. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints. PMID:26773788

  11. Acoustic surface perception from naturally occurring step sounds of a dexterous hexapod robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneyitoglu Ozkul, Mine; Saranli, Afsar; Yazicioglu, Yigit

    2013-10-01

    Legged robots that exhibit dynamic dexterity naturally interact with the surface to generate complex acoustic signals carrying rich information on the surface as well as the robot platform itself. However, the nature of a legged robot, which is a complex, hybrid dynamic system, renders the more common approach of model-based system identification impractical. The present paper focuses on acoustic surface identification and proposes a non-model-based analysis and classification approach adopted from the speech processing literature. A novel feature set composed of spectral band energies augmented by their vector time derivatives and time-domain averaged zero crossing rate is proposed. Using a multi-dimensional vector classifier, these features carry enough information to accurately classify a range of commonly occurring indoor and outdoor surfaces without using of any mechanical system model. A comparative experimental study is carried out and classification performance and computational complexity are characterized. Different feature combinations, classifiers and changes in critical design parameters are investigated. A realistic and representative acoustic data set is collected with the robot moving at different speeds on a number of surfaces. The study demonstrates promising performance of this non-model-based approach, even in an acoustically uncontrolled environment. The approach also has good chance of performing in real-time.

  12. Acoustic techniques for studying soil-surface seals and crusts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and upon drying, soil crusting. Soil-surface sealing is a result of the clogging of interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water and by structural deformation of the soil fabric, which red...

  13. Note: External multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graul, J. S.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Andersen, G. P.; Lilly, T. C.

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies.

  14. Note: external multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications.

    PubMed

    Graul, J S; Ketsdever, A D; Andersen, G P; Lilly, T C

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies. PMID:23902119

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Sensors and actuators based on surface acoustic waves propagating along solid liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) along solid-liquid interfaces depends sensitively on the properties of the liquid covering the solid surface and may result in a momentum transfer into the liquid and thus a propulsion effect via acoustic streaming. This review gives an overview of the design of different SAW devices used for the sensing of liquids and the basic mechanisms of the interaction of SAWs with overlaying liquids. In addition, applications of devices based on these phenomena with respect to touch sensing and the measurement of liquid properties such as density, viscosity or the composition of mixed liquids are described, including microfabricated as well as macroscopic devices made from non-piezoelectric materials. With respect to the rapidly growing field of acoustic streaming applications, recent developments in the movement of nanolitre droplets on a single piezoelectric chip, the rather macroscopic approaches to the acoustic pumping of liquids in channels and recent attempts at numerical simulations of acoustic streaming are reported.

  16. Surface acoustic wave generation and detection using graphene interdigitated transducers on lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Mayorov, A. S.; Hunter, N.; Muchenje, W.; Wood, C. D.; Rosamond, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Cunningham, J. E.

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using graphene as a conductive electrode for the generation and detection of surface acoustic waves at 100 s of MHz on a lithium niobate substrate. The graphene interdigitated transducers (IDTs) show sensitivity to doping and temperature, and the characteristics of the IDTs are discussed in the context of a lossy transmission line model.

  17. Hydrogen-Bond Basic Siloxane Phosphonate Polymers for Surface Acoustic Wave (Saw) Sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a novel hydrogen-bond basic siloxane phosphonate SAW polymer gave excellent initial response and long-term performance when tested against phenol vapor and compared with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a conventional hydrogent-bond basic SAW polymer....

  18. Acoustic Receptivity of a Blasius Boundary Layer with 2-D and Oblique Surface Waviness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine acoustic receptivity and subsequent boundary-layer instability evolution for a Blasius boundary layer formed on a flat plate in the presence of two-dimensional (2-D) and oblique (3-D) surface waviness. The effect of the non-localized surface roughness geometry and acoustic wave amplitude on the receptivity process was explored. The surface roughness had a well defined wavenumber spectrum with fundamental wavenumber k (sub w). A planar downstream traveling acoustic wave was created to temporally excite the flow near the resonance frequency of an unstable eigenmode corresponding to k (sub ts) = k (sub w). The range of acoustic forcing levels, epsilon, and roughness heights, DELTA h, examined resulted in a linear dependence of receptivity coefficients; however, the larger values of the forcing combination epsilon dot DELTA h resulted in subsequent nonlinear development of the Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave. This study provided the first experimental evidence of a marked increase in the receptivity coefficient with increasing obliqueness of the surface waviness in excellent agreement with theory. Detuning of the 2-D and oblique disturbances was investigated by varying the streamwise wall-roughness wavenumber a,, and measuring the T-S response. For the configuration where laminar-to-turbulent breakdown occurred, the breakdown process was found to be dominated by energy at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies, indicative of K-type breakdown.

  19. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  20. Dual differential interferometer for measurements of broadband surface acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. M.; Claus, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    A simple duel interferometer which uses two pairs of orthogonally polarized optical beams to measure both the amplitude and direction of propagation of broadband ultrasonic surface waves is described. Each pair of focused laser probe beams is used in a separate wideband differential interferometer to independently detect the component of surface wave motion along one direction on the surface. By combining the two output signals corresponding to both components, the two dimensional surface profile and its variation as a function of time is determined.

  1. Tunable arrayed waveguide grating driven by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Poveda, Antonio; Hernández-Mínguez, Alberto; Biermann, Klaus; Tahraoui, Abbes; Gargallo, Bernardo; Muñoz, Pascual; Santos, Paulo V.; Cantarero, Andrés.; de Lima, Maurício M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a design approach for compact reconfigurable phased-array wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) devices with N access waveguides (WGs) based on multimode interference (MMI) couplers. The proposed devices comprise two MMI couplers which are employed as power splitters and combiners, respectively, linked by an array of N single-mode WGs. First, passive devices are explored. Taking advantage of the transfer phases between the access ports of the MMI couplers, we derive very simple phase relations between the arms that provide wavelength dispersion at the output plane of the devices. When the effective refractive index of the WGs is modulated with the proper relative optical phase difference, each wavelength component can switch paths between the preset output channel and the remaining output WGs. Moreover, very simple phase relations between the modulated WGs that enable the reconfiguration of the output channel distribution when the appropriated coupling lengths of the MMI couplers are chosen are also derived. In this way, a very compact expression to calculate the channel assignment of the devices as a function of the applied phase shift is derived for the general case of N access WGs. Finally, the experimental results corresponding to an acoustically driven phased-array WDM device with five access WGs fabricated on (Al,Ga)As are shown.

  2. Acoustical imaging of spheres above a reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David; Berryman, James

    2003-04-01

    An analytical study using the MUSIC method of subspace imaging is presented for the case of spheres above a reflecting boundary. The field scattered from the spheres and the reflecting boundary is calculated analytically, neglecting interactions between spheres. The singular value decomposition of the response matrix is calculated and the singular vectors divided into signal and noise subspaces. Images showing the estimated sphere locations are obtained by backpropagating the noise vectors using either the free space Green's function or the Green's function that incorporates reflections from the boundary. We show that the latter Green's function improves imaging performance after applying a normalization that compensates for the interference between direct and reflected fields. We also show that the best images are attained in some cases when the number of singular vectors in the signal subspace exceeds the number of spheres. This is consistent with previous analysis showing multiple eigenvalues of the time reversal operator for spherical scatterers [Chambers and Gautesen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001)]. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Effect of surface acoustic waves on the catalytic decomposition of ethanol employing a comb transducer for ultrasonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Reese; D. H. Hurley; H.W. Rollins

    2006-04-01

    The effect of surface acoustic waves, generated on a silver catalyst using a comb transducer, on the catalytic decomposition of ethanol is examined. The comb transducer employs purely mechanical means for surface acoustic wave (SAW) transduction. Unlike interdigital SAW transducers on piezoelectric substrates, the complicating effects of heat generation due to electromechanical coupling, high electric fields between adjacent electrodes, and acoustoelectric currents are avoided. The ethanol decomposition reactions are carried out at 473 K. The rates of acetaldehyde and ethylene production are retarded when acoustic waves are applied. The rates recover to varying degrees when acoustic excitation ceases.

  4. Wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for displacement and crack monitoring in concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M.; McKeeman, I.; Saafi, M.; Niewczas, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that wireless surface acoustic wave devices can be used to monitor millimetre displacements in crack opening during the cyclic and static loading of reinforced concrete structures. Sensors were packaged to extend their gauge length and to protect them against brittle fracture, before being surface-mounted onto the tensioned surface of a concrete beam. The accuracy of measurements was verified using computational methods and optical-fibre strain sensors. After packaging, the displacement and temperature resolutions of the surface acoustic wave sensors were 10 μ {{m}} and 2 °C respectively. With some further work, these devices could be retrofitted to existing concrete structures to facilitate wireless structural health monitoring.

  5. Polarisation inhomogeneities of a ring resonator and nonreciprocity of counterpropagating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuryatov, V N; Sokolov, A L

    2002-04-30

    The nonreciprocity of the characteristics of counterpropagating waves in a ring resonator formed by totally reflecting prisms is analysed. The polarisation-inhomogeneous properties of a prism resonator and their effect on the nonreciprocity of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves are studied. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Surface Generated Acoustic Wave Biosensors for the Detection of Pathogens: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Gaso, María-Isabel; March-Iborra, Carmen; Montoya-Baides, Ángel; Arnau-Vives, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This review presents a deep insight into the Surface Generated Acoustic Wave (SGAW) technology for biosensing applications, based on more than 40 years of technological and scientific developments. In the last 20 years, SGAWs have been attracting the attention of the biochemical scientific community, due to the fact that some of these devices - Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave (SH-SAW), Surface Transverse Wave (STW), Love Wave (LW), Flexural Plate Wave (FPW), Shear Horizontal Acoustic Plate Mode (SH-APM) and Layered Guided Acoustic Plate Mode (LG-APM) - have demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of biorelevant molecules in liquid media. In addition, complementary efforts to improve the sensing films have been done during these years. All these developments have been made with the aim of achieving, in a future, a highly sensitive, low cost, small size, multi-channel, portable, reliable and commercially established SGAW biosensor. A setup with these features could significantly contribute to future developments in the health, food and environmental industries. The second purpose of this work is to describe the state-of-the-art of SGAW biosensors for the detection of pathogens, being this topic an issue of extremely importance for the human health. Finally, the review discuses the commercial availability, trends and future challenges of the SGAW biosensors for such applications. PMID:22346725

  7. Interaction of surface and bulk acoustic waves with a two-dimensional semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, V. M. Chaplik, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    The interaction of a surface elastic Rayleigh wave with an electron-hole plasma in a two-dimensional semimetal has been theoretically studied as determined by the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms. Dispersion equations describing the coupled plasmon-acoustic modes for both types of interaction are derived, and damping of the Rayleigh wave is calculated. The damping of the acoustic and optical plasmon modes, which is related to the sound emission by plasma oscillations into the substrate volume, is calculated and it is shown that this sound emission is predominantly determined by the acoustic plasmon mode in the case of a deformation potential mechanism and by the optical mode in the case of a piezoelectric mechanism.

  8. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  9. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  10. A high-throughput standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell sorter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Rufo, Joseph; Guo, Feng; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J. Philip; Levine, Stewart J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic-based fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) have drawn increased attention in recent years due to their versatility, high biocompatibility, high controllability, and simple design. However, the sorting throughput for existing acoustic cell sorters is far from optimum for practical applications. Here we report a high-throughput cell sorting method based on standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs). We utilized a pair of focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs) to generate SSAW with high resolution and high energy efficiency. As a result, the sorting throughput is improved significantly from conventional acoustic-based cell sorting methods. We demonstrated the successful sorting of 10 μm polystyrene particles with a minimum actuation time of 72 μs, which translates to a potential sorting rate of more than 13,800 events/s. Without using a cell-detection unit, we were able to demonstrate an actual sorting throughput of 3,300 events/s. Our sorting method can be conveniently integrated with upstream detection units, and it represents an important development towards a functional acoustic-based FACS system. PMID:26289231

  11. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  12. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  13. The vibration dipole: A time reversed acoustics scheme for the experimental localisation of surface breaking cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    A combination of time reversed acoustics and nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy techniques is introduced to localize surface breaking defects in a non-destructive manner. Reciprocal time reversal is applied at two neighbouring positions in order to create a vibration dipole with high amplitudes. At surface breaking cracks, nonlinear elastic effects are triggered by the shear forces due to induced friction of the crack interfaces. By mapping the nonlinearity generated by the vibration dipole over the sample surface, the position of a surface breaking crack can be visualized. The technique is tested on an industrial steel sample containing a closed crack.

  14. Surface acoustical intensity measurements on a diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of surface intensity measurements as an alternative to the conventional selective wrapping technique of noise source identification and ranking on diesel engines was investigated. A six cylinder, in line turbocharged, 350 horsepower diesel engine was used. Sound power was measured under anechoic conditions for eight separate parts of the engine at steady state operating conditions using the conventional technique. Sound power measurements were repeated on five separate parts of the engine using the surface intensity at the same steady state operating conditions. The results were compared by plotting sound power level against frequency and noise source rankings for the two methods.

  15. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-29

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves. PMID:27176523

  16. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  17. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  18. HF Doppler Acoustic Imaging of the Ocean Surface and Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkel, Robert; Smith, Jerome A.

    2004-11-01

    HF phased array Doppler sonar represents a new tool for obtaining Three-dimensional (r,q,t) images of the oceanic surface and interior velocity field. While the capabilities of the approach are unique, the design constraints are also unusual. Examples of both are presented in this work.

  19. Observations of Brine Pool Surface Characteristics and Internal Structure Through Remote Acoustic and Structured Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Michel, A.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the surface characteristics and internal structure of deep-sea brine pools are currently limited to discrete in-situ observations. Complementary acoustic and structured light imaging sensors mounted on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) have demonstrated the ability systematically detect variations in surface characteristics of a brine pool, reveal internal stratification and detect areas of active hydrocarbon activity. The presented visual and acoustic sensors combined with a stereo camera pair are mounted on the 4000m rated ROV Hercules (Ocean Exploration Trust). These three independent sensors operate simultaneously from a typical 3m altitude resulting in visual and bathymetric maps with sub-centimeter resolution. Applying this imaging technology to 2014 and 2015 brine pool surveys in the Gulf of Mexico revealed acoustic and visual anomalies due to the density changes inherent in the brine. Such distinct changes in acoustic impedance allowed the high frequency 1350KHz multibeam sonar to detect multiple interfaces. For instance, distinct acoustic reflections were observed at 3m and 5.5m below the vehicle. Subsequent verification using a CDT and lead line indicated the acoustic return from the brine surface was the signal at 3m, while a thicker muddy and more saline interface occurred at 5.5m, the bottom of the brine pool was not located but is assumed to be deeper than 15m. The multibeam is also capable of remotely detecting emitted gas bubbles within the brine pool, indicative of active hydrocarbon seeps. Bubbles associated with these seeps were not consistently visible above the brine while using the HD camera on the ROV. Additionally, while imaging the surface of brine pool the structured light sheet laser became diffuse, refracting across the main interface. Analysis of this refraction combined with varying acoustic returns allow for systematic and remote detection of the density, stratification and activity levels within and

  20. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  1. A contactless methodology of picking up micro-particles from rigid surfaces by acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kun; Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Controlled movement and pick up of small object from a rigid surface is a primary challenge in many applications. In this paper, a contactless methodology of picking up micro-particles within deionized water from rigid surfaces by acoustic radiation force is presented. In order to achieve this, an acoustic radiation force was generated by 1.75 MHz transducers. A custom built setup facilitates the optimization of the sound field by varying the parameters such as sound source size and source position. The three-dimensional pressure distributions are measured and its relative sound field is also characterized accordingly. The standing wave field has been formed and it is mainly composed of two obliquely incident plane waves and their reflectors. We demonstrated the gripping and positioning of silica beads, SiO2, and aluminum micro-particles of 100 μm to 500 μm in size with this method using acoustic radiation force. The acoustic radiation force generated is well controlled, contactless, and in the tens of nano-Newton range which allowed us to manipulate relative big micro objects such as MEMS components as well as moving objects such as living cells. The proposed method provided an alternative form of contactless operating environment with scalable dimensions suitable for the manipulating of small objects. This permits high-throughput processing and reduction in time required for MEMS assembling, cell biomechanics, and biotechnology applications.

  2. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  3. Correlated motion of electrons on the Au(111) surface: anomalous acoustic surface-plasmon dispersion and single-particle excitations.

    PubMed

    Vattuone, L; Smerieri, M; Langer, T; Tegenkamp, C; Pfnür, H; Silkin, V M; Chulkov, E V; Echenique, P M; Rocca, M

    2013-03-22

    The linear dispersion of the low-dimensional acoustic surface plasmon (ASP) opens perspectives in energy conversion, transport, and confinement far below optical frequencies. Although the ASP exists in a wide class of materials, ranging from metal surfaces and ultrathin films to graphene and topological insulators, its properties are still largely unexplored. Taking Au(111) as a model system, our combined experimental and theoretical study revealed an intriguing interplay between collective and single particle excitations, causing the ASP associated with the Shockley surface state to be embedded within the intraband transitions without losing its sharp character and linear dispersion. PMID:25166849

  4. On the formation of nanostructures on a CdTe surface, stimulated by surface acoustic waves under nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, A. I.; Baidullaeva, A.; Veleschuk, V. P. Mozol, P. E.; Boiko, N. I.; Litvin, O. S.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of nanoscale structures in the unirradiated part of a p-CdTe crystal surface irradiated by a nanosecond ruby laser is revealed and investigated. It is shown that their formation is caused by the effect of the long-range action of a laser pulse with an intensity of I = 20 MW/cm{sup 2}. Nanoscale-structure formation is explained by the influence of the pressure gradient of the surface acoustic wave, in particular, within the “vacancy-pump” mechanism on the surface.

  5. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Degang; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin; He Zhaojian; Cai Feiyan; Ke Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of 'beat.' Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  6. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Liu, Zhengyou; Qiu, Chunyin; He, Zhaojian; Cai, Feiyan; Ke, Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of “beat.” Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  7. Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage: Role of acoustic boundary conditions at the pleural surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Kramer, Jeffrey M.; Waldrop, Tony G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Miller, Rita J.; Blue, James P.; Zachary, James F.

    2002-02-01

    In a previous study [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1290 (2000)] the acoustic impedance difference between intercostal tissue and lung was evaluated as a possible explanation for the enhanced lung damage with increased hydrostatic pressure, but the hydrostatic-pressure-dependent impedance difference alone could not explain the enhanced occurrence of hemorrhage. In that study, it was hypothesized that the animal's breathing pattern might be altered as a function of hydrostatic pressure, which in turn might affect the volume of air inspired and expired. The acoustic impedance difference between intercostal tissue and lung would be affected with altered lung inflation, thus altering the acoustic boundary conditions. In this study, 12 rats were exposed to 3 volumes of lung inflation (inflated: approximately tidal volume; half-deflated: half-tidal volume; deflated: lung volume at functional residual capacity), 6 rats at 8.6-MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure (MI of 3.1) and 6 rats at 16-MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure (MI of 5.8). Respiration was chemically inhibited and a ventilator was used to control lung volume and respiratory frequency. Superthreshold ultrasound exposures of the lungs were used (3.1-MHz, 1000-Hz PRF, 1.3-μs pulse duration, 10-s exposure duration) to produce lesions. Deflated lungs were more easily damaged than half-deflated lungs, and half-deflated lungs were more easily damaged than inflated lungs. In fact, there were no lesions observed in inflated lungs in any of the rats. The acoustic impedance difference between intercostal tissue and lung is much less for the deflated lung condition, suggesting that the extent of lung damage is related to the amount of acoustic energy that is propagated across the pleural surface boundary.

  8. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  9. A perturbative analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation and reflection in interdigital transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten Hilmar

    1997-12-01

    The coupling of stress and strain fields to electric fields present in anisotropic piezoelectric crystals makes them ideal for use as electromechanical transducers in a wide variety of applications. In recent years such crystals have been utilized to produce surface acoustic wave devices for signal processing applications, in which an applied metallic grating both transmits and receives, through the piezoelectric effect, electromechanical surface waves. The design of such interdigital transducers requires an accurate knowledge of wave propagation and reflection. The presence of the metal grating in addition to its ideal transduction function, by means of electrical and mechanical loading, also introduces a velocity shift as well as reflection into substrate surface waves. We seek to obtain a consistent formulation of the wave behavior due to the electrical and mechanical loading of the substrate crystal by the metallic grating. A perturbative solution up to second order in h//lambda is developed, where h is the maximum grating height and λ the acoustic wavelength. For the operating frequencies and physical parameters of modern surface acoustic wave devices such an analysis will provide an adequate description of device behavior in many cases, thereby circumventing the need for more computationally laborious methods. Numerical calculations are presented and compared with available experimental data.

  10. Counter-propagation neural network for image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sygnowski, Wojciech; Macukow, Bohdan

    1996-08-01

    Recently, several image compression techniques based on neural network algorithms have been developed. In this paper, we propose a new method for image compression--the modified counter-propagation neural network algorithm, which is a combination of the self-organizing map of Kohonen and the outstar structure of Grossberg. This algorithm has been successfully used in many applications. The modification presented has also demonstrated an interesting performance in comparison with the standard techniques. It was found that at the learning stage we can use any image for a network training (without a significant influence on the net operation) and the compression ratio and quality depend on the size of the basic element (the number of pixels in the cluster) and the amount of error tolerated when processing.

  11. Filamentation Instability of Counterpropagating Charged Particle Beams: Statistical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M. E.

    2008-10-15

    The filamentation instability (FI) driven by beams of counter-propagating electrons is examined with one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The 1D simulation reveals the saturation mechanism of the FI. The magnetic pressure gradient displaces the electrons. The resulting electrostatic field inhibits together with the magnetic field a further growth of the filaments by suppressing the electron motion. The FI evolves into a stationary equilibrium in 1D, which shows a statistical distribution of the filament sizes that resembles a Gumbel distribution. The 2D PIC simulation allows the filaments to move around each other and filaments carrying currents of equal polarity can merge. The time-evolution of the characteristic size of the filaments in the 2D simulation is measured. It increases linearly with the time.

  12. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals. PMID:24116414

  13. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    PubMed Central

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications. PMID:25951337

  14. Reflection of an acoustic line source by an impedance surface with uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2014-10-01

    An exact analytic solution is derived for the 2D acoustic pressure field generated by a time-harmonic line mass source located above an impedance surface with uniform grazing flow. Closed-form asymptotic solutions in the far field are also provided. The analysis is valid for both locally-reacting and nonlocally-reacting impedances, as is demonstrated by analyzing a nonlocally reacting effective impedance representing the presence of a thin boundary layer over the surface. The analytic solution may be written in a form suggesting a generalization of the method of images to account for the impedance surface. The line source is found to excite surface waves on the impedance surface, some of which may be leaky waves which contradict the assumption of decay away from the surface predicted in previous analyses of surface waves with flow. The surface waves may be treated either (correctly) as unstable waves or (artificially) as stable waves, enabling comparison with previous numerical or mathematical studies which make either of these assumptions. The computer code for evaluating the analytic solution and far-field asymptotics is provided in the supplementary material. It is hoped this work will provide a useful benchmark solution for validating 2D numerical acoustic codes.

  15. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted XV-15 Tiltrotor Surface Acoustic Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.; Prichard, Devon S.

    1997-01-01

    Predicted XV-15 exterior surface acoustic pressures are compared with previously published experimental data. Surface acoustic pressure transducers were concentrated near the tip-path-plane of the rotor in airplane mode. The comparison emphasized cruise conditions which are of interest for tiltrotor interior noise - level flight for speeds ranging from 72 m/s to 113 m/s. The predictions were produced by components of the NASA Langley Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Code (TRAC) system of computer codes. Comparisons between measurements and predictions were made in both the time and frequency domains, as well as overall sound pressure levels. In general, the predictions replicated the measured data well. Discrepancies between measurements and predictions were noted. Some of the discrepancies were due to poor correlation of the measured data with the rotor tach signal. In other cases limitations of the predictive methodology have been indicated.

  16. Surface-acoustic-wave filter with a short delay time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliaev, Iu. V.; Fedorets, V. N.

    1983-11-01

    A SAW filter centered at 50 MHz and comprising three identical 350-nm-thick Al transducers with surface resistivity 0.13 ohms fabricated on 0.5-mm or 1-mm thick 7 x 7-mm Y + 127 deg, X LiNbO3 substrates by photolithography is characterized experimentally. The electrodes are suspended capacitatively, and the transducers are separated by about 100 microns, corresponding to a delay of 30 nsec. The filter structure and response are presented graphically; characteristics include passband 10 percent, rejection of the forward-passage signal 55-60 dB, bandwidth ratio at 40 and 3 dB no worse than 2.6, active-pulse height -12 dB below the main signal, and triple-transit signal level -26 dB. Applications in radio and TV are discussed.

  17. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. B.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xuan, W. P.; Chen, J. K.; Wang, X. Z.; Mayrhofer, P.; Duan, P. F.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Luo, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1‑x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (<0.5%). The performance of the two types of devices was also investigated and compared, using acoustofluidics as an example. The AlScN/Si SAW devices achieved much lower threshold powers for the acoustic streaming and pumping of liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices.

  18. Detachable Acoustofluidic System for Particle Separation via a Traveling Surface Acoustic Wave.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Collins, David J; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Components in biomedical analysis tools that have direct contact with biological samples, especially biohazardous materials, are ideally discarded after use to prevent cross-contamination. However, a conventional acoustofluidic device is typically a monolithic integration that permanently bonds acoustic transducers with microfluidic channels, increasing processing costs in single-use platforms. In this study, we demonstrate a detachable acoustofluidic system comprised of a disposable channel device and a reusable acoustic transducer for noncontact continuous particle separation via a traveling surface acoustic wave (TSAW). The channel device can be placed onto the SAW transducer with a high alignment tolerance to simplify operation, is made entirely of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and does not require any additional coupling agent. A microstructured pillar is used to couple acoustic waves into the fluid channel for noncontact particle manipulation. We demonstrate the separation of 10 and 15 μm particles at high separation efficiency above 98% in a 49.5 MHz TSAW using the developed detachable acoustofluidic system. Its disposability and ease of assembly should enable broad use of noncontact, disposable particle manipulation techniques in practical biomedical applications related to sample preparation. PMID:27086552

  19. Probing the interaction of a membrane receptor with a surface-attached ligand using whole cells on acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Saitakis, Michael; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2010-03-15

    Two different types of acoustic sensors, a surface acoustic wave device supporting a Love-wave (Love-SAW) and a quartz crystal microbalance system with dissipation (QCM-D), were used to demonstrate the potential of acoustic devices to probe the binding of a cell membrane receptor to an immobilized ligand. The class I Major Histocompatibility Complex molecule HLA-A2 on the surface of whole cells and anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies immobilized on the sensor were used as an interaction pair. Acoustic measurements consisted of recording the energy and velocity or frequency of the acoustic wave. Results showed that both devices could detect the number of cells in solution as well as the cells bound to the surface. In addition, the Love-wave sensor, which can sense binding events within the relatively short distance of approximately 50 nm from the device surface, was sensitive to the number of bonds formed between the cell membrane and the device surface while the QCM-D, which can sense deeper within the liquid, was found to respond well to stimuli that affected the cell membrane rigidity (cytochalasin D treatment). The above results suggest that acoustic biosensors can be a powerful tool in the study of cell/substrate interactions and acoustic devices of different type can be used in a complementary way. PMID:20045307

  20. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  1. Surface response of a viscoelastic medium to subsurface acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-02-01

    The response at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to buried fundamental acoustic sources is studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Finite and infinitesimal monopole and dipole sources within the low audible frequency range (40-400 Hz) are considered. Analytical and numerical integral solutions that account for compression, shear and surface wave response to the buried sources are formulated and compared with numerical finite element simulations and experimental studies on finite dimension phantom models. It is found that at low audible frequencies, compression and shear wave propagation from point sources can both be significant, with shear wave effects becoming less significant as frequency increases. Additionally, it is shown that simple closed-form analytical approximations based on an infinite medium model agree well with numerically obtained ``exact'' half-space solutions for the frequency range and material of interest in this study. The focus here is on developing a better understanding of how biological soft tissue affects the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy from biological acoustic sources below the skin surface, whose typical spectral content is in the low audible frequency range. Examples include sound radiated from pulmonary, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular system functions, such as breath sounds, bowel sounds and vascular bruits, respectively.

  2. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-25

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, in porous materials, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Susan Leslie; Hietala, Vincent Mark; Tigges, Chris Phillip

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, such as mass uptake at various pressures, in a thin-film material, in particular porous membranes, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors.

  4. Acoustic Effects on Colloid/Surface Interactions and Porous-Media Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.; Duran, J.

    2004-12-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves have been observed to influence porous fluid-flow behavior in the Earth and geomaterials over a wide range of scale lengths (microns to kilometers). Examples include oil reservoir production increases induced by seismic (1 to 500 Hz) waves, and mobilizing colloidal clays in sandstone cores by ultrasonic (10 to 50 kHz) energy. The effects of stress-wave propagation on both colloid electrokinetics and fluid-flow dynamics in porous media are not understood. In particular, the coupling of acoustic and seismic waves with colloid behavior is an important mechanism to understand because the distribution of colloids in a porous medium will directly affect its permeability. Recent experimental observations indicate that very-high-frequency (0.5 to 5 MHz) acoustic energy can induce attachment and detachment of micron-size colloids at solid surfaces. Using a microscopic, video image-processing system focused on a glass flow-visualization cell, the behavior of 0.5- to 3-micron diameter polystyrene spheres suspended in 0 to 0.1 M aqueous solution was observed. Initial image-processing-based analysis of acoustically-induced colloid/surface detachment events indicates that very-high-frequency acoustics not only increases particle detachment, but may also permanently "deactivate" colloid attachment (or "active") sites on the glass cell surface. The ability of acoustics to attach or detach colloids also appears to depend on the colloid size and ionic strength of the suspending solution. Other experiments show that seismic-band (1 to 1000 Hz) mechanical stress oscillations can change the permeability of centimeter-size sandstone cores due to mobilization of micron-size colloids contained in the pore space. A unique core-holder apparatus that mechanically strains 2.54-cm-diameter porous rock samples during constant-rate fluid flow was used for these experiments. During single-phase brine flow through sandstone, axial stress oscillations at 50 Hz mobilized

  5. Virtual membrane for filtration of particles using surface acoustic waves (SAW).

    PubMed

    Fakhfouri, Armaghan; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Collins, David J; Ai, Ye; Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-21

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based particle manipulation is contactless, versatile, non-invasive and biocompatible making it useful for biological studies and diagnostic technologies. In this work, we present a sensitive particle sorting system, termed the virtual membrane, in which a periodic acoustic field with a wavelength on the order of particle dimensions permits size-selective filtration. Polystyrene particles that are larger than approximately 0.3 times the acoustic half-wavelength experience a force repelling them from the acoustic field. If the particle size is such that, at a given acoustic power and flow velocity, this repulsive force is dominant over the drag force, these particles will be prohibited from progressing further downstream (i.e. filtered), while smaller particles will be able to pass through the force field along the pressure nodes (akin to a filter's pores). Using this mechanism, we demonstrate high size selectivity using a standing SAW generated by opposing sets of focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs). The use of FIDTs permits the generation of a highly localized standing wave field, here used for filtration in μl min(-1) order flow rates at 10s of mW of applied power. Specifically, we demonstrate the filtration of 8 μm particles from 5 μm particles and 10.36 μm particles from 7.0 μm and 5.0 μm particles, using high frequency SAW at 258 MHz, 192.5 MHz, and 129.5 MHz, respectively. PMID:27458086

  6. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  7. Superlensing effect for surface acoustic waves in a pillar-based phononic crystal with negative refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Addouche, Mahmoud Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A. Choujaa, Abdelkrim Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate super resolution imaging for surface acoustic waves using a phononic structure displaying negative refractive index. This phononic structure is made of a monolithic square lattice of cylindrical pillars standing on a semi-infinite medium. The pillars act as acoustic resonator and induce a surface propagating wave with unusual dispersion. We found, under specific geometrical parameters, one propagating mode that exhibits negative refraction effect with negative effective index close to −1. Furthermore, a flat lens with finite number of pillars is designed to allow the focusing of an acoustic point source into an image with a resolution of (λ)/3 , overcoming the Rayleigh diffraction limit.

  8. Efficient Solution of Three-Dimensional Problems of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering by Open Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turc, Catalin; Anand, Akash; Bruno, Oscar; Chaubell, Julian

    2011-01-01

    We present a computational methodology (a novel Nystrom approach based on use of a non-overlapping patch technique and Chebyshev discretizations) for efficient solution of problems of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by open surfaces. Our integral equation formulations (1) Incorporate, as ansatz, the singular nature of open-surface integral-equation solutions, and (2) For the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), use analytical regularizes that effectively reduce the number of iterations required by iterative linear-algebra solution based on Krylov-subspace iterative solvers.

  9. A method for reducing the level of spurious signals in surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodii, Iu. N.; Grankin, I. M.; Zapunnyi, A. P.; Kolomeiko, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    A method for reducing spurious signals in surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters is proposed whereby both bulk and reflected wave signals are attenuated by electrodes of special configuration providing synphase addition of the useful signal and nonsynphase addition of spurious signal components. The electrodes of the input and output converters are made with a common focus point and equal angular apertures. The shape of the electrodes of the focusing converters on anisotropic crystal surfaces is determined by the corresponding SAW group velocity curve. An implementation of the method proposed here is examined together with some test results.

  10. Undulate microarray fabrication on polymer film using standing surface acoustic waves and ultraviolet polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Deqing; Xue, Dai; Wang, Yancheng; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-06-01

    By exciting standing surface acoustic waves (SAWs), a monomer solution can be shaped into a wavy structure. By applying ultraviolet (UV) polymerization, a linear undulate microarray can be fabricated on the polymer material using one-dimensional standing SAWs. When two-dimensional standing SAWs are applied, a latticed microarray, which presents periodically distributed bumps and wells, can be fabricated. The periodicity of the undulate microarray is dependent on the SAW wavelength. Also, the undulating amplitude of the microarray is tunable when applying different input voltages to generate SAWs. The integrated standing SAWs and UV polymerization process provide a rapid method for creating periodic surface patterns.