Science.gov

Sample records for coupling agent gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane

  1. Test of carcinogenicity in mouse skin: Methylenedianiline,. gamma. glycidyloxytrimethyloxysilane,. gamma. aminopropyltriethoxysilane and a mixture of m-phenylenediamine, methylenedianiline, and diglycidylether of bisphenol-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.M.; Smith, L.H.; Frome, E.; Whitaker, M.J.; Gipson, L.C.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Application of graded concentrations of four test substances in acetone to the skin of C3H mice five times a week resulted in the following: ..gamma..aminopropyltriethoxysilane at concentration of 100 and 50 wt/vol % was a severe and mild skin irritant in female C3Hf/Bd respectively and in males a mild skin irritant. Methylenedianiline at a concentration of 10 wt/vol % in methanol killed 4/9 females and 1/9 males. When acetone was the solvent 3/10 females and 3/10 males died within 2 weeks. No mortality or skin damage occurred with ..gamma..glycidyloxytrimethyloxysilane or the mixture of m-phenylenediamine, methylenedianiline and diglycidylether of bisphenol A (MDA). A study of the effects of a two-year, three times a week, topical application of the four test materials revealed no significant increase in skin tumors. The incidence of liver tumors appeared to be increased by exposure to methylenedianiline and with the mixture (MDA). Significant and dose-dependent increases in mortality were found in male mice with MDA and increased mortality at the highest dose (10.8 mg/week) in females. In the case of methylenedianiline excess mortality was found in both sexes. The precise cause of excess mortality from dermal absorption of the materials applied over a two-year period was not established. 5 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Dental applications for silane coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Tomotaro

    2016-01-01

    Silane coupling agents alter the properties of material surfaces, which are modified by means of an organic functional group of specific silanes. This review describes the use of hydrophobic silane compounds for surface modification of silica-based and other materials. (J Oral Sci 58, 151-155, 2016). PMID:27349534

  3. Multifunctional nanoparticles as coupled contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yongdong; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; O’Donnell, Matthew; Gao, Xiaohu

    2011-01-01

    Engineering compact imaging probes with highly integrated modalities is a key focus in bionanotechnology and will have profound impact on molecular diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutics. However, combining multiple components on a nanometer scale to create new imaging modalities unavailable from individual components has proven challenging. Here, we demonstrate iron oxide and gold coupled core-shell nanoparticles with well defined structural characteristics (e.g., size, shell thickness, and core-shell separation) and physical properties (e.g., electronic, magnetic, optical, thermal, and acoustic). The resulting multifunctional nanoprobes not only offer contrast for electron microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, and scattering-based imaging, but more importantly, enable a new imaging mode, magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging, with remarkable contrast enhancement compared to PA images using conventional nanoparticle contrast agents. PMID:20975706

  4. Polymeric coupling agent for bonding polymers to aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, S.L.; Bell, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    A polymeric coupling agent, containing {beta}-dike tone and epoxy functional groups, is being evaluated as a potential adhesion enhancer and corrosion inhibitor to be utilized on adhesively bonded aluminum substrates. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy studies indicate chemical interaction of the coupling agent with the aluminum oxide surface. Modified tubular butt joints were utilized to evaluate the joint strengths and durabilities of coupling agent treated joints. Dry strengths of treated joints were comparable to untreated controls, however after 3 and 5 days immersion in 57{degrees}C water, the coupling agent treated joints displayed improved joint strengths as compared to the untreated controls. Comparisons of coupling agent treated and untreated aluminum substrates after 24 hours exposure to salt spray (ASTM B117) indicated improved corrosion resistance due to the coupling agent treatment.

  5. Silane coupling agent structures on carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Cristina; Rubio, Juan; Rubio, Fausto; Fierro, José Luis G; Oteo, José Luis

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are considered ideal materials for reinforcing polymers due to their excellent mechanical properties, among others. In order to obtain composites of optimal properties the clue is to enhance the interaction between reinforcement (CNFs) and polymer matrix. Surface modification of CNFs with silane coupling agents (SCAs) has revealed as one of the most interesting methods. The silanization process has been carried out mixing at room temperature and for one minute the hydrolysed silane with CNFs. We have use four different SCAs: 3-aminopropyltriethoxyxilane (APS), 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AMMO), N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-(aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (DAMO), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO), in order to elucidate the SCA-CNFs interaction and the silane structures formed on CNFs surface. XPS and FTIR-ATR techniques have pointed out that each silane adsorbs on CNFs surface through chemical bonding, forming multilayers. Silane nature determines the structure taken on CNFs surface. APS and AMO silanes adsorb taking vertical structures on CNFs surface, while DMO and GMO adsorb on CNFs taking horizontal structures, stabilized by zwitterions formed through H-bonds with hydroxyl groups from CNFs surface. PMID:21780418

  6. Development of high temperature resistant graphite fiber coupling agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Surface treatments were investigated as potential coupling agents to improve the elevated temperature shear strength retention of polyimide/graphite and polyphenylquinoxaline/graphite composites. The potential coupling agents were evaluated by fiber strand tensile tests, fiber and composite weight losses at 533 and 588K, and by interlaminar shear strength retention at 533 and 588K. The two surface treatments selected for more extensive evaluation were a coating of Ventromer T-1, a complex organometallic reaction product of titanium tetrachloride and trimethyl borate, and a polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) sizing which was pyrolyzed in nitrogen to form a carbonaceous layer on the fiber. Pyrolyzed polyphenylquinoxaline is a satisfactory coupling agent for polyimide/Thornel 300 graphite fiber composites. During 1000 hours aging at 588K such composites lose a little over half their transverse tensile strength, and suffer a slight loss in flexural modulus. No degradation of flexural strength or interlaminar shear strength occured during 1000 hours aging at 588K. None of the coupling agents examined had a markedly beneficial effect with polyphenylquinoxaline composites.

  7. Coherent Pattern Prediction in Swarms of Delay-Coupled Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a general swarm model of self-propelling agents interacting through a pairwise potential in the presence of noise and communication time delay. Previous work has shown that a communication time delay in the swarm induces a pattern bifurcation that depends on the size of the coupling amplitude. We extend these results by completely unfolding the bifurcation structure of the mean field approximation. Our analysis reveals a direct correspondence between the different dynamical behaviors found in different regions of the coupling-time delay plane with the different classes of simulated coherent swarm patterns. We derive the spatiotemporal scales of the swarm structures, as well as demonstrate how the complicated interplay of coupling strength, time delay, noise intensity, and choice of initial conditions can affect the swarm. In particular, our studies show that for sufficiently large values of the coupling strength and/or the time delay, there is a noise intensity threshold that forces a transition of the swarm from a misaligned state into an aligned state. We show that this alignment transition exhibits hysteresis when the noise intensity is taken to be time dependent. PMID:24255625

  8. Coherent Pattern Prediction in Swarms of Delay-Coupled Agents.

    PubMed

    Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B

    2012-10-01

    We consider a general swarm model of self-propelling agents interacting through a pairwise potential in the presence of noise and communication time delay. Previous work has shown that a communication time delay in the swarm induces a pattern bifurcation that depends on the size of the coupling amplitude. We extend these results by completely unfolding the bifurcation structure of the mean field approximation. Our analysis reveals a direct correspondence between the different dynamical behaviors found in different regions of the coupling-time delay plane with the different classes of simulated coherent swarm patterns. We derive the spatiotemporal scales of the swarm structures, as well as demonstrate how the complicated interplay of coupling strength, time delay, noise intensity, and choice of initial conditions can affect the swarm. In particular, our studies show that for sufficiently large values of the coupling strength and/or the time delay, there is a noise intensity threshold that forces a transition of the swarm from a misaligned state into an aligned state. We show that this alignment transition exhibits hysteresis when the noise intensity is taken to be time dependent. PMID:24255625

  9. The effect of coupling agents on composite durability

    SciTech Connect

    Macturk, K.S.; Schultheisz, C.R.; Hunston, D.L.; Schutte, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The relationship between fiber surface treatments and glass fiber/epoxy composite durability was investigated. The type of silane coupling agent deposited on the fiber surface was varied, and the single fiber fragmentation test was used to measure strengths of the fiber and the fiber-matrix interface. The samples were tested dry and after conditioned in 75{degrees}C distilled water for up to 10 weeks. With dry samples the interface strengths varied with the reactivity of the silane deposited on the surface. Moisture exposure produced little change in fiber strengths and, for samples containing silane treated fibers, little change in interface strength, even when the silane was unreactive with the epoxy. In contrast, samples containing unsized fibers exhibited significant losses in interface strengths.

  10. Modification of eucalyptus pulp fiber using silane coupling agents with aliphatic side chains of different length

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of three silane coupling agents with different aliphatic chain lengths on the hydrophobicity of eucalyptus pulp fiber. The three silanes coupling agents used (isobutyltrimethoxysilane, methyltrimethoxysilane, and n-octyltriethoxysilane [OTES]) we...

  11. Surface modification of basalt with silane coupling agent on asphalt mixture moisture damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yahong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yinhui; Li, Wensheng; Yuan, Jianmin; Tan, Ligang; Wang, Shuangyin; Wu, Zhenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on γ-(methacryloyloxy) propyltrimethoxysilane (KH570). The surface of basalt rocks was modified by KH570 and the new silane coupling agent (NSCA), and the interfacial interaction between silane coupling agent and basalt was also studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the silane coupling agent molecule bound strongly with basalt rocks. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer of coupling agent was formed on the surface of modified basalt. The boiling test and immersion Marshall test confirmed that the moisture sensitivity of basalt modified with the new silane coupling agent increased more significantly than that untreated and treated with KH570. The Retained Marshall Strength of basalt modified with the new coupling agent increased from 71.74% to 87.79% compared with untreated basalt. The results indicated that the new silane coupling agent played an important role in improving the interfacial performance between basalt and asphalt.

  12. Further development of high temperature-resistant graphite fiber coupling agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Potential coupling agents for graphite fibers were screened by their effect on the weight losses of Thornel 300, HMS, and HTS fibers at 588K for 200 and 400 hours. Unidirectional laminates were made from HMS and HTS fibers, untreated, and treated with each of the seven coupling agents. The matrix of all laminates was PMR polyimide (PMR-PR). On the basis of the best overall retention of elevated temperature interlaminar shear strength after 200 hours at 588K, composite weight after 200 hours at 588K, and fiber weight after 400 hours at 588K, ventromer T-1 applied from aqueous solution and pyrolyzed PPQ were selected for further evaluation as coupling agents for HTS fiber while ventromer T-2 and pyrolyzed PPQ were selected as coupling agents for HMS fiber. It was shown that pyrolyzed PPQ as a coupling agent improves the oxidative stability of HTS/PMR-PI composites.

  13. Coherent Pattern Prediction in Swarms of Delay-Coupled Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Scwartz, Ira

    2013-03-01

    We consider a general swarm model of self-propelling particles interacting through a pairwise potential in the presence of a fixed communication time delay. Previous work has shown that swarms with communication time delays and noise may display pattern transitions that depend on the size of the coupling amplitude. We extend these results by completely unfolding the bifurcation structure of the mean field approximation. Our analysis reveals a direct correspondence between the different dynamical behaviors found in different regions of the coupling-time delay plane with the different classes of simulated coherent swarm patterns. We derive the spatio-temporal scales of the swarm structures, and also demonstrate how the complicated interplay of coupling strength, time delay, noise intensity, and choice of initial conditions can affect the swarm. In addition, when adding noise to the system, we find that for sufficiently large values of the coupling strength and/or the time delay, there is a noise intensity threshold that forces a transition of the swarm from a misaligned state into an aligned state. We show that this alignment transition exhibits hysteresis when the noise intensity is taken to be time dependent. Office of Naval Research, NIH (LMR and IBS) and NRL (EF)

  14. Bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin core: influence of temperature on silane coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Simamotos Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Rontani, Regina Maria Puppin; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air drying temperature and different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and composite resin core. The post surface was cleaned with alcohol and treated with different silane coupling agents, being three prehydrolyzed silanes [Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE)] and one two-component silane [Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply)]. Two post-silanization air drying temperatures, 23ºC and 60ºC, were applied. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the silanized post and filled with composite resin. Each bonded post provided 7 slices for push-out testing. Each slice was loaded to failure under compression at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott tests (α=0.05). Dunnett's test was used to compare the mean of the control group with that of each experimental group. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured slices. For the 23ºC air drying temperature, the use of RelyX Ceramic Primer resulted in significantly lower bond strength than the other silane coupling agents, while the bond strength with Silane Coupling Agent was the highest of all groups. Only with Silane Coupling Agent, the bond strength for the 23ºC air drying temperature was significantly higher than that for 60ºC air drying. In conclusion, the use of warm air drying after silane application produced no increase in the bond strength between the fiber-reinforced composite post and the composite core. The two-component silane produced higher bond strength than all prehydrolyzed silanes when it was used with air drying at room temperature. PMID:22460308

  15. Cluster Consensus of Nonlinearly Coupled Multi-Agent Systems in Directed Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Austin; Chen, Shi-Hua

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the cluster consensus problem in directed networks of nonlinearly coupled multi-agent systems by using pinning control. Depending on the community structure generated by the group partition of the underlying digraph, various clusters can be made coherently independent by applying feedback injections to a fraction of the agents. Sufficient conditions for cluster consensus are obtained using algebraic graph theory and matrix theory and some simulations results are included to illustrate the method.

  16. Impact of biofibers and coupling agents on the weathering characteristics of composites polymer degradation and stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper explores the ultraviolet (UV) weathering performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with different biofiber fillers and coupling agent. Biofiber polymer composite (BFPC) material samples were prepared using oak, cotton burr and stem (CBS) or guayule bagasse as fiber source...

  17. Development and Evaluation of Novel Coupling Agents for Kenaf-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaofeng

    Natural fibers are gaining popularity as reinforcement materials for thermoset resins over the last two decades. Natural fibers are inexpensive, abundant, renewable and environmentally friendly. Kenaf fibers are one of the natural fibers that can potentially be used for reinforcing unsaturated polyester (UPE). As a polymer matrix, UPE enjoys a 40% market share of all the thermoset composites. This widespread application is due to many favorable characteristics including low cost, ease of cure at room temperature, ease of molding, a good balance of mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. One of the barriers for the full utilization of the kenaf fiber reinforced UPE composites, however, is the poor interfacial adhesion between the natural fibers and the UPE resins. The good interfacial adhesion between kenaf fibers and UPE matrix is essential for generating the desired properties of kenaf-UPE composites for most of the end applications. Use of a coupling agent is one of the most effective ways of improving the interfacial adhesion. In this study, six novel effective coupling agents were developed and investigated for kenaf-UPE composites: DIH-HEA, MFA, NMA, AESO-DIH, AESO-MDI, and AESO-PMDI. All the coupling agents were able to improve the interfacial adhesion between kanaf and UPE resins. The coupling agents were found to significantly enhance the flexural properties and water resistance of the kenaf-UPE composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed all the coupling agents were covalently bonded onto kenaf fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the composites revealed the improved interfacial adhesion between kanaf fibers and UPE resins.

  18. Adhesion enhancement of steel fibers to acrylic bone cement through a silane coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Lieberman, M; Vickers, A; Schmid, S R; Mason, J J

    2006-01-01

    The use of a silane coupling agent (methacryloxypropyl-trichlorosilane) to improve the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced acrylic bone cements was assessed. Changes to the tensile and fracture properties of bone cements reinforced with silane-coated or uncoated 316L stainless steel fibers of different aspect ratios were studied. Contact-angle measurements indicated that the coupling agent coats the metal surface through room temperature treatments in a short time (within 2 h). Push-out tests indicated that the interfacial shear strength of silane-coated 316L stainless steel rods is 141% higher than the uncoated rods. The elastic moduli, ultimate stresses, and fracture toughness of the silane-coated, steel fiber-reinforced bone cements are significantly higher than the bone cements reinforced with uncoated steel fibers. There were no differences in the tensile mechanical properties of the silane-coated or uncoated, steel fiber-reinforced cements after aging in a physiological saline solution, indicating that the bonding effectiveness is decreased by the intrusion of water at the metal-polymer interface. Because of possible biocompatibility issues with leaching of the silane coupling agent and no long-term mechanical benefit in simulated aging experiments, the use of these agents is not recommended for in vivo use. PMID:16224777

  19. Joining consensus of networked multi-agent systems with nonlinear couplings and weighting constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bohui; Wang, Jingcheng; Zhang, Langwen; Ge, Yang

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the joining consensus of networked multi-agent systems subject to nonlinear couplings and weighted directed graphs via pinning control. A weighted-average consensus protocol is proposed to achieve the collective decision by interacting with the local information of some pinned agents. By proposing a novel joining consensus protocol, average consensus and general consensus strategies are joined to achieve an agreement for the weighting networked system. Furthermore, by calculating a proper consensus gain and using finite control Lyapunov controllers, an efficient joining consensus protocol is presented to improve the consensus speed. Sufficient conditions for achieving the consensuses asymptotically are proved. Finally, theoretical results are validated via simulations.

  20. Laboratory evaluation of a chemical coupling agent to prevent debonding of asphalts from aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divito, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    Debonding of asphalt from mineral aggregates (stripping) was investigated. A silane coupling agent was compared with a well known, commercially available liquid antistrip (amine) in the immersion compression and double punch debonding tests on two Arizona mineral aggregate sources. The silane was used as a mineral aggregate pretreatment while the amine was added to the asphalt. It is indicated that the silane generally performed as well as the liquid antistrip or better.

  1. Studies on Hdpe-Coconut Flour Composites: Effect of Coupling Agents and Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; González, J.; Hernández, M.; Ichazo, M. N.; Alvarado, Sinai; Ziegler, Dulce Maria

    2008-08-01

    This study investigates the mechanical, thermal and morphological behavior of coconut flour/polyethylene composites, with special interest on the influence of the surface modification of coconut flour and the presence of different coupling agents on the interfacial bonding. The different treatments of the composites with an EAA copolymer, with titanate, with 5 and 18 wt% of NaOH and acetylating, confirm the better tensile behavior of these composites.

  2. Agent-based Model for the Coupled Human-Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvoleff, A.; Werner, B.

    2006-12-01

    Integrated assessment models have been used to predict the outcome of coupled economic growth, resource use, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, both for scientific and policy purposes. These models generally have employed significant simplifications that suppress nonlinearities and the possibility of multiple equilibria in both their economic (DeCanio, 2005) and climate (Schneider and Kuntz-Duriseti, 2002) components. As one step toward exploring general features of the nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system, we have developed a series of variations on the well studied RICE and DICE models, which employ different forms of agent-based market dynamics and "climate surprises." Markets are introduced through the replacement of the production function of the DICE/RICE models with an agent-based market modeling the interactions of producers, policymakers, and consumer agents. Technological change and population growth are treated endogenously. Climate surprises are representations of positive (for example, ice sheet collapse) or negative (for example, increased aerosols from desertification) feedbacks that are turned on with probability depending on warming. Initial results point toward the possibility of large amplitude instabilities in the coupled human-climate system owing to the mismatch between short outlook market dynamics and long term climate responses. Implications for predictability of future climate will be discussed. Supported by the Andrew W Mellon Foundation and the UC Academic Senate.

  3. Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B.

    2010-06-01

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane—treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

  4. Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B.

    2010-06-02

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane--treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

  5. Investigating the use of coupling agents to improve the interfacial properties between a resorbable phosphate glass and polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Walker, Gavin S; Scotchford, Colin A

    2013-09-01

    Eight different chemicals were investigated as potential candidate coupling agents for phosphate glass fibre reinforced polylactic acid composites. Evidence of reaction of the coupling agents with phosphate glass and their effect on surface wettability and glass degradation were studied along with their principle role of improving the interface between glass reinforcement and polymer matrix. It was found that, with an optimal amount of coupling agent on the surface of the glass/polymer, interfacial shear strength improved by a factor of 5. Evidence of covalent bonding between agent and glass was found for three of the coupling agents investigated, namely: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane; etidronic acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. These three coupling agents also improved the interfacial shear strength and increased the hydrophobicity of the glass surface. It is expected that this would provide an improvement in the macroscopic properties of full-scale composites fabricated from the same materials which may also help to retain these properties for the desired length of time by retarding the breakdown of the fibre/matrix interface within these composites. PMID:22781920

  6. Coupled agent-based and finite-element models for predicting scar structure following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-08-01

    Following myocardial infarction, damaged muscle is gradually replaced by collagenous scar tissue. The structural and mechanical properties of the scar are critical determinants of heart function, as well as the risk of serious post-infarction complications such as infarct rupture, infarct expansion, and progression to dilated heart failure. A number of therapeutic approaches currently under development aim to alter infarct mechanics in order to reduce complications, such as implantation of mechanical restraint devices, polymer injection, and peri-infarct pacing. Because mechanical stimuli regulate scar remodeling, the long-term consequences of therapies that alter infarct mechanics must be carefully considered. Computational models have the potential to greatly improve our ability to understand and predict how such therapies alter heart structure, mechanics, and function over time. Toward this end, we developed a straightforward method for coupling an agent-based model of scar formation to a finite-element model of tissue mechanics, creating a multi-scale model that captures the dynamic interplay between mechanical loading, scar deformation, and scar material properties. The agent-based component of the coupled model predicts how fibroblasts integrate local chemical, structural, and mechanical cues as they deposit and remodel collagen, while the finite-element component predicts local mechanics at any time point given the current collagen fiber structure and applied loads. We used the coupled model to explore the balance between increasing stiffness due to collagen deposition and increasing wall stress due to infarct thinning and left ventricular dilation during the normal time course of healing in myocardial infarcts, as well as the negative feedback between strain anisotropy and the structural anisotropy it promotes in healing scar. The coupled model reproduced the observed evolution of both collagen fiber structure and regional deformation following coronary

  7. The Compatibility Effect Of Coupling Agent On Rheological-Morphological Relationship Of Banana Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. Y.; Shamsudin, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The rheological properties of banana fibre reinforced polypropylene (PP/BF) composites at different composition were analysed using Shimadzu capillary rheometer. The effect of coupling agent concentration on the rheological properties was studied and followed by drawing a relationship of rheological-morphological properties of PP/BF composites. It was found that all composite system exhibits pseudoplasticity and incorporation of treated fibres consequents enhanced viscosity due to improved interfacial adhesion at fibre-matrix interface. However, it was observed that PP/BF composite with 2 wt% silane concentration does not yield further enhancement in the rheological properties when compared to that of 1 wt%. Composites with 1 wt% silane concentration were found to yield most promising compatibility effect with well-oriented and uniformly dispersed fibre morphology.

  8. The effects of corn zein protein coupling agent on mechanical properties of flax fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitacre, Ryan John

    In the field of renewable materials, natural fiber composites demonstrate the capacity to be a viable structural material. When normalized by density, flax fiber mechanical properties are competitive with E-glass fibers. However, the hydrophilic nature of flax fibers reduces the interfacial bond strength with polymer thermosets, limiting composite mechanical properties. Corn zein protein was selected as a natural bio-based coupling agent because of its combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. Zein was deposited on the surface of flax, which was then processed into unidirectional composite. The mechanical properties of zein treated samples where measured and compared against commonly utilized synthetic treatments sodium hydroxide and silane which incorporate harsh chemicals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy were also used to determine analyze zein treatments. Results demonstrate the environmentally friendly zein treatment successfully increased tensile strength 8%, flexural strength 17%, and shear strength 30% compared to untreated samples.

  9. Effects of the methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on phenolic and miscanthus composites containing calcium sulfite scrubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sean

    The purpose of this research is to test the effects of methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on composite material containing calcium sulfite obtained from the Southern Illinois Power Co-operative. This scrubber material and the miscanthus plant are of interest due to their use in coal burning power plants to reduce toxic emission. When calcium sulfate is passed through coal fire gas emissions it absorbs mercury and sulfur. In these composites it is used as filler to reduce cost. Miscanthus is a source of both cellulose reinforcement and some natural resin. This plant has low care requirements, little mineral content, useful energy return, and positive environmental effects. Under investigation is whether a post-cure procedure or a silane coupling agent will positively impact the composite. Hot pressing alone may not be enough to fully cure the phenolic. It is hoped that the silane will increase the strength characteristics of the composite by enhancing adhesion between the calcium sulfite and phenolic resin. Possible effects on the miscanthus by the silane will also be tested. Phenolic is being utilized because of its recycling and biodegradable properties along with cost effectiveness in mass production. Composite mechanical performance was measured through 3-point bending to measure flexural strength and strain at breakage. A dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) was used to find thermomechanical properties. The post-cure was found to be effective, particularly on the final composite containing silane. When methyltrimethoxysilane was added to the miscanthus prior to fabrication, it was found to reduce flexural strength and density. However the addition of methyltrimethoxysilane to the calcium sulfite altered thermo-mechanical properties to a state more like pure phenolic, with added flexibility and thermal stability.

  10. Aryl diazonium salts: a new class of coupling agents for bonding polymers, biomacromolecules and nanoparticles to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mahouche-Chergui, Samia; Gam-Derouich, Sarra; Mangeney, Claire; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2011-07-01

    This critical review summarizes existing knowledge on the use of diazonium salts as a new generation of surface modifiers and coupling agents for binding synthetic polymers, biomacromolecules, and nanoparticles to surfaces. Polymer grafts can be directly grown at surfaces through the so-called grafting from approaches based on several polymerization methods but can also be pre-formed in solution and then grafted to surfaces through grafting onto strategies including "click" reactions. Several routes are also described for binding biomacromolecules through aryl layers in view of developing biosensors and protein arrays, while the use of aryl diazonium coupling agents is extended to the attachment of nanoparticles. Patents and industrial applications of the surface chemistry of diazonium compounds are covered. This review stresses the paramount role of aryl diazonium coupling agents in adhesion, surface and materials sciences (114 references). PMID:21479328

  11. Cytocompatibility and Mechanical Properties of Short Phosphate Glass Fibre Reinforced Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites: Effect of Coupling Agent Mediated Interface.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew; Walker, Gavin; Scotchford, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In this study three chemical agents Amino-propyl-triethoxy-silane (APS), sorbitol ended PLA oligomer (SPLA) and Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) were identified to be used as coupling agents to react with the phosphate glass fibre (PGF) reinforcement and the polylactic acid (PLA) polymer matrix of the composite. Composites were prepared with short chopped strand fibres (l = 20 mm, ϕ = 20 µm) in a random arrangement within PLA matrix. Improved, initial composite flexural strength (~20 MPa) was observed for APS treated fibres, which was suggested to be due to enhanced bonding between the fibres and polymer matrix. Both APS and HDI treated fibres were suggested to be covalently linked with the PLA matrix. The hydrophobicity induced by these coupling agents (HDI, APS) helped to resist hydrolysis of the interface and thus retained their mechanical properties for an extended period of time as compared to non-treated control. Approximately 70% of initial strength and 65% of initial modulus was retained by HDI treated fibre composites in contrast to the control, where only ~50% of strength and modulus was retained after 28 days of immersion in PBS at 37 °C. All coupling agent treated and control composites demonstrated good cytocompatibility which was comparable to the tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) control, supporting the use of these materials as coupling agent's within medical implant devices. PMID:24955744

  12. Facile Synthesis of Reductively Degradable Biopolymers Using Cystamine Diisocyanate as a Coupling Agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2016-03-14

    Reductively degradable biopolymers have emerged as a unique class of smart biomedical materials. Here, a functional coupling agent, cystamine diisocyanate (CDI), was designed to offer a facile access to reductively degradable biopolymers via polycondensation with various diols. CDI was readily obtained with a decent yield of 46% by reacting cystamine dihydrochloride with triphosgene. The polycondensation of oligo(ethylene glycol) diol (Mn = 0.4 or 1.5 kg/mol) or oligo(ε-caprolactone) diol (Mn = 0.53 kg/mol) with CDI in N,N-dimethylformamide at 60 °C using dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst afforded reductively degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (SSPEG, Mn = 6.2-76.8 kg/mol) or poly(ε-caprolactone) (SSPCL, Mn = 6.8-16.3 kg/mol), in which molecular weights were well controlled by diol/CDI molar ratios. Moreover, PEG-SSPCL-PEG triblock copolymers could be readily prepared by reacting dihydroxyl-terminated SSPCL with PEG-isocyanate derivative. PEG-SSPCL-PEG with an Mn of 5.0-16.3-5.0 kg/mol formed small-sized micelles with an average diameter of about 85 nm in PB buffer. The in vitro release studies using doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug showed that, in sharp contrast to reduction-insensitive PEG-PCL(HDI)-PEG controls, drug release from PEG-SSPCL-PEG micelles was fast and nearly complete in 24 h under a reductive condition containing 10 mM glutathione. The confocal microscopy experiments in drug-resistant MCF-7 cells (MCF-7/ADR) displayed efficient cytoplasmic DOX release from PEG-SSPCL-PEG micelles. MTT assays revealed that DOX-loaded PEG-SSPCL-PEG micelles were much more potent against MCF-7/ADR cells than reduction-insensitive PEG-PCL(HDI)-PEG controls (IC50: 6.3 vs 55.4 μg/mL). It should further be noted that blank PEG-SSPCL-PEG micelles were noncytotoxic up to a tested concentration of 1 mg/mL. Hence, cystamine diisocyanate appears to be an innovative coupling agent that facilitates versatile synthesis of biocompatible and reductively degradable biopolymers

  13. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response

  14. Cytocompatibility and Mechanical Properties of Short Phosphate Glass Fibre Reinforced Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites: Effect of Coupling Agent Mediated Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew; Walker, Gavin; Scotchford, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In this study three chemical agents Amino-propyl-triethoxy-silane (APS), sorbitol ended PLA oligomer (SPLA) and Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) were identified to be used as coupling agents to react with the phosphate glass fibre (PGF) reinforcement and the polylactic acid (PLA) polymer matrix of the composite. Composites were prepared with short chopped strand fibres (l = 20 mm, ϕ = 20 µm) in a random arrangement within PLA matrix. Improved, initial composite flexural strength (~20 MPa) was observed for APS treated fibres, which was suggested to be due to enhanced bonding between the fibres and polymer matrix. Both APS and HDI treated fibres were suggested to be covalently linked with the PLA matrix. The hydrophobicity induced by these coupling agents (HDI, APS) helped to resist hydrolysis of the interface and thus retained their mechanical properties for an extended period of time as compared to non-treated control. Approximately 70% of initial strength and 65% of initial modulus was retained by HDI treated fibre composites in contrast to the control, where only ~50% of strength and modulus was retained after 28 days of immersion in PBS at 37 °C. All coupling agent treated and control composites demonstrated good cytocompatibility which was comparable to the tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) control, supporting the use of these materials as coupling agent’s within medical implant devices. PMID:24955744

  15. Biocomposites based on Argan nut shell and a polymer matrix: Effect of filler content and coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Essabir, Hamid; Bensalah, Mohammed Ouadi; Rodrigue, Denis; Bouhfid, Rachid; Qaiss, Abou El Kacem

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed at developing a biocomposite using polypropylene (PP) as the matrix and Argan nut shell (ANS) as reinforcement. Also, styrene-(ethylene-butene)-styrene triblock copolymer grafted with maleic anhydride (SEBS-g-MA) was used as a coupling agent. The samples were prepared by using extrusion compounding followed by injection molding to determine the effect of filler and coupling agent content on the morphological, thermal, mechanical, and hygroscopic properties of the biocomposites. SEM micrographs revealed that good ANS dispersion/distribution into PP was achieved with an important reduction of fiber pull-out, micro-spaces, and voids with coupling agent addition. This led to substantial improvement intension, torsion, and water absorption reduction due to improved interfacial adhesion. Although ANS particles did not significantly modify the thermal stability of PP, the use of a coupling agent increased it. The experimental data were compared with several theoretical models such Voigt, Reuss, Hirsch, and Tsai-Pagano to characterize the interfacial adhesion quality and to determine the elastic modulus of a single ANS particle. Finally, all the results show that Argan waste to produce PP biocomposites is an interesting avenue to effectively deal with agricultural wastes and develop valuable industrial and practical applications. PMID:27083345

  16. Interfacial properties of two-carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate composites using two-synthesized graft copolymers as coupling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.M.

    2000-05-15

    Two model coupling agents, water-dispersible (WDGP) and tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble graft copolymers (TSGP), were synthesized for carbon fiber/polycarbonate (PC) composites. WDGP contains a long polyacrylamide (PAAm) chain grafted on a PC backbone, whereas TSGP contains a short grafted PAAm Chain. Measurements of the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and other interfacial properties were evaluated using a fragmentation test for two-fiber composites (TFC) to provide the same loading state. Optimal conditions for the treatment was established as a function of treatment time, temperature, initial concentration, and melting procedure. The amount adsorbed on the carbon fiber was higher for WDGP and TSGP were 54% and 74%, respectively. Mechanisms of energy adsorption for WDGP and intermolecular interaction for TSGP can be considered to contribute differently to IFSS improvement. The improvement in IFSS for both coupling agents may be due to chemical and hydrogen bonding in the interface between functional groups in the carbon fiber and PAAm in the coupling agents and to interdiffusion in the interface between PC in coupling agents and matrix PC.

  17. Coupling Agent-Based and Groundwater Modeling to Explore Demand Management Strategies for Shared Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Municipal water demands in growing population centers in the arid southwest US are typically met through increased groundwater withdrawals. Hydro-climatic uncertainties attributed to climate change and land use conversions may also alter demands and impact the replenishment of groundwater supply. Groundwater aquifers are not necessarily confined within municipal and management boundaries, and multiple diverse agencies may manage a shared resource in a decentralized approach, based on individual concerns and resources. The interactions among water managers, consumers, and the environment influence the performance of local management strategies and regional groundwater resources. This research couples an agent-based modeling (ABM) framework and a groundwater model to analyze the effects of different management approaches on shared groundwater resources. The ABM captures the dynamic interactions between household-level consumers and policy makers to simulate water demands under climate change and population growth uncertainties. The groundwater model is used to analyze the relative effects of management approaches on reducing demands and replenishing groundwater resources. The framework is applied for municipalities located in the Verde River Basin, Arizona that withdraw groundwater from the Verde Formation-Basin Fill-Carbonate aquifer system. Insights gained through this simulation study can be used to guide groundwater policy-making under changing hydro-climatic scenarios for a long-term planning horizon.

  18. Socio-Ecohydrologic Agents And Services: Integrating Human And Natural Components To Address Coupled System Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavao-zuckerman, M.; Pope, A.; Chan, D.; Curl, K.; Gimblett, H. R.; Hough, M.; House-Peters, L.; Lee, R.; Scott, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    decision-making on spatially-explicit landscapes in a mechanistic way, taking into account social interaction, adaptation, and decision-making at different levels, allowing individual stakeholders to make decisions based on their unique perceptions of their environment, be it economic, social, or ecological awareness. Initial parameterization of the ABM proceeds from a case study centered in the town of Rayón, Sonora, Mexico, where semi-structured interviews were used to elicit perceptions by water resource users of CNH function, change, and solutions relating to livelihood changes in response to several drivers. In both case studies, we see the potential and limitations for an approach to adaptive management and decision support related to water resources that links ecosystem services and agent-based modeling. Methodologically, synthetic approaches such as these may allow coupling of systems for improved assessment and analysis, while at the same time lack a connection to the perspectives of water users and managers on the ground. There is thus potential for a either a loss of system resilience in the face of external change, or an opportunity to increase system resilience by building off perspectives already in place within these coupled socio-ecohydrologic systems.

  19. Influence of silane coupling agents on the rheological behavior of hemp fiber filled polyamide 1010 biomass composites in molten state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Yosuke; Hasumi, Megumi; Kitano, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to develop the new engineering materials such as structural materials and tribomaterials based on all plants-derived materials, the influence of silane coupling agent on the rheological properties of hemp fiber (HF) filled polyamide 1010 (PA1010) biomass composites in molten state was investigated for one step of the fabrication of these materials. PA1010 was made from sebacic acid and decamethylenediamine, which are obtained from plant-derived castor oil. Hemp fibers were surface-treated by two types of surface treatment: a) alkali treatment by NaOH solution and b) surface treatment by silane coupling agents with different concentrations. Three types of silane coupling agents: aminosilane, epoxysilane and ureidosilane were used for surface treatment. HF/PA1010 composites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and compression-molded. Rheological behavior in molten state were evaluated by oscillatory flow testing using a parallel plate type rheometer. It was found that the silane coupling agents remarkably influence on: 1) rheological properties such as storage modulus, loss modulus, loss tangent and complex viscosity in low angular frequency region in molten state, 2) temperature dependences of rheological properties, and 3) relationship between phase angle and complex modulus (van Gurp - Palmen plots). These rheological behavior were also strongly influenced by the type of silane coupling agents. The viscoelastic properties (both storage and loss moduli) of aminosilane and epoxysilane treated composites were lower, however, those of ureidosilane treated ones were higher than the moduli of only alkali treated composites. Ureidosilane treated composites were the least temperature sensitive in the surface treated composites investigated here.

  20. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Second annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-04-01

    {open_quotes}Investigation of Oil Recovery Improvement by Coupling an Interfacial Tension Agent and a Mobility Control Agent in Light Oil Reservoirs{close_quotes} is studying two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent. The first area defines the interactions of alkaline agents, surfactants, and polymers on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second area concerns the economic improvement of the combined technology. This report continues the fluid-fluid interaction evaluations and begins the fluid-rock studies. Fluid-fluid interfacial tension work determined that replacing sodium ion with either potassium or ammonium ion in solutions with interfacial tension reduction up to 19,600 fold was detrimental and had little or no effect on alkali-surfactant solutions with interfacial tension reduction of 100 to 200 fold. Reservoir brine increases interfacial tension between crude oil and alkaline-surfactant solutions. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-surfactant solutions maintained ultra low and low interfacial tension values better than NaOH-surfactant solutions. The initial phase of the fluid-rock investigations was adsorption studies. Surfactant adsorption is reduced when co-dissolved with alkali. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} are more efficient at reducing surfactant adsorption than NaOH. When polymer is added to the surfactant solution, surfactant adsorption is reduced as well. When both polymer and alkali are added, polymer is the dominate component, reducing the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NaOH effect on adsorption. Substituting sodium ion with potassium or ammonium ion increased or decreased surfactant adsorption depending on surfactant structure with alkali having a less significant effect. No consistent change of surfactant adsorption with increasing salinity was observed in the presence or absence of alkali or polymer.

  1. Intramuscular Temperature Rises With Topical Analgesics Used as Coupling Agents During Therapeutic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Measom, Gary J.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Nature's Chemist as an ultrasound coupling agent with the effectiveness of another topical analgesic (Biofreeze), Aquasonic 100, and a sham treatment in producing intramuscular (IM) temperature increase during a typical therapeutic ultrasound treatment. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups (n = 10 in each group). Groups 1 through 3 received continuous ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2 for 10 minutes at a frequency of 3 MHz over the posterior calf. Group 4 received a sham treatment. In group 1, we used Aquasonic 100 alone; in group 2, we used a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of Biofreeze and Aquasonic 100; in group 3, we used a 1:1 mixture of Nature's Chemist and Aquasonic 100; and in group 4, we used a 1:1 mixture of Aquasonic 100 and Nature's Chemist. In all groups, IM temperature was recorded during the treatment and for 15 minutes posttreatment. We used a modified visual analogue scale to measure each subject's perception of heat at the treatment area during and after treatment. Subjects: Forty college students (age, 22.5 ± 2.0 years; height, 175.5 ± 8.0 cm; weight, 71.6 ± 13.1 kg; calf skinfold thickness, 17.8 ± 7.2 mm) volunteered to become subjects. Measurements: The IM temperature was recorded at 15-second intervals for 25 minutes at 1 cm below the subcutaneous fat with a thermocouple. Differences were analyzed within and among groups at the beginning of the treatment (T0), the end of the treatment (T10), and 15 minutes posttreatment (T25). Results: The IM temperature increases in groups 1 through 3 were significantly different from those in group 4 (sham), but they were not significantly different from each other. Temperatures increased in group 1 (Aquasonic 100) by 7.47° ± 1.8°C, in group 2 (Biofreeze and Aquasonic 100) by 6.52° ± 1.6°C, and in group 3 (Nature's Chemist and Aquasonic 100) by 6.99° ± 1.1°C. Temperatures decreased in group 4 (sham) by 0.56° ± 0.3°C. There were no

  2. Highly Efficient Arsenic Removal Using a Composite of Ultrafine Magnetite Nanoparticles Interlinked by Silane Coupling Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shu-Chi; Yu, Yu-Han; Li, Cheng-Hao; Wu, Chin-Ching; Lei, Hao-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in groundwater is a great environmental health concern and is often the result of contact between groundwater and arsenic-containing rocks or sediments and from variation of pH and redox potentials in the subsurface. In the past decade, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have been shown to have high adsorption activity towards As. Alerted by the reported cytotoxicity of 5–12 nm MNP, we studied the adsorption behavior of 1.15 nm MNP and a MNP composite (MNPC), MNPs interlinked by silane coupling agents. With an initial concentration of As at 25 mg L−1, MNPs exhibited high adsorption capacity for As(V) and As (III), 206.9 mg·g−1 and 168.6 mg·g−1 under anaerobic conditions, respectively, and 109.9 mg·g−1 and 108.6 mg·g−1 under aerobic conditions, respectively. Under aerobic conditions, MNPC achieved even higher adsorption capacity than MNP, 165.1 mg·g−1 on As(V) and 157.9 mg·g−1 on As(III). For As(V) at 50 mg L−1, MNPC achieved an adsorption capacity as high as 341.8 mg·g−1, the highest in the literature. A kinetic study indicated that this adsorption reaction can reach equilibrium within 15 min and the rate constant of As(V) is about 1.9 times higher than that of As(III). These results suggested that MNPC can serve as a highly effective adsorbent for fast removal of As. PMID:23202769

  3. Silane coupling agent for attaching fusion-bonded epoxy to steel.

    PubMed

    Tchoquessi Diodjo, Madeleine R; Belec, Lénaïk; Aragon, Emmanuel; Joliff, Yoann; Lanarde, Lise; Perrin, François-Xavier

    2013-07-24

    We describe the possibility of using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) to increase the durability of epoxy powder coating/steel joints. The curing temperature of epoxy powder coatings is frequently above 200 °C, which is seen so far as a major limitation for the use of the heat-sensitive aminosilane coupling agent. Despite this limitation, we demonstrate that aminosilane is a competitive alternative to traditional chromate conversion to enhance the durability of epoxy powder coatings/steel joints. Fourier-transform reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to identify the silane deposition conditions that influence the adhesion of epoxy powder coatings on steel. We show that AFM analysis provides highly sensitive measurements of mechanical property development and, as such, the degree of condensation of the silane. The joint durability in water at 60 °C was lower when the pH of the γ-APS solution was controlled at 4.6 using formic acid, rather than that at natural pH (10.6). At the curing temperature of 220 °C, oxidation of the carbon adjacent to the amine headgroup of γ-APS gives amide species by a pseudofirst-order kinetics. However, a few amino functionalities remain to react with oxirane groups of epoxy resin and, thus, strengthen the epoxy/silane interphase. The formation of ammonium formate in the acidic silane inhibits the reaction between silane and epoxy, which consequently decreases the epoxy/silane interphase cohesion. We find that the nanoroughness of silane deposits increases with the cure temperature which is beneficial to the wet stability of the epoxy/steel joints, due to increased mechanical interlocking. PMID:23790122

  4. A Cu(II)2 Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Contrast Agent Enabled by Magnetic Exchange Coupling.

    PubMed

    Du, Kang; Harris, T David

    2016-06-29

    The ability of magnetic exchange coupling to enable observation of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) in transition metal ions with long electronic relaxation times (τs) is demonstrated. Metalation of the dinucleating, tetra(carboxamide) ligand HL with Cu(2+) in the presence of pyrophosphate (P2O7)(4-) affords the complex [LCu(II)2(P2O7)](-). Solution-phase variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data reveal weak ferromagnetic superexchange coupling between the two S = 1/2 Cu(II) centers, with a coupling constant of J = +2.69(5) cm(-1), to give an S = 1 ground state. This coupling results in a sharpened NMR line width relative to a GaCu analogue, indicative of a shortening of τs. Presaturation of the amide protons in the Cu2 complex at 37 °C leads to a 14% intensity decrease in the bulk water (1)H NMR signal through the CEST effect. Conversely, no CEST effect is observed in the GaCu complex. These results provide the first example of a Cu-based PARACEST magnetic resonance contrast agent and demonstrate the potential to expand the metal ion toolbox for PARACEST agents through introduction of magnetic exchange coupling. PMID:27276533

  5. Superhydrophobic cotton fabric coating based on a complex layer of silica nanoparticles and perfluorooctylated quaternary ammonium silane coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghua; Gu, Guotuan; Meng, Wei-Dong; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2007-01-01

    A superhydrophobic complex coating for cotton fabrics based on silica nanoparticles and perfluorooctylated quaternary ammonium silane coupling agent (PFSC) was reported in this article. The complex thin film was prepared through a sol-gel process using cotton fabrics as a substrate. Silica nanoparticles in the coating made the textile surface much rougher, and perfluorooctylated quaternary ammonium silane coupling agent on the top layer of the surface lowered the surface free energy. Textiles coated with this coating showed excellent water repellent property, and water contact angle (CA) increased from 133° on cotton fabrics treated with pure PFSC without silica sol pretreatment up to 145°. The oil repellency was also improved and the contact angle of CH 2I 2 droplet on the fabric surface reached to 131°. In contrast, the contact angle of CH 2I 2 on the fabric surface treated with pure PFSC was only 125°.

  6. Influence of additional coupling agent on the mechanical properties of polyester-agave cantala roxb based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaidillah, Raharjo, Wijang W.; Wibowo, A.; Harjana, Mazlan, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical and morphological properties of the unsaturated polyester resins (UPRs)-agave cantala roxb based composite are investigated in this paper. The cantala fiber woven in 3D angle interlock was utilized as the composite reinforcement. Surface grafting of the cantala fiber through chemical treatment was performed by introducing silane coupling agent to improving the compatibility with the polymer matrix. The fabrication of the composite specimens was conducted using vacuum bagging technique. The effect of additional coupling agent to the morphological appearance of surface fracture was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the influence of additional silane to the mechanical properties was examined using tensile, bending and impact test. The photograph of surface fracture on the treated specimens showed the residual matrix left on the fibers in which the phenomenon was not found in the untreated specimens. Based on mechanical tests, the treated specimens were successfully increased their mechanical properties by 55%, 9.67%, and 92.4% for tensile strength, flexural strength, and impact strength, respectively, at 1.5% silane coupling agent.

  7. Coupling multi-agent model and GIS to simulate pine wood nematode disease spread in ZheJiang Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaguo; Wang, Lei; Zhang, XiaoLi; Luo, YouQing; Zhao, Liqiong

    2008-10-01

    A coupled method based on multi-agent model, remote sensing and GIS is described to simulate the forest disease spread. The coupled model focuses on the temporal dynamics of the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus population at the landscape scale. Each individual is modeled as an autonomous agent who behaves according to a set of rules including spreading in the landscape, feeding on Pinus massoniana, sheltering in forest edges and dying, constrained by terrain, land cover and other variables. The model parameters are derived from remote sensing data and field measurements. Ten factors, including damage degree of Pinus Massoniana, altitude and slope, are helped to build the transfer rules. The main outputs are the dynamic disease distribution maps and survived pine population. Our method is applied and validated in DingHai distinct, Zhou Shan city of Zhejiang Province. Three Landsat TM images from the year 1991 to 2006 are used for the pine information extraction. The extracted pine distribution map is used to compare with the simulated surviving pine map. The results show that the coupled model can produce reasonable results and be used as a virtual experiment tool. However, it is difficult to simulate the human activities to help or prevent disease spread and the long fly behavior of insect vectors. Therefore, there still exists some difference between the simulated results and the real data. At the next step, those factors will be considered.

  8. Amide Coupling Reaction for the Synthesis of Bispyridine-based Ligands and Their Complexation to Platinum as Dinuclear Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Michael G.; Johnson, Ben W.; Sutcliffe, Oliver B.; Brown, Sarah D.; Wheate, Nial J.

    2014-01-01

    Amide coupling reactions can be used to synthesize bispyridine-based ligands for use as bridging linkers in multinuclear platinum anticancer drugs. Isonicotinic acid, or its derivatives, are coupled to variable length diaminoalkane chains under an inert atmosphere in anhydrous DMF or DMSO with the use of a weak base, triethylamine, and a coupling agent, 1-propylphosphonic anhydride. The products precipitate from solution upon formation or can be precipitated by the addition of water. If desired, the ligands can be further purified by recrystallization from hot water. Dinuclear platinum complex synthesis using the bispyridine ligands is done in hot water using transplatin. The most informative of the chemical characterization techniques to determine the structure and gross purity of both the bispyridine ligands and the final platinum complexes is 1H NMR with particular analysis of the aromatic region of the spectra (7-9 ppm). The platinum complexes have potential application as anticancer agents and the synthesis method can be modified to produce trinuclear and other multinuclear complexes with different hydrogen bonding functionality in the bridging ligand. PMID:24893964

  9. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  10. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-21

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml(-1). The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic. PMID:25327566

  11. Use of new phosphonylating and coupling agents in the synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides via the H-phosphonate approach.

    PubMed Central

    Sakatsume, O; Yamane, H; Takaku, H; Yamamoto, N

    1990-01-01

    New phosphonylating and coupling agents for the synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides via H-phosphonate approach have been developed. Tris(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propyl) phosphite, prepared by the reaction of lithium salt of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propoxide with PCl3, reacts with deoxyribonucleosides in the presence of a catalytic amount of triethylamine to produce in the high yield the corresponding deoxyribonucleoside 3'-H-phosphonate units. The use of a new coupling reagent, 1,3-dimethyl-2-chloro-imidazolinium chloride (DMCI) for the internucleotidic H-phosphonate bond formation via the H-phosphonate approach is also discussed in detail. Images PMID:2356122

  12. Monomolecular layers and thin films of silane coupling agents by vapor-phase adsorption on oxidized aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, D.G.; Bein, T.

    1992-08-06

    Thin films of tetraethoxysilane [TEOS], (3-bromopropyl)trimethoxysilane [BPS], trimethoxyvinylsilane [VS], and 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate [TPM] on oxidized aluminum surfaces have been investigated by reflection-absorption FTIR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. Gravimetric measurements with the QCM can reveal quantitative aspects of adsorption and film formation, even for films as thin as monolayers. Adsorption of these silane coupling agents from solution typically produces multilayer films. Vapor-phase adsorption of TEOS and TPM at room temperature results in monomolecular layers. The coupling agents VS and BPS require additional heating after the vapor-phase adsorption to initiate the hydrolysis and condensation reactions necessary for the surface attachment, which produces one to three layers. For vapor adsorbed films a packing density of 4-7 molecules/nm{sup 2} was found. The data strongly suggest that the organic moieties in several of these films have a preferential orientation on the surface; they can be viewed as two-dimensional, oligomeric siloxane networks with oriented organic chains. Subsequent heating of TPM films results in structural rearrangements; heating of TEOS results in complete condensation to SiO{sub 2} films. 43 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Wood Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene Composites: Effect of Fibre Geometry and Coupling Agent on Physico-Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bledzki, Andrzej K.; Faruk, Omar

    2003-11-01

    Wood fibre reinforced polypropylene composites at fibre content 50% by weight have been prepared and different types of wood fibres (hard wood fibre, soft wood fibre, long wood fibre and wood chips) were treated with coupling agent (MAH-PP) to increase the interfacial adhesion with the matrix to improve the dispersion of the particles and to decrease the water sorption properties of the final composite. The present study investigated the tensile, flexural, charpy impact and impact properties of wood fibre reinforced polypropylene composites as a function of coupling agent and fibre length and structure. From the results it is observed that wood chips-PP composites showed better tensile and flexural properties comparative with the other wood fibre-PP composites with the addition of 5%MAH-PP, which is around 65% and 50% for tensile strength and flexural strength respectively. Hard wood fibre-PP composites showed better impact characteristic values comparative to other wood fibre-PP composites with the addition of 5%MAH-PP and damping index decreased about to 60%. Charpy impact strength also increased up to 60% with the addition of 5%MAH-PP for long wood fibre-PP composites. Water absorption and scanning electron microscopy of the composites are also investigated.

  14. Effect of coupling agent on nano-ZnO modification and antibacterial activity of ZnO/HDPE nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. N.; Xu, W. M.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Commercial zinc oxide nanoparticles were modified by silane coupling agent of KH550 and KH560, respectively. The obtained nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and apparent sedimentation stability (Sapp). Then, nano-ZnO/high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composite films were prepared via melt blending and a hot compression-molding process. The antibacterial testing of the films against E. coli and S. aureus was carried out via plate counting. SEM, TGA and Sapp suggest the modifier of silane changed the surface hydrophilicity and effectively broke the agglomerations of nanoparticles. Antibacterial testing results indicated the antibacterial rate of the films increased with increasing nano-ZnO content. At a low doped content of 0.2 wt%, the types of coupling agent influenced the antibacterial property with that of KH560-modified nano-ZnO/HDPE KH550-modified nano-ZnO/HDPE unmodified nano-ZnO/HDPE films. When the dosage nano-ZnO was over 0.2 wt%, the differences of antibacterial activity resulted by modification was concealed by the strong antibacterial activity with near 100% of the nano- ZnO/HDPE composite films.

  15. Metal chelators coupled with nanoparticles as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neuro-degenerative disorder characterized by the progressive and irreversible loss of memory followed by complete dementia. Despite the disease's high prevalence and great economic and social burden, an explicative etiology or viable cure is not available. Great effort has been made to better understand the disease's pathogenesis, and to develop more effective therapeutic agents. However, success is greatly hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier that limits a large number of potential therapeutics from entering the brain. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is one of the few valuable tools for overcoming this impediment and its application as a potential AD treatment shows promise. In this review, the current studies on nanoparticle delivery of chelation agents as possible therapeutics for AD are discussed because several metals are found excessive in the AD brain and may play a role in the disease development. Specifically, a novel approach involving transport of iron chelation agents into and out of the brain by nanoparticles is highlighted. This approach may provide a safer and more effective means of simultaneously reducing several toxic metals in the AD brain. It may also provide insights into the mechanisms of AD pathophysiology, and prove useful in treating other iron-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome. It is important to note that the use of nanoparticle-mediated transport to facilitate toxicant excretion from diseased sites in the body may advance nanoparticle technology, which is currently focused on targeted drug delivery for disease prevention and treatment. The application of nanoparticle-mediated drug transport in the treatment of AD is at its very early stages of development and, therefore, more studies are warranted. PMID:19936278

  16. Overcoming Heterogeneity Effects Through Polymer-Enhanced Groundwater Remediation Techniques: Coupling Polymer Floods with Chemical Oxidants and Bio-agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. M.; Silva, J. A.; Munakata-Marr, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Even small heterogeneity contrasts in contaminated systems (resulting from differences in permeability or contaminant saturation) can affect the distribution of injected remediation agents by channeling fluids through high-permeability flowpaths, thus bypassing some regions and leaving contaminants uncontacted. The addition of a viscous polymer solution to the remediation agent may enhance agent delivery as a result of increased cross-flow (or "sweep efficiency") into different layers of the system, if the polymer solution remains stable in the presence of the remediation agent. Our research combines various non-toxic, food- grade polymer solutions with the remediation techniques of chemical oxidation and bio-remediation, to increase the effectiveness of treatment at sites contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The coupling of polymer floods with oxidants may help to combat contaminant "rebound" sometimes associated with incomplete contaminant destruction in low-permeability zones. Initial compatibility testing has shown that certain robust polymer/oxidant mixtures possess stable viscosities and pose low additional oxidant demands over multi-day timescales. Transport of these solutions through natural porous media was studied in column experiments, and small two-dimensional experiments with heterogeneous layering were conducted to assess effectiveness of contaminant destruction. Limitations of these compatible polymer/oxidant combinations as well as possible experimental strategies to optimize delivery are also discussed. In addition, results of polymer/microbial screening tests reveal that polymer solutions do not inhibit the dechlorinating capabilities of a microbial consortium. Preliminary findings have also raised the possibility that certain polymers may successfully serve as electron donors in the subsurface. The implications of these results for either bioaugmentation or delivery of biostimulants are presented.

  17. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.

    1995-12-01

    This research studied the oil recovery potential of flooding light oil reservoirs by combining interfacial tension reducing agent(s) with a mobility control agent. The specific objectives were: To define the mechanisms and limitations of co-injecting interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent to recover incremental oil. Specifically, the study focused on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions. To evaluate the economics of the combination technology and investigate methods to make the process more profitable. Specific areas of study were to evaluate different chemical concentration tapers and the volume of chemical injection required to give optimal oil recovery.

  18. Health care supply networks in tightly and loosely coupled structures: exploration using agent-based modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagarajah, A.; Parker, D.; Xu, H.

    2010-03-01

    Health care supply networks are multi-faceted complex structures. This article discusses architecture of complex systems and an agent-based modelling framework to study health care supply networks and their impact on patient safety, economics, and workloads. Here we demonstrate the application of a safety dynamics model proposed by Cook and Rasmussen (2005, '"Going Solid": A Model of System Dynamics and Consequences for Patient Safety', Quality & Safety in Health Care, 14, 67-84.) to study a health care system, using a hypothetical simulation of an emergency department as a representative unit and its dynamic behaviour. By means of simulation, this article demonstrates the non-linear behaviours of a health service unit and its complexities; and how the safety dynamic model may be used to evaluate the various policy and design aspects of health care supply networks.

  19. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the adsorption of alkali, surfactant, and polymer onto crushed Berea sandstone.

  20. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, September--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the adsorption of alkali, surfactant, and polymer onto crushed Berea sandstone.

  1. Design and synthesis of diamide-coupled benzophenones as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zabiulla; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Bushra Begum, A; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-06-10

    A series of diamide-coupled benzophenone, 2-(4-benzoyl-phenoxy)-N-{2-[2-(4-benzoyl-phenoxy)-acetylamino]-phenyl}-acetamide analogues (9a-l) were synthesized by multistep reactions and all compounds were well characterized. Among the series (9a-l), compound 9k with three methyl groups at ortho position in rings A, B, and D and bromo group at the para position in ring E was selected as a lead compound by screening through multiple cancer cell types by in-vitro cytotoxic and antiproliferative assay systems. Also, the cytotoxic nature of the compound 9k resulted the regression of the tumor growth in-vivo, which could be due to decreased vascularisation in the peritoneum lining of the mice which regress the tumor growth. The results were reconfirmed in-vivo chorioallantoic membrane model which indicates a scope of developing 9k into potent anticancer drug in near future. PMID:27027818

  2. The influence of coupling agents on mechanical property retention and long-term cytocompatibility of phosphate glass fibre reinforced PLA composites.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M S; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Walker, G S; Scotchford, C A

    2013-12-01

    Completely resorbable composites are an attractive alternative for metallic bone-fracture fixation devices. However, failure of their interfacial integrity within aqueous environments, which can lead to a rapid loss of overall mechanical properties, has been reported in the literature. In this study coupling agents were investigated for phosphate glass fibre reinforced poly(lactic acid) composites. Three coupling agents with varying wettability were employed to improve initial mechanical properties and their retention in vitro via improvement of the interfacial bond between polymer matrix and fibres. Coupling agents were grafted onto the glass fibres by dip-coating in coupling agent solution at optimised concentrations. Three-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and sorbitol ended PLA oligomer treatments improved the initial flexural properties (27% strength with APS and 17% modulus via SPLA treatment) of the composites and 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) treatments also decreased the loss of flexural strength and modulus during degradation. HDI treated samples retained 57.2% and 64.7% of their initial strength and modulus, respectively compared to control where only 34% of initial strength and 52% of initial modulus was retained after 28 days of degradation in PBS solution. Initial improvements in flexural properties were associated with improved shear bond strength at the interface due to covalent bonding between the glass fibres and polymer matrix provided by the coupling agents. Delay in mechanical property loss with degradation was suggested to be due to the hydrophobicity at the interface, which could have hindered the interfacial integrity loss and consequently loss of mechanical integrity of the composites. All coupling agent treated and control composites were tested for cytocompatibility using a primary human osteoblast cell line. A comparable response to the control, in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation

  3. Surface modification of organic polymers with bioactive titanium oxide without the aid of a silane-coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Balas, F; Kokubo, T; Kawashita, M; Nakamura, T

    2007-06-01

    Polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH), and poly(epsilon-caprolactam) (Nylon 6) were successfully modified with a thin crystalline titanium oxide layer on their surfaces by a simple dipping into a titanium alkoxide solution and a subsequent soak in hot HCl solution, without the aid of a silane-coupling agent. The surface modified polymers formed a bone-like apatite layer in a simulated body fluid (SBF) within a period of 2 days. PE, PET, and Nylon 6 formed an apatite layer faster and had a higher adhesive strength to the apatite. Three-dimensional fabrics with open spaces in various sizes containing such surface modified polymer fibers are expected to be useful as bone substitutes, since they may be able to form apatite on their constituent fibers in the living body, and thus, integrate with living bone. PMID:17277978

  4. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting on interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economic of the combined technology. This report examines the effect of polymer addition to different combinations of alkaline agents and surfactants. Xanthan gum and polyacrylamide polymers were evaluated. In addition, the effect of alkali and polymer on the critical micelle concentration of different surfactant types was investigated.

  5. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the effect of polymer addition to different combinations of alkaline agents and surfactants. Xanthan gum and polyacrylamide polymers were evaluated. In addition, the effect of alkali and polymer on the critical micelle concentration of different surfactant types was investigated.

  6. A Multiplex PCR-coupled Liquid Bead Array for the Simultaneous Detection of Four Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W J; Erler, A M; Nasarabadi, S L; Skowronski, E W; McCready, P M

    2004-02-04

    We have developed a 10-plexed PCR assay coupled to a 12-plexed liquid bead array to rapidly screen environmental samples for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, and B. melitensis. Highly validated species -specific primer sets were used to simultaneously amplify multiple diagnostic regions unique to each individual pathogen. Resolution of the mix of amplified products was achieved by PCR product hybridization to corresponding probe sequences, attached to unique sets of fluorescent beads. The hybridized beads were processed through a flow cytometer, which detected presence and quantity of each PCR product. The assay was optimized to allow for maximum sensitivity in a multiplexed format. A high- throughput demonstration was performed where 384 simulated environmental samples were spiked with different amounts of B. thuringensis spores and pathogen DNA. The samples were robotically processed to extract DNA and arrayed for multiplexed PCR-liquid bead detection. The assay correctly identified the presence or absence of each pathogen and collected over 3,000 individual data points within a single 8-hour shift for approximately $1.20 per sample in a 10-plexed assay.

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  8. On the synthesis of copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles and binding silane coupling agents to magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, Jeremy Scott

    This dissertation addresses the creation of a multifunctional nanoplatform for cancer targeting, imaging, and therapy. Magnetic oxide nanoparticles were labeled with silane coupling agents that could be used for targeting. The magnetic oxides have application as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles were prepared for possible use in Curie temperature limited hyperthermia therapy. Spherical, single crystal iron oxide nanoparticles with average diameters of 4 nm, 6 nm, 8 nm, 11 nm, or 16 nm were prepared using published procedures. The iron oxide particle chemistry was extended to synthesize 13 nm diameter CoFe2O4, 9 nm diameter MnFe2O4, and 12 nm diameter NiFe2O4. The particles had a coating of oleic acid and oleylamine ligands. Silane coupling chemistry was used to displace these ligands with either beta-aminoethyl-gamma-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, triethoxysilane-PEG, or triethoxysilane-biotin. The silane ligands would allow the particles to be conjugated with a targeting group. New chemistry was developed to synthesize fcc CuNi nanoparticles with the objective of finding methods that give particles with an average size less than 50 nm, a narrow distribution of particle sizes, and control of particle composition. The particle synthesis involves the reduction of a mixture of copper(II) and nickel(II) and the reduction conditions included diol reduction, polyol synthesis, seeding by diol reduction, and oleate reduction. One of the main issues is the formation of hcp nickel particles as a containment in the method. The factors that avoided the formation of hcp nickel particles and allow only fcc particles to form were the choice of reducing agent, ratio of surfactants, and heating time. Both the oleate reduction and diol reduction gave a mixture of the hcp and fcc phases. By controlling certain reaction conditions, such as keeping the ratio of oleic acid to oleylamine 1:1 and slowly heating to reflux for

  9. Understanding coupled natural and human systems on fire prone landscapes: integrating wildfire simulation into an agent based planning system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Ana; Ager, Alan; Preisler, Haiganoush; Day, Michelle; Spies, Tom; Bolte, John

    2015-04-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) allow users to examine the long-term effects of agent decisions in complex systems where multiple agents and processes interact. This framework has potential application to study the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems where multiple stimuli determine trajectories over both space and time. We used Envision, a landscape based ABM, to analyze long-term wildfire dynamics in a heterogeneous, multi-owner landscape in Oregon, USA. Landscape dynamics are affected by land management policies, actors decisions, and autonomous processes such as vegetation succession, wildfire, or at a broader scale, climate change. Key questions include: 1) How are landscape dynamics influenced by policies and institutions, and 2) How do land management policies and actor decisions interact to produce intended and unintended consequences with respect to wildfire on fire-prone landscapes. Applying Envision to address these questions required the development of a wildfire module that could accurately simulate wildfires on the heterogeneous landscapes within the study area in terms of replicating historical fire size distribution, spatial distribution and fire intensity. In this paper we describe the development and testing of a mechanistic fire simulation system within Envision and application of the model on a 3.2 million fire prone landscape in central Oregon USA. The core fire spread equations use the Minimum Travel Time algorithm developed by M Finney. The model operates on a daily time step and uses a fire prediction system based on the relationship between energy release component and historical fires. Specifically, daily wildfire probabilities and sizes are generated from statistical analyses of historical fires in relation to daily ERC values. The MTT was coupled with the vegetation dynamics module in Envision to allow communication between the respective subsystem and effectively model fire effects and vegetation dynamics after a wildfire. Canopy and

  10. Effects of surface treatment with coupling agents of PVDF-HFP fibers on the improvement of the adhesion characteristics on PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O. M.; See, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Surface treatment of polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) fibers was conducted with coupling agents such as epoxy silane, amino silane, and titanate to improve the adhesion characteristics of PVDF-HFP fibers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The adhesion strength was largest when 4 wt% amino silane was used for surface treatment, showing a 250% improvement compared to the untreated case. Surface roughening and shrinking of the PVDF-HFP fibers were observed after surface treatment, but no chemical bonding occurred between the PVDF-HFP fibers and the coupling agents. It was thus concluded that the improvement of the adhesion characteristics of the PVDF-HFP fibers and PDMS was caused by the physical bonding between them due to the surface treatment with coupling agents. In addition, for the surface roughening mechanism, amino silane infiltration into the PVDF-HFP fibers during the surface treatment, followed by extraction during the drying process, was suggested.

  11. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines effect of rock type on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. This report also begins a series of evaluations to improve the economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer oil recovery.

  12. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    This study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injection and interfacial tension reduction agents and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines altering the concentration of alkali and polymer on the oil recovery economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  13. Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet-filled impact modified polypropylene nanocomposites: influence of particle diameter, filler loading, and coupling agent on the mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Alex J.; Nader, Jacques W.; Kiziltas, Alper; Gardner, Douglas J.; Dagher, Habib J.

    2013-03-01

    Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP)-filled impact-modified polypropylene (IMPP) composites were prepared at 2, 4, 6, and 8 wt % xGnP with and without the addition of a coupling agent and manufactured using melt mixing followed by injection molding. The coupling agent used in this study was polypropylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA). The nanoparticles used were xGnP with three different sizes: xGnP5 has an average thickness of 10 nm, and an average platelet diameter of 5 μm, whereas xGnP15 and xGnP25 have the same thickness but average diameters are 15 and 25 μm, respectively. Test results show that nanocomposites with smaller xGnP diameter exhibited better flexural and tensile properties for both neat and compatibilized composites. For composites containing a coupling agent, tensile and flexural modulus and strength increased with the addition of xGnP. In the case of neat composites, both tensile and flexural modulus and strength decreased at higher filler loading levels. Increasing xGnP loading resulted in reduction of elongation at break for both neat and composites containing coupling agent. Explanation of this brittle behavior in a nanoplatelet-filled IMPP is presented using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet-filled impact modified polypropylene nanocomposites: influence of particle diameter, filler loading, and coupling agent on the mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Alex J.; Nader, Jacques W.; Kiziltas, Alper; Gardner, Douglas J.; Dagher, Habib J.

    2014-03-01

    Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP)-filled impact-modified polypropylene (IMPP) composites were prepared at 2, 4, 6, and 8 wt % xGnP with and without the addition of a coupling agent and manufactured using melt mixing followed by injection molding. The coupling agent used in this study was polypropylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA). The nanoparticles used were xGnP with three different sizes: xGnP5 has an average thickness of 10 nm, and an average platelet diameter of 5 μm, whereas xGnP15 and xGnP25 have the same thickness but average diameters are 15 and 25 μm, respectively. Test results show that nanocomposites with smaller xGnP diameter exhibited better flexural and tensile properties for both neat and compatibilized composites. For composites containing a coupling agent, tensile and flexural modulus and strength increased with the addition of xGnP. In the case of neat composites, both tensile and flexural modulus and strength decreased at higher filler loading levels. Increasing xGnP loading resulted in reduction of elongation at break for both neat and composites containing coupling agent. Explanation of this brittle behavior in a nanoplatelet-filled IMPP is presented using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Casteel, J.

    1994-09-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the changes in the relative permeability characteristics with addition of alkali, surfactant, and polymer to the injected solution, the effect of matrix type on relative permeability characteristics with alkali-surfactant-polymer and the effect of different polymer concentrations on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  16. Effect of a silane coupling agent on the optical and the mechanical characteristics of nanodiamond/acrylic resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min-Gun; Chun, Yoon-Soo; Lim, Dae-Soon; Kim, Jung Youl

    2014-10-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is a good candidate for a filler material to fabricate transparent films. This study explores a characterization of the optical and the mechanical properties of ND dispersed polymer films. An attrition milling method was adapted to break ND aggregates, and a silane coupling agent (3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) was used to modify the ND surfaces and stabilize the dispersion. Dipentaerylthritol hexaacrylate and pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were used in the polymer matrix, and up to 3 wt.% of ND was added to improve the mechanical properties. Fabricated composites were analyzed and tested using UV-visible spectroscopy for the optical properties and a Micro-Vickers hardness tester and ball-on-disktype friction tester for the mechanical properties. Results show that the transmittance of the ND-added composite increased with decreasing aggregate size. Through the addition of small amounts of NDs, the mechanical properties were greatly improved, the material became 3.5 times as hard, and the wear rate were greatly decreased. Possible mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of the mechanical and the optical properties are discussed.

  17. The surface modification of TiN nano-particles using macromolecular coupling agents, and their resulting dispersibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guojun; Qian, Jiasheng; Miao, Jibin; Yang, Bin; Xia, Ru; Chen, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) nano-particles were modified by the grafting of a random copolymerization functionalized macromolecular coupling agent (F-MCA) via a direct blending method. The hydroxyl groups on the surface of the nano-TiN particles interact with the silanol groups [SiOCH3] of the F-MCA to form an organic coating layer. The formation of covalent bonds [TiOSi] was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the presence of the F-MCA inhibited the growth of the crystal plane but did not change the crystal structure of the TiN. Thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle measurement indicated that the F-MCA molecules were adsorbed or anchored to the surface of the nano-TiN particles, which hindered their aggregation. Pristine nano-TiN particles are poorly dispersed in ethyl acetate. Compared with the pristine TiN particles, the modified TiN particles show good dispersibility and form a stable colloidal dispersion in ethyl acetate. The surface hydrophobicity of the modified TiN increases, and the F-MCA molecules are anchored on the surface of the TiN particles. TiN particles modified by a F-MCA can be used in polymer blends, thermoplastic elastomers and polymer nanocomposites that have a better performance and longer life cycle.

  18. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  19. Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ζ-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

  20. Hyperfine coupling constants on inner-sphere water molecules of Gd(III)-based MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Helm, Lothar; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-11-12

    Herein we present a theoretical investigation of the hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) on the inner-sphere water molecules of [Gd(H(2)O)(8)](3+) and different Gd(III)-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents such as [Gd(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-), [Gd(DTPA)(H(2)O)](2-), [Gd(DTPA-BMA)(H(2)O)] and [Gd(HP-DO3A)(H(2)O)]. DFT calculations performed on the [Gd(H(2)O)(8)](3+) model system show that both hybrid-GGA functionals (BH&HLYP, B3PW91 and PBE1PBE) and the hybrid meta-GGA functional TPSSh provide (17)O HFCCs in close agreement with the experimental data. The use of all-electron relativistic approaches based on the DKH2 approximation and the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) provide results of essentially the same quality. The accurate calculation of HFCCs on the [Gd(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-), [Gd(DTPA)(H(2)O)](2-), [Gd(DTPA-BMA)(H(2)O)] and [Gd(HP-DO3A)(H(2)O)] complexes requires an adequate description of solvent effects. This was achieved by using a mixed cluster/continuum approach that includes explicitly two second-sphere water molecules. The calculated isotropic (17)O HFCCs (A(iso)) fall within the range 0.40-0.56 MHz, and show deviations from the corresponding experimental values typically lower than 0.05 MHz. The A(iso) values are significantly affected by the distance between the oxygen atom of the coordinated water molecule and the Gd(III) ion, as well as by the orientation of the water molecule plane with respect to the Gd-O vector. (1)H HFCCs of coordinated water molecules and (17)O HFCCs of second-sphere water molecules take values close to zero. PMID:22927182

  1. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Summary annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. The third year of the study finished the oil recovery coreflood studies and evaluated different techniques to improve alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution economics. The final series of corefloods compared the oil recovery efficiency of the alkali gradient in Berea sandstone and J Sand sandstone. Oil recovery efficiency was essentially the same in both types of core, 13 to 15% PV of oil. Cost of chemical per incremental barrel of oil with 30% pore volume of alkaline-surfactant- polymer solution injected were $3.20 for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}- Petrostep B-100-Flopaam 3330S solution in both types of core.

  2. A Novel Application of Agent-based Modeling: Projecting Water Access and Availability Using a Coupled Hydrologic Agent-based Model in the Nzoia Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Pricope, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Projections indicate that increasing population density, food production, and urbanization in conjunction with changing climate conditions will place stress on water resource availability. As a result, a holistic understanding of current and future water resource distribution is necessary for creating strategies to identify the most sustainable means of accessing this resource. Currently, most water resource management strategies rely on the application of global climate predictions to physically based hydrologic models to understand potential changes in water availability. However, the need to focus on understanding community-level social behaviors that determine individual water usage is becoming increasingly evident, as predictions derived only from hydrologic models cannot accurately represent the coevolution of basin hydrology and human water and land usage. Models that are better equipped to represent the complexity and heterogeneity of human systems and satellite-derived products in place of or in conjunction with historic data significantly improve preexisting hydrologic model accuracy and application outcomes. We used a novel agent-based sociotechnical model that combines the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Agent Analyst and applied it in the Nzoia Basin, an area in western Kenya that is becoming rapidly urbanized and industrialized. Informed by a combination of satellite-derived products and over 150 household surveys, the combined sociotechnical model provided unique insight into how populations self-organize and make decisions based on water availability. In addition, the model depicted how population organization and current management alter water availability currently and in the future.

  3. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-21

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  4. The influence of starch oxidization and aluminate coupling agent on interfacial interaction, rheological behavior, mechanical and thermal properties of poly(propylene carbonate)/starch blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guo; Zhang, Shui-Dong; Huang, Han-Xiong; The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering of the Ministry of Education Team

    Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) is a kind of new biodegradable polymer that is synthesized by copolymerization of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide. In this work, PPC end-capped with maleic anhydride (PPCMA)/thermoplastic starch (TPS), PPCMA/thermoplastic oxidized starch (TPOS) and PPCMA/AL-TPOS (TPOS modified by aluminate coupling agent) blends were prepared by melt blending to improve its thermal and mechanical properties. FTIR results showed that there existed hydrogen-bonding interaction between PPCMA and starch. SEM observation revealed that the compatibility between PPCMA and TPOS was improved by the oxidation of starch. The enhanced interfacial interactions between PPCMA and TPOS led to a better performance of PPC blends such as storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G''), complex viscosity (η*), tensile strength and thermal properties. Furthermore, the modification of TPOS by aluminate coupling agent (AL) facilitated the dispersion of oxidized starch in PPC matrix, and resulted in increasing the tensile strength and thermal stability. National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Science Fund of Guangdong Province.

  5. Novel One-pot Fabrication of Lab-on-a-Bubble@Ag Substrate without Coupling-agent for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jizhou; Ou-Yang, Lei; Zhu, Lihua; Zou, Jing; Tang, Heqing

    2014-01-01

    Through in-situ reduction of silver nitrate without using any coupling-agent, a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was prepared by coating silver on hollow buoyant silica microspheres as a lab on a bubble (LoB). The silver coated LoBs (LoBs@Ag) floated on surface of a solution could provide a very convenient platform for the detection of target molecules in the solution. The LoBs@Ag substrate not only immobilized well-distributed Ag nanoparticles on the surface LoBs, but excluded the interference of coupling agents. This yielded high-resolution SERS spectra with excellent reproducibility. The adsorption of crystal violet (CV) on the LoBs@Ag substrate was investigated by means of SERS combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The LoBs@Ag substrate exhibited a remarkable Raman enhancement effect for CV with an enhancement factor of 6.9 × 108 and wide adaptability from dye, pesticide to bio-molecules. On the basis of this substrate, a simple and sensitive SERS method was proposed for the determination of trace organic pollutants or bio-molecules. PMID:24487575

  6. Quantitative imaging of the tissue contrast agent [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in articular cartilage by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Wiener, Edzard; Marnitz, Tim; Wu, Bei; Müller, Berit; Hamm, Bernd; Sabine Becker, J

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an emerging analytical technique in the generation of quantitative images of MR contrast agent distribution in thin tissue sections of articular cartilage. An analytical protocol is described that includes sample preparation by cryo-cutting of tissue sections, mass spectrometric measurements by LA-ICP-MS and quantification of gadolinium images by one-point calibration, standard addition method (employing matrix-matched laboratory standards) and isotope dilution analysis using highly enriched stable Gd-155 isotope (abundance 92 vs 14.8% in the [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ contrast agent). The tissue contrast agent concentrations of [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in cartilage measured in this work are in agreement with findings obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and other analytical methodologies. The LA-ICP-MS imaging data also confirm the observation that the spatial distribution of [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in the near-equilibrium state is highly inhomogeneous across cartilage thickness with the highest concentration measured in superficial cartilage and a strong decrease toward the subchondral bone. In the present work, it is shown for the first time that LA-ICP-MS can be applied to validate the results from quantitative gadolinium-enhanced MRI technique of articular cartilage. PMID:23281293

  7. TiO₂ nanoparticles functionalized monolithic capillary microextraction online coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the analysis of Gd ion and Gd-based contrast agents in human urine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolan; Chen, Beibei; Zhang, Lin; Song, Shiyao; Cai, Yabing; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a novel method of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized monolithic capillary microextraction (CME) online coupling with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was developed for the sequential determination of Gd(3+) and Gd-based contrast agents in human urine samples. The monolithic capillary was prepared by embedding anatase TiO2 NPS in the poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (MAA-EDMA) framework. The Gd(3+) and Gd-based contrast agents (such as gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and Gd-DTPA-bismethylamide (Gd-DTPA-BMA)) display different adsorption behaviors on the prepared monolithic capillary which possesses the adsorption properties of both anatase TiO2 NPS and poly(MAA-EDMA) monolith. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 3.6, 3.2, and 4.5 ng L(-1) for Gd(3+), Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DTPA-BMA, respectively, which are the lowest up to date. The enrichment factor was 25-fold with the sample throughput of 5 h(-1). The proposed method was validated by the analysis of Gd(3+) and Gd-DTPA in the healthy human urine samples as well as Gd(3+) and Gd-DTPA-BMA in patient urine samples. It was found that only a small amount of the free Gd(3+) was released from Gd-DTPA-BMA, and accurate results could be obtained since no oxidation/reduction or subtraction is involved in this method. This method is simple, sensitive, and rapid and provides a very attractive nonchromatography strategy for the speciation of Gd(3+) and Gd-based contrast agents in urine samples. PMID:26239367

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of bond structure between polyvinyl alcohol and a titanate cross-coupling agent

    SciTech Connect

    Guelguen, M.A.; Popoola, O.O.; Kriven, W.M.

    1995-06-01

    Chemical interactions between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and triethanol amine titanate chelate were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The titanate chelate cross coupled the PVA solution and produced a viscous gel. The gel had a three- dimensional network structure containing --C{sub PVA}--O--Ti--O--C{sub PVA}--organic complexes. A new C(1{ital s}) signature at 285.7 eV and an O(1{ital s}) signature at 531.25 eV were associated with the formation of these complexes. The water of the PVA solution was physically retained in the gelled structure and was readily available for chemical reactions. The removal of this entrapped water was irreversible and lead to a collapsed film of Ti-cross-linked PVA.

  9. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  10. Indium-zinc-oxide electric-double-layer thin-film transistors gated by silane coupling agents 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine-graphene oxide solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liqiang; Huang, Yukai; Shi, Yangyang; Cheng, Guanggui; Ding, Jianning

    2015-07-01

    Silane coupling agents 3-triethoxysilylpropyla-mine-graphene oxide (KH550-GO) solid electrolyte are prepared by spin coating process. A high proton conductivity of ~1.2   ×   10-3 Scm-1 is obtained at room temperature. A strong electric-double-layer (EDL) effect is observed due to the accumulation of protons at KH550-GO/IZO interface. Indium-Zinc-Oxide thin film transistors gated by KH550-GO solid electrolyte are self-assembled on ITO glass substrates. Good electrical performances are obtained, such as a low subthreshold swing of ~140 mV/dec., a high current on/off ratio of ~2.9   ×   107 and a high field-effect mobility of ~13.2 cm2 V-1 S-1, respectively.

  11. Portable solid phase micro-extraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry system for on-site analysis of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  12. Results and Lessons Learned from a Coupled Social and Physical Hydrology Model: Testing Alternative Water Management Policies and Institutional Structures Using Agent-Based Modeling and Regional Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J.; Lammers, R. B.; Prousevitch, A.; Ozik, J.; Altaweel, M.; Collier, N. T.; Kliskey, A. D.; Alessa, L.

    2015-12-01

    Water Management in the U.S. Southwest is under increasing scrutiny as many areas endure persistent drought. The impact of these prolonged dry conditions is a product of regional climate and hydrological conditions, but also of a highly engineered water management infrastructure and a complex web of social arrangements whereby water is allocated, shared, exchanged, used, re-used, and finally consumed. We coupled an agent-based model with a regional hydrological model to understand the dynamics in one richly studied and highly populous area: southern Arizona, U.S.A., including metropolitan Phoenix and Tucson. There, multiple management entities representing an array of municipalities and other water providers and customers, including private companies and Native American tribes are enmeshed in a complex legal and economic context in which water is bought, leased, banked, and exchanged in a variety of ways and on multiple temporal and physical scales. A recurrent question in the literature of adaptive management is the impact of management structure on overall system performance. To explore this, we constructed an agent-based model to capture this social complexity, and coupled this with a physical hydrological model that we used to drive the system under a variety of water stress scenarios and to assess the regional impact of the social system's performance. We report the outcomes of ensembles of runs in which varieties of alternative policy constraints and management strategies are considered. We hope to contribute to policy discussions in this area and connected and legislatively similar areas (such as California) as current conditions change and existing legal and policy structures are revised. Additionally, we comment on the challenges of integrating models that ostensibly are in different domains (physical and social) but that independently represent a system in which physical processes and human actions are closely intertwined and difficult to disentangle.

  13. Determination of six chemotherapeutic agents in municipal wastewater using online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rabii, Farida W; Segura, Pedro A; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-07-15

    Due to the increased consumption of chemotherapeutic agents, their high toxicity, carcinogenicity, their occurrence in the aquatic environment must be properly evaluated. An analytical method based on online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. A 1 mL injection volume was used to quantify six of the most widely used cytotoxic drugs (cyclophosphamide, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, methotrexate, irinotecan and epirubicin) in municipal wastewater. The method was validated using standard additions. The validation results in wastewater influent had coefficients of determination (R(2)) between 0.983 and 0.998 and intra-day precision ranging from 7 to 13% (expressed as relative standard deviation %RSD), and from 9 to 23% for inter-day precision. Limits of detection ranged from 4 to 20 ng L(-1) while recovery values were greater than 70% except for gemcitabine, which is the most hydrophilic compound in the selected group and had a recovery of 47%. Matrix effects were interpreted by signal suppression and ranged from 55 to 118% with cyclophosphamide having the highest value. Two of the target anticancer drugs (cyclophosphamide and methotrexate) were detected and quantified in wastewater (effluent and influent) and ranged from 13 to 60 ng L(-1). The proposed method thus allows proper monitoring of potential environmental releases of chemotherapy agents. PMID:24388503

  14. Applying an agent-based model of agricultural terraces coupled with a landscape evolution model to explore the impact of human decision-making on terraced terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaubius, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural terraces impact landscape evolution as a result of long-term human-landscape interactions, including decisions regarding terrace maintenance and abandonment. Modeling simulations are often employed to examine the sensitivity of landscapes to various factors, such as rainfall and land cover. Landscape evolution models, erosion models, and hydrological models have all previously been used to simulate the impact of agricultural terrace construction on terrain evolution, soil erosion, and hydrological connectivity. Human choices regarding individual terraces have not been included in these models to this point, despite recent recognition that maintenance and abandonment decisions alter transport and storage patterns of soil and water in terraced terrain. An agent-based model of human decisions related to agricultural terraces is implemented based on a conceptual model of agricultural terrace life cycle stages created from a literature review of terracing impacts. The agricultural terracing agent-based model is then coupled with a landscape evolution model to explore the role of human decisions in the evolution of terraced landscapes. To fully explore this type of co-evolved landscape, human decision-making and its feedbacks must be included in landscape evolution models. Project results may also have implications for management of terraced terrain based on how human choices in these environments affect soil loss and land degradation.

  15. A novel inorganic/organic composite membrane tailored by various organic silane coupling agents for use in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Yong

    A series of organic silica/Nafion composite membranes has been prepared by using organic silane coupling agents (SCA) bearing different hydrophilic functional groups. The physico-chemical properties of the composite membranes have been characterized by electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), diffuse-reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRFTIR), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and thermogravimetric mass spectrometry (TG-MS). It has been found that some organic silica/Nafion composite membranes modified by organic silane agents bearing amino groups exhibit extremely low methanol crossover and proton conductivity values, e.g., a composite membrane shows a proton conductivity that is about five orders of magnitude lower and a methanol permeability that is about three orders of magnitude lower than those of a Nafion117 membrane. However, under optimized conditions for controlling the basicity of the amino groups, we also obtained a composite membrane with 89% lower methanol permeability and 49% lower proton conductivity compared with Nafion117 membrane. The results clearly demonstrate that the diffusion of methanol and protons through the membrane can be controlled by adjusting the functional groups on the organic silica.

  16. Production of Galactooligosaccharides Using β-Galactosidase Immobilized on Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles with Tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine as an Optional Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ching; Duan, Kow-Jen

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and was used to produce galactooligosaccharides (GOS) from lactose. Immobilized enzyme was prepared with or without the coupling agent, tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine (THP). The two immobilized systems and the free enzyme achieved their maximum activity at pH 6.0 with an optimal temperature of 50 °C. The immobilized enzymes showed higher activities at a wider range of temperatures and pH. Furthermore, the immobilized enzyme coupled with THP showed higher thermal stability than that without THP. However, activity retention of batchwise reactions was similar for both immobilized systems. All the three enzyme systems produced GOS compound with similar concentration profiles, with a maximum GOS yield of 50.5% from 36% (w·v−1) lactose on a dry weight basis. The chitosan-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be regenerated using a desorption/re-adsorption process described in this study. PMID:26047337

  17. Quantitative determination of the anticancer agent tubeimoside I in rat plasma by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Jin; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Chuan; Liu, Run-Hui; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Hui-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Xiang-Wei; Zhu, Jian-Bao; Chen, Chun-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Tubeimoside I is an important component isolated from Bolbostemma paniculatum. Tubeimoside I has been demonstrated to possess many pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antitumor-promoting effects. The purpose of the present study was to examine in vivo pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of tubeimoside I in rats by using a liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry quantitative detection method (LC/MS). The plasma samples were deproteinated, evaporated and reconstituted in 100 microl methanol prior to analysis. The separation was performed by Waters Symmetry C18 reversed-phase column (3.5 microm, 150 mm x 2.1mm, Waters Inc., USA) and a SB-C18 guard column (5 microm, 20 mm x 4.0mm). The mobile phase was a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 5 microM NaAc (60:40, v/v). The method was validated within the concentration range 20-5000 ng/ml, and the calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficients >0.999. The lowest limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for tubeimoside I was 20 ng/ml in 0.1 ml rat plasma. The intra-assay accuracy and precision ranged from 92.4 to 104.9% and from 5.8 to 10.5%, respectively, while inter-assay accuracy and precision ranged from 94.2 to 95.0% and from 5.1 to 8.8%, respectively. The method was further applied to assess pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of tubeimoside I after intravenous and oral administration to rats. The oral bioavailability of tubeimoside I is only 0.23%, which indicates that tubeimoside I has poor absorption or undergoes acid-induced degradation. Practical utility of this new LC/MS method was confirmed in pilot pharmacokinetic studies in rats following both intravenous and oral administration. PMID:16931181

  18. Analysis of sulfate metabolites of the doping agents oxandrolone and danazol using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rzeppa, S; Viet, L

    2016-09-01

    The direct detection of sulfate conjugates of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can be a powerful tool in doping control analysis. By skipping the solvolysis step analysis time can be reduced, and due to long term sulfate metabolites the detection time can be significantly extended as demonstrated for some AAS. This study presents the successful identification of sulfate metabolites of the doping agents oxandrolone and danazol in excretion urines by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The sulfate conjugate of 17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5α-androsta-13-en-3-one could be identified as a new metabolite of oxandrolone. Sulfate conjugates of the danazol metabolites ethisterone and 2α-hydroxymethylethisterone were identified in an excretion urine for the first time. In addition, these sulfate conjugates were synthesized successfully. For a confirmation analysis, the number of analytes can be increased by additional sulfate conjugates of danazol metabolites (2-hydroxymethyl-1,2-dehydroethisterone and 6β-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethylethisterone), which were also identified for the first time. The presented validation data underline the suitability of the identified sulfate conjugates for doping analysis with regard to the criteria given by the technical documents of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). PMID:27394004

  19. Cinnamaldehyde Characterization as an Antibacterial Agent toward E. coli Metabolic Profile Using 96-Blade Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled to Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Fatemeh; Bojko, Barbara; Bessonneau, Vincent; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-03-01

    Sampling and sample preparation plays an important role in untargeted analysis as it influences final composition of the analyzed extract and consequently reflection of the metabolome. In the current work, mechanism of bactericidal action of cinnamaldehyde (CA) against Escherichia coli (E. coli) during bacteria growth applying high-throughput solid-phase microextraction in direct immersion mode coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was investigated. Numerous discriminant metabolites due to CA addition to the bacteria culture were mapped in the E. coli metabolic pathways. We propose new metabolic pathways confirming that CA acts as an oxidative stress agent against E. coli. The results of the current research have successfully demonstrated that CA changes the bacterial metabolism through interactions with different biochemical families such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates, which needs further validation by proteomics and transcriptomics studies. The results presented here show the great potential of the novel approach in drug discovery and food safety. PMID:26811002

  20. Surface modification of Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles by silane coupling agent: Synthesis and application in proton exchange composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Salarizadeh, Parisa; Javanbakht, Mehran; Pourmahdian, Saeed; Bagheri, Ahmad; Beydaghi, Hossein; Enhessari, Morteza

    2016-06-15

    Modifying surfaces of nanoparticles with silane coupling agent provides a simple method to alter their surface properties and improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer matrix. Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles (IT) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as novel reinforcing filler for proton exchange membranes. The main operating parameters such as reaction time (R.T), APTES/IT and triethylamine (TEA)/IT ratios have been optimized for maximum grafting efficiency. The optimum conditions for R.T, APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were 6h, 4 and 0.3 respectively. It was observed that the APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were the most significant parameters affecting the grafting percentage. Modified nanoparticles were characterized using FT-IR, TGA, SEM, TEM and XRD techniques. Effects of modified nanoparticles in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were evaluated. The resulting nanocomposite membranes exhibited higher proton conductivity in comparison with pristine SPPEK and SPPEK/IT membranes. This increase is attributed to connectivity of the water channels which creates more direct pathways for proton transport. Composite membrane with 3% AIT (6.46% grafting amount) showed 0.024Scm(-1) proton conductivity at 25°C and 149mWcm(-2) power density (at 0.5V) at 80°C which were about 243% and 51%, respectively higher than that of pure SPPEK. PMID:27023633

  1. Facile synthesis of 1-alkoxy-1H-benzo- and 7-azabenzotriazoles from peptide coupling agents, mechanistic studies, and synthetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manish K; Kumar, Mukesh; Chamala, Raghu Ram; Yedulla, Vijayender R; Wagner, Domenick; Leung, Evan; Yang, Lijia; Matin, Asha; Ahmad, Sadia

    2014-01-01

    Summary (1H-Benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yloxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (BOP), 1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (Bt-OTs), and 3H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-b]pyridine-3-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (At-OTs) are classically utilized in peptide synthesis for amide-bond formation. However, a previously undescribed reaction of these compounds with alcohols in the presence of a base, leads to 1-alkoxy-1H-benzo- (Bt-OR) and 7-azabenzotriazoles (At-OR). Although BOP undergoes reactions with alcohols to furnish 1-alkoxy-1H-benzotriazoles, Bt-OTs proved to be superior. Both, primary and secondary alcohols undergo reaction under generally mild reaction conditions. Correspondingly, 1-alkoxy-1H-7-azabenzotriazoles were synthesized from At-OTs. Mechanistically, there are three pathways by which these peptide-coupling agents can react with alcohols. From 31P{1H}, [18O]-labeling, and other chemical experiments, phosphonium and tosylate derivatives of alcohols seem to be intermediates. These then react with BtO− and AtO− produced in situ. In order to demonstrate broader utility, this novel reaction has been used to prepare a series of acyclic nucleoside-like compounds. Because BtO− is a nucleofuge, several Bt-OCH2Ar substrates have been evaluated in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Finally, the possible formation of Pd π–allyl complexes by departure of BtO− has been queried. Thus, alpha-allylation of three cyclic ketones was evaluated with 1-(cinnamyloxy)-1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazole, via in situ formation of pyrrolidine enamines and Pd catalysis. PMID:25246951

  2. Carbon nanotubes noncovalently functionalized by an organic-inorganic hybrid: new building blocks for constructing superhydrophobic conductive coatings.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi; Liao, Zhangjie; Zhu, Zhongming; Guo, Honglei

    2010-08-17

    A facile method for constructing superhydrophobic, conductive, and transparent/translucent coatings is presented. Pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are first noncovalently (wrapped) modified by an organic-inorganic hybrid of an amphiphilic copolymer of styrene and maleic anhydride and silica with the existence of gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (a silane coupling agent). The modified MWNTs were mixed with tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol, air sprayed, coated with a fluoroalkylsilane, and then heat treated to obtain the superhydrophobic, conductive, and transparent/translucent coatings. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the coatings have a micrometer- and nanometer-scale hierarchical structure similar to that of lotus leaves; therefore, they show both high water contact angles (>160 degrees) and low sliding angles (<2 degrees). The coatings also exhibit good transmittance and greatly improved conductivities. This method is convenient, inexpensive, and easy to scale up. Moreover, it does not require any chemical modification of the MWNTs or use any harsh chemicals. PMID:20695543

  3. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  4. Ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for screening of doping agents. I: Investigation of mobile phase and MS conditions.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the analysis of selected doping substances by UHPSFC-MS/MS were optimized to ensure suitable peak shapes and maximized MS responses. A representative mixture of 31 acidic and basic doping agents was analyzed, in both ESI+ and ESI- modes. The best compromise for all compounds in terms of MS sensitivity and chromatographic performance was obtained when adding 2% water and 10mM ammonium formate in the CO2/MeOH mobile phase. Beside mobile phase, the nature of the make-up solvent added for interfacing UHPSFC with MS was also evaluated. Ethanol was found to be the best candidate as it was able to compensate for the negative effect of 2% water addition in ESI- mode and provided a suitable MS response for all doping agents. Sensitivity of the optimized UHPSFC-MS/MS method was finally assessed and compared to the results obtained in conventional UHPLC-MS/MS. Sensitivity was improved by 5-100-fold in UHPSFC-MS/MS vs. UHPLC-MS/MS for 56% of compounds, while only one compound (bumetanide) offered a significantly higher MS response (4-fold) under UHPLC-MS/MS conditions. In the second paper of this series, the optimal conditions for UHPSFC-MS/MS analysis will be employed to screen >100 doping agents in urine matrix and results will be compared to those obtained by conventional UHPLC-MS/MS. PMID:25467513

  5. Qualitative screening of veterinary anti-microbial agents in tissues, milk, and eggs of food-producing animals using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongmei; Yu, Jie; Tao, Yanfei; Pan, Yuanhu; Xie, Shuyu; Huang, Lingli; Peng, Dapeng; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-04-01

    A method for the analysis of 120 drugs in animal derived food was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These analytes belong to 12 families of veterinary anti-microbial agents (quinolones, macrolides, β-lactams, nitroimidazoles, sulfonamides, lincomycines, chloramphenicols, quinoxalines, tetracyclines, polypeptides, and antibacterial synergists) as well as other compounds not assigned to a particular drug family. The animal derived food samples include muscle and liver of swine, bovine, sheep, and chicken, as well as hen eggs and dairy milk. The sample preparation included ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) with acetonitrile-water and a final clean-up with auto solid-phase extraction (SPE) on HLB cartridges. The detection and quantification of 120 anti-microbial agents was performed using LC-MS/MS in positive and negative ion mode. The chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of all drugs in food-producing animals were 0.5-3.0μg/kg and 1.5-10.0μg/kg, respectively. The developed method was successfully utilized to monitor real samples, which demonstrated that it is a simple, fast, and robust method, and could be used as a regulatory to screen for the presence of residues from veterinary anti-microbial drugs in animal-derived foods. PMID:26950031

  6. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  7. Ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for screening of doping agents. II: Analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Rentsch, Marco; Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The potential and applicability of UHPSFC-MS/MS for anti-doping screening in urine samples were tested for the first time. For this purpose, a group of 110 doping agents with diverse physicochemical properties was analyzed using two separation techniques, namely UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS in both ESI+ and ESI- modes. The two approaches were compared in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and matrix effects. As expected, very diverse retentions and selectivities were obtained in UHPLC and UHPSFC, proving a good complementarity of these analytical strategies. In both conditions, acceptable peak shapes and MS detection capabilities were obtained within 7 min analysis time, enabling the application of these two methods for screening purposes. Method sensitivity was found comparable for 46% of tested compounds, while higher sensitivity was observed for 21% of tested compounds in UHPLC-MS/MS and for 32% in UHPSFC-MS/MS. The latter demonstrated a lower susceptibility to matrix effects, which were mostly observed as signal suppression. In the case of UHPLC-MS/MS, more serious matrix effects were observed, leading typically to signal enhancement and the matrix effect was also concentration dependent, i.e., more significant matrix effects occurred at the lowest concentrations. PMID:25467514

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP‐C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Navolotskii, Denis V.; Ivanenko, Natalya B.; Fedoros, Elena I.; Panchenko, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6–200 µg/L, intra‐day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti‐cancer drug BP‐С1, a complex of cis‐configured platinum and benzene‐poly‐carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half‐life times for α‐ and β‐phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP‐C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP‐C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days’ break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. ‘Slow’ phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site. © 2015 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26061351

  9. Dynamic Agents of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Moore, Thomas E.; Collier, Michael

    2011-01-01

    VISIONS sounding rocket mission (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) has been awarded to NASA/GSFC (PI Rowland) in order to provide the first combined remote sensing and in situ measurements of the regions where ion acceleration to above 5 e V is occurring, and of the sources of free energy and acceleration mechanisms that accelerate the ions. The key science question of VISIONS is how, when, and where, are ions accelerated to escape velocities in the auroral zone below 1000 km, following substorm onset? Sources of free energy that power this ion acceleration process include (but not limited) electron precipitation, field-aligned currents, velocity shears, and Alfvenic Poynting flux. The combine effect of all these processes on ionospheric ion outflows will be investigated in a framework of the kinetic model that has been developed by Khazanov et al. in order to study the polar wind transport in the presence of photoelectrons.

  10. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  11. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  12. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1999-11-01

    Several important developments have occurred in recent years in the chemotherapy for and prophylaxis of parasitic infections. Although mefloquine is clearly the most effective agent for prevention of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria, its use has been compromised by side effects, both real and imagined. Well-designed studies have shown that side effects occur no more frequently with low-dose mefloquine than with chloroquine. Use of mefloquine in pregnant women has not been associated with birth defects, but the incidence of stillbirths may be increased. Malarone is a new agent that combines atovaquone and proguanil, and it may be as effective as mefloquine; however, it is not yet available in the United States. Several newer agents have appeared in response to the development of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, especially in Southeast Asia. Halofantrine is available for the treatment of mild to moderate malaria due to P. falciparum and for P. vivax infections. Because of severe toxic effects, use of halofantrine should be restricted to only those unusual and rare situations in which other agents cannot be used. Artemisinin (an extract of the Chinese herbal remedy qinghaosu) and two derivatives, artesunate and artemether, are active against multidrug resistant P. falciparum and are widely used in Asia in oral, parenteral, and rectal forms. The antibacterial azithromycin in combination with atovaquone or quinine has now been reported to treat babesiosis effectively in experimental animals and in a few patients. Azithromycin in combination with paromomycin has also shown promise in the treatment of cryptosporidiosis (and toxoplasmosis when combined with pyrimethamine) in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Albendazole is currently the only systemic agent available for treatment of microsporidiosis, an infection primarily of patients with AIDS. In addition, albendazole and ivermectin have emerged as effective broad

  13. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  14. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  15. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  16. Agent Building Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  17. Mother ship and physical agents collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

  18. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  19. Pinning synchronization of a mobile agent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Sun, You-xian

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the problem of controlling a group of mobile agents in a plane in order to move them towards a desired orbit via pinning control, in which each agent is associated with a chaotic oscillator coupled with those of neighboring agents, and the pinning strategy is to have the common linear feedback acting on a small fraction of agents by random selection. We explore the effects of the pinning probability, feedback gains and agent density in the pinning synchronization of a mobile agent network under a fast-switching constraint, and perform numerical simulations for validation. In particular, we show that there exists a critical pinning density for network synchronization with an unbounded region: above the threshold, the dynamical network can be controlled by pinning; below it, anarchy prevails. And for the network with a single bounded synchronization region, pinning control has little effect as regards enhancing network synchronizability.

  20. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  1. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  2. Dynamics of adaptive agents with asymmetric information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMartino, Andrea; Galla, Tobias

    2005-08-01

    We apply path integral techniques to study the dynamics of agent-based models with asymmetric information structures. In particular, we devise a batch version of a model proposed originally by Berg et al (2001 Quantitative Finance 1 203), and convert the coupled multi-agent processes into an effective-agent problem from which the dynamical order parameters in ergodic regimes can be derived self-consistently together with the corresponding phase structure. Our dynamical study complements and extends the available static theory. Results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  3. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  4. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  5. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  6. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  7. Optical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, J. J.; Gundersen, J.; Lee, A. T.; Richards, P. L.; Wollack, E.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes contributions to the CMBpol Technology Study Workshop concerning optical coupling structures. These are structures in or near the focal plane which convert the free space wave to a superconducting microstrip on a SI wafer, or to the waveguide input to a HEMT receiver. In addition to an introduction and conclusions by the editor, this paper includes independent contributions by Bock on 'Planar Antenna-Coupled Bolometers for CMB Polarimetry', by Gunderson and Wollack on 'Millimeter-Wave Platlet Feeds', and by Lee on 'Multi-band Dual-Polarization Lens-coupled Planar Antennas for Bolometric CMB polarimetry.'

  8. Advances in HIV Prevention for Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2014-01-01

    Serodiscordant couples play an important role in maintaining the global HIV epidemic. This review summarizes biobehavioral and biomedical HIV prevention options for serodiscordant couples focusing on advances in 2013 and 2014, including World Health Organization guidelines and best-evidence for couples counseling, couples-based interventions, and the use of antiviral agents for prevention. In the past few years marked advances have been made in HIV prevention for serodiscordant couples and numerous ongoing studies are continuously expanding HIV prevention tools, especially in the area of pre-exposure prophylaxis. Uptake and adherence to antiviral therapy remains a key challenge. Additional research is needed to develop evidence-based interventions for couples, and especially for male-male couples. Randomized trials have demonstrated the prevention benefits of antiretroviral-based approaches among serodiscordant couples; however, residual transmission observed in recognized serodiscordant couples represents an important and resolvable challenge in HIV prevention. PMID:25145645

  9. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  10. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  11. Proceedings of the Agent 2002 Conference on Social Agents : Ecology, Exchange, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C., ed.; Sallach, D., ed.

    2003-04-10

    Welcome to the ''Proceedings'' of the third in a series of agent simulation conferences cosponsored by Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. The theme of this year's conference, ''Social Agents: Ecology, Exchange and Evolution'', was selected to foster the exchange of ideas on some of the most important social processes addressed by agent simulation models, namely: (1) The translation of ecology and ecological constraints into social dynamics; (2) The role of exchange processes, including the peer dependencies they create; and (3) The dynamics by which, and the attractor states toward which, social processes evolve. As stated in the ''Call for Papers'', throughout the social sciences, the simulation of social agents has emerged as an innovative and powerful research methodology. The promise of this approach, however, is accompanied by many challenges. First, modeling complexity in agents, environments, and interactions is non-trivial, and these representations must be explored and assessed systematically. Second, strategies used to represent complexities are differentially applicable to any particular problem space. Finally, to achieve sufficient generality, the design and experimentation inherent in agent simulation must be coupled with social and behavioral theory. Agent 2002 provides a forum for reviewing the current state of agent simulation scholarship, including research designed to address such outstanding issues. This year's conference introduces an extensive range of domains, models, and issues--from pre-literacy to future projections, from ecology to oligopolistic markets, and from design to validation. Four invited speakers highlighted major themes emerging from social agent simulation.

  12. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  13. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  14. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  15. Chemical crowd control agents.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Hussain, Syed Ather; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Anwar, Naureen; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Chemical crowd control agents are also referred to as riot control agents and are mainly used by civil authorities and government agencies to curtail civil disobedience gatherings or processions by large crowds. Common riot control agents used to disperse large numbers of individuals into smaller, less destructive, and more easily controllable numbers include chloroacetophenone, chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, dibenzoxazepine, diphenylaminearsine, and oleoresin capsicum. In this paper, we discuss the emergency medical care needed by sufferers of acute chemical agent contamination and raise important issues concerning toxicology, safety and health. PMID:26658556

  16. Change Agent Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Folwell L.

    2011-01-01

    Consulting is a rough racket. Only a tarantula hair above IRS agents, meter maids and used car sales people, the profession is a prickly burr for slings and arrows. Throw in education, focus on dysfunctional schools and call oneself a "change agent," and this bad rap all but disappears. Unfortunately, though, consulting/coaching/mentoring in…

  17. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  18. Crystallization and tile separation in the multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, Jacques Henri; Fanchon, Jean

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the self-organization of simple mobile agents confined in a two-dimension rectangular area. Each agent interacts with its neighbors inside an interaction disk and moves following various types of force-driven couplings (e.g. repulsion or attraction). The agents do not know their absolute position, do not exchange messages, have no memory, and no learning capabilities. We first study the self-organization appearing in systems made-up with one sole type of agents, initially generated at random in the terrain. By changing the agent-agent repulsive interaction, we observe five different population reorganizations, namely, grouping, diffusion (that is classical), but especially interesting, crystallization (i.e., the agents group together on the vertices a regular hexagonal lattice), alignment along straight lines, and vortex dynamics. Then, we consider reorganization in systems made-up from two to five types of agents, where each pair of agent types has specific interaction parameters. The main result of this work is to show that, by only changing the agent-agent repulsion rules, one can generate hexagonal or rectangular multi-agent crystals or on the contrary, induce complete separation in regular hexagonal tiles.

  19. Pediatric Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Moran, Cassandra; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review In immunocompromised hosts, invasive fungal infections are common and fatal. In the past decade, the antifungal armamentarium against invasive mycoses has expanded greatly. The purpose of this report is to review the most recent literature addressing the use of antifungal agents in children. Recent findings Most studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of antifungal agents are limited to adults. However, important progress has been made in describing the pharmacokinetics and safety of newer antifungal agents in children, including the echinocandins. Summary Dosage guidelines for newer antifungal agents are currently based on adult and limited pediatric data. Because important developmental pharmacology changes occur throughout childhood impacting the pharmacokinetics of these agents, antifungal studies specifically designed for children are necessary. PMID:19741525

  20. How do agents represent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  1. Standard Agent Framework 1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  2. Joint chemical agent detector (JCAD): the future of chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laljer, Charles E.

    2003-08-01

    The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has continued development through 2002. The JCAD has completed Contractor Validation Testing (CVT) that included chemical warfare agent testing, environmental testing, electromagnetic interferent testing, and platform integration validation. The JCAD provides state of the art chemical warfare agent detection capability to military and homeland security operators. Intelligence sources estimate that over twenty countries have active chemical weapons programs. The spread of weapons of mass destruction (and the industrial capability for manufacture of these weapons) to third world nations and terrorist organizations has greatly increased the chemical agent threat to U.S. interests. Coupled with the potential for U.S. involvement in localized conflicts in an operational or support capacity, increases the probability that the military Joint Services may encounter chemical agents anywhere in the world. The JCAD is a small (45 in3), lightweight (2 lb.) chemical agent detector for vehicle interiors, aircraft, individual personnel, shipboard, and fixed site locations. The system provides a common detection component across multi-service platforms. This common detector system will allow the Joint Services to use the same operational and support concept for more efficient utilization of resources. The JCAD detects, identifies, quantifies, and warns of the presence of chemical agents prior to onset of miosis. Upon detection of chemical agents, the detector provides local and remote audible and visual alarms to the operators. Advance warning will provide the vehicle crew and other personnel in the local area with the time necessary to protect themselves from the lethal effects of chemical agents. The JCAD is capable of being upgraded to protect against future chemical agent threats. The JCAD provides the operator with the warning necessary to survive and fight in a chemical warfare agent threat environment.

  3. Biological warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies. PMID:21829313

  4. Dioxin, agent orange

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: dioxin, a prevalent problem; nobody wanted dioxin; agent organe and Vietnam; what we know about and may learn about agent orange and Veterans' health; agent organe and birth defects; dioxin in Missouri; 2, 4, 5-T: the U.S.' disappearing herbicide; Seveso: high-level environmental exposure; the nitro explosion; industrial exposures to dioxin; company behavior in the face of dioxin exposures; dioxin and specific cancers; animal tests of dioxin toxicity; dioxin decions; the present and the future.

  5. Novel Phenylethynyl Imide Silanes as Coupling Agents for Titanium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Conell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; SaintClair, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    The durability of titanium (Ti) alloys bonded with high temperature adhesives such as polyimides has failed to attain the level of performance required for many applications. The problem to a large part is attributed to the instability of the surface treatment on the Ti substrate. Although Ti alloy adhesive specimens with surface treatments such as chromic acid anodization, Pasa-Jell, Turco, etc. have provided high initial mechanical properties, these properties have decreased as a function of aging at ambient temperature and faster, when aged at elevated temperatures or in a hot-wet environment. As part of the High Speed Civil Transport program where Ti honeycomb sandwich structure must perform for 60,000 hours at 177 C, work was directed to the development of environmentally safe, durable Ti alloy surface treatments.

  6. Surface reactions on thin layers of silane coupling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, D.G.; Bein, T. )

    1993-11-01

    The reactivity of immobilized functional groups in thin layers of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APS), (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane, (3-bromopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and (8-bromooctyl)trimethoxysilane on oxidized aluminum substrates was studied with reflection-adsorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), optical ellipsometry and contact-angle measurements. Mass changes on the surface associated with the surface-confined reactions were measured with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Single layers of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane on oxidized aluminum react with chlorodimethylsilane to give [(-O)[sub 3]Si(CH[sub 2])[sub 3]NH[sub 2][sup +]SiMe[sub 2]H]Cl[sup [minus

  7. Decoupling Coupled Constraints Through Utility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N; Marden, JR

    2014-08-01

    Several multiagent systems exemplify the need for establishing distributed control laws that ensure the resulting agents' collective behavior satisfies a given coupled constraint. This technical note focuses on the design of such control laws through a game-theoretic framework. In particular, this technical note provides two systematic methodologies for the design of local agent objective functions that guarantee all resulting Nash equilibria optimize the system level objective while also satisfying a given coupled constraint. Furthermore, the designed local agent objective functions fit into the framework of state based potential games. Consequently, one can appeal to existing results in game-theoretic learning to derive a distributed process that guarantees the agents will reach such an equilibrium.

  8. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  9. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  10. Riot Control Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly ... agent from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will ...

  11. Tubular Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system for coupling a vascular overflow graft or cannula to a heart pump. A pump pipe outlet is provided with an external tapered surface which receives the end of a compressible connula. An annular compression ring with a tapered internal bore surface is arranged about the cannula with the tapered internal surface in a facing relationship to the external tapered surface. The angle of inclination of the tapered surfaces is converging such that the spacing between the tapered surfaces decreases from one end of the external tapered surface to the other end thereby providing a clamping action of the tapered surface on a cannula which increases as a function of the length of cannula segment between the tapered surfaces. The annular compression ring is disposed within a tubular locking nut which threadedly couples to the pump and provides a compression force for urging the annular ring onto the cannula between the tapered surfaces. The nut has a threaded connection to the pump body. The threaded coupling to the pump body provides a compression force for the annular ring. The annular ring has an annular enclosure space in which excess cannula material from the compression between the tapered surfaces to "bunch up" in the space and serve as an enlarged annular ring segment to assist holding the cannula in place. The clamped cannula provides a seamless joint connection to the pump pipe outlet where the clamping force is uniformly applied to the cannula because of self alignment of the tapered surfaces. The nut can be easily disconnected to replace the pump if necessary.

  12. Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD): the future of chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laljer, Charles E.; Owen, Jeffery L.

    2002-06-01

    The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) will provide state of the art chemical warfare agent detection capability to ground vehicle operators. Intelligence sources estimate that over twenty counties have active chemical weapons programs. The spread of chemical weapons to third world nations, coupled with the potential for US involvement in these areas in an operational or support capacity, increases the probability that the Joint Services may encounter chemical agents and toxic industrial materials anywhere in the world. Currently, fielded chemical agent detectors are bulky, labor intensive, and subject to false readings. No legacy detector is sensitive enough to provide detection and warning of the low dose hazards associated with miosis contamination. The JCAD will provide a small, lightweight chemical agent detector for vehicle interiors, aircraft, individual personnel, shipboard, and fixed site locations. The system provides a common detection components across multi-service platforms. This common detector system will allow the Joint Services to use the same operational and support concept for more efficient utilization of resources. The JCAD will detect, identify, quantify, and warn of the presence of chemical agents prior to onset of miosis. Upon detection of chemical agents, the detector will provide local and remote audible and visual alarms to the operators. Advance warning will provide the vehicle crew with the time necessary to protect themselves from the lethal effects of chemical agents. The JCAD will also be capable of being upgraded to protect against future chemical agent threats. The JCAD will provide the vehicle operators with the warning necessary to survive and fight in a chemical warfare agent threat environment.

  13. Agent amplified communication

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.; Selman, B.; Milewski, A.

    1996-12-31

    We propose an agent-based framework for assisting and simplifying person-to-person communication for information gathering tasks. As an example, we focus on locating experts for any specified topic. In our approach, the informal person-to-person networks that exist within an organization are used to {open_quotes}referral chain{close_quotes} requests for expertise. User-agents help automate this process. The agents generate referrals by analyzing records of e-mail communication patterns. Simulation results show that the higher responsiveness of an agent-based system can be effectively traded for the higher accuracy of a completely manual approach. Furthermore, preliminary experience with a group of users on a prototype system has shown that useful automatic referrals can be found in practice. Our experience with actual users has also shown that privacy concerns are central to the successful deployment of personal agents: an advanced agent-based system will therefore need to reason about issues involving trust and authority.

  14. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  15. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  16. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  17. Activity of enzyme immobilized on silanized Co-Cr-Mo.

    PubMed

    Puleo, D A

    1995-08-01

    The surface of an orthopedic biomaterial was modified by the covalent immobilization of biomolecules. Derivatization of Co-Cr-Mo samples with organic and aqueous solutions of gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) resulted in a concentration-dependent number of reactive NH2 groups on the surface available for coupling to protein. The enzyme trypsin was used as a model biomolecule to investigate the effect of immobilization on proteolytic activity. Trypsin was coupled to the silanized samples by formation of Schiff's base linkages via glutaraldehyde. The nature of the interaction between trypsin and biomaterial was then probed by treatment with concentrated guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and urea. Residual activity (following treatment with chaotropic agents) of trypsin immobilized on silanized Co-Cr-Mo was dependent both on the nature of the silane solution and on the type of chaotropic agent. Organic silanization with APS required a minimum density of approximately 49 NH2 per nm2 of nominal surface area (> 0.021 M APS) for residual activity of immobilized trypsin. For aqueous silanization, approximately 5.4 NH2/nm2 (0.51 M APS) resulted in maximal residual trypsin activity. Treatment with GuHCl removed more trypsin activity from Co-Cr-Mo samples silanized with organic solutions of APS than did treatment with urea. On the contrary, with aqueous silanization the samples possessed greater residual activity following treatment with GuHCl than following urea. Compared to simple adsorption with protein onto Co-Cr-Mo, both methods of silanization with APS resulted in superior residual immobilized enzyme activity. PMID:7593038

  18. MpcAgent

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of the building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.

  19. MpcAgent

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of themore » building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.« less

  20. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  1. Agent Persuasion Mechanism of Acquaintance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghua, Wu; Wenguang, Lu; Hailiang, Meng

    Agent persuasion can improve negotiation efficiency in dynamic environment based on its initiative and autonomy, and etc., which is being affected much more by acquaintance. Classification of acquaintance on agent persuasion is illustrated, and the agent persuasion model of acquaintance is also illustrated. Then the concept of agent persuasion degree of acquaintance is given. Finally, relative interactive mechanism is elaborated.

  2. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 107.1620 Section 107.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance...

  3. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  4. Can Subscription Agents Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Marcia

    1985-01-01

    With the saturation of traditional markets for their services, subscription agents have evolved from orders and invoices to serving customers by communicating with librarians and publishers and making automated and paper products available. Magazine fulfillment centers, publisher discounts, and electronic publishing will influence the subscription…

  5. Remote Agent Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benard, Doug; Dorais, Gregory A.; Gamble, Ed; Kanefsky, Bob; Kurien, James; Millar, William; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, Pandu; Rouquette, Nicolas; Rajan, Kanna; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Remote Agent (RA) is a model-based, reusable artificial intelligence (At) software system that enables goal-based spacecraft commanding and robust fault recovery. RA was flight validated during an experiment on board of DS1 between May 17th and May 21th, 1999.

  6. E-Learning Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Dawn G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of using intelligent agents to facilitate the location and customization of appropriate e-learning resources and to foster collaboration in e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper proposes an e-learning environment that can be used to provide customized…

  7. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  8. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  9. Distributed Agents for Autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Rick; Amigoni, Francesco; Brambilla, Andrea; de la Rosa Steinz, Sonia; Lavagna, Michele; le Duc, Ian; Page, Jonathan; Page, Oliver; Steel, Robin; Wijnands, Quirien

    2010-08-01

    The Distributed Agents for Autonomy (DAFA) Study has been performed for ESA by SciSys UK Ltd, Vega GmbH and Politecnico di Milano. An analysis of past, present and future space missions has been conducted, structured around a set of three pre-defined mission scenarios: Formation Flying, Earth Observation and Planetary Exploration. This analysis led to the definition of a framework of use cases where the application of distributed autonomy seems necessary or appropriate, and a set of metrics that may be used to assess such deployments. Agent technology and architectures were extensively surveyed and the results used to elaborate each of the mission scenarios to the point where a software prototype could be constructed. Such a prototype was developed for a scenario based on the ExoMars mission and this has been used to highlight the advantages of a DAFA approach to the mission architecture.

  10. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo›2.2.2! octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo›2.2.1! heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  11. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    2000-02-08

    Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  12. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  13. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo[2.2.2] octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  14. Perioperative allergy: uncommon agents.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Cardinale, F; Indinnimeo, L; Crisafulli, G; Peroni, D G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia may often be considered as a high-risk procedure and anaphylaxis remains a major cause of concern for anesthetists who routinely administer many potentially allergenic agents. Neuromuscular blocking agents, latex and antibiotics are the substances involved in most of the reported reactions. Besides these three agents, a wide variety of substances may cause an anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia. Basically all the administered drugs or substances may be potential causes of anaphylaxis. Among them, those reported the most in literature include hypnotics, opioids, local anesthetics, colloids, dye, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Iodinated Contrast Media (ICM), antiseptics, aprotinin, ethylene oxyde and formaldehyde, and protamine and heparins. No premedication can effectively prevent an allergic reaction and a systematic preoperative screening is not justified for all patients; nevertheless, an allergy specialist should evaluate those patients with a history of anesthesia-related allergy. Patients must be fully informed of investigation results, and advised to provide a detailed report prior to future anesthesia. PMID:22014927

  15. Liposome encapsulation of chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh Erh

    1976-01-13

    A method for transferring a chelating agent across a cellular membrane by encapsulating the charged chelating agent within liposomes and carrying the liposome-encapsulated chelating agent to the cellular membrane where the liposomes containing the chelating agent will be taken up by the cells, thereby transferring the chelating agent across the cellular membrane. A chelating agent can be introduced into the interior of a cell of a living organism wherein the liposomes will be decomposed, releasing the chelating agent to the interior of the cell. The released chelating agent will complex intracellularly deposited toxic heavy metals, permitting the more soluble metal complex to transfer across the cellular membrane from the cell and subsequently be removed from the living organism.

  16. Hydroxypyridonate and hydroxypyrimidinone chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Doble, Daniel M.; Sunderland, Christopher J.; Thompson, Marlon

    2005-01-25

    The present invention provides hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrimidone chelating agents. Also provides are Gd(III) complexes of these agents, which are useful as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The invention also provides methods of preparing the compounds of the invention, as well as methods of using the compounds in magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  17. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  18. Domain nucleation and confinement in agent-controlled bistable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battogtokh, Dorjsuren

    2015-03-01

    We report a mechanism of pattern formation in growing bistable systems coupled indirectly. A modified Fujita et al. model is studied as an example of a reaction-diffusion system of nondiffusive activator and inhibitor molecules immersed in the medium of a fast diffusive agent. Here we show that, as the system grows, a new domain nucleates spontaneously in the area where the local level of the agent becomes critical. Newly nucleated domains are stable and the pattern formation is different from Turing's mechanism in monostable systems. Domains are spatially confined by the agent even if the activator and inhibitor molecules diffuse. With the spatial extension of the system, a larger domain may undergo a wave number instability, and the concentrations of active molecules within the neighboring elements of a domain can become sharply different. The mechanism reported in this work could be generic for pattern formation systems involving multistability, growth, and indirect coupling.

  19. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Raza, S K; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2010-07-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  20. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  1. Chemical warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, K.; Raza, S. K.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  2. REMOTE BIOSENSOR FOR IN SITU MONITORING OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remote electrochemical biosensor for field monitoring of organophosphate nerve agents is described. The new sensor relies on the coupling of the effective biocatalytic action of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) with a submersible amperometric probe design. This combination resu...

  3. Cleaning agents and asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Barranco, P

    2010-01-01

    Although cleaners represent a significant part of the working population worldwide, they remain a relatively understudied occupational group. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between cleaning work and asthma, but the risk factors are uncertain. Cleaning workers are exposed to a large variety of cleaning products containing both irritants and sensitizers, as well as to common indoor allergens and pollutants. Thus, the onset or aggravation of asthma in this group could be related to an irritant-induced mechanism or to specific sensitization. The main sensitizers contained in cleaning products are disinfectants, quaternary ammonium compounds (such as benzalkonium chloride), amine compounds, and fragrances.The strongest airway irritants in cleaning products are bleach (sodium hypochlorite), hydrochloric acid, and alkaline agents (ammonia and sodium hydroxide), which are commonly mixed together. Exposure to the ingredients of cleaning products may give rise to both new-onset asthma, with or without a latency period, and work-exacerbated asthma. High-level exposure to irritants may induce reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Cleaning workers may also have a greater relative risk of developing asthma due to prolonged low-to-moderate exposure to respiratory irritants. In addition, asthma-like symptoms without confirmed asthma are also common after exposure to cleaning agents. In many cleaners, airway symptoms induced by chemicals and odors cannot be explained by allergic or asthmatic reactions. These patients may have increased sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, which is known to reflect sensory reactivity, and this condition is termed airway sensory hyperreactivity. PMID:21313993

  4. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage. PMID:25817449

  5. Holograms as Teaching Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robin A.

    2013-02-01

    Hungarian physicist Dennis Gabor won the Pulitzer Prize for his 1947 introduction of basic holographic principles, but it was not until the invention of the laser in 1960 that research scientists, physicians, technologists and the general public began to seriously consider the interdisciplinary potentiality of holography. Questions around whether and when Three-Dimensional (3-D) images and systems would impact American entertainment and the arts would be answered before educators, instructional designers and students would discover how much Three-Dimensional Hologram Technology (3DHT) would affect teaching practices and learning environments. In the following International Symposium on Display Holograms (ISDH) poster presentation, the author features a traditional board game as well as a reflection hologram to illustrate conventional and evolving Three-Dimensional representations and technology for education. Using elements from the American children's toy Operation® (Hasbro, 2005) as well as a reflection hologram of a human brain (Ko, 1998), this poster design highlights the pedagogical effects of 3-D images, games and systems on learning science. As teaching agents, holograms can be considered substitutes for real objects, (human beings, organs, and animated characters) as well as agents (pedagogical, avatars, reflective) in various learning environments using many systems (direct, emergent, augmented reality) and electronic tools (cellphones, computers, tablets, television). In order to understand the particular importance of utilizing holography in school, clinical and public settings, the author identifies advantages and benefits of using 3-D images and technology as instructional tools.

  6. The problem of coupling in dry-head lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Neucks, Joshua S.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.

    2007-04-01

    Recent in vitro studies have shown that air pockets can get trapped at the coupling interface of the treatment head in dry-head lithotripsy, and this can pose a significant barrier to transmission of shock wave energy to the focal zone. Breakage of model stones is very sensitive to the presence of air pockets at the coupling interface. The quality of routine coupling is highly variable, and it seems quite feasible that the way in which the coupling gel is applied may have a significant effect on the quality of coupling. Therefore, attempts to find the best coupling regime may be valuable to perform, and preliminary results of in vitro tests are presented in this report. Experiments were conducted using gel or castor oil as coupling agents. The test tank was coupled through a transparent Mylar membrane to the water-filled cushion of the treatment head, so that pockets of air trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be observed and photographed. It is shown that the quality of coupling can be improved by applying an excessive amount of gel to just the water cushion of the lithotripter, while applying gel to both the water cushion and the Mylar membrane typically gives poor coupling. Repeat decoupling and re-coupling substantially degraded the quality of coupling, reducing shock wave energy density at the target by ˜80%. It was also observed that using castor oil as a coupling medium does not guarantee air-free coupling.

  7. Learning models of intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Carmel, D.; Markovitch, S.

    1996-12-31

    Agents that operate in a multi-agent system need an efficient strategy to handle their encounters with other agents involved. Searching for an optimal interactive strategy is a hard problem because it depends mostly on the behavior of the others. In this work, interaction among agents is represented as a repeated two-player game, where the agents` objective is to look for a strategy that maximizes their expected sum of rewards in the game. We assume that agents` strategies can be modeled as finite automata. A model-based approach is presented as a possible method for learning an effective interactive strategy. First, we describe how an agent should find an optimal strategy against a given model. Second, we present an unsupervised algorithm that infers a model of the opponent`s automaton from its input/output behavior. A set of experiments that show the potential merit of the algorithm is reported as well.

  8. Flexible, secure agent development framework

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith; Steven Y.

    2009-04-07

    While an agent generator is generating an intelligent agent, it can also evaluate the data processing platform on which it is executing, in order to assess a risk factor associated with operation of the agent generator on the data processing platform. The agent generator can retrieve from a location external to the data processing platform an open site that is configurable by the user, and load the open site into an agent substrate, thereby creating a development agent with code development capabilities. While an intelligent agent is executing a functional program on a data processing platform, it can also evaluate the data processing platform to assess a risk factor associated with performing the data processing function on the data processing platform.

  9. CATS-based Air Traffic Controller Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes intelligent agents that function as air traffic controllers. Each agent controls traffic in a single sector in real time; agents controlling traffic in adjoining sectors can coordinate to manage an arrival flow across a given meter fix. The purpose of this research is threefold. First, it seeks to study the design of agents for controlling complex systems. In particular, it investigates agent planning and reactive control functionality in a dynamic environment in which a variety perceptual and decision making skills play a central role. It examines how heuristic rules can be applied to model planning and decision making skills, rather than attempting to apply optimization methods. Thus, the research attempts to develop intelligent agents that provide an approximation of human air traffic controller behavior that, while not based on an explicit cognitive model, does produce task performance consistent with the way human air traffic controllers operate. Second, this research sought to extend previous research on using the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS) as the basis for intelligent agents. The agents use a high-level model of air traffic controller activities to structure the control task. To execute an activity in the CATS model, according to the current task context, the agents reference a 'skill library' and 'control rules' that in turn execute the pattern recognition, planning, and decision-making required to perform the activity. Applying the skills enables the agents to modify their representation of the current control situation (i.e., the 'flick' or 'picture'). The updated representation supports the next activity in a cycle of action that, taken as a whole, simulates air traffic controller behavior. A third, practical motivation for this research is to use intelligent agents to support evaluation of new air traffic control (ATC) methods to support new Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts. Current approaches that use large, human

  10. New antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Tomas, Elizabeth

    2003-07-01

    Currently, use of standard antifungal therapies can be limited because of toxicity, low efficacy rates, and drug resistance. New formulations are being prepared to improve absorption and efficacy of some of these standard therapies. Various new antifungals have demonstrated therapeutic potential. These new agents may provide additional options for the treatment of superficial fungal infections and they may help to overcome the limitations of current treatments. Liposomal formulations of AmB have a broad spectrum of activity against invasive fungi, such as Candida spp., C. neoformans, and Aspergillus spp., but not dermatophyte fungi. The liposomal AmB is associated with significantly less toxicity and good rates of efficacy, which compare or exceed that of standard AmB. These factors may provide enough of an advantage to patients to overcome the increased costs of these formulations. Three new azole drugs have been developed, and may be of use in both systemic and superficial fungal infections. Voriconazole, ravuconazole, and posaconazole are triazoles, with broad-spectrum activity. Voriconazole has a high bioavailability, and has been used with success in immunocompromised patients with invasive fungal infections. Ravuconazole has shown efficacy in candidiasis in immunocompromised patients, and onychomycosis in healthy patients. Preliminary in vivo studies with posaconazole indicated potential use in a variety of invasive fungal infections including oropharyngeal candidiasis. Echinocandins and pneumocandins are a new class of antifungals, which act as fungal cell wall beta-(1,3)-D-glucan synthase enzyme complex inhibitors. Caspofungin (MK-0991) is the first of the echinocandins to receive Food and Drug Administration approval for patients with invasive aspergillosis not responding or intolerant to other antifungal therapies, and has been effective in patients with oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis. Standardization of MIC value determination has improved the

  11. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  12. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    PubMed

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  13. The value of less connected agents in Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Daniel; Bazzan, Ana L. C.

    2013-11-01

    In multiagent systems, agents often face binary decisions where one seeks to take either the minority or the majority side. Examples are minority and congestion games in general, i.e., situations that require coordination among the agents in order to depict efficient decisions. In minority games such as the El Farol Bar Problem, previous works have shown that agents may reach appropriate levels of coordination, mostly by looking at the history of past decisions. Not many works consider any kind of structure of the social network, i.e., how agents are connected. Moreover, when structure is indeed considered, it assumes some kind of random network with a given, fixed connectivity degree. The present paper departs from the conventional approach in some ways. First, it considers more realistic network topologies, based on preferential attachments. This is especially useful in social networks. Second, the formalism of random Boolean networks is used to help agents to make decisions given their attachments (for example acquaintances). This is coupled with a reinforcement learning mechanism that allows agents to select strategies that are locally and globally efficient. Third, we use agent-based modeling and simulation, a microscopic approach, which allows us to draw conclusions about individuals and/or classes of individuals. Finally, for the sake of illustration we use two different scenarios, namely the El Farol Bar Problem and a binary route choice scenario. With this approach we target systems that adapt dynamically to changes in the environment, including other adaptive decision-makers. Our results using preferential attachments and random Boolean networks are threefold. First we show that an efficient equilibrium can be achieved, provided agents do experimentation. Second, microscopic analysis show that influential agents tend to consider few inputs in their Boolean functions. Third, we have also conducted measurements related to network clustering and centrality

  14. Agent Assignment for Process Management: Pattern Based Agent Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Stefan; Talib, Ramzan

    In almost all workflow management system the role concept is determined once at the introduction of workflow application and is not reevaluated to observe how successfully certain processes are performed by the authorized agents. This paper describes an approach which evaluates how agents are working successfully and feed this information back for future agent assignment to achieve maximum business benefit for the enterprise. The approach is called Pattern based Agent Performance Evaluation (PAPE) and is based on machine learning technique combined with post processing technique. We report on the result of our experiments and discuss issues and improvement of our approach.

  15. Agent-based enterprise integration

    SciTech Connect

    N. M. Berry; C. M. Pancerella

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing and deploying software agents in an enterprise information architecture such that the agents manage enterprise resources and facilitate user interaction with these resources. The enterprise agents are built on top of a robust software architecture for data exchange and tool integration across heterogeneous hardware and software. The resulting distributed multi-agent system serves as a method of enhancing enterprises in the following ways: providing users with knowledge about enterprise resources and applications; accessing the dynamically changing enterprise; locating enterprise applications and services; and improving search capabilities for applications and data. Furthermore, agents can access non-agents (i.e., databases and tools) through the enterprise framework. The ultimate target of the effort is the user; they are attempting to increase user productivity in the enterprise. This paper describes their design and early implementation and discusses the planned future work.

  16. Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

  17. New agents for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, N; Di Lorenzo, G; Sonpavde, G; Bellmunt, J

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has been revolutionized by the arrival of multiple novel agents in the past 2 years. Immunotherapy in the form of sipuleucel-T, androgen axis inhibitors, including abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, a chemotherapeutic agent, cabazitaxel, and a radiopharmaceutical, radium-223, have all yielded incremental extensions of survival and have been recently approved. A number of other agents appear promising in early studies, suggesting that the armamentarium against castrate-resistant prostate cancer is likely to continue to expand. Emerging androgen pathway inhibitors include androgen synthesis inhibitors (TAK700), androgen receptor inhibitors (ARN-509, ODM-201), AR DNA binding domain inhibitors (EPI-001), selective AR downregulators or SARDs (AZD-3514), and agents that inhibit both androgen synthesis and receptor binding (TOK-001/galeterone). Promising immunotherapeutic agents include poxvirus vaccines and CTLA-4 inhibitor (ipilimumab). Biologic agents targeting the molecular drivers of disease are also being investigated as single agents, including cabozantinib (Met and VEGFR2 inhibitor) and tasquinimod (angiogenesis and immune modulatory agent). Despite the disappointing results seen from studies evaluating docetaxel in combination with other agents, including GVAX, anti-angiogentic agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept, lenalinomide), a SRC kinase inhibitor (dasatinib), endothelin receptor antagonists (atrasentan, zibotentan), and high-dose calcitriol (DN-101), the results from the trial evaluating docetaxel in combination with the clusterin antagonist, custirsen, are eagerly awaited. New therapeutic hurdles consist of discovering new targets, understanding resistance mechanisms, the optimal sequencing and combinations of available agents, as well as biomarkers predictive for benefit. Novel agents targeting bone metastases are being developed following the success of zoledronic acid

  18. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  19. The Agent of Change: The Agent of Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, C. R., Jr.

    This speech examines the role of change agents in third world societies and indicates that the change agent must, to some extent, manipulate the social situation, even if his view of society is a more optimistic one than he finds in reality. If he considers strains and stresses to be the lubricants of change, then his focus on conflict as a…

  20. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  1. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  2. TACtic- A Multi Behavioral Agent for Trading Agent Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Hassan; Shiri, Mohammad E.; Khosravi, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Ehsan; Davoodi, Alireza

    Software agents are increasingly being used to represent humans in online auctions. Such agents have the advantages of being able to systematically monitor a wide variety of auctions and then make rapid decisions about what bids to place in what auctions. They can do this continuously and repetitively without losing concentration. To provide a means of evaluating and comparing (benchmarking) research methods in this area the trading agent competition (TAC) was established. This paper describes the design, of TACtic. Our agent uses multi behavioral techniques at the heart of its decision making to make bidding decisions in the face of uncertainty, to make predictions about the likely outcomes of auctions, and to alter the agent's bidding strategy in response to the prevailing market conditions.

  3. Improving Access To Novel Agents For Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Gaynon, Paul S.; Sposto, Richard; Wayne, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite great progress in the development of curative therapy, leukemia remains a leading cause of death from disease in childhood and survivors are at life-long risk of complications of treatment. New agents are needed to further increase cure rates and decrease treatment-associated toxicities. The complex biology and aggressive nature of childhood leukemia, coupled with the relatively small patient population available for study, pose specific challenges to the development of new therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies and initiatives designed to improve access to new agents in the treatment of pediatric leukemia. PMID:25678105

  4. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  5. Agent-Based Literacy Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this theoretical essay is to explore the limits of traditional conceptualizations of reader and text and to propose a more general theory based on the concept of a literacy agent. The proposed theoretical perspective subsumes concepts from traditional theory and aims to account for literacy online. The agent-based literacy theory…

  6. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  7. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  8. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.

  9. Biorhythm in Couple Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.

    1977-01-01

    Twelve couples in marital counseling were studied during 12 months on the basis of their biorhythms. For each couple a compatibility percentage was obtained. It was found that difficulties in their interaction correlated highly with dissonance in their biorhythms. (Author)

  10. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26931587

  11. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  12. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  13. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric; Beddar, A Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-01

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity. PMID:17022248

  14. Knowledge focus via software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Donald E.

    2001-09-01

    The essence of military Command and Control (C2) is making knowledge intensive decisions in a limited amount of time using uncertain, incorrect, or outdated information. It is essential to provide tools to decision-makers that provide: * Management of friendly forces by treating the "friendly resources as a system". * Rapid assessment of effects of military actions againt the "enemy as a system". * Assessment of how an enemy should, can, and could react to friendly military activities. Software agents in the form of mission agents, target agents, maintenance agents, and logistics agents can meet this information challenge. The role of each agent is to know all the details about its assigned mission, target, maintenance, or logistics entity. The Mission Agent would fight for mission resources based on the mission priority and analyze the effect that a proposed mission's results would have on the enemy. The Target Agent (TA) communicates with other targets to determine its role in the system of targets. A system of TAs would be able to inform a planner or analyst of the status of a system of targets, the effect of that status, adn the effect of attacks on that system. The system of TAs would also be able to analyze possible enemy reactions to attack by determining ways to minimize the effect of attack, such as rerouting traffic or using deception. The Maintenance Agent would scheudle maintenance events and notify the maintenance unit. The Logistics Agent would manage shipment and delivery of supplies to maintain appropriate levels of weapons, fuel and spare parts. The central idea underlying this case of software agents is knowledge focus. Software agents are createad automatically to focus their attention on individual real-world entities (e.g., missions, targets) and view the world from that entities perspective. The agent autonomously monitors the entity, identifies problems/opportunities, formulates solutions, and informs the decision-maker. The agent must be

  15. Agent Model Development for Assessing Climate-Induced Geopolitical Instability.

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.

    2005-12-01

    We present the initial stages of development of new agent-based computational methods to generate and test hypotheses about linkages between environmental change and international instability. This report summarizes the first year's effort of an originally proposed three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The preliminary work focused on a set of simple agent-based models and benefited from lessons learned in previous related projects and case studies of human response to climate change and environmental scarcity. Our approach was to define a qualitative model using extremely simple cellular agent models akin to Lovelock's Daisyworld and Schelling's segregation model. Such models do not require significant computing resources, and users can modify behavior rules to gain insights. One of the difficulties in agent-based modeling is finding the right balance between model simplicity and real-world representation. Our approach was to keep agent behaviors as simple as possible during the development stage (described herein) and to ground them with a realistic geospatial Earth system model in subsequent years. This work is directed toward incorporating projected climate data--including various C02 scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report--and ultimately toward coupling a useful agent-based model to a general circulation model.3

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of ferrofluid bound anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Hulin, P.; Klein, R.; Schmidt, A.; Bergemannand, Ch.; Parak, F. G.

    2001-09-01

    Ferrofluids coated with starch polymers can be used as biocompatible carriers in a new field of locoregional tumor therapy called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment using an external magnetic field. In the present study, we confirm the concentration of ferrofluids in VX2 squamous cell carcinoma tissue of the rabbit using histological investigations and MR imaging. The therapeutic efficacy of "magnetic drug targeting" was studied using the rabbit VX2 squamous cell carcinoma model. Mitoxantrone coupled ferrofluids were injected intraarterially into the artery supplying the tumor (femoral artery). The magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) was focused to the tumor placed at the medial portion of the hind limb of New Zealand White rabbits. Complete tumor remissions could be seen without any negative side effects by using only 20% of the normal systemic dosage of the chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone. Figs 3, Refs 14.

  17. Agent Communications using Distributed Metaobjects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.; Spires, Shannon V.

    1999-06-10

    There are currently two proposed standards for agent communication languages, namely, KQML (Finin, Lobrou, and Mayfield 1994) and the FIPA ACL. Neither standard has yet achieved primacy, and neither has been evaluated extensively in an open environment such as the Internet. It seems prudent therefore to design a general-purpose agent communications facility for new agent architectures that is flexible yet provides an architecture that accepts many different specializations. In this paper we exhibit the salient features of an agent communications architecture based on distributed metaobjects. This architecture captures design commitments at a metaobject level, leaving the base-level design and implementation up to the agent developer. The scope of the metamodel is broad enough to accommodate many different communication protocols, interaction protocols, and knowledge sharing regimes through extensions to the metaobject framework. We conclude that with a powerful distributed object substrate that supports metaobject communications, a general framework can be developed that will effectively enable different approaches to agent communications in the same agent system. We have implemented a KQML-based communications protocol and have several special-purpose interaction protocols under development.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  20. Combining Human and Machine Intelligence to Derive Agents' Behavioral Rules for Groundwater Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Quinn, C.; Cai, X.

    2015-12-01

    One major challenge of agent-based modeling is to derive agents' behavioral rules due to behavioral uncertainty and data scarcity. This study proposes a new approach to combine a data-driven modeling based on the directed information (i.e., machine intelligence) with expert domain knowledge (i.e., human intelligence) to derive the behavioral rules of agents considering behavioral uncertainty. A directed information graph algorithm is applied to identifying the causal relationships between agents' decisions (i.e., groundwater irrigation depth) and time-series of environmental, socio-economical and institutional factors. A case study is conducted for the High Plains aquifer hydrological observatory (HO) area, U.S. Preliminary results show that four factors, corn price (CP), underlying groundwater level (GWL), monthly mean temperature (T) and precipitation (P) have causal influences on agents' decisions on groundwater irrigation depth (GWID) to various extents. Based on the similarity of the directed information graph for each agent, five clusters of graphs are further identified to represent all the agents' behaviors in the study area as shown in Figure 1. Using these five representative graphs, agents' monthly optimal groundwater pumping rates are derived through the probabilistic inference. Such data-driven relationships and probabilistic quantifications are then coupled with a physically-based groundwater model to investigate the interactions between agents' pumping behaviors and the underlying groundwater system in the context of coupled human and natural systems.

  1. Agents, Bayes, and Climatic Risks - a modular modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, A.; Jaeger, C.

    2005-08-01

    When insurance firms, energy companies, governments, NGOs, and other agents strive to manage climatic risks, it is by no way clear what the aggregate outcome should and will be. As a framework for investigating this subject, we present the LAGOM model family. It is based on modules depicting learning social agents. For managing climate risks, our agents use second order probabilities and update them by means of a Bayesian mechanism while differing in priors and risk aversion. The interactions between these modules and the aggregate outcomes of their actions are implemented using further modules. The software system is implemented as a series of parallel processes using the CIAMn approach. It is possible to couple modules irrespective of the language they are written in, the operating system under which they are run, and the physical location of the machine.

  2. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories. PMID:27547627

  3. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kuźnik, Nikodem; Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories. PMID:27547627

  4. Introducing Infectious Agents and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Lewis, George K; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Infectious Agents and Cancer is a new open access, peer-reviewed, online journal, which encompasses all aspects of basic, clinical and translational research that provide an insight into the association between chronic infections and cancer. PMID:23509916

  5. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  6. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  7. Tissue Penetration of Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Timothy; Troke, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the tissue penetration of systemically administered antifungal agents is critical for a proper appreciation of their antifungal efficacy in animals and humans. Both the time course of an antifungal drug and its absolute concentrations within tissues may differ significantly from those observed in the bloodstream. In addition, tissue concentrations must also be interpreted within the context of the pathogenesis of the various invasive fungal infections, which differ significantly. There are major technical obstacles to the estimation of concentrations of antifungal agents in various tissue subcompartments, yet these agents, even those within the same class, may exhibit markedly different tissue distributions. This review explores these issues and provides a summary of tissue concentrations of 11 currently licensed systemic antifungal agents. It also explores the therapeutic implications of their distribution at various sites of infection. PMID:24396137

  8. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  9. Agent-based forward analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A.; Jiao, Yu; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Potok, Thomas E.; Lusk, Rick M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose software agent-based "forward analysis" for efficient information retrieval in a network of sensing devices. In our approach, processing is pushed to the data at the edge of the network via intelligent software agents rather than pulling data to a central facility for processing. The agents are deployed with a specific query and perform varying levels of analysis of the data, communicating with each other and sending only relevant information back across the network. We demonstrate our concept in the context of face recognition using a wireless test bed comprised of PDA cell phones and laptops. We show that agent-based forward analysis can provide a significant increase in retrieval speed while decreasing bandwidth usage and information overload at the central facility. n

  10. Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Kelly, Andrew O.; Boeloeni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed a software agent to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during Shuttle launch countdown. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream, automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met, identifies limit warnings and violations of launch commit criteria, aids Shuttle engineers through troubleshooting procedures, and provides additional insight to verify appropriate troubleshooting of problems by contractors. The agent has successfully detected launch commit criteria warnings and violations on a simulated playback data stream. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation.

  11. What makes virtual agents believable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovych, Anton; Trescak, Tomas; Simoff, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the concept of believability and make an attempt to isolate individual characteristics (features) that contribute to making virtual characters believable. As the result of this investigation we have produced a formalisation of believability and based on this formalisation built a computational framework focused on simulation of believable virtual agents that possess the identified features. In order to test whether the identified features are, in fact, responsible for agents being perceived as more believable, we have conducted a user study. In this study we tested user reactions towards the virtual characters that were created for a simulation of aboriginal inhabitants of a particular area of Sydney, Australia in 1770 A.D. The participants of our user study were exposed to short simulated scenes, in which virtual agents performed some behaviour in two different ways (while possessing a certain aspect of believability vs. not possessing it). The results of the study indicate that virtual agents that appear resource bounded, are aware of their environment, own interaction capabilities and their state in the world, agents that can adapt to changes in the environment and exist in correct social context are those that are being perceived as more believable. Further in the paper we discuss these and other believability features and provide a quantitative analysis of the level of contribution for each such feature to the overall perceived believability of a virtual agent.

  12. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  13. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - General Agents' authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPONSIBILITY OF GENERAL AGENTS TO UNDERTAKE EMERGENCY REPAIRS IN FOREIGN PORTS Sec. 2 General Agents' authority. The General Agents are hereby delegated authority to undertake for the account of the...

  15. A amphoteric copolymer profile modification agent

    SciTech Connect

    Wang HongGuan; Yu LianCheng; Tian HongKun

    1995-11-01

    This report provides a new gel profile modification agent prepared by an amphoteric copolymer (FT-213) and a novel crosslinking agent (BY), and introduces the preparations of the amphoteric polymer, the crosslinking agent and the profile modification agent, the action mechanism, the test conditions and the evaluations of the performance of the agent. The 45 well treatments in oilfields demonstrate that the agent can be prepared conveniently, the agent has better compatibility and application performances, and the treatment life is longer with the use of the agent. 80,000 tons incremental oil and 60,000 m{sup 3} decreasing water production have been achieved.

  16. Corrosion protection of aluminum by silane-based surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun

    The possibility of using silane coupling agents as replacements for chromate treatments was investigated for aluminum substrates. In order to understand the influence of deposition parameters on silane film formation, pure Al substrates were used to study the interaction between silane coupling agents and aluminum surfaces. The silane films formed on pure A1 substrates from aqueous solutions were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Time-of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The deposition parameters studied include solution concentration, solution dipping time and pH value of the applied solution. It appears that silane film formation involved a true equilibrium of hydrolysis and condensation in aqueous solution. It has been found that the silane film thickness obtained depends primarily on the solution concentration and is independent of the solution dipping time. The molecular orientation of the applied silane film is determined by the pH value of the applied silane solution and the isoelectic point of the metal substrates. The deposition window in terms of pH value for A1 substrates is between 4 and 7. The total surface energy of silane-coated A1 substrate decreases with film aging time, the decreased rate, however, is determined by the nature of silane coupling agents. Based on the results obtained above, a pretreatment, which involved two-step bis-(triethoxysilyl) ethane and gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, was developed for Al substrates with commercial polyester and polyurethane paints. The results of salt spray testing, cyclic corrosion testing, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that this treatment provided the same level of corrosion performance as the treatment of phosphating plus a final chromate rinse. The likely reasons for excellent performance are discussed in terms of the physical and chemical characteristics of the

  17. A multi-agent architecture for geosimulation of moving agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidnia, Mohammad H.; Alesheikh, Ali A.; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a novel architecture is proposed in which an axiomatic derivation system in the form of first-order logic facilitates declarative explanation and spatial reasoning. Simulation of environmental perception and interaction between autonomous agents is designed with a geographic belief-desire-intention and a request-inform-query model. The architecture has a complementary quantitative component that supports collaborative planning based on the concept of equilibrium and game theory. This new architecture presents a departure from current best practices geographic agent-based modelling. Implementation tasks are discussed in some detail, as well as scenarios for fleet management and disaster management.

  18. Next Generation Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Muscettola, Nicola; Morris, Paul H.; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    In May 1999, as part of a unique technology validation experiment onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft, the Remote Agent became the first complete autonomous spacecraft control architecture to run as flight software onboard an active spacecraft. As one of the three components of the architecture, the Remote Agent Planner had the task of laying out the course of action to be taken, which included activities such as turning, thrusting, data gathering, and communicating. Building on the successful approach developed for the Remote Agent Planner, the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner is a completely redesigned and reimplemented version of the planner. The new system provides all the key capabilities of the original planner, while adding functionality, improving performance and providing a modular and extendible implementation. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop a system that provides both a basis for future applications and a framework for further research in the area of autonomous planning for spacecraft. In this article, we present an introductory overview of the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner. We present a new and simplified definition of the planning problem, describe the basics of the planning process, lay out the new system design and examine the functionality of the core reasoning module.

  19. Optical recognition of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Linder, Kim Dalton; Trujillo, Josh J.

    2008-04-01

    Differentiation between particulate biological agents and non-biological agents is typically performed via a time-consuming "wet chemistry" process or through the use of fluorescent and spectroscopic analysis. However, while these methods can provide definitive recognition of biological agents, many of them have to be performed in a laboratory environment, or are difficult to implement in the field. Optical recognition techniques offer an additional recognition approach that can provide rapid analysis of a material in-situ to identify those materials that may be biological in nature. One possible application is to use these techniques to "screen" suspicious materials and to identify those that are potentially biological in nature. Suspicious materials identified by this screening process can then be analyzed in greater detail using the other, more definitive (but time consuming) analysis techniques. This presentation will describe the results of a feasibility study to determine whether optical pattern recognition techniques can be used to differentiate biological related materials from non-biological materials. As part of this study, feature extraction algorithms were developed utilizing multiple contrast and texture based features to characterize the macroscopic properties of different materials. In addition, several pattern recognition approaches using these features were tested including cluster analysis and neural networks. Test materials included biological agent simulants, biological agent related materials, and non-biological materials (suspicious white powders). Results of a series of feasibility tests will be presented along with a discussion of the potential field applications for these techniques.

  20. Inhalational exposure to nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Niven, Alexander S; Roop, Stuart A

    2004-03-01

    The respiratory system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of nerve agent toxicity. It is the major route of entry and absorption of nerve agent vapor, and respiratory failure is the most common cause of death follow-ing exposure. Respiratory symptoms are mediated by chemical irritation,muscarinic and nicotinic receptor overstimulation, and central nervous system effects. Recent attacks have demonstrated that most patients with an isolated vapor exposure developed respiratory symptoms almost immediately. Most patients had only mild and transient respiratory effects, and those that did develop significant respiratory compromise did so rapidly. These observations have significant ramifications on triage of patients in a mass-casualty situation, because patients with mild-to-moderate exposure to nerve agent vapor alone do not require decontamination and are less likely to develop progressive symptoms following initial antidote therapy. Limited data do not demonstrate significant long-term respiratory effects following nerve agent exposure and treatment. Provisions for effective respiratory protection against nerve agents is a vital consideration in any emergency preparedness or health care response plan against a chemical attack. PMID:15062227

  1. Investigational antimicrobial agents of 2013.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Michael J; Bush, Karen

    2013-10-01

    New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  2. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  3. Bibliographic Coupling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    1974-01-01

    The theory and practical applications of bibliographic coupling are reviewed. The reviewer takes issue with the use of bibliographic coupling for information retrieval and automatic classification on logical grounds, and for reasons relating to uncontrolled citation practices. The usefulness of the procedure for the study of the science of science…

  4. Gear Spline Coupling Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-29

    An analytical model is developed to evaluate the design of a spline coupling. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, the model calculates the number of teeth in contact, tooth loads, stiffnesses, stresses, and safety factors. The analytic model provides essential spline coupling design and modeling information and could be easily integrated into gearbox design and simulation tools.

  5. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2015-05-19

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  6. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  7. Environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; Kramberger, Iris; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques can provide a vast amount of anatomical information, enabling diagnosis and the monitoring of disease and treatment profile. MRI uniquely offers convenient, non-invasive, high resolution tomographic imaging. A considerable amount of effort has been invested, across several decades, in the design of non toxic paramagnetic contrast agents capable of enhancing positive MRI signal contrast. Recently, focus has shifted towards the development of agents capable of specifically reporting on their local biochemical environment, where a switch in image contrast is triggered by a specific stimulus/biochemical variable. Such an ability would not only strengthen diagnosis but also provide unique disease-specific biochemical insight. This feature article focuses on recent progress in the development of MRI contrast switching with molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticle-based agents. PMID:24040650

  8. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  9. Chemical warfare. Nerve agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Holstege, C P; Kirk, M; Sidell, F R

    1997-10-01

    The threat of civilian and military casualties from nerve agent exposure has become a greater concern over the past decade. After rapidly assessing that a nerve agent attack has occurred, emphasis must be placed on decontamination and protection of both rescuers and medical personnel from exposure. The medical system can become rapidly overwhelmed and strong emotional reactions can confuse the clinical picture. Initially, care should first be focused on supportive care, with emphasis toward aggressive airway maintenance and decontamination. Atropine should be titrated, with the goal of therapy being drying of secretions and the resolution of bronchoconstriction and bradycardia. Early administration of pralidoxime chloride maximizes antidotal efficacy. Benzodiazepines, in addition to atropine, should be administered if seizures develop. Early, aggressive medical therapy is the key to prevention of the morbidity and mortality associated with nerve agent poisoning. PMID:9330846

  10. Agent review phase one report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zubelewicz, Alex Tadeusz; Davis, Christopher Edward; Bauer, Travis LaDell

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes the findings for phase one of the agent review and discusses the review methods and results. The phase one review identified a short list of agent systems that would prove most useful in the service architecture of an information management, analysis, and retrieval system. Reviewers evaluated open-source and commercial multi-agent systems and scored them based upon viability, uniqueness, ease of development, ease of deployment, and ease of integration with other products. Based on these criteria, reviewers identified the ten most appropriate systems. The report also mentions several systems that reviewers deemed noteworthy for the ideas they implement, even if those systems are not the best choices for information management purposes.

  11. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  12. Exponentially modified QCD coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2008-04-01

    We present a specific class of models for an infrared-finite analytic QCD coupling, such that at large spacelike energy scales the coupling differs from the perturbative one by less than any inverse power of the energy scale. This condition is motivated by the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics operator product expansion philosophy. Allowed by the ambiguity in the analytization of the perturbative coupling, the proposed class of couplings has three parameters. In the intermediate energy region, the proposed coupling has low loop-level and renormalization scheme dependence. The present modification of perturbative QCD must be considered as a phenomenological attempt, with the aim of enlarging the applicability range of the theory of the strong interactions at low energies.

  13. Ground energy coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  14. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  15. Erythropoietic agents and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Prchal, Josef T

    2008-10-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a peptide hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis. There are several agents in clinical use and in development that either act as ligands for the cell surface receptors of Epo or promote Epo production, which stimulates erythropoiesis. These are known as erythropoietic agents. The agents already in use include epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alfa. Newer agents under active investigation include continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) or proline hydroxylase inhibitors that increase hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), thereby stimulating Epo production and iron availability and supply. Erythropoietic agents have been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and to decrease post-stroke infarct size in mouse models. They have also been reported to shorten survival when used to treat anemia in many cancer patients and to increase thromboembolism. In contrast, rapid decrease of Epo levels as observed in astronauts and high-altitude dwellers upon rapid descent to sea level leads to the decrease of erythroid mass, a phenomenon known as "neocytolysis." The relative decrease in the serum Epo level is known to occur in some subjects with otherwise unexplained anemia of aging. Anemia by itself is a predictor of poor physical function in the elderly and is a significant economic burden on society. One out of every five persons in the United States will be elderly by 2050. Erythropoietic agents, by preventing and treating otherwise unexplained anemias of the elderly and anemia associated with other disease conditions of the elderly, have the potential to improve the functional capacity and to decrease the morbidity and mortality in the elderly, thereby alleviating the overall burden of medical care in society. PMID:18809098

  16. Erythropoietic Agents and the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Prchal, Josef T.

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin is a peptide hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis. There are several agents in clinical use and in development, which either act as ligands for the cell surface receptors of erythropoietin or promote erythropoietin production that stimulates erythropoiesis. These are known as erythropoietic agents. The agents already in use include epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alfa. Newer agents stimulating erythropoiesis (such as continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) or proline hydroxylase inhibitors that increase HIF-1 thereby stimulating erythropoietin production and iron availability and supply) are under active investigation. Erythropoietic agents have been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and to decrease post-stroke infarct size in mouse models. They have also been reported to shorten survival when used to treat anemia in many cancer patients and to increase thromboembolism. In contrast, rapid decrease of erythropoietin levels as observed in astronauts and high-altitude dwellers upon rapid descent to sea level leads to the decrease of erythroid mass, a phenomenon known as neocytolysis. The relative decrease in the serum erythropoietin level is known to occur in some subjects with otherwise unexplained anemia of aging. Anemia by itself is a predictor of poor physical function in the elderly and is a significant economic burden on society. One out of every five persons in the United States will be elderly by 2050. Erythropoietic agents, by preventing and treating otherwise unexplained anemias of the elderly and anemia associated with other disease conditions of the elderly, have the potential to improve the functional capacity and to decrease the morbidity and mortality in the elderly, thereby alleviating the overall burden of medical care in society. PMID:18809098

  17. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  18. An overview of inotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Vroom, Margreeth B

    2006-09-01

    The use of inotropic agents has been surrounded by many controversies. Recent guidelines for the treatment of patients with chronic and acute heart failure have elucidated some of the issues, but many remain. As a result, a substantial variability in the use of agents between institutions and caregivers remains, which mainly results from the lack of uniform data in the literature. Prospective randomized trials with a long-term follow-up and sufficient power are clearly needed, and a number of trials are currently in progress. PMID:16959760

  19. The birth of nerve agent warfare: lessons from Syed Abbas Foroutan.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan

    2004-05-11

    The author reviewed Farsi-language articles published recently by Dr. Syed Abbas Foroutan, which constitute the only firsthand clinical descriptions of battlefield nerve agent casualties in the world literature, and the author compares his comments with US and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) chemical casualty care doctrine. Foroutan's lessons learned reassure us that a robust medical evacuation system, coupled with timely and appropriate medical care of nerve agent poisoning, will save many more lives on future battlefields. PMID:15136687

  20. 7 CFR 58.629 - Flavoring agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Material § 58.629 Flavoring agents. Flavoring agents either natural or artificial shall be wholesome and... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flavoring agents. 58.629 Section 58.629 Agriculture.... Flavoring agents shall be one or more of those approved in § 58.605....

  1. 7 CFR 58.629 - Flavoring agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Material § 58.629 Flavoring agents. Flavoring agents either natural or artificial shall be wholesome and... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flavoring agents. 58.629 Section 58.629 Agriculture.... Flavoring agents shall be one or more of those approved in § 58.605....

  2. 7 CFR 58.629 - Flavoring agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Material § 58.629 Flavoring agents. Flavoring agents either natural or artificial shall be wholesome and... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flavoring agents. 58.629 Section 58.629 Agriculture.... Flavoring agents shall be one or more of those approved in § 58.605....

  3. Depression: The Differing Narratives of Couples in Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautiainen, Eija-Liisa; Aaltonen, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    How does the spouse of a person with depression take part in constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy? In this study we examined couples' ways of co-constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy. Three couple therapy processes were chosen for the study, one spouse in each couple having been referred to an outpatient clinic…

  4. Cluster consensus of high-order multi-agent systems with switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bo; Sun, Fuchun; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yao; Xi, Jianxiang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the cluster consensus problems of generic linear multi-agent systems with switching topologies. Sufficient criteria for cluster consensus, which generalise the results in existing literatures, are derived for both state feedback and observer-based control schemes. By using an averaging method, it is shown that cluster consensus can be achieved when the union of the acyclic topologies contains a directed spanning tree within each cluster frequently enough. We also provide a principle to construct digraphs with inter-cluster cyclic couplings that promote cluster consensus regardless of the magnitude of inter-agent coupling weights. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  5. Spatial process and data models : toward integration of agent-based models and GIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. G.; North, M. J.; Robinson, D. T.; Riolo, R.; Rand, W.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Michigan

    2007-10-01

    The use of object-orientation for both spatial data and spatial process models facilitates their integration, which can allow exploration and explanation of spatial-temporal phenomena. In order to better understand how tight coupling might proceed and to evaluate the possible functional and efficiency gains from such a tight coupling, we identify four key relationships affecting how geographic data (fields and objects) and agent-based process models can interact: identity, causal, temporal and topological. We discuss approaches to implementing tight integration, focusing on a middleware approach that links existing GIS and ABM development platforms, and illustrate the need and approaches with example agent-based models.

  6. Why Do Extension Agents Resign?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manton, Linda Nunes; van Es, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Past and current Illinois extension agents were surveyed via mail questionnaires as to reasons for staying or leaving extension programs. Reasons for leaving included family changes, family moves, opportunity to advance, better salary/benefits, dissatisfaction with administration, and too much time away from family. (CT)

  7. Foodborne illness and microbial agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illnesses result from the consumption of food containing microbial agents such as bacteria, viruses, parasites or food contaminated by poisonous chemicals or bio-toxins. Pathogen proliferation is due to nutrient composition of foods, which are capable of supporting the growth of microorgan...

  8. Superintendents: The Key Influence Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Randy

    1990-01-01

    By the nature of their positions in schools, administrators are either influence agents or targets. Based on personal interviews with 140 Oregon administrators and a survey of 319 administrators around the state, this article highlights administrators' comments about their administrative influence and about constraints on their influence.…

  9. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  10. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  11. SEM: A Cultural Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bradley; Bourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The authors advance the concept that institutional culture is a purposeful framework by which to view SEM's utility, particularly as a cultural change agent. Through the connection of seemingly independent functions of performance and behavior, implications emerge that deepen the understanding of the influence of culture on performance outcomes…

  12. Direct Vasodilators and Sympatholytic Agents.

    PubMed

    McComb, Meghan N; Chao, James Y; Ng, Tien M H

    2016-01-01

    Direct vasodilators and sympatholytic agents were some of the first antihypertensive medications discovered and utilized in the past century. However, side effect profiles and the advent of newer antihypertensive drug classes have reduced the use of these agents in recent decades. Outcome data and large randomized trials supporting the efficacy of these medications are limited; however, in general the blood pressure-lowering effect of these agents has repeatedly been shown to be comparable to other more contemporary drug classes. Nevertheless, a landmark hypertension trial found a negative outcome with a doxazosin-based regimen compared to a chlorthalidone-based regimen, leading to the removal of α-1 adrenergic receptor blockers as first-line monotherapy from the hypertension guidelines. In contemporary practice, direct vasodilators and sympatholytic agents, particularly hydralazine and clonidine, are often utilized in refractory hypertension. Hydralazine and minoxidil may also be useful alternatives for patients with renal dysfunction, and both hydralazine and methyldopa are considered first line for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy. Hydralazine has also found widespread use for the treatment of systolic heart failure in combination with isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN). The data to support use of this combination in African Americans with heart failure are particularly robust. Hydralazine with ISDN may also serve as an alternative for patients with an intolerance to angiotensin antagonists. Given these niche indications, vasodilators and sympatholytics are still useful in clinical practice; therefore, it is prudent to understand the existing data regarding efficacy and the safe use of these medications. PMID:26033778

  13. Improving agents using reliable communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinbin

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in introspective modalities and linear time symmetries do not necessarily obviate the need for web browsers [1]. In our research, we disprove the exploration of agents, which embodies the appropriate principles of electrical engineering. Here we demonstrate that even though semaphores and XML [1] are mostly incompatible, randomized algorithms and write-back caches are mostly incompatible.

  14. Echographic studies of osmotic agents.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Z M; Tark, E; Ahmad, S

    1979-09-01

    The effectiveness of osmotic agents, acetazolamide (Diamox), urea, glycerol, and mannitol, and massages (5 and 10 minutes) for inducing hypotony in rabbit eyes was evaluated by ultrasonography. Mannitol was found to have the greatest hypotonic effect followed closely by urea and glycerol, then acetazolamide. The difference between the 5 and 10 minute massages was negligible. PMID:122221

  15. An Autonomous Spacecraft Agent Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney; Bernard, Douglas E.; Chien, Steve A.; Gat, Erann; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, P. Pandurang; Wagner, Michael D.; Williams, Brian C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the New Millennium Remote Agent (NMRA) architecture for autonomous spacecraft control systems. This architecture integrates traditional real-time monitoring and control with constraint-based planning and scheduling, robust multi-threaded execution, and model-based diagnosis and reconfiguration.

  16. A Practical and Catalytic Reductive Olefin Coupling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A redox-economic method for the direct coupling of olefins that uses an inexpensive iron catalyst and a silane reducing agent is reported. Thus, unactivated olefins can be joined directly to electron-deficient olefins in both intra- and intermolecular settings to generate hindered bicyclic systems, vicinal quaternary centers, and even cyclopropanes in good yield. The reaction is not sensitive to oxygen or moisture and has been performed on gram-scale. Most importantly, it allows access to many compounds that would be difficult or perhaps impossible to access using other methods. PMID:24428607

  17. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  18. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1996-05-07

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  19. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  20. Halide test agent replacement study

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Freeman, W.P.; Kovach, B.J.

    1995-02-01

    The intended phaseout of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from commercial use required the evaluation of substitute materials for the testing for leak paths through both individual adsorbers and installed adsorbent banks. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) is in charge of maintaining the standards and codes specifying adsorbent leak test methods for the nuclear safety related air cleaning systems. The currently published standards and codes cite the use of R-11, R-12 and R-112 for leak path test agents. All of these compounds are CFCs. There are other agencies and organizations (USDOE, USDOD and USNRC) also specifying testing for leak paths or in some cases for special life tests using the above compounds. The CONAGT has recently developed criteria for the suitability evaluation of substitute test agents. On the basis of these criteria, several compounds were evaluated for their acceptability as adsorbent bed leak and life test agents. The ASME CONAGT Test Agent Qualification Criteria. The test agent qualification is based on the following parameters: (1) Similar retention times on activated carbons at the same concentration levels as one of the following: R-11, R-12, R-112 or R-112a. (2) Similar lower detection limit sensitivity and precision in the concentration range of use as R-11, R-12, R-112 and R-112a. (3) Gives the same in-place leak test results as R-11, R-12, R-112, or R-112a. (4) Chemical and radiological stability under the use conditions. (5) Causes no degradation of the carbon and its impregnant or of the other NATS components under the use conditions. (6) Is listed in the USEPA Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) inventory for commercial use.

  1. Biologic agents in juvenile spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Katsicas, María Martha; Russo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The juvenile spondyloarthropathies (JSpA) are a group of related rheumatic diseases characterized by involvement of peripheral large joints, axial joints, and entheses (enthesitis) that begin in the early years of life (prior to 16(th) birthday).The nomenclature and concept of spondyloarthropathies has changed during the last few decades. Although there is not any specific classification of JSpA, diseases under the spondyloarthropathy nomenclature umbrella in the younger patients include: the seronegative enthesitis and arthropathy (SEA) syndrome, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis. Moreover, the ILAR criteria for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis includes two categories closely related to spondyloarthritis: Enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.We review the pathophysiology and the use of biological agents in JSpA. JSpA are idiopathic inflammatory diseases driven by an altered balance in the proinflammatory cytokines. There is ample evidence on the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-17 in the physiopathology of these entities. Several non-biologic and biologic agents have been used with conflicting results in the treatment of these complex diseases. The efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, have been analysed in controlled and uncontrolled trials, usually showing satisfactory outcomes. Other biologic agents, such as abatacept, tocilizumab and rituximab, have been insufficiently studied and their role in the therapy of SpA is uncertain. Interleukin-17-blocking agents are promising alternatives for the treatment of JSpA patients in the near future. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with JSpA have recently been proposed and are discussed in the present review. PMID:26968522

  2. Theory of agent-based market models with controlled levels of greed and anxiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, P.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2010-01-01

    We use generating functional analysis to study minority-game-type market models with generalized strategy valuation updates that control the psychology of agents' actions. The agents' choice between trend-following and contrarian trading, and their vigor in each, depends on the overall state of the market. Even in 'fake history' models, the theory now involves an effective overall bid process (coupled to the effective agent process) which can exhibit profound remanence effects and new phase transitions. For some models the bid process can be solved directly, others require Maxwell-construction-type approximations.

  3. Integrated Information Framework for Intelligent Cooperative Design Based on Multi-Agent System and XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cao; Lina, Yang; Yanli, Yang; Hua, Chen

    2008-11-01

    To meet the requirements of distributed cooperation in various industries, the architecture of cooperative design based on multi-agent system on Internet is proposed by analyzing cooperative design pattern, and its key technologies, such as product developing process management, information management, and conflict resolution, are discussed. An integrated information framework of loosely coupling modules is proposed which supports concurrent work mode based on multi-agent system. Integrating Web service technique and agent technique into this framework can organize many cooperative members and their activities effectively though they are distributed at different places. Finally, system development mode based on Web is put forward.

  4. Coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  5. The subfertile couple.

    PubMed

    McCusker, M P

    1982-01-01

    When pregnancy is achieved through fertility awareness, there are further long-range benefits to the couple: information which will permit them the choice to avoid, delay or achieve subsequent pregnancies. Thus, the opportunity for responsible parenthood continues. The goal of nursing in subfertility care is to identify factors which may contribute to lowered fertility, and to teach and/or refer appropriately. The most comprehensive single intervention may be to teach the couple awareness of their own fertility through the Billings Method of natural family planning. If conception does not occur, the couple may progress to infertility investigation, knowing that the expense, inconvenience, and possible trauma are justified. Whether pregnancy occurs or not, it is likely that the couple will have had the benefit of clarifying their relationship, further understanding their bodies, and generally growing toward fuller personhood. PMID:6920464

  6. Laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) for chemical agent reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Richter, Dale A.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Lobb, C. T.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III

    2002-06-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a new technique which exploits Raman scattering to provide standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division is developing the LISA technology under a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command for incorporation on the Army's future reconnaissance vehicles. A field-engineered prototype LISA-Recon system is being designed to demonstrate on-the- move measurements of chemical contaminants. In this article, we will describe the LISA technique, data form proof-of- concept measurements, the LISA-Recon design, and some of the future realizations envisioned for military sensing applications.

  7. Module coupling and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, B.; Held, H.

    2003-04-01

    Successive coupling of several nonlinear submodules seems to be the implicit master strategy of the current world-wide modelling endeavour. The process of coupling is investigated by using different methods of examining low order coupled atmosphere-ocean systems. As a first step, a coupled atmosphere-ocean system, based on the Lorenz84 atmosphere is considered, operated in a forced versus the truly coupled mode. In [1] it is shown that forcing cannot emulate the fully coupled system, yet quite the contrary, generates time series of intermittently high predictability ("locking"). Standard linear stability analysis is incapable to explain the locking phenomenon. While regions of linear asymptotic stability can be evaluated, it turns out that this criterion is too conservative and does not explain the standard locking situation, as the trajectory periodically leaves the region of stability during a locking phase. We therefore propose that the locking phenomenon needs to be analysed in the framework of non-linear dynamics. Preliminary analysis of the statistic of locking-periods displays a similarity to type III intermittency. Bifurcation diagrams obtained from the continuation software AUTO indicate a rich phase space structure which makes the interpretation of the locking phenomenon intricate. Systematic variation of coupling constants appears to be a promising task as the key effects could be followed into parameter regimes of more transparent phase space structure. begin{thebibliography}{0} bibitem{Wittenberg98}A. T. Wittenberg, J. L. Anderson. Dynamical implications of prescribing part of a coupled system: Results from a low order model. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 5: 167-179, 1998.

  8. Coupled transverse motion

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  10. The New Agent: A Qualitative Study to Strategically Adapt New Agent Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Lauri M.; Hadley, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative study reported here assessed the needs of agents related to new agent professional development to improve the current model. Agents who participated in new agent professional development within the last 5 years were selected to participate in focus groups to determine concerns and continued needs. Agents enjoyed networking and…

  11. Neuroprotective "agents" in surgery. Secret "agent" man, or common "agent" machine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The search for clinically-effective neuroprotective agents has received enormous support in recent years--an estimated $200 million by pharmaceutical companies on clinical trials for traumatic brain injury alone. At the same time, the pathophysiology of brain injury has proved increasingly complex, rendering the likelihood of a single agent "magic bullet" even more remote. On the other hand, great progress continues with technology that makes surgery less invasive and less risky. One example is the application of endovascular techniques to treat coronary artery stenosis, where both the invasiveness of sternotomy and the significant neurological complication rate (due to microemboli showering the cerebral vasculature) can be eliminated. In this paper we review aspects of intraoperative neuroprotection both present and future. Explanations for the slow progress on pharmacologic neuroprotection during surgery are presented. Examples of technical advances that have had great impact on neuroprotection during surgery are given both from coronary artery stenosis surgery and from surgery for Parkinson's disease. To date, the progress in neuroprotection resulting from such technical advances is an order of magnitude greater than that resulting from pharmacologic agents used during surgery. The progress over the last 20 years in guidance during surgery (CT and MRI image-guidance) and in surgical access (endoscopic and endovascular techniques) will soon be complemented by advances in our ability to evaluate biological tissue intraoperatively in real-time. As an example of such technology, the NASA Smart Probe project is considered. In the long run (i.e., in 10 years or more), pharmacologic "agents" aimed at the complex pathophysiology of nervous system injury in man will be the key to true intraoperative neuroprotection. In the near term, however, it is more likely that mundane "agents" based on computers, microsensors, and microeffectors will be the major impetus to improved

  12. Software for Automation of Real-Time Agents, Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Estlin, Tara; Gaines, Daniel; Schaffer, Steve; Chouinard, Caroline; Engelhardt, Barbara; Wilklow, Colette; Mutz, Darren; Knight, Russell; Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; Simmons, Reid; Apfelbaum, David

    2005-01-01

    Version 2 of Closed Loop Execution and Recovery (CLEaR) has been developed. CLEaR is an artificial intelligence computer program for use in planning and execution of actions of autonomous agents, including, for example, Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna ground stations, robotic exploratory ground vehicles (rovers), robotic aircraft (UAVs), and robotic spacecraft. CLEaR automates the generation and execution of command sequences, monitoring the sequence execution, and modifying the command sequence in response to execution deviations and failures as well as new goals for the agent to achieve. The development of CLEaR has focused on the unification of planning and execution to increase the ability of the autonomous agent to perform under tight resource and time constraints coupled with uncertainty in how much of resources and time will be required to perform a task. This unification is realized by extending the traditional three-tier robotic control architecture by increasing the interaction between the software components that perform deliberation and reactive functions. The increase in interaction reduces the need to replan, enables earlier detection of the need to replan, and enables replanning to occur before an agent enters a state of failure.

  13. CATS-based Agents That Err

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes preliminary research on intelligent agents that make errors. Such agents are crucial to the development of novel agent-based techniques for assessing system safety. The agents extend an agent architecture derived from the Crew Activity Tracking System that has been used as the basis for air traffic controller agents. The report first reviews several error taxonomies. Next, it presents an overview of the air traffic controller agents, then details several mechanisms for causing the agents to err in realistic ways. The report presents a performance assessment of the error-generating agents, and identifies directions for further research. The research was supported by the System-Wide Accident Prevention element of the FAA/NASA Aviation Safety Program.

  14. Software agents in molecular computational biology.

    PubMed

    Keele, John W; Wray, James E

    2005-12-01

    Progress made in applying agent systems to molecular computational biology is reviewed and strategies by which to exploit agent technology to greater advantage are investigated. Communities of software agents could play an important role in helping genome scientists design reagents for future research. The advent of genome sequencing in cattle and swine increases the complexity of data analysis required to conduct research in livestock genomics. Databases are always expanding and semantic differences among data are common. Agent platforms have been developed to deal with generic issues such as agent communication, life cycle management and advertisement of services (white and yellow pages). This frees computational biologists from the drudgery of having to re-invent the wheel on these common chores, giving them more time to focus on biology and bioinformatics. Agent platforms that comply with the Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA) standards are able to interoperate. In other words, agents developed on different platforms can communicate and cooperate with one another if domain-specific higher-level communication protocol details are agreed upon between different agent developers. Many software agent platforms are peer-to-peer, which means that even if some of the agents and data repositories are temporarily unavailable, a subset of the goals of the system can still be met. Past use of software agents in bioinformatics indicates that an agent approach should prove fruitful. Examination of current problems in bioinformatics indicates that existing agent platforms should be adaptable to novel situations. PMID:16420735

  15. Coupling Correction Study at NSRRC

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, James

    2003-07-29

    Emittance coupling between vertical and horizontal planes at TLS has been investigated. Using a set of skew quadrupoles, the coupling can be corrected to an acceptable value. The coupling sources are studied and possible errors are reduced.

  16. From actors to agents in socio-ecological systems models.

    PubMed

    Rounsevell, M D A; Robinson, D T; Murray-Rust, D

    2012-01-19

    The ecosystem service concept has emphasized the role of people within socio-ecological systems (SESs). In this paper, we review and discuss alternative ways of representing people, their behaviour and decision-making processes in SES models using an agent-based modelling (ABM) approach. We also explore how ABM can be empirically grounded using information from social survey. The capacity for ABM to be generalized beyond case studies represents a crucial next step in modelling SESs, although this comes with considerable intellectual challenges. We propose the notion of human functional types, as an analogy of plant functional types, to support the expansion (scaling) of ABM to larger areas. The expansion of scope also implies the need to represent institutional agents in SES models in order to account for alternative governance structures and policy feedbacks. Further development in the coupling of human-environment systems would contribute considerably to better application and use of the ecosystem service concept. PMID:22144388

  17. Agent-based models in translational systems biology

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Effective translational methodologies for knowledge representation are needed in order to make strides against the constellation of diseases that affect the world today. These diseases are defined by their mechanistic complexity, redundancy, and nonlinearity. Translational systems biology aims to harness the power of computational simulation to streamline drug/device design, simulate clinical trials, and eventually to predict the effects of drugs on individuals. The ability of agent-based modeling to encompass multiple scales of biological process as well as spatial considerations, coupled with an intuitive modeling paradigm, suggests that this modeling framework is well suited for translational systems biology. This review describes agent-based modeling and gives examples of its translational applications in the context of acute inflammation and wound healing. PMID:20835989

  18. Swarm autonomic agents with self-destruct capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic entity manages a system by generating one or more stay alive signals based on the functioning status and operating state of the system. In some embodiments, an evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy. The evolvable neural interface receives and generates heartbeat monitor signals and pulse monitor signals that are used to generate a stay alive signal that is used to manage the operations of the synthetic neural system. In another embodiment an asynchronous Alice signal (Autonomic license) requiring valid credentials of an anonymous autonomous agent is initiated. An unsatisfactory Alice exchange may lead to self-destruction of the anonymous autonomous agent for self-protection.

  19. Swarm autonomic agents with self-destruct capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Sterritt, Roy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments an autonomic entity manages a system by generating one or more stay alive signals based on the functioning status and operating state of the system. In some embodiments, an evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy. The evolvable neural interface receives and generates heartbeat monitor signals and pulse monitor signals that are used to generate a stay alive signal that is used to manage the operations of the synthetic neural system. In another embodiment an asynchronous Alice signal (Autonomic license) requiring valid credentials of an anonymous autonomous agent is initiated. An unsatisfactory Alice exchange may lead to self-destruction of the anonymous autonomous agent for self-protection.

  20. From actors to agents in socio-ecological systems models

    PubMed Central

    Rounsevell, M. D. A.; Robinson, D. T.; Murray-Rust, D.

    2012-01-01

    The ecosystem service concept has emphasized the role of people within socio-ecological systems (SESs). In this paper, we review and discuss alternative ways of representing people, their behaviour and decision-making processes in SES models using an agent-based modelling (ABM) approach. We also explore how ABM can be empirically grounded using information from social survey. The capacity for ABM to be generalized beyond case studies represents a crucial next step in modelling SESs, although this comes with considerable intellectual challenges. We propose the notion of human functional types, as an analogy of plant functional types, to support the expansion (scaling) of ABM to larger areas. The expansion of scope also implies the need to represent institutional agents in SES models in order to account for alternative governance structures and policy feedbacks. Further development in the coupling of human-environment systems would contribute considerably to better application and use of the ecosystem service concept. PMID:22144388

  1. [Alternative agents used in ADHD].

    PubMed

    Hässler, Frank; Dück, Alexander; Reis, Olaf; Buchmann, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is, with a prevalence of 2% to 6%, one of the most common neurobehavioral disorder affecting children and adolescents, persisting into adulthood. Comorbidity and psychosocial circumstances enter into the choice of intervention strategies. Several agents have been demonstrated effective in treating individuals with ADHD. Direct or indirect attenuation of dopamine and norepinephrine neurotransmission appears closely related to both the stimulant and nonstimulant medications efficacious in ADHD. However, important differences concerning efficacy and side effects exist both between and with the specific classes of agents like neuroleptics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, alpha-agonists, beta-blockers, buspiron, l-dopa, melatonin, pycnogenol, zinc, magnesium, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and homeopathy. Elucidating the various mechanisms of action of ADHD medications may lead to better choices in matching potential responses to the characteristics of individuals. We review the purported mechanism of action and available evidence for selected complementary and alternative medicine therapies for ADHD in childhood and adolescence. PMID:19105161

  2. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  3. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  4. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  5. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. PMID:26566569

  6. Coevolutionary networks of reinforcement-learning agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianercy, Ardeshir; Galstyan, Aram

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a model of network formation in repeated games where the players adapt their strategies and network ties simultaneously using a simple reinforcement-learning scheme. It is demonstrated that the coevolutionary dynamics of such systems can be described via coupled replicator equations. We provide a comprehensive analysis for three-player two-action games, which is the minimum system size with nontrivial structural dynamics. In particular, we characterize the Nash equilibria (NE) in such games and examine the local stability of the rest points corresponding to those equilibria. We also study general n-player networks via both simulations and analytical methods and find that, in the absence of exploration, the stable equilibria consist of star motifs as the main building blocks of the network. Furthermore, in all stable equilibria the agents play pure strategies, even when the game allows mixed NE. Finally, we study the impact of exploration on learning outcomes and observe that there is a critical exploration rate above which the symmetric and uniformly connected network topology becomes stable.

  7. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  8. New therapeutic agents for acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-02-01

    The currently available somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) and growth hormone (GH) antagonists are used to control levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in patients with acromegaly. However, these therapies are limited by wide variations in efficacy, associated adverse effects and the need for frequent injections. A phase III trial of oral octreotide capsules demonstrated that this treatment can safely sustain suppressed levels of GH and IGF-1 and reduce the severity of symptoms in patients with acromegaly previously controlled by injectable SRL therapy, with the added benefit of no injection-site reactions. Phase I and phase II trials of the pan-selective SRL DG3173, the liquid crystal octreotide depot CAM2029 and an antisense oligonucleotide directed against the GH receptor have shown that these agents can be used to achieve biochemical suppression in acromegaly and have favourable safety profiles. This Review outlines the need for new therapeutic agents for patients with acromegaly, reviews clinical trial data of investigational agents and considers how these therapies might best be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:26610414

  9. Chemotherapy and Dietary Phytochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been used for cancer treatment already for almost 70 years by targeting the proliferation potential and metastasising ability of tumour cells. Despite the progress made in the development of potent chemotherapy drugs, their toxicity to normal tissues and adverse side effects in multiple organ systems as well as drug resistance have remained the major obstacles for the successful clinical use. Cytotoxic agents decrease considerably the quality of life of cancer patients manifesting as acute complaints and impacting the life of survivors also for years after the treatment. Toxicity often limits the usefulness of anticancer agents being also the reason why many patients discontinue the treatment. The nutritional approach may be the means of helping to raise cancer therapy to a new level of success as supplementing or supporting the body with natural phytochemicals cannot only reduce adverse side effects but improve also the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Various plant-derived compounds improve the efficiency of cytotoxic agents, decrease their resistance, lower and alleviate toxic side effects, reduce the risk of tumour lysis syndrome, and detoxify the body of chemotherapeutics. The personalised approach using various phytochemicals provides thus a new dimension to the standard cancer therapy for improving its outcome in a complex and complementary way. PMID:23320169

  10. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  11. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  12. Chelating agents and cadmium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Shinobu, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    A wide range of conventional chelating agents have been screened for (a) antidotal activity in acute cadmium poisoning and (b) ability to reduce aged liver and kidney deposits of cadmium. Chelating agents belonging to the dithiocarbamate class have been synthesized and tested in both the acute and chronic modes of cadmium intoxication. Several dithiocarbamates, not only provide antidotal rescue, but also substantially decrease the intracellular deposits of cadmium associated with chronic cadmium intoxication. Fractionating the cytosol from the livers and kidneys of control and treated animals by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration clearly demonstrates that the dithiocarbamates are reducing the level of metallothionein-bound cadmium. However, the results of cell culture (Ehrlich ascites) studies designed to investigate the removal of cadmium from metallothionein and subsequent transport of the resultant cadmium complex across the cell membrane were inconclusive. In other in vitro investigations, the interaction between isolated native Cd, Zn-metallothionein and several chelating agents was explored. Ultracentrifugation, equilibrium dialysis, and Sephadex G-25 gel filtration studies have been carried out in an attempt to determine the rate of removal of cadmium from metallothionein by these small molecules. Chemical shifts for the relevant cadmium-dithiocarbamate complexes have been determined using natural abundance Cd-NMR.

  13. Coupled adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings.

  14. Novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sachin Gopalkrishna; Fuloria, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades considerable progress has been made in the management of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC) leading to a significant improvement in five-year survival. Although part of this success has been rightly attributed to aggressive surgical management and advances in other adjunct treatments, our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancer and emergence of newer molecular targets for colon cancer has created a powerful impact. In this review article we will discuss various targeted therapies in the management of mCRC. Newer agents on the horizon soon to be incorporated in clinical practice will be briefly reviewed as well. PMID:26798440

  15. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  16. Novel antileukemic agents derived from tamibarotene and nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haiyong; Feng, Jinhong; Li, Minyong; Xu, Wenfang

    2011-12-01

    A series of novel nitric oxide-releasing tamibarotene derivatives were synthesized by coupling nitric oxide (NO) donors with tamibarotene via various spacers, and were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against human leukemic HL-60, NB4 and K562 cell lines in vitro. The test results showed that three compounds (7g, 9a and 9e) exhibited more potent antileukemic activity than the control tamibarotene. Furthermore, the preliminary structure-activity analysis revealed that amino acids serving as spacers could bring about significantly improved biological activities of NO donor hybrids. These interesting results could provide new insights into the development of NO-based antileukemic agents. PMID:22014829

  17. Marriage Encounter Weekends: Couples Who Win and Couples Who Lose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Fifty couples who had the most positive or negative reactions in a group of Marriage Encounter couples were interviewed. Results indicated nine couples experienced significant negative changes related to Marriage Encounter, suggesting that distressed couples who attend Marriage Encounters are susceptible to further marital deterioration.…

  18. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  19. Chemopreventive Agent Development | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group promotes and supports research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phas | Research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials.

  20. 7 CFR 58.628 - Sweetening agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.628 Sweetening agents. Sweetening agents shall be clean and wholesome and consist of one...

  1. 7 CFR 58.629 - Flavoring agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.629 Flavoring agents. Flavoring agents either natural or artificial shall be wholesome...

  2. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  3. 7 CFR 58.629 - Flavoring agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.629 Flavoring agents. Flavoring agents either natural or artificial shall be wholesome...

  4. 7 CFR 58.628 - Sweetening agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.628 Sweetening agents. Sweetening agents shall be clean and wholesome and consist of one...

  5. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  6. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  7. Security Measures to Protect Mobile Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, Piyanka; Govil, M. C.; Dutta, Kamlesh

    2010-11-01

    The security issues of mobile agent systems have embarrassed its widespread implementation. Mobile agents that move around the network are not safe because the remote hosts that accommodate the agents initiates all kinds of attacks. These hosts try to analyze the agent's decision logic and their accumulated data. So, mobile agent security is the most challenging unsolved problems. The paper analyzes various security measures deeply. Security especially the attacks performed by hosts to the visiting mobile agent (the malicious hosts problem) is a major obstacle that prevents mobile agent technology from being widely adopted. Being the running environment for mobile agent, the host has full control over them and could easily perform many kinds of attacks against them.

  8. Intelligent Agents as Cognitive Tools for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Examines the educational potential for intelligent agents as cognitive tools. Discusses the role of intelligent agents: managing large amounts of information (information overload), serving as a pedagogical expert, and creating programming environments for the learner. (AEF)

  9. Learning other agents` preferences in multiagent negotiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, H.H.; Kieronska, D.; Venkatesh, S.

    1996-12-31

    In multiagent systems, an agent does not usually have complete information about the preferences and decision making processes of other agents. This might prevent the agents from making coordinated choices, purely due to their ignorance of what others want. This paper describes the integration of a learning module into a communication-intensive negotiating agent architecture. The learning module gives the agents the ability to learn about other agents` preferences via past interactions. Over time, the agents can incrementally update their models of other agents` preferences and use them to make better coordinated decisions. Combining both communication and learning, as two complement knowledge acquisition methods, helps to reduce the amount of communication needed on average, and is justified in situations where communication is computationally costly or simply not desirable (e.g. to preserve the individual privacy).

  10. Coupled moderator neutronics

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-12-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source.

  11. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  12. Fostering Multimedia Learning of Science: Exploring the Role of an Animated Agent's Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsworth, Qi; Atkinson, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    Research suggests that students learn better when studying a picture coupled with narration rather than on-screen text in a computer-based multimedia learning environment. Moreover, combining narration with the visual presence of an animated pedagogical agent may also encourage students to process information deeper than narration or on-screen…

  13. Extinguishing agent for combustible metal fires

    DOEpatents

    Riley, John F.; Stauffer, Edgar Eugene

    1976-10-12

    A low chloride extinguishing agent for combustible metal fires comprising from substantially 75 to substantially 94 weight percent of sodium carbonate as the basic fire extinguishing material, from substantially 1 to substantially 5 weight percent of a water-repellent agent such as a metal stearate, from substantially 2 to substantially 10 weight percent of a flow promoting agent such as attapulgus clay, and from substantially 3 to substantially 15 weight percent of a polyamide resin as a crusting agent.

  14. Partner switching promotes cooperation among myopic agents on a geographical plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixiao; Min, Yong; Zhu, Xiaodong; Cao, Jie

    2013-02-01

    We study the coupling dynamics between the evolution of cooperation and the evolution of partnership network on a geographical plane. While agents play networked prisoner’s dilemma games, they can dynamically adjust their partnerships based on local information about reputation. We incorporate geographical features into the process of the agent’s partner switching and investigate the corresponding effects. At each time step of the coevolution, a random agent can either update his strategy by imitation or adjust his partnership by switching from the lowest reputation partner to the highest reputation one among his neighbors. We differentiate two types of neighbors: geographical neighbors (i.e., the set of agents who are close to the focal agent in terms of geographical distance) and connectivity neighbors (i.e., the set of agents who are close to the focal agent in the partnership network in terms of geodesic distance). We find that switching to either geographical neighbors or connectivity neighbors enhances cooperation greatly in a wide parameter range. Cooperation can be favored in a much stricter condition when agents switch to connectivity neighbors more frequently. However, an increasing tendency of reconnecting to geographical neighbors shortens the geographical distance between a pair of partners on average. When agents consider the cost of geographical distance in adjusting the partnership, they are prone to reconnect to geographical neighbors.

  15. 14 CFR 221.11 - Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agent. 221.11 Section 221.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Who is Authorized To Issue and File Tariffs § 221.11 Agent. An agent may issue and...

  16. STUDIES OF WATERBORNE AGENTS OF VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The etiologic agent of a large outbreak of waterborne viral gastroenteritis was detected employing immune electron microscopy (IEM) and a newly developed solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA). This agent, referred to as the Snow Mountain Agent (SMA), is 27-32 nm. in diameter, has cu...

  17. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  18. 24 CFR 232.1011 - Management agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management agents. 232.1011 Section... Management agents. (a) An operator or borrower may, with the prior written approval of HUD, execute a management agent agreement setting forth the duties and procedures for matters related to the management...

  19. 24 CFR 232.1011 - Management agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management agents. 232.1011 Section... Management agents. (a) An operator or borrower may, with the prior written approval of HUD, execute a management agent agreement setting forth the duties and procedures for matters related to the management...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  1. Online Deception Detection Using BDI Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritts, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This research has two facets within separate research areas. The research area of Belief, Desire and Intention (BDI) agent capability development was extended. Deception detection research has been advanced with the development of automation using BDI agents. BDI agents performed tasks automatically and autonomously. This study used these…

  2. The Ontogenesis of Agent: Linguistic Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olswang, Lesley Barrett; Carpenter, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the findings of a longitudinal study of three infants between their 11th and 22nd months to document development of linguistic expression of the agent concept indicated that first vocalizations were inconsistently associated with nonverbal agentive behaviors and later mature utterances coded agent-action-recipient events. (MC)

  3. Infants Attribute to Agents Goals and Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yuyan; Choi, You-jung

    2012-01-01

    This commentary article is to be published alongside: Hernik, M., & Southgate, V. (2012). What do infants know about agents' goals? The authors see this issue consisting of two closely related questions. First, what is an agent to infants? Second, how do infants attribute goals to agents? Hernik and Southgage (H&S) focused on the second question.…

  4. Construction and Evaluation of Animated Teachable Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodenheimer, Bobby; Williams, Betsy; Kramer, Mattie Ruth; Viswanath, Karun; Balachandran, Ramya; Belynne, Kadira; Biswas, Gautam

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the design decisions, technical approach, and evaluation of the animation and interface components for an agent-based system that allows learners to learn by teaching. Students learn by teaching an animated agent using a visual representation. The agent can answer questions about what she has been taught and take quizzes.…

  5. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  6. Honey - A Novel Antidiabetic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Wahab, Mohd S. Ab

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains a burden worldwide in spite of the availability of numerous antidiabetic drugs. Honey is a natural substance produced by bees from nectar. Several evidence-based health benefits have been ascribed to honey in the recent years. In this review article, we highlight findings which demonstrate the beneficial or potential effects of honey in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), on the gut microbiota, in the liver, in the pancreas and how these effects could improve glycemic control and metabolic derangements. In healthy subjects or patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus, various studies revealed that honey reduced blood glucose or was more tolerable than most common sugars or sweeteners. Pre-clinical studies provided more convincing evidence in support of honey as a potential antidiabetic agent than clinical studies did. The not-too-impressive clinical data could mainly be attributed to poor study designs or due to the fact that the clinical studies were preliminary. Based on the key constituents of honey, the possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic effect of honey are proposed. The paper also highlights the potential impacts and future perspectives on the use of honey as an antidiabetic agent. It makes recommendations for further clinical studies on the potential antidiabetic effect of honey. This review provides insight on the potential use of honey, especially as a complementary agent, in the management of diabetes mellitus. Hence, it is very important to have well-designed, randomized controlled clinical trials that investigate the reproducibility (or otherwise) of these experimental data in diabetic human subjects. PMID:22811614

  7. Copper complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Cristina; Pellei, Maura; Tisato, Francesco; Santini, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Metal-based antitumor drugs play a relevant role in antiblastic chemotherapy. Cisplatin is regarded as one of the most effective drugs, even if severe toxicities and drug resistance phenomena limit its clinical use. Therefore, in recent years there has been a rapid expansion in research and development of novel metal-based anticancer drugs to improve clinical effectiveness, to reduce general toxicity and to broaden the spectrum of activity. The variety of metal ion functions in biology has stimulated the development of new metallodrugs other than Pt drugs with the aim to obtain compounds acting via alternative mechanisms of action. Among non-Pt compounds, copper complexes are potentially attractive as anticancer agents. Actually, since many years a lot of researches have actively investigated copper compounds based on the assumption proposal that endogenous metals may be less toxic. It has been established that the properties of copper-coordinated compounds are largely determined by the nature of ligands and donor atoms bound to the metal ion. In this review, the most remarkable achievements in the design and development of copper(I, II) complexes as antitumor agents are discussed. Special emphasis has been focused on the identification of structure-activity relationships for the different classes of copper(I,II) complexes. This work was motivated by the observation that no comprehensive surveys of copper complexes as anticancer agents were available in the literature. Moreover, up to now, despite the enormous efforts in synthesizing different classes of copper complexes, very few data concerning the molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying their antitumor activity are available. This overview, collecting the most significant strategies adopted in the last ten years to design promising anticancer copper(I,II) compounds, would be a help to the researchers working in this field. PMID:19199864

  8. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  9. Anticancer agents from marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjun; Zhou, Feng; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of anticancer active compounds found in the marine ecosystems. More than 5300 different known metabolites are from sponges and their associated microorganisms. To survive in the complicated marine environment, most of the sponge species have evolved chemical means to defend against predation. Such chemical adaptation produces many biologically active secondary metabolites including anticancer agents. This review highlights novel secondary metabolites in sponges which inhibited diverse cancer species in the recent 5 years. These natural products of marine sponges are categorized based on various chemical characteristics. PMID:25402340

  10. Fluorescent whitening agents in detergents.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, C; von Rütte, R

    1975-01-01

    Washing is a form of textile care which is characterized by its repetitive nature. Washing methods vary enormously in different parts of the world. The main types of detergents and fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are described. Washing slows down the deterioration in use of white goods, and yellowing is counteracted by FWAs. FWAs also enhance the freshness and brightness of most pale shades. Cost calculations show clearly the economic advantages of using FWAs in washing: the useful life of textiles can be prolonged considerably for a very small additional cost. PMID:1064549

  11. Method For Detecting Biological Agents

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan W.; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Whitten, David G.

    2005-12-27

    A sensor is provided including a polymer capable of having an alterable measurable property from the group of luminescence and electrical conductivity, the polymer having an intermediate combination of a recognition element, a tethering element and a property-altering element bound thereto and capable of altering the measurable property, the intermediate combination adapted for subsequent separation from the polymer upon exposure to an agent having an affinity for binding to the recognition element whereupon the separation of the intermediate combination from the polymer results in a detectable change in the alterable measurable property, and, detecting said detectable change in the alterable measurable property.

  12. Coupling Gammasphere and ORRUBA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Matos, M.; Chipps, K. A.; Hardy, S.; Shand, C.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lister, C. J.; Peters, W. A.; Seweryniak, D.

    2013-04-19

    The coincident detection of particles and gamma rays allows the study of the structure of exotic nuclei via inverse kinematics reactions using radioactive ion beams and thick targets. We report on the status of the project to couple the highresolution charged-particle detector ORRUBA to Gammasphere, a high-efficiency, high-resolution gamma ray detector.

  13. The Coupling Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Peter T.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) relies on the well-known phenomenon of coupling between neuronal activity and brain blood flow. For nearly a century, the presumption was that hemodynamics were coupled to neuronal activity via energy demand and oxidative metabolism. Early 15O positron-emission tomographic (PET) studies challenged this theory, demonstrating a physiological “uncoupling” between brain blood flow and oxygen metabolism. These PET observations played a pivotal role in guiding the development of fMRI, by demonstrating which physiological parameters were most closely coupled to neuronal activity and by presaging the BOLD-contrast effect. Subsequent PET studies were crucial for constraining theories concerning the physiological mechanisms underlying hemodynamic/neuronal coupling and, thereby, guiding the development of models for quantification of oxygen metabolic rate %Δ from fMRI. A first-person account of the PET “coupling” studies and their influence on the development of fMRI is provided. PMID:22306802

  14. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  15. The Pregnant Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, A. Bradley, III

    This paper reports some of the preliminary findings of an investigation of the ways in which married couples experience pregnancy. Demographic, historical, personal, and marital information was gathered through individual interviews with each prospective parent. The 57 variables measured were combined to make six clusters: (1) experience of…

  16. Too Many Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author offers his ad hoc reflections on the question of just how many academic couples a department could comfortably accommodate from the point of view of good governance, in the hope of getting an honest dialogue started and seeing some reasonable guidelines eventually created by one organization or another as a result. He…

  17. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  18. Mobile agent location in distributed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, S. G.; Argyropoulos, I. P.

    2012-12-01

    An agent is a small program acting on behalf of a user or an application which plays the role of a user. Artificial intelligence can be encapsulated in agents so that they can be capable of both behaving autonomously and showing an elementary decision ability regarding movement and some specific actions. Therefore they are often called autonomous mobile agents. In a distributed system, they can move themselves from one processing node to another through the interconnecting network infrastructure. Their purpose is to collect useful information and to carry it back to their user. Also, agents are used to start, monitor and stop processes running on the individual interconnected processing nodes of computer cluster systems. An agent has a unique id to discriminate itself from other agents and a current position. The position can be expressed as the address of the processing node which currently hosts the agent. Very often, it is necessary for a user, a processing node or another agent to know the current position of an agent in a distributed system. Several procedures and algorithms have been proposed for the purpose of position location of mobile agents. The most basic of all employs a fixed computing node, which acts as agent position repository, receiving messages from all the moving agents and keeping records of their current positions. The fixed node, responds to position queries and informs users, other nodes and other agents about the position of an agent. Herein, a model is proposed that considers pairs and triples of agents instead of single ones. A location method, which is investigated in this paper, attempts to exploit this model.

  19. Peptidyl Molecular Imaging Contrast Agents Using a New Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Pagel, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A versatile method is disclosed for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of molecular imaging contrast agents. A DO3A moiety was derivatized to introduce a CBZ-protected amino group and then coupled to a polymeric support. CBZ cleavage with Et2AlCl/thioanisole was optimized for SPPS. Amino acids were then coupled to the aminoDOTA loaded resin using conventional step-wise Fmoc SPPS to create a product with DOTA coupled to the C-terminus of the peptide. In a second study, the DO3A moiety was coupled to a glycine-loaded polymeric support, and amino acids were then coupled to the amino-DOTA-peptide loaded resin using SPPS, to incorporate DOTA within the peptide sequence. The peptide-(Tm3+-DOTA) amide showed a PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) effect, which demonstrated the utility of this contrast agent for molecular imaging. These results demonstrate the advantages of exploiting SPPS methodologies through the development of unique DOTA derivatives to create peptide-based molecular imaging contrast agents. PMID:17330953

  20. Triazole: A Promising Antitubercular Agent.

    PubMed

    Keri, Rangappa S; Patil, Siddappa A; Budagumpi, Srinivasa; Nagaraja, Bhari Mallanna

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease with comparatively high mortality worldwide. The statistics shows that around three million people throughout the world die annually from tuberculosis and there are around eight million new cases each year, of which developing countries showed major share. Therefore, the discovery and development of effective antituberculosis drugs with novel mechanism of action have become an insistent task for infectious diseases research programs. The literature reveals that, heterocyclic moieties have drawn attention of the chemists, pharmacologists, microbiologists, and other researchers owing to its indomitable biological potential as anti-infective agents. Among heterocyclic compounds, triazole (1,2,3-triazole/1,2,4-triazole) nucleus is one of the most important and well-known heterocycles, which is a common and integral feature of a variety of natural products and medicinal agents. Triazole core is considered as a privileged structure in medicinal chemistry and is widely used as 'parental' compounds to synthesize molecules with medical benefits, especially with infection-related activities. In the present review, we have collated published reports on this versatile core to provide an insight so that its complete therapeutic potential can be utilized for the treatment of tuberculosis. This review also explores triazole as a potential targeted core moiety against tuberculosis and various research ongoing worldwide. It is hoped that this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic triazole-based antituberculosis drugs. PMID:25643871

  1. Chemopreventive agents targeting tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharada H; Thulasingam, Senthilkumar; Nagarajan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that tumor development and progression depend not only on the perturbed genes that govern cell proliferation, but is also highly determined by the non-tumor cells of the stromal compartment surrounding the tumor called tumor microenvironment (TME). These findings highlight the importance of targeting the microenvironment in combination with therapies aimed at tumor cells as a valuable approach. The innate and adaptive immune cells in the TME interact among themselves and also with the endothelial cells, pericytes and mast cells of the stromal compartment through various autocrine and paracrine manner to regulate abnormal cell proliferation. Direct cytotoxic killing of cancer cells and/or reversion of the immunosuppressive TME are to be considered as better strategies for chemoprevention and chemotherapy. With a growing emphasis on a "hallmark targeting" strategy for cancer therapy, the TME now appears as a promising target for cancer prevention using natural products. Clarification on the nontumor stromal cells, the mediators involved, interactions with immune response cells, and immune-evasive mechanisms are needed in order to manipulate the characteristics of the TME by natural pharmacological agents to design effective therapies. This review will provide a glimpse on the roles played by various non-tumor cells in tumor progression and their intervention by pharmacological agents. PMID:26679106

  2. A Review of Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Pameijer, Cornelis H.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the availability of a large number of luting agents (dental cements) proper selection can be a daunting task and is usually based on a practitioner's reliance on experience and preference and less on in depth knowledge of materials that are used for the restoration and luting agent properties. This review aims at presenting an overview of current cements and discusses physical properties, biocompatibility and other properties that make a particular cement the preferred choice depending on the clinical indication. Tables are provided that outline the different properties of the generic classification of cements. It should be noted that no recommendations are made to use a particular commercial cement for a hypothetical clinical situation. The choice is solely the responsibility of the practitioner. The appendix is intended as a guide for the practitioner towards a recommended choice under commonly encountered clinical scenarios. Again, no commercial brands are recommended although the author recognizes that some have better properties than others. Please note that this flowchart strictly presents the author's opinion and is based on research, clinical experience and the literature. PMID:22505909

  3. Nanoparticle-based theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jin; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine is emerging as a promising therapeutic paradigm. It takes advantage of the high capacity of nanoplatforms to ferry cargo and loads onto them both imaging and therapeutic functions. The resulting nanosystems, capable of diagnosis, drug delivery and monitoring of therapeutic response, are expected to play a significant role in the dawning era of personalized medicine, and much research effort has been devoted toward that goal. A convenience in constructing such function-integrated agents is that many nanoplatforms are already, themselves, imaging agents. Their well developed surface chemistry makes it easy to load them with pharmaceutics and promote them to be theranostic nanosystems. Iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles, have been previously well investigated in the imaging setting and are candidate nanoplatforms for building up nanoparticle-based theranostics. In the current article, we will outline the progress along this line, organized by the category of the core materials. We will focus on construction strategies and will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with this emerging technology. PMID:20691229

  4. Innovative Agents in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Faiman, Beth; Richards, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable cancer of the bone marrow plasma cells. However, the overall survival of patients with MM has increased dramatically within the past decade. This is due, in part, to newer agents such as immunomodulatory drugs (lenalidomide, thalidomide, and pomalidomide) and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib, carfilzomib, MLN9708). These and several other new classes of drugs have arisen from an improved understanding of the complex environment in which genetic changes occur. Improved understanding of genetic events will enable clinicians to better stratify risk before and during therapy, tailor treatment, and test the value of personalized interventions. The ultimate goal in this incurable disease setting is to reduce the impact of cancer- or chemotherapy-related side effects. Nurses and advanced practitioners are integral to the treatment team. Thus, each should be aware of changes to the current drug landscape. Targeted drugs with sophisticated mechanisms of action are currently under investigation. Patients gain access to newer drugs within the context of clinical trials. Awareness of such trials will help accrual and determine if therapeutic benefit exists. In this article, we will describe new agents with unique and targeted mechanisms of action that have activity in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. PMID:25089218

  5. Surfactants as blackbird stressing agents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefebvre, P.W.; Seubert, J.L.

    1970-01-01

    Applications of wetting-agent solutions produce mortality in birds. The exact cause of death is undetermined but it is believed that destruction of the insulating qualities of the plumage permits ambient cold temperatures and evaporation to lower the body temperature to a lethal level. The original concept of using these materials as bird-control tools was developed in 1958 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Laurel, Maryland. Early field trials by personnel of the Division of Wildlife Services and the Denver Wildlife Research Center indicated that ground-application techniques had promise but limitations of the equipment precluded successful large-scale roost treatments. In 1966, Patuxent Center personnel began using tanker-type aircraft to evaluate high-volume aerial applications of wetting agents. The success of these tests led to the use of small aircraft to make low-volume, high-concentration aerial applications just prior to expected rainfall. Recent trials of the low-volume method show that, with some limitations, it is effective, inexpensive, and safe to the environment. Current research emphasizes the screening of new candidate materials for efficacy, biodegradability, and toxicity to plants and non-target animals, as well as basic investigations of the avian physiological mechanisms involved. Field trials to develop more effective application techniques will continue.

  6. Electric power market agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyungseon

    The electric power industry in many countries has been restructured in the hope of a more economically efficient system. In the restructured system, traditional operating and planning tools based on true marginal cost do not perform well since information required is strictly confidential. For developing a new tool, it is necessary to understand offer behavior. The main objective of this study is to create a new tool for power system planning. For the purpose, this dissertation develops models for a market and market participants. A new model is developed in this work for explaining a supply-side offer curve, and several variables are introduced to characterize the curve. Demand is estimated using a neural network, and a numerical optimization process is used to determine the values of the variables that maximize the profit of the agent. The amount of data required for the optimization is chosen with the aid of nonlinear dynamics. To suggest an optimal demand-side bidding function, two optimization problems are constructed and solved for maximizing consumer satisfaction based on the properties of two different types of demands: price-based demand and must-be-served demand. Several different simulations are performed to test how an agent reacts in various situations. The offer behavior depends on locational benefit as well as the offer strategies of competitors.

  7. Camouflaging Agents for Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Claudia; Porto, Dennis A; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Lim, Henry W

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired condition resulting in patches of depigmented skin that is cosmetically disfiguring and can subsequently be psychologically disturbing. For patients seeking to mask their vitiligo, camouflage options have historically been limited and been designated as a cosmetic, rather than a medical, concern. As research has indicated that proper concealment of vitiligo lesions can vastly improve quality of life, we believe it is essential that dermatologists become aware of all the options available to their patients and that discussions of camouflage options be broached from the first visit. Methods for concealment include cosmetic tattoos, dihydroxyacetone, general cosmetics, and various topical camouflage agents, including the newest product, Microskin™. We conducted a literature review of all of the available options for vitiligo concealment and evaluated their advantages and disadvantages. Ultimately, temporary methods of concealment are recommended; but the particular agent used can come from discussion with the patient based on the location of the lesions, degree of concealment desired, cost, and availability. PMID:27050692

  8. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  9. SAF1. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.Y

    1997-06-01

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  10. Nerve agents: implications for anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Hrobak, Paula Kay

    2008-04-01

    Anesthesia providers may be called to treat injuries from chemical weapons or spills, for which prompt treatment is vital. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of nerve agents and the resultant pathophysiology and to be able to quickly recognize the signs and symptoms of nerve agent exposure. This review article addresses the different types of nerve agents that are currently being manufactured as well as the symptomatic and definitive treatment of the patient who presents with acute nerve agent toxicity. This article also reviews the physiology of the neuromuscular junction and the autonomic nervous system receptors that nerve agent toxicity affects. PMID:18478812

  11. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Dongare, Pradeep A; Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice. PMID:26644615

  12. 22 CFR 51.22 - Passport agents and passport acceptance agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passport agents and passport acceptance agents. 51.22 Section 51.22 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Application § 51.22 Passport agents and passport acceptance agents. (a) U.S. citizen employees of the Department authorized to serve as passport...

  13. 30 CFR 250.145 - How do I designate an agent or a local agent?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I designate an agent or a local agent? 250.145 Section 250.145 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... SHELF General Special Types of Approvals § 250.145 How do I designate an agent or a local agent? (a)...

  14. Intelligent agent support for automated radiology exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yi; Popescu, Mihail

    2000-10-01

    A difficult problem in automatic medical image understanding is that for every image type such as x-ray and every body organ such as heart, there exist specific solutions that do not allow for generalization. Just collecting all the specific solutions will not achieve the vision of a computerized physician. To address this problem, we propose an intelligent agent approach that is based on agent-oriented programming is that it combines the benefits of object-oriented programming and expert system. For radiology image understanding, we present a multi- agent system that is composed of two major types of intelligent agents: radiologist agents and patient agents. A patient agent asks for multiple opinions from radiologists agents in interpreting a given set of images and then integrates the opinions. A radiologist agent decomposes the image recognition task into smaller problems that are solved collectively by multiple intelligent sub-agents. Finally, we present a preliminary implementation and running examples of the multi-agent system.

  15. Knowledge Management in Role Based Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kır, Hüseyin; Ekinci, Erdem Eser; Dikenelli, Oguz

    In multi-agent system literature, the role concept is getting increasingly researched to provide an abstraction to scope beliefs, norms, goals of agents and to shape relationships of the agents in the organization. In this research, we propose a knowledgebase architecture to increase applicability of roles in MAS domain by drawing inspiration from the self concept in the role theory of sociology. The proposed knowledgebase architecture has granulated structure that is dynamically organized according to the agent's identification in a social environment. Thanks to this dynamic structure, agents are enabled to work on consistent knowledge in spite of inevitable conflicts between roles and the agent. The knowledgebase architecture is also implemented and incorporated into the SEAGENT multi-agent system development framework.

  16. Other potentially useful new injectable anesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Ilkiw, J E

    1992-03-01

    Ultrashort barbiturates are not ideal injectable anesthetic agents, and new agents continue to be released as investigators pursue the goal of finding a more ideal agent. Of the new injectable agents discussed, propofol seems to be the most promising drug. Propofol should find a place in veterinary practice as an outpatient anesthetic agent because it has a rapid, smooth, and complete recovery even after repeated or continuous administration. Midazolam does not induce anesthesia in healthy, small animals and, as such, can only be used in combination with other injectable agents, such as ketamine or the thiobarbiturates. In our practice, Telazol has found a place in the anesthetic management of feral cats and aggressive dogs, where it is used for heavy sedation or to induce anesthesia. The role of flumazenil, as a reversal agent, in veterinary practice remains to be determined; however, the role in small domestic animals is unlikely to be significant. PMID:1585555

  17. Observation and inverse problems in coupled cell networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Romain

    2012-03-01

    A coupled cell network is a model for many situations such as food webs in ecosystems, cellular metabolism and economic networks. It consists in a directed graph G, each node (or cell) representing an agent of the network and each directed arrow representing which agent acts on which. It yields a system of differential equations \\dot x(t)=f(x(t)) , where the component i of f depends only on the cells xj(t) for which the arrow j → i exists in G. In this paper, we investigate the observation problems in coupled cell networks: can one deduce the behaviour of the whole network (oscillations, stabilization, etc) by observing only one of the cells? We show that the natural observation properties hold for almost all the interactions f.

  18. Serotonin Regulates Electrical Coupling via Modulation of Extrajunctional Conductance: H-current

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Theresa M.; Caplan, Jonathan S.; Zoran, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic strength can be highly variable from animal to animal within a species or over time within an individual. The process of synaptic plasticity induced by neuromodulatory agents might be unpredictable when the underlying circuits subject to modulation are themselves inherently variable. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptomine; 5HT) and serotonergic signaling pathways are important regulators of animal behavior and are pharmacological targets in a wide range of neurological disorders. We have examined the effect of 5HT on electrical synapses possessing variable coupling strengths. While 5HT decreased electrical coupling at synapses with weak electrical connectivity, synapses with strong electrical coupling were less affected by 5HT treatment, as follows from the equations used for calculating coupling coefficients. The fact that the modulatory effect of 5HT on electrical connections was negatively correlated with the strength of electrical coupling suggests that the degree of electrical coupling within a neural network impacts subsequent neuromodulation of those synapses. Biophysical studies indicated that these effects were primarily due to 5HT-induced modulation of membrane currents that indirectly affect junctional coupling at synaptic contacts. In support of these experimental analyses, we created a simple model of coupled neurons to demonstrate that modulation of electrical coupling could be due solely to 5HT effects on H-channel conductance. Therefore, variability in the strength of electrical coupling in neural circuits can determine the pharmacological effect of this neuromodulatory agent. PMID:20599836

  19. Serotonin regulates electrical coupling via modulation of extrajunctional conductance: H-current.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Theresa M; Caplan, Jonathan S; Zoran, Mark J

    2010-08-19

    Synaptic strength can be highly variable from animal to animal within a species or over time within an individual. The process of synaptic plasticity induced by neuromodulatory agents might be unpredictable when the underlying circuits subject to modulation are themselves inherently variable. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptomine; 5HT) and serotonergic signaling pathways are important regulators of animal behavior and are pharmacological targets in a wide range of neurological disorders. We have examined the effect of 5HT on electrical synapses possessing variable coupling strengths. While 5HT decreased electrical coupling at synapses with weak electrical connectivity, synapses with strong electrical coupling were less affected by 5HT treatment, as follows from the equations used for calculating coupling coefficients. The fact that the modulatory effect of 5HT on electrical connections was negatively correlated with the strength of electrical coupling suggests that the degree of electrical coupling within a neural network impacts subsequent neuromodulation of those synapses. Biophysical studies indicated that these effects were primarily due to 5HT-induced modulation of membrane currents that indirectly affect junctional coupling at synaptic contacts. In support of these experimental analyses, we created a simple model of coupled neurons to demonstrate that modulation of electrical coupling could be due solely to 5HT effects on H-channel conductance. Therefore, variability in the strength of electrical coupling in neural circuits can determine the pharmacological effect of this neuromodulatory agent. PMID:20599836

  20. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing. PMID

  1. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  2. Emergent Behavior of Coupled Barrier Island - Resort Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    Barrier islands are attractive sites for resorts. Natural barrier islands experience beach erosion and island overwash during storms, beach accretion and dune building during inter-storm periods, and migration up the continental shelf as sea level rises. Beach replenishment, artificial dune building, seawalls, jetties and groins have been somewhat effective in protecting resorts against erosion and overwash during storms, but it is unknown how the coupled system will respond to long-term sea level rise. We investigate coupled barrier island - resort systems using an agent-based model with three components: natural barrier islands divided into a series of alongshore cells; resorts controlled by markets for tourism and hotel purchases; and coupling via storm damage to resorts and resort protection by government agents. Modeled barrier islands change by beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms. In the resort hotel market, developer agents build hotels and hotel owning agents purchase them using predictions of future revenue and property appreciation, with the goal of maximizing discounted utility. In the tourism market, hotel owning agents set room rental prices to maximize profit and tourist agents choose vacation destinations maximizing a utility based on beach width, price and word-of-mouth. Government agents build seawalls, groins and jetties, and widen the beach and build up dunes by adding sand to protect resorts from storms, enhance beach quality, and maximize resort revenue. Results indicate that barrier islands and resorts evolve in a coupled manner to resort size saturation, with resorts protected against small-to-intermediate-scale storms under fairly stable sea level. Under extended, rapidly rising sea level, protection measures enhance the effect of large storms, leading to emergent behavior in the form of limit cycles or barrier submergence

  3. Hexameric Mn(II) Dendrimer as MRI Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Gale, Eric M.; Atanasova, Iliyana; Rietz, Tyson A.

    2014-01-01

    A Mn(II) chelating dendrimer was prepared as a contrast agent for MRI applications. The dendrimer comprises six tyrosine-derived [Mn(EDTA)(H2O)]2− moieties coupled to a cyclotriphosphazene core. Variable temperature 17O NMR revealed a single water co-ligand per Mn(II) that undergoes fast water exchange (kex = (3.0±0.1) × 108 s−1 at 37 °C). The 37 °C per Mn(II) relaxivity ranged from 8.2 to 3.8 mM−1s−1 from 0.47 to 11.7T, and is 6-fold higher on a per molecule basis. From this field dependence a rotational correlation time was estimated as 0.45±0.02 ns. The imaging and pharmacokinetic properties of the dendrimer were compared to clinically used [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2− in mice at 4.7T. On first pass, the higher per ion relaxivity of the dendrimer resulted in 2-fold greater blood signal than for [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2−. Blood clearance was fast and elimination occurred through both the renal and hepatobiliary routes. This Mn(II) containing dendrimer represents potential alternative to Gd-based contrast agents, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease where the use of current Gd-based agents may be contraindicated. PMID:25224391

  4. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  5. Tuberculosis and nature's pharmacy of putative anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, coupled with the twinning of tuberculosis (TB) to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), the burden of TB is now difficult to manage. Therefore, new antimycobacterial agents are being sought from natural sources. This review focuses on natural antimycobacterial agents from endophytes and medicinal plants of Africa, Europe, Asia, South America and Canada. In the countries mentioned in this review, numerous plant species display putative anti-TB activity. Several antimycobacterial chemical compounds have also been isolated, including: ellagitannin punicalagin, allicin, anthraquinone glycosides, iridoids, phenylpropanoids, beta-sitosterol, galanthimine, crinine, friedelin, gallic acid, ellagic acids, anthocyanidin, taraxerol, termilignan B, arjunic acid, glucopyranosides, 1-epicatechol, leucopelargonidol, hydroxybenzoic acids, benzophenanthridine alkaloids, neolignans, and decarine. These compounds may provide leads to novel and more efficacious drugs to lessen the global burden of TB and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. If there is a long-term remedy for TB, it must lie in nature's pharmacy of putative antimycobacterial agents. PMID:26464047

  6. An agent-based microsimulation of critical infrastructure systems

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON,DIANNE C.; STAMBER,KEVIN L.

    2000-03-29

    US infrastructures provide essential services that support the economic prosperity and quality of life. Today, the latest threat to these infrastructures is the increasing complexity and interconnectedness of the system. On balance, added connectivity will improve economic efficiency; however, increased coupling could also result in situations where a disturbance in an isolated infrastructure unexpectedly cascades across diverse infrastructures. An understanding of the behavior of complex systems can be critical to understanding and predicting infrastructure responses to unexpected perturbation. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an agent-based model of critical US infrastructures using time-dependent Monte Carlo methods and a genetic algorithm learning classifier system to control decision making. The model is currently under development and contains agents that represent the several areas within the interconnected infrastructures, including electric power and fuel supply. Previous work shows that agent-based simulations models have the potential to improve the accuracy of complex system forecasting and to provide new insights into the factors that are the primary drivers of emergent behaviors in interdependent systems. Simulation results can be examined both computationally and analytically, offering new ways of theorizing about the impact of perturbations to an infrastructure network.

  7. Dual-frequency transducer for nonlinear contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Guiroy, Axel; Novell, Anthony; Ringgaard, Erling; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Abellard, André-Pierre; Zawada, Tomasz; Bouakaz, Ayache; Levassort, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Detection of high-order nonlinear components issued from microbubbles has emerged as a sensitive method for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the detection of these high-frequency components, including the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, remains challenging because of the lack of transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. In this context, we propose a new design of imaging transducer based on a simple fabrication process for high-frequency nonlinear imaging. The transducer is composed of two elements: the outer low-frequency (LF) element was centered at 4 MHz and used in transmit mode, whereas the inner high-frequency (HF) element centered at 14 MHz was used in receive mode. The center element was pad-printed using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) paste. The outer element was molded using a commercial PZT, and curved porous unpoled PZT was used as backing. Each piezoelectric element was characterized to determine the electromechanical performance with thickness coupling factor around 45%. After the assembly of the two transducer elements, hydrophone measurements (electroacoustic responses and radiation patterns) were carried out and demonstrated a large bandwidth (70% at -3 dB) of the HF transducer. Finally, the transducer was evaluated for contrast agent imaging using contrast agent microbubbles. The results showed that harmonic components (up to the sixth harmonic) of the microbubbles were successfully detected. Moreover, images from a flow phantom were acquired and demonstrated the potential of the transducer for high-frequency nonlinear contrast imaging. PMID:24297028

  8. Electromagnetically coupled microstrip dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltman, H. G.; Huebner, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new class of printed circuit radiator consisting of a microstrip dipole electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip feed line is described. Several configurations which differ in bandwidth, efficiency, and construction simplicity are presented. A geometry which has been found to be optimum for many applications is noted. Radiation characteristics of both isolated elements and arrays of elements are examined. Experimental and theoretical results are presented.

  9. Thermal coupling measurement method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow from an embedded heated wire responds to a change in the ambient environment. The wire is part of a self-balancing bridge system, and heat flow is measured directly in watts. Steady-state and transient thermal coupling can be measured directly and is an indication of the thermal resistance and diffusivity for the system under study. The method is applied to an aerospace electroexplosive component.

  10. Magnetic coupling device

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.

    2009-08-18

    A quick connect/disconnect coupling apparatus is provided in which a base member is engaged by a locking housing through a series of interengagement pins. The pins maintain the shaft in a locked position. Upon exposure to an appropriately positioned magnetic field, pins are removed a sufficient distance such that the shaft may be withdrawn from the locking housing. The ability to lock and unlock the connector assembly requires no additional tools or parts apart from a magnetic key.

  11. [Comorbidity in infertile couples].

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Gideon A; Bürgin, Laila; Kaufmann, Fabrice; De Geyter, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Pregnancy is the result of a series of highly complex processes, which can be deranged by multiple disturbances on many different levels. Physicians are increasingly dealing with couples suffering from infertility. This rise in case numbers is mainly due to the fact that couples are more and more delaying childbearing until a later phase of their reproductive life, when their social and professional careers are established. The increasing mean age at the first birth has a negative impact on fertility by deteriorating quality and reducing the quantity of oocytes. With increasing age systemic diseases are becoming more coincidental, which in turn tend to exert negative effects on fecundity and fertility both in males and females. This review highlights some associations between infertility and various common systemic diseases. Both general practitioners and gynecologists should counsel young women about the finity of the reproductive phase of their life. Young couples are to be informed, that a "healthy lifestyle" without smoking, sexual transmitted diseases and without metabolic diseases as diabetes and obesity can have a positive effect not only on their general health but also on their fertility and the outcome of future pregnancies. PMID:19950056

  12. Quick torque coupling

    DOEpatents

    Luft, Peter A.

    2009-05-12

    A coupling for mechanically connecting modular tubular struts of a positioning apparatus or space frame, comprising a pair of toothed rings (10, 12) attached to separate strut members (16), the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12) mechanically interlocking in both an axial and circumferential manner, and a third part comprising a sliding, toothed collar (14) the teeth (22) of which interlock the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12), preventing them from disengaging, and completely locking the assembly together. A secondary mechanism provides a nesting force for the collar, and/or retains it. The coupling is self-contained and requires no external tools for installation, and can be assembled with gloved hands in demanding environments. No gauging or measured torque is required for assembly. The assembly can easily be visually inspected to determine a "go" or "no-go" status. The coupling is compact and relatively light-weight. Because of it's triply interlocking teeth, the connection is rigid. The connection does not primarily rely on clamps, springs or friction based fasteners, and is therefore reliable in fail-safe applications.

  13. Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand; Estlin, Tara; Gaines, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing (CARACaS) is a recent product of a continuing effort to develop architectures for controlling either a single autonomous robotic vehicle or multiple cooperating but otherwise autonomous robotic vehicles. CARACaS is potentially applicable to diverse robotic systems that could include aircraft, spacecraft, ground vehicles, surface water vessels, and/or underwater vessels. CARACaS incudes an integral combination of three coupled agents: a dynamic planning engine, a behavior engine, and a perception engine. The perception and dynamic planning en - gines are also coupled with a memory in the form of a world model. CARACaS is intended to satisfy the need for two major capabilities essential for proper functioning of an autonomous robotic system: a capability for deterministic reaction to unanticipated occurrences and a capability for re-planning in the face of changing goals, conditions, or resources. The behavior engine incorporates the multi-agent control architecture, called CAMPOUT, described in An Architecture for Controlling Multiple Robots (NPO-30345), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 65. CAMPOUT is used to develop behavior-composition and -coordination mechanisms. Real-time process algebra operators are used to compose a behavior network for any given mission scenario. These operators afford a capability for producing a formally correct kernel of behaviors that guarantee predictable performance. By use of a method based on multi-objective decision theory (MODT), recommendations from multiple behaviors are combined to form a set of control actions that represents their consensus. In this approach, all behaviors contribute simultaneously to the control of the robotic system in a cooperative rather than a competitive manner. This approach guarantees a solution that is good enough with respect to resolution of complex, possibly conflicting goals within the constraints of the mission to

  14. Drug therapy reviews: antirheumatic agents.

    PubMed

    Evens, R P

    1979-05-01

    The pathophysiology, symptoms and drug treatment of rheumatic disease are reviewed. Antirheumatic drugs reviewed are salicylates (including aspirin, sodium salicylate, choline salicylate, choline magnesium salicylate, salsalate), phenylpropionic acid derivatives (fenoprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen), indole derivatives (sulindac, tolmetin and indomethacin), pyrazolone derivatives (phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone), gold compounds, penicillamine, antimalarials mefenamic acid, corticosteroids and immunosuppressives. Simple analgesic therapy (acetaminophen, aspirin, propoxyphene) is used in the early stage of the disease. As the disease progresses, aspirin remains the drug of choice for antiinflammatory activity but the phenylpropionic acid or indole derivatives may be preferred in patients unable to tolerate salicylates. If such nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents are not effective, parenteral therapy with gold compounds or oral penicillamine usually is indicated. Indomethacin or phenylbutazone, then antimalarials, are resorted to next. Corticosteroids or immunosuppressives are reserved for patients who are unsuccessfully controlled or who have major side effects with the other drugs. Mefenamic acid occupies a very secondary place in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. PMID:377958

  15. [Anticonvulsant agents in neuralgic pain.].

    PubMed

    Jurna, I; Zenz, M

    1992-06-01

    The anticonvulsants, carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, and valproic acid are capable of depressing attacks of shooting pain in neuralgia. Shooting pain is perceived in trigeminal, intercostal, and other neuralgias, as a consequence of infectious diseases such as herpes zoster, and in the course of polyneuropathies of various causes. It is due to injury of nociceptive afferents, which generate bursts of activity in response to appropriate environmental changes. The anticonvulsant agents have no analgesic property per se, so that background pain remains unchanged. The depression of shooting pain results from the anticonvulsant action of the compounds. Both carbamazepine and phenytoin block synaptic transmission of neuronal hyperactivity by a direct depressant action that includes reduction of sodium conductance and by activation of inhibitory control. Clonazepam and valproic acid act by enhancing GABA-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission. Carbamazepine is by far the most widely used compound; phenytoin, clonazepam, and valproic acid are not so popular because of their side effects. PMID:18415623

  16. Biotherapeutic agents and vaginal health.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazzewi, F H; Tester, R F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of vaginal infection requires different drugs although the recurrence rate post treatment remains high due to adverse effects on the beneficial microbiota. Thus, there are clear clinical advantages for the use of biotherapeutic agents (prebiotics and/or probiotics) for treating these infections. Pre- and probiotic beneficial effects can be delivered topically or systemically. In general, both approaches have the potential to optimize, maintain and restore the ecology of the vaginal ecosystem. Specific carbohydrates provide a therapeutic approach for controlling infections by stimulating the growth of the indigenous lactobacilli but inhibiting the growth and adhesion of pathogens to the vaginal epithelial cells. Overall, little evidence exists to promote the prevention or treatment of vaginal disease with prebiotic carbohydrates in formulations such as pessaries, creams or douches. However, recent reports have promoted prebiotic applications in ecosystems other than the gut and include the mouth, skin and vagina. This review focuses on the utilization of pre- and probiotics for vaginal health. PMID:26757173

  17. The Extended Mind: Coupling Environment and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrobel, Susie

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes embodiment and cognitive extension as examples of strong anticipation as defined by Dubois. Clark and Chalmers formulated a thesis which states that parts of the environment, if coupled successfully, can become part of the extended mind. This coupling, be it deliberate or unintentional, shifts the observer-world boundary outwards when the observer encompasses parts of his environment. The resulting extended observer forms a new systemic whole, which consists of both the assimilated context and the recalibrated version of the original observer. Recalibration occurs when conditioning and adaptation lead to corresponding changes on the neural level, for instance, when an agent compensates for delays in a control loop. Plasticity is a prerequisite for any successful incorporation of external structures. However, uncoupled parts of the observer must remain inviolate in order to preserve the boundary. Neither the extended mind nor the core observer are absolute concepts. Depending on whether we focus on local-scale interactions or on large-scale behaviour, boundaries are formed at different interfacial cuts, which lead to either an endo- or an exo-perspective or endo- or exo-anticipation, respectively. For biological extended agents which undergo a transition from exo- to endo-states, a tell-tale sign of a successful exo-endo transition is invisibility. This invisibility occurs when the agent is no longer aware of the delay originally introduced into the control loop by the assimilated part of the environment. Explaining the world in terms of effective causality is not sufficient to account for extended minds. The latter require explanations in terms of final causation. For extended minds, this ordering principle comes in the shape of nested hierarchical layers. The interfaces of these layers may have merged for an endo-observer, whereas an exo-observer can make out the detailed structure, including artificially introduced delays. A sufficient

  18. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q-Han

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments. PMID:26911786

  19. The QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    We review the present theoretical and empirical knowledge for αs, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dependence of αs(Q2) on momentum transfer Q encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics-from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on αs(Q2) at high Q2, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small Q2, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of αs(Q2) in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how αs is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as "Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization-scale ambiguity. We also report recent significant measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the "Principle of Maximum Conformality", which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of theoretical conventions such as the renormalization scheme. In the last part of the review, we discuss the challenge of understanding the analytic behavior αs(Q2) in the low momentum transfer domain. We survey various theoretical models for the nonperturbative strongly coupled regime, such as the light-front holographic approach to QCD. This new framework predicts the form of the quark-confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and

  20. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  1. Collective Motion in a Network of Self-Propelled Agent Systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhao, Dandan; Liu, Xueming; Gao, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions of animals that move towards the same direction is a conspicuous feature in nature. Such groups of animals are called a self-propelled agent (SPA) systems. Many studies have been focused on the synchronization of isolated SPA systems. In real scenarios, different SPA systems are coupled with each other forming a network of SPA systems. For example, a flock of birds and a school of fish show predator-prey relationships and different groups of birds may compete for food. In this work, we propose a general framework to study the collective motion of coupled self-propelled agent systems. Especially, we study how three different connections between SPA systems: symbiosis, predator-prey, and competition influence the synchronization of the network of SPA systems. We find that a network of SPA systems coupled with symbiosis relationship arrive at a complete synchronization as all its subsystems showing a complete synchronization; a network of SPA systems coupled by predator-prey relationship can not reach a complete synchronization and its subsystems converges to different synchronized directions; and the competitive relationship between SPA systems could increase the synchronization of each SPA systems, while the network of SPA systems coupled by competitive relationships shows an optimal synchronization for small coupling strength, indicating that small competition promotes the synchronization of the entire system. PMID:26640954

  2. Collective Motion in a Network of Self-Propelled Agent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Zhao, Dandan; Liu, Xueming; Gao, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions of animals that move towards the same direction is a conspicuous feature in nature. Such groups of animals are called a self-propelled agent (SPA) systems. Many studies have been focused on the synchronization of isolated SPA systems. In real scenarios, different SPA systems are coupled with each other forming a network of SPA systems. For example, a flock of birds and a school of fish show predator-prey relationships and different groups of birds may compete for food. In this work, we propose a general framework to study the collective motion of coupled self-propelled agent systems. Especially, we study how three different connections between SPA systems: symbiosis, predator-prey, and competition influence the synchronization of the network of SPA systems. We find that a network of SPA systems coupled with symbiosis relationship arrive at a complete synchronization as all its subsystems showing a complete synchronization; a network of SPA systems coupled by predator-prey relationship can not reach a complete synchronization and its subsystems converges to different synchronized directions; and the competitive relationship between SPA systems could increase the synchronization of each SPA systems, while the network of SPA systems coupled by competitive relationships shows an optimal synchronization for small coupling strength, indicating that small competition promotes the synchronization of the entire system. PMID:26640954

  3. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  4. Persuasive Conversational Agent with Persuasion Tactics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tatsuya; Kitamura, Yasuhiko

    Persuasive conversational agents persuade people to change their attitudes or behaviors through conversation, and are expected to be applied as virtual sales clerks in e-shopping sites. As an approach to create such an agent, we have developed a learning agent with the Wizard of Oz method in which a person called Wizard talks to the user pretending to be the agent. The agent observes the conversations between the Wizard and the user, and learns how to persuade people. In this method, the Wizard has to reply to most of the user's inputs at the beginning, but the burden gradually falls because the agent learns how to reply as the conversation model grows.

  5. Evolutionary algorithms and multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae C.

    2006-05-01

    This paper discusses how evolutionary algorithms are related to multi-agent systems and the possibility of military applications using the two disciplines. In particular, we present a game theoretic model for multi-agent resource distribution and allocation where agents in the environment must help each other to survive. Each agent maintains a set of variables representing actual friendship and perceived friendship. The model directly addresses problems in reputation management schemes in multi-agent systems and Peer-to-Peer distributed systems. We present algorithms based on evolutionary game process for maintaining the friendship values as well as a utility equation used in each agent's decision making. For an application problem, we adapted our formal model to the military coalition support problem in peace-keeping missions. Simulation results show that efficient resource allocation and sharing with minimum communication cost is achieved without centralized control.

  6. A New Understanding of Chemical Agent Release

    SciTech Connect

    Nakafuji, G; Greenman, R; Theofanous, T

    2002-07-24

    The evolution of thickened chemical agent released at supersonic velocities, due to a missile defense intercept or a properly functioning warhead, has been misunderstood. Current and historical experimental and modeling efforts have attributed agent breakup to a variety of droplet breakup mechanisms. According to this model, drops of agent fragment into subsequent generations of smaller drops until a stable drop size is reached. Recent experimental data conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel show that agent breakup is not driven by any droplet breakup mechanism. The breakup of agent is instead governed by viscoelastic behavior and aerodynamic history effects. This viscoelastic breakup mechanism results in the formation of threads and sheets of liquid, instead of drops. The evolution and final state of agent released has broad implications not only for aerobreakup models, but also for all atmospheric dispersion models.

  7. Moving just like you: motor interference depends on similar motility of agent and observer.

    PubMed

    Kupferberg, Aleksandra; Huber, Markus; Helfer, Bartosz; Lenz, Claus; Knoll, Alois; Glasauer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in neuroscience suggest an overlap between brain regions involved in the execution of movement and perception of another's movement. This so-called "action-perception coupling" is supposed to serve our ability to automatically infer the goals and intentions of others by internal simulation of their actions. A consequence of this coupling is motor interference (MI), the effect of movement observation on the trajectory of one's own movement. Previous studies emphasized that various features of the observed agent determine the degree of MI, but could not clarify how human-like an agent has to be for its movements to elicit MI and, more importantly, what 'human-like' means in the context of MI. Thus, we investigated in several experiments how different aspects of appearance and motility of the observed agent influence motor interference (MI). Participants performed arm movements in horizontal and vertical directions while observing videos of a human, a humanoid robot, or an industrial robot arm with either artificial (industrial) or human-like joint configurations. Our results show that, given a human-like joint configuration, MI was elicited by observing arm movements of both humanoid and industrial robots. However, if the joint configuration of the robot did not resemble that of the human arm, MI could longer be demonstrated. Our findings present evidence for the importance of human-like joint configuration rather than other human-like features for perception-action coupling when observing inanimate agents. PMID:22761853

  8. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  9. Considerations in detecting CDC select agents under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Charles; Soelberg, Scott; Swanson, Nathaneal; Furlong, Clement; Baker, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) has become a widely accepted technique for real-time detection of interactions between receptor molecules and ligands. Antibody may serve as receptor and can be attached to the gold surface of the SPR device, while candidate analyte fluids contact the detecting antibody. Minute, but detectable, changes in refractive indices (RI) indicate that analyte has bound to the antibody. A decade ago, an inexpensive, robust, miniature and fully integrated SPR chip, called SPREETA, was developed. University of Washington (UW) researchers subsequently developed a portable, temperature-regulated instrument, called SPIRIT, to simultaneously use eight of these three-channel SPREETA chips. A SPIRIT prototype instrument was tested in the field, coupled to a remote reporting system on a surrogate unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Two target protein analytes were released sequentially as aerosols with low analyte concentration during each of three flights and were successfully detected and verified. Laboratory experimentation with a more advanced SPIRIT instrument demonstrated detection of very low levels of several select biological agents that might be employed by bioterrorists. Agent detection under field-like conditions is more challenging, especially as analyte concentrations are reduced and complex matricies are introduced. Two different sample preconditioning protocols have been developed for select agents in complex matrices. Use of these preconditioning techniques has allowed laboratory detection in spiked heavy mud of Francisella tularensis at 10 3 CFU/ml, Bacillus anthracis spores at 10 3 CFU/ml, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) at 1 ng/ml, and Vaccinia virus (a smallpox simulant) at 10 5 PFU/ml. Ongoing experiments are aimed at simultaneous detection of multiple agents in spiked heavy mud, using a multiplex preconditioning protocol.

  10. Investigating biocomplexity through the agent-based paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Capturing the dynamism that pervades biological systems requires a computational approach that can accommodate both the continuous features of the system environment as well as the flexible and heterogeneous nature of component interactions. This presents a serious challenge for the more traditional mathematical approaches that assume component homogeneity to relate system observables using mathematical equations. While the homogeneity condition does not lead to loss of accuracy while simulating various continua, it fails to offer detailed solutions when applied to systems with dynamically interacting heterogeneous components. As the functionality and architecture of most biological systems is a product of multi-faceted individual interactions at the sub-system level, continuum models rarely offer much beyond qualitative similarity. Agent-based modelling is a class of algorithmic computational approaches that rely on interactions between Turing-complete finite-state machines—or agents—to simulate, from the bottom-up, macroscopic properties of a system. In recognizing the heterogeneity condition, they offer suitable ontologies to the system components being modelled, thereby succeeding where their continuum counterparts tend to struggle. Furthermore, being inherently hierarchical, they are quite amenable to coupling with other computational paradigms. The integration of any agent-based framework with continuum models is arguably the most elegant and precise way of representing biological systems. Although in its nascence, agent-based modelling has been utilized to model biological complexity across a broad range of biological scales (from cells to societies). In this article, we explore the reasons that make agent-based modelling the most precise approach to model biological systems that tend to be non-linear and complex. PMID:24227161

  11. Anaphylactoid and adverse reactions to radiocontrast agents.

    PubMed

    Hagan, John B

    2004-08-01

    Over the past 75 years, radiocontrast agents have provided numerous diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The benefits of these agents must be weighed against the potential risks for each individual undergoing radiologic tests. This summary is intended to be a guide for the allergy and immunology specialist to direct him or her to the current literature regarding adverse reactions to traditional and less commonly used radiologic contrast agents. PMID:15242724

  12. Massive Multi-Agent Systems Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campagne, Jean-Charles; Gardon, Alain; Collomb, Etienne; Nishida, Toyoaki

    2004-01-01

    In order to build massive multi-agent systems, considered as complex and dynamic systems, one needs a method to analyze and control the system. We suggest an approach using morphology to represent and control the state of large organizations composed of a great number of light software agents. Morphology is understood as representing the state of the multi-agent system as shapes in an abstract geometrical space, this notion is close to the notion of phase space in physics.

  13. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  14. Controllable optomechanical coupling in serially-coupled triple resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenguang Zhao, Yunsong; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-15

    Radiation pressure can efficiently couple mechanical modes with optical modes in an optical cavity. The coupling efficiency is quite dependent on the interaction between the optical mode and mechanical mode. In this report, we investigate a serially-coupled triple resonator system, where a freestanding beam is placed in the vicinity of the middle resonator. In this coupled system, we demonstrate that the mechanical mode of the free-standing beam can be selectively coupled to different resonance supermodes through the near field interaction.

  15. Departments as Agents of Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-07-01

    Higher education is changing because it has no choice. And, for the most part, outside influences are dictating the processes of change. The more fortunate institutions have had a flat budget during this period, but most have been forced to deal with a declining revenue stream as well. Legislators seem bent on micromanaging state-supported institutions, even as they cut their support. Regulators demand greater institutional accountability. Students and their parents expect more service at lower prices and increased flexibility. Technological advances have dramatically affected the availability and accessibility of extant knowledge. It is no longer a question of whether institutions will change, but rather, who will control the change. Most institutions possess long-standing academic traditions, but these are placed at risk in an increasingly competitive market that holds little sympathy for such traditions and may even see them as obstacles or barriers. As a result, the change agents will undoubtedly have a profound effect on the very nature of academic institutions. From the academic point of view, it would seem prudent to attempt to manage the changes that will inevitably occur. A number of concerned observers, notably the Pew Higher Education Roundtable and the American Association for Higher Education, argue persuasively that the academic department is the logical focus for responding to the current winds of change. Using a marketing metaphor, the academic department has been likened to a "producers' cooperative" of services that consumers seek. Thus, the department should be held accountable for the quality of teaching delivered by its members, for the coherence of its major, for its contributions to the general education curriculum, and for supervising and rewarding its individual faculty members. If departments are to be held accountable, it is surely in their best interest to act in such a way that they are accountable. Expecting academic departments to be

  16. Identification of Directional Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezruchko, Boris P.; Smirnov, Dmitry A.

    An important piece of information, which can be extracted from parameters of empirical models, is quantitative characteristics of couplings between processes under study. The problem of coupling detection is encountered in multiple fields including physics (Bezruchko et al., 2003), geophysics (Maraun and Kurths, 2005; Mokhov and Smirnov, 2006, 2008; Mosedale et al., 2006; Palus and Novotna, 2006; Verdes, 2005; Wang et al., 2004), cardiology (Rosenblum et al., 2002; Palus and Stefanovska, 2003) and neurophysiology (Arnhold et al., 1999; Brea et al., 2006; Faes et al., 2008; Friston et al., 2003; Kreuz et al., 2007; Kiemel et al., 2003; Le Van Quyen et al., 1999; Mormann et al., 2000; Osterhage et al., 2007; Pereda et al., 2005; Prusseit and Lehnertz, 2008; Smirnov et al., 2005; Romano et al., 2007; Schelter et al., 2006; Schiff et al., 1996; Sitnikova et al., 2008; Smirnov et al., 2008, Staniek and Lehnertz, 2008; Tass, 1999; Tass et al., 2003). Numerous investigations are devoted to synchronisation, which is an effect of interaction between non-linear oscillatory systems (see, e.g., Balanov et al., 2008; Boccaletti et al., 2002; Hramov and Koronovskii, 2004; Kreuz et al., 2007; Maraun and Kurths, 2005; Mormann et al., 2000; Mosekilde et al., 2002; Osipov et al., 2007; Palus and Novotna, 2006; Pikovsky et al., 2001; Prokhorov et al., 2003; Tass et al., 2003). In the last decade, more careful attention is paid to directional coupling analysis. Such characteristics might help, e.g., to localise an epileptic focus (a pathologic area) in the brain from electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings: hypothetically, an increasing influence of an epileptic focus on adjacent areas leads to the seizure onset for some kinds of epilepsy.

  17. Air-Coupled Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, D.; Solodov, I.; Busse, G.

    Sound and ultrasound in air are the products of a multitude of different processes and thus can be favorable or undesirable phenomena. Development of experimental tools for non-invasive measurements and imaging of airborne sound fields is of importance for linear and nonlinear nondestructive material testing as well as noise control in industrial or civil engineering applications. One possible solution is based on acousto-optic interaction, like light diffraction imaging. The diffraction approach usually requires a sophisticated setup with fine optical alignment barely applicable in industrial environment. This paper focuses on the application of the robust experimental tool of scanning laser vibrometry, which utilizes commercial off-the-shelf equipment. The imaging technique of air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is based on the modulation of the optical path length by the acoustic pressure of the sound wave. The theoretical considerations focus on the analysis of acousto-optical phase modulation. The sensitivity of the ACV in detecting vibration velocity was estimated as ~1 mm/s. The ACV applications to imaging of linear airborne fields are demonstrated for leaky wave propagation and measurements of ultrasonic air-coupled transducers. For higher-intensity ultrasound, the classical nonlinear effect of the second harmonic generation was measured in air. Another nonlinear application includes a direct observation of the nonlinear air-coupled emission (NACE) from the damaged areas in solid materials. The source of the NACE is shown to be strongly localized around the damage and proposed as a nonlinear "tag" to discern and image the defects.

  18. The coupled atom transistor.

    PubMed

    Jehl, X; Voisin, B; Roche, B; Dupont-Ferrier, E; De Franceschi, S; Sanquer, M; Cobian, M; Niquet, Y-M; Sklénard, B; Cueto, O; Wacquez, R; Vinet, M

    2015-04-22

    We describe the first implementation of a coupled atom transistor where two shallow donors (P or As) are implanted in a nanoscale silicon nanowire and their electronic levels are controlled with three gate voltages. Transport spectroscopy through these donors placed in series is performed both at zero and microwave frequencies. The coherence of the charge transfer between the two donors is probed by Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Single-charge transfer at zero bias (electron pumping) has been performed and the crossover between the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes is studied. PMID:25783566

  19. The coupled atom transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, X.; Voisin, B.; Roche, B.; Dupont-Ferrier, E.; De Franceschi, S.; Sanquer, M.; Cobian, M.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Sklénard, B.; Cueto, O.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the first implementation of a coupled atom transistor where two shallow donors (P or As) are implanted in a nanoscale silicon nanowire and their electronic levels are controlled with three gate voltages. Transport spectroscopy through these donors placed in series is performed both at zero and microwave frequencies. The coherence of the charge transfer between the two donors is probed by Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Single-charge transfer at zero bias (electron pumping) has been performed and the crossover between the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes is studied.

  20. Magnetic Coupling Delivers Increased Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    Fixed magnetic pins reduce reluctance of gap in magnetic coupling. Concentrate flux and increase torque transmitted. Coupling arranged as face or radial drive. Addition of flux pins to gap between magnetically coupled shafts in bioreactor experiment increases transferred torque by almost 50 percent.

  1. Radioiodine: the classic theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Edward B

    2012-05-01

    Radioiodine has the distinction of being the first theranostic agent in our armamentarium. Millennia were required to discover that the agent in orally administered seaweed and its extracts, which had been shown to cure neck swelling due to thyromegaly, was iodine, first demonstrated to be a new element in 1813. Treatment of goiter with iodine began at once, but its prophylactic value to prevent a common form of goiter took another century. After Enrico Fermi produced the first radioiodine, (128)I, in 1934, active experimentation in the United States and France delineated the crucial role of iodine in thyroid metabolism and disease. (130)I and (131)I were first employed to treat thyrotoxicosis by 1941, and thyroid cancer in 1943. After World War II, (131)I became widely available at a reasonable price for diagnostic testing and therapy. The rectilinear scanner of Cassen and Curtis (Science 1949;110:94-95), and a dedicated gamma camera invented by Anger (Nature 1952;170:200-201), finally permitted the diagnostic imaging of thyroid disease, with (131)I again the radioisotope of choice, although there were short-lived attempts to employ (125)I and (132)I for this purpose. (123)I was first produced in 1949 but did not become widely available until about 1982, 10 years after a production technique eliminated high-energy (124)I contamination. I continues to be the radioiodine of choice for the diagnosis of benign thyroid disease, whereas (123)I and (131)I are employed in the staging and detection of functioning thyroid cancer. (124)I, a positron emitter, can produce excellent anatomically correlated images employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography equipment and has the potential to enhance heretofore imperfect dosimetric studies in determining the appropriate administered activity to ablate/treat thyroid cancer. Issues of acceptable measuring error in thyroid cancer dosimetry and the role in (131)I therapy of tumor heterogeneity, tumor hypoxia, and

  2. Emergency department management of nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, B L

    1998-01-01

    Nerve agents are toxic chemicals developed for use by the military, but used by terrorists against civilian populations. As threats of terrorism increase, it is possible that health care providers will be confronted with multiple victims of nerve agent exposure. Nerve agents are highly toxic forms of organophosphate poisons that potentially could cause harm to anyone who comes in contact. Emergency personnel need to be familiar with the agents, know how to prepare for encountering and treating victims, and know how to protect all people involved from further poisoning. PMID:9855972

  3. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials. PMID:23872337

  4. Oak Ridge Mobile Agent Community (ORMAC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-06-30

    The Oak Ridge Mobile Agent Community (ORMAC) framework software facilitates the execution of a collection of mobile software agents across a heterogeneous collection of computer systems. ORMAC provides the software agents with the ability to communicate with each other in a synchronous and asynchronous manner. Also, ORMAC allows the software agents to move to any computer system in the community and continue execution there. ORMAC is intended to aid programmers in solving a very generalmore » set of distributed software problems.« less

  5. Dentine and enamel bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, R L; Tung, M S; Blosser, R L; Asmussen, E

    1987-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential use of aqueous FO (ferric oxalate containing a small concentration of HNO3), acetone solutions of NPG (N-phenylglycine), and PMDM (the reaction product of pyromellitic dianhydride and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) yields strong adhesive bonding of composite resins to both dentine and enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if aluminum ions could be substituted for ferric ions and if the procedure could be simplified. Aqueous solutions containing aluminum oxalate and aluminum nitrate, followed in sequence by acetone solutions of NPG and PMDM, gave strong tensile adhesive bond strengths between a composite and extracted human teeth. Comparable values have been obtained with FO, NPG and PMDM. Aluminum oxalate solutions containing no nitrate gave lower bond strengths, as was the case with FO. Aqueous solutions of acidified aluminum oxalate can dissolve NPG, thereby allowing a simplification of the procedure. Tested for comparison, commercially available dentine bonding agents gave lower average bond strengths on dentine than did some of the experimental materials. PMID:3316044

  6. Cold as a therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Olivero, W; Wang, D; Lanzino, G

    2006-05-01

    The use of cold as a therapeutic agent has a long and colorful history. The Edwin Smith Papyrus, the most ancient medical text known, dated 3500 B.C., made numerous references to the use of cold as therapy. Baron de Larrey, a French army surgeon during Napoleon's Russian campaign, packed the limbs in ice prior to amputations to render the procedures painless. In the early twentieth century, a neurosurgeon, Temple Fay, pioneered "human refrigeration" as a treatment for malignancies and head injuries. In 1961, Irving Cooper developed the first closed cryoprobe system and ushered in the modern era of cryogenic surgery with his imperturbable convictions. Fay's early work fell victim to the disruptive sequel of the World War II. The Nazis confiscated his data (presented before the Third International Cancer Congress in 1939) forwarded to Belgium for publication and brutally applied his refrigeration techniques experimentally without any benefit of anesthesia in the concentration camps, especially Dachau. Hypothermia became associated in the public mind with the atrocities exposed at the war trials in Nürnberg. After lying dormant for decades, the interest was rekindled in the late 80s when mild hypothermia was shown to confer dramatic neuroprotection in a number of experimental models of brain injury. With several large multi-center clinical studies currently under way, hypothermia is receiving unprecedented attention from the medical and scientific communities. PMID:16489500

  7. Direct anti-HCV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the "cure HCV" goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  8. Departments as Agents of Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-07-01

    Higher education is changing because it has no choice. And, for the most part, outside influences are dictating the processes of change. The more fortunate institutions have had a flat budget during this period, but most have been forced to deal with a declining revenue stream as well. Legislators seem bent on micromanaging state-supported institutions, even as they cut their support. Regulators demand greater institutional accountability. Students and their parents expect more service at lower prices and increased flexibility. Technological advances have dramatically affected the availability and accessibility of extant knowledge. It is no longer a question of whether institutions will change, but rather, who will control the change. Most institutions possess long-standing academic traditions, but these are placed at risk in an increasingly competitive market that holds little sympathy for such traditions and may even see them as obstacles or barriers. As a result, the change agents will undoubtedly have a profound effect on the very nature of academic institutions. From the academic point of view, it would seem prudent to attempt to manage the changes that will inevitably occur. A number of concerned observers, notably the Pew Higher Education Roundtable and the American Association for Higher Education, argue persuasively that the academic department is the logical focus for responding to the current winds of change. Using a marketing metaphor, the academic department has been likened to a "producers' cooperative" of services that consumers seek. Thus, the department should be held accountable for the quality of teaching delivered by its members, for the coherence of its major, for its contributions to the general education curriculum, and for supervising and rewarding its individual faculty members. If departments are to be held accountable, it is surely in their best interest to act in such a way that they are accountable. Expecting academic departments to be

  9. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  10. New therapeutic agents for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    REID, JOHN L.

    1996-01-01

    1Over the last 40 years a range of therapeutic strategies has been introduced for the long term treatment of hypertension. 2Although safe effective agents are available a significant number of patients are unable or unwilling to take these drugs as long term treatment. 3Both insufficient efficacy and adverse effects justify the search for new antihypertensive strategies. 4Recent developments include orally active angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonists (ARA) which appear to offer the benefits of prevention of angiotensin II effects without the adverse effects of bradykinin potentiation, such as cough, which limit the usefulness of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. 5Imidazoline receptor agonists offer the potential of centrally active antihypertensives without the adverse effects of sedation and dry mouth. Further clinical experience is necessary to confirm whether the clinical efficacy and good tolerability are confirmed with long term use. 6Both ARA and imidazoline preferring substances offer the bonus of a desirable haemodynamic profile in patients with heart failure and may open new therapeutic avenues in the management of cardiac failure. PMID:8807142

  11. Direct anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the “cure HCV” goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  12. Radiation recall with anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Burris, Howard A; Hurtig, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Radiation recall is an acute inflammatory reaction confined to previously irradiated areas that can be triggered when chemotherapy agents are administered after radiotherapy. It remains a poorly understood phenomenon, but increased awareness may aid early diagnosis and appropriate management. A diverse range of drugs used in the treatment of cancer has been associated with radiation recall. As most data come from case reports, it is not possible to determine the true incidence, but to date the antineoplastic drugs for which radiation recall reactions have been most commonly reported include the anthracycline doxorubicin, the taxanes docetaxel and paclitaxel, and the antimetabolites gemcitabine and capecitabine. Radiation recall is drug-specific for any individual patient; it is not possible to predict which patients will react to which drugs, and rechallenge does not uniformly induce a reaction. There are no identifiable characteristics of drugs that cause radiation recall, and thus, it is a possibility that must be kept in mind with use of any drug after radiotherapy, including those from new drug classes. Although it is not yet possible to design treatment regimens to eliminate the risk of radiation recall, it seems likely that risks can be minimized by prolonging the interval between completion of radiotherapy and initiation of chemotherapy. PMID:21045191

  13. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focussing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Stockpile Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons, which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand this coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense ({ge} 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse 1.06 {mu}m laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities (0.35 to 10{sup 4} x n{sub crit}). Ponderomotive effects are included as a force on the cold background and hot emission electrons of the form, F{sub h,c} = -({omega}{sup 2}{sub Ph,c}/2{omega}{sup 2}){del}I, in which I is the laser intensity and {omega}{sub p}{sup 2} = 4{pi}e{sup 2}n/m{sub 0}{gamma} with m{sub 0} the electron rest mass.

  14. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or funding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons (suprathermal), which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand the electron fuel coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense short pulse laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities. Our study will spell out the acceleration and transport mechanisms active in the Fast Ignitor environment.

  15. Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Michael T.

    2013-12-02

    This particular consortium implementation of the software integration infrastructure will, in large part, refactor portions of the Rocstar multiphysics infrastructure. Development of this infrastructure originated at the University of Illinois DOE ASCI Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) to support the center's massively parallel multiphysics simulation application, Rocstar, and has continued at IllinoisRocstar, a small company formed near the end of the University-based program. IllinoisRocstar is now licensing these new developments as free, open source, in hopes to help improve their own and others' access to infrastructure which can be readily utilized in developing coupled or composite software systems; with particular attention to more rapid production and utilization of multiphysics applications in the HPC environment. There are two major pieces to the consortium implementation, the Application Component Toolkit (ACT), and the Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit (MPACT). The current development focus is the ACT, which is (will be) the substrate for MPACT. The ACT itself is built up from the components described in the technical approach. In particular, the ACT has the following major components: 1.The Component Object Manager (COM): The COM package provides encapsulation of user applications, and their data. COM also provides the inter-component function call mechanism. 2.The System Integration Manager (SIM): The SIM package provides constructs and mechanisms for orchestrating composite systems of multiply integrated pieces.

  16. Coupled biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. M.; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton provides the cell with structural integrity and allows it to change shape to crawl along a surface, for example. The actin cytoskeleton can be modeled as a semiflexible biopolymer network that modifies its morphology in response to both external and internal stimuli. Just inside the inner nuclear membrane of a cell exists a network of filamentous lamin that presumably protects the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. Lamins are intermediate filaments that can also be modeled as semiflexible biopolymers. It turns out that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins that bridge the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the cytoskeletal network. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription, since DNA--yet another semiflexible polymer--contains lamin-binding domains, and, thus, widen the field of epigenetics.

  17. Magnetically Coupled Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, S.A.

    1999-01-26

    Throughout the DOE complex, materials are routinely transported within glovebox processing lines. Cylindrical product cans, crucibles, sample containers, tools, and waste products are all examples of items that are moved between equipment stations during glovebox operations. Traditional transport methods have included manual handling using tongs, chain and belt conveyors, carts with pull wires, and overhead hoists on monorails. These methods rely on hands-on operations and/or utilize high maintenance equipment located inside the gloveboxes, which can lead to high radiation exposure to personnel and can generate large amounts of radioactive waste. One innovative approach incorporates linear induction motors (LIMs) so that high maintenance items are located outside the gloveboxes, but LIMs produce heat, do not move smoothly over a wide range of velocities, and are not locked in position at zero velocity. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) engineers have developed and demonstrated a concept for a magnetically coupled transport system to transfer material within process lines and from line to line. This automated system significantly reduces hands-on operations. Linear actuators and lead screws provide smooth horizontal and vertical movement. Rare earth magnetic coupling technology allows the majority of the equipment to be located outside the glovebox, simplifying maintenance and minimizing radioactive waste.

  18. Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Calorimeters that utilize the temperature sensitivity of magnetism have been under development for over 20 years. They have targeted a variety of different applications that require very high resolution spectroscopy. I will describe the properties of this sensor technology that distinguish it from other low temperature detectors and emphasize the types of application to which they appear best suited. I will review what has been learned so far about the best materials, geometries, and read-out amplifiers and our understanding of the measured performance and theoretical limits. I will introduce some of the applications where magnetic calorimeters are being used and also where they are in development for future experiments. So far, most magnetic calorimeter research has concentrated on the use of paramagnets to provide temperature sensitivity; recent studies have also focused on magnetically coupled calorimeters that utilize the diamagnetic response of superconductors. I will present some of the highlights of this research, and contrast the properties of the two magnetically coupled calorimeter types.

  19. Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-12-02

    This particular consortium implementation of the software integration infrastructure will, in large part, refactor portions of the Rocstar multiphysics infrastructure. Development of this infrastructure originated at the University of Illinois DOE ASCI Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) to support the center's massively parallel multiphysics simulation application, Rocstar, and has continued at IllinoisRocstar, a small company formed near the end of the University-based program. IllinoisRocstar is now licensing these new developments as free, openmore » source, in hopes to help improve their own and others' access to infrastructure which can be readily utilized in developing coupled or composite software systems; with particular attention to more rapid production and utilization of multiphysics applications in the HPC environment. There are two major pieces to the consortium implementation, the Application Component Toolkit (ACT), and the Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit (MPACT). The current development focus is the ACT, which is (will be) the substrate for MPACT. The ACT itself is built up from the components described in the technical approach. In particular, the ACT has the following major components: 1.The Component Object Manager (COM): The COM package provides encapsulation of user applications, and their data. COM also provides the inter-component function call mechanism. 2.The System Integration Manager (SIM): The SIM package provides constructs and mechanisms for orchestrating composite systems of multiply integrated pieces.« less

  20. The QCD running coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge onmore » $$\\alpha_{s}$$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $$\\alpha_s$$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled

  1. Collective motion patterns of swarms with delay coupling: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaykowska, Klementyna; Schwartz, Ira B.; Mier-y-Teran Romero, Luis; Heckman, Christoffer R.; Mox, Dan; Hsieh, M. Ani

    2016-03-01

    The formation of coherent patterns in swarms of interacting self-propelled autonomous agents is a subject of great interest in a wide range of application areas, ranging from engineering and physics to biology. In this paper, we model and experimentally realize a mixed-reality large-scale swarm of delay-coupled agents. The coupling term is modeled as a delayed communication relay of position. Our analyses, assuming agents communicating over an Erdös-Renyi network, demonstrate the existence of stable coherent patterns that can be achieved only with delay coupling and that are robust to decreasing network connectivity and heterogeneity in agent dynamics. We also show how the bifurcation structure for emergence of different patterns changes with heterogeneity in agent acceleration capabilities and limited connectivity in the network as a function of coupling strength and delay. Our results are verified through simulation as well as preliminary experimental results of delay-induced pattern formation in a mixed-reality swarm.

  2. Collective motion patterns of swarms with delay coupling: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Szwaykowska, Klementyna; Schwartz, Ira B; Mier-Y-Teran Romero, Luis; Heckman, Christoffer R; Mox, Dan; Hsieh, M Ani

    2016-03-01

    The formation of coherent patterns in swarms of interacting self-propelled autonomous agents is a subject of great interest in a wide range of application areas, ranging from engineering and physics to biology. In this paper, we model and experimentally realize a mixed-reality large-scale swarm of delay-coupled agents. The coupling term is modeled as a delayed communication relay of position. Our analyses, assuming agents communicating over an Erdös-Renyi network, demonstrate the existence of stable coherent patterns that can be achieved only with delay coupling and that are robust to decreasing network connectivity and heterogeneity in agent dynamics. We also show how the bifurcation structure for emergence of different patterns changes with heterogeneity in agent acceleration capabilities and limited connectivity in the network as a function of coupling strength and delay. Our results are verified through simulation as well as preliminary experimental results of delay-induced pattern formation in a mixed-reality swarm. PMID:27078366

  3. Laboratory conditions and safety in a chemical warfare agent analysis and research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Levent; Karayilanoğlu, Turan; Kose, Songul

    2002-08-01

    Toxic chemicals have been used as weapons of war and also as means of terrorist attacks on civilian populations. Research focusing on chemical warfare agents (CWAs) may be associated with an increased risk of exposure to and contamination by these agents. This article summarizes some of the regulations concerning designation and safety in a CWA analysis and research laboratory and medical countermeasures in case of an accidental exposure. The design of such a laboratory, coupled with a set of safety guidelines, provides for the safe conduct of research and studies involving CWAs. Thus, a discussion of decontamination and protection means against CWAs is also presented. PMID:12188231

  4. The epitheliome: agent-based modelling of the social behaviour of cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, D C; Southgate, J; Hill, G; Holcombe, M; Hose, D R; Wood, S M; Mac Neil, S; Smallwood, R H

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new computational modelling paradigm for predicting the emergent behaviour resulting from the interaction of cells in epithelial tissue. As proof-of-concept, an agent-based model, in which there is a one-to-one correspondence between biological cells and software agents, has been coupled to a simple physical model. Behaviour of the computational model is compared with the growth characteristics of epithelial cells in monolayer culture, using growth media with low and physiological calcium concentrations. Results show a qualitative fit between the growth characteristics produced by the simulation and the in vitro cell models. PMID:15351133

  5. 3DGIS-Based Multi-Agent Geosimulation and Visualization of Building Evacuation Using GAMA Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macatulad, E. G.; Blanco, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Recent GIS applications have already extended analyses from the traditional 2-2.5D environment (x,y,attributes) to 3D space (x,y,z,attributes). Coupled with agent-based modeling (ABM), available 3DGIS data can be used to develop simulation models for improved analysis of spatial data and spatial processes. One such application is on building evacuation for which ABM is integrated with 3D indoor spatial data to model human behavior during evacuation events and simulate evacuation scenarios visualized in 3D. The research presented in this paper develops a multi-agent geosimulation model for building evacuation, integrating 3DGIS dataset of the case study building as input in ABM using the GAMA simulation platform. This model is intended to complement and improve traditional approaches in building evacuation planning and management such as earthquake and fire drills. The initial model developed includes PEOPLE agents to model the building occupants, and FLOORS, ROOMS, INDOOR_PATHS and EXIT_POINTS agents, which are modeled from the 3DGIS layers. The INDOOR_PATHS and EXIT_POINTS agents influence the movement of PEOPLE agents. Test simulations were performed involving PEOPLE agents placed in rooms of the building based on potential number of occupants computed based from the floor area of each room. The PEOPLE agents are programmed to find the shortest path along the INDOOR_PATHS towards the EXIT_POINTS instance designated for each room of the building. The simulation computes for the total time it takes for all PEOPLE agents to exit the building.

  6. Reinforcement Learning Multi-Agent Modeling of Decision-Making Agents for the Study of Transboundary Surface Water Conflicts with Application to the Syr Darya River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegels, N.; Siegfried, T.; Pereira Cardenal, S. J.; Jensen, R. A.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2008-12-01

    In most economics--driven approaches to optimizing water use at the river basin scale, the system is modelled deterministically with the goal of maximizing overall benefits. However, actual operation and allocation decisions must be made under hydrologic and economic uncertainty. In addition, river basins often cross political boundaries, and different states may not be motivated to cooperate so as to maximize basin- scale benefits. Even within states, competing agents such as irrigation districts, municipal water agencies, and large industrial users may not have incentives to cooperate to realize efficiency gains identified in basin- level studies. More traditional simulation--optimization approaches assume pre-commitment by individual agents and stakeholders and unconditional compliance on each side. While this can help determine attainable gains and tradeoffs from efficient management, such hardwired policies do not account for dynamic feedback between agents themselves or between agents and their environments (e.g. due to climate change etc.). In reality however, we are dealing with an out-of-equilibrium multi-agent system, where there is neither global knowledge nor global control, but rather continuous strategic interaction between decision making agents. Based on the theory of stochastic games, we present a computational framework that allows for studying the dynamic feedback between decision--making agents themselves and an inherently uncertain environment in a spatially and temporally distributed manner. Agents with decision-making control over water allocation such as countries, irrigation districts, and municipalities are represented by reinforcement learning agents and coupled to a detailed hydrologic--economic model. This approach emphasizes learning by agents from their continuous interaction with other agents and the environment. It provides a convenient framework for the solution of the problem of dynamic decision-making in a mixed cooperative / non

  7. Safe motion planning for mobile agents: A model of reactive planning for multiple mobile agents

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Kikuo.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of motion planning for multiple mobile agents is studied. Each planning agent independently plans its own action based on its map which contains a limited information about the environment. In an environment where more than one mobile agent interacts, the motions of the robots are uncertain and dynamic. A model for reactive agents is described and simulation results are presented to show their behavior patterns. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The Design of Motivational Agents and Avatars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    While the addition of an anthropomorphic interface agent to a learning system generally has little direct impact on learning, it potentially has a huge impact on learner motivation. As such agents become increasingly ubiquitous on the Internet, in virtual worlds, and as interfaces for learning and gaming systems, it is important to design them to…

  9. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS AGENTS AND WATERBORNE DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of electron microscopic techniques in the study of human gastroenteritis led in the 1970's to the identification of new viral agents that had previously escaped detection by routine cell culture procedures. These agents have been the focus of study by researchers ...

  10. Improving Disability Awareness among Extension Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahadevan, Lakshmi; Peterson, Rick L.; Grenwelge, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Increasing prevalence rates and legislative mandates imply that educators, parents, and Extension agents will need better tools and resources to meet the needs of special populations. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service addresses this issue by using e-learning tools. Extension agents can take advantage of these courses to gain critical…

  11. 21 CFR 178.3125 - Anticorrosive agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section may be used as anticorrosive agents in food-contact materials subject to the provisions of this... component of resinous and polymeric food-contact coatings intended for repeated use in contact with dry... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anticorrosive agents. 178.3125 Section...

  12. 21 CFR 178.3125 - Anticorrosive agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section may be used as anticorrosive agents in food-contact materials subject to the provisions of this... component of resinous and polymeric food-contact coatings intended for repeated use in contact with dry... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anticorrosive agents. 178.3125 Section...

  13. 21 CFR 178.3125 - Anticorrosive agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... agents in food-contact materials subject to the provisions of this section: Substances Limitations Zinc... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anticorrosive agents. 178.3125 Section 178.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 3 - General Agents' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General Agents' responsibilities. Sec. 3 Section 3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY OF GENERAL AGENTS TO UNDERTAKE EMERGENCY REPAIRS IN FOREIGN PORTS Sec. 3 General...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - General Agents' authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General Agents' authority. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY OF GENERAL AGENTS TO UNDERTAKE IN CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES PORTS VOYAGE REPAIRS AND...

  16. 7 CFR 58.722 - Emulsifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.722 Emulsifying agents. Emulsifying agents shall be those permitted by the Food and Drug Administration for the specific pasteurized process cheese product, and shall be free from extraneous...

  17. 7 CFR 58.722 - Emulsifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.722 Emulsifying agents. Emulsifying agents shall be those permitted by the Food and Drug Administration for the specific pasteurized process cheese product, and shall be free from extraneous...

  18. Security of Mobile Agents on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corradi, Antonio; Montanari, Rebecca; Stefanelli, Cesare

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet focuses on new programming paradigms based on mobile agents. Considers the security issues associated with mobile agents and proposes a security architecture composed of a wide set of services and components capable of adapting to a variety of applications, particularly electronic commerce. (Author/LRW)

  19. Marine Natural Products as Prototype Agrochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Xiaoyu; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Dunbar, D. C Harles; Perry, Tony L.; Wilkins, Scott P.; Hamann, Mark T.; Bobzin, Steve; Huesing, Joseph; Camp, Robin; Prinsen, Mike; Krupa, Dan; Wideman, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of identifying new leads that could serve as prototype agrochemical agents, 18 structurally diverse marine-derived compounds were examined for insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal activities. Several new classes of compounds have been shown to be insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal, which suggests that marine natural products represent an intriguing source for the discovery of new agrochemical agents. PMID:12670165

  20. 13 CFR 120.952 - Fiscal agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiscal agent. 120.952 Section 120.952 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company... Fiscal Agent to assess the financial markets, minimize the cost of sales, arrange for the production...

  1. Assurance in Agent-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliom, Laura R.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-05-10

    Our vision of the future of information systems is one that includes engineered collectives of software agents which are situated in an environment over years and which increasingly improve the performance of the overall system of which they are a part. At a minimum, the movement of agent and multi-agent technology into National Security applications, including their use in information assurance, is apparent today. The use of deliberative, autonomous agents in high-consequence/high-security applications will require a commensurate level of protection and confidence in the predictability of system-level behavior. At Sandia National Laboratories, we have defined and are addressing a research agenda that integrates the surety (safety, security, and reliability) into agent-based systems at a deep level. Surety is addressed at multiple levels: The integrity of individual agents must be protected by addressing potential failure modes and vulnerabilities to malevolent threats. Providing for the surety of the collective requires attention to communications surety issues and mechanisms for identifying and working with trusted collaborators. At the highest level, using agent-based collectives within a large-scale distributed system requires the development of principled design methods to deliver the desired emergent performance or surety characteristics. This position paper will outline the research directions underway at Sandia, will discuss relevant work being performed elsewhere, and will report progress to date toward assurance in agent-based systems.

  2. Practice among Novice Change Agents in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blossing, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the article is to understand practice as negotiation of meaning among novice and internal change agents in school organisations. The research question is as follows: What themes of participation and reification/management occur among the change agents? The study was qualitative in design using the social learning theory of community of…

  3. Kromoscopy for detection of chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Kenneth J.; Sanghera, Jas; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Block, Myron J.

    2004-12-01

    The ability of a Kromoscope to discriminate between chemical warfare agent simulants and toxic industrial chemicals is evaluated. The Kromoscope response to the simulants DMMP and DIMP is compared to a pesticide (diazanon) and cyclopentanol. The response of a mid-infrared Kromoscope to the nerve agents VX and GB and the stimulant DF are calculated.

  4. Explor@ Advisory Agent: Tracing the Student's Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren-Cayrol, Karin; Paquette, Gilbert; Miara, Alexis; Bergeron, Frederick; Rivard, Jacques; Rosca, Ioan

    This paper presents research and development of an adaptive World Wide Web-based system called Explor@ Advisory Agent, capable of tailoring advice to the individual student's needs, actions, and reactions toward pedagogical events, as well as according to diagnosis of content acquisition. Explor@ Advisory Agent consists of two sub-systems, the…

  5. The Change Agent's Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havelock, Ronald G.; Zlotolow, Steve

    This guidebook describes how successful change happens and how change agents can organize their work to make it happen. It is designed to help change agents in various organizational settings understand the dimensions of the problem and the social situation; organize a plan for change; know what to look for and what to avoid in one's self, team,…

  6. Your company's secret change agents.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Richard Tanner; Sternin, Jerry

    2005-05-01

    Organizational change has traditionally come about through top-down initiatives such as hiring experts or importing best-of-breed practices. Such methods usually result in companywide rollouts of templates mandated from on high. These do little to get people excited. But within every organization, there are a few individuals who find unique ways to look at problems that seem impossible to solve. Although these change agents start out with the same tools and access to resources as their peers, they are able to see solutions where others do not. They find a way to bridge the divide between what is happening and what is possible. These positive deviants are the key, the authors believe, to a better way of creating organizational change. Your company can make the most of their methods by following six steps. In Step 1, Make the group the guru, the members of the community are engaged in the process of their own evolution. Step 2, Reframe through facts, entails restating the problem in a way that opens minds to new possibilities. Step 3, Make it safe to learn, involves creating an environment that supports innovative ideas. In Step 4, Make the problem concrete, the community combats abstraction by stating uncomfortable truths. In Step 5, Leverage social proof, the community looks to the larger society for examples of solutions that have worked in parallel situations. In Step 6, Confound the immune defense response, solutions are introduced organically from within the group in a way that promotes acceptance. Throughout the steps, the leader must suspend his or her traditional role in favor of more facilitatory practices. The positive-deviance approach has unearthed solutions to such complicated and diverse problems as malnutrition in Mali and human trafficking in East Java. This methodology can help solve even the most extreme dilemmas. PMID:15929405

  7. Polymeric coupling agents for enhancing the adhesion of epoxy to steel-II

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidesswaran, K.; Bell, J.P.; Nikles, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Steel is one of the most versatile materials known to mankind. It is used in a variety of applications. In many of these applications, it is exposed to the atmosphere, leading to rust formation, which weakens structures made using steel. Hence, protection is important. The popular methods to prevent corrosion are painting, galvanizing, electroplating etc. The widely used Chrome etching process is very effective in corrosion inhibition as well as in hardening the steel. But, Chromium and its compounds are highly placed among the toxic chemicals listed under pollution prevention initiatives of the EPA. Hence, it was decided to find alternatives to this process.

  8. Development of chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/glycerol hydrogel as a thermosensitive coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chen, Yu-Bin; Lo, Yu-Lung; Lin, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-08-20

    This work develops a dual-function thermosensitive hydrogel to prevent overheating, a side effect of focused ultrasound therapy. The proposed hydrogel has the components of chitosan, β-glycerophosphate, and glycerol. Its thermosensitive sol-to-gel transition gives an instant signal of overheating without the need of any awkward sensing device. Impacts of varying component concentrations on the sol-to-gel temperature, rate, and degree of transparency are also investigated. Chemical structures and ultrasonic coefficients after heating are obtained with a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultrasonic measurement, respectively. Optimized formula of the proposed hydrogel is 0.5% chitosan, 5% β-glycerophosphate, and 25% glycerol. This hydrogel has a high acoustic impedance (Z=1.8 Mrayl) close to that of human skin, high ultrasonic transmission (T=99%, which is normalized to water) from 25 to 55°C, and low attenuation coefficient (α=4.0Np/m). These properties assure the success of dual functions of the hydrogel developed in this work. PMID:27178947

  9. Nanometal-Oxide Sunscreen Agents by Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis with detection by ICPMS is being explored to characterize nanomaterials in waste water treatment plant effluents. TiO2 and ZnO, being widely used as UV filters in personal care products, plastics, and paints, are of concern as they enter the environment...

  10. EFFECT OF SILANE COUPLING AGENTS ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLVENTLESS MAGNETIC INK. (R826728)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Surface modification of apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic by synthetic coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Qin; Zhou, Da-Li; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Jia-Bei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, lysine was introduced into the surface of apatite—wollastonite glass ceramic (AW-GC) to improve its cytocompatibility by two steps reaction procedure. Firstly, lysine connected to N-β-(aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane (A-1120) by covalent binding of amide group. Secondly, the lysine-functionalized A-1120 was deposited on the surface of AW-GC through a silanization reaction involving a covalent attachment. FTIR spectra indicated that lysine had been immobilized onto the surface of AW-GC successfully. Bioactivity of the surface modified AW-GC was investigated by simulated body fluid (SBF), and the in vitro cytocompatibility was evaluated by coculturing with human osteosarcoma cell MG63. The results showed that the process of hydroxyapatite layer formed on the modified material was similar to AW-GC while the mode of hydroxyapatite deposition was changed. The growth of MG63 cells showed that modifying the AW-GC surface with lysine enhances the cell adhesion and proliferation.

  12. Effect of coupling agents on the weathering characteristics of bio-fiber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-fiber polymer composites (BFPC) are composite materials made from a thermoplastic or thermoset resin (substrate) with cellulosic fibers as fillers or reinforcement. BFPC have shown a significant growth in the last decade as a building product, automotive parts, and landscaping products. BFPC com...

  13. Sugar beet pulp and poly(lactic acid) composites using methylene diphenyl diisocyanate as coupling agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites from sugar beet pulp (SBP) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were extruded in the presence of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI). SBP particles were evenly distributed within the PLA matrix phase as revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopic analysis. The resultant composites w...

  14. Effect of particle size, coupling agent and DDGS additions on Paulownia wood polypropylene composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanical, flexural, thermal, and physical characteristics of wood plastic composites employing Paulownia wood (PP) flour derived from 36-mo-old trees blended with polypropylene (PP) were analyzed. Composites of 25% and 40% w/w of PW and 0-10% by weight of maleated polypropylene (MAPP) were pr...

  15. Temperature Rise in Human Muscle During Ultrasound Treatments Using Flex-All as a Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Douglas F.; Draper, David O.; Myrer, J. William

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine if Flex-all 454, as advertised, is effective as a thermal ultrasound couplant. Design and Setting: Research design was a one-factor analysis of variance. Subjects received three (alternating order) ultrasound treatments (1 MHz at 1.5 W/cm2 for 10 minutes) using the following couplants: 50% Flex-all mixed with 50% ultrasound gel; 100% ultrasound gel; and sham ultrasound with 100% Flex-all. Data were collected in a ventilated laboratory. Subjects: Fifteen male and female students (mean age = 24.2 ± 3.7 years). Measurements: Muscle temperature was measured via hypodermic microprobes inserted 3 and 5 cm deep in the medial triceps surae. A visual analogue scale was used to measure perceived heat. Results: At 3 cm, the increases for the gel, 50/50 mixture, and sham were 3.2°C, 2.6°C, and -0.82°C, respectively. At 5 cm, the increases were 2.17°C, 1.80°C, and -0.50°C, respectively. Subjects rated the sham treatment as mild heating (although the temperature dropped) and perceived treatments using the 50/50 mixture to be warmer than treatments using 100% gel couplant. Conclusion: Ultrasound treatments delivered with a 50/50 Flex-all/gel couplant felt warmer to subjects; however, identical treatments with 100% ultrasound gel produced higher muscle temperatures. Clinicians desiring optimal thermal effects should use 100% ultrasound gel as the couplant. ImagesFig 1. PMID:16558500

  16. Synthesis of nano-hydroxyapatite and its rapid mediated surface functionalization by silane coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sarish; Khan, Kishwar; Mujahid, Mohammad; Nosheen, Shaneela

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods were synthesized by simple one step wet precipitation method followed by their rapid surface functionalization via aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to give modified (HA-APTS) product. Functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA-APTS) holds amino groups on their surface that can be further functionalized with other bioactive molecules. The extent of functionalization of HA was studied under three different processing conditions; at room temperature, at 80 °C and under microwave condition (600 W). Three different temperatures have been use for the purpose of comparison between the functionalized products so that we can judge that whether there is any effect of temperature on the final products. In the last we conclude that temperature has no effect. So microwave condition is best to carried out the functionalization in just 5 min. PMID:26478359

  17. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  18. Trust method for multi-agent consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulski, Dariusz G.; Lewis, Frank L.; Gu, Edward Y.; Hudas, Greg R.

    2012-06-01

    The consensus problem in multi-agent systems often assumes that all agents are equally trustworthy to seek agreement. But for multi-agent military applications - particularly those that deal with sensor fusion or multi-robot formation control - this assumption may create the potential for compromised network security or poor cooperative performance. As such, we present a trust-based solution for the discrete-time multi-agent consensus problem and prove its asymptotic convergence in strongly connected digraphs. The novelty of the paper is a new trust algorithm called RoboTrust, which is used to calculate trustworthiness in agents using observations and statistical inferences from various historical perspectives. The performance of RoboTrust is evaluated within the trust-based consensus protocol under different conditions of tolerance and confirmation.

  19. Can Space Applications Benefit from Intelligent Agents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Blesson; McKee, Gerard

    The work reported in this paper proposes a Swarm-Array computing approach based on 'Intelligent Agents' to apply autonomic computing concepts to parallel computing systems and build reliable systems for space applications. Swarm-array computing is a swarm robotics inspired, novel computing approach considered as a path to achieve autonomy in parallel computing systems. In the intelligent agent approach, a task to be executed on parallel computing cores is considered as a swarm of autonomous agents. A task is carried to a computing core by carrier agents and can be seamlessly transferred between cores in the event of a predicted failure, thereby achieving self-* objectives of autonomic computing. The approach is validated on a multi-agent simulator.

  20. An agent based model of genotype editing

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L. M.; Huang, C. F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our investigation on an agent-based model of Genotype Editing. This model is based on several characteristics that are gleaned from the RNA editing system as observed in several organisms. The incorporation of editing mechanisms in an evolutionary agent-based model provides a means for evolving agents with heterogenous post-transcriptional processes. The study of this agent-based genotype-editing model has shed some light into the evolutionary implications of RNA editing as well as established an advantageous evolutionary computation algorithm for machine learning. We expect that our proposed model may both facilitate determining the evolutionary role of RNA editing in biology, and advance the current state of research in agent-based optimization.

  1. Ecology Based Decentralized Agent Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peysakhov, Maxim D.; Cicirello, Vincent A.; Regli, William C.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of maintaining a desired number of mobile agents on a network is not trivial, especially if we want a completely decentralized solution. Decentralized control makes a system more r e bust and less susceptible to partial failures. The problem is exacerbated on wireless ad hoc networks where host mobility can result in significant changes in the network size and topology. In this paper we propose an ecology-inspired approach to the management of the number of agents. The approach associates agents with living organisms and tasks with food. Agents procreate or die based on the abundance of uncompleted tasks (food). We performed a series of experiments investigating properties of such systems and analyzed their stability under various conditions. We concluded that the ecology based metaphor can be successfully applied to the management of agent populations on wireless ad hoc networks.

  2. Quartic gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian

    1998-08-01

    We review the recent progress in studying the anomalous electroweak quartic gauge boson couplings (QGBCs) at the LHC and the next generation high energy e±e- linear colliders (LCs). The main focus is put onto the strong electroweak symmetry breaking scenario in which the non-decoupling guarantees sizable new physics effects for the QGBCs. After commenting upon the current low energy indirect bounds and summarizing the theoretical patterns of QGBCs predicted by the typical resonance/non-resonance models, we review our systematic model-independent analysis on bounding them via WW-fusion and WWZ/ZZZ-production. The interplay of the two production mechanisms and the important role of the beam-polarization at the LCs are emphasized. The same physics may be similarly and better studied at a multi-TeV muon collider with high luminosity.

  3. Cooking strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clérouin, Jean

    2015-09-01

    We present the orbital-free method for dense plasmas which allows for efficient variable ionisation molecular dynamics. This approach is a literal application of density functional theory where the use of orbitals is bypassed by a semi-classical estimation of the electron kinetic energy through the Thomas-Fermi theory. Thanks to a coherent definition of ionisation, we evidence a particular regime in which the static structure no longer depends on the temperature: the Γ-plateau. With the help of the well-known Thomas-Fermi scaling laws, we derive the conditions required to obtain a plasma at a given value of the coupling parameter and deduce useful fits. Static and dynamical properties are predicted as well as a a simple equation of state valid on the Γ-plateau. We show that the one component plasma model can be helpful to describe the correlations in real systems.

  4. Magnetically Coupled Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, S. R.; Irwin, K. D.; Kelly, D.; Nagler, P. N.; Porst, J. P.; Rotzinger, H.; Sadleir, J. E.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic calorimeters have been under development for over 20 years targeting a wide variety of different applications that require very high resolution spectroscopy. They have a number of properties that distinguish them from other 10w temperature detectors. In this paper we review these properties and emphasize the types of application to which they are most suited. We will describe what has been learned about the best materials, geometries, and read-out amplifiers and our understanding of the measured performance and theoretical limits. While most magnetic calorimeter research has concentrated on the use of paramagnets to provide the temperature sensitivity, recently magnetically coupled microcalorimeters have been in development that utilize the diamagnetic response of superconductors. We will contrast some of the properties of the two different magnetic sensor types.

  5. Coupled quantum Otto cycle.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Johal, Ramandeep S

    2011-03-01

    We study the one-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model of two spin-1/2 systems as a quantum heat engine. The engine undergoes a four-step Otto cycle where the two adiabatic branches involve changing the external magnetic field at a fixed value of the coupling constant. We find conditions for the engine efficiency to be higher than in the uncoupled model; in particular, we find an upper bound which is tighter than the Carnot bound. A domain of parameter values is pointed out which was not feasible in the interaction-free model. Locally, each spin seems to cause a flow of heat in a direction opposite to the global temperature gradient. This feature is explained by an analysis of the local effective temperature of the spins. PMID:21517482

  6. Nonminimally coupled hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Seoktae; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2011-02-15

    We discuss the hybrid inflation model where the inflaton field is nonminimally coupled to gravity. In the Jordan frame, the potential contains {phi}{sup 4} term as well as terms in the original hybrid inflation model. In our model, inflation can be classified into the type (I) and the type (II). In the type (I), inflation is terminated by the tachyonic instability of the waterfall field, while in the type (II) by the violation of slow-roll conditions. In our model, the reheating takes place only at the true minimum and even in the case (II) finally the tachyonic instability occurs after the termination of inflation. For a negative nonminimal coupling, inflation takes place in the vacuum-dominated region, in the large field region, or near the local minimum/maximum. Inflation in the vacuum-dominated region becomes either the type (I) or (II), resulting in a blue or red spectrum of the curvature perturbations, respectively. Inflation around the local maximum can be either the type (I) or the type (II), which results in the red spectrum of the curvature perturbations, while around the local minimum it must be the type (I), which results in the blue spectrum. In the large field region, to terminate inflation, potential in the Einstein frame must be positively tilted, always resulting in the red spectrum. We then numerically solve the equations of motion to investigate the whole dynamics of inflaton and confirm that the spectrum of curvature perturbations changes from red to blue ones as scales become smaller.

  7. For whom will the Bayesian agents vote?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caticha, Nestor; Cesar, Jonatas; Vicente, Renato

    2015-04-01

    Within an agent-based model where moral classifications are socially learned, we ask if a population of agents behaves in a way that may be compared with conservative or liberal positions in the real political spectrum. We assume that agents first experience a formative period, in which they adjust their learning style acting as supervised Bayesian adaptive learners. The formative phase is followed by a period of social influence by reinforcement learning. By comparing data generated by the agents with data from a sample of 15000 Moral Foundation questionnaires we found the following. 1. The number of information exchanges in the formative phase correlates positively with statistics identifying liberals in the social influence phase. This is consistent with recent evidence that connects the dopamine receptor D4-7R gene, political orientation and early age social clique size. 2. The learning algorithms that result from the formative phase vary in the way they treat novelty and corroborative information with more conservative-like agents treating it more equally than liberal-like agents. This is consistent with the correlation between political affiliation and the Openness personality trait reported in the literature. 3. Under the increase of a model parameter interpreted as an external pressure, the statistics of liberal agents resemble more those of conservative agents, consistent with reports on the consequences of external threats on measures of conservatism. We also show that in the social influence phase liberal-like agents readapt much faster than conservative-like agents when subjected to changes on the relevant set of moral issues. This suggests a verifiable dynamical criterium for attaching liberal or conservative labels to groups.

  8. Aqueous microwaves assisted cross-coupling reactions applied to unprotected nucleosides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len, Christophe; Hervé, Gwénaelle

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention due to their potential biological activities. Amongst all synthetic nucleosides, C5-modified pyrimidines and C7- or C8-modified purines have mostly been prepared using palladium cross-coupling reactions and then studied as antitumoral and antiviral agents. Our objective is to focus this review on the Suzuki-Miyaura and on the Heck cross-couplings of nucleosides using microwave irradiations which are an alternative technology compatible with green chemistry and sustainable development.

  9. Major loss of junctional coupling during mitosis in early mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Junctional coupling was assessed during the transition from the fourth to the fifth cell cycle of mouse embryogenesis by injection of the dye carboxyfluorescein and by measurement of electrical continuity between cells. Junctional coupling, which arises de novo in early 8-cell mouse embryos, subsequently becomes reduced towards the end of the cell cycle as the blastomeres enter into mitosis. Arrest of the cell cycle in metaphase by nocodazole, an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, reveals that cell coupling becomes undetectable at mitosis. Junctional coupling then is resumed during interphase of the 16-cell stage. Nocodazole itself has no effect on junctional coupling in interphase cells, regardless of the extent of intercellular flattening, whereas taxol, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, does reduce the extent of coupling in interphase cells. PMID:2868015

  10. Gay and lesbian couples in Italy: comparisons with heterosexual couples.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Paolo; Dèttore, Davide; Lasagni, Irene; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina

    2014-12-01

    Assessing couple relationships across diverse languages and cultures has important implications for both clinical intervention and prevention. This is especially true for nontraditional relationships potentially subject to various expressions of negative societal evaluation or bias. Few empirically validated measures of relationship functioning have been developed for cross-cultural applications, and none have been examined for their psychometric sufficiency for evaluating same-sex couples across different languages and cultures. The current study examined the psychometric properties of an Italian translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory - Revised (MSI-R), a 150-item 13-scale measure of couple relationship functioning, for its use in assessing the intimate relationships of gay and lesbian couples in Italy. Results for these couples were compared to data from heterosexual married and unmarried cohabiting couples from the same geographical region, as well as to previously published data for gay, lesbian, and unmarried heterosexual couples from the United States. Findings suggest that, despite unique societal pressures confronting Italian same-sex couples, these relationships appear resilient and fare well both overall and in specific domains of functioning compared to heterosexual couples both in Italy and the United States. PMID:24867576

  11. Black hole temperature: Minimal coupling vs conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Fazel, Mohamadreza; Mirza, Behrouz; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2014-05-15

    In this article, we discuss the propagation of scalar fields in conformally transformed spacetimes with either minimal or conformal coupling. The conformally coupled equation of motion is transformed into a one-dimensional Schrödinger-like equation with an invariant potential under conformal transformation. In a second stage, we argue that calculations based on conformal coupling yield the same Hawking temperature as those based on minimal coupling. Finally, it is conjectured that the quasi normal modes of black holes are invariant under conformal transformation.

  12. Pseudo-peptides as novel antileptospiral agents: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamallu, Chandan; Sharanaiah, Umesha; Kollur, Shiva Prasad; Mallesh, Naveen Kumar R.; Hosakere, Revanasiddappa D.; Balamurugan, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the synthesis of novel class of pseudo-peptides derived by coupling an amino acid with a heterocyclic moiety containing free amine group using suitable coupling agents. The synthesized compounds were characterized using spectral (1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS) techniques. Preliminary pharmacological assays for Leptospirosis were studied by test tube dilution (TDT) and micro dilution technique (MDT). In particular, all the analyses led to the conclusion that the synthesized compound inhibiting the Leptospira a causal organism of Leptospirosis.

  13. Valorization of titanium metal wastes as tanning agent used in leather industry.

    PubMed

    Crudu, Marian; Deselnicu, Viorica; Deselnicu, Dana Corina; Albu, Luminita

    2014-10-01

    The development of new tanning agents and new technologies in the leather sector is required to cope with the increasingly higher environmental pressure on the current tanning materials and processes such as tanning with chromium salts. In this paper, the use of titanium wastes (cuttings) resulting from the process of obtaining highly pure titanium (ingots), for the synthesis of new tanning agent and tanning bovine hides with new tanning agent, as alternative to tanning with chromium salts are investigated. For this purpose, Ti waste and Ti-based tanning agent were characterized for metal content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and chemical analysis; the tanned leather (wet white leather) was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope/Energy Dispersive Using X-ray (Analysis). SEM/EDX analysis for metal content; Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), Micro-Hot-Table and standard shrinkage temperature showing a hydrothermal stability (ranged from 75.3 to 77°C) and chemical analysis showing the leather is tanned and can be processed through the subsequent mechanical operations (splitting, shaving). On the other hand, an analysis of major minor trace substances from Ti-end waste (especially vanadium content) in new tanning agent and wet white leather (not detected) and residue stream was performed and showed that leachability of vanadium is acceptable. The results obtained show that new tanning agent obtained from Ti end waste can be used for tanning bovine hides, as eco-friendly alternative for chrome tanning. PMID:24507977

  14. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anil N; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance(®) (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (K(trans)), efflux rate constant (K(ep)). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested. PMID:27298076

  15. Hepatitis B Reactivation with Novel Agents in Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O.; Sokol, Lubomir; Dalia, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an endemic disease in most parts of the world despite available prophylactic vaccines. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy, and certain patients undergoing therapy are at increased risk of HBV reactivation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody, is well studied in HBV reactivation, but newer agents have been implicated as well. Here, we review novel agents suspected in HBV reactivation and effective strategies to prevent HBV reactivation. Fifteen years of literature were reviewed in order to better understand the reactivation rates of hepatitis B in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Anti-CD20 antibodies continue to be the main medications that can lead to HBV reactivation, and HBV reactivation rates have decreased with increased awareness. HBV reactivation is uncommon when using other novel agents. Entecavir and lamivudine remain the agents of choice to prevent HBV reactivation in high risk patients. In conclusion, the immunosuppressive effect of NHL and its therapy provide a pathway for HBV reactivation, especially in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibody. Since many HBV positive patients are often excluded from clinical trials of novel agents in NHL, more aggressive post-market surveillance of new agents, well-designed best practice advisories, and timely case reports are needed to reduce the incidence of HBV reactivation. Lastly, large prospective investigations coupled with well-utilized best practice advisories need to be conducted to understand the impact of more potent novel NHL therapy on HBV reactivation. PMID:27350944

  16. Hepatitis B Reactivation with Novel Agents in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O; Sokol, Lubomir; Dalia, Samir

    2016-06-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an endemic disease in most parts of the world despite available prophylactic vaccines. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy, and certain patients undergoing therapy are at increased risk of HBV reactivation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody, is well studied in HBV reactivation, but newer agents have been implicated as well. Here, we review novel agents suspected in HBV reactivation and effective strategies to prevent HBV reactivation. Fifteen years of literature were reviewed in order to better understand the reactivation rates of hepatitis B in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Anti-CD20 antibodies continue to be the main medications that can lead to HBV reactivation, and HBV reactivation rates have decreased with increased awareness. HBV reactivation is uncommon when using other novel agents. Entecavir and lamivudine remain the agents of choice to prevent HBV reactivation in high risk patients. In conclusion, the immunosuppressive effect of NHL and its therapy provide a pathway for HBV reactivation, especially in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibody. Since many HBV positive patients are often excluded from clinical trials of novel agents in NHL, more aggressive post-market surveillance of new agents, well-designed best practice advisories, and timely case reports are needed to reduce the incidence of HBV reactivation. Lastly, large prospective investigations coupled with well-utilized best practice advisories need to be conducted to understand the impact of more potent novel NHL therapy on HBV reactivation. PMID:27350944

  17. Non-covalent carriage of anticancer agents by humanized antibody trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arpita; Sharma, Sweta; Yadav, Veejendra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the internalization and non-covalent carriage of small molecule anticancer agents like vinca alkaloids by humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Such carriage is marked by significant reduction in side effects and increased therapeutic value of these anticancer agents. This study is coherent with few clinical observations of enhanced efficiency of these anticancer agents when co-administered with therapeutic antibodies. This study will also serve as the foundation for screening a database of anticancer agents for possible compounds that may be co-delivered alongwith the antibody. Based on this study vincristine conformation inside antibody and its charge environment may be used as descriptors for screening purposes. Graphical Abstract This article describes the use of immunotherapeutic agents for enhancing the bioavailability and efficacy of small molecule anticancer agents. The internalization and non-covalent carriage of vinca alkaloids by humanized antibody trastuzumab has been investigated utilizing flexible ligand molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies coupled with MMGBSA binding energy calculations. The study concludes efficient non-covalent carriage without probability of premature expulsion. It is recommended that vincristine conformation and charge distribution may be used for screening library of compounds for possible mAb cargo. PMID:27109707

  18. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anil N.; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance® (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (Ktrans), efflux rate constant (Kep). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested. PMID:27298076

  19. A user-system interface agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakim, Nagi T.; Srivastava, Sadanand; Bousaidi, Mehdi; Goh, Gin-Hua

    1995-01-01

    Agent-based technologies answer to several challenges posed by additional information processing requirements in today's computing environments. In particular, (1) users desire interaction with computing devices in a mode which is similar to that used between people, (2) the efficiency and successful completion of information processing tasks often require a high-level of expertise in complex and multiple domains, (3) information processing tasks often require handling of large volumes of data and, therefore, continuous and endless processing activities. The concept of an agent is an attempt to address these new challenges by introducing information processing environments in which (1) users can communicate with a system in a natural way, (2) an agent is a specialist and a self-learner and, therefore, it qualifies to be trusted to perform tasks independent of the human user, and (3) an agent is an entity that is continuously active performing tasks that are either delegated to it or self-imposed. The work described in this paper focuses on the development of an interface agent for users of a complex information processing environment (IPE). This activity is part of an on-going effort to build a model for developing agent-based information systems. Such systems will be highly applicable to environments which require a high degree of automation, such as, flight control operations and/or processing of large volumes of data in complex domains, such as the EOSDIS environment and other multidisciplinary, scientific data systems. The concept of an agent as an information processing entity is fully described with emphasis on characteristics of special interest to the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). Issues such as agent 'existence' and 'qualification' are discussed in this paper. Based on a definition of an agent and its main characteristics, we propose an architecture for the development of interface agents for users of an IPE that is agent-oriented and whose resources

  20. Multi-agent-based Order Book Model of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, T.; Golke, S.; Paul, W.; Schneider, J. J.

    2006-08-01

    We introduce a simple model for simulating financial markets, based on an order book, in which several agents trade one asset at a virtual exchange continuously. For a stationary market the structure of the model, the order flow rates of the different kinds of order types and the used price time priority matching algorithm produce only a diffusive price behavior. We show that a market trend, i.e. an asymmetric order flow of any type, leads to a non-trivial Hurst exponent for the price development, but not to "fat-tailed" return distributions. When one additionally couples the order entry depth to the prevailing trend, also the stylized empirical fact of "fat tails" can be reproduced by our Order Book Model.