Science.gov

Sample records for coupled ocean-atmosphere gcm

  1. Interannual variability in the stratospheric-tropospheric circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Kitoh, Akio; Koide, Hiroshi; Kodera, Kunihiko

    1996-03-01

    The authors look for interannual variations in circulation patterns in the stratosphere/troposphere circulation and sea surface temperatures within the Meteorological Research Institute coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. They are able to identify two modes in this model which exhibit this type of variability. One involves the stratospheric polar vortex, coupled via tropospheric circulation to SST variations. The second mode involves El Nino type phenomena coupled into the tropospheric subtropical jet.

  2. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Feedbacks in Boundary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    The focus of this dissertation is on studying ocean-atmosphere (OA) interactions in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) and Kuroshio Extension (KE) region using satellite observations and the Scripps Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model. Within SCOAR, a new technique is introduced by implementing an interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the SST-flux coupler to remove the mesoscale SST field felt by the atmosphere. This procedure allows large-scale SST coupling to be preserved while extinguishing the mesoscale eddy impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This technique provides insights to spatial-scale dependence of OA coupling, and the impact of mesoscale features on both the ABL and the surface ocean. For the HCS, the use of downscaled forcing from SCOAR, as compared to NCEP Reanalysis 2, proves to be more appropriate in quantifying wind-driven upwelling indices along the coast of Peru and Chile. The difference in their wind stress distribution has significant impact on the wind-driven upwelling processes and total upwelling transport along the coast. Although upwelling induced by coastal Ekman transport dominates the wind-driven upwelling along coastal areas, Ekman pumping can account for 30% of the wind-driven upwelling in several coastal locations. Control SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while Smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. The SST-wind stress coupling however, did not produce any rectified response on the ocean eddies. Coupling between SST, wind speed and latent heat flux is insignificant on large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. On the other hand, coupling between these three variables are significant on the mesoscale for most of the model run, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat through direct flux anomalies as well as indirectly through stability changes on the

  3. Studies of regional-scale climate variability and change. Hidden Markov models and coupled ocean-atmosphere modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Smyth, P.

    2008-10-14

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding, in which we had developed a twin approach of probabilistic network (PN) models (sometimes called dynamic Bayesian networks) and intermediate-complexity coupled ocean-atmosphere models (ICMs) to identify the predictable modes of climate variability and to investigate their impacts on the regional scale. We had developed a family of PNs (similar to Hidden Markov Models) to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale GCM seasonal predictions. Using an idealized atmospheric model, we had established a novel mechanism through which ocean-induced sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies might influence large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns on interannual and longer time scales; we had found similar patterns in a hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea-ice model. The goal of the this continuation project was to build on these ICM results and PN model development to address prediction of rainfall and temperature statistics at the local scale, associated with global climate variability and change, and to investigate the impact of the latter on coupled ocean-atmosphere modes. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling together with the development of associated software; new intermediate coupled models; a new methodology of inverse modeling for linking ICMs with observations and GCM results; and, observational studies of decadal and multi-decadal natural climate results, informed by ICM results.

  4. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.F.; Bourgeois, A.J.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Duffy, P.B.; Dannevik, W.P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at LLNL has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler`s other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  5. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere 4D-Var: Formulation and Sensitivity Analysis Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Xu, Liang; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Tim; Rowley, Clark

    2016-04-01

    The US Navy is currently developing the first coupled ocean-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to be used for short-term regional forecasting. This project merges the 4D-Var capabilities of the atmospheric component of the Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS©) with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). This will provide the coupled ocean-atmosphere forecast with a fully balanced analysis that accounts for all combined observations in both primary fluids (i.e. ocean and atmosphere). In this present work, the formulation of the system is presented in detail along with a series of adjoint sensitivity analysis results using the coupled ocean-atmosphere adjoint model. The sensitivity of the atmosphere (ocean) to each ocean (atmosphere) model variable is analyzed in detail in order to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in the coupled data assimilation system.

  6. ENSO Bred Vectors in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. C.; Cai, Ming; Kalnay, E.; Rienecker, M.; Yuan, G.; Toth, ZA.

    2004-01-01

    The breeding method has been implemented in the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM) with the goal of improving operational seasonal to interannual climate predictions through ensemble forecasting and data assimilation. The coupled instability as cap'tured by the breeding method is the first attempt to isolate the evolving ENSO instability and its corresponding global atmospheric response in a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. Our results show that the growth rate of the coupled bred vectors (BV) peaks at about 3 months before a background ENSO event. The dominant growing BV modes are reminiscent of the background ENSO anomalies and show a strong tropical response with wind/SST/thermocline interrelated in a manner similar to the background ENSO mode. They exhibit larger amplitudes in the eastern tropical Pacific, reflecting the natural dynamical sensitivity associated with the presence of the shallow thermocline. Moreover, the extratropical perturbations associated with these coupled BV modes reveal the variations related to the atmospheric teleconnection patterns associated with background ENSO variability, e.g. over the North Pacific and North America. A similar experiment was carried out with the NCEP/CFS03 CGCM. Comparisons between bred vectors from the NSIPP CGCM and NCEP/CFS03 CGCM demonstrate the robustness of the results. Our results strongly suggest that the breeding method can serve as a natural filter to identify the slowly varying, coupled instabilities in a coupled GCM, which can be used to construct ensemble perturbations for ensemble forecasts and to estimate the coupled background error covariance for coupled data assimilation.

  7. Ocean-atmosphere coupling from a climate network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    In recent years extensive studies on the climate system have been carried out making use of advanced complex network statistics. However, most previous studies have been characterized by two conceptual restrictions: First, in most cases network measures have been computed without taking into account the topology of the discrete grid, regular or irregular, that climate data is typically stored on. To overcome this problem, the concept of node splitting invariant network measures has been introduced considering individual node weights, for example according to the surface area a node represents, when computing network measures [1]. Second, the great majority of recent studies have been focussing on single climatological fields located on surfaces parallel to or directly on the Earth's surface. A recent work introduced a methodology for quantifying interaction structures between geopotential height fields at different isobaric surfaces by proposing general definitions for network measures dealing with a network of networks composed from distinct subnetworks [2]. In this work, we combine both, the node-weighting scheme as well as the interacting network measure approach. For this purpose, we invent new node-weighted cross-network measures that provide a general tool for quantifying interaction structures in multilayer networks that is applicable to many fields beyond the study of the climate system, such as communication, social or trade networks. Our new approach is utilized for studying ocean-atmosphere coupling in the northern hemisphere. Specifically, we construct 18 coupled climate networks based on monthly data from the ERA 40 reanalysis, each consisting of two subnetworks. In all cases, one subnetwork represents sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies while the other is based on the geopotential height (HGT) of isobaric surfaces at different pressure levels. By investigating the connectivity of the resulting interdependent network structures, we identify a

  8. Global thermohaline circulation and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    1997-09-01

    A global ocean general circulation model (GCM) with idealized geometry (two basins of equal size, Marotzke and Willebrand, 1991) is coupled to an energy balance atmospheric model with nonlinear parameterizations of meridional atmospheric transports of heat and moisture. With the coupled model that prescribes the atmospheric heat and moisture transports, the North Atlantic meridional mass overturning rates at equilibrium increases as the global hydrological cycle strength increases. Furthermore, the equilibrium overturning rate is primarily controlled by the hydrological cycle of the Southern Hemisphere, whereas the Northern Hemispheric hydrological cycle has little impact. The transition of the thermohaline circulation from the conveyor belt to the southern sinking state is controlled by two factors, the hydrological cycle in Northern Hemisphere, and the ratio of hydrological cycle strengths between the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing either of them destabilizes the thermohaline circulation. The large-scale dynamics of the North Atlantic overturning is mainly interhemispheric, with the bulk of the overturning rising in the Southern Hemisphere. Multiple intermediate states exist that are only quantitatively different, under very small salinity perturbations. The coupled feedbacks between the thermohaline circulation and the atmospheric heat and moisture transports are demonstrated to exist in the coupled model, and all of them are positive. In addition, it is identified that the coupled feedbacks associated with the atmospheric transports in the Southern Hemisphere are also positive. Two different flux adjustments are used in the coupled model, with one adjusting the atmospheric transports efficiencies, the other adjusting the surface fluxes. Different flux adjustments influence the coupled feedback intensities, and hence the stability of the thermohaline circulation. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14

  9. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  10. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  11. Global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models in LASG/IAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongqiang, Yu; Xuehong, Zhang; Yufu, Guo

    2004-06-01

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric general circulation models are the only tools to quantitatively simulate the climate system. Since the end of the 1980s, a group of scientists in the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), have been working to develop a global OGCM and a global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). From the original flux anomaly-coupling model developed in the beginning of the 1990s to the latest directly-coupling model, LASG scientists have developed four global coupled GCMs. This study summarizes the development history of these models and describes the third and fourth coupled GCMs and selected applications. Strengths and weaknesses of these models are highlighted.

  12. Synchronizing Two AGCMs via Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A new approach for fusing or synchronizing to very different Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) is described. The approach is also well suited for understand why two different coupled models have such large differences in their respective climate simulations. In the application presented here, the differences between the coupled models using the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) are examined. The intent is to isolate which component of the air-sea fluxes is most responsible for the differences between the coupled models and for the errors in their respective coupled simulations. The procedure is to simultaneously couple the two different atmospheric component models to a single ocean general circulation model (OGCM), in this case the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Each atmospheric component model experiences the same SST produced by the OGCM, but the OGCM is simultaneously coupled to both AGCMs using a cross coupling strategy. In the first experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the NCAR AGCM (Community Atmospheric Model; CAM) and the momentum flux from the COLA AGCM. Both AGCMs feel the same SST. In the second experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the COLA AGCM and the momentum flux from the CAM AGCM. Again, both atmospheric component models experience the same SST. By comparing these two experimental simulations with control simulations where only one AGCM is used, it is possible to argue which of the flux components are most responsible for the differences in the simulations and their respective errors. Based on these sensitivity experiments we conclude that the tropical ocean warm bias in the COLA coupled model is due to errors in the heat flux, and that the erroneous westward shift in the tropical Pacific cold

  13. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  14. Coupled ocean-atmosphere variability in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Toshio; Behera, Swadhin K.; Luo, Jing-Jia; Masson, Sebastien; Jury, Mark R.; Rao, Suryachandra A.

    The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is a natural ocean—atmosphere coupled mode that plays important roles in seasonal and interannual climate variations. The coupled mode locked to boreal summer and fall is distinguished as a dipole in the SST anomalies that are coupled to zonal winds. The equatorial winds reverse their direction from westerlies to easterlies during the peak phase of the positive IOD events when SST is cool in the east and warm in the west. In response to changes in the wind, the thermocline rises in the east and subsides in the west. Subsurface equatorial long Rossby waves play a major role in strengthening SST anomalies in (he central and western parts. The SINTEX-F1 coupled model results support the observational finding that these equatorial Rossby waves are coupled to the surface wind forcing associated with IOD rather than ENSO. The ENSO influence is only distinct in off-equatorial latitudes south of 10°S. Although IOD events dominate the ocean—atmosphere variability during its evolution, their less frequent occurrence compared to ENSO events leads the mode to the second seat in the interannual variability. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the most dominant uniform mode to capture the IOD statistically. The seasonally stratified correlation between the indices of IOD and ENSO peaks at 0.53 in September—November. This means that only one third of IOD events are associated with ENSO events. Since a large number of IOD events are not associated with ENSO events, the independent nature of IOD is examined using partial correlation and pure composite techniques. Through changes in atmospheric circulation and water vapor transport, a positive IOD event causes drought in Indonesia, above normal rainfall in Africa, India, Bangladesh and Vietnam, and dry as well as hot summer in Europe, Japan, Korea and East China. In the Southern Hemisphere, the positive IOD causes dry winter in Australia, and dry as well as warm conditions in Brazil. The

  15. Nonlinear dynamics approach to the predictability of the Cane-Zebiak coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, L.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-01-01

    The predictability of the Cane-Zebiak coupled ocean-atmosphere model is investigated using nonlinear dynamics analysis. Newer theoretical concepts are applied to the coupled model in order to help quantify maximal prediction horizons for finite amplitude perturbations on different scales. Predictability analysis based on the maximum Lyapunov exponent considers infinitesimal perturbations, which are associated with errors in the smallest fastest-evolving scales of motion. However, these errors become irrelevant for the predictability of larger scale motions. In this study we employed finite-size Lyapunov exponent analysis to assess the predictability of the Cane-Zebiak coupled ocean-atmosphere model as a function of scale. We demonstrate the existence of fast and slow timescales, as noted in earlier studies, and the expected enhanced predictability of the anomalies on large scales. The final results and conclusions clarify the applicability of these new methods to seasonal forecasting problems.

  16. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-01

    An atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) model is coupled to an ocean mixed-layer (OML) model in order to study the equilibrium state of the coupled system in the tropics, particularly in the Pacific region. The equilibrium state of the coupled system is solved as a function of sea-surface temperature (SST) for a given surface wind and as a function of surface wind for a given SST. It is noted that in both cases, the depth of the CBL and OML increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is solved iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling and a fixed OML depth, and it is observed that SST falls with increasing wind in both cases. Realistic gradients of mixed-layer depth and upwelling are observed in experiments with surface wind and SST prescribed as a function of longitude.

  17. Intercomparison of present and future climates simulated by coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C; AchutaRao, K M; Lambert, S J

    2000-09-06

    We present an overview of results from the most recent phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). This phase of CMIP has archived output from both unforced (''control run'') and perturbed (1% per year increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide) simulations by 15 modern coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models. The models are about equally divided between those employing and those not employing ad hoc flux corrections at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The new generation of non-flux-connected control runs are nearly as stable and agree with observations nearly as well as the flux-corrected models. This development represents significant progress in the state of the art of climate modeling since the Second (1995) Scientific Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; see Gates et al. 1996). From the increasing-CO{sub 2} runs, we find that differences between different models, while substantial, are not as great as would be expected from earlier assessments that relied on equilibrium climate sensitivity.

  18. Coupled land-ocean-atmosphere processes and South asian monsoon variability.

    PubMed

    Meehl, G A

    1994-10-14

    Results from a global coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model and a model with specified tropical convective heating anomalies show that the South Asian monsoon was an active part of the tropical biennial oscillation (TBO). Convective heating anomalies over Africa and the western Pacific Ocean associated with the TBO altered the simulated pattern of atmospheric circulation for the Northern Hemisphere winter mid-latitude over Asia. This alteration in the mid-latitude circulation maintained temperature anomalies over South Asia through winter and helped set up the land-sea temperature contrast for subsequent monsoon development. South Asian snow cover contributed to monsoon strength but was symptomatic of the larger scale alteration in the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation pattern. PMID:17771448

  19. Assessment of climate sensitivity to the representation of aerosols in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Laura; Michou, Martine; Nabat, Pierre; Saint-Martin, David

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can significantly affect the Earth's radiative balance due to absorption, scattering, and indirect effects upon the climate system. Although our understanding of aerosol properties has improved over recent decades, aerosol radiative forcing remains as one of the largest uncertainties when projecting future climate change. A coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model was used to perform sensitivity tests in order to investigate how the representation of aerosols within the model can affect decadal climate variability. These tests included looking at the difference between using constant emissions versus using emissions that evolve over a period of thirty years; examining the impacts of including indirect effects from sea salt and organics; altering the aerosol optical properties; and using an interactive aerosol scheme versus using 2-D climatologies. The results of these sensitivity tests show how modifying certain aspects of the aerosol scheme can significantly modify radiative flux and global surface temperature.

  20. Interdecadal variations of the thermohaline circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Delworth, T.; Manabe, S.; Stouffer, R.J. )

    1993-11-01

    A fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model is shown to have irregular oscillations of the thermohaline circulation in the NOrth Atlantic Ocean with a time scale of approximately 50 years. The irregular oscillation appears to be driven by density anomalies in the sinking region of the thermohaline circulation (approximately 52[degrees]N to 72[degrees]N) combined with much smaller density anomalies of opposite sign in the broad, rising region. The spatial pattern of sea surface temperature anomalies associated with this irregular oscillation bears an encouraging resemblance to a pattern of observed interdecadal variability in the North Atlantic. The anomalies of sea surface temperature induce model surface air temperature anomalies over the northern North Atlantic, Arctic, and northwestern Europe. 21 refs., 28 figs.

  1. Wintertime atmospheric response to Atlantic multidecadal variability: effect of stratospheric representation and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peings, Yannick; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) on the wintertime atmosphere circulation is investigated using three different configurations of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). Realistic SST and sea ice anomalies associated with the AMV in observations are prescribed in CAM5 (low-top model) and WACCM5 (high-top model) to assess the dependence of the results on the representation of the stratosphere. In a third experiment, the role of ocean-atmosphere feedback is investigated by coupling CAM5 to a slab-ocean model in which the AMV forcing is prescribed through oceanic heat flux anomalies. The three experiments give consistent results concerning the response of the NAO in winter, with a negative NAO signal in response to a warming of the North Atlantic ocean. This response is found in early winter when the high-top model is used, and in late winter with the low-top model. With the slab-ocean, the negative NAO response is more persistent in winter and shifted eastward over the continent due to the damping of the atmospheric response over the North Atlantic ocean. Additional experiments suggest that both tropical and extratropical SST anomalies are needed to obtain a significant modulation of the NAO, with small influence of sea ice anomalies. Warm tropical SST anomalies induce a northward shift of the ITCZ and a Rossby-wave response that is reinforced in the mid-latitudes by the extratropical SST anomalies through eddy-mean flow interactions. This modeling study supports that the positive phase of the AMV promotes the negative NAO in winter, while illustrating the impacts of the stratosphere and of the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in the spatial pattern and timing of this response.

  2. Wintertime atmospheric response to Atlantic multidecadal variability: effect of stratospheric representation and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peings, Yannick; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) on the wintertime atmosphere circulation is investigated using three different configurations of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). Realistic SST and sea ice anomalies associated with the AMV in observations are prescribed in CAM5 (low-top model) and WACCM5 (high-top model) to assess the dependence of the results on the representation of the stratosphere. In a third experiment, the role of ocean-atmosphere feedback is investigated by coupling CAM5 to a slab-ocean model in which the AMV forcing is prescribed through oceanic heat flux anomalies. The three experiments give consistent results concerning the response of the NAO in winter, with a negative NAO signal in response to a warming of the North Atlantic ocean. This response is found in early winter when the high-top model is used, and in late winter with the low-top model. With the slab-ocean, the negative NAO response is more persistent in winter and shifted eastward over the continent due to the damping of the atmospheric response over the North Atlantic ocean. Additional experiments suggest that both tropical and extratropical SST anomalies are needed to obtain a significant modulation of the NAO, with small influence of sea ice anomalies. Warm tropical SST anomalies induce a northward shift of the ITCZ and a Rossby-wave response that is reinforced in the mid-latitudes by the extratropical SST anomalies through eddy-mean flow interactions. This modeling study supports that the positive phase of the AMV promotes the negative NAO in winter, while illustrating the impacts of the stratosphere and of the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in the spatial pattern and timing of this response.

  3. Coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling on horizontally icosahedral and vertically hybrid-isentropic/isopycnic grids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleck, Rainer; Sun, Shan; Li, Haiqin; Benjamin, Stan

    2016-04-01

    Current efforts to close the gap between weather prediction and climate models have led to the construction of a coupled ocean-atmosphere system consisting of two high-resolution component models, operating on matching icosahedral grids and utilizing adaptive, near-isentropic/isopycnic vertical coordinates. The two components models, FIM and HYCOM (the latter converted to an icosahedral mesh for this purpose), have been tested extensively in twice-daily global medium-range weather prediction (http://fim.noaa.gov) and in real-time ocean data assimilation (http://hycom.org), respectively. The use of matching horizontal grids, currently at resolutions of 15km, 30km and 60km, avoids coastline ambiguities and interpolation errors at the air-sea interface. The intended purpose of the coupled model being subseasonal-to-seasonal prediction, our focus is on mid-term precipitation biases and the statistical steadiness of the atmospheric circulation (blocking frequency, Rossby wave breaking, meridional heat transport, etc.), as well as on possible causes of ocean model drift. An attempt is made to isolate the weather model's role in modifying water mass properties and ocean circulations (including meridional overturning) by comparing coupled model results to ocean-only experiments forced by observed atmospheric boundary conditions. A multi-decadal run at 60km resolution is used to illustrate ENSO variability in the coupled system.

  4. Ice-ocean-atmosphere coupling in the Regional Arctic System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Brunke, M.; Cassano, J. J.; Craig, A.; Duvivier, A.; Hughes, M.; Maslowski, W.; Nijssen, B.; Osinski, R.

    2013-12-01

    This work demonstrates the sea ice model performance in the latest version of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), which is a fully coupled regional climate model developed by a group of U.S. institutions as a regional counterpart to the Community Earth System Model (CESM). RASM is comprised of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE), Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. It uses the same coupling infrastructure as CESM, with important physics differences that we have found to be important in our high-resolution model. Model evaluations using SSM/I sea ice extent and concentration, ICESat sea ice thickness measurements, ice-ocean buoys, and satellite retrievals of sea ice drift and deformation, lead us to adjust the standard CESM Monin-Obukhov ice-ocean-atmospheric coupling and ice-ocean stress term used for coupling with POP-CICE at eddy-permitting resolution of 1/12 degree with the 50km resolution WRF and VIC models. Evaluation metrics based on scaling laws and wavelet techniques illustrate that 20-minute coupling produces deformation and drift statistics commensurate with high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. However, dynamical interactions are compromised when typical radiative settings are used as in stand-alone POP-CICE and WRF. This highlights the limitations of surface polar boundary conditions in stand-alone models relative to fully coupled interactions. Our results suggest that use of uncoupled models as testbeds for improved polar components of next-generation global Earth System Models may introduce biases into fully coupled systems, and these can be reduced using a regional coupled climate system model, such as RASM, as a testbed instead.

  5. Secular Trends and Climate Drift in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C C; Gleckler, P J; Phillips, T J; Bader, D C

    2004-11-23

    Coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (coupled GCMs) with interactive sea ice are the primary tool for investigating possible future global warming and numerous other issues in climate science. A long-standing problem with such models is that when different components of the physical climate system are linked together, the simulated climate can drift away from observations unless constrained by ad hoc adjustments to interface fluxes. However, eleven modern coupled GCMs--including three that do not employ flux adjustments--behave much better in this respect than the older generation of models. Surface temperature trends in control run simulations (with external climate forcing such as solar brightness and atmospheric carbon dioxide held constant) are small compared with observed trends, which include 20th century climate change due to both anthropogenic and natural factors. Sea ice changes in the models are dominated by interannual variations. Deep ocean temperature and salinity trends are small enough for model control runs to extend over 1000 simulated years or more, but trends in some regions, most notably the Arctic, are inconsistent among the models and may be problematic.

  6. Simulation of global warming with a simple coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xiangze; Zhang Xuehong

    1994-12-31

    A highly simplified ocean-atmosphere coupling system is established based on a two-dimensional oceanic thermohaline circulation model and an energy balance atmospheric model. Transient responses of the coupled system to a radiation forcing corresponding to the doubling of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration have been investigated with an emphasis on the role of the model`s thermohaline circulation in the warming processes of the system. The results show that there are some significant differences between the Pacific and the Atlantic in their transient responses. On the whole, the warming in the Atlantic is slower in the surface and faster in the deep layers than those in the Pacific due to the process of the deep water formation in the northern North Atlantic, where the active convection and the downward vertical advection transport the surface thermal anomalies into the lower layers efficiently. On a hundred-year time scale, the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic is weakened. As a result, the warming in the upper layer of the northern North Atlantic will be further delayed because of the reduction of the northward heat transport.

  7. The impact of ENSO on Southern African rainfall in CMIP5 ocean atmosphere coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieppois, Bastien; Rouault, Mathieu; New, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We study the ability of 24 ocean atmosphere global coupled models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) to reproduce the teleconnections between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Southern African rainfall in austral summer using historical forced simulations, with a focus on the atmospheric dynamic associated with El Niño. Overestimations of summer rainfall occur over Southern Africa in all CMIP5 models. Abnormal westward extensions of ENSO patterns are a common feature of all CMIP5 models, while the warming of the Indian Ocean that happens during El Niño is not correctly reproduced. This could impact the teleconnection between ENSO and Southern African rainfall which is represented with mixed success in CMIP5 models. Large-scale anomalies of suppressed deep-convection over the tropical maritime continent and enhanced convection from the central to eastern Pacific are correctly simulated. However, regional biases occur above Africa and the Indian Ocean, particularly in the position of the deep convection anomalies associated with El Niño, which can lead to the wrong sign in rainfall anomalies in the northwest part of South Africa. From the near-surface to mid-troposphere, CMIP5 models underestimate the observed anomalous pattern of pressure occurring over Southern Africa that leads to dry conditions during El Niño years.

  8. Longitudinal biases in the Seychelles Dome simulated by 35 ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagura, Motoki; Sasaki, Wataru; Tozuka, Tomoki; Luo, Jing-Jia; Behera, Swadhin K.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    Seychelles Dome refers to the shallow climatological thermocline in the southwestern Indian Ocean, where ocean wave dynamics efficiently affect sea surface temperature, allowing sea surface temperature anomalies to be predicted up to 1-2 years in advance. Accurate reproduction of the dome by ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) is essential for successful seasonal predictions in the Indian Ocean. This study examines the Seychelles Dome as simulated by 35 CGCMs, including models used in phase five of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Among the 35 CGCMs, 14 models erroneously produce an upwelling dome in the eastern half of the basin whereas the observed Seychelles Dome is located in the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean. The annual mean Ekman pumping velocity in these models is found to be almost zero in the southern off-equatorial region. This result is inconsistent with observations, in which Ekman upwelling acts as the main cause of the Seychelles Dome. In the models reproducing an eastward-displaced dome, easterly biases are prominent along the equator in boreal summer and fall, which result in shallow thermocline biases along the Java and Sumatra coasts via Kelvin wave dynamics and a spurious upwelling dome in the region. Compared to the CMIP3 models, the CMIP5 models are even worse in simulating the dome longitudes.

  9. Data Assimilation Into a Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model: Application to the 1997-1998 El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong

    1999-01-01

    As part of JPL's ocean data assimilation effort to study ocean circulation and seasonal-interannual climate variability, sea level anomaly observed by TOPEX altimeter, together with sea surface temperature and wind stress data, are assimilated into a simple coupled ocean atmosphere model of the tropical Pacific. Model-data consistency is examined. Impact of the assimilation (as initialization) on El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forecasts is evaluated. The coupled model consists of a shallow water component with two baroclinic modes, an Ekman shear layer, a simplified mixed-layer temperature equation, and a statistical atmosphere based on dominant correlations between historical surface temperature and wind stress anomaly data. The adjoins method is used to fit the coupled model to the data over various six-month periods from late 1996 to early 1998 by optimally adjusting the initial state, model parameters, and basis functions of the statistical atmosphere. On average, the coupled model can be fitted to the data to approximately within the data and representation errors (5 cm, 0.5 C, and 10 sq m/sq m for sea level, surface temperature, and pseudo wind stress anomalies, respectively). The estimated fields resemble observed spatio-temporal structure reasonably well. Hindcasts/forecasts of the 1997/1998 El Nino initialized from forced estimated ocean states and parameters are much more realistic than those simply initialized from ocean states (see figure below). In particular, the ability of the model to produce significant warming beyond the initial state is dramatically improved. Parameter estimation, which compensates for some model errors, is found to be important to obtaining better fits of the model to data and to improving forecasts.

  10. North Atlantic Interannual Variability in a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delworth, Thomas L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary mode of sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic on interannual timescales during winter is examined in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. The model, developed at die Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, is global in domain with realistic geography and a seasonal cycle of insulation. Analyses performed on a 1000-year integration of this model show that this mode is characterized by zonal bands of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic and bears a distinct resemblance to observational results. The largest anomalies in the model are to the southeast of Newfoundland.The model SST variations appear to be related to a north-south dipole in the atmospheric 500-mb geopotential height field, which resembles the North Atlantic oscillation and the Western Atlantic pattern. Analyses are presented that show that this mode of SST variability is primarily driven by perturbations to the surface heat fluxes, which are largely governed by atmospheric variability. Changes in model ocean circulation also contribute to this mode of variability but appear to be of secondary importance.Additional integrations are analyzed to examine the above conclusion. The same atmospheric model used in the above integration was coupled to a 50-m slab ocean and integrated for 500 years. The primary mode of SST variability in this model, in which there were no effects of ocean dynamics, resembles the primary mode from the coupled model, strengthening the conclusion that the surface fluxes are the primary mechanism generating this oceanic variability. One notable difference between the two models is related to the presence of deep vertical mixing at high latitudes in the model with a fully dynamic ocean. An additional 500-year integration of the atmospheric model with a prescribed seasonal cycle of SSTs lends further support to this conclusion, as do additional diagnostic calculations in which a 50-m slab ocean was forced by the time series of surface fluxes from both the

  11. How much of the NAO monthly variability is from ocean-atmospheric coupling: results from an interactive ensemble climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xiaoge; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Minghua; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The chaotic atmospheric circulations and the ocean-atmosphere coupling may both cause variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This study uses an interactive ensemble (IE) coupled model to study the contribution of the atmospheric noise and coupling to the monthly variability of the NAO. In the IE model, seven atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) realizations with different initial states are coupled with a single realization of the land, ocean and ice component models. The chaotic noise from the atmosphere at the air-sea interface is therefore reduced. The time variances of monthly NAO index in the ensemble AGCM mean of the IE model is found to be about 20.1 % of that in the SC model. Therefore, more than 79.9 % of the simulated monthly variability of NAO is caused by atmospheric noise. The coupling between sea surface temperature (SST) and NAO is only found in regions south of about 40°N in the North Atlantic Ocean. The IE strategy highlighted the interaction between the NAO and the SST in the region (28°-38°N, 20°W-50°W) to the southeast of the Gulf Stream extension. While the ocean-atmosphere coupling explains <1/5th of the NAO variability in the IE model, it shows slightly larger persistence than the SC model, consistent with the hypothesis of a slower mode of variability from ocean-atmosphere coupling that has larger predictability than the variability driven by the atmosphere.

  12. Instability of The Coupled Ocean-atmosphere System On Interdecadal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te Raa, L. A.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    The stability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system in a single-hemispheric basin is investigated in a three-dimensional primitive equation ocean model, which is cou- pled to an energy balance model for the atmosphere. Steady states are computed using techniques of numerical bifurcation theory, after which their stability is determined by solving the linear stability problem numerically. Sustained interdecadal oscillations arise through an instability of the flow if the atmospheric diffusivity is decreased. The pattern of the perturbation destabilizing the steady state follows from the linear stability analysis, so that a clear picture of the physical mechanism can be given. The oscillation appears to be driven by the ocean's thermohaline circulation, with an atmo- spheric response affecting only the stability properties. The phase difference between perturbation meridional and zonal buoyancy gradients in the ocean and the subsequent responses of the meridional and zonal overturning circulation are key elements in the oscillation. The oscillation is shown to be robust to more realistic continental geome- try and forcing conditions.

  13. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Loss of Refractory Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Frossard, A. A.; Long, M. S.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Tyssebotn, I. M.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Marine aerosol produced in the oceans from bursting bubbles and breaking waves is number dominated by submicron aerosol that are highly enriched in marine organic matter relative to seawater. Recent studies suggest that these organic-rich, submicron aerosol have a major impact on tropospheric chemistry and climate. It has been assumed this marine-derived aerosol organic matter is of recent origin stemming from biological activity in the photic zone. However, we deployed a marine aerosol generator on a recent cruise in the Sargasso Sea with seawater collected from 2500 m and showed that the aerosol generated from this seawater was enriched with organic matter to the same level as observed in surface Sargasso seawater, implying that the marine organic matter flux from the oceans into atmospheric aerosol is partly due to marine organic matter not of recent origin. We propose that marine aerosol production and subsequent physical and photochemical atmospheric evolution is the main process whereby old, refractory organic matter is removed from the oceans, thereby closing the carbon budget in the oceans and solving a long-standing conundrum regarding the removal mechanism for this organic matter in the sea. The implications of this study for couplings in the ocean-atmosphere cycling of organic matter will be discussed.

  14. Coupling submesoscale physics to seabirds behaviour at the ocean-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Monte, S.; Cotté, C.; d'Ovidio, F.; Lévy, M.; Le Corre, M.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2012-04-01

    During their journeys, seabirds are faced to environmental heterogeneity of the scale of tens of Kms in extension and of days in duration, that are induced in the open ocean by mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence. We combine tracking of frigatebirds in the Mozambique channel - available for the first time with 3-D resolution - and multisatellite-based nonlinear diagnostics to inquire how birds respond to the coupled ocean-atmosphere physics. Birds behaviour along their flight trajectory are categorized in 5 classes of vertical displacement, e.g. slow or fast descents, and are superimposed with the submesoscale structures obtained by a Lagrangian reanalysis or remote-sensing measures. We show that frigatebirds modify their behaviour at such scale over and outside transport and thermal fronts. We suggest that birds colocalization with structures generated by horizontal transport is a consequence of their quest for food (preferentially located on thermal fronts) but also for upward vertical wind. Our multidisciplinary method can be applied to forthcoming high-resolution animal tracking data and contribute to elucidate the response of marine ecosystems to environmental change.

  15. A Coupled GCM Intercomparison Study of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, S. K.; Luo, J.; Takahashi, K.; Yamagata, T.

    2007-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is an important component of seasonal climate variations in the Southern Hemisphere. Though several associated processes are already discussed using observational data, the SPCZ is yet to be resolved properly in global general circulation models (GCMs). Particularly, the ocean- atmosphere coupled GCMs often fail to simulate the correct orientation and the zonal extent of the SPCZ. Most of these models replicate an east-west zonally oriented ITCZ similar to that in the Northern Hemisphere giving rise to the so-called double ITCZ problem. In this study simulation results from a variety of models are used to understand model biases in resolving the temporal and spatial distribution of the SPCZ. These models range from standalone atmospheric GCMs to the state of the art ocean-atmosphere coupled GCMs. It is found that the seasonal SPCZ in standalone atmospheric GCM results is better represented than that in the coupled GCM with an identical atmospheric component and a spatial resolution of about 100 km. The dry zone to the east of the SPCZ is not well-formed in coupled GCMs, particularly in austral summer when the SPCZ is pronounced. This is related to the model biases of the sea surface temperature, which is warmer in eastern Pacific in coupled GCM than the observation. The bias is not as clearly manifested in a spatially higher resolution coupled GCM in which the eastern Pacific SST is better simulated. The increase in model horizontal resolution helps in resolving the local air-sea interactions, the cross- equatorial winds and the local circulation cells. The dry zone is also improved in another experiment in which the improvement in model coupling physics improved the bias in equatorial cold tongue. It is also found that the SPCZ simulation is not improved by just increasing the vertical resolution in coupled GCM. This also imply that a proper representation of the boundary layer and the associated physics is more important

  16. Climate variability in a coupled GCM. Part II: The Indian Ocean and monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M.; Sterl, A.; Assenbaum, M.; Junge, M.M.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    1994-10-01

    We have investigated the seasonal cycle and the interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean circulation and the Indian summer monsoon simulated by a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model in a 26-year integration. Although the model exhibits significant climate drift, overall, the coupled GCM simulates realistically the seasonal changes in the tropical Indian Ocean and the onset and evolution of the Indian summer monsoon. The amplitudes of the seasonal changes, however, are underestimated. The coupled GCM also simulates considerable interannual variability in the tropical Indian Ocean circulation, which is partly related to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon and the associated changes in the Walker circulation. Changes in the surface wind stress appear to be crucial in forcing interannual variations in the Indian Ocean SST. As in the Pacific Ocean, the net surface heat flux acts as a negative feedback on the SST anomalies. The interannual variability in monsoon rainfall, simulated by the coupled GCM, is only about half as strong as observed. The reason for this is that the simulated interannual variability in the Indian monsoon appears to be related to internal processes within the atmosphere only. In contrast, an investigation based on observations shows a clear lead-lag relationship between interannual variations in the monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST anomalies. Furthermore, the atmospheric GCM also fails to reproduce this lead-lag relationship between monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST when run in a stand-alone integration with observed SSTs prescribed during the period 1970-1988. These results indicate that important physical processes relating tropical Pacific SST to Indian monsoon rainfall are not adequately modeled in our atmospheric GCM. Monsoon rainfall predictions appear therefore premature. 24 refs., 13 figs, 2 tabs.

  17. Primary reasoning behind the double ITCZ phenomenon in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianglong; Zhang, Xuehong; Yu, Yongqiang; Dai, Fushan

    2004-12-01

    This paper investigates the processes behind the double ITCZ phenomenon, a common problem in Coupled ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Models (CGCMs), using a CGCM—FGCM-0 (Flexible General Circulation Model, version 0). The double ITCZ mode develops rapidly during the first two years of the integration and becomes a perennial phenomenon afterwards in the model. By way of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) for SST, sea surface pressure, and sea surface wind, some air-sea interactions are analyzed. These interactions prompt the anomalous signals that appear at the beginning of the coupling to develop rapidly. There are two possible reasons, proved by sensitivity experiments: (1) the overestimated east-west gradient of SST in the equatorial Pacific in the ocean spin-up process, and (2) the underestimated amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast in CCM3 (the Community Climate Model, Version Three). The overestimated east-west gradient of SST brings the anomalous equatorial easterly. The anomalous easterly, affected by the Coriolis force in the Southern Hemisphere, turns into an anomalous westerly in a broad area south of the equator and is enhanced by atmospheric anomalous circulation due to the underestimated amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast simulated by CCM3. The anomalous westerly leads to anomalous warm advection that makes the SST warm in the southeast Pacific. The double ITCZ phenomenon in the CGCM is a result of a series of nonlocal and nonlinear adjustment processes in the coupled system, which can be traced to the uncoupled models, oceanic component, and atmospheric component. The zonal gradient of the equatorial SST is too large in the ocean component and the amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast is too low in the atmosphere component.

  18. North Atlantic interannual variability in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Delworth, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary mode of sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic on interannual timescales during winter is examined in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. The model, developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, is global in domain with realistic geography and a seasonal cycle of insolation. Analyses performed on a 1000-year integration of this model show that this mode is characterized by zonal bands of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic and bears a distinct resemblance to observational results. The largest anomalies in the model are to the southeast of Newfoundland. The model SST variations appear to be related to a north-south dipole in the atmopsheric 500-mb geopotential height field, which resembles the North Atlantic oscillation and the Western Atlantic pattern. Analyses are presented that show that this mode of SST variability is primarily driven by perturbations to the surface heat fluxes, which are largely governed by atmospheric variability. Changes in model ocean circulation also contribute to this mode of variability but appear to be of secondary importance. Additional integrations are analyzed to examine the above conclusion. The same atmospheric model used in the above integration was coupled to a 50-m slab ocean and integrated for 500 years. The primary mode of SST variability in this model, in which there were no effects of ocean dynamics, resembles the primary mode from the coupled model, strengthening the conclusion that the surface fluxes are the primary mechanism generating this oceanic variability. One notable difference between the two models is related to the presence of deep vertical mixing at high latitudes in the model with a fully dynamic ocean. An additional 500-year integration of the atmospheric model with a prescribed seasonal cycle of SSTs lends further support to this conclusion. 46 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of a low-order coupled wind-driven ocean-atmosphere system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus in J Atmos Sci 37:1157-1176, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini in J Phys Oceanogr 41:1585-1604, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear, while for periodic atmospheric solutions the double gyres emerge. In the present model domain setting context, this feature is related to the level of truncation of the atmospheric fields, as indicated by a preliminary analysis of the impact of higher wavenumber ("synoptic" scale) modes on the development of oceanic gyres. In the latter case, double gyres appear in the presence of a chaotic atmosphere. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on its attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial ( at 2 + bt 3 + ct 4) up to exponential-like evolutions. These features are explained

  20. Simulation of ENSO with a global atmospheric GCM coupled to a high-resolution, tropical Pacific ocean GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Philander, S.G.H.; Pacanowski, R.C.; Lau, N.C.; Nath, M.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to an oceanic GCM that is dynamically active only in the tropical Pacific simulates variability over a broad spectrum of frequencies. Of special interest is the simulation of a realistically irregular Southern Oscillation between warm El Nino and cold La Nino states with time scale of 5 years. The spatial structure is different in the eastern and western halves of the ocean basin. Sea surface temperature changes have their largest amplitude in the central and eastern tropical Pacific, but the low-frequency zonal wind fluctuations are displaced westward and are large over the western half of the basin. During El Nino the associated curl contributes to a pair of pronounced minima in thermocline depth, symmetrically about the equator in the west. In the east the deepening of the thermodine in response to the winds in the west has an approximate Gaussian shape centered on the equator. The low-frequency sea surface temperature and zonal wind anomalies wax and wane practically in place and in phase without significant zonal phase propagation. Thermocline depth variations have phase propagation, a property of the oceanic response to the quasi-periodic winds that force currents and excite a host of waves with periods near 5 years, This indicates that the ocean-atmosphere interactions that cause El Nino to develop at a certain time are countered and reversed by the delayed response of the ocean to earlier winds. Kelvin and Rossby waves cannot be identified in the low-frequency fluctuations of this model, but they are energetic at relatively short periods and are of vital importance to a quasi-resonant oceanic mode with a period near 7 months that is excited in the model. The similarities and differences between the results of this simulation and those with other models are discussed.

  1. Shortwave feedbacks and El Nino-Southern Oscillation: Forced ocean coupled ocean-atmosphere experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waliser, Duane E.; Blanke, Bruno; Neelin, J. David; Gautier, C.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in tropical sea surface temperature (SST) can produce changes in cloudiness that modify incoming solar shortwave (SW) radiation, which in turn affects SST. The effects of this negative feedback on Pacific interannual variability are examined in forced ocean model and hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations. Two empirical schemes are used to model the large-scale, low-frequency response of surface SW to SST anomalies. The first scheme attempts to account for the nonlocal nature of the atmospheric response to SST based patterns of covariability analyzed through singular value decomposition. In the observations the primary coupled mode of variability is composed of a SW anomaly in the central Pacific that covaries with anomalous SST in the eastern Pacific. This is applied in the model as a nonlocal feedback. The second scheme examines the effects of a purely local feedback with a spatially varying coefficient of magnitude chosen similar to the first scheme. In almost all cases the second scheme behaved similarly to the first, presumably because the correlation scale of SST is large enough for El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics that there is little sensitivity to the local approximation in the SW feedback. In simulations forced by time series of observed wind stress the SW feedback induced very minor SST damping. Results for a simpified heat budget analysis showed that while the SW feedback increased the local heat flux damping on SST, it also induced a mean shallowing of the mixed layer. The resulting changes in both the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the zonal velocity response to the wind stress acted to oppose the local heat flux damping effects. When the observed SW anomalies were applied to forced simulations, the simulated SST anomalies were modified as expected, and agreement with observed SST improved. In coupled simulations the SW feedbacks had greater impact than in the case of specified stress. The main effects were

  2. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  3. A 24-variable low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model: OA-QG-WS v2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, S.; De Cruz, L.

    2014-04-01

    A new low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model for midlatitudes is derived. It is based on quasi-geostrophic equations for both the ocean and the atmosphere, coupled through momentum transfer at the interface. The systematic reduction of the number of modes describing the dynamics leads to an atmospheric low-order component of 20 ordinary differential equations, already discussed in Reinhold and Pierrehumbert (1982), and an oceanic low-order component of four ordinary differential equations, as proposed by Pierini (2011). The coupling terms for both components are derived and all the coefficients of the ocean model are provided. Its dynamics is then briefly explored, through the analysis of its mean field, its variability and its instability properties. The wind-driven ocean displays a decadal variability induced by the atmospheric chaotic wind forcing. The chaotic behavior of the coupled system is highly sensitive to the ocean-atmosphere coupling for low values of the thermal forcing affecting the atmosphere (corresponding to a weakly chaotic coupled system). But it is less sensitive for large values of the thermal forcing (corresponding to a highly chaotic coupled system). In all the cases explored, the number of positive exponents is increasing with the coupling. Two codes in Fortran and Lua of the model integration are provided as Supplement.

  4. Parallel Computation of Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Coupled Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Yamashita, T.

    2003-12-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions are very important in the formation and development of tropical storms. These interactions are dominant in exchanging heat, momentum, and moisture fluxes. Heat flux is usually computed using a bulk equation. In this equation air-sea interface supplies heat energy to the atmosphere and to the storm. Dynamical interaction is most often one way in which it is the atmosphere that drives the ocean. The winds transfer momentum to both ocean surface waves and ocean current. The wind wave makes an important role in the exchange of the quantities of motion, heat and a substance between the atmosphere and the ocean. Storm surges can be considered as the phenomena of mean sea-level changes, which are the result of the frictional stresses of strong winds blowing toward the land and causing the set level and the low atmospheric pressure at the centre of the cyclone can additionally raise the sea level. In addition to the rise in water level itself, another wave factor must be considered. A rise of mean sea level due to white-cap wave dissipation should be considered. In bounded bodies of water, such as small seas, wind driven sea level set up is much serious than inverted barometer effects, in which the effects of wind waves on wind-driven current play an important role. It is necessary to develop the coupled system of the full spectral third-generation wind-wave model (WAM or WAVEWATCH III), the meso-scale atmosphere model (MM5) and the coastal ocean model (POM) for simulating these physical interactions. As the component of coupled system is so heavy for personal usage, the parallel computing system should be developed. In this study, first, we developed the coupling system of the atmosphere model, ocean wave model and the coastal ocean model, in the Beowulf System, for the simulation of the storm surge. It was applied to the storm surge simulation caused by Typhoon Bart (T9918) in the Yatsushiro Sea. The atmosphere model and the ocean model have

  5. Impact of Precession On Monsoon Characteristics From Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braconnot, Pascale; Marti, Olivier

    Precession cycle modulates the seasonal distribution of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere with a periodicity of about 23 kyr. Summer insolation is the largest for periods during which the Earth is near the perihelion of its orbit dur- ing summer. The associated continental warming favours the deepening of the sum- mer thermal low over the Northern Hemisphere continents and the inland advection of moist air from the tropical oceans, strengthening the monsoon activity. Different orbital configurations (precession) can lead to large June-July-August (summer) inso- lation forcing. Amongst these, the maximum insolation can occur between the vernal equinox and the summer solstice or between the summer solstice and the autumnal equinox. Using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model we investigate the response of the Indian and southeast monsoons to changes in precession and we explore the differences between periods where the monsoon activity is strong compared to the period of reference but the seasonal timing of the insolation forcing is different. Our aim is to determine if extreme phases in the seasonal forcing can lead to different signatures in the monsoon response. We focus on the Asian monsoon and on the at- mospheric and oceanic circulation in the Indian Ocean. Our results show that, even though the changes in the land-sea contrast that drives the monsoon flow follows quite well the differences in the insolation forcing, the regional distribution over the con- tinental regions affected by the monsoon and the ocean substantially varies from one simulation to the other. Large differences are found in the simulated surface temper- ature and salinity in the Indian Ocean. They are related to various feedbacks, where the changes in the hydrological cycle over the basin through precipitation, evapora- tion and river runoff play and important role. Our results strongly emphasize that the timing of the seasonal cycle need to be considered in

  6. An ENSO prediction approach based on ocean conditions and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Ding, Ruiqiang; Chen, Han-ching

    2016-05-01

    A simple statistical model for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) prediction is derived based on the evolution of the ocean heat condition and the oceanic Kelvin wave propagation associated with westerly wind events (WWEs) and easterly wind surges (EWSs) in the tropical Pacific. The multivariate linear regression model solely relies on the pentad thermocline depth anomaly evolution in 25 days along with the zonal surface wind modulation. It successfully hindcasts all ENSOs except for the 2000/01 La Niña, using the pentad (or monthly) mean tropical atmosphere ocean array data since 1994 with an averaged skill (measured by anomaly correlation) of 0.62 (or 0.67) with a 6-month lead. The exception is mainly due to the long-lasting cold sea surface temperature anomalies in the subtropics resulting from the strong 1998/99 La Niña, even though the tropical warm water volume (WWV) had rebounded and turned phases after 2000. We also note that the hindcast skill is comparable using pentad or monthly mean NCEP global ocean data assimilation system data for the same time period. The hindcast skill of the proposed statistical model is better than that based on the WWV index in terms of the monthly correlation, normalized RMSEs and ENSO occurrences, which suggest that including the evolution of the subsurface ocean temperature anomaly and the WWEs/EWSs in the central tropical Pacific can enhance the ability to predict ENSO. The hindcast skill is also comparable to the predictions using other dynamical and statistical models, indicating that these processes are the keys to ENSO development. The dynamics behind the statistical model are consistent with the physical processes of ENSO development as follows: the tropical WWV resulting from the interannually-varying meridional subtropical cell transport provides a sufficient heat source. When the seasonal phase lock of ocean-atmosphere coupling triggers the positive (negative) zonal wind anomaly in boreal summer and fall, an

  7. Oceanic control of multidecadal variability in an idealized coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, Quentin; Huck, Thierry; Arzel, Olivier; Campin, Jean-Michel; de Verdière, Alain Colin

    2016-05-01

    Idealized ocean models are known to develop intrinsic multidecadal oscillations of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Here we explore the role of ocean-atmosphere interactions on this low-frequency variability. We use a coupled ocean-atmosphere model set up in a flat-bottom aquaplanet geometry with two meridional boundaries. The model is run at three different horizontal resolutions (4°, 2° and 1°) in both the ocean and atmosphere. At all resolutions, the MOC exhibits spontaneous variability on multidecadal timescales in the range 30-40 years, associated with the propagation of large-scale baroclinic Rossby waves across the Atlantic-like basin. The unstable region of growth of these waves through the long wave limit of baroclinic instability shifts from the eastern boundary at coarse resolution to the western boundary at higher resolution. Increasing the horizontal resolution enhances both intrinsic atmospheric variability and ocean-atmosphere interactions. In particular, the simulated atmospheric annular mode becomes significantly correlated to the MOC variability at 1° resolution. An ocean-only simulation conducted for this specific case underscores the disruptive but not essential influence of air-sea interactions on the low-frequency variability. This study demonstrates that an atmospheric annular mode leading MOC changes by about 2 years (as found at 1° resolution) does not imply that the low-frequency variability originates from air-sea interactions.

  8. Numerical simulation of Typhoon Muifa (2011) using a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ling, Tiejun; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunfei; Gao, Zhiyi; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System is applied to investigate typhoon-ocean interactions in this study. The COAWST modeling system represents the state-of-the-art numerical simulation technique comprising several coupled models to study coastal and environmental processes. The modeling system is applied to simulate Typhoon Muifa (2011), which strengthened from a tropical storm to a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific, to explore the heat fluxes exchanged among the processes simulated using the atmosphere model WRF, ocean model ROMS and wave model SWAN. These three models adopted the same horizontal grid. Three numerical experiments with different coupling configurations are performed in order to investigate the impact of typhoon-ocean interaction on the intensity and ocean response to typhoon. The simulated typhoon tracks and intensities agree with observations. Comparisons of the simulated variables with available atmospheric and oceanic observations show the good performance of using the coupled modeling system for simulating the ocean and atmosphere processes during a typhoon event. The fully coupled simulation that includes a ocean model identifies a decreased SST as a result of the typhoon-forced entrainment. Typhoon intensity and wind speed are reduced due to the decrease of the sea surface temperature when using a coupled ocean model. The experiments with ocean coupled to atmosphere also results in decreased sea surface heat flux and air temperature. The heat flux decreases by about 29% compared to the WRF only case. The reduction of the energy induced by SST decreases, resulting in weakening of the typhoon. Coupling of the waves to the atmosphere and ocean model induces a slight increase of SST in the typhoon center area with the ocean-atmosphere interaction increased as a result of wave feedback to atmosphere.

  9. Structure and predictability of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M.; Sterl, A.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Junge, M.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The space-time structure and predictability of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon was investigated. Two comprehensive datasets were analyzed by means of an advanced statistical method, one based on observational data and other on data derived from an extended-range integration performed with a coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model. It is shown that a considerable portion of the ENSO related low-frequency climate variability in both datasets is associated with a cycle implies the possibility of climate predictions in the tropics up to lead times of about one year. This is shown by conducting an ensemble of predictions with our coupled general circulation model. For the first time a coupled model of this type was successfully applied to ENSO predictions. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  10. A Regional Coupled Model System to Examine Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice, Ice Sheet and Permafrost Interactions in the Arctic: HIRHAM5 - HYCOM - CICE - PISM - GIPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. H.; Mottram, R.; Langen, P. L.; Madsen, K. S.; Stendel, M.; Rodehacke, C. B.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a high resolution fully coupled regional model system that describes ocean, atmosphere and sea ice processes in the Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic and treats atmosphere / ocean / ice sheet interactions as well as land and sub-sea permafrost processes in an advanced semi-coupled form. The system has been developed using five existing model components: the high resolution regional climate model HIRHAM5, the regional ocean model HYCOM and the CICE model that describes sea ice dynamics, the PISM ice sheet model and the GIPL permafrost model. These models have been interactively coupled which enables us to perform experiments examining the relative importance of ocean and atmospheric forcing as well as internal dynamics, to explain the recent rapid decline of Arctic sea ice, recent changes in the Greenland ice sheet mass balance together with both land and sub-sea permafrost conditions. Analysis of the model results indicates the model can successfully reproduce the interannual and seasonal variability in sea ice extent, describe recent changes in the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance as well as permafrost conditions around Greenland and possibly under the Arctic Ocean sea floor. This opens up the possibility of a range of process based experiments as well as simulations to project the future and study the past of Arctic sea ice that we plan to run using the EC-Earth GCM as boundary forcing. Examples, focusing on various coupling issues will be presented and the need for further refinements will be assessed by highlighting processes that appear to be essential to the interactions and hence possibly important at climate scales.

  11. Coupled Oceanic-Atmospheric Variability at Different Temporal Scales and U.S. Precipitation Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goly, A.; Teegavarapu, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive examination of the influences of interdecadal, decadal and interannual oceanic-atmospheric oscillations on U.S. precipitation characteristics and extremes is carried out in this study. Four major oscillations affecting the precipitation patterns in the U.S. are evaluated within two phases (cool/negative and warm/positive phases) for each of the oscillations: El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Nine extreme precipitation indices, Inter-Event Time Definition (IETD) parameters, dry and wet spell transitions and correlations are analyzed along with parametric statistical hypothesis tests to validate significant changes from one phase to another. The analysis is carried out for the entire continental U.S. at a spatial resolution of 0.125 degree for the period 1950-1999. Analyses confirm spatially non-uniform changes in the influence of the oscillations on precipitation characteristics along with temporal variations over major hydrological basins of the U.S.

  12. Role of the Ocean-Atmosphere interactions for the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability in an idealized coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, Quentin; Huck, Thierry; de Verdière, Alain Colin; Arzel, Olivier; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-01

    The role of the ocean-atmosphere interactions in the multidecadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is investigated in an idealized coupled configuration of the MIT General Circulation Model. The flat-bottom ocean, composed of an Atlantic-like small basin, a Pacific-like large basin, and an unblocked Antarctic-like circumpolar channel, is coupled to a global atmospheric model (SPEEDY). In order to better represent the atmospheric dynamics and its interactions with the ocean, three set-ups, with horizontal resolution of about 4°, 2° and 1° (at the equator) in both the ocean and atmosphere models, are compared. They show a linearly increasing North Atlantic Oscillation-like variability. At all resolutions, the AMOC undergoes a spontaneous variability on multidecadal time scales between 30-40 yr, with an additional higher frequency in the highest resolution set-up. The AMOC variability responds to temperature anomalies along the western boundary through the thermal wind relationship. These temperature anomalies result from the propagation of large-scale baroclinic Rossby waves across the small basin. The unstable region responsible for the growth of Rossby waves through baroclinic instability, diagnosed using a temperature variance budget, shifts from the eastern boundary at coarse resolution (4°) to the western boundary at higher resolution (2° and 1°). An earlier study, performed with the same coarse resolution set-up (4°), has shown that the AMOC does not participate to the growth of Rossby waves, but passively reacts to these waves. The AMOC being mainly connected to the western boundary dynamics, its role in setting large scale baroclinic Rossby waves might be different between the coarse resolution set-ups (4°) and the higher resolution set-ups (2° and 1°). The ocean-atmosphere interactions are strongly enhanced in the highest resolution set-up (1°), with the development of a significant correlation of about 0

  13. Finding the driver of local ocean-atmosphere coupling in reanalyses and CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barradas, Alfredo; Kalnay, Eugenia; Peña, Malaquías; BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Motesharrei, Safa

    2016-06-01

    Identification of the driver of coupled anomalies in the climate system is of great importance for a better understanding of the system and for its use in predictive efforts with climate models. The present analysis examines the robustness of a physical method proposed three decades ago to identify coupled anomalies as of atmospheric or oceanic origin by analyzing 850 mb vorticity and sea surface temperature anomalies. The method is then used as a metric to assess the coupling in climate simulations and a 30-year hindcast from models of the CMIP5 project. Analysis of the frequency of coupled anomalies exceeding one standard deviation from uncoupled NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim and partially coupled CFSR reanalyses shows robustness in the main results: anomalies of oceanic origin arise inside the deep tropics and those of atmospheric origin outside of the tropics. Coupled anomalies occupy similar regions in the global oceans independently of the spatiotemporal resolution. Exclusion of phenomena like ENSO, NAO, or AMO has regional effects on the distribution and origin of coupled anomalies; the absence of ENSO decreases anomalies of oceanic origin and favors those of atmospheric origin. Coupled model simulations in general agree with the distribution of anomalies of atmospheric and oceanic origin from reanalyses. However, the lack of the feedback from the atmosphere to the ocean in the AMIP simulations reduces substantially the number of coupled anomalies of atmospheric origin and artificially increases it in the tropics while the number of those of oceanic origin outside the tropics is also augmented. Analysis of a single available 30-year hindcast surprisingly indicates that coupled anomalies are more similar to AMIP than to coupled simulations. Differences in the frequency of coupled anomalies between the AMIP simulations and the uncoupled reanalyses, and similarities between the uncoupled and partially coupled reanalyses, support the notion that the nature of the

  14. Sensitivity of Air-sea Exchange In A Regional Scale Coupled Ice/ocean/atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrum, C.; Hübner, U.; Jacob, D.; Podzun, R.

    The sub-systems ice, ocean and atmosphere are coupled on the global as well as the regional scale. However, regional coupled modeling is only in the beginning, full cou- pled models which are able to describe the interaction on the regional scale and the feedback mechanism are rare at the moment. For the North Sea and the Baltic Sea such a coupled model has been developed and exemplary integrated over a full seasonal cy- cle. By comparison of different regionalization studies the impact of the regional at- mospheric modeling and coupling on the air sea fluxes have been investigated. It was shown that the regionalization as well as the coupling show strong influence on the air/sea fluxes and thus on the oceanic conditions. Further problems in regional mod- eling like the description of storm track variability and its influence on the regional ocean model were identified.

  15. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  16. A zonally averaged, coupled ocean-atmosphere model for paleoclimate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, T.F.; Mysak, L.A. ); Wright, D.G. )

    1992-08-01

    A zonally averaged ocean model for the thermohaline circulation is coupled to a zonally averaged, one-layer energy balance model of the atmosphere to form a climate model for paleoclimate studies. The emphasis of the coupled model is on the ocean's thermohaline circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Under present-day conditions, the global conveyor belt is simulated. Latitude-depth structures of modeled temperature and salinity fields, as well as depth-integrated meridional transports of heat and freshwater, compare well with estimates from observations when wind stress is included. Ekman cells are present in the upper ocean and contribute substantially to the meridional fluxes at low latitudes.The atmospheric component of the coupled climate model consists of a classical balance model. When the two components are coupled after being spun up individually, the system remains steady. If intermittent convection is operating, the coupled model shows systematic deviations of the surface salinity, which may result in reversals of the thermohaline circulation. This climate drift can be inhibited by removing intermittent convection prior to coupling. The climate model is applied to investigate the effect of excess freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic, and the influence of the parameterization of precipitation is tested. The Atlantic thermohalinc flow is sensitive to anomalous freshwater input. Reversals of the deep circulation can occur in the Atlantic, leading to a state where deep water is formed only in the Southern Ocean. A feedback mechanism is identified that may also trigger the reversal of the Pacific thermobaline circulation yielding the inverse conveyor bell as an additional steady state. In total, four different stable equilibria of the coupled model were realized.

  17. Large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions in a simplified coupled model of the midlatitude wintertime circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    Midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interactions are studied in simulations from a simplified coupled model that includes synoptic-scale atmospheric variability, ocean current advection of SST, and air-sea heat exchange. Although theoretical dynamical ('identical twin') predictions using this model have shown that the SST anomalies in this model indeed influence the atmosphere, it is found here that standard cross correlation and empirical orthogonal function analyses of monthly mean model output yield the standard result, familiar from observational studies, that the atmosphere forces the ocean with little or no feedback. Therefore, these analyses are inconclusive and leave open the question of whether anomalous SST is influencing the atmosphere. In contrast, it is found that compositing strong warm events of model SST is a useful indicator of ocean forcing the atmosphere. Additional evidence is presented for oceanic influence on the atmosphere, namely, that ocean current advection appears to enhance the persistence of model SST anomalies through a feedback effect that is absent when only heat flux is allowed to influence SST anomaly evolution.

  18. CO/sub 2/-induced change in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model and its paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.; Bryan, K. Jr.

    1985-11-20

    The effect of large changes of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ was studied, using the coupled ocean-atmosphere model of Bryan et al. (1982), for derivation of six climatic equilibria (cases with 1/2 to 8 times the present CO/sub 2/ concentration). An increase of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ to the level of 8 times the normal concentration is accompanied by a decrease in the meridional gradient of surface air temperature (SAT) (the CO/sub 2/-induced increase of SAT is particularly large at high latitudes), with no changes in the intensity or the latitudinal placement of the atmospheric jet. The meridional density gradient of the ocean surface water changes little because of an increased in thermal expansion coefficient of seawater with increased temperature; thus, the intensity of thermohaline circulation does not diminish as expected. On the other hand, reduction of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ causes a dramatic change in the thermohaline circulation at half the normal CO/sub 2/ concentration, the sea water is held at the freezing point from pole down to 45 deg latitude because of the formation of sea ice.

  19. Multiple-century response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to an increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.; Stouffer, R.J. )

    1994-01-01

    To speculate on the future change of climate over several centuries, three 500-year integrations of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model were performed. In addition, to the standard integration in which the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide remains unchanged, two integrations are conducted. In one integration, the CO[sub 2] concentration increases by 1% yr[sup [minus]1] (compounded) until it reaches four times the initial value at the 140th year and remains unchanged thereafter. In another integration, the CO[sub 2] concentration also increases at the rate of 1% yr[sup [minus]1] until it reaches twice the initial value of the 70th year and remains unchanged thereafter. One of the most notable features of the CO[sub 2]-quadrupoling integration is the gradual disappearance of thermohaline circulations in most of the model oceans during the first 250-year period, leaving behind wind-driven cells. For example, thermohaline circulation nearly vanished in the North Atlantic during the first 200 years of the integration. In the Weddell and Ross seas, thermohaline circulation becomes weaker and shallower, thereby reducing the rate of bottom water formation and weakening the northward flow of bottom water in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The weakening or near disappearance of thermohaline circulation described above is attributable mainly to the capping of the model oceans by relatively fresh water in high latitudes where the excess of precipitation over evaporation increases markedly due to the enhanced poleward moisture transport in the warmer model troposphere.

  20. Double ITCZ in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: From CMIP3 to CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Hailong; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-10-01

    Recent progress in reducing the double Intertropical Convergence Zone bias in coupled climate models is examined based on multimodel ensembles of historical climate simulations from Phase 3 and Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5). Biases common to CMIP3 and CMIP5 models include spurious precipitation maximum in the southeastern Pacific, warmer sea surface temperature (SST), weaker easterly, and stronger meridional wind divergences away from the equator relative to observations. It is found that there is virtually no improvement in all these measures from the CMIP3 ensemble to the CMIP5 ensemble models. The five best models in the two ensembles as measured by the spatial correlations are also assessed. No progress can be identified in the subensembles of the five best models from CMIP3 to CMIP5 even though more models participated in CMIP5; the biases of excessive precipitation and overestimated SST in southeastern Pacific are even worse in the CMIP5 models.

  1. Applying a fully nonlinear particle filter on a coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Philip; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Wilson, Simon

    2014-05-01

    It is a widely held assumption that particle filters are not applicable in high-dimensional systems due to filter degeneracy, commonly called the curse of dimensionality. This is only true of naive particle filters, and indeed it has been shown much more advanced methods perform particularly well on systems of dimension up to 216 ≡ 6.5 × 104. In this talk we will present results from using the equivalent weights particle filter in twin experiments with the global climate model HadCM3. These experiments have a number of notable features. Firstly the sheer size of model in use is substantially larger than has been previously achieved. The model has state dimension approximately 4 × 106 and approximately 4 × 104 observations per analysis step. This is 2 orders of magnitude more than has been achieved with a particle filter in the geosciences. Secondly, the use of a fully nonlinear data assimilation technique to initialise a climate model gives us the possibility to find non-Gaussian estimates for the current state of the climate. In doing so we may find that the same model may demonstrate multiple likely scenarios for forecasts on a multi-annular/decadal timescale. The experiments consider to assimilating artificial sea surface temperatures daily for several years. We will discuss how an ensemble based method for assimilation in a coupled system avoids issues faced by variational methods. Practical details of how the experiments were carried out, specifically the use of the EMPIRE data assimilation framework, will be discussed. The results from applying the nonlinear data assimilation method can always be improved through having a better representation of the model error covariance matrix. We will discuss the representation which we have used for this matrix, and in particular, how it was generated from the coupled system.

  2. On the use of ocean-atmosphere-wave models during an extreme CAO event: the importance of being coupled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Sandro; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario M.; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    During winter 2012 an extreme meteorological event stroke the whole Europe and particularly its central-southern sector. A strong and persistent spit of cold air coming from Siberian region (a Cold Air Outbreak, CAO) insisted on northern Italy and the Adriatic sea basin, leading to decreases in the sea temperatures up to 6 °C in less than two weeks, ice formation on the Venice lagoon and an exceptional snow fall in the Apennine region. In the sea the CAO was associated to a significant episode of dense water formation (DWF), a crucial phenomenon that heavily impacts the whole Adriatic Sea (from the sinking of water masses and associated ventilation of the northernmost shelf, to the flow along the western coast, until the flushing of southern Adriatic open slope and submarine canyons, with associated sediment transport and bottom reshaping). The extent of the DWF event in the Northern Adriatic sub-basin was estimated by means of coastal observatories, ad hoc measurements and, until now, results from existing one-way coupled atmosphere-ocean models. These are characterized by no SST feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere, and therefore by turbulent heat fluxes that may heavily reflect a non-consistent ocean state. The study proposes an investigation of the 2012 CAO using a fully coupled, three components, ocean-atmosphere-wave system (COAWST). Results highlight that, although the energy interplays between air and sea do not seem to significantly impact the wind forecasts, when providing heat fluxes that are consistent with the ocean temperature we find modified heat fluxes and air sea temperatures figures. Moreover, the consistent description of thermal exchanges adopted in the fully coupled model can affect the basin circulation, the quantification of dense water produced mass, and the description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  3. An abrupt climate event in a coupled ocean-atmosphere simulation without external forcing.

    PubMed

    Hall, A; Stouffer, R J

    2001-01-11

    Temperature reconstructions from the North Atlantic region indicate frequent abrupt and severe climate fluctuations during the last glacial and Holocene periods. The driving forces for these events are unclear and coupled atmosphere-ocean models of global circulation have only simulated such events by inserting large amounts of fresh water into the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Here we report a drastic cooling event in a 15,000-yr simulation of global circulation with present-day climate conditions without the use of such external forcing. In our simulation, the annual average surface temperature near southern Greenland spontaneously fell 6-10 standard deviations below its mean value for a period of 30-40 yr. The event was triggered by a persistent northwesterly wind that transported large amounts of buoyant cold and fresh water into the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Oceanic convection shut down in response to this flow, concentrating the entire cooling of the northern North Atlantic by the colder atmosphere in the uppermost ocean layer. Given the similarity between our simulation and observed records of rapid cooling events, our results indicate that internal atmospheric variability alone could have generated the extreme climate disruptions in this region. PMID:11196636

  4. ENSO Simulation in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: Are the Current Models Better?

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-04-29

    Maintaining a multi-model database over a generation or more of model development provides an important framework for assessing model improvement. Using control integrations, we compare the simulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and its extratropical impact, in models developed for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report with models developed in the late 1990's (the so-called Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-2 [CMIP2] models). The IPCC models tend to be more realistic in representing the frequency with which ENSO occurs, and they are better at locating enhanced temperature variability over the eastern Pacific Ocean. When compared with reanalyses, the IPCC models have larger pattern correlations of tropical surface air temperature than do the CMIP2 models during the boreal winter peak phase of El Nino. However, for sea-level pressure and precipitation rate anomalies, a clear separation in performance between the two vintages of models is not as apparent. The strongest improvement occurs for the modeling groups whose CMIP2 model tended to have the lowest pattern correlations with observations. This has been checked by subsampling the multi-century IPCC simulations in a manner to be consistent with the single 80-year time segment available from CMIP2. Our results suggest that multi-century integrations may be required to statistically assess model improvement of ENSO. The quality of the El Nino precipitation composite is directly related to the fidelity of the boreal winter precipitation climatology, highlighting the importance of reducing systematic model error. Over North America distinct improvement of El Nino forced boreal winter surface air temperature, sea-level pressure, and precipitation rate anomalies in the IPCC models occurs. This improvement, is directly proportional to the skill of the tropical El Nino forced precipitation anomalies.

  5. Investigating the life cycle of a polar low with the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere- Wave-Sediment Transport modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    adakudlu, muralidhar; Sobolowski, Stefan; Mayer, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    A polar low that formed on 3 March 2008 over the Norwegian Sea is simulated using the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. COAWST is a high-resolution NWP system involving WRF, ROMS and SWAN models with a fully interactive ice module (CRIM) in ROMS. It can be run both in coupled and uncoupled modes and is a potential tool to study regional extremes and the associated air-sea- wave interactions. The objective of this study is to assess the importance of atmosphere-ocean coupling in simulating polar lows. The polar low under question provides an ideal platform to carry out such a study given the availability of measurements of its structure and full lifecycle. The observations were taken with dropsondes and wind lidar by the Norwegian IPY- THORPEX research mission. These observations show that the polar low had a sharp frontal structure below 700 hPa during the cyclogenesis phase. As the polar low grew, the associated circulation extended from ~ 700 hPa up to ~ 450 hPa. The maximum wind speed observed atlower-levels during the development was ~ 28 ms-1. Total surface fluxes rose from ~ 375 Wm-2 to ~ 580 Wm-2 during the growth stage suggesting an important role for air-sea interactions in contributing to the strength of the low. The lifetime of the low was quite long, ~ 2 days, relative to that of a normal polar low, which is usually less than 24 hours. In this work, two simulations are performed, one with a 2-way coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean, and the second with an atmosphere-only set-up. The simulations begin at 0000 UTC on 2 March 2008 and are run at a horizontal resolution of ~ 12 km. Initial and boundary conditions are obtained from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). Parameters such as surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, temperature, wind speed, surface pressure, precipitation, vertical temperature gradient are analysed and compared in the coupled and uncoupled simulations

  6. A regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed for CORDEX East Asia: assessment of Asian summer monsoon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a developed regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model FROALS was applied to the CORDEX East Asia domain. The performance of FROALS in the simulation of Asian summer monsoon during 1989-2010 was assessed using the metrics developed by the CLIVAR Asian-Australian Monsoon Panel Diagnostics Task Team. The results indicated that FROALS exhibited good performance in simulating Asian summer monsoon climatology. The simulated JJA mean SST biases were weaker than those of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble mean (MMEM). The skill of FROALS approached that of CMIP5 MMEM in terms of the annual cycle of Asian summer monsoon. The simulated monsoon duration matched the observed counterpart well (with a spatial pattern correlation coefficient of 0.59). Some biases of CMIP5 MMEM were also found in FROALS, highlighting the importance of local forcing and model physics within the Asian monsoon domain. Corresponding to a strong East Asian summer monsoon, an anomalous anticyclone was found over western North Pacific in both observation and simulation. However, the simulated strength was weaker than the observed due to the responses to incorrect sea surface anomalies over the key regions. The model also accurately captured the spatial pattern of the intraseasonal variability variance and the extreme climate indices of Asian summer monsoons, although with larger amplitude. The results suggest that FROALS could be used as a dynamical downscaling tool nested within the global climate model with coarse resolution to develop high-resolution regional climate change projections over the CORDEX East Asia domain.

  7. Coupled Radiative-Dynamical GCM Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, J. J.; Lian, Y.; Marley, M. S.

    2007-10-01

    The stellar flux incident on hot Jupiters is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared lightcurve, spectra, albedo, and atmospheric composition. Recent Spitzer lightcurve observations show that on some hot Jupiters, including HD189733b and HD209458b, the circulation efficiently homogenizes the temperature, whereas other planets such as Ups And b may exhibit large day-night temperature differences. Moreover, Spitzer infrared photometry and spectra constrain the vertical temperature structure in the atmosphere, which may deviate strongly from radiative equilibrium. Several groups have investigated the atmospheric circulation with a variety of 2D and 3D models (Showman and Guillot 2002; Cho et al. 2003, 2006; Langton and Laughlin 2007; Cooper and Showman 2005, 2006; Dobbs-Dixon and Lin 2007). However, all of these models drive the dynamics with simplified heating/cooling schemes that preclude robust predictions for the 3D temperature patterns, spectra, and lightcurves. Here, we present the first simulations of cloud-free hot Jupiters from a 3D general circulation model (GCM) that couples the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of radiative transfer. For the dynamics, we adopt the MITgcm, which is a state-of-the-art circulation model that solves the 3D primitive equations of meteorology. Our radiation model is that of Marley and McKay (1999), which solves the two-stream radiative-transfer equations using the correlated-k method for the opacities; this radiative-transfer model has been extensively applied to brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets by Marley, Fortney, and collaborators. By coupling these components, the GCM provides a much more realistic representation of the radiative-dynamical interaction than possible with previous models. Here, we will present simulations of HD209458b and HD189733b, compare the predicted temperatures, spectra, and lightcurves with existing data, and make

  8. Modeling efforts to improve the Asian Summer Monsoon representation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, G.; Masson, S. G.; Durand, F.; Terray, P.; Berthet, S.; Jullien, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) simulated over the 1989-2009 period with a new 0.75° coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel (45°S-45°N) model based on WRF and NEMO models is presented. The model biases are comparable to those commonly found in coupled global coupled models (CGCMs): the Findlater jet is too weak, precipitations are underestimated over India while they are overestimated over South-East Asia and the Maritime Continent. The ASM onset is delayed by several weeks, an error which is also very common in current CGCMs. We show that land surface temperature errors are a major source of the ASM low-level circulation and rainfall biases in our model: a cold bias over the Middle-East region weakens the Findlater jet while a warm bias over India strengthens the monsoon circulation in the Bay of Bengal. To explore the origins of those biases and their relationship with the ASM, a series of sensitivity experiments is presented. First, we show that changing the land surface albedo representation in our model directly influences the ASM characteristics by reducing the cold bias in the Middle-East region. It improves the "heat low" representation, which has direct implication on the Findlater jet strength and precipitation over India. Furthermore, the ASM onset is shifted back by almost one month in agreement with observations. Second, a parameterization of the convective cloud-radiative feedback is introduced in the atmospheric model. It acts to reduce the warm bias present in convective regions such as India and favors the monsoon northward migration. As a consequence, the dry bias is reduced in this region. Finally, horizontal resolution is increased from 0.75° to 0.25° for both oceanic and atmospheric models to assess the sensitivity of the ASM biases to the model resolution. Large-scale model errors persist at higher resolution, but are significantly attenuated. Precipitation is improved in mountainous areas with strong orographic control, but also in

  9. Intrinsic Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes of the Asian Summer Monsoon: A Re-assessment of Monsoon-ENSO Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Wu, H. T.

    2000-01-01

    Using global rainfall and sea surface temperature (SST) data for the past two decades (1979-1998), we have investigated the intrinsic modes of Asian summer monsoon (ASM) and ENSO co-variability. Three recurring ASM rainfall-SST coupled modes were identified. The first is a basin scale mode that features SST and rainfall variability over the entire tropics (including the ASM region), identifiable with those occurring during El Nino or La Nina. This mode is further characterized by a pronounced biennial variation in ASM rainfall and SST associated with fluctuations of the anomalous Walker circulation that occur during El Nino/La Nina transitions. The second mode comprises mixed regional and basin-scale rainfall and SST signals, with pronounced intraseasonal and interannual variabilities. This mode features a SST pattern associated with a developing La Nina, with a pronounced low level anticyclone in the subtropics of the western Pacific off the coast of East Asia. The third mode depicts an east-west rainfall and SST dipole across the southern equatorial Indian Ocean, most likely stemming from coupled ocean-atmosphere processes within the ASM region. This mode also possesses a decadal time scale and a linear trend, which are not associated with El Nino/La Nina variability. Possible causes of year-to-year rainfall variability over the ASM and sub-regions have been evaluated from a reconstruction of the observed rainfall from singular eigenvectors of the coupled modes. It is found that while basin-scale SST can account for portions of ASM rainfall variability during ENSO events (up to 60% in 1998), regional processes can accounts up to 20-25% of the rainfall variability in typical non-ENSO years. Stronger monsoon-ENSO relationship tends to occur in the boreal summer immediately preceding a pronounced La Nina, i.e., 1998, 1988 and 1983. Based on these results, we discuss the possible impacts of the ASM on ENSO variability via the west Pacific anticyclone and articulate a

  10. A New Approach for Coupled GCM Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, B. P.; Duane, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    A new multi-model approach for coupled GCM sensitivity studies is presented. The purpose of the sensitivity experiments is to understand why two different coupled models have such large differences in their respective climate simulations. In the application presented here, the differences between the coupled models using the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) are examined. The intent is to isolate which component of the air-sea fluxes is most responsible for the differences between the coupled models and for the errors in their respective coupled simulations. The procedure is to simultaneously couple the two different atmospheric component models to a single ocean general circulation model (OGCM), in this case the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Each atmospheric component model experiences the same SST produced by the OGCM, but the OGCM is simultaneously coupled to both AGCMs using a cross coupling strategy. In the first experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the NCAR AGCM (Community Atmospheric Model; CAM) and the momentum flux from the COLA AGCM. Both AGCMs feel the same SST. In the second experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the COLA AGCM and the momentum flux from the CAM AGCM. Again, both atmospheric component models experience the same SST. By comparing these two experimental simulations with control simulations where only one AGCM is used, it is possible to argue which of the flux components are most responsible for the differences in the simulations and their respective errors. Based on these sensitivity experiments we conclude that the tropical ocean warm bias in the COLA coupled model is due to errors in the heat flux, and that the erroneous westward shift in the tropical Pacific cold tongue minimum in the NCAR model is

  11. A comparison of surface air temperature variability in three 1000-Yr. coupled ocean-atmosphere model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.; Hegerl, G.; Tett, S.

    2000-02-01

    This study compares the variability of surface air temperature in three long coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model integrations. It is shown that the annual mean climatology of the surface air temperatures (SAT) in all three models is realistic and the linear trends over the 1,000-yr integrations are small over most areas of the globe. Second, although there are notable differences among the models, the models' SAT variability is fairly realistic on annual to decadal timescales, both in terms of the geographical distribution and of the global mean values. A notable exception is the poor simulation of observed tropical Pacific variability. In the HadCM2 model, the tropical variability is overestimated, while in the GFDL and HAM3L models, it is underestimated. Also, the ENSO-related spectral peak in the globally averaged observed SAT differs from that in any of the models. The relatively low resolution required to integrate models for long time periods inhibits the successful simulation of the variability in this region. On timescales longer than a few decades, the largest variance in the models is generally located near sea ice margins in high latitudes, which are also regions of deep oceanic convection and variability related to variations in the thermohaline circulation. However, the exact geographical location of these maxima varies from model to model. The preferred patterns of interdecadal variability that are common to all three coupled models can be isolated by computing empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of all model data simultaneously using the common EOF technique. A comparison of the variance each model associated with these common EOF patterns shows that the models generally agree on the most prominent patterns of variability. However, the amplitudes of the dominant models of variability differ to some extent between the models and between the models and observations. For example, two of the models have a mode with relatively large

  12. Response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide: Sensitivity to the rate of increase

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.

    1999-08-01

    The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant exponential rate of CO{sub 2} increase ranging from 4% yr{sup {minus}1} to 0.25% yr{sup {minus}1}. By the time of CO{sub 2} doubling, the surface air temperature response in all the transient integrations is locally more than 50% and globally more than 35% of the equilibrium response. The land-sea contrast in the warming, which is evident in the equilibrium results, is larger in all the transient experiments. The land-sea difference in the response increases with the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. The thermohaline circulation (THC) weakens in response to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration in all the transient integrations, confirming earlier work. The results also indicate that the slower the rate of increase, the larger the weakening of the THC by the time of doubling. Two of the transient experiments are continued beyond the time of CO{sub 2} doubling with the CO{sub 2} concentration maintained at that level. The amount of weakening of the THC after the CO{sub 2} stops increasing is smaller in the experiment with the slower rate of CO{sub 2} increase, indicating that the coupled system has more time to adjust to the forcing when the rate of CO{sub 2} increase is slower. After a period of slow overturning, the THC gradually recovers and eventually regains the intensity found in the control integration, so that the equilibrium THC is very similar in the control and doubled CO{sub 2} integrations. Considering only the sea level changes due to the thermal expansion of seawater, the integration with the slowest rate of increase in CO{sub 2} concentration has the largest globally averaged sea level rise by the time of CO{sub 2} doubling. However, only a relatively small fraction of the

  13. A bimodel climate response controlled by water vapor transport in a coupled ocean-atmosphere box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchfield, G. Edward; Wang, Huaxiao; Wyant, Matthew

    1990-06-01

    The importance of the hydrological cycle as a controlling factor on the magnitude of the thermohaline circulation is illustrated in a simple one-hemisphere coupled ocean-atmosphere box model. The ocean model includes differential surface heating and evaporation, horizontal and vertical exchange of heat and salt between boxes, and a simply parameterized thermohaline circulation. Surface heat fluxes and evaporation are determined through the coupled ocean and energy balance atmosphere models which treat fluxes of long- and short-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat. Two parameters represent the most important physics: µ controls the magnitude of the thermohaline circulation; ɛ controls the strength of the hydrological cycle. For fixed µ, two regimes are distinguished. One, associated with small values of ɛ, has weak latitudinal water vapor transport in the atmosphere, a strong thermohaline circulation with sinking in high latitudes, upwelling in low latitudes, and strong latitudinal transport of heat by the ocean. The second regime for larger ɛ is characterized by strong latitudinal water vapor transport which, by reducing the surface salinity in high latitudes, shuts down the thermohaline circulation and has reduced ocean and net latitudinal heat transport. The bimodal response in the model is shown to be the consequence of a shift in the mechanism of supply of salt to the high-latitude surface ocean from predominantly thermohaline transport, a nonlinear process, to or from predominantly eddy mixing transport, a linear process. In climatological terms, the bimodality represents two distinct climate regimes, one with an active ocean meridional circulation and relatively warm ocean and atmosphere temperatures in high latitudes, and the other with a less active ocean circulation and an increased latitudinal temperature gradient in atmosphere and ocean. The regime with an active thermohaline circulation tends to be less stable than the other, exhibiting over

  14. Regional coupled ocean-atmosphere downscaling in the Southeast Pacific: impacts on upwelling, mesoscale air-sea fluxes, and ocean eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian A.; Miller, Arthur J.; Seo, Hyodae

    2013-05-01

    Ocean-atmosphere coupling in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) of the Southeast Pacific is studied using the Scripps Coupled Ocean-atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model, which is used to downscale the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis-2 (RA2) product for the period 2000-2007 at 20-km resolution. An interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the sea-surface temperature (SST)-flux coupler is invoked in a separate run to isolate the impact of the mesoscale (˜50-200 km, in the oceanic sense) SST field felt by the atmosphere in the fully coupled run. For the HCS, SCOAR produces seasonal wind stress and wind stress curl patterns that agree better with QuikSCAT winds than those from RA2. The SCOAR downscaled wind stress distribution has substantially different impacts on the magnitude and structure of wind-driven upwelling processes along the coast compared to RA2. Along coastal locations such as Arica and Taltal, SCOAR and RA2 produce seasonally opposite signs in the total wind-driven upwelling transport. At San Juan, SCOAR shows that upwelling is mainly due to coastal Ekman upwelling transport, while in RA2 upwelling is mostly attributed to Ekman pumping. Fully coupled SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. Coupling between SST, wind speed, and latent heat flux is incoherent in large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. In contrast, coupling between these three variables is clearly identified for oceanic mesoscales, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat directly through the bulk formulation, as well as indirectly through stability changes on the overlying atmosphere, which affects surface wind speeds. The SST-wind stress and SST-heat-flux couplings, however, fail to produce a strong change in the ocean eddy statistics. No rectified effects of ocean-atmosphere

  15. Future summer precipitation changes over CORDEX-East Asia domain downscaled by a regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model: A comparison to the stand-alone RCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2016-03-01

    Climate changes under the RCP8.5 scenario over the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX)-East Asia domain downscaled by a regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model Flexible Regional Ocean-Atmosphere Land System (FROALS) are compared to those downscaled by the corresponding atmosphere-only regional climate model driven by a global climate system model. Changes in the mean and interannual variability of summer rainfall were discussed for the period of 2051-2070 with respect to the present-day period of 1986-2005. Followed by an enhanced western North Pacific subtropical high and an intensified East Asian summer monsoon, an increase in total rainfall over north China, the Korean Peninsula, and Japan but a decrease in total rainfall over southern China are observed in the FROALS projection. Homogeneous increases of extreme rainfall amounts were found over the CORDEX-East Asia domain. A predominant increase in the interannual variability was evident for both total rainfall and the extreme rainfall amount. The spatial patterns of the projected rainfall changes by FROALS were generally consistent with those from the driving global model at a broad scale due to similar projected circulation changes. In both models, the enhanced southerlies over east China increased the moisture divergences over southern China and enhanced the moisture advection over north China. However, the atmosphere-only regional climate model (RCM) exhibited responses to the underlying sea surface temperature (SST) warming anomalies that were too strong, which induced an anomalous cyclone over the north South China Sea, followed by increases (decreases) of total and extreme rainfall over southern China (central China). The differences of the projected changes in both rainfall and circulation between FROALS and the atmosphere-only RCM were partly affected by the differences in the projected SST changes. The results recommend the employment of a regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model in the

  16. Teleconnections of the Southern Oscillation in the tropical Atlantic sector in the OSU coupled upper ocean-atomosphere GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Hameed, S.; Meinster, A. ); Sperber, K.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The Oregon State University coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM has been shown to qualitatively simulate the Southern Oscillation. A composite analysis of the warm and cold events simulated in this 23-year integration has been performed. During the low phase of the Southern Oscillation, when warm anomalies occur in the eastern Pacific, the model simulates for the Atlantic region during March-May (1) a deficit of precipitation over the tropical South American continent, (2) Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico sea level pressure and sea surface temperature are in phase with the eastern Pacific anomalies, while those east of the Nordeste region are out of phase, and (3) northeast trade winds are anomalously weak and southwest trade winds are anomalously strong (as inferred from surface current anomalies). The anomalies in the oceanic processes are induced by perturbations in the atmospheric circulation over the Atlantic and are coupled to changes in the Walker circulation. During the high phase of the simulated Southern Oscillation, conditions in the atmosphere and ocean are essentially the reverse of the low phase. The model produces a response in the South American region during the opposing phases of the Southern Oscillation that is in general agreement with observations. The interannual variation of Nordeste rainfall is shown to be dominated by a few band-limited frequencies. These frequencies are found in the SST series of those regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans where strong correlations with Nordeste precipitation exist.

  17. Coupled Radiative-Dynamical GCM Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, J. J.; Lian, Y.; Marley, M. S.; Knutson, H. A.; Charbonneau, D.

    2008-09-01

    The stellar flux incident on hot Jupiters -- gas giants within 0.1 AU of their stars -- is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared lightcurves, spectrum, albedo, and atmospheric composition. Although several atmospheric-dynamics models of these objects have been published, all adopt simplified heating/cooling schemes that preclude robust predictions for the 3D temperature patterns, spectra, and lightcurves. Here, we present cloud-free simulations of hot Jupiters from the first 3D general circulation model (GCM) that couples the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of radiative transfer. We emphasize HD189733b and HD209458b, which are the best observationally constrained hot Jupiters and which represent an interesting pair because one (HD209458b) appears to have a dayside stratosphere while the other (HD189733b) does not. Our simulations develop large day-night temperature contrasts and winds reaching speeds of several km/sec. A prograde equatorial jet forms with retrograde flows at higher latitudes, which leads to an eastward displacement of the hottest regions from the substellar point and coldest regions from the antistellar point. For HD189733b, our predicted lightcurves compare favorably with lightcurves observed at 8 and 24 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope, including the modest day-night flux variation and offset of the flux peak from the time of secondary eclipse. The simulated temperatures decrease with altitude, leading to a spectrum dominated by absorption features. For HD209458b, inclusion of TiO and VO opacity leads to a dayside thermal inversion layer (stratosphere) where temperatures rise above 2000 K, consistent with suggestions offered to explain the observed secondary-eclipse spectrum. Interestingly, however, our 3D models do not match the observed spectrum, which suggests that our simulated stratosphere does not yet have the correct properties (e.g., altitude and

  18. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model system for studies of interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin and precipitation over the Southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ultimate objective of this research project is to make understanding and predicting regional climate easier. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to construct a coupled ocean-atmosphere model (COAM) system, (2) use it to explore the interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin, and (3) determine climate effects on the precipitation over the Southwestern United States. During this project life, three major tasks were completed: (1) Mesoscale ocean and atmospheric model; (2) global-coupled ocean and atmospheric modeling: completed the coupling of LANL POP global ocean model with NCAR CCM2+ global atmospheric model; and (3) global nested-grid ocean modeling: designed the boundary interface for the nested-grid ocean models.

  19. On Verifying Currents and Other Features in the Hawaiian Islands Region Using Fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System Compared to Global Ocean Model and Ocean Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, P. G.; Chen, S.

    2014-12-01

    This poster introduces and evaluates features concerning the Hawaii, USA region using the U.S. Navy's fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS-OS™) coupled to the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). It also outlines some challenges in verifying ocean currents in the open ocean. The system is evaluated using in situ ocean data and initial forcing fields from the operational global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Verification shows difficulties in modelling downstream currents off the Hawaiian islands (Hawaii's wake). Comparing HYCOM to NCOM current fields show some displacement of small features such as eddies. Generally, there is fair agreement from HYCOM to NCOM in salinity and temperature fields. There is good agreement in SSH fields.

  20. Investigating the Influence of Atmospheric Changes on the Variability of the North Pacific Using a Fully Coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, P.; Poulsen, C. J.; Stott, L. D.

    2004-12-01

    In this study we attempt to investigate whether changes in atmospheric concentrations in ozone and greenhouse gases (GHGs), including CO2, N2O, and methane, have an influence on decadal-scaled oceanic and atmospheric dynamics in the Northeast Pacific. Using a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM (FOAM1.5) we simulate climatic conditions for the pre-industry and the present day while focusing on the North Pacific. We explore how the ozone hole over the Southern Hemisphere and increased concentrations in GHGs observed in the present day influence the Pacific (Inter)Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific High (NPH), two dominant modes of variability in the North Pacific. In each model we examine the spatial and temporal patterns of the NPH, sea-surface temperatures and salinities (SSTs, SSSs) as well as wind and ocean currents on the order of interannual to interdecadal time scales. We find that within these simulations the influence of the prescribed atmospheric perturbations is small. We observe that the present-day SST and SSS fields of the Northeast Pacific are similar in both model runs as well as sea level pressure. In both simulations the PDO dominates the patterns of variability in the North Pacific and does not appear to change either in character or expression as a result of the atmospheric perturbations. The atmospheric change caused by the rise in GHG concentrations and the decline in ozone is not prominent as a primary influence on the decadal scale variability within the Northeast Pacific.

  1. The impact of coastal phytoplankton blooms on ocean-atmosphere thermal energy exchange: Evidence from a two-way coupled numerical modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, Jason K.; Smith, Travis A.; Barron, Charlie N.; deRada, Sergio; Anderson, Stephanie C.; Gould, Richard W.; Arnone, Robert A.

    2012-12-01

    A set of sensitivity experiments are performed with a two-way coupled and nested ocean-atmosphere forecasting system in order to deconvolve how dense phytoplankton stocks in a coastal embayment may impact thermal energy exchange processes. Monterey Bay simulations parameterizing solar shortwave transparency in the surface ocean as an invariant oligotrophic oceanic water type estimate consistently colder sea surface temperature (SST) than simulations utilizing more realistic, spatially varying shortwave attenuation terms based on satellite estimates of surface algal pigment concentration. These SST differences lead to an ∼88% increase in the cumulative turbulent thermal energy transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere over the three month simulation period. The result is a warmer simulated atmospheric boundary layer with respective local air temperature differences approaching ∼2°C. This study suggests that the retention of shortwave solar flux by ocean flora may directly impact even short-term forecasts of coastal meteorological variables.

  2. Assimilation of MGS Data Into a Coupled GCM-Mesoscale Model of the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Haberle, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The project sought to develop a coupled GCM-mesoscale model and to assimilate Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data into the coupled model. To achieve the project goals, four specific research activities were proposed. These activities are reiterated for completeness and the progress in each of the activities is noted in future sections of this report.

  3. Simulation of ENSO-like phenomena with a low-resolution coupled GCM of the global ocean and atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Ngarcheung; Philander, S.G.H.; Nath, M.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A 140-year simulation of the ocean-atmosphere climate system has been performed by the GFDL Climate Dynamics Project using a low-resolution coupled general circulation model (GCM). The model was subjected to annually averaged insolation throughout the integration. This coupled system exhibits well-defined fluctuations in the tropical Pacific, with a preferred time scale of 3-4 years. The characteristics of these recurrent anomalies were examined by applying an extended empirical orthogonal function (EEOF) analysis to selected model variables. These results indicate that the simulated oscillations are accompanied by coherent changes in the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. The spatial patterns associated with the leading EEOF mode indicate that SST anomalies make their first appearance off the Peru-Ecuador coast and then migrate steadily westward, with an average transit time of 12-15 months. The arrival and eventual decay of SST fluctuations in the western Pacific is typically followed by the initiation of anomalies of the opposite polarity along the American coasts. The space-time evolution of various meteorological and oceanographic signals exhibits well-defined phase relationships with the SST perturbations. Some aspects of the model behavior during these warm and cold episodes are reminiscent of observed phenomena associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Analysis of the climatological heat budget for the top ocean layer indicates a near balance between horizontal and vertical temperature advection by the time-mean flow, vertical diffusion, and heat input from the overlying atmosphere. The principal mechanisms associated with the simulated ENSO-like cycles were then studied by examining the local heat budget for the SST perturbations. The relative importance of various linear advective processes in the heat budget exhibits a notable dependence on geographical location and on the specific phase of the ENSO-like cycle.

  4. Dynamical downscaling of historical climate over CORDEX East Asia domain: A comparison of regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model to stand-alone RCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun; Peng, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    The FROALS (flexible regional ocean-atmosphere-land system) model, a regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model, has been applied to the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) East Asia domain. Driven by historical simulations from a global climate system model, dynamical downscaling for the period from 1980 to 2005 has been conducted at a uniform horizontal resolution of 50 km. The impacts of regional air-sea couplings on the simulations of East Asian summer monsoon rainfall have been investigated, and comparisons have been made to corresponding simulations performed using a stand-alone regional climate model (RCM). The added value of the FROALS model with respect to the driving global climate model was evident in terms of both climatology and the interannual variability of summer rainfall over East China by the contributions of both the high horizontal resolution and the reasonably simulated convergence of the moisture fluxes. Compared with the stand-alone RCM simulations, the spatial pattern of the simulated low-level monsoon flow over East Asia and the western North Pacific was improved in the FROALS model due to its inclusion of regional air-sea coupling. The results indicated that the simulated sea surface temperature (SSTs) resulting from the regional air-sea coupling were lower than those derived directly from the driving global model over the western North Pacific north of 15°N. These colder SSTs had both positive and negative effects. On the one hand, they strengthened the western Pacific subtropical high, which improved the simulation of the summer monsoon circulation over East Asia. On the other hand, the colder SSTs suppressed surface evaporation and favored weaker local interannual variability in the SST, which led to less summer rainfall and weaker interannual rainfall variability over the Korean Peninsula and Japan. Overall, the reference simulation performed using the FROALS model is reasonable in terms of rainfall over the land area of

  5. A Fully Coupled GCM Study of a "Geoengineered World"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, D. J.; Ridgwell, A.; Valdes, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Several schemes have been proposed with the explicit aim of modifying the future climate of the planet as a mitigation strategy in a response to anthropogenic global warming. A selection of these, including the placing of mirrors at the Lagrange point between the Earth and the Sun, and the injection of aerosols into the stratosphere, have at their heart the goal of effectively reducing the incoming solar radiation near the top of the atmosphere, to "balance" increased surface warming due to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. However, it is likely that an exact balance of the radiative forcing would be very difficult to obtain, due to differing spatial characteristics of the solar forcing applied (greatest at the equator and least at the poles) and that of long wave absorption (more equal over all latitudes), as well as differing temporal characteristics of the radiative forcings. In this study, we model the different climate expected in a "Geoengineered World", compared to the "Preindustrial World", if both have the same global annual mean surface temperature. We use the UK Met Office GCM, HadCM3L, and carry out 5 simulations: Pre-industrial, Doubled CO2, Quadrupled CO2, and 2 simulations in which the increased CO2 is balanced in the global annual mean by a reduction in incoming solar radiation. The "strength" of mirror/aerosol required is calculated using an iterative procedure, until balance is obtained. Our results indicate significant differences between the Geoengineered World and the Preindustrial World, despite near identical global annual mean surface temperatures. In particular, we obtain relatively large differences in surface temperature over mid-latitude continental regions, in particular North America, and significant changes in upwelling on the West African tropical coast. The drying of the American Mid-West, and impacts on Africa fisheries, are likely to have significant consequences for global and local food production.

  6. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO). Model results from the planar beach case show good agreement with depth-averaged analytical solutions and with theoretical flow structures. Simulation results for the DUCK' 94 experiment agree closely with measured profiles of cross-shore and longshore velocity data from Garcez Faria et al. (1998, 2000). Diagnostic simulations showed that the nonlinear processes of wave roller generation and wave-induced mixing are important for the accurate simulation of surf zone flows. It is further recommended that a more realistic approach for determining the contribution of wave rollers and breaking induced turbulent mixing can be formulated using non-dimensional parameters which are functions of local wave parameters and the beach slope. Dominant terms in the cross-shore momentum balance are found to be the quasi-static pressure gradient and breaking acceleration. In the alongshore direction

  7. Interannual variability of the coupled tropical Pacific ocean - atmosphere system associated with the El Nino-southern oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Levitus, S.

    1997-06-01

    Upper-ocean temperature and surface marine meteorological observations are used to examine interannual variability of the coupled tropical Pacific climate system. The basinwide structure and evolution of meteorological and oceanographic fields associated with ENSO events are described using composites, empirical orthogonal functions, and a lagged correlation analysis. The analyses reveal well-defined spatial structures and coherent phase relations among various anomaly fields.

  8. A hybrid coupled model for the pacific ocean-atmosphere system. Part I: Description and basic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2015-03-01

    A hybrid coupled model (HCM) is constructed for El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related modeling studies over almost the entire Pacific basin. An ocean general circulation model is coupled to a statistical atmospheric model for interannual wind stress anomalies to represent their dominant coupling with sea surface temperatures. In addition, various relevant forcing and feedback processes exist in the region and can affect ENSO in a significant way; their effects are simply represented using historical data and are incorporated into the HCM, including stochastic forcing of atmospheric winds, and feedbacks associated with freshwater flux, ocean biology-induced heating (OBH), and tropical instability waves (TIWs). In addition to its computational efficiency, the advantages of making use of such an HCM enable these related forcing and feedback processes to be represented individually or collectively, allowing their modulating effects on ENSO to be examined in a clean and clear way. In this paper, examples are given to illustrate the ability of the HCM to depict the mean ocean state, the circulation pathways connecting the subtropics and tropics in the western Pacific, and interannual variability associated with ENSO. As satellite data are taken to parameterize processes that are not explicitly represented in the HCM, this work also demonstrates an innovative method of using remotely sensed data for climate modeling. Further model applications related with ENSO modulations by extratropical influences and by various forcings and feedbacks will be presented in Part II of this study.

  9. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part II: Spatial and temporal structure of response

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.; Mitchell, J.F.B.

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution (2.75{degrees} lat x 3.75{degrees} long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases linearly, there is a delay of about 30 yr before the ocean warms appreciably. This {open_quotes}cold start{close_quotes} is, at least partly, an artifact of the experimental design. At the time of doubling (after 70 yr), the patterns of change are similar to those found in comparable studies of the equilibrium response, except in the high latitudes of the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic, where the warming is considerably reduced. The mechanisms leading to this reduction are discussed. After two to three decades, the pattern of warming is well established. The warming over land is substantially larger than that over the sea, with a consequent lowering of surface pressure over the northern continents in summer. The patterns of changes in precipitation and soil moisture take longer to establish themselves, although locally there are consistent changes after the third decade. 55 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Predictability of weather and climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model: A dynamical systems approach. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nese, Jon M.

    1989-01-01

    A dynamical systems approach is used to quantify the instantaneous and time-averaged predictability of a low-order moist general circulation model. Specifically, the effects on predictability of incorporating an active ocean circulation, implementing annual solar forcing, and asynchronously coupling the ocean and atmosphere are evaluated. The predictability and structure of the model attractors is compared using the Lyapunov exponents, the local divergence rates, and the correlation, fractal, and Lyapunov dimensions. The Lyapunov exponents measure the average rate of growth of small perturbations on an attractor, while the local divergence rates quantify phase-spatial variations of predictability. These local rates are exploited to efficiently identify and distinguish subtle differences in predictability among attractors. In addition, the predictability of monthly averaged and yearly averaged states is investigated by using attractor reconstruction techniques.

  12. On the use of a coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model during an extreme cold air outbreak over the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchi, Antonio; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Falco, Pier Paolo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bergamasco, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Carniel, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    An intense cold air outbreak affected the northern Adriatic Sea during winter 2012, determining an exceptional persistence of northeasterly Bora wind over the basin, which lasted for about 3 weeks. The cold air coming from the Balkans produced icing in the Venice lagoon and very intense snowfall in the Apennines Mountains and even near the coasts. In order to understand the importance and role of air-sea interactions for the evolution of the atmospheric fields, simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model encompassing the whole period have been performed using sea surface temperature (SST) fields with an increasing level of complexity. Starting from a large-scale static sea temperature, the SST in the initial and boundary conditions has been progressively made more realistic. First, a more refined field, retrieved from a satellite radiometer was used; then, the same field was updated every 6 h. Next, the effect of including a simplified 1D ocean model reproducing the Oceanic Mixed Layer (OML) evolution has been tested. Finally, the potential improvements coming from a coupled description of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-waves interactions have been explored within the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. Results highlight that the energy exchange between air and sea does not significantly impact the atmospheric fields, in particular 10 m wind and 2 m temperature, also because of the geography of the basin and the predominance of synoptic-scale flow in intense events of Bora, in the northern Adriatic. However, when sensible and latent heat fluxes, which are dependent on atmospheric and oceanic variables, are analyzed, the more realistic representation of SST drastically improves the model performances.

  13. Roles of land surface albedo and horizontal resolution on the Indian summer monsoon biases in a coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Guillaume; Masson, Sébastien; Durand, Fabien; Terray, Pascal; Berthet, Sarah; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) simulated over the 1989-2009 period with a new 0.75° ocean-atmosphere coupled tropical-channel model extending from 45°S to 45°N is presented. The model biases are comparable to those commonly found in coupled global climate models (CGCMs): the Findlater jet is too weak, precipitations are underestimated over India while they are overestimated over the southwestern Indian Ocean, South-East Asia and the Maritime Continent. The ISM onset is delayed by several weeks, an error which is also very common in current CGCMs. We show that land surface temperature errors are a major source of the ISM low-level circulation and rainfall biases in our model: a cold bias over the Middle-East (ME) region weakens the Findlater jet while a warm bias over India strengthens the monsoon circulation over the southern Bay of Bengal. A surface radiative heat budget analysis reveals that the cold bias is due to an overestimated albedo in this desertic ME region. Two new simulations using a satellite-observed land albedo show a significant and robust improvement in terms of ISM circulation and precipitation. Furthermore, the ISM onset is shifted back by 1 month and becomes in phase with observations. Finally, a supplementary set of simulations at 0.25°-resolution confirms the robustness of our results and shows an additional reduction of the warm and dry bias over India. These findings highlight the strong sensitivity of the simulated ISM rainfall and its onset timing to the surface land heating pattern and amplitude, especially in the ME region. It also illustrates the key-role of land surface processes and horizontal resolution for improving the ISM representation, and more generally the monsoons, in current CGCMs.

  14. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

  15. Transient Responses of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Gradual Changes of Atmospheric CO2. Part I. Annual Mean Response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, S.; Stouffer, R. J.; Spelman, M. J.; Bryan, K.

    1991-08-01

    This study investigates the response of a climate model to a gradual increase or decrease of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The model is a general circulation model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land surface system with global geography and seasonal variation of insulation. To offset the bias of the coupled model toward settling into an unrealistic state, the fluxes of heat and water at the ocean-atmosphere interface are adjusted by amounts that vary with season and geography but do not change from one year to the next. Starting from a quasi-equilibrium climate, three numerical time integrations of the coupled model are performed with gradually increasing, constant, and gradually decreasing concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide.It is noted that the simulated response of sea surface temperature is very slow over the northern North Atlantic and the Circumpolar Ocean of the Southern Hemisphere where vertical mixing of water penetrates very deeply. However, in most of the Northern Hemisphere and low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, the distribution of the change in surface air temperature of the model at the time of doubling (or halving) of atmospheric carbon dioxide resembles the equilibrium response of an atmospheric-mixed layer ocean model to CO2 doubling (or halving). For example, the rise of annual mean surface air temperature in response to the gradual increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide increases with latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere and is larger over continents than oceans.When the time-dependent response of the model oceans to the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is compared with the corresponding response to the CO2, reduction at an identical rate, the penetration of the cold anomaly in the latter case is significantly deeper than that of the warm anomaly in the former case. The lack of symmetry in the penetration depth of a thermal anomaly between the two cases is associated with the difference in static stability, which is due mainly

  16. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiundar; Atlas, Robert; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Lin, Xin

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA Satellite and field campaign cloud related data sets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. Also we have implemented a Land Information System (LIS that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models into the MMF. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) This modeling system has been applied and tested its performance for two different climate scenarios, El Nino (1998) and La Nina (1999). The coupled new modeling system produced more realistic propagation and intensity of tropical rainfall systems and intraseasonal oscillations, and diurnal variation of precipitation that are very difficult to forecast using even the state-of-the-art GCMs. In this talk I will present: (1) a brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (both Microphysical and land processes) and (2) The Goddard MMF and the Major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF) and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs).

  17. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional singlecolumn models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from Merent geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloudscale model (termed a super-parameterization or multiscale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameteridon NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production nms will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  18. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to imiprove the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. I this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the Goddard research plan of using Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  19. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System: TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. In this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  20. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  1. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 22; A Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model for Global Ocean Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    An ocean-atmosphere radiative model (OARM) evaluates irradiance availability and quality in the water column to support phytoplankton growth and drive ocean thermodynamics. An atmospheric component incorporates spectral and directional effects of clear and cloudy skies as a function of atmospheric optical constituents, and spectral reflectance across the air-sea interface. An oceanic component evaluates the propagation of spectral and directional irradiance through the water column as a function of water, five phytoplankton groups, and chromophoric dissolved organic matter. It tracks the direct and diffuse streams from the atmospheric component, and a third stream, upwelling diffuse irradiance. The atmospheric component of OARM was compared to data sources at the ocean surface with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.97 and a root mean square of 12.1%.

  2. A System of Conservative Regridding for Ice-Atmosphere Coupling in a General Circulation Model (GCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R.; Nowicki, S.; Kelley, M.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    The method of elevation classes, in which the ice surface model is run at multiple elevations within each grid cell, has proven to be a useful way for a low-resolution atmosphere inside a general circulation model (GCM) to produce high-resolution downscaled surface mass balance fields for use in one-way studies coupling atmospheres and ice flow models. Past uses of elevation classes have failed to conserve mass and energy because the transformation used to regrid to the atmosphere was inconsistent with the transformation used to downscale to the ice model. This would cause problems for two-way coupling. A strategy that resolves this conservation issue has been designed and is presented here. The approach identifies three grids between which data must be regridded and five transformations between those grids required by a typical coupled atmosphere-ice flow model. This paper develops a theoretical framework for the problem and shows how each of these transformations may be achieved in a consistent, conservative manner. These transformations are implemented in Glint2, a library used to couple atmosphere models with ice models. Source code and documentation are available for download. Confounding real-world issues are discussed, including the use of projections for ice modeling, how to handle dynamically changing ice geometry, and modifications required for finite element ice models.

  3. Impact of ocean-atmosphere coupling and high resolution on the simulation of medicanes over the Mediterranean Sea: multi-model analysis with Med-CORDEX and EURO-CORDEX runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Miguel Angel; Jesús González-Alemán, Juan; Romera, Raquel; Domínguez, Marta; Gil, Victoria; Sánchez, Enrique; Gallardo, Clemente; Miglietta, Mario Marcelo; Walsh, Kevin; Sein, Dmitri; Somot, Samuel; dell'Aquila, Alessandro; Ahrens, Bodo; Colette, Augustin; Bastin, Sophie; Van Meijgaard, Erik; Nikulin, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    Medicanes are cyclones over the Mediterranean Sea having a tropical structure and a rather small size, for which the sea-atmosphere interaction plays a fundamental role. High resolution and ocean-atmosphere coupled RCM simulations performed in MedCORDEX and EURO-CORDEX projects are used to analyze the ability of RCMs to represent the observed characteristics of medicanes, and the impact of increasing resolution and using air-sea coupling on its simulation. An observational database based on satellite images combined with very high resolution simulations (Miglietta et al. 2013) is used as the reference for evaluating the simulations. The simulated medicanes do not coincide in general with the observed cases, so that the evaluation should be done in a statistical sense. The spatial distribution of medicanes is generally well simulated, while the monthly distribution reveals the difficulty of simulating the first medicanes appearing in September after the summer minimum. Large differences are found among models, supporting the use of multi-model ensembles. Interesting trade-offs are found for some models, as better values for intensity are associated to worse frequency values in one model, or relatively good values of frequency and intensity are obtained at the expense of a damped air-sea interaction in a model with spectral nudging. High resolution has a strong and positive impact on the frequency of simulated medicanes, while the effect on its intensity is less clear. Air-sea coupling reduces the medicane frequency, as could be expected due to a negative intensity feedback that is known for tropical cyclones. A preliminary analysis indicates that this feedback could depend on the oceanic mixed layer depth, increasing the interest of applying ocean-atmosphere coupled RCMs

  4. Effects of Mountain Uplift on East Asian Summer Climate Investigated by a Coupled Atmosphere Ocean GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitoh, Akio

    2004-02-01

    To study the effects of progressive mountain uplift on East Asian summer climate, a series of coupled general circulation model (CGCM) experiments were performed. Eight different mountain heights were used: 0% (no mountain), 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100% (control run), 120%, and 140%. The land sea distribution is the same for all experiments and mountain heights are varied uniformly over the entire globe.Systematic changes in precipitation pattern and circulation fields as well as sea surface temperature (SST) appeared with progressive mountain uplift. In summertime, precipitation area moves inland on the Asian continent with mountain uplift, while the Pacific subtropical anticyclone and associated trade winds become stronger. The mountain uplift resulted in an SST increase over the western tropical Pacific and the Maritime Continent and an SST decrease over the western Indian Ocean and the central subtropical Pacific. There is a drastic change in the East Asian circulations with the threshold value at the 60% mountain height. With the mountain height below 60%, the southwesterly monsoon flow from the Indian Ocean becomes strong by uplift and transports moisture toward East Asia, forming the baiu rainband. With higher mountain heights, intensified subtropical trade winds transport moisture from the Pacific into the Asian continent.In order to investigate how the SST change affected the results presented herein, additional experiments were performed with the same experimental design but with the atmospheric GCM (AGCM). A comparison between CGCM and AGCM experiments revealed that major features such as a shift in precipitation inland and an appearance of the baiu rainband by higher orography were reproduced similarly in both the AGCM and the CGCM. However, there was a qualitatively as well as quantitatively different feature. The anticyclonic circulation anomalies in the lower troposphere, which appeared by mountain uplift in the tropical western Pacific in the CGCM

  5. Coupling of a Simple 3-Layer Snow Model to GISS GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinov, I.

    2001-12-01

    Appropriate simulation of the snow cover dynamics is an important issue for the General Circulation Models (GCMs). The presence of snow has a significant impact on ground albedo and on heat and moisture balance. A 3-layer snow model similar to the one proposed by Lynch-Stieglitz was developed with the purpose of using it inside the GCM developed in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The water transport between the layers is modeled explicitly while the heat balance is computed implicitly between the snow layers and semi-implicitly on the surface. The processes of melting and refreezing and compactification of layers under the gravitational force are modeled appropriately. It was noticed that implicit computation of the heat transport can cause a significant under- or over-estimation of the incoming heat flux when the temperature of the upper snow layer is equal to 0 C. This may lead in particular to delayed snow melting in spring. To remedy this problem a special flux-control algorithm was added to the model, which checks computed flux for possible errors and if such are detected the heat transport is recomputed again with the appropriate corrections. The model was tested off-line with Sleepers River forcing data and exhibited a good agreement between simulated and observed quantities for snow depth, snow density and snow temperature. The model was then incorporated into the GISS GCM. Inside the GCM the model is driven completely by the data simulated by other parts of the GCM. The screening effect of the vegetation is introduced by means of masking depth. For a thin snowpack a fractional cover is implemented so that the total thickness of the the snow is never less then 10 cm (rather, the areal fraction of the snow cover decreases when it melts). The model was tested with 6 year long GCM speed-up runs. It proved to be stable and produced reasonable results for the global snow cover. In comparison to the old GISS GCM snow model (which was

  6. Analysis of the Effects of SST and Model Resolutions on the Identification of the 1993 Superstorm Using an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Regional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, D.; Velissariou, P.; Chassignet, E.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The non-tropical storm, the 12-14 March 1993 Superstorm, which called the Storm of the Century had a wide reaching effect on the Northern Gulf of Mexico region and the East Coast of the United States. Previous studies show that the initial development of the storm could not be simulated accurately enough to represent the intensity and the evolution of the storm over the Gulf of Mexico region. The aim of this study is to identify the effects of the air-sea fluxes, the sea surface temperature (SST) and the model resolution on determining the intensity and the track of the storm more accurately. To this end, the outputs from two-way coupled model runs were examined to analyze the storm characteristics. Model configurations have been set within a coupled system framework that includes the atmospheric model Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) and the ocean model Regional Ocean Model (ROMS). Three WRF domains assigned 15 km, 5 km and ~1.6 km resolutions, respectively and an 8 km resolution ROMS domain were used in the coupled system. The initial and boundary conditions for WRF were extracted from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) products and the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) generated SSTs while, the conditions for ROMS were extracted from HYCOM. Comparisons were performed against NOAA buoys and GridSAT brightness temperatures. Minimum mean sea level pressure (MSLP), maximum wind speed and storm locations were examined. Time series for MSLP and wind speed were used to illustrate how air-sea interaction and resolution changes storm intensity along the track. The results showing the RMS differences on the storm location and intensity of the storm are also presented.

  7. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and A Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1 998 and 1999).

  8. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  9. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Y.; Xiao, H.; Neelin, J.; Ji, X.

    2013-12-01

    An evaluation is presented of the impact on tropical climate of continental-scale perturbations given by different representations of land surface processes (LSP) in a general circulation model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that such perturbations have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific Ocean. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, model experiments are performed with different LSP representations confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. The largest impact found over the tropical Pacific is mainly from perturbations in the tropical African continent where convective heating anomalies associated with perturbed surface heat fluxes trigger global teleconnections through equatorial wave dynamics. In the equatorial Pacific, the remote impacts of the convection anomalies are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as by the effects of ocean memory. LSP perturbations over South America and Asia-Australia have much weaker global impacts. The results further suggest that correct representations of LSP, land use change, and associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty of future climate projections with global climate models under various climate change scenarios. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA

  10. Assimilation of satellite color observations in a coupled ocean GCM-ecosystem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    1992-01-01

    Monthly average coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates of chlorophyll concentration were assimilated into an ocean global circulation model(GCM) containing a simple model of the pelagic ecosystem. The assimilation was performed in the simplest possible manner, to allow the assessment of whether there were major problems with the ecosystem model or with the assimilation procedure. The current ecosystem model performed well in some regions, but failed in others to assimilate chlorophyll estimates without disrupting important ecosystem properties. This experiment gave insight into those properties of the ecosystem model that must be changed to allow data assimilation to be generally successful, while raising other important issues about the assimilation procedure.

  11. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and a Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a superparameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generatio11 regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  12. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and a Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CFWs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1 998 and 1999). In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  13. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and A Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  14. A Coupled fcGCM-GCE Modeling System: A 3D Cloud Resolving Model and a Regional Scale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and ore sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicity calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A Brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications), and (4) The characteristics of the four-dimensional cloud data

  15. Centennial-to-millennial climate variability over the Great Plains in transient simulations of the Holocene with a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Schwalb, A.; Zorita, E.

    2010-12-01

    Two simulations with the coupled Atmosphere-Ocean general circulation model ECHO-G for the period 7,000 years BP until present are investigated related to climatic variability over the central Great Plains. The first simulation is driven with changes in orbital forcing, the second simulation with additional variable solar and greenhouse gas forcing. The simulations have not been forced with an acceleration technique in order to take into account ocean-atmosphere interactions on longer time scales. The solar forced simulation has been used to investigate connections between changes in solar activity and the North America summer monsoon. The composite pattern between zonal winds at 850 hPa and changes in solar activity clearly shows that during periods with increased solar activity the northward flow and hence the North American monsoon is increased. The correlation pattern between the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and summer precipitation over the Great Plains show significant correlations from inter-annual to multi-decadal time scales. Oceanic fingerprints between precipitation over the Great Plains and the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean, respectively, show distinct differences between winter and summer season. During northern winter the well known tripole pattern over the North Atlantic Ocean is evident while over the northeastern Pacific a negative SST anomaly is evident. During northern summer, precipitation variability over the Great Plains is strongly connected with tropical Pacific SSTs related to an El-Nino pattern. Our results therefore suggest that changes in solar activity are linked via indirect atmosphere-ocean coupling to climate variability over the Great Plains on longer time scales, mostly pronounced during northern summer. These changes occur on top of internal climate variability and therefore can exert amplifying and/or dampening effects on precipitation dynamics over the North America Great Plains.

  16. Earth's Climate: The Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    A new AGU book, Earth's Climate: The Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction, edited by Chunzai Wang, Shang-Ping Xie, and James A. Carton, presents current observations, theories, and models of ocean-atmosphere interaction that helps shape climate and its variations over the global ocean. The book represents the climate community's first effort to summarize the modern science of ocean-atmosphere interaction and the roles that the interaction play in climate variability in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans as well as interactions across basins and between the tropics and extratropics. In this issue, Eos talks with lead editor Chunzai Wang. Wang is a research oceanographer at the Physical Oceanography Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, in Miami, Florida.

  17. The Ocean-Atmosphere Hydrothermohaline Conveyor Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döös, Kristofer; Kjellsson, Joakim; Zika, Jan; Laliberté, Frédéric; Brodeau, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The ocean thermohaline circulation is linked to the hydrothermal circulation of the atmosphere. The ocean thermohaline circulation is expressed in potential temperature-salinity space and comprises a tropical upper-ocean circulation, a global conveyor belt cell and an Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The atmospheric hydrothermal circulation in a potential temperature-specific humidity space unifies the tropical Hadley and Walker cells as well as the midlatitude eddies into a single, global circulation. Superimposed, these thermohaline and hydrothermal stream functions reveal the possibility of a close connection between some parts of the water and air mass conversions. The exchange of heat and fresh water through the sea surface (precipiation-evaporation) and incoming solar radiation act to make near-surface air warm and moist while making surface water warmer and saltier as both air and water travel towards the Equator. In the tropics, air masses can undergo moist convection releasing latent heat by forming precipitation, thus acting to make warm surface water fresher. We propose that the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship for moist near-surface air acts like a lower bound for the atmospheric hydrothermal cell and an upper bound for the ocean thermohaline Conveyor-Belt cell. The analysis is made by combining and merging the overturning circulation of the ocean and atmosphere by relating the salinity of the ocean to the humidity of the atmosphere, where we set the heat and freshwater transports equal in the two stream functions By using simulations integrated with our Climate-Earth system model EC-Earth, we intend to produce the "hydrothermohaline" stream function of the coupled ocean-atmosphere overturning circulation in one single picture. We explore how the oceanic thermohaline Conveyor Belt can be linked to the global atmospheric hydrothermal circulation and if the water and air mass conversions in humidity-temperature-salinity space can be related and linked to each

  18. The effect of Arabian Sea optical properties on SST biases and the South Asian summer monsoon in a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. G.; Joshi, M.; Robertson, E. S.; Woolnough, S. J.

    2012-08-01

    This study examines the effect of seasonally varying chlorophyll on the climate of the Arabian Sea and South Asian monsoon. The effect of such seasonality on the radiative properties of the upper ocean is often a missing process in coupled general circulation models and its large amplitude in the region makes it a pertinent choice for study to determine any impact on systematic biases in the mean and seasonality of the Arabian Sea. In this study we examine the effects of incorporating a seasonal cycle in chlorophyll due to phytoplankton blooms in the UK Met Office coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM HadCM3. This is achieved by performing experiments in which the optical properties of water in the Arabian Sea—a key signal of the semi-annual cycle of phytoplankton blooms in the region—are calculated from a chlorophyll climatology derived from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) data. The SeaWiFS chlorophyll is prescribed in annual mean and seasonally-varying experiments. In response to the chlorophyll bloom in late spring, biases in mixed layer depth are reduced by up to 50% and the surface is warmed, leading to increases in monsoon rainfall during the onset period. However when the monsoons are fully established in boreal winter and summer and there are strong surface winds and a deep mixed layer, biases in the mixed layer depth are reduced but the surface undergoes cooling. The seasonality of the response of SST to chlorophyll is found to depend on the relative depth of the mixed layer to that of the anomalous penetration depth of solar fluxes. Thus the inclusion of the effects of chlorophyll on radiative properties of the upper ocean acts to reduce biases in mixed layer depth and increase seasonality in SST.

  19. On the Decadal Modes of Oscillation of an Idealized Ocean-atmosphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vikram M.

    1990-01-01

    Axially-symmetric, linear, free modes of global, primitive equation, ocean-atmosphere models are examined to see if they contain decadal (10 to 30 years) oscillation time scale modes. A two-layer ocean model and a two-level atmospheric model are linearized around axially-symmetric basic states containing mean meridional circulations in the ocean and the atmosphere. Uncoupled and coupled, axially-symmetric modes of oscillation of the ocean-atmosphere system are calculated. The main conclusion is that linearized, uncoupled and coupled, ocean-atmosphere systems can contain axially-symmetric, free modes of variability on decadal time scales. These results have important implications for externally-forced decadal climate variability.

  20. Evolution dynamics of tropical ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.; Chao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    The structure of ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability is extracted from the revised Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set SSTs, surface winds, and the latent heat (LH) and net shortwave (SW) surface fluxes using the covariance-based rotated principal component analysis method. The coupled annual cycle variability is concisely described using two modes that are in temporal quadrature. The first, peaking in June/July (and December/January), represents monsoonal flow onto Indochina, Central America, and western Africa. The second mode peaks in September/October and March/April when it represents the extreme phases of the SST annual cycle in the eastern oceans. Analysis of the surface momentum balance in the Pacific cold tongue core shows the equatorial flow, and in particular the zonal wind, to be dynamically consistent with the SST gradient during both the cold tongue`s nascent (June/July) and mature (September/October) phases; the dynamical consistency improves when the impact of nearsurface static stability variation on horizontal momentum dissipation is also considered. Evolution structure of the extracted annual cycle, moreover, shows the easterly wind tendency to lead SST cooling in the off-coastal zone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Pacific cold tongue westward expansion results from local interaction of the zonal wind and zonal SST gradient, as encapsulated in the proposed {open_quotes}westward expansion hypothesis{close_quotes} - a simple analytic model of which is also presented. 29 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Mechanisms of internally generated decadal-to-multidecadal variability of SST in the Atlantic Ocean in a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Schneider, Edwin K.; Wu, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of the internally generated decadal-to-multidecadal variability of SST in the Atlantic Ocean are investigated in a long control simulation of the Community Climate System Model version 3 with constant external forcing. The interactive ensemble (IE) coupling strategy, with an ensemble of atmospheric GCMs (AGCM) coupled to an ocean model, a sea-ice model and a land model, is used to diagnose the roles of various processes in the coupled GCM (CGCM). The noise components of heat flux, wind stress and fresh water flux of the control simulation, determined from the CGCM surface fluxes by subtracting the SST-forced surface fluxes, estimated as the ensemble mean of AGCM simulations, are applied at the ocean surface of the IE in different regions and in different combinations. The IE simulations demonstrate that the climate variability in the control simulation is predominantly forced by noise. The local noise forcing is found to be responsible for the SST variability in the Atlantic Ocean, with noise heat flux and noise wind stress playing a critical role. The control run Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) index is decomposed into interannual, decadal and multidecadal modes based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition. The AMV multidecadal mode, a combination of 50- and 100-year modes, is examined in detail. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) pattern in the atmosphere, dominated by the noise component, forces the multidecadal mode through noise heat flux and noise wind stress. The noise wind stress forcing on the multidecadal mode is associated with ocean dynamics, including gyre adjustment and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The AMV decadal mode is also found to be related to noise NAO forcing. The associated ocean dynamics are connected with both noise heat flux and noise wind stress, but the AMOC related to the decadal mode is more likely to be forced by noise heat flux. For both multidecadal and decadal modes, the

  2. Coupling the WAM wave model to EC-Earth GCM: Will it reduce the Southern Ocean bias?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Hylke

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to accelerate progress on the reduction of the well-known ocean SST bias in the Southern Ocean (SO), research has been undertaken to include the WAM wave-model in to the EC-Earth GCM. EC-Earth v3.1 is based on the ECMWF IFS atmosphere model and uses NEMO to describe the ocean circulation. The SST bias in EC-Earth, as in many other coupled GCMs, is predominantly a summer problem. In that season mixed layer depths are shallow because strong radiative forcing leads to strong vertical temperature stratification. Realistic sea states and surface wave breaking will feedback on to the upper layers of the oceanic circulation, for example through enhanced vertical mixing. Without actual sea state information, NEMO relies on certain parameterizations that involve atmospheric surface windstress. However, during a "growing"/"decaying" sea state, the net stress entering the ocean is lower/higher than the atmospheric wind stress. Without real-time information of the sea state, ocean models such as NEMO can only assume a sea-state in equilibrium with the wind at all times, a situation which is rather rare. We present first results of the effect of including surface ocean waves (WAM) into EC-Earth. If only IFS-WAM interaction is included, effects on the SO bias are limited. The small changes in the wind patterns (and thereby windstress), induced by the wave-induced modified drag-coefficients, are clearly not large enough to substantially modify the SST pattern. If WAM-NEMO interactions are included as well the changes are more substantial (as they modify the vertical mixing), but not necessarily everywhere in the right direction regarding the SST bias.

  3. The Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model of the RMIB: MAOOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cruz, Lesley; Demaeyer, Jonathan; Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere system exhibits a decadal variability at midlatitudes, which gives rise to the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NOA). The driving mechanism behind this variability has been the subject of much interest and debate in recent years. This conundrum was addressed using several low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere models for midlatitudes, with an increasing level of physical realism: OA-QG-WS v1 [1], v2 [2], and most recently, VDDG [3]. The VDDG-model was designed to capture the key dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, featuring a two-layer atmosphere over a shallow-water ocean layer with passively advected temperature. It incorporates both frictional coupling and an energy balance scheme which accounts for radiative and heat fluxes between ocean and atmosphere. The spectral expansion was truncated at 10 atmospheric and 8 oceanic modes, and a coupled low-frequency variability was found. We present an extended version of the VDDG model, in which an arbitrary number of atmospheric and oceanic modes can be retained. The modularity of the new model version allows one to easily modify the model physics. Using this new model, named the "Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model" (MAOOAM), we analyse the dependence of the model dynamics on the truncation level of the spectral expansion. Indeed, previous studies have shown that spurious behaviour may exist in low-resolution models, which can be unveiled by a comparison with their high-resolution counterparts [4]. In particular, we assess the robustness of the coupled low-frequency variability when the number of modes is increased. References [1] Vannitsem, S.: Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model, Climate dynamics, 42, 1981-1998, 2014. [2] Vannitsem, S. and De Cruz, L.: A 24-variable low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model: OA-QG-WS v2, Geoscientific Model Development, 7, 649-662, 2014. [3] Vannitsem, S., Demaeyer, J., De Cruz, L., and Ghil

  4. A comparison of downscaled and raw GCM output: implications for climate change scenarios in the San Juan River basin, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Hay, L. E.; Leavesley, G. H.

    1999-11-01

    The fundamental rationale for statistical downscaling is that the raw outputs of climate change experiments from General Circulation Models (GCMs) are an inadequate basis for assessing the effects of climate change on land-surface processes at regional scales. This is because the spatial resolution of GCMs is too coarse to resolve important sub-grid scale processes (most notably those pertaining to the hydrological cycle) and because GCM output is often unreliable at individual and sub-grid box scales. By establishing empirical relationships between grid-box scale circulation indices (such as atmospheric vorticity and divergence) and sub-grid scale surface predictands (such as precipitation), statistical downscaling has been proposed as a practical means of bridging this spatial difference. This study compared three sets of current and future rainfall-runoff scenarios. The scenarios were constructed using: (1) statistically downscaled GCM output; (2) raw GCM output; and (3) raw GCM output corrected for elevational biases. Atmospheric circulation indices and humidity variables were extracted from the output of the UK Meteorological Office coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM (HadCM2) in order to downscale daily precipitation and temperature series for the Animas River in the San Juan River basin, Colorado. Significant differences arose between the modelled snowpack and flow regimes of the three future climate scenarios. Overall, the raw GCM output suggests larger reductions in winter/spring snowpack and summer runoff than the downscaling, relative to current conditions. Further research is required to determine the generality of the water resource implications for other regions, GCM outputs and downscaled scenarios.

  5. Experimental study of ocean-atmosphere exchanges

    SciTech Connect

    Eymard, L.; Weill, A.; Planton, S.

    1994-12-31

    The SOFIA/ASTEX and SEMAPHORE campaigns were performed over open ocean, near the Azores, to study the ocean-atmosphere exchanges at the local and meso-scales, with a particular insight to the spatial variability of fluxes and related processes. In both cases, the experimental strategy involved two research aircraft and an oceanographic vessel, as well as surface buoys. SOFIA/ASTEX was more particularly devoted to the study of boundary layer and cloud properties, including microphysical and radiative aspects, in the framework of the international campaign ASTEX. SEMAPHORE was aimed at the analysis of surface fluxes and interactions with the upper ocean at the mesoscale. It included an important network of ocean circulation and thermal properties, from ships, current meter moorings, current drifters, and drifting buoys. The thermal front associated with the Azores current is an important feature of the ocean circulation and was particularly investigated. The analysis of data from meteorological satellites is also an important aspect of the two campaigns.

  6. A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Scott D.; Slutz, Ralph J.; Jenne, Roy L.; Steurer, Peter M.

    1987-10-01

    Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)-the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and easily used data set. As background, a historical overview is given of how archiving of these marine data has evolved from 1854, when systematic recording of shipboard meteorological and oceanographic observations was first established as an international activity. Input data sets used for COADS are described, as well as the processing steps used to pack input data into compact binary formats and to apply quality controls for identification of suspect weather elements and duplicate marine reports. Seventy-million unique marine reports for 1854-1979 were output from initial processing. Further processing is described, which created statistical summaries for each month of each year of the period, using 2° latitude × 2° longitude boxes. Monthly summary products are available giving 14 statistics (such as the median and the mean) for each of eight observed variables (air and sea-surface temperatures, scalar and vector wind, pressure, humidity, and cloudiness), plus 11 derived variables. Examples of known temporal, spatial, and methodological inhomogeneities in marine data, and plans for periodic updates to COADS, including an update through 1986 scheduled for completion by early 1988, are presented.

  7. Comparisons of GCM and Observed Surface Wind Fields over the Tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Nicholas E.; Barnett, Tim P.; Chervin, Robert M.; Schlesinger, Michael E.; Schlese, Ulrich

    1989-03-01

    Many of the processes that have important effects on both the climatological distribution and interannual variability of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical oceans are greatly affected by the surface wind field. For this reason accurate simulation of the surface wind is a key factor governing the success of coupled tropical ocean-atmosphere models. This paper presents the results of two analyses that investigate the quality of wind fields produced by three general circulation models (GCMs) over the tropical Indian and Pacific oceans.The first analysis concerns the annual cycles of the tropical wind fields simulated by versions of the GCM at the Oregon State University (OSU), European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF), and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). These models have similar horizontal resolutions but vary widely in vertical resolution. The results show that although there are substantial differences in model performance, apparently related to differences in vertical resolution, there are also clear similarities in their behavior. Each GCM did best in major trade wind regions and somewhat poorly in convectively active areas with light winds. This finding suggests that the formulations governing the interactions between persistent convection and the circulation may limit model performance.A second analysis examines the response of the NCAR GCM, in terms of tropical Pacific wind stress, to prescribed SST anomalies over the period 1961-1972. It was found that the model response to SST anomalies associated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation(ENSO) was distinct and in some respects resembled that of the real atmosphere. However, there were important discrepancies in the spatial configuration of the GCM field and in the amplitude of response of the GCM to the SST anomalies. An analysis of these discrepancies suggests that while the trapped equatorial Kelvin wave response of an ocean model coupled to this GCM would be

  8. Modeling oxygenation of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Late Ordovician-Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the Earth's history, the redox state of surface environments, biogeochemical cycles, and biological innovation/extinction have been intimately related. Therefore, understanding the long-term (over millions of years) evolution of the redox state of an ocean-atmosphere system and its controlling factors is one of the fundamental topics of Earth Sciences. In particular, Early Paleozoic is marked by the prominent biological evolution/diversification events (Cambrian explosion and Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), implying the causal linkage between ocean oxygenation and biological innovation. On the other hand, multiple lines of evidence (such as black shale deposition, low C/S ratio of buried sediments, low molybdenum isotopic value, and iron speciation data) suggest that ocean interior had been kept in low oxygen condition until the Devonian. Dahl et al. (2010) PNAS found an increase in molybdenum isotopic value from ~1.4‰ to ~2.0‰ between ~440 Ma and ~390 Ma, implying the oceanic redox transition to a well-oxygenated condition. It was proposed that this ocean oxygenation event correlates with the diversification of vascular land plants; an enhanced burial of terrigenous organic matter increases the oxygen supply rate to an ocean-atmosphere system. Although this hypothesis for a causal linkage between the diversification of land plants and oxidation event of an ocean-atmosphere system is intriguing, it remains unclear whether the radiation of land plant is necessary to cause such redox transition. Because oxygen is most likely regulated by a combination of several feedbacks in the Earth system, it is essential to evaluate the impact of plant diversification on the oxygenation state of an ocean-atmosphere system by use of a numerical model in which C-N-P-O-S coupled biogeochemical cycles between ocean-atmosphere-sediment systems are take into account. In this study, the paleoredox history of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Paleozoic is

  9. a Coupled GCM Comparison of Marine Isotope Stages 1, 5e, 11c and 31 IN Relation to Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, A. J.; DeConto, R.; Melles, M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Minyuk, P.

    2012-12-01

    The lack of scientific data concerning interglacials of the Pleistocene in the Arctic has been a major obstacle within the climate community. Study of the interglacials of Marine Isotope Stage(s) (MIS) 1, 5e, 11c and 31 in high latitudes is important to decoding Arctic sensitivity and providing us with a potential analogue for a future Arctic with climate change. Data from a sediment core recovered from Lake El'Gygytgyn in northeastern (NE) Russia gives a continuous, high-resolution record of the Arctic spanning the past 2.8 million years whilst recording these interglacials. The data was used to correlate simulated interglacial Arctic climate with Arctic climate derived from sediment core proxy studies. Here, we use a Global Circulation Model (GCM) with a coupled atmosphere and land-surface scheme complete with an interactive vegetation component to simulate marine isotope stages 1, 5e, 11c and 31 in the Arctic. GCM simulations of MIS 5e and 31 in the Arctic both show a warmer arctic climate that can be explained by high obliquity, high eccentricity, high CO2 (287 ppmv ,325 ppmv , respectively) and precession that aligns perihelion with boreal summer. Consequently, MIS 5e showed the greatest summer warming compared to the other interglacials and pre-industrial control. However, the distinctly higher values of mean temperature of the warmest month (MTWM) and annual precipitation during stage 11c cannot readily be explained by summer orbital forcings and greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations. Montane forest is seen migrating northward in stages 1, 5e and 31 as the surface insolation increases and sea ice melts, whereas in 11c, the warmest of the interglacials, evergreen forest takes over and migrates pole ward toward the coast. Feedback from low albedo forest biome was studied and conclusions suggest the increase in temperature due to forest cover is insignificant in creating a significantly warm regional climate. The warming associated with a lack of a Greenland Ice

  10. Estimating annual precipitation for the Colorado River Basin using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Ajay; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2012-06-01

    Estimating long-lead time precipitation under the stress of increased climatic variability is a challenging task in the field of hydrology. A modified Support Vector Machine (SVM) based framework is proposed to estimate annual precipitation using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. Oceanic-atmospheric oscillations, consisting of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) for a period of 1900-2008, are used to generate annual precipitation estimates with a 1 year lead time. The SVM model is applied to 17 climate divisions encompassing the Colorado River Basin in the western United States. The overall results revealed that the annual precipitation in the Colorado River Basin is significantly influenced by oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. The long-term precipitation predictions for the Upper Colorado River Basin can be successfully obtained using a combination of PDO, NAO, and AMO indices, whereas coupling AMO and ENSO results in improved precipitation predictions for the Lower Colorado River Basin. The results also show that the SVM model provides better precipitation estimates compared to the Artificial Neural Network and Multivariate Linear Regression models. The annual precipitation estimates obtained using the modified SVM modeling framework may assist water managers in statistically understanding the hydrologic response in relation to large scale climate patterns within the Colorado River Basin.

  11. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (˜10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (˜5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfully satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. The results may also be useful for helping to tune them.

  12. An Analysis of Precipitation Associated With the ITCZ in the CMIP5 AMIP and Historical-Coupled GCM Simulations: A Quantitative Assessment of Magnitude and Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanfield, R.; Jiang, J. H.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Su, H.

    2014-12-01

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the broad-scale features of precipitation as simulated by Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are in modest agreement with observations, however, large systematic errors are found in the Tropics (IPCC AR5 Ch.9). This study provides a quantitative analysis of precipitation associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over the equatorial northern Pacific. Results from 31 CMIP5 Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) Global Circulation Model (GCM) runs and their historical ocean-coupled counterparts are compared with Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations. Differences found between the GCMs and observations are quantitatively analyzed using two innovative feature-based approaches with the intent of separating these discrepancies in the precipitation fields into components of magnitude-based error due to parameterizations, and location-based error due to large scale dynamics. Results show widespread and varied results across all GCMs, with some models showing large under/over-simulation of precipitation magnitude while other models suffer from significant pole-ward or equator-ward position shift of the ITCZ. Linkage between these results with the models' deep/convective and shallow/stratiform parameterizations are discussed.

  13. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfullymore » satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.« less

  14. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfully satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.

  15. Study of thermospheric and ionospheric tidal responses to the 2009 stratospheric sudden warming by an assimilative atmosphere-ionosphere coupled TIME-GCM with FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-Ting; Liu, Hanli; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Lin, Charles C. H.; Chen, Chia-Hung; Chang, Loren; Chen, Wei-Han

    In this study, ionospheric peak densities obtained from radio occultation soundings of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC are decomposed into their various constituent tidal components for studying the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) effects on the tidal responses during the 2008/2009. The observations are further compared with the results from an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model, TIME-GCM. The model assimilates MERRA 3D meteorological data between the lower-boundary (~30km) and 0.1h Pa (~62km) by a nudging method. The comparison shows general agreement in the major features of decrease of migrating tidal signatures (DW1, SW2 and TW3) in ionosphere around the growth phase of SSW, with phase/time shifts in the daily time of maximum around EIA and middle latitudes. Both the observation and simulation indicate a pronounced enhancement of the ionospheric SW2 signatures after the stratospheric temperature increase. The model suggest that the typical morning enhancement/afternoon reduction of electron density variation is mainly caused by modification of the ionospheric migrating tidal signatures. The model shows that the thermospheric SW2 tide variation is similar to ionosphere as well as the phase shift. These phases shift of migrating tides are highly related to the present of induced secondary planetary wave 1 in the E region.

  16. Arctic forcing of decadal variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean in a high-resolution global coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.

    2014-06-01

    The hypothesis that northern high-latitude atmospheric variability influences decadal variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean by modulating the wind jet blowing over the Gulf of Tehuantepec (GT) is examined using the high-resolution configuration of the MIROC 3.2 global coupled model. The model is shown to have acceptable skill in replicating the spatial pattern, strength, seasonality, and time scale of observed GT wind events. The decadal variability of the simulated GT winds in a 100-year control integration is driven by the Arctic Oscillation (AO). The regional impacts of the GT winds include strong sea surface cooling, increased salinity, and the generation of westward-propagating anticyclonic eddies, also consistent with observations. However, significant nonlocal effects also emerge in concert with the low-frequency variability of the GT winds, including anomalously low upper ocean heat content (OHC) in the central tropical Pacific Ocean. It is suggested that the mesoscale eddies generated by the wind stress curl signature of the GT winds, which propagate several thousand kilometers toward the central Pacific, contribute to this anomaly by strengthening the meridional overturning associated with the northern subtropical cell. A parallel mechanism for the decadal OHC variability is considered by examining the Ekman and Sverdrup transports inferred from the atmospheric circulation anomalies in the northern midlatitude Pacific directly associated with the AO.

  17. Contrasting Indian Ocean SST Variability With and Without ENSO Influence: A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean GCM Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jin-Yi; Lau, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we perform experiments with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) to examine ENSO's influence on the interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability of the tropical Indian Ocean. The control experiment includes both the Indian and Pacific Oceans in the ocean model component of the CGCM (the Indo-Pacific Run). The anomaly experiment excludes ENSOs influence by including only the Indian Ocean while prescribing monthly-varying climatological SSTs for the Pacific Ocean (the Indian-Ocean Run). In the Indo-Pacific Run, an oscillatory mode of the Indian Ocean SST variability is identified by a multi-channel singular spectral analysis (MSSA). The oscillatory mode comprises two patterns that can be identified with the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode (IOZM) and a basin-wide warming/cooling mode respectively. In the model, the IOZM peaks about 3-5 months after ENSO reaches its maximum intensity. The basin mode peaks 8 months after the IOZM. The timing and associated SST patterns suggests that the IOZM is related to ENSO, and the basin- wide warming/cooling develops as a result of the decay of the IOZM spreading SST anomalies from western Indian Ocean to the eastern Indian Ocean. In contrast, in the Indian-Ocean Run, no oscillatory modes can be identified by the MSSA, even though the Indian Ocean SST variability is characterized by east-west SST contrast patterns similar to the IOZM. In both control and anomaly runs, IOZM-like SST variability appears to be associated with forcings from fluctuations of the Indian monsoon. Our modeling results suggest that the oscillatory feature of the IOZM is primarily forced by ENSO.

  18. Impact of seas/lakes on polar meteorology of Titan: Simulation by a coupled GCM-Sea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2009-12-01

    The detection of large hydrocarbon seas/lakes near the poles by the Cassini spacecraft raises the question as to whether and how polar seas affect the meteorology on Titan. The polar meteorology and methane hydrological cycle in the presence of seas are investigated by a three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a one-dimensional sea energy balance model considering the observed sea/lake geography. The sea composition has a large control on the seasonal evolution of seas, temperature and wind system in the polar region, particularly in the north where large seas are located. The surface of ethane-rich seas, which do not evaporate methane, undergo a large seasonal temperature variation and the sea surface is often warmer than the surrounding land surface. Land breeze in summer towards the seas causes a moisture convergence over the seas, which leads to enhanced summer precipitation in the sea area. On the other hand, methane-rich seas evaporate some methane and are therefore colder than the surroundings. This causes a sea breeze across the north pole in summer, which blows away the moisture from the polar region, so precipitation becomes scarce in the north polar region. The breeze can become stronger than the tidal wind. Sea evaporation peaks in winter, when the temperature and average methane mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer become lowest. The sea level predominantly rises in summer by precipitation and retreats in winter by evaporation. The meteorology in the south polar region is less sensitive to the composition of the lakes because of the paucity and smallness of southern lakes. Lake-effect precipitation can occur either by moisture convergence by the breeze or humidity enhancement over the seas, but is more characteristic of warm seasons than of cold seasons.

  19. Multiple equilibria, natural variability, and climate transitions in an idealized ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, R.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    An idealized coupled ocean-atmosphere is constructed to study climatic equilibria and variability. The model focuses on the role of large-scale fluid motions in the climate system. The atmospheric component is an eddy-resolving two-level global primitive equation model with simplified physical parameterizations. The oceanic component is a zonally averaged sector model of the thermohaline circulation. The two components exchange heat and freshwater fluxes synchonously. Coupled integrations are carried out over periods of several centuries to identify the equilibrium states of the ocean-atmosphere system. It is shown that there exist at least three types of equilibria, which are distinguished by whether they have upwelling or downwelling in the polar regions. Each oceanic circulation in the coupled model exhibits natural variability on interdecadal and longer timescales. The dominant interdecadal mode of variability is associated with the advection of oceanic temperature anomalies in the sinking regions. The sensitivity of the coupled model to climatic perturbations is studied. A rapid increase in the greenhouse gas concentrations leads to a collapse of the meridional overtuning in the ocean. Introduction of a large positive surface freshwater anomaly in the high latitudes leads to a temporary suppression of the sinking motion, followed by a rapid recovery, due primarily to the high latitude cooling associated with the reduction of oceanic heat transport. In this evolution, the secondary roles played by the atmospheric heat transport and moisture transport in destablizing the thermohaline circulation are compared, and the former is found to be dominant.

  20. Skill Assessment of a Spectral Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson, W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton, detrital material, and water absorb and scatter light spectrally. The Ocean- Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is intended to provide surface irradiance over the oceans with sufficient spectral resolution to support ocean ecology, biogeochemistry, and heat exchange investigations, and of sufficient duration to support inter-annual and decadal investigations. OASIM total surface irradiance (integrated 200 nm to 4 microns) was compared to in situ data and three publicly available global data products at monthly 1-degree resolution. OASIM spectrally-integrated surface irradiance had root mean square (RMS) difference= 20.1 W/sq m (about 11%), bias=1.6 W/sq m (about 0.8%), regression slope= 1.01 and correlation coefficient= 0.89, when compared to 2322 in situ observations. OASIM had the lowest bias of any of the global data products evaluated (ISCCP-FD, NCEP, and ISLSCP 11), and the best slope (nearest to unity). It had the second best RMS, and the third best correlation coefficient. OASIM total surface irradiance compared well with ISCCP-FD (RMS= 20.7 W/sq m; bias=-11.4 W/sq m, r=0.98) and ISLSCP II (RMS =25.2 W/sq m; bias= -13.8 W/sq m; r=0.97), but less well with NCEP (RMS =43.0 W/sq m ;bias=-22.6 W/sq m; x=0.91). Comparisons of OASIM photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) with PAR derived from SeaWiFS showed low bias (-1.8 mol photons /sq m/d, or about 5%), RMS (4.25 mol photons /sq m/d ' or about 12%), near unity slope (1.03) and high correlation coefficient (0.97). Coupled with previous estimates of clear sky spectral irradiance in OASIM (6.6% RMS at 1 nm resolution), these results suggest that OASIM provides reasonable estimates of surface broadband and spectral irradiance in the oceans, and can support studies on ocean ecosystems, carbon cycling, and heat exchange.

  1. Dynamical ocean-atmospheric drivers of floods and droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Hall, Julia

    2014-05-01

    The present study contributes to a better depiction and understanding of the "facial expression" of the Earth in terms of dynamical ocean-atmospheric processes associated to both floods and droughts. For this purpose, the study focuses on nonlinear dynamical and statistical analysis of ocean-atmospheric mechanisms contributing to hydrological extremes, broadening the analytical hydro-meteorological perspective of floods and hydrological droughts to driving mechanisms and feedbacks at the global scale. In doing so, the analysis of the climate-related causality of hydrological extremes is not limited to the synoptic situation in the region where the events take place. Rather, it goes further in the train of causality, peering into dynamical interactions between planetary-scale ocean and atmospheric processes that drive weather regimes and influence the antecedent and event conditions associated to hydrological extremes. In order to illustrate the approach, dynamical ocean-atmospheric drivers are investigated for a selection of floods and droughts. Despite occurring in different regions with different timings, common underlying mechanisms are identified for both kinds of hydrological extremes. For instance, several analysed events are seen to have resulted from a large-scale atmospheric situation consisting on standing planetary waves encircling the northern hemisphere. These correspond to wider vortices locked in phase, resulting in wider and more persistent synoptic weather patterns, i.e. with larger spatial and temporal coherence. A standing train of anticyclones and depressions thus encircled the mid and upper latitudes of the northern hemisphere. The stationary regime of planetary waves occurs when the mean eastward zonal flow decreases up to a point in which it no longer exceeds the westward phase propagation of the Rossby waves produced by the latitude-varying Coriolis effect. The ocean-atmospheric causes for this behaviour and consequences on hydrological

  2. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  3. Seasonal prediction of global sea level anomalies using an ocean-atmosphere dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Elaine R.; Spillman, Claire M.; Church, John A.; McIntosh, Peter C.

    2014-10-01

    Advanced warning of extreme sea level events is an invaluable tool for coastal communities, allowing the implementation of management policies and strategies to minimise loss of life and infrastructure damage. This study is an initial attempt to apply a dynamical coupled ocean-atmosphere model to the prediction of seasonal sea level anomalies (SLA) globally for up to 7 months in advance. We assess the ability of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's operational seasonal dynamical forecast system, the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA), to predict seasonal SLA, using gridded satellite altimeter observation-based analyses over the period 1993-2010 and model reanalysis over 1981-2010. Hindcasts from POAMA are based on a 33-member ensemble of seasonal forecasts that are initialised once per month for the period 1981-2010. Our results show POAMA demonstrates high skill in the equatorial Pacific basin and consistently exhibits more skill globally than a forecast based on persistence. Model predictability estimates indicate there is scope for improvement in the higher latitudes and in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. Most characteristics of the asymmetric SLA fields generated by El-Nino/La Nina events are well represented by POAMA, although the forecast amplitude weakens with increasing lead-time.

  4. Quantifying predictability variations in a low-order ocean-atmosphere model - A dynamical systems approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nese, Jon M.; Dutton, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The predictability of the weather and climatic states of a low-order moist general circulation model is quantified using a dynamic systems approach, and the effect of incorporating a simple oceanic circulation on predictability is evaluated. The predictability and the structure of the model attractors are compared using Liapunov exponents, local divergence rates, and the correlation and Liapunov dimensions. It was found that the activation of oceanic circulation increases the average error doubling time of the atmosphere and the coupled ocean-atmosphere system by 10 percent and decreases the variance of the largest local divergence rate by 20 percent. When an oceanic circulation develops, the average predictability of annually averaged states is improved by 25 percent and the variance of the largest local divergence rate decreases by 25 percent.

  5. Comparison of GCM subgrid fluxes calculated using BATS and SiB schemes with a coupled land-atmosphere high-resolution model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinmei; Arritt, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of land-atmosphere interactions and biosphere in climate change studies has long been recognized, and several land-atmosphere interaction schemes have been developed. Among these, the Simple Biosphere scheme (SiB) of Sellers et al. and the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) of Dickinson et al. are two of the most widely known. The effects of GCM subgrid-scale inhomogeneities of surface properties in general circulation models also has received increasing attention in recent years. However, due to the complexity of land surface processes and the difficulty to prescribe the large number of parameters that determine atmospheric and soil interactions with vegetation, many previous studies and results seem to be contradictory. A GCM grid element typically represents an area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. Within such an area, there exist variations of soil type, soil wetness, vegetation type, vegetation density and topography, as well as urban areas and water bodies. In this paper, we incorporate both BATS and SiB2 land surface process schemes into a nonhydrostatic, compressible version of AMBLE model (Atmospheric Model -- Boundary-Layer Emphasis), and compare the surface heat fluxes and mesoscale circulations calculated using the two schemes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Ocean-atmosphere-wave characterisation of a wind jet (Ebro shelf, NW Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoll, Manel; Navarro, Jorge; Pallares, Elena; Ràfols, Laura; Espino, Manuel; Palomares, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution the wind jet dynamics in the northern margin of the Ebro River shelf (NW Mediterranean Sea) are investigated using coupled numerical models. The study area is characterised by persistent and energetic offshore winds during autumn and winter. During these seasons, a seaward wind jet usually develops in a ˜ 50 km wide band offshore. The COAWST (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport) modelling system was implemented in the region with a set of downscaling meshes to obtain high-resolution meteo-oceanographic outputs. Wind, waves and water currents were compared with in situ observations and remote-sensing-derived products with an acceptable level of agreement. Focused on an intense offshore wind event, the modelled wind jet appears in a limited area offshore with strong spatial variability. The wave pattern during the wind jet is characterised by the development of bimodal directional spectra, and the ocean circulation tends to present well-defined two-layer flow in the shallower region (i.e. inner shelf). The outer shelf tends to be dominated by mesoscale dynamics such as the slope current. Due to the limited fetch length, ocean surface roughness considering sea state (wave-atmosphere coupling) modifies to a small extent the wind and significant wave height under severe cross-shelf wind events. However, the coupling effect in the wind resource assessment may be relevant due to the cubic relation between the wind intensity and power.

  7. Ocean-atmosphere interaction and the tropical climatology. Part I. The dangers of flux correction

    SciTech Connect

    Neelin, J.D.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    1995-05-01

    This sequence of papers examines the role of dynamical feedbacks between the ocean and the atmosphere in determining features of the tropical climatology. A stripped-down, intermediate, coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to provide a prototype problem for the Pacific basin. Here the authors contrast the fully coupled case with the case where flux correction is used to construct the climatology. In the fully coupled case, the climatology is determined largely by feedback mechanisms within the ocean basin: winds driven by gradients of sea surface temperature (SST) within the basin interact with the ocean circulation to maintain SST gradients. For all realistic cases, these lead to a unique steady solution for the tropical climatology. In the flux-corrected case, the artificially constructed climatology becomes unstable at sufficiently large coupling, leading to multiple steady states as found in a number of coupled models. Using continuation methods, we show that there is a topological change in the bifurcation structure as flux correction is relaxed toward a fully coupled case; this change is characterized as an imperfection and must occur generically for all flux-corrected cases. The cold branch is steady solutions is governed by mechanisms similar to the fully coupled case. The warm branch, however, is spurious and disappears. The dynamics of this and consequences for coupled models are discussed. Multiple steady states can be ruled out as a mechanism for El Nino in favor of oscillatory mechanisms. The important role that coupled feedbacks are suggested to play in establishing tropical climatology is referred to as {open_quotes}the climatological version of the Bjerknes hypothesis.{close_quotes} 43 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ocean-atmosphere processes driving Indian summer monsoon biases in CFSv2 hindcasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Murtugudde, Raghu; Wang, Hui; Kumar, Arun

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the role of the Indian Ocean (IO) and the atmosphere biases in generating and sustaining large-scale precipitation biases over Central India (CI) during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in the climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2) hindcasts that are produced by initializing the system each month from January 1982 to March 2011. The CFSv2 hindcasts are characterized by a systematic dry monsoon bias over CI that deteriorate with forecast lead-times and coexist with a wet bias in the tropical IO suggesting a large-scale interplay between coupled ocean-atmosphere and land biases. The biases evolving from spring-initialized forecasts are analyzed in detail to understand the evolution of summer biases. The northward migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) that typically crosses the equator in the IO sector during April in nature is delayed in the hindcasts when the forecast system is initialized in early spring. Our analyses show that the delay in the ITCZ coexists with wind and SST biases and the associated processes project onto the seasonal evolution of the coupled ocean-atmosphere features. This delay in conjunction with the SST and the wind biases during late spring and early summer contributes to excessive precipitation over the ocean and leading to a deficit in rainfall over CI throughout the summer. Attribution of bias to a specific component in a coupled forecast system is particularly challenging as seemingly independent biases from one component affect the other components or are affected by their feedbacks. In the spring-initialized forecasts, the buildup of deeper thermocline in association with warmer SSTs due to the enhanced Ekman pumping in the southwest IO inhibits the otherwise typical northward propagation of ITCZ in the month of April. Beyond this deficiency in the forecasts, two key ocean-atmosphere coupled mechanisms are identified; one in the Arabian Sea, where a positive windstress curl bias in conjunction

  9. Developing a new Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA-3.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Alves, Oscar; Okely, Patricia; Tseitkin, Faina; Marshall, Andrew; Luo, Jing-Jia; Hudson, Debra; Zhao, Maggie; Yin, Yonghong; Hendon, Harry

    2013-04-01

    The Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) is a state-of-the-art intra-seasonal to seasonal forecast system based on a coupled climate model and ocean/atmosphere/land observations assimilation system. Several versions of the POAMA system have been developed over the past decade, including 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.4. The development of a new POAMA system, POAMA-3.0, is currently underway. The model components in POAMA-3.0 are totally different from its previous versions. The POAMA-3.0 model is based on ACCESS-1.3 coupled model (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator) developed at the Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research (CAWCR). The ACCESS-1.3 model is comprised of the UK Met Office atmospheric model UM7.3, GFDL ocean model MOM4p1, Los Alamos sea ice model CICE4.1, the Australian land model CABLE1.8 and the CERFACS coupler OASIS3.25. The model configuration used for seasonal forecasting has some different configurations compared to the model used for the IPCC AR5 contributions in several aspects, such as an improved shortwave penetration scheme in the ocean model, enhanced entrainment and detrainment rates in deep convection, an improved cloud overlap scheme and better representation of the boundary layer in the atmospheric model. A 100-yr run is conducted and the model's biases and interannual variability are validated. At the current stage of POAMA-3.0 development, a simple data assimilation approach is applied to produce initial conditions for intra-seasonal/seasonal forecasts during the period of 1980-2010. The atmospheric model is nudged to ECMWF ERA-interim data and the ocean model is driven by the surface fluxes while the atmosphere is being nudged. Seasonal hindcasts are performed during the period 1982-2010 and each hindcast goes out to lead time of 5 months. The prediction skill for El Nino indices, Indian Ocean dipole, Madden-Julian Oscillation and Australian rainfall are evaluated. The retrospective results of

  10. Overview of the Sargasso Sea Ocean/Atmosphere Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansell, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    International efforts to develop global scale ocean, atmosphere and climate observation systems will be aided by coordination of and access to existing observational efforts. In this light, the Sargasso Sea Ocean/Atmosphere Observatory (S2O2) has been formed to enhance the contributions of the many marine atmospheric, biogeochemical and hydrographic studies that are conducted in time series mode in the southwestern North Atlantic Ocean. S2O2 is an organization of ocean and atmosphere scientists with shared interests in improving our understanding of the functions, processes and interactions occurring in this region of the atmosphere/ocean. The elements making up S2O2 include time-series projects, technology development, modeling, and process studies. Our approach is to facilitate the advancements and synthesis of science in the region in order to answer interdisciplinary, higher level questions about this system. We seek to strengthen our individual science through improved linkages between S2O2 elements, and to make our data and knowledge available in a coordinated way to allied observatories and the larger earth science community via the WWW. The user community includes US national and international programs aimed at advancing our understanding of ocean and atmospheric processes through sustained observations, as well as those coastal observatories adjacent to the S2O2 zone of interest. A subset of the participating S2O2 elements (supported by the US National Science Foundation, the US National Oceanographic and Aeronautics Administration, the US National Atmospheric and Space Administration, and the Governments of Bermuda and Venezuela) include: the 47 year Hydrostation S (Panulirus) project; the 20 year Ocean Flux Program; the 12 year US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS); the 20 year Bermuda atmospheric (formerly AEROCE) tower program; the 7 year, twice weekly ADCP and thermosalinograph survey between New Jersey and Bermuda; the 7 year Bermuda

  11. Ocean-Atmosphere-Land interactions and their consequences on the biogeochemical variability in Eastern Boundary Upwelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, L.; McWilliams, J. C.; Deutsch, C.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep water along Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (EBUS) yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems, but the effect of coastal wind shape and ocean-atmosphere interactions on regional Net Primary Production (NPP) is not well known. Here, we first show how the spatial and temporal variability of nearshore winds in EBUS is affected by orography, coastline shape, and air-sea interaction. Using regional atmospheric simulations over the US West Coast, we determine monthly characteristics of the wind drop-off, and show that when the mountain orography is combined with the coastline shape of a cape, it has the biggest influence on wind drop-off. Then, using a realistic ocean model of the California Current System, we show that the slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity, despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On a regional scale, the wind drop-off leads to a substantially higher NPP, especially when it occurs over a broad swath, even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of NPP from upwelling is effected by alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. When peak winds extend all the way to the coast, alongshore current shear is stronger, and a more energetic eddy field subducts nutrients offshore and out of the photic zone, reducing overall productivity. This causal sequence is supported by satellite remote sensing. Finally, using a interanual coupled simulation over the US West Coast, we show the ocean-atmosphere interactions can also reduce the eddy activity by pumping energy out from the eddies, reducing their amplitude and rotation speed, and leading to more realistic eddies characteristics. This may also reduce the eddy quenching and therefore increase the NPP. This complex ocean-atmosphere-land interactions imply that simple wind indices are incomplete predictors of productivity in EBUS.

  12. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  13. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics changes associated with prominent ocean surface turbulent heat fluxes trends during 1958-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hu; Liu, Jiping; Lohmann, Gerrit; Shi, Xiaoxu; Hu, Yongyun; Chen, Xueen

    2016-03-01

    Three prominent features of ocean surface turbulent heat fluxes (THF) trends during 1958-2013 are identified based on the Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) data set. The associated ocean-atmosphere dynamics changes are further investigated based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. First, the THF are enhanced over the mid-latitude expansions of the subtropical western boundary currents (WBCs). An intensified oceanic heat transport, forced by stronger near-surface zonal wind, is likely to be the cause of such THF tendency. Second, the THF are reduced over the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, which is primarily caused by the decreasing near-surface wind speed and sea surface temperature (SST), associated with a local coupled ocean-atmosphere cooling mode. Finally, the THF are reduced over the northern tropical Atlantic Ocean, which is attributed to the decreasing air-sea humidity and temperature differences as a result of the convergence of near-surface air and the divergence of ocean currents (upwelling).

  14. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean - atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a low order coupled wind-driven Ocean-Atmosphere (OA) system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear. This feature is expected to be related with the specific domain choice over which the coupled system is defined. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on his attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial (at2 + bt3 + ct4) up to purely exponential evolutions. These features are explained and analyzed in the light of the recent findings on error growth (Nicolis et al, 2009). References Charney J G, Straus DM (1980) Form-Drag Instability, Multiple Equilibria and Propagating Planetary Waves in Baroclinic, Orographically Forced, Planetary Wave Systems. J Atmos Sci 37: 1157-1176. Nicolis C, Perdigao RAP, Vannitsem S (2009) Dynamics of

  15. Quantifying predictability variations in a low-order ocean-atmosphere model: A dynamical systems approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nese, J.M. ); Dutton, J.A. )

    1993-02-01

    A dynamical systems approach is used to quantify the predictability of weather and climatic states of a low-order, moist general circulation model. The effects on predictability of incorporating a simple oceanic circulation are evaluated. The predictability and structure of the model attractors are compared using Lyapunov exponents, local divergence rates, and the correlation and Lyapunov dimensions. Lyapunov exponents quantify global predictability by measuring the mean rate of growth of small perturbations on an attractor, while local divergence rates quantify temporal variations of this error growth rate and thus measure local, or instantaneous, predictability. Activating an oceanic circulation increases the average error doubling time of the atmosphere and the coupled ocean-atmosphere system by 10% while decreasing the variance of the largest local divergence rate by 20%. The correlation dimension of the attractor decreases slightly when an oceanic circulation is activated, while the Lyapunov dimension decreases more significantly because it depends directly on the Lyapunov exponents. The average predictability of annually averaged states is improved by 25% when an oceanic circulation develops, and the variance of the largest local divergence rate also decreases by 25%. One-third of the yearly averaged states have local error doubling times larger than 2 years. The dimensions of the attractors of the yearly averaged states are not significantly different than the dimensions of the attractors of the original model. The most important contribution of this article is the demonstration that the local divergence rates provide a concise quantification of the variations of predictability on attractors and an efficient basis for comparing their local predictability characteristics. Local divergence rates might be computed to provide a real-time estimate of local predictability to accompany an operational forecast.

  16. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land system model, Spectral Version 2: FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qing; Lin, Pengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Liu, Yimin; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Guoxiong; He, Bian; He, Jie; Li, Lijuan; Li, Jiandong; Li, Yangchun; Liu, Hailong; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya; Wang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaocong; Wang, Zaizhi; Wu, Bo; Wu, Tongwen; Xu, Yongfu; Yu, Haiyang; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Weipeng; Zhou, Linjiong

    2013-05-01

    The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model, Spectral Version 2 (FGOALS-s2) was used to simulate realistic climates and to study anthropogenic influences on climate change. Specifically, the FGOALS-s2 was integrated with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to conduct coordinated experiments that will provide valuable scientific information to climate research communities. The performances of FGOALS-s2 were assessed in simulating major climate phenomena, and documented both the strengths and weaknesses of the model. The results indicate that FGOALS-s2 successfully overcomes climate drift, and realistically models global and regional climate characteristics, including SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation. In particular, the model accurately captures annual and semi-annual SST cycles in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and the main characteristic features of the Asian summer monsoon, which include a low-level southwestern jet and five monsoon rainfall centers. The simulated climate variability was further examined in terms of teleconnections, leading modes of global SST (namely, ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO), and changes in 19th-20th century climate. The analysis demonstrates that FGOALS-s2 realistically simulates extra-tropical teleconnection patterns of large-scale climate, and irregular ENSO periods. The model gives fairly reasonable reconstructions of spatial patterns of PDO and global monsoon changes in the 20th century. However, because the indirect effects of aerosols are not included in the model, the simulated global temperature change during the period 1850-2005 is greater than the observed warming, by 0.6°C. Some other shortcomings of the model are also noted.

  17. The role of ocean-atmosphere interaction in shaping climate change in the North Atlantic sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Ralf; Nour-Eddine, Omrani; Keenlyside Noel, S.; Richard, Greatbatch

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present an analysis of North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interaction in a warming climate, based on a long-term coupled general circulation model experiment forced by the RCP 8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5) scenario. In addition to globally strongly increased SSTs as a direct response to the radiative forcing, the model run shows a distinct change of the local sea surface temperature (SST hereafter) pattern in the Gulf Stream region. This includes changes of the SST gradients in the region of the Gulf Stream SST front, likely as a response of the wind-driven part of the oceanic surface circulation. As a consequence of a massive slow-down of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation the northern North Atlantic furthermore shows a much weaker warming than the other oceans. The feedback of these changes on the atmosphere was studied in a set of sensitivity experiments based on the SST climatology of the coupled runs. The set consists of four runs: a control experiment based on the historical run, a run using the full SST from coupled RCP 8.5 run and two runs, where where we deconstructed the SST signal into a homogenous mean warming part and a local SST pattern change. In the region of the precipitation maximum in the historical run the future scenario shows an increase of absolute SSTs, but a a significant decrease in local precipitation. We show evidence that the local response in that region is connected to the (with respect to the historical run) weakened SST gradients rather than to the absolute SST. Consistently, the model shows enhanced precipitation north of this region, where the SST gradients are enhanced. The warming causes a decreased low-level convergence and upward motion in the region with reduced SST gradient. However, the signal restricts to the low and mid-troposphere and does not reach the higher model levels. There is little evidence for a large-scale response to the SST pattern changes in the Gulf Stream region

  18. The Somali current and the southwest monsoon: An ocean atmosphere instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Somali current and the southwest monsoon are identified as arising from an ocean atmosphere instability which is associated with the low latitude variation of the Coriolis force. Data on the fall of isotherms, surface wind speed, ocean response to frictional force, and upwelling of cold water are discussed.

  19. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2015-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere

  20. The role of hydrological processes in ocean-atmosphere interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    Earth is unique among the planets of the solar system in possessing a full hydrological cycle. The role of water in the evolution of planetary atmospheres is discussed. As the atmospheres of the planets developed and modified the early climates of the planets, only the climate trajectory of Earth intercepted the water phase transitions near the triplet point of water, thus allowing the full gamut of water forms to coexist. As a result, transitions between the water phases pervade the entire system and probably are responsible for the creation of a unique climate state. The interactions between the components of the climate system are enriched by the nonlinearity of the water phase transitions. The nonlinear character of the phase transitions of water suggests that the climate should be particularly sensitive to hydrological processes, especially in the tropics. Signatures of the nonlinearity are found in both the structures of the oceans and the atmosphere. Models of the ocean and atmospheric and oceanic data and models of the coupled system are used to perform systematic analyses of hydrological processes and their role in system interaction. The analysis is extended to consider the role of hydrological processes in the basic dynamics and thermodynamics of oceanic and atmospheric systems. The role hydrological processes play in determining the scale of the major atmospheric circulation patterns is investigated. Explanations are offered as to why large-scale convection in the tropical atmosphere is constrained to lie within the 28{degrees}C sea surface temperature contour and how hydrological processes are involved in interannual climate variability. The relative roles of thermal and haline forcing of the oceanic thermohaline circulation are discussed. Hydrological processes are considered in a global context by the development of a conceptual model of a simple planetary system. 94 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. The Impact of Cloud Seeding of Marine Stratocumulus on the Ocean Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, P. J.; Chen, C.; Latham, J.

    2007-12-01

    atmospheric circulations, and they are also areas of oceanic upwelling, and participate in the many aspects of upper ocean dynamical circulations, influencing for example, the source regions of the cold tongue of SSTs that extends into the central pacific, an area important for features like ENSO. In this study we will describe our preliminary findings about the consequences of geoengineering of marine stratus and stratocumulus to the ocean atmosphere system through simulations with slab ocean and fully coupled version of the NCAR Community Climate Sytem Model.

  2. Coupled ocean-atmosphere loss of marine refractory dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, David J.; Keene, William C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Long, Michael S.; Maben, John R.; Russell, Lynn M.; Kinsey, Joanna D.; Tyssebotn, Inger Marie B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2016-03-01

    The oceans hold a massive quantity of organic carbon, nearly all of which is dissolved and more than 95% is refractory, cycling through the oceans several times before complete removal. The vast reservoir of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC) is a critical component of the global carbon cycle that is relevant to our understanding of fundamental marine biogeochemical processes and the role of the oceans in climate change with respect to long-term storage and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here we show that RDOC includes surface-active organic matter that can be incorporated into primary marine aerosol produced by bursting bubbles at the sea surface. We propose that this process will deliver RDOC from the sea surface to the atmosphere wherein its photochemical oxidation corresponds to a potentially important and hitherto unknown removal mechanism for marine RDOC.

  3. Meridional thermal field of a coupled ocean-atmosphere system: a conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang

    2006-05-01

    This paper constitutes the author's continuing effort in the construction of a minimal theory of the earth's climate. In an earlier paper published in the Journal of Climate in 2001, this author has derived the global-mean fields of an aquatic planet forced by the solar insolation, which provide the necessary constraints for the present derivation of the meridional thermal field. The model closure invokes maximized entropy production (MEP), a thermodynamic principle widely used in turbulence and climate studies. Based on differing convective regimes of the ocean and atmosphere, both fluids are first reduced two thermal masses with aligned fronts, consistent with a minimal description of the observed field. Subjected to natural bounds, a robust solution is then found, characterized by an ice-free ocean, near-freezing cold fluid masses, mid-latitude fronts, and comparable ocean and atmosphere heat transports. The presence of polar continents, however, sharply reduces the ocean heat transport outside the tropics, but leaves the thermal field largely unchanged. Given the limitation of an extremely crude model, the deduced thermal field nonetheless seems sensible, suggesting that the model has captured the physics for a minimal account of the observed field. Together with the above-mentioned paper, the model reinforces the pre-eminent role of the triple point of water in stabilizing the surface temperature - against changing external condition. Such internal control is made possible by the turbulent nature of the climate fluids, which necessitates a selection rule based on extremization.

  4. Numerical simulation of large-scale ocean-atmosphere coupling and the ocean's role in climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of reducing model generated sigma coordinate data to pressure levels is considered. A mass consistent scheme for performing budget analyses is proposed, wherein variables interpolated to a given pressure level are weighted according to the mass between a nominal pressure level above and either a nominal pressure level below or the Earth's surface, whichever is closer. The method is applied to the atmospheric energy cycle as simulated by the OSU two level atmospheric general circulation model. The results are more realistic than sigma coordinate analyses with respect to eddy decomposition, and are in agreement with the sigma coordinate evaluation of the numerical energy sink. Comparison with less sophisticated budget schemes indicates superiority locally, but not globally.

  5. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling associated with Typhoons/ Hurricane and their impacts on marine ecosystem (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    DanLing TANG South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guangzhou, China Phone (86) 13924282728; Fax/Tel: (86) 020 89023203 (off), 020 89023191 (Lab),Email,lingzistdl@126.com, Typhoon / hurricane activities and their impacts on environments have been strengthening in both intensity and spatial coverage, along with global changes in the past several decades; however, our knowledge about impact of typhoon on the marine ecosystem is very scarce. We have conducted a series studies in the South China Sea (SCS), investigating phytoplankton, sea surface temperature (SST), fishery data and related factors before, during, and after typhoon. Satellite remote sensing and in situ observation data obtained from research cruise were applied. Our study showed that typhoon can support nutrients to surface phytoplankton by inducing upwelling and vertical mixing, and typhoon rain can also nourish marine phytoplankton; both typhoon winds and rain can enhance production of marine phytoplankton. Slow-moving typhoon induced phytoplankton blooms of higher Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), the strong typhoon induced phytoplankton blooms of a large area. We conservatively estimate that typhoon periods may account for 3.5% of the annual primary production in the oligotrophic SCS. It indicated that one typhoon may induce transport of nutrient-rich water from depth and from the coast to offshore regions, nourishing phytoplankton biomass. More observations confirmed that typhoon can induce cold eddy, and cold eddy can support eddy-shape phytoplankton bloom by upwelling. We have suggested a new index to evaluate typhoon impact on marine ecosystem and environment. This is the first time to report moving eddies and eddy-shape phytoplankton blooms associated with tropical cyclone, the relationship among tropical cyclone, cold eddy upwelling and eddy-shape phytoplankton bloom may give some viewpoint on the tropical cyclone's affection on the mesoscale circulation. Those studies may help better understand the mechanism of typhoon impacts on marine ecosystem, and the role of typhoon in the global environmental changes. The present research was supported by the following grants awarded to D.L.TANG: (1) National Natural Science Foundation of China (40976091, 40811140533) and Guangdong Natural Science Foundation, China (8351030101000002); (2) Chinese Academy of Sciences (kzcx2-yw-226 and LYQ200701);

  6. Rapid Climate Change Over The North Atlantic In A Coupled Ocean-atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N.

    An episode of rapid climate change is observed in a 300-year control integration of the National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Climate System Model [CSM; Boville and Gent (1998), Journal of Climate, 11, 1115-1130 and articles in the same edition]. The changes are associated with the formation of sea ice over the Labrador sea and expansion into the North Atlantic south of Greenland. The sea ice expan- sion begins approximately 110 years into the simulation, and is accompanied by ma- jor changes in regional climate and more modest changes in the far field. Over the Labrador Sea winter surface temperature decline more than 10C in 8 years with total decreases of up to 15C. Over Greenland winter temperatures decrease by approxi- mately 6C, over the British Isles by 1C and over Northern Europe by approximately 0.75C. Changes in precipitation are less pronounced but are particularly clear (in- creases) over the British Isles. The cooling is also marked by changes in the winter circulation over the western North Atlantic, where sea level pressure rises of more than 10 hPa occurred markedly change the configuration of the Icelandic Low. Be- yond northern Europe associated climate changes are in some cases detectable but muted. The climate system recovers after approximately 90 years and over a period of about 10 years returns to a state similar to that of the initial 100 years. The causes of the rapid appearance of ice have not year been investigated, however summer SSTs in the Labrador Sea are cooling in the years prior to the appearance of winter sea ice suggesting that changes in ocean circulation may be involved. The rapid expansion of the sea ice once it began to appear suggests some degree of local positive feedback, possibly due to the lack of recovery of summer SSTs after the sea- sonal melting. The simulated climate shift shares features similar to those seen in the cooling episode of 8.2 kyrs ago [Alley, R.B. et al (1997), Geology, 25, 483-486; Von Grafenstein et al (1998), Climate Dynamics, 14, 73-81]. These results are particularly interesting because they allow the spatial scales and character of the impacts on the climate system to be characterized and because the changes arose from internal model dynamics rather than imposed changes.

  7. Ocean-Atmosphere Heat Exchange: Limitations of Currently Available Datasets and Potential for Future Progress (Solicited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The flux of heat between the ocean and the atmosphere is a key element of the global climate system, central to variations in the ocean heat budget and variations in surface temperature. Factors determining the heat exchange will be discussed using models and observations with an emphasis on the period 1990-2015. This period include changes associated with the potential warming hiatus and more recently the major El Nino event that developed in 2015. The ability of leading datasets to reliably estimate surface flux changes is limited by a number of factors and these will be discussed in the context of variations in other components of the climate system. Progress towards obtaining more reliable climatological estimates of the heat exchange will also be considered with reference to recent developments using residual techniques and ocean reanalyses in addition to atmospheric reanalysis, remote sensing and ship based datasets. In addition, use of surface meteorological fields to generate ocean model forcing will be examined together with recent developments using high resolution coupled ocean-atmosphere models. Finally, the potential for significant advances in regions of major uncertainty using the growing network of surface flux buoys will be discussed with a focus on two moorings now in place in the Southern Ocean.

  8. Decadal prediction of Colorado River streamflow anomalies using ocean-atmosphere teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switanek, Matthew B.; Troch, Peter A.

    2011-12-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) time series are used to forecast a decade ahead streamflow anomalies in the upper Colorado River at Lee's Ferry. In the instrumental record, we obtain unusually high decadal forecast skill that is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level, suggesting strong ocean-atmosphere-land teleconnection. In order to test whether such teleconnection existed in the past, we compare the retrospective forecast skill to the skills obtained using the available ocean-atmosphere teleconnection and streamflow reconstructions derived from tree rings. We find much lower skill in the reconstructed record. Using frequency analysis, we show that the streamflow and sea surface temperature oscillations in the instrumental records all have dominant low frequency periodicities (>35 years) that explain much of the total variance. However, such dominant periodicities do not appear in the power spectra of the reconstructed records of AMO, PDO and streamflow. Given that these dominant low periodicities are likely responsible for the high prediction skill in the instrumental record, it remains uncertain whether reliable decadal streamflow predictions in the upper Colorado River basin will be possible in the years ahead.

  9. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-05-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1989 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  10. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-09-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1988 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  11. Impact of ice cover in the Arctic on ocean-atmosphere turbulent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selivanova, J. V.; Tilinina, N. D.; Gulev, S. K.; Dobrolubov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of spatiotemporal variability of the ice-covered area in the Arctic on the value and interannual dynamics of turbulent heat fluxes on the ocean-atmosphere border is considered. An expected inverse dependence of the heat fluxes integrated over the Arctic area and the area of ice is not detected. The largest interannual oscillations of heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere are timed to the varying position of the ice edge and, to a lesser extent, are connected with total area of ice. The role of the marginal ice zone in oceanic heat transfer is analyzed. In particular, it is shown that while moving along the marginal zone from the ice-free surface to the surface with an ice concentration of 0.8, latent and sensible heat fluxes are reduced by a factor of 2.5-3.

  12. The Influence of Indian Ocean Atmospheric Circulation on Warm Pool Hydroclimate During the Holocene Epoch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tierney, J.E.; Oppo, D. W.; LeGrande, A. N.; Huang, Y.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Existing paleoclimate data suggest a complex evolution of hydroclimate within the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) during the Holocene epoch. Here we introduce a new leaf wax isotope record from Sulawesi, Indonesia and compare proxy water isotope data with ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) simulations to identify mechanisms influencing Holocene IPWP hydroclimate. Modeling simulations suggest that orbital forcing causes heterogenous changes in precipitation across the IPWP on a seasonal basis that may account for the differences in time-evolution of the proxy data at respective sites. Both the proxies and simulations suggest that precipitation variability during the September-November (SON) season is important for hydroclimate in Borneo. The preeminence of the SON season suggests that a seasonally lagged relationship between the Indian monsoon and Indian Ocean Walker circulation influences IPWP hydroclimatic variability during the Holocene.

  13. Synchronized Dipole-Like Oscillations' Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions and Their Centennial-Scale Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, E.; Oh, J.; Rial, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dipole phenomenon in ocean-atmospheric variability, such as the Indian Ocean Dipole and the El Niño Southern oscillation, which are also often called teleconnections, have long been recognized as important influences on local climate. This study presents a multi-faceted analysis of several newly identified sea surface temperature dipole locations, located via the traditional empirical orthogonal function analysis, as well as cross correlation analysis, of sea surface data from just over the last century. We begin with the analysis of two dipole modes ranged over the high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere (located in the South Pacific and South Indian Ocean). These dipole modes have inter-annual periodicity as well as seasonal modes, with clear impacts on local, continental precipitation. Specifically, this study shows synchronization of sea surface temperature dipoles, their interactions with sea level pressure and winds, and makes steps towards understanding the dynamics of their connections via deconvolution of their respective climate signals. In order to study these effects, we define an index representing the time evolution of each dipole mode to follow the teleconnections of the sea surface temperature dipole modes with respect to other variables. This also allows for comparison with known, major, climate indices, allowing us to establish the effects of these oscillations as well as demonstrate the uniqueness of our new dipoles from these overarching influences. This study provides a more in depth understanding of teleconnection ocean-atmosphere dynamics, their effects on their local climates and distant climates, as well as their persistence over the previous century.

  14. Ocean-atmosphere interaction in the seasonal to decadal variations of tropical Atlantic climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Yuko

    The tropical Atlantic ocean and atmosphere display distinct seasonal cycles with considerable year-to-year variations superimposed. The present study investigates processes and mechanisms important for tropical Atlantic climate and its variability, using numerical models and observational data, with an emphasis on ocean-atmosphere interaction. For the seasonal cycle, topics of particular interest are the rapid development of the monsoon-cold tongue complex in boreal summer and the oceanic response to the secondary acceleration of equatorial easterly winds in November; for interannual-to-decadal variability, they are the effect of the November thermocline shoaling on the equatorial zonal mode and the atmospheric response to the meridional sea surface temperature (SST) dipole mode. Atmospheric model experiments indicate that interaction between the equatorial cold tongue and the West African monsoon is essential for the rapid seasonal transition from boreal spring to summer. Mechanisms are identified for the summertime acceleration of equatorial easterly wind, which contributes to rapid equatorial cooling by forcing upwelling and thermocline shoaling. Analysis of high-resolution satellite/in-situ data reveals the equatorial SST change associated with the November easterly wind acceleration and thermocline shoaling. This overlooked climatic feature is further shown to give rise to a new mode of tropical Atlantic variability---Atlantic Nino II---which resembles the boreal summer zonal mode but peaks in November--December, and is statistically independent of the preceding summer events. Atlantic Nino II significantly affects interannual rainfall variations in the coastal Congo-Angola region, and evolves into the meridional mode in the following spring, affecting rainfall variations in northeast Brazil. It thus fills an important climate predictability gap in time, during the season for which the local variability was otherwise poorly understood. The atmospheric model

  15. Decadal variability of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean Surface Temperature in shipboard measurements and in a Global Ocean-Atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vikram M.; Delworth, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    processes may be responsible for the choice of the decadal and multidecadal timescales. Finally, it must be emphasized that the GFDL coupled ocean-atmosphere model generates the decadal and multidecadal timescale variability without any externally applied force, solar or lunar, at those timescales.

  16. The relative role of ocean-atmosphere interaction and African easterly waves in the generation and development of Tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabos, William; Sein, Dmitry; Hodges, Kevin; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    We use the regionally coupled ocean - atmosphere model ROM and its atmospheric component REMO in standalone configuration in order to assess the relative role of ocean feedbacks and the African easterly waves in the simulation of tropical cyclonic activity in the Atlantic ocean. To this end, a number of coupled and uncoupled simulations forced by ERA-Interim boundary conditions have been carried out. In one set of simulations, the atmospheric domain includes the Northern Africa land masses, where the easterly waves are formed. In a second set of simulations, the easterly waves are taken from the ERA Interim reanalysis, as atmospheric domain excludes explicitly the African land masses. We study the statistics of modeled tracks of the tropical cyclones in the simulations. We found that the coupling has a strong impact on the number of tropical cyclones generated in the Northern Tropical Atlantic. In the coupled run it was close to the observations, while in the uncoupled runs the number of tropical cyclones was strongly overestimated. The coupling also influences the simulated position of the ITCZ.

  17. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  18. AMS Observations over Coastal California from the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, K. H.; Coggon, M. M.; Hodas, N.; Negron, A.; Ortega, A. M.; Crosbie, E.; Sorooshian, A.; Nenes, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    In July 2015, fifteen research flights were conducted on a US Navy Twin Otter aircraft as part of the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS) campaign. The flights took place near the California coast at Monterey, to investigate the effects of sea surface temperature and algal blooms on oceanic particulate emissions, the diurnal mixing of urban pollution with other airmasses, and the impacts of biological aerosols on the California atmosphere. The aircraft's payload included an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a differential mobility analyzer, a cloud condensation nuclei counter, a counterflow virtual impactor, a cloudwater collector, and two instruments designed to detect biological aerosols - a wideband integrated biological spectrometer and a SpinCon II - as well as a number of meteorology and aerosol probes, two condensation particle counters, and instruments to measure gas-phase CO, CO2, O3, and NOx. Here, we describe in depth the objectives and outcomes of BOAS and report preliminary results, primarily from the AMS. We detail the spatial characteristics and meteorological variability of speciated aerosol components over a strong and persistent bloom of Pseudo-Nitzschia, the harmful algae that cause 'red tide', and report newly identified AMS markers for biological particles. Finally, we compare these results with data collected during BOAS over urban, forested, and agricultural environments, and describe the mixing observed between oceanic and terrestrial airmasses.

  19. Upper Colorado River and Great Basin streamflow and snowpack forecasting using Pacific oceanic-atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubeidillah, Abdoul A.; Tootle, Glenn A.; Moser, Cody; Piechota, Thomas; Lamb, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    SummaryWater managers in western U.S., including areas such as the State of Utah, are challenged with managing scarce resources and thus, rely heavily on forecasts to allocate and meet various water demands. The need for improved streamflow and snowpack forecast models in the Upper Colorado River and Great Basin is of the utmost importance. In this research, the use of oceanic and climatic variables as predictors to improve the long lead-time (three to nine months) forecast of streamflow and snowpack was investigated. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis was used to identify a region of Pacific Ocean SSTs and a region of 500 mbar geopotential height (Z 500) that were teleconnected with streamflow (and snowpack) in Upper Colorado River and Great Basin headwaters. The resulting Pacific Ocean SSTs and Z 500 regions were used to create indices that were then used as predictors in a non-parametric forecasting model. The majority of forecasts resulted in positive statistical skill, which indicated an improvement of the forecast over the climatology or no-skill forecast. The results indicated that derived indices from Pacific Ocean SSTs were better suited for long lead-time (six to nine month) forecasts of streamflow (and snowpack) while the derived indices from Z 500 improved short-lead time (3 month) forecasts. In all, the results of the forecast model indicated that incorporating Pacific oceanic-atmospheric climatic variability in forecast models can lead to improved forecasts for both streamflow and snowpack.

  20. Ocean-atmosphere forcing of summer streamflow drought in Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, D. G.; Fleig, A. K.; Tallaksen, L.; Hannah, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Droughts are high impact events that have substantial implications for both human and natural systems. As such, improved understanding of the hydroclimatological processes involved in drought development is a major scientific imperative of direct practical relevance. To address this research need, this paper investigates the chain of processes linking antecedent ocean-atmosphere variation to summer streamflow drought in Great Britain. Analyses are structured around four drought regions (defined using hierarchical cluster analysis) for the period 1964-2001. Droughts are identified using a novel Regional Drought Area Index. Composite analysis of monthly sea surface temperatures (SSTs) that occur prior to drought onset reveals the occurrence of a horseshoe-shaped pattern of North Atlantic SST anomalies that is similar to the pattern of SST anomalies associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Patterns in geopotential height and wind fields prior to drought onset support the influence of the NAO on drought development, but also demonstrate that North Atlantic climate variation prior to drought occurrence is too complex to be described solely by indices of the NAO. In revealing new information on the chain of processes leading to the development of hydrological drought in Great Britain, this paper has the potential to inform drought forecasting research and so improve drought preparedness and management.

  1. Assessing the capability of EOS sensors in measuring ocean-atmosphere moisture exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the Science Synergism Studies to identify interdisciplinary Scientific studies, which could be addressed by the Environmental Observing System (EOS), the techniques being developed to measure ocean-atmosphere moisture exchanges using satellite sensors were evaluated. Studies required to use sensors proposed for EOS were examined. A method has been developed to compute the moisture flux using the wind speed, sea surface temperature, and preciptable water measured by satellite sensors. It relies on a statistical model which predicts surface-level humidity from precipitable water. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) measures all 3 parameters and was found to be sensitive to the annual cycle and large interannual variations such as the 1982 to 1983 El Nino. There are systematic differences between geophysical parameters measured by Nimbus/SMMR and in situ measurements. After quadratic trends and crosstalks were removed from the parameters through multivariate regressions, the latent heat fluxes computed from SMMR agree with those computed from ship reports to within 30 W/sq m. The poor quality of ship reports may be the cause of a portion of this scatter. Similar results are found using SEASAT/SMMR data. When the scatterometer winds were used instead of the SMMR winds, the difference between the satellite fluxes and the ship fluxes was reduced.

  2. The Mobile Buoy: An Autonomous Surface Vehicle for Integrated Ocean-Atmosphere Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, P. M.; McGillis, W. R.; Moisan, J. R.; Higinbotham, J. R.; Schirtzinger, C.

    2009-05-01

    A solar-powered Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) called OASIS (Ocean-Atmosphere Sensor Integration System) has been developed that makes measurements spanning the ocean mixed layer and lower atmospheric surface layer. An OASIS ASV can be remotely commanded to act as a boat, drifter, or untethered buoy (when programmed to keep at a station). OASIS has performed cross-shelf transect surveys within the mid-Atlantic Bight (63 km), Gulf of Maine, and additional field tests to develop techniques to map harmful algal blooms. One example of the utility of the OASIS ASV is with carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes - predicting future climate change will require that scientists understand what controls exchanges of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and ocean interior. OASIS measurements from the Gulf of Maine transect included surface ocean CO2 partial pressures from 320 to 670 μatm, air-sea CO2 sea-to-air fluxes from -3.2 to +12.2 mmol m2 d-1, upper ocean currents (0-50 m depth), surface ocean fluorescence, temperature and salinity, and several additional measurements. We are also installing a cabled, autonomous ocean mixed- layer hydrographic profiling system for future deployments. The complete integration of atmosphere and ocean measurements onboard an autonomous navigating vehicle is a key advance for ocean observation technology and observational science programs. ASVs have great potential for ocean and climate studies, and can become a major component of earth observation systems in the coming decades.

  3. Ocean-atmosphere forcing of centennial hydroclimatic variability in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinman, Byron A.; Abbott, Mark B.; Mann, Michael E.; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Feng, Song; Pompeani, David P.; Stansell, Nathan D.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Finney, Bruce P.; Bird, Broxton W.

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing centennial timescale hydroclimate variability during the late Holocene is critically important for understanding large-scale patterns of drought and their relationship with climate dynamics. We present sediment oxygen isotope records spanning the last two millennia from 10 lakes, as well as climate model simulations, indicating that the Little Ice Age was dry relative to the Medieval Climate Anomaly in much of the Pacific Northwest of North America. This pattern is consistent with observed associations between the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Northern Annular Mode and drought as well as with proxy-based reconstructions of Pacific ocean-atmosphere variations over the past 1000 years. The large amplitude of centennial variability indicated by the lake data suggests that regional hydroclimate is characterized by longer-term shifts in ENSO-like dynamics, and that an improved understanding of the centennial timescale relationship between external forcing and drought conditions is necessary for projecting future hydroclimatic conditions in western North America.

  4. Biogeochemical processes in the ocean and at the ocean-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliot, A.

    2006-12-01

    The ocean can be considered as a chemical reactor, whose energy sources are the various matter inputs originating from the continent and the ocean. Among various elements, carbon plays a key role as it is involved in both inorganic form as CO{2} and organic forms such as compounds synthesized through photosynthesis. Thus, the ocean is presently an active actor in climate change and ocean-atmosphere exchange processes. This review will present some insights into: 1) schematic representations of the carbon cycle, with emphasis on CO{2} exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere and to the organic parts of this cycle, 2) concepts relative to the biological pump of CO{2}, with a detailed view on photosynthesis, 3) concepts leading to the existence of oceanic provinces and associated productivity for open sea and coastal areas, 4) addressing the question: what is the net efficiency of the biological pump of CO{2 }in terms of exportation of organic carbon and sequestration in sediments and 5) specific aspects on biogeochemical processes occurring at the boundary between the ocean and the atmosphere.

  5. Upper Colorado River and Great Basin Streamflow and Snowpack Forecasting using Pacific Oceanic-Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, O. A.; Tootle, G. A.; Moser, C.; Piechota, T. C.; Lamb, K. W.; Kao, S.

    2011-12-01

    Water managers in western U.S., including areas such as the State of Utah, are challenged with managing scarce resources and thus, rely heavily on forecasts to allocate and meet various water demands. The need for improved streamflow and snowpack forecast models in the Upper Colorado River and Great Basin is of the utmost importance. In this research, the use of oceanic and climatic variables as predictors to improve the long lead-time (three to nine months) forecast of streamflow and snowpack was investigated. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis was used to identify a region of Pacific Ocean SSTs and a region of 500 mbar geopotential height (Z500) that were teleconnected with streamflow (and snowpack) in Upper Colorado River and Great Basin headwaters. The resulting Pacific Ocean SSTs and Z500 regions were used to create indices that were then used as predictors in a non-parametric forecasting model. The majority of forecasts resulted in positive statistical skill, which indicates an improvement over the climatology or no-skill forecast (i.e., ranking of events using the Weibull distribution). The results indicated that derived indices from Pacific Ocean SSTs were better suited for long lead-time (six to nine month) forecasts of streamflow (and snowpack) while the derived indices from Z500 improved short-lead time (3 month) forecasts. In all, the results of the forecast model indicated that incorporating Pacific oceanic-atmospheric climatic variability in forecast models can lead to improved forecasts for both streamflow and snowpack. This method will be applied and tested at several selected hydropower projects in the study area, and some preliminary results will be shown.

  6. Evaluating the relationship between oceanic-atmospheric indices and variability in the streamflow: A continental U.S. study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagarika, S.; Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2013-12-01

    Oceanic-atmospheric indices and variability has been found to influence the hydrological process. This study evaluates the possible influences of two indicators of oceanic-atmospheric variability i.e., sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and 500 mbar geopotential height (Z500) index on 864 unimpaired streamflows stations categorized according to hydrologic unit codes for a 60 year period from 1950 to 2010 in the continental United States. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is used to evaluate the spatio-temporal association between oceanic-atmospheric indices and streamflow. A lead-time approach of six months i.e., seasonal average of monthly SSTs and Z500 for April to September of previous year was used to obtain the temporal expansion series between the oceanic-atmospheric indicators and water year streamflow values. This was followed by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean based warm and cold phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). This resulted in the identification of new regions of highly correlated SSTs and Z500 that may not be represented by conservative index regions of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), PDO, and AMO. Results showed the Pacific SSTs had strong correlations with the Midwest, southern South-Atlantic-Gulf and Pacific Northwest regions, where as the Atlantic SSTs showed strong correlations with New England, South-Atlantic-Gulf and Upper and Lower Colorado regions. The Pacific and Atlantic Z500 showed strong correlations with the Midwest, New England, Souris-Red-Rainy, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf regions. The PDO warm phase showed strong correlations with most of California, Upper and Lower Colorado, and South-Atlantic-Gulf regions; the PDO cold phases showed correlations with Pacific Northwest, eastern Ohio, and South-Atlantic-Gulf regions. The warm phase of AMO showed correlations with Midwest, Souris-Red-Rainy, Upper Mississippi, Arkansas

  7. Atmosphere-only GCM (ACCESS1.0) simulations with prescribed land surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are valuable tools for understanding how the global ocean-atmosphere-land surface system interacts and are routinely evaluated relative to observational data sets. Conversely, observational data sets can also be used to constrain GCMs in order to identify systematic errors in their simulated climates. One such example is to prescribe sea surface temperatures (SSTs) such that 70 % of the Earth's surface temperature field is observationally constrained (known as an Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, AMIP, simulation). Nevertheless, in such simulations, land surface temperatures are typically allowed to vary freely, and therefore any errors that develop over the land may affect the global circulation. In this study therefore, a method for prescribing the land surface temperatures within a GCM (the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator, ACCESS) is presented. Simulations with this prescribed land surface temperature model produce a mean climate state that is comparable to a simulation with freely varying land temperatures; for example, the diurnal cycle of tropical convection is maintained. The model is then developed further to incorporate a selection of "proof of concept" sensitivity experiments where the land surface temperatures are changed globally and regionally. The resulting changes to the global circulation in these sensitivity experiments are found to be consistent with other idealized model experiments described in the wider scientific literature. Finally, a list of other potential applications is described at the end of the study to highlight the usefulness of such a model to the scientific community.

  8. Decadal trends of ocean and land carbon fluxes from a regional joint ocean-atmosphere inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, K.; Gruber, N.

    2015-12-01

    From 1980 until 2010, the combined CO2 sink strengths of ocean and land increased by nearly 50% (-0.55 Pg C yr-1 decade-1), but the spatial distribution of this trend is not well known. We address this by performing a joint cyclostationary ocean-atmosphere inversion for the three decades 1980-1989, 1990-1999, and 2000-2008, using only carbon data from the ocean and atmosphere as constraints, i.e., without applying any prior information about the land fluxes. We find that in the inversion, most of the 30 year sink trend stems from the ocean (-0.44 Pg C yr-1 decade-1). The contribution of the terrestrial biosphere is commensurably smaller but has more decadal variability. First, the land sink strength intensified in the 1990s by 0.4 (±0.3) Pg C yr-1 compared to the 1980s but then weakened slightly by 0.2 (±0.4) Pg C yr-1 in the 2000s. The different land regions contributed very variedly to these global trends. While the northern extratropical land acted as an increasing carbon sink throughout the examined period primarily driven by boreal regions, the tropical land is estimated to have acted as an increasing source of CO2, with source magnitude and trend dominated by enhanced release in tropical America during the Amazon mean wet season. This pattern is largely unchanged if the oceanic inversion constraint, which is based on a stationary ocean circulation, is replaced by an estimate based on simulation results from an ocean biogeochemical general circulation model that includes year-to-year variability in the air-sea CO2 fluxes and also has a trend (-0.07 Pg C yr-1 decade-1) that is at the very low end of current estimates. However, the land/ocean partitioning of the trend contribution is adjusted accordingly. Oceanic carbon data has a major impact on carbon exchange for all tropical regions and southern Africa but also for observationally better constrained regions in North America and temperate Asia. The European trend exhibits a strong sensitivity to the choice

  9. OASIS: Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Snowpack Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Abbatt, J.; Beine, H.; Berg, T.; Bigg, K.; Domine, F.; Leck, C.; Lindberg, S.; Matrai, P.; MacDonald, R.; McConnell, J.; Platt, U.; Raspopov, O.; Shepson, P.; Shumilov, O.; Stutz, J.; Wolff, E.

    2004-05-01

    While Polar regions encompass a large part of the globe, little attention has been paid to the interactions between the atmosphere and its extensive snow-covered surfaces. Recent discoveries in the Arctic and Antarctic show that the top ten centimeters of snow is not simply a white blanket but in fact is a surprisingly reactive medium for chemical reactions in the troposphere. It has been concluded that interlinked physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms, fueled by the sun and occurring in the snow, are responsible for depletion of tropospheric ozone and gaseous mercury. At the same time production of highly reactive compounds (e.g. formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide) has been observed at the snow surface. Air-snow interactions also have an impact on the chemical composition of the snow and hence the nature and amounts of material released in terrestrial/marine ecosystems during the melting of seasonal snow-packs. Many details of these possibly naturally occurring processes are yet to be discovered. For decades humans have added waste products including acidic particles (sulphates) and toxic contaminants such as gaseous mercury and POPs (persistent organic pollutants) to the otherwise pristine snow surface. Virtually nothing is known about transformations of these contaminants in the snowpack, making it impossible to assess the risk to the polar environment, including humans. This is especially disconcerting when considering that climate change will undoubtedly alter the nature of these transformations involving snow, ice, atmosphere, ocean, and, ultimately, biota. To address these topics an interdisciplinary group of scientists from North America, Europe and Japan is developing a set of coordinated research activities under the banner of the IGBP programs IGAC and SOLAS. The program of Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) interactions has been established with a mission statement aimed at determining the impact of OASIS chemical exchange on tropospheric

  10. Using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations for long lead-time streamflow forecasting in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2007-12-01

    In the recent past, oceanic-atmospheric oscillations have been used successfully for long lead-time streamflow forecasting. Herein, we present a data-driven model, Support Vector Machine (SVM) for the long lead-time streamflow forecast incorporating oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. The SVM is based on Statistical Learning Theory that uses a hypothesis space of linear functions based on Kernel approach and can be used to predict a quantity forward in time based on training that uses past data. The principal strength of SVM lies in minimizing the empirical classification error and maximizing the geometric margin by solving inverse problems. The SVMs are considered superior to the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) due to the tendency of formulating a quadratic optimization problem which ensures a global optimum that is found missing in the traditional ANN approach. The SVM model was applied to four unimpaired gages in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). The streamflow data for the selected gages was used from 1906¡§C2004. Annual oceanic-atmospheric indexes comprising of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) for a period of 1906¡§C2001 were used to generate streamflow volumes for three years ahead. The SVM model was trained with 86 years of data (1906¡§C1991) and tested for 10 years of data (1992-2001). The testing criteria used for the model effectiveness was based on correlation coefficient r, root means square error (RMSE) and nash sutcliffe efficiency coefficient e. Predictions during the testing phase showed a good agreement with measured streamflow volumes for the selected gages in UCRB. Rigorous sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of individual oscillation. The results indicated a strong signal for NAO and ENSO indexes as compared to PDO and AMO indexes for the long lead-time streamflow forecast. The oceanic-atmospheric

  11. An error model for GCM precipitation and temperature simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Woldemeskel, F.; Mehrotra, R.; Sivakumar, B.

    2012-04-01

    Water resources assessments for future climates require meaningful simulations of likely precipitation and evaporation for simulation of flow and derived quantities of interest. The current approach for making such assessments involve using simulations from one or a handful of General Circulation Models (GCMs), for usually one assumed future greenhouse gas emission scenario, deriving associated flows and the planning or design attributes required, and using these as the basis of any planning or design that is needed. An assumption that is implicit in this approach is that the single or multiple simulations being considered are representative of what is likely to occur in the future. Is this a reasonable assumption to make and use in designing future water resources infrastructure? Is the uncertainty in the simulations captured through this process a real reflection of the likely uncertainty, even though a handful of GCMs are considered? Can one, instead, develop a measure of this uncertainty for a given GCM simulation for all variables in space and time, and use this information as the basis of water resources planning (similar to using "input uncertainty" in rainfall-runoff modelling)? These are some of the questions we address in course of this presentation. We present here a new basis for assigning a measure of uncertainty to GCM simulations of precipitation and temperature. Unlike other alternatives which assess overall GCM uncertainty, our approach leads to a unique measure of uncertainty in the variable of interest for each simulated value in space and time. We refer to this as an error model of GCM precipitation and temperature simulations, to allow a complete assessment of the merits or demerits associated with future infrastructure options being considered, or mitigation plans being devised. The presented error model quantifies the error variance of GCM monthly precipitation and temperature, and reports it as the Square Root Error Variance (SREV

  12. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  13. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  14. Lagged effects of the Mistral wind on heavy precipitation through ocean-atmosphere coupling in the region of Valencia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthou, Ségolène; Mailler, Sylvain; Drobinski, Philippe; Arsouze, Thomas; Bastin, Sophie; Béranger, Karine; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy

    2016-05-01

    The region of Valencia in Spain has historically been affected by heavy precipitation events (HPEs). These HPEs are known to be modulated by the sea surface temperature (SST) of the Balearic Sea. Using an atmosphere-ocean regional climate model, we show that more than 70 % of the HPEs in the region of Valencia present a SST cooling larger than the monthly trend in the Northwestern Mediterranean before the HPEs. This is linked to the breaking of a Rossby wave preceding the HPEs: a ridge-trough pattern at mid-levels centered over western France associated with a low-level depression in the Gulf of Genoa precedes the generation of a cut-off low over southern Spain with a surface depression over the Alboran Sea in the lee of the Atlas. This latter situation is favourable to the advection of warm and moist air towards the Mediterranean Spanish coast, possibly leading to HPEs. The depression in the Gulf of Genoa generates intense northerly (Mistral) to northwesterly (Tramontane/Cierzo) winds. In most cases, these intense winds trigger entrainment at the bottom of the oceanic mixed layer which is a mechanism explaining part of the SST cooling in most cases. Our study suggests that the SST cooling due to this strong wind regime then persists until the HPEs and reduces the precipitation intensity.

  15. Latest results of the LMD Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, S.; Marcq, E.; Lott, F.

    2012-12-01

    The LMD Venus General Circulation Model (GCM), under development since 2005, models the circulation in Venus atmosphere (from the surface up to roughly 100 km), in particular the superrotation feature. The temperature structure is computed using a specific radiative transfer module based on net-exchange matrix formulation. Since the publication of the GCM details (Lebonnois et al, JGR 115, 2010, doi:10.1029/2009JE003458), some improvements were done, especially for the boundary layer scheme that affects the exchange of angular momentum between atmosphere and surface. Surprising impact of initial conditions on the steady-state zonal winds is also discussed. Passive tracers, tuned to mimic CO and OCS distributions, have also been added to the model to simulate the latitudinal distributions induced by transport. In this presentation, comparisons between our latest simulations and available observations from Venus Express (winds, temperature fields, CO and OCS distributions) are detailed: zonal and meridional wind distributions in the cloud region and above, thermal tide features in winds and temperature near the cloud-top, CO and OCS latitudinal profiles below the clouds. These comparisons help constrain the meridional circulation and its impact on trace species distributions, the chemical relaxation timescale of the same trace species as well as the thermal tides and their role in the angular momentum budget and in the superrotation mechanism. The impact on the zonal wind field of gravity waves that may be generated near the surface is currently investigated with a new parametrisation. These gravity waves have been suggested as a significant contributor in the angular momentum budget and superrotation mechanism (Hou and Farrell, J. Atmos. Sci. 44, pp.1049-1061, 1987, doi:10.1175/1520-0469(1987)044<1049:SIBCLA>2.0.CO;2). This parametrisation and its first results are presented here.

  16. An ocean-atmosphere climate simulation with an embedded cloud resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Cristiana; Khairoutdinov, Marat; DeMott, Charlotte A.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Straus, David M.; Randall, David A.; Kinter, James L.; Shukla, J.

    2010-01-01

    Mean climate and intraseasonal to interannual variability of two versions of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) are analyzed. The first version is the standard CCSM, in which cloud effects on the large-scale circulation are represented via parameterizations. The second version includes “super-parameterization” (SP) of convective processes by replacing parameterized cloud processes with a two-dimensional (2D) cloud-process resolving model (CRM) at each CGCM grid column. The SP-CCSM improves several shortcomings of the CCSM simulation, including mean precipitation patterns, equatorial SST cold tongue structure and associated double intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), the Asian monsoon, periodicity of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and the intraseasonal Madden-Julian Oscillation. These improvements were obtained without the retuning of the coupled model, which is surprising in view of previous experience with other coupled models.

  17. Sensitivity of the Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere to Seasonal and Long-Term Climate Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.-M.; Lau, K.-M.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneer works of Bjerknes (1966,1969) many studies have been conducted to understand the El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. These studies have led to a basic understanding of the dynamics of El Nino. Central to the couple dynamics of ENSO is the delayed action oscillator theory (Suarez and Schopf 1988), which successfully describes the cyclic feature of El Nino. While the oscillatory feature of El Nino is reasonably well understood, the irregularity of El Nino, the effect of monsoon on ENSO, and the response of coupled system to the global warming are still under debate. In the present study, we attempt to provide some theoretical understanding of possible impacts of seasonal cycle, monsoon, and climate changes on ENSO using intermediate coupled model.

  18. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso- to planetary-scale. Mechanics, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Small, Justin

    2015-12-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. High-resolution global coupled integrations using CAM/CESM were carried out at NCAR by the lead PI. At TAMU, we have complemented the work at NCAR by analyzing datasets from the high-resolution (28km) CESM integrations (Small et al., 2014) as well as very high resolution (9km, 3km) runs using a coupled regional climate (CRCM) carried out locally. The main tasks carried out were: 1. Analysis of surface wind in observations and high-resolution CAM/CCSM simulations 2. Development of a feature-tracking algorithm for studying midlatitude air-sea interaction by following oceanic mesoscale eddies and creating composites of the atmospheric response overlying the eddies. 3. Applying the Lagrangian analysis technique in the Gulf Stream region to compare data from observational reanalyses, global CESM coupled simulations, 9km regional coupled simulations and 3km convection-resolving regional coupled simulations. Our main findings are that oceanic mesoscale eddies influence not just the atmospheric boundary layer above them, but also the lower portions of the free troposphere above the boundary layer. Such a vertical response could have implications for a remote influence of Gulf Stream oceanic eddies on North Atlantic weather patterns through modulation of the storm track, similar to what has been noted in the North Pacific. The coarse resolution

  19. An error model for GCM precipitation and temperature simulations for future (warmer) climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, B.; Woldemeskel, F. M.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.

    2013-12-01

    Water resources assessments for future climates require meaningful simulations of likely precipitation and evaporation for simulation of flow and derived quantities of interest. Future climate projections using Global Climate Models (GCMs) are commonly used to assess the impacts of global climate change on hydrology and water resources. The reliability of such assessments, however, is questionable due to the various uncertainties present in GCM simulations, such as those associated with model structure, scenario, and initial condition. We present here a new basis for assigning a measure of uncertainty to GCM simulations of precipitation and temperature. Unlike other alternatives which assess overall GCM uncertainty, our approach leads to a unique measure of uncertainty in the variable of interest for each simulated value in space and time. We refer to this as an error model of GCM precipitation and temperature simulations. This is done through estimation of an uncertainty metric, called square root of error variance (SREV), and it involves the following steps: (1) Interpolating GCM outputs to a common spatial grid; (2) Converting the interpolated GCM outputs to percentiles; (3) Estimating SREV for each percentile; and (4) Transforming SREV estimates to time series. The SREV is derived taking into account the model structural, the emission scenario, and the initial condition uncertainty of the simulated value, the full error model being formulated using six GCMs (from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multi-model dataset); three emission scenarios (B1, A1B and A2) and three ensemble runs, with a total of 54 time series representing the period 2001 to 2099. The results reveal that model uncertainty is the main source of error followed by scenario uncertainty. For precipitation, total uncertainty is larger in the tropical region close to the equator and reduces towards the north and south poles. The opposite is true for temperature where

  20. A review of the Southern Oscillation - Oceanic-atmospheric circulation changes and related rainfall anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousky, V. E.; Kagano, M. T.; Cavalcanti, I. F. A.

    1984-01-01

    The region of South America is emphasized in the present consideration of the Southern Oscillation (SO) oceanic and atmospheric circulation changes. The persistence of climate anomalies associated with El Nino-SO events is due to strong atmosphere-ocean coupling. Once initiated, the SO follows a certain sequence of events with clearly defined effects on tropical and subtropical rainfall. Excessive rainfall related to the SO in the central and eastern Pacific, Peru, Ecuador, and southern Brazil, are complemented by drought in Australia, Indonesia, India, West Africa, and northeast Brazil. El Nino-SO events are also associated with dramatic changes in the tropospheric flow pattern over a broad area of both hemispheres.

  1. Tropical ocean-atmosphere interaction, the Pacific cold tongue, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, F.F.

    1996-10-04

    The tropical Pacific basin allows strong feedbacks among the trade winds, equatorial zonal sea surface temperature contrast, and upper ocean heat content. Coupled atmosphere-ocean dynamics produce both the strong Pacific cold tongue climate state and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. A simple paradigm of the tropical climate system is presented, capturing the basic physics of these two important aspects of the tropic Pacific and basic features of the climate states of the Atlantic and Indian ocean basins. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Information content of downscaled GCM precipitation variables for crop simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ines, A. V. M.; Mishra, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    A simple statistical downscaling procedure for transforming daily global climate model (GCM) rainfall was applied at the local scale in Katumani, Kenya. We corrected the rainfall frequency bias of the GCM by truncating its daily rainfall cumulative distribution into the station's distribution using a wet-day threshold. Then, we corrected the GCM's rainfall intensity bias by mapping its truncated rainfall distribution into the station's truncated distribution. Additional tailoring was made to the bias corrected GCM rainfall by linking it with a stochastic disaggregation scheme based on a conditional stochastic weather generator to correct the temporal structure inherent with daily GCM rainfall. Results of the simple and hybridized GCM downscaled precipitation variables (total, probability of occurrence, intensity and dry spell length) were linked with a crop model. An objective evaluation of the tailored GCM data was done using entropy. This study is useful for the identification of the most suitable downscaling technique, as well as the most effective precipitation variables for forecasting crop yields.

  3. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a climate mode synchronizing forest carbon losses from North and South America by analyzing time series of tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), landfall hurricanes and tropical storms, and Amazon fires during 1995-2013. Years with anomalously high tropical North Atlantic SSTs during March-June were often followed by a more active hurricane season and a larger number of satellite-detected fires in the southern Amazon during June-November. The relationship between North Atlantic tropical cyclones and southern Amazon fires (r = 0.61, p < 0.003) was stronger than links between SSTs and either cyclones or fires alone, suggesting that fires and tropical cyclones were directly coupled to the same underlying atmospheric dynamics governing tropical moisture redistribution. These relationships help explain why seasonal outlook forecasts for hurricanes and Amazon fires both failed in 2013 and may enable the design of improved early warning systems for drought and fire in Amazon forests.

  4. The role of ocean-atmosphere interactions in tropical cooling during the last glacial maximum

    PubMed

    Bush; Philander

    1998-02-27

    A simulation with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model configured for the Last Glacial Maximum delivered a tropical climate that is much cooler than that produced by atmosphere-only models. The main reason is a decrease in tropical sea surface temperatures, up to 6 degrees C in the western tropical Pacific, which occurs because of two processes. The trade winds induce equatorial upwelling and zonal advection of cold water that further intensify the trade winds, and an exchange of water occurs between the tropical and extratropical Pacific in which the poleward surface flow is balanced by equatorward flow of cold water in the thermocline. Simulated tropical temperature depressions are of the same magnitude as those that have been proposed from recent proxy data. PMID:9478892

  5. Thermal structure of Venus upper atmosphere by a self-consistent ground-to-thermosphere GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, G.; Lebonnois, S.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Stolzenbach, A.; Lefevre, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present here the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus predicted by a full self-consistent Venus General Circulation Model (GCM). The Venus GCM developed at Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) [1] is currently operational up to 150 km and it is one of the leading models in the community. Recent improvements (i.e the inclusion of physical processes relevant in the upper atmosphere, the coupling with a photochemical model) contributed to a better understanding of the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere of Venus. Our aim is to describe the role of radiative, photochemical and dynamical effects in the observed thermal structure of those upper layers,and to evaluate the impact of current parameterisations and theoretical uncertainties on the temperature fields. Several sensitivity tests will be performed to understand the data-model discrepancies and to improve the comparison.

  6. Flying the TRMM Satellite in a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    2001-01-01

    By incorporating the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite orbital information into the Colorado State University General Circulation Model (CSU GCM), we are able to 'fly' a satellite in the GCM, and sample the simulated atmosphere in the same way as the TRMM sensors sample the real atmosphere. The TRMM-sampled statistics for precipitation and radiative fluxes at annual, intraseasonal, monthly-mean and seasonal-mean diurnal time scales are evaluated by comparing the satellite-sampled against fully-sampled simulated atmospheres. The sampling rates of the TRMM sensors are significantly affected by the sensors' swath widths. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) sample each 2.25 x 2.25 degree grid box in the Tropics and subtropics about once per day, but at a different local time every day, while the Precipitation Radar (PR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) sensor visit each grid box about once every three days and twice per day, respectively. Besides inadequate samplings resulting from sensors' swath widths, there is a large, systematic diurnal undersampling associated with TRMM's orbital geometry for grid boxes away from the Equator. When only one month of TRMM data are used, this diurnal undersampling can lead to more daytime samples relative to nighttime samples in one hemisphere, and more nighttime samples relative to daytime samples in the other hemisphere. The resulting sampling biases (3-6 W m(exp-2)) are very pronounced in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) over the subtropical land masses. The sampling errors in OLR monthly- and seasonal-means are less than 8 W m(exp-2) (5%) for each 2.25 x 2.25 degree grid box. The OLR monthly- and seasonal-means are not sensitive to diurnal undersamplings associated with the TRMM orbits and sensors' swath widths. However, this is not the case for total precipitation. Diurnal undersampling could produce errors as large as 20% in the Tropics and 40

  7. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Trends for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena F.

    2010-01-01

    Mainly due to their global nature, satellite observations can provide a very useful basis for GCM validations. In particular, satellite sounders such as AIRS provide 3-D spatial information (most useful for GCMs), so the question arises: can we use AIRS datasets for climate variability assessments? We show that the recent (September 2002 February 2010) CERES-observed negative trend in OLR of approx.-0.1 W/sq m/yr averaged over the globe is found in the AIRS OLR data as well. Most importantly, even minute details (down to 1 x 1 degree GCM-scale resolution) of spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS-retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over this time period are essentially the same. The correspondence can be seen even in the very large spatial variations of these trends with local values ranging from -2.6 W/sq m/yr to +3.0 W/sq m/yr in the tropics, for example. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate, and indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of other AIRS derived products as well. These products show that global and regional anomalies and trends of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over the last 7+ years are strongly influenced by EI-Nino-La Nina cycles . We have created climate parameter anomaly datasets using AIRS retrievals which can be compared directly with coupled GCM climate variability assessments. Moreover, interrelationships of these anomalies and trends should also be similar between the observed and GCM-generated datasets, and, in cases of discrepancies, GCM parameterizations could be improved based on the relationships observed in the data. First, we assess spatial "trends" of variability of climatic parameter anomalies [since anomalies relative to the seasonal cycle are good proxies of

  8. Carbon-isotope composition of Lower Cretaceous fossil wood: Ocean-atmosphere chemistry and relation to sea-level change

    SciTech Connect

    Groecke, D.R.; Hesselbo, S.P.; Jenkyns, H.C.

    1999-02-01

    The carbon-isotope composition of fossil wood fragments, collected through a biostratigraphically well-constructed Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) shallow-marine siliciclastic succession on the Isle of Wight, southern Britain, shows distinct variations with time. The results indicate that the stratigraphic signature of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the Aptian was influenced primarily by fluctuations in the isotopic composition of CO{sub 2} in the global ocean-atmosphere system, as registered in marine carbonates elsewhere, and was not governed by local paleoenvironmental and/or paleoecological factors. Negative and positive excursions in {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the lower Aptian occur in phase with inferred transgressions and regressions, respectively -- a pattern that contrasts with that observed in many previous studies for different time intervals. The relationship between {delta}{sup 13}C variations and relative sea-level change is tentatively interpreted as a response to various climatic and eustatic factors, relating to rapid sea-floor spreading, thermal uplift of ocean floor, emplacement of plateaus, volcanic CO{sub 2} emissions, weathering, and sedimentary rate.

  9. Relative roles of land- and ocean-atmosphere interactions in Asian-Pacific thermal contrast variability at the precessional band.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jian, ZhiMin; Zhao, Ping; Xiao, Dong; Chen, JunMing

    2016-01-01

    In a 250-kyr transient simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we identified a precessional forced seesaw of the summer middle-upper tropospheric eddy temperature between Asia and the North Pacific as the paleo-APO (Asian-Pacific oscillation). The paleo-APO variability is out of phase with the precession parameter. Corresponding to a positive paleo-APO phase, both the subtropical anticyclonic circulation over the North Pacific and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strengthen. Summer anomalous sea surface temperature shows a western cold-eastern warm pattern over the extratropical North Pacific and a zonal positive-negative-positive pattern over the tropical Pacific. The variations in the simulated paleo-APO and East Asian southerly wind at the precessional band agree well with the geological proxies at the Dongge, Sanbao, Linzhu, and Hulu caves in China, which also implies that these proxies may well reflect the variability in the southerly wind over East Asia. Sensitivity experiments further reveal that the reduced precession parameter may enhance the positive paleo-APO phase and the associated EASM because of the response of the land-atmosphere interactions to the precessional insolation changes. The effect of the ocean-atmosphere interactions on the paleo-APO is secondary. PMID:27381940

  10. Relative roles of land- and ocean-atmosphere interactions in Asian-Pacific thermal contrast variability at the precessional band

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Jian, ZhiMin; Zhao, Ping; Xiao, Dong; Chen, JunMing

    2016-01-01

    In a 250-kyr transient simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we identified a precessional forced seesaw of the summer middle-upper tropospheric eddy temperature between Asia and the North Pacific as the paleo-APO (Asian-Pacific oscillation). The paleo-APO variability is out of phase with the precession parameter. Corresponding to a positive paleo-APO phase, both the subtropical anticyclonic circulation over the North Pacific and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strengthen. Summer anomalous sea surface temperature shows a western cold-eastern warm pattern over the extratropical North Pacific and a zonal positive-negative-positive pattern over the tropical Pacific. The variations in the simulated paleo-APO and East Asian southerly wind at the precessional band agree well with the geological proxies at the Dongge, Sanbao, Linzhu, and Hulu caves in China, which also implies that these proxies may well reflect the variability in the southerly wind over East Asia. Sensitivity experiments further reveal that the reduced precession parameter may enhance the positive paleo-APO phase and the associated EASM because of the response of the land-atmosphere interactions to the precessional insolation changes. The effect of the ocean-atmosphere interactions on the paleo-APO is secondary. PMID:27381940

  11. Relative roles of land- and ocean-atmosphere interactions in Asian-Pacific thermal contrast variability at the precessional band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Jian, Zhimin; Zhao, Ping; Xiao, Dong; Chen, Junming

    2016-07-01

    In a 250-kyr transient simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we identified a precessional forced seesaw of the summer middle-upper tropospheric eddy temperature between Asia and the North Pacific as the paleo-APO (Asian-Pacific oscillation). The paleo-APO variability is out of phase with the precession parameter. Corresponding to a positive paleo-APO phase, both the subtropical anticyclonic circulation over the North Pacific and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strengthen. Summer anomalous sea surface temperature shows a western cold-eastern warm pattern over the extratropical North Pacific and a zonal positive-negative-positive pattern over the tropical Pacific. The variations in the simulated paleo-APO and East Asian southerly wind at the precessional band agree well with the geological proxies at the Dongge, Sanbao, Linzhu, and Hulu caves in China, which also implies that these proxies may well reflect the variability in the southerly wind over East Asia. Sensitivity experiments further reveal that the reduced precession parameter may enhance the positive paleo-APO phase and the associated EASM because of the response of the land-atmosphere interactions to the precessional insolation changes. The effect of the ocean-atmosphere interactions on the paleo-APO is secondary.

  12. Tidal Signals In GOCE Measurements And Time-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Forbes, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we investigate tidal signatures in GOCE measurements during 15-24 November 2009 and complementary simulations with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere- Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM). The TIME-GCM simulations are driven by inputs that represent the prevailing solar and geomagnetic conditions along with tidal and planetary waves applied at the lower boundary (ca. 30km). For this pilot study, the resultant TIME-GCM densities are analyzed in two ways: 1) we use results along the GOCE orbital track, to calculate ascending/descending orbit longitude- latitude density difference and sum maps for direct comparison with the GOCE diagnostics, and 2) we conduct a complete analysis of TIME-GCM results to unambiguously characterize the simulated atmospheric tides and to attribute the observed longitude variations to specific tidal components. TIME-GCM captures some but not all of the observed longitudinal variability. The good data- model agreement for wave-2, wave-3, and wave-4 suggests that thermospheric impacts can be attributed to the DE1, DE2, DE3, S0, SE1, and SE2 tides. Discrepancies between TIME-GCM and GOCE results are most prominent in the wave-1 variations, and suggest that further refinement of the lower boundary forcing is necessary before we extend our analysis and interpretation to densities associated with the remainder of the GOCE mission.

  13. From GCM grid cell to agricultural plot: scale issues affecting modelling of climate impact

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Christian; Sultan, Benjamin; Balme, Maud; Sarr, Benoit; Traore, Seydou; Lebel, Thierry; Janicot, Serge; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    General circulation models (GCM) are increasingly capable of making relevant predictions of seasonal and long-term climate variability, thus improving prospects of predicting impact on crop yields. This is particularly important for semi-arid West Africa where climate variability and drought threaten food security. Translating GCM outputs into attainable crop yields is difficult because GCM grid boxes are of larger scale than the processes governing yield, involving partitioning of rain among runoff, evaporation, transpiration, drainage and storage at plot scale. This study analyses the bias introduced to crop simulation when climatic data is aggregated spatially or in time, resulting in loss of relevant variation. A detailed case study was conducted using historical weather data for Senegal, applied to the crop model SARRA-H (version for millet). The study was then extended to a 10°N–17° N climatic gradient and a 31 year climate sequence to evaluate yield sensitivity to the variability of solar radiation and rainfall. Finally, a down-scaling model called LGO (Lebel–Guillot–Onibon), generating local rain patterns from grid cell means, was used to restore the variability lost by aggregation. Results indicate that forcing the crop model with spatially aggregated rainfall causes yield overestimations of 10–50% in dry latitudes, but nearly none in humid zones, due to a biased fraction of rainfall available for crop transpiration. Aggregation of solar radiation data caused significant bias in wetter zones where radiation was limiting yield. Where climatic gradients are steep, these two situations can occur within the same GCM grid cell. Disaggregation of grid cell means into a pattern of virtual synoptic stations having high-resolution rainfall distribution removed much of the bias caused by aggregation and gave realistic simulations of yield. It is concluded that coupling of GCM outputs with plot level crop models can cause large systematic errors due to

  14. Multi-model GCM ensemble simulations of idealized tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, K. A.; Jablonowski, C.; Ullrich, P. A.; Kent, J.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Taylor, M.; Nair, R.

    2013-12-01

    As General Circulation Models (GCMs) are now capable of running operationally at higher horizontal resolutions than ever before, such models have become a tool of choice for the evaluation of tropical cyclones in current and future climate conditions. GCM horizontal resolutions in the range between 10-50 km are now computationally achievable for seasonal or multi-year simulations and there is growing confidence that high-resolution global models provide reliable representations of many characteristics of tropical storms. However, model design choices are an important source of uncertainty. This is widely documented for physical parameterization suites, but it is less recognized for the dynamical component of models and the physics-dynamics coupling. The study offers a first look into these structural uncertainties. This study focuses on dynamical core model intercomparisons. In particular, it looks at the results of the Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP) that took place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in August 2012. The analysis is focused on the evaluation of an idealized tropical storm and uncertainties triggered by the choice of model dynamical core formulation in various global models. These models include the four dynamical cores available in NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (Finite-Volume (FV), Spectral-Element (SE) and the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian spectral transform dynamical cores), the NOAA model FIM, the model ICON (Max-Planck Institute and German Weather Service), GFDL's FV3 model on the cubed-sphere grid, ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) and the model PUMA from the University of Hamburg.

  15. Ocean-atmospheric linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle on the time scale of decades to centuries. The input rate of CO2 to the atmosphere due to fossil fuel burning and deforestation has continued to increase over the last century. To balance the global carbon budget, a sink is required whose magnitude is changing on similar time scales. We have sought to identify aspects of the ocean system that are capable of responding on decadal time scales, to examine our present ability to model such changes, and to pinpoint ways in which this ability could be improved. Many other important aspects of the ocean's role in global change are not addressed, including the importance of oceanic heat transport and thermal inertia to the climate system, biogeochemical cycling of elements other than carbon, and the importance of the ocean as a source or sink of trace gases.

  16. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  17. The Bisa GEM-Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, Lori; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    GEM-Mars is a three-dimensional general circulation model of the Mars atmosphere extending from the surface to approximately 170 km based on the latest version of the GEM (Global Environmental Mesoscale) model, the operational data assimilation and weather forecasting system for Canada [Côté et al., 1998]. The dynamical core is an implicit two-time-level semi-Lagrangian scheme on an Arakawa C-grid with a terrain-following, log-hydrostatic-pressure vertical coordinate discretized on a Charney-Phillips grid. The model has both a hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic formulation, providing a single platform for simulations on a variety of horizontal scales. The model code is fully parallelized using OMP and MPI. The GCM includes the relevant physical processes such as CO2 condensation, planetary boundary layer mixing, gravity wave drag and surface parameterizations. A simple water cycle, basic gas-phase chemistry and passive tracers are also included in the model. Because of the vertical extent of the model, UV heating, non-LTE effects and molecular diffusion are also included. Dust is prescribed using the MGS scenario for total opacities and a Conrath profile shape. In the dust radiative transfer code, dust optical properties are based on the Wolff et al [2006, 2009] data. Temperatures in the lower and middle atmosphere have been evaluated using TES [Smith, 2004] and MCS [Kleinbohl et al. 2009] data. Winds and atmospheric circulation (mass stream functions) have been compared with the literature and show a good correspondence to other Mars GCMs. In parallel, active lifting and settling of size-distributed dust has also been implemented. The soil model has been improved to better match surface and near-surface temperatures from the Viking Landers, Phoenix [Davy et al. 2010], and TES. Near-surface winds and friction velocities have been compared with the literature and show reasonable performance. Condensation of CO2 in surface ice has been validated using CO2 ice mass

  18. New Planetary Energy Balance, Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction and their Effects on Extreme Events in North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrouk, Mohammed-Said

    2016-04-01

    Global warming has now reached the energetic phase of H2O's return to the ground after the saturation of the atmosphere in evaporation since the 80s and 90s of the last century, which were characterized by severe droughts, mainly in Africa. This phase is the result of the accumulation of thermal energy exchanges in the Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere system that resulted in the thrust reversal of the energy balance toward the poles. This situation is characterized by a new thermal distribution: above the ocean, the situation is more in surplus compared to the mainland, or even opposite when the balance is negative on the land, and in the atmosphere, warm thermal advection easily reach the North Pole (planetary crests), as well as cold advection push deep into North Africa and the Gulf of Mexico (planetary valleys). This "New Ground Energy Balance" establishes a "New Meridian Atmospheric Circulation (MAC)" with an undulating character throughout the year, including the winter characterized by intense latitudinal very active energy exchanges between the surplus areas (tropical) and the deficit (polar) on the one hand, and the atmosphere, the ocean and the continent on the other. The excess radiation balance increases the potential evaporation of the atmosphere and provides a new geographical distribution of H2O worldwide: the excess water vapor is easily converted by cold advection (polar vortex) to heavy rains that cause floods or snow storms that paralyze the normal functioning of human activities, which creates many difficulties for users and leaves damage and casualties, but ensures water availability missing since a long time in many parts of the world, in Africa, Europe and America. The new thermal distribution reorganizes the geography of atmospheric pressure: the ocean energy concentration is transmitted directly to the atmosphere, and the excess torque is pushed northward. The Azores anticyclone is strengthened and is a global lock by the Atlantic ridge at Greenland

  19. Develop Plan for Analysis of the Effluent from GCM Production.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Mowry, Curtis D.

    2015-08-24

    This milestone is focused on developing a plan for the analysis of the effluent from the Sandia low temperature sintering Bi-Si-Zn oxide glass composite material (GCM) waste form for the long term storage of iodine and its capture materials.

  20. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  1. Snow complexity representation and GCM climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Viterbo, Pedro; Miranda, Pedro M. A.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2010-05-01

    Accurate simulations of the snow cover strongly impact on the quality of weather and climate predictions as the solar radiation absorption at land-atmosphere interface is modified by a factor up to 4 in response to snow presence (albedo effect). In Northern latitudes and Mountainous regions snow acts also as an important energy and water reservoir and a correct representation of snow mass and snow density is crucial for temperature predictions at all time-scales, with direct consequences for soil hydrology (thermal insulation effect). Three different complexity snow schemes implemented in the ECMWF land surface scheme HTESSEL are tested within the EC-EARTH framework. The snow schemes are: 1) OLD, the original HTESSEL single bulk layer snow scheme (same as in the ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalysis); 2) OPER, a new snow scheme in operations since September 2009, with a liquid water reservoir and revised formulations of snow density, fractional cover and snow albedo; and 3) ML3, a multi-layer version of OPER. All three snow schemes in HTESSEL are energy- and mass- balance models. The multi-layer snow scheme, ML3, was validated in offline mode covering several spatial and temporal scales: (i) site simulations for several observation locations from the Snow Models intercomparison project-2 (SnowMip2) and (ii) global simulations driven by the meteorological forcing from the Global Soil Wetness Project-2 (GSWP2) and the ECMWF ERA-Interim re-analysis. On point locations ML3 improve snow mass simulations, while on a global scale the impacts are residual pointing to the need of coupled atmosphere simulations. The 3 schemes are compared in the framework of the atmospheric model of EC-EARTH, based on the current seasonal forecast system of ECMWF. The standard configuration runs at T159 horizontal spectral resolution with 62 vertical levels. Three member ensembles of 30 years (1979-2008) simulations, with prescribed SSTs and sea ice, were performed for each of the snow schemes

  2. Coral Evidence for Abrupt Changes in Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics in the SW Pacific since 1565 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, E. J.; Gagan, M. K.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lough, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    A coral-based multi-tracer approach can give an overview of the whole tropical ocean-atmosphere system. Key indicators are sea surface temperature (SST), which sets climate boundary conditions, sea surface salinity (SSS), which provides a measure of energy transfer through the evaporation-precipitation balance, and river runoff, which can establish the strength and variability of precipitation. We present palaeoenvironmental records from eight massive { \\it Porites} coral colonies, spanning 120 to 420 years of continuous growth, collected from the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Stable isotopes (\\delta18O and \\delta13C), Sr/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios were measured in 5-year increments and a record of annual UV luminescence was developed. By replicating the measurements between colonies we demonstrate how faithfully corals record changes in their environment over decadal-to-centennial timescales, constructing composite records in a manner analogous to dendroclimatology and confidence intervals for each proxy. The competing environmental influences affecting a number of tracers can be distinguished by comparison between the SST-tracers (Sr/Ca, U/Ca, \\delta18O), the freshwater flux tracers (\\Delta\\delta18O, Ba/Ca and luminescence) and tracers of water mass characteristics (\\delta18O, \\delta13C, and \\Delta14C). The coral palaeothermometers Sr/Ca and U/Ca ratios, measured in tandem with \\delta18O, allow the separation of SST changes from changes in seawater \\delta18O, thereby resolving SSS. The composite Sr/Ca and U/Ca are in excellent agreement back to 1565, and capture the 20th century warming trend, up to the 1980s when the cores were collected. The most remarkable feature of the 420-year record is that SSTs were consistently as warm as the second half of the 20th century from the early 18th and through most of the 19th centuries. Changes in the evaporation-precipitation balance dominate the \\delta18O record. A striking 0.2\\permil\\ shift from the

  3. Assessment of CMIP5 GCM daily predictor variables for statistical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpelasoka, F. S.; Charles, S.; Chiew, F. H.; Fu, G.; Beecham, S.

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of CMIP5 GCM daily predictor variables for statistical downscaling To support adaptation to climate change in the water resource sector in South Australia, downscaled climate projections are being constructed within the Goyder Institute for Water Research - a 5-year multi-million dollar collaborative research partnership between the Government of South Australia, CSIRO and the university sector. Statistical downscaling is a robust approach providing a link between observed (re-analysis) large-scale atmospheric variables (predictors) and local or regional surface climate variables such as daily station rainfall. When applied to outputs of Global Climate Models (GCMs), the credibility of statistically downscaled future projections is dependent on the ability of GCMs to reproduce the re-analysis data statistics for the current climate. The main objective of this study is thus to assess daily predictor variables simulated by phase Five of Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) GCMs, while acknowledging that an optimal measure of overall GCM performance does not exist and the usefulness of any assessment approach varies with the intended application. Here we assess GCMs by comparing cumulative probability density functions of predictor variables against the re-analysis data using the Kolmogorov test metric. Historical daily data simulations from 12 GCMs (BCC-csm1, CanESM2, CSIRO-Mk3.6.0, GFDL-ESM2M, HadGEM2-ES, IPSL-CM5A-LR, IPSL-CM5A-MR, MIROC4h, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, MPI-ESM-LR, MRI-CGCM3, and NorESM1-M) for the period 1961-2005 are used. The variables assessed include specific/relative humidity, winds, geopotential heights at different atmospheric levels and sea-level pressure over the Australian region (7-45oS, 100-160oE). We present a summary of results for the South Australia region quantifying the ability of these GCMs in reproducing the mean state and the relative frequency of extremes for these predictors. The complexity and challenges in GCM

  4. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  5. Studies of African wave disturbances with the GISS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Hall, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations made with the general circulation model of the NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS GCM) run at 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude horizontal resolution are analyzed to determine the model's representation of African wave disturbances. Waves detected in the model's lower troposphere over northern Africa during the summer monsoon season exhibit realistic wavelengths of about 2200 km. However, power spectra of the meridional wind show that the waves propagate westward too slowly, with periods of 5-10 days, about twice the observed values. This sluggishness is most pronounced during August, consistent with simulated 600-mb zonal winds that are only about half the observed speeds of the midtropospheric jet. The modeled wave amplitudes are strongest over West Africa during the first half of the summer but decrease dramatically by September, contrary to observational evidence. Maximum amplitudes occur at realistic latitudes, 12 deg - 20 deg N, but not as observed near the Atlantic coast. Spectral analyses suggest some wave modulation of precipitation in the 5-8 day band, and compositing shows that precipitation is slightly enhanced east of the wave trough, coincident with southerly winds. Extrema of low-level convergence west of the wave troughs, coinciding with northerly winds, were not preferred areas for simulated precipitation, probably because of the drying effect of this advection, as waves were generally north of the humid zone. The documentation of African wave disturbances in the GISS GCM is a first step toward considering wave influences in future GCM studies of Sahel drought.

  6. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Tropospheric Chemistry Model Description and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Grenfell, J. Lee; Rind, David; Price, Colin; Grewe, Volker; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A tropospheric chemistry module has been developed for use within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to study interactions between chemistry and climate change. The model uses a simplified chemistry scheme based on CO-NOx-CH4 chemistry, and also includes a parameterization for emissions of isoprene, the most important non-methane hydrocarbon. The model reproduces present day annual cycles and mean distributions of key trace gases fairly well, based on extensive comparisons with available observations. Examining the simulated change between present day and pre-industrial conditions, we find that the model has a similar response to that seen in other simulations. It shows a 45% increase in the global tropospheric ozone burden, within the 25% - 57% range seen in other studies. Annual average zonal mean ozone increases by more than 125% at Northern Hemisphere middle latitudes near the surface. Comparison of model runs that allow the calculated ozone to interact with the GCM's radiation and meteorology with those that do not shows only minor differences for ozone. The common usage of ozone fields that are not calculated interactively seems to be adequate to simulate both the present day and the pre-industrial ozone distributions. However, use of coupled chemistry does alter the change in tropospheric oxidation capacity, enlarging the overall decrease in OH concentrations from the pre-industrial to the present by about 10% (-5.3% global annual average in uncoupled mode, -5.9% in coupled mode). This indicates that there may be systematic biases in the simulation of the pre-industrial to present day decrease in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere (though a 10% difference is well within the total uncertainty). Global annual average radiative forcing from pre-industrial to present day ozone change is 0.32 W/sq m. The forcing seems to be increased by about 10% when the chemistry is coupled to the GCM. Forcing values greater

  7. Modeling of Sub-Grid Heterogeneity and its Impact on GCM Global Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Cairns, B.; Rossow, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of high, low, and mid-level clouds is obtained from ISCCP D1 data. Monthly mean global maps of the observed cloud variability are used to re-scale GCM prognostic cloud optical depths and radiative parameters via the Monte Carlo cloud heterogeneity parameterization that utilizes the existing plane-parallel GCM radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes for inhomogeneous cloud distributions. The GCM radiative fluxes at TOA and the ground surface are then compared to ERBE and GEBA results. These comparisons show that including sub-grid cloud variability in the GCM radiative model improves agreement between the GCM radiative energy budget components and observations,

  8. A review of recent research on improvement of physical parameterizations in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic assessment of the effect of a series of improvements in physical parameterizations of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) are summarized. The implementation of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) in the GCM is followed by a comparison of SiB GCM simulations with that of the earlier slab soil hydrology GCM (SSH-GCM) simulations. In the Sahelian context, the biogeophysical component of desertification was analyzed for SiB-GCM simulations. Cumulus parameterization is found to be the primary determinant of the organization of the simulated tropical rainfall of the GLA GCM using Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A comparison of model simulations with station data revealed excessive shortwave radiation accompanied by excessive drying and heating to the land. The perpetual July simulations with and without interactive soil moisture shows that 30 to 40 day oscillations may be a natural mode of the simulated earth atmosphere system.

  9. GCM Simulations of the Tropical Hydrogen Distribution Observed by Mars Odyssey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischna, M. A.; Richardson, M. I.

    2005-01-01

    The age and nature of the tropical hydrogen deposits on Mars remain uncertain. Competing theories suggest that the deposits are composed of either ancient, hydrated minerals or recently emplaced water ice. We use the GFDL Mars GCM with a fully coupled atmosphere-regolith water cycle to explore which of these hypotheses is best supported by model results. Such a conclusion can be drawn from the resultant trends in subsurface ice evolution during various obliquity and polar cap conditions. Our results suggest that the tropical hydrogen distribution is best explained by recent emplacement of ice through either exposure of the south polar ice cap or by burial of tropical surface ice from the most recent high obliquity excursions.

  10. Radiative transfer model for the computation of radiance and polarization in an ocean-atmosphere system: polarization properties of suspended matter for remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Chami, M; Santer, R; Dilligeard, E

    2001-05-20

    A radiative transfer code termed OSOA for the ocean-atmosphere system that is able to predict the total and the polarized signals has been developed. The successive-orders-of-scattering method is used. The air-water interface is modeled as a planar mirror. Four components grouped by their optical properties, pure seawater, phytoplankton, nonchlorophyllose matter, and yellow substances, are included in the water column. Models are validated through comparisons with standard models. The numerical accuracy of the method is better than 2%; high computational efficiency is maintained. The model is used to study the influence of polarization on the detection of suspended matter. Polarizing properties of hydrosols are discussed: phytoplankton cells exhibit weak polarization and small inorganic particles, which are strong backscatterers, contribute appreciably to the polarized signal. Therefore the use of the polarized signal to extract the sediment signature promises good results. Also, polarized radiance could improve characterization of aerosols when open ocean waters are treated. PMID:18357248

  11. A GCM study on the mechanism of seasonal abrupt changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijun; Zeng, Qingcun

    1994-02-01

    In this paper the observational studies and some related dynamical and numerical researches on seasonal abrupt changes were reviewed first. Then a speculation that the seasonal variation of insolation and the nonlinear dynamic interaction account for the abrupt changes was put forward and was asserted by a set of GCM sensitivity experiments. The results show that the abrupt changes would exist in case that all the earth surface was grass land and there was no topography. However, many factors may have influences on the abrupt changes. Hence this phenomenon is quite complicated and needs further investigations.

  12. MOS correction of GCM- and RCM-simulated daily precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Jonathan; Widmann, Martin; Wong, Geraldine; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu; Kent, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Understanding long-term changes in daily precipitation characteristics, particularly those associated with extreme events, is an important component of climate change science and impact assessment. Estimates of such changes are required at local scales where impacts are most keenly felt. However, the limited spatial resolution of General Circulation Models (GCMs) makes direct estimates of future daily precipitation unrealistic. A popular downscaling approach is to use GCMs to drive high-resolution Regional Climate Models (RCMs). Whilst able to simulate precipitation characteristics at smaller scales, RCMs do not represent local variables and remain limited by systematic errors and biases. It is possible to apply statistical corrections, known as Model Output Statistics (MOS), to RCM-simulated precipitation. The simplest form of MOS (including bias correction) follows a 'distribution-wise' approach in which the statistical link is derived between long-term distributions of simulated and observed variables. However, more sophisticated MOS methods may be performed 'event-wise' using, for example, multiple linear regression to derive links between simulated and observed sequences of day-to-day weather. This approach requires a fitting period in which the simulated temporal evolution of large-scale weather states matches that of the real world and is thus limited to either reanalysis-driven RCMs or nudged GCM simulations. It is unclear to what extent MOS can be used to correct daily precipitation directly from GCMs, thus removing the computationally challenging RCM step from the downscaling process. Here, we present and cross-validate a stochastic, event-wise MOS method for both GCM- and RCM-simulated precipitation. A 'mixture' model, combining gamma and generalised Pareto distributions, is used to represent the complete (extreme and non-extreme) precipitation distribution. This is combined with a vector generalised linear model (VGLM) in order to estimate the

  13. Long Lead-Time Forecasting of Snowpack and Precipitation in the Upper Snake River Basin using Pacific Oceanic-Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S.; Tootle, G.; Parkinson, S.; Holbrook, P.; Blestrud, D.

    2012-12-01

    Water managers and planners in the western United States are challenged with managing resources for various uses, including hydropower. Hydropower is especially important throughout the Upper Snake River Basin, where a series of hydropower projects provide a low cost renewable energy source to the region. These hydropower projects include several dams that are managed by Idaho Power Company (IPC). Planners and managers rely heavily on forecasts of snowpack and precipitation to plan for hydropower availability and the need for other generation sources. There is a pressing need for improved snowpack and precipitation forecast models in the Upper Snake River Basin. This research investigates the ability of Pacific oceanic-atmospheric data and climatic variables to provide skillful long lead-time (three to nine months) forecasts of snowpack and precipitation, and examines the benefits of segregating the warm and cold phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) to reduce the temperature variability within the target dataset. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to identify regions of Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures (SST) and 500mbar geopotential heights (Z500) for various lead times (three, six, and nine months) that were teleconnected with snowpack and precipitation stations in Upper Snake River Basin headwaters. The identified Pacific Ocean SST and Z500 regions were used to create indices that became predictors in a non-parametric forecasting model. The majority of forecasts resulted in positive statistical skill, which indicated an improvement of the forecast over the climatology forecast (no-skill forecast). The results from the forecasts models indicated that derived indices from the SVD analysis resulted in improved forecast skill when compared to forecasts using established climate indices. Segregation of the cold phase PDO years resulted in the identification of different regions in the Pacific Ocean and vastly improved skill for the nine month

  14. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    2012-01-01

    Model results from the planar beach case show good agreement with depth-averaged analytical solutions and with theoretical flow structures. Simulation results for the DUCK' 94 experiment agree closely with measured profiles of cross-shore and longshore velocity data from and . Diagnostic simulations showed that the nonlinear processes of wave roller generation and wave-induced mixing are important for the accurate simulation of surf zone flows. It is further recommended that a more realistic approach for determining the contribution of wave rollers and breaking induced turbulent mixing can be formulated using non-dimensional parameters which are functions of local wave parameters and the beach slope. Dominant terms in the cross-shore momentum balance are found to be the quasi-static pressure gradient and breaking acceleration. In the alongshore direction, bottom stress, breaking acceleration, horizontal advection and horizontal vortex forces dominate the momentum balance. The simulation results for the bar/rip channel morphology case clearly show the ability of the modeling system to reproduce horizontal and vertical circulation patterns similar to those found in laboratory studies and to numerical simulations using the radiation stress representation. The vortex force term is found to be more important at locations where strong flow vorticity interacts with the wave-induced Stokes flow field. Outside the surf zone, the three-dimensional model simulations of wave-induced flows for non-breaking waves closely agree with flow observations from MVCO, with the vertical structure of the simulated flow varying as a function of the vertical viscosity as demonstrated by Lentz et al. (2008).

  15. Initialization and Predictability of a Coupled ENSO Forecast Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dake; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    1997-01-01

    The skill of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model in predicting ENSO has recently been improved using a new initialization procedure in which initial conditions are obtained from the coupled model, nudged toward observations of wind stress. The previous procedure involved direct insertion of wind stress observations, ignoring model feedback from ocean to atmosphere. The success of the new scheme is attributed to its explicit consideration of ocean-atmosphere coupling and the associated reduction of "initialization shock" and random noise. The so-called spring predictability barrier is eliminated, suggesting that such a barrier is not intrinsic to the real climate system. Initial attempts to generalize the nudging procedure to include SST were not successful; possible explanations are offered. In all experiments forecast skill is found to be much higher for the 1980s than for the 1970s and 1990s, suggesting decadal variations in predictability.

  16. Weather Regimes in the Pacific from a GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, K.; Hannachi, A.

    1995-07-01

    Weather regimes have been sought by examining the 500-mb streamfunction of the UGAMP GCM run for 10 yr at T42 resolution with perpetual January forcing. Five-day low-pass EOFs provide a low-order phase space in which to study dynamical aspects of the variability. The PNA pattern shows up as the first EOF over the Northern Hemisphere representing 12% of the variance, rising to 18.5% for Pacific-area-only EOFs.Within the phase space of three to five EOFs, two local minima of the area-averaged tendency (based on rotational velocity advection) are found. These two flow patterns both have a smaller implied tendency than the climatology and lie in the ±PNA regions of the phase space. It is suggested that these patterns may be acting as `fixed points' within the atmospheric attractor, encouraging persistent flows and the formation of weather regimes. These dynamical attracting points are compared with a more conventional means of identifying weather regimes using a statistical maximum likelihood analysis of all model states during the 10-yr GCM run. This analysis also indicates two preferred classes, separate from the climatology, in the ±PNA regions of phase space. These classes tend to be nearer the climatology than the dynamical states but have similar appearance otherwise.Finally the role of low-frequency transients are examined to improve the dynamical interpretation of the regime centers. The method is first demonstrated for the extended Lorenz model of Molteni et al. The fixed points of the GCM attractor are assumed to be steady solutions to the 500-mb vorticity equation in the absence of contributions from transient eddies. The eddy contributions to the climatological vorticity budget are first determined, and then the deviations from the climatology that could provide similar contributions to the budget are found. Again two states in the ±PNA regions of phase space are found to satisfy the above conditions. The authors speculate that the attractors themselves

  17. Modeling Studies of the Effects of Tropical Rainfall on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions and Oceanic Hydrological Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dake

    2000-01-01

    This research project is a joint effort of UMD/JCESS, NASA/GSFC, NOAA/PMEL and LDEO, with UMD/JCESS being the leader and LDEO being responsible for coupled modeling. Although the project as a whole is for three years, the LDEO part was terminated at the end of the second year because of a shift of focus. The detailed description of the whole project and the effort made at LDEO have been given in the two joint annual reports and the two annual reports from LDEO. Here we only provide a brief summary of what we have done here at LDEO and a list of publications that resulted partly from this project.

  18. Do GCM's Predict the Climate.... Or the Low Frequency Weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Varon, D.; Schertzer, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Over twenty-five years ago, a three-regime scaling model was proposed describing the statistical variability of the atmosphere over time scales ranging from weather scales out to ≈ 100 kyrs. Using modern in situ data reanalyses, monthly surface series (at 5ox5o), 8 "multiproxy" (yearly) series of the Northern hemisphere from 1500- 1980, and GRIP and Vostok paleotemperatures at 5.2 and ≈ 100 year resolutions (over the past 91-420 kyrs), we refine the model and show how it can be understood with the help of new developments in nonlinear dynamics, especially multifractals and cascades. In a scaling range, mean fluctuations in state variables such as temperature ΔT ≈ ΔtH the where Δt is the duration. At small (weather) scales the fluctuation exponents are generally H>0; they grow with scale. At longer scales Δt >τw (≈ 10 days) they change sign, the fluctuations decrease with scale; this is the low variability, "low frequency weather" regime the spectrum is a relatively flat "plateau", it's variability is that of the usual idea of "long term weather statistics". Finally for longer times, Δt>τc ≈ 10 - 100 years, again H>0, the variability again increases with scale. This is the true climate regime. These scaling regimes allow us to objectively define the weather as fluctuations over periods <τw, "climate states", as fluctuations at scale τc and "climate change" as the fluctuations at longer periods >τc). We show that the intermediate regime is the result of the weather regime undergoing a "dimensional transition": at temporal scales longer than the typical lifetime of planetary structures (τw), the spatial degrees of freedom are rapidly quenched, only the temporal degrees of freedom are important. This low frequency weather regime has statistical properties well reproduced not only by weather cascade models, but also by control runs (i.e. without climate forcing) of GCM's (including IPSL and ECHAM GCM's). In order for GCM's to go beyond simply

  19. Ocean-Atmosphere interaction observed from comparison of the ENSO signatures in the time series of J2 and the Earth's spin rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, L.; Fang, M.; Zang, X.; Zheng, D.; Hager, B. H.; Wunsch, C.; Ding, X.

    2003-12-01

    Significant interannual variations have been observed from the multi-satillite SLR solutions of the Earth's oblateness, known as the J2 time series, by the Texas CSR group (Cheng & Tapley, submitted) with a time span from 1975 to the present, as well as by our independent analysis of the Godard series (courtesy of Ben Chao for the data) with a time span from 1979 to the present. These variations are closely related to the ENSO events as evidenced by their apparent correlation, not perfect though, with the Southern Oscillation Index. Our preliminary analysis shows that the ENSO signature in the atmospheric circulation is not adequate to account for up to 50% of the interannuals in the J2 series. In contrast, the atmosphere contributes better than 80% of the observed time variation of the Earth's rotation rate i.e. the length of day (LOD) at the ENSO time scale, mostly from the thermally driven eastward wind fields (e.g. Zheng et al, 2003). We normalize the LOD and J2 series by making the maxima in both data sets units, and make a comparison. A strong correlation is found between the LOD and J2. It is apparently due to a common cause from the ENSO. At the same time, noticeable differences are observed, especially with the phases. These differences are ultimately attributed to the ocean-atmosphere interaction during the ENSO events. As a preliminary study, we calculate the oceanic contribution to the interannuals of LOD and J2 by running a high-resolution state-of-art self-consistent and volume conserving ocean numerical model with realistic atmospheric forcing. A simple model for the ocean-atmospheric interaction will be employed to calculate the changes in the wind and pressure fields. Solid Earth deformation induced by the bottom pressure change is also considered in the modeling. Correlation analysis are conducted between the "fully model" ENSO driven LOD and J2. Comparisons between the observed and modeled correltions will be presented.

  20. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso-to planetary-scale. Mechanisms, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Richard; Bryan, Frank; Tribbia, Joseph; Park, Sungsu; Dennis, John; Saravanan, R.; Schneider, Niklas; Kwon, Young-Oh

    2015-06-11

    This project aims to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving ocean mesoscale activity and the corresponding response in the atmosphere. The main computational objectives are; i) to perform and assess Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations with the new Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) spectral element dynamical core; ii) use static mesh refinement to focus on oceanic fronts; iii) develop a new Earth System Modeling tool to investigate the atmospheric response to fronts by selectively filtering surface flux fields in the CESM coupler. The climate research objectives are 1) to improve the coupling of ocean fronts and the atmospheric boundary layer via investigations of dependency on model resolution and stability functions: 2) to understand and simulate the ensuing tropospheric response that has recently been documented in observations: and 3) to investigate the relationship of ocean frontal variability to low frequency climate variability and the accompanying storm tracks and extremes in high resolution simulations. This is a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of computational scientists, climate scientists and climate model developers. It specifically aims at DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  1. Tropical Sensitivity of a Coupled Model to Specified ISCCP Low Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, C. T.; Rosati, A.; Gudgel, R.

    2000-07-01

    The seasonal cycle of SST observed in the eastern equatorial Pacific is poorly simulated by many ocean-atmosphere coupled GCMs. This deficiency may be partly due to an incorrect prediction of tropical marine stratocumulus (MSc). To explore this hypothesis, two basic multiyear simulations have been performed using a coupled GCM with seasonally varying solar radiation. The model's cloud prediction scheme, which underpredicts tropical marine stratocumulus, is used for all clouds in the control run. In contrast, in the `ISCCP' run, the climatological monthly mean low cloud fraction is specified over the open ocean, utilizing C2 data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). In this manner, the treatment of MSc clouds, including the annual cycle, is more realistic than in previous sensitivity studies.Robust surface and subsurface thermodynamical and dynamical responses to the specified MSc are found in the Tropics, especially near the equator. In the annual mean, the equatorial cold tongue extends farther west and intensifies, while the east-west SST gradient is enhanced. A double SST maximum flanking the cold tongue becomes asymmetric about the equator. The SST annual cycle in the eastern equatorial Pacific strengthens, and the equatorial SST seasonal anomalies migrate farther westward. MSc-induced local shortwave radiative cooling enhances dynamical cooling associated with the southeast trades. The surface meridional wind stress in the extreme eastern equatorial Pacific remains southerly all year, while the surface zonal wind stress and equatorial upwelling intensify, as does the seasonal cycle of evaporation, in better agreement with observation. Within the ocean, the thermocline steepens and the Equatorial Undercurrent intensifies. When the low clouds are entirely removed, the SST warms by about 5.5 K in the western and central tropical Pacific, relative to `ISCCP,' and the model's SST bias there reverses sign.ENSO-like interannual

  2. THOR: an open-source exo-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosheintz, Luc; Mendonça, João; Käppeli, Roger; Lukas Grimm, Simon; Mishra, Siddhartha; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    In this talk, I will present THOR, the first fully conservative, GPU-accelerated exo-GCM (general circulation model) on a nearly uniform, global grid that treats shocks and is non-hydrostatic. THOR will be freely available to the community as a standard tool.Unlike most GCMs THOR solves the full, non-hydrostatic Euler equations instead of the primitive equations. The equations are solved on a global three-dimensional icosahedral grid by a second order Finite Volume Method (FVM). Icosahedral grids are nearly uniform refinements of an icosahedron. We've implemented three different versions of this grid. FVM conserves the prognostic variables (density, momentum and energy) exactly and doesn't require a diffusion term (artificial viscosity) in the Euler equations to stabilize our solver. Historically FVM was designed to treat discontinuities correctly. Hence it excels at resolving shocks, including those present in hot exoplanetary atmospheres.Atmospheres are generally in near hydrostatic equilibrium. We therefore implement a well-balancing technique recently developed at the ETH Zurich. This well-balancing ensures that our FVM maintains hydrostatic equilibrium to machine precision. Better yet, it is able to resolve pressure perturbations from this equilibrium as small as one part in 100'000. It is important to realize that these perturbations are significantly smaller than the truncation error of the same scheme without well-balancing. If during the course of the simulation (due to forcing) the atmosphere becomes non-hydrostatic, our solver continues to function correctly.THOR just passed an important mile stone. We've implemented the explicit part of the solver. The explicit solver is useful to study instabilities or local problems on relatively short time scales. I'll show some nice properties of the explicit THOR. An explicit solver is not appropriate for climate study because the time step is limited by the sound speed. Therefore, we are working on the first fully

  3. The GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepfer, H.; Bony, S.; Winker, D.; Cesana, G.; Dufresne, J. L.; Minnis, P.; Stubenrauch, C. J.; Zeng, S.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Cloud Product (GOCCP) designed to evaluate the cloudiness simulated by general circulation models (GCMs). For this purpose, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization L1 data are processed following the same steps as in a lidar simulator used to diagnose the model cloud cover that CALIPSO would observe from space if the satellite was flying above an atmosphere similar to that predicted by the GCM. Instantaneous profiles of the lidar scattering ratio (SR) are first computed at the highest horizontal resolution of the data but at the vertical resolution typical of current GCMs, and then cloud diagnostics are inferred from these profiles: vertical distribution of cloud fraction, horizontal distribution of low, middle, high, and total cloud fractions, instantaneous SR profiles, and SR histograms as a function of height. Results are presented for different seasons (January-March 2007-2008 and June-August 2006-2008), and their sensitivity to parameters of the lidar simulator is investigated. It is shown that the choice of the vertical resolution and of the SR threshold value used for cloud detection can modify the cloud fraction by up to 0.20, particularly in the shallow cumulus regions. The tropical marine low-level cloud fraction is larger during nighttime (by up to 0.15) than during daytime. The histograms of SR characterize the cloud types encountered in different regions. The GOCCP high-level cloud amount is similar to that from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The low-level and middle-level cloud fractions are larger than those derived from passive remote sensing (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-Cloud and Earth Radiant Energy System Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances, TOVS Path B, AIRS-Laboratoire de M

  4. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Annen, J.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Lefevre, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars' atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 microns with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35deg on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60degN 112degW was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone-profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  5. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Kelly Elizabeth; Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Delgado, J. D.; Annen, J.; Lefèvre, F.

    2008-09-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars’ atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 μm with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35°, on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60°N 112°W was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  6. GCM studies of the influence of vegetation on the general circulation: The role of albedo in modulating climate change. [GCM (general circulation model)

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a simple biosphere model is used to examine the role of vegetation change on climate. Various biomes are substituted to simulate degradation of vegetation. It is found that albedo change plays a distinct role in the local decrease of rainfall. Changes in vegetation morphology and physiology do not cause catastrophic decreases in precipitation. Simulations of Amazon deforestation show that the climate response is very dependent on the amount of change in albedo between rainforest and degraded grass. Precipitation drops as albedo increases. The change in plant physiology decreases evapotranspiration, but moisture convergence increases to offset the drying. This compensation is a result of cloud feedback in this model, and does not occur when cloudiness is prescribed. Experiments with idealized boundary conditions show a similar dependence of rainfall on albedo in cases of tropical deforestation, subtropical desertification, and mid-latitude deforestation. In the topics, rainfall decreases over land only when reflectivity is increased, even when the rainforest is left intact. The monsoon precipitation of the subtropical experiment fails when savannah is replaced by high-albedo desert. When low-albedo desert is used, the decrease in summer rainfall is small. When mid-latitude forest is replaced by grassland, precipitation patterns shift, but net rainfall remains unchanged. Additional simulations of mid-latitude drought show that low soil moisture leads to moderate spring and summer droughts, but dry soil combined with dormant vegetation produces extremely severe droughts. Soil moisture deficits were more persistent when vegetation did not go dormant.

  7. Antarctic glacial geologic record and GCM modeling: A test

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, D.H.; Bromwich, D.H.; Harwood, D.M.; Webb, P.

    1992-03-01

    A recent GCM (General Circulation Model) study of Antarctic glaciation by Oglesby concluded that (1) oceanic heat transport is relatively unimportant in the development and maintenance of Antarctic glaciation; (2) height and polar position, not the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, have led to thermal isolation; and (3) surface elevation may be crucial for glaciation. Model results are here evaluated against the Pliocene geologic record for Antarctica. The Sirius Group, widely distributed in the Transantarctic Mountains, contains diatom floras suggesting open marine conditions in interior East Antarctica as recently as about 3 m.y. ago. The Sirius deposits also contain a sparse fossil flora including Nothofagus wood, demonstrating snow-free conditions and elevated summer temperatures within 500 km of the South Pole. Based on fission track data and marine sediments, uplift rates for the Transantarctic Mountains are estimated to average 50-100 m m.y.-1 for the last 10 m.y., although rates may have been higher during the last 3 m.y. The continental interior is also most unlikely to have changed elevation by more than a few hundred meters in the last 3 m.y. If the dating of the Sirius is correct and uplift rates have not been an order of magnitude higher, then polar location and elevation cannot be primary controls on the formation and subsequent fluctuations of the ice sheet.

  8. African easterly wave activity in a variable resolution GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaoui, M.; Royer, J.-F.; Chauvin, F.

    2002-03-01

    The role of large-scale conditions on African easterly waves' variability and associated rainfall is investigated in simulations with the variable resolution version of the Arpege-Climat General Circulation Model (GCM). Easterly waves are identified from the 850 hPa meridional winds. The simulated waves' characteristics and their frequency response are compared with that in the reanalyses of the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) during summer 1992. The zonal wavelength of the simulated waves increases toward the equator. This increase, found also in previous works, is explained by the increase in 850-hPa mean zonal winds toward the equator as a result of low-level monsoon flow. A pronounced seasonal variability indicating a late summer enhancement of wave activity and related precipitation is found in both simulations and reanalyses. This feature, which has been found from observation campaigns, is explained by the variability of the large-scale circulation, which gives favorable conditions for the penetration of the easterly waves into the moist layer in the late summer. A shift of the spectra towards low frequencies is found in the simulated waves when compared to the reanalysis. The shift is explained by the relatively weak westward winds within the African Easterly Jet in the model, which tend to generate waves with low phase speed and frequency. We suggest that the weakness of the winds in the jet is caused by the strong eastward monsoon flow in the model, which may be due to surface condition parameterizations.

  9. GCM simulated geopotential heights compared to GPS RO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodtsov, S.; Kirilenko, A.; Olsen, D.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate, high-quality, global coverage data is required for global climate monitoring. It also provides possibility of additional validation of the general circulation models (GCMs). GPS Radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements have potential of becoming a new benchmark in data acquisition, providing new high-quality profiles of the parameters of the atmosphere, such as the temperature, water vapor pressure, and geopotential heights. In our study we use GPS RO data with a purpose to test global circulation models (GCMs). We study how climate change signal emerges in the GPS RO data and how these signals are reflected in GCM simulations. We use temperature and geopotential height profiles from 2001-2006 CHAMP and 2006-2011 COMIC acquisitions to validate the output from twelve IPCC AR4 GCMs run under A1B SRES scenario. We found that the 2001-2011 trends of the temperature and geopotential height derived from the IPCC AR4 GCMs show the same pattern with trends derived from GPS RO data - warming of the upper troposphere (UT) and cooling of the lower stratosphere (LS). There is some discrepancy between trends in lower troposphere (LT) between models and GPS RO data: some GCMs show decreasing temperature and geopotential height trends while the GPS RO trends are positive. The statistical analysis of these trends will be reported.

  10. The Nonlinear Response of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean-Atmosphere System to Periodic Variations in Insolation and its Association with the Abrupt Climate Transitions during the Quaternary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    The evidences of climate changes during the Quaternary are abundant but the physical mechanisms behind the climate transitions are controversial. The theory of Milankovitch takes into account the periodic orbital variations and the solar radiation received by the Earth as the main explanation for the glacial-interglacial cycles. However, some gaps in the theory still remain. In this study, we propose elucidating some of these gaps by approaching the Equatorial Pacific Ocean as a large oscillator, capable of triggering climate changes in different temporal scales. A mathematical model representing El Ninõ-like phenomena, based on Duffing equation and modulated by the astronomical cycle of 100 ka, was used to simulate the variability of the equatorial Pacific climate system over the last 2 Ma. The physical configuration of the Pacific Ocean, expressed in the equation, explains the temporal limit of the glacial-interglacial cycles. According to the simulation results, consistent with paleoclimate records, the amplification of the effects of the gradual variation of the Earth's orbit eccentricity - another unclear question - is due to the feedback mechanism of the Pacific ocean-atmosphere system, which responds non-linearly to small variations in insolation forcing and determines the ENSO-like phase (warm or cold) at different time scales and different intensities. The approach proposed here takes into account that the abrupt transitions between the ENSO-like phases, and the consequent changes in the sea surface temperature (SST) along the Equatorial Pacific Ocean, produce reactions that act as secondary causes of the temperature fluctuations that result in a glaciation (or deglaciation) - as the drastic change on the rate of evaporation/precipitation around the globe, and the increase (or decrease) of the atmospheric CO2 absorption by the phytoplankton. The transitional behavior between the warm and the cold phases, according to the presented model, is enhanced as