Science.gov

Sample records for cover crop mulch-specific

  1. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Goyal, Ravinder K; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotypexmulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  2. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A.; Abdul-Baki, Aref A.; Sobolev, Anatoli P.; Goyal, Ravinder K.; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L.; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotype×mulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  3. Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are great tools to improve soil quality and health, and great tools to increase carbon sequestration. They are nutrient management tools that can help scavenge nitrate, cycle nitrogen to the following crop, mine NO3 from groundwater, and increase nitrogen use efficiency of cropping syste...

  4. Cover crops for Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are grown to benefit the following crop as well as to improve the soil, but they are normally not intended for harvest. Selecting the right cover crops for farming operations can improve yields, soil and water conservation and quality, and economic productivity. Properly managed cover ...

  5. Cover Crop Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential benefits of cover crops in vegetable production systems depend on the type of cover crop that is used and how it is managed from planting to termination date. This chapter focuses on management practices that are applicable to a broad range cover crops and vegetable production systems ...

  6. Success with cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an important tool for producers interested in improving soil and crop productivity. They help control erosion, improve soil quality, improve soil properties that impact water infiltration and conservation, provide habitat and food for beneficial insects, and provide food for wildlif...

  7. Cover crops and N credits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops often provide many short- and long-term benefits to cropping systems. Legume cover crops can significantly reduce the N fertilizer requirement of non-legume cash crops that follow. The objectives of this presentation were to: I) educate stakeholders about the potential benefits of cover ...

  8. Cover crops and vegetable rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have long known that winter cover crops can decrease soil erosion, increase soil organic matter and fertility, and provide a beneficial impact on the following crop, but it is not always known which cover crop will provide the best results for a specific region and cropping system. Research...

  9. Midwest Cover Crops Field Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers who want to prevent soil erosion, improve nutrient cycling, sustain their soils, and protect/maintain the environment have been returning to a very old practice: planting cover crops. Cover crops are effective tools for reducing soil erosion and increasing nutrient recycling on farmlands, ...

  10. High plains cover crop research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. Those stated benefits have included greatly reduced water use, enhanced soil microbiological activity, increased biomass productivity, and enhanced wa...

  11. Cover Crop Basics for Nutrient Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an under-utilized tool in Mid-Atlantic agriculture. Among their many benefits, cover crops supply N for the next crop and/or conserve residual N, and have great potential to improve soil quality. Before using cover crops, growers must identify niches within their cropping system an...

  12. Cover crop biomass harvest for bioenergy: implications for crop productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops, such as rye (Secale cereale), are usually used in conservation agriculture systems in the Southeast. Typically, the cover crop is terminated two to three weeks before planting the summer crop, with the cover biomass left on the soil surface as a mulch. However, these cover crops ...

  13. Using cover crops and cropping systems for nitrogen management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reasons for using cover crops and optimized cropping sequences to manage nitrogen (N) are to maximize economic returns, improve soil quality and productivity, and minimize losses of N that might adversely impact environmental quality. Cover crops and cropping systems’ effects on N management are...

  14. AGRONOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF TROPICAL COVER CROPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are important components of a sustainable crop production system. They can be planted with plantation crops such as cacao, coffee, banana, rubber and oil palm or in rotation with cash crops. Their use in a cropping system is mainly beneficial for soil and water conservation, recycling of...

  15. Timely precipitation drives cover crop outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can expand ecosystem services, though sound management recommendations for their use within semi-arid cropping systems is currently constrained by a lack of information. This study was conducted to determine agroecosystem responses to late-summer seeded cover crops under no-till managem...

  16. Roadmap to increased cover crop adoption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are increasingly utilized by farmers and promoted by agronomists for the multiple benefits they contribute to soil and crop management systems. Yet, only a small percentage of cropland is planted to cover crops. In June of 2012, the National Wildlife Federation brought together 36 of the...

  17. Growing cover crops to improve carbon sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different cover crops were grown and evaluated for improving carbon sequestration. The cover crops in the study include not only winter and summer types but also legumes and non-legumes, respectively. Winter legumes are white clover, bell beans, and purple vetch, and winter non-legumes are triticale...

  18. Winter cover crops influence Amaranthus palmeri establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops were evaluated for their effect on Palmer amaranth (PA) suppression in cotton production. Cover crops examined included rye and four winter legumes: narrow-leaf lupine, crimson clover, Austrian winter pea, and cahaba vetch. Each legume was evaluated alone and in a mixture with rye...

  19. COVER CROP EXTRACT EFFECTS ON RADISH RADICLE ELONGATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation systems using cover crops offer many benefits, including enhanced weed suppression. Researchers have shown that some cover crops leach allelopathic chemicals that contribute to weed growth inhibition. Twelve cover crops were evaluated for allelopathic potential in two experiments usin...

  20. Replacing fallow by cover crops: economic sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow by cover crops in intensive fertilized systems has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for reducing nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of this new technology is still limited because they are either unwilling or unable, although adoption reluctance is frequently rooted in low economic profitability, low water se efficiency or poor knowledge. Economic analyses permit a comparison between the profit that farmers obtain from agricultural products and the cost of adopting specific agricultural techniques. The goal of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of replacing the usual winter fallow with cover crops (barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo)) in irrigated maize systems and variable Mediterranean weather conditions using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations of key farms' financial performance indicators. The three scenarios studied for each cover crop were: i) just leaving the cover crop residue in the ground, ii) leaving the cover crop residue but reduce following maize fertilization according to the N available from the previous cover crop and iii) selling the cover crop residue for animal feeding. All the scenarios were compared with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. With observed data from six different years and in various field trials, looking for different weather conditions, probability distribution functions of maize yield, cover crop biomass production and N fertilizer saving was fitted. Based in statistical sources maize grain price, different forage prices and the cost of fertilizer were fitted to probability distribution functions too. As result, introducing a cover crop involved extra costs with respect to fallow as the initial investment, because new seed, herbicide or extra field operations. Additional

  1. Coupling cover crops and manure injection: cover crop N and P uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Injecting manure into established cover crops may reduce N and P losses by increasing nutrient cycling. The objectives of this research were to quantify fall and spring cover crop shoot dry matter (DM) production and N and P uptake following manure injection at increasing target N rates. Liquid swin...

  2. THE ECONOMICS OF COVER CROP BIOMASS FOR CORN AND COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inclusion of cover crops into cropping systems brings both direct and indirect costs and benefits to the farm. A myriad of studies have examined the economic benefits of cover crops in multiple cropping systems by comparing them to systems without cover crops. To date, economic research pertaini...

  3. Using cash cover crops to provide pollinator provisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, the use of winter cover crops in MN and SD has been slow to be adopted. The short growing season and potential for late wet springs make cover crops risky to farmers with little economic return. The use of cash cover crops in this area offers the standard advantages of other cover crops, wi...

  4. Unique cover crops for Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana sugarcane production practices provide a tremendous opportunity for the use of cover crops following the final sugarcane harvest in the fall of one year and prior to replanting sugarcane during the summer of the next year. A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years...

  5. Cover Crop Effects on Weed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds are often the most common and costly pests in vegetable production, especially in organic production systems. Weeds that germinate during cover cropping and produce seeds will increase the weed seedbank and may increase production costs. This chapter discusses the effect of cultural practices ...

  6. Fluorescence imaging to quantify crop residue cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Crop residues, the portion of the crop left in the field after harvest, can be an important management factor in controlling soil erosion. Methods to quantify residue cover are needed that are rapid, accurate, and objective. Scenes with known amounts of crop residue were illuminated with long wave ultraviolet (UV) radiation and fluorescence images were recorded with an intensified video camera fitted with a 453 to 488 nm band pass filter. A light colored soil and a dark colored soil were used as background for the weathered soybean stems. Residue cover was determined by counting the proportion of the pixels in the image with fluorescence values greater than a threshold. Soil pixels had the lowest gray levels in the images. The values of the soybean residue pixels spanned nearly the full range of the 8-bit video data. Classification accuracies typically were within 3(absolute units) of measured cover values. Video imaging can provide an intuitive understanding of the fraction of the soil covered by residue.

  7. Winter cover crop effect on corn seedling pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an excellent management tool to improve the sustainability of agriculture. Winter rye cover crops have been used successfully in Iowa corn-soybean rotations. Unfortunately, winter rye cover crops occasionally reduce yields of the following corn crop. We hypothesize that one potential...

  8. Small Grain Winter Cover Crops for Corn and Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops are plants that cover the soil between harvest and planting of summer annual grain crops. While doing this, cover crops perform important environmental functions that include reducing soil erosion, accumulating nutrients, and increasing soil carbon. This educational module provide...

  9. The use of cover crops to manage soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are used to manage soils for many different reasons. Inserting cover crops into fallow periods and spaces in cropping systems is a beneficial soil management practice. Natural ecosystems typically have some plants growing, covering the soil, transpiring water, taking up nutrients, fixing...

  10. Are Cover Crops Being Used in the Corn Belt?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wealth of scientific information exists quantifying the benefits of cover crops, yet adoption of cover crops in agronomic farming systems is low. Research has documented the effectiveness of using cover crops to decrease soil erosion and decrease nitrogen losses to sub-surface drainage water. Othe...

  11. A suggestion for planning cover crop mixtures: zones of occupancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers may be able to improve the competitiveness of cover crop mixtures by selecting species to occupy zones in the cover crop canopy. This suggestion is based on a study where we compared four cover crop treatments, 1, 3, 6, and 9 species mixtures, for biomass production. Treatments were est...

  12. Are Cover Crops Being Used in the US Corn Belt?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benefits of using cover crops are well established in the scientific literature, but adoption among end-users in agronomic farming systems is uncertain. Furthermore, limited regional information is available quantifying cover crop use in agronomic systems. Before cover crop use can increase, imp...

  13. Grazing winter cover crops in a cotton-cover crop conservation tillage system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing of winter annual cover crops with cattle offers a way to offset costs and increase farm revenue in conservation tillage systems. However, cattle may create problems due to soil treading and reduction in surface residues needed to reduce soil erosion. Optimizing production efficiencies may re...

  14. Cover crops can improve potato tuber yield and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is the need to develop sustainable systems with higher yields and crop quality. We conducted studies with cover crops grown under limited irrigation (< 200 mm) to assess the effects of certain types of cover crops on tuber yield and quality. On a commercial farm operation prior to the 2006 and...

  15. Cover Crop Chart: An Intuitive Educational Resource for Extension Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebig, Mark A.; Johnson, Holly; Archer, David; Hendrickson, John; Nichols, Kristine; Schmer, Marty; Tanaka, Don

    2013-01-01

    Interest in cover crops by agricultural producers has increased the need for information regarding the suitability of crops for addressing different production and natural resource goals. To help address this need, staff at the USDA-ARS Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory developed a decision aid called the Cover Crop Chart (CCC). Visually…

  16. Remote sensing to monitor cover crop adoption in southeastern Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, winter cereal cover crops are often planted in rotation with summer crops to reduce the loss of nutrients and sediment from agricultural systems. Cover crops can also improve soil health, control weeds and pests, supplement forage needs, and support resilient croppin...

  17. Evaluation of tropical legume cover crops for copper use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are important components of cropping systems due to their role in improving soil quality. Lack of adequate levels of soil micronutrients prevent the success of cover crops in highly weathered tropical soils. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate copper use ...

  18. Cover crop effects on soil carbon and nitrogen under bioenergy sorghum crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can increase soil C and N storage and reduce the potential for N leaching under agronomic crops, but information on their benefits under bioenergy crops is scanty due to the removal of aboveground biomass. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of cover crops on soil organ...

  19. A FIELD-GROWN TRANSGENIC TOMATO LINE EXPRESSING POLYAMINES REVEALS LEGUME COVER CROP MULCH-SPECIFIC PERTUBATIONS IN FRUIT PHENOTYPE AT THE LEVELS OF METABOLITE PROFILES, GENE EXPRESSION AND AGRONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging environmental issues including chemical pollution of soil and water due to heavy use of chemicals in conventional agriculture together with concerns about meeting the food needs of the world’s growing population have necessitated a paradigm shift toward sustainable alternatives to conventio...

  20. Rye Cover Crops in a Corn Silage-Soybean Rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn silage is often grown in the Upper Midwest to provide feed for cattle. Silage harvest, however, does not leave enough crop residue to adequately protect the soil from erosion and can reduce soil organic matter. Winter cover crops planted after silage harvest and after other crops in the croppin...

  1. A Centralized Regional Database for Winter Cover Crops in Annual Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops have the potential to reduce erosion, minimize losses of nitrogen and phosphorus, and increase soil carbon in annual cropping systems in the Midwest. Public support, however, for incentives to farmers to adopt cover crops is minimal. Therefore, development of location-specific rec...

  2. Cover cropping and no-tillage improve soil health in arid irrigated cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact on soil health of long-term no-tillage (NT) and cover cropping (CC) practices, alone and in combination, was measured and compared with standard tillage (ST) with and without cover crops (NO) in irrigated row crops after 15 years of management in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. Soil aggregat...

  3. Herbicide and cover crop residue integration in conservation tillage tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased adoption of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information on the role of various cover crops in weed control, tomato quality, and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, turnip, and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to a...

  4. Black oat cover crop management in watermelon production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black oats (Avena strigosa Schreb.) were sown as a cover crop near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26 deg N) in Fall 2010. The cover crop was allowed to senesce naturally and was planted to watermelons in both the spring and in the fall of 2011. Watermelon transplants planted in the spring into mowed black o...

  5. REMOTE SENSING OF COVER CROP PERFORMANCE ON MARYLAND'S EASTERN SHORE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of cover crops on agricultural land has been identified as a desirable management practice with potential to positively impact Chesapeake Bay water quality. Accordingly, state cost share programs have been developed to promote cover crops. This project uses a combination of remote sensing an...

  6. Remote Sensing of Cover Crop Production on Maryland's Eastern Shore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of winter cover crops is being promoted throughout Maryland as an effective agricultural best management practice with great promise for reducing nutrient inputs to the Chesapeake Bay. Remote sensing provides a tool for real-time estimation of cover crop productivity and nutrient uptake effi...

  7. Effect of Cover Crops on Soil Fungal Diversity and Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of various cover crops (sordan, mustard, canola, honeysweet, and fallow) to influence soil fungal biomass and diversity were tested in a potato field in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Soil samples (0-5 cm depth) were randomly selected from each cover crop plot and soil fungal communitie...

  8. Winter cover crops impact on corn production in semiarid regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops have been proposed as a technique to increase soil health. This study examined the impact of winter brassica cover crop cocktails grown after wheat (Triticum aestivum) on corn yields; corn yield losses due to water and N stress; soil bacteria to fungi ratios; mycorrhizal markers; and ge...

  9. Cover crops for erosion control in bioenergy hardwood plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, R.K.; Green, T.H.; Mays, D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of cover crops between tree rows has been suggested as a means of reducing soil erosion in short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) plantations for bioenergy production. This study is designed to test whether cover crops could reduce erosion without significantly reducing the growth and biomass yield of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) planted as the SRWC at a 1.5 X 3 in spacing. Four cover crops, winter rye grass (Lolium multigeonum L., a winter annual grass); tall fescue (Fescuta eliator L., a winter perennial grass); crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L., a winter annual legume); and interstate sericea (Lespedeza ameata L., a growing season perennial legume), are tested at two different strip widths (1.22 and 2.44 m) as well as a control with complete competition control. Small berms were built to direct runoff to a sediment fence installed at the down slope ends of each plot. Soil erosion is measured by sediment accumulation near the fence. Height, ground-line diameter and crown width of trees were measured on a monthly basis. During the first growing season all cover crops reduced growth of trees. There were some significant differences among cover crop regimes. Slight differences in soil erosion were detected during the first growing season. The control plots lost more soil per hectare than cover crops, however, strip widths and cover crops did not show any significant difference.

  10. Remote sensing to monitor cover crop adoption in southeastern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hively, Wells; Sjoerd Duiker; Greg McCarty; Prabhakara, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    In the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, winter cereal cover crops are often planted in rotation with summer crops to reduce the loss of nutrients and sediment from agricultural systems. Cover crops can also improve soil health, control weeds and pests, supplement forage needs, and support resilient cropping systems. In southeastern Pennsylvania, cover crops can be successfully established following corn (Zea mays L.) silage harvest and are strongly promoted for use in this niche. They are also planted following corn grain, soybean (Glycine max L.), and vegetable harvest. In Pennsylvania, the use of winter cover crops for agricultural conservation has been supported through a combination of outreach, regulation, and incentives. On-farm implementation is thought to be increasing, but the actual extent of cover crops is not well quantified. Satellite imagery can be used to map green winter cover crop vegetation on agricultural fields and, when integrated with additional remote sensing data products, can be used to evaluate wintertime vegetative groundcover following specific summer crops. This study used Landsat and SPOT (System Probatoire d’ Observation de la Terre) satellite imagery, in combination with the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer, to evaluate the extent and amount of green wintertime vegetation on agricultural fields in four Pennsylvania counties (Berks, Lebanon, Lancaster, and York) from 2010 to 2013. In December of 2010, a windshield survey was conducted to collect baseline data on winter cover crop implementation, with particular focus on identifying corn harvested for silage (expected earlier harvest date and lower levels of crop residue), versus for grain (expected later harvest date and higher levels of crop residue). Satellite spectral indices were successfully used to detect both the amount of green vegetative groundcover and the amount of crop residue on the surveyed fields. Analysis of wintertime satellite imagery

  11. Cover Crop Biomass and Corn Yield Following 13 Rye, Wheat, and Triticale Cultivars Used as Winter Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops have the potential to reduce nitrate leaching and erosion in corn-soybean rotations in the upper Midwest. The cover crop growing season between harvest and planting of corn and soybean, however, is short and cold. Additionally, previous studies in Iowa have indicated that winter r...

  12. Topography Mediates the Influence of Cover Crops on Soil Nitrate Levels in Row Crop Agricultural Systems.

    PubMed

    Ladoni, Moslem; Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Robertson, G Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Supplying adequate amounts of soil N for plant growth during the growing season and across large agricultural fields is a challenge for conservational agricultural systems with cover crops. Knowledge about cover crop effects on N comes mostly from small, flat research plots and performance of cover crops across topographically diverse agricultural land is poorly understood. Our objective was to assess effects of both leguminous (red clover) and non-leguminous (winter rye) cover crops on potentially mineralizable N (PMN) and [Formula: see text] levels across a topographically diverse landscape. We studied conventional, low-input, and organic managements in corn-soybean-wheat rotation. The rotations of low-input and organic managements included rye and red clover cover crops. The managements were implemented in twenty large undulating fields in Southwest Michigan starting from 2006. The data collection and analysis were conducted during three growing seasons of 2011, 2012 and 2013. Observational micro-plots with and without cover crops were laid within each field on three contrasting topographical positions of depression, slope and summit. Soil samples were collected 4-5 times during each growing season and analyzed for [Formula: see text] and PMN. The results showed that all three managements were similar in their temporal and spatial distributions of NO3-N. Red clover cover crop increased [Formula: see text] by 35% on depression, 20% on slope and 32% on summit positions. Rye cover crop had a significant 15% negative effect on [Formula: see text] in topographical depressions but not in slope and summit positions. The magnitude of the cover crop effects on soil mineral nitrogen across topographically diverse fields was associated with the amount of cover crop growth and residue production. The results emphasize the potential environmental and economic benefits that can be generated by implementing site-specific topography-driven cover crop management in row-crop

  13. Topography Mediates the Influence of Cover Crops on Soil Nitrate Levels in Row Crop Agricultural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ladoni, Moslem; Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Robertson, G. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Supplying adequate amounts of soil N for plant growth during the growing season and across large agricultural fields is a challenge for conservational agricultural systems with cover crops. Knowledge about cover crop effects on N comes mostly from small, flat research plots and performance of cover crops across topographically diverse agricultural land is poorly understood. Our objective was to assess effects of both leguminous (red clover) and non-leguminous (winter rye) cover crops on potentially mineralizable N (PMN) and NO3--N levels across a topographically diverse landscape. We studied conventional, low-input, and organic managements in corn-soybean-wheat rotation. The rotations of low-input and organic managements included rye and red clover cover crops. The managements were implemented in twenty large undulating fields in Southwest Michigan starting from 2006. The data collection and analysis were conducted during three growing seasons of 2011, 2012 and 2013. Observational micro-plots with and without cover crops were laid within each field on three contrasting topographical positions of depression, slope and summit. Soil samples were collected 4–5 times during each growing season and analyzed for NO3--N and PMN. The results showed that all three managements were similar in their temporal and spatial distributions of NO3—N. Red clover cover crop increased NO3--N by 35% on depression, 20% on slope and 32% on summit positions. Rye cover crop had a significant 15% negative effect on NO3--N in topographical depressions but not in slope and summit positions. The magnitude of the cover crop effects on soil mineral nitrogen across topographically diverse fields was associated with the amount of cover crop growth and residue production. The results emphasize the potential environmental and economic benefits that can be generated by implementing site-specific topography-driven cover crop management in row-crop agricultural systems. PMID:26600462

  14. Soil and crop nitrogen as influenced by tillage, cover crops, and nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and crop management practices may influence soil mineral N, crop N uptake, and N leaching. We evaluated the effects of three tillage practices [no-till (NT), strip till (ST), and chisel till (CT)], four cover crops {legume [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth)], nonlegume [rye (Secale cereale L.)],...

  15. Assessing effectiveness of winter cover crops to improve water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops are an important conservation practice with potential to improve water quality by reducing excess nitrogen (N), remaining during the winter/early spring in soil, from leaching, runoff, and sediment loss into surface waters after harvest of summer crops. Throughout the Chesapeake B...

  16. Soil Nitrogen Response to Coupling Cover Crops with Manure Injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling winter small grain cover crops (CC) with manure (M) application may increase retention of manure nitrogen (N) in corn-soybean cropping systems. The objective of this research was to quantify soil N changes after application of liquid swine M (Sus scrofa L.) at target N rates of 112, 224, an...

  17. Differential Soil Acidity Tolerance of Tropical Legume Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In tropical regions, soil acidity and low soil fertility are the most important yield limiting factors for sustainable crop production. Using legume cover crops as mulch is an important strategy not only to protect the soil loss from erosion but also ameliorating soil fertility. Information is limit...

  18. Coupling Cover Crops and Manure Injection: Soil Inorganic N Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of a rye/oat cover crop with liquid swine manure application may enhance retention of manure nitrogen (N) in corn-soybean cropping systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in soil inorganic N following injection of liquid swine manure to plots seeded with a rye/oat co...

  19. Cover Crop Chart: An Outreach Tool for Agricultural Producers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in cover crops by farmers and ranchers throughout the Northern Great Plains has increased the need for information on the suitability of a diverse portfolio of crops for different production and management resource goals. To help address this need, Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory...

  20. Cover Crop Chart: An intuitive educational resource for extension professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in cover crops by agricultural producers has increased the need for information regarding the suitability of crops for addressing different production and natural resource goals. To help address this need, staff at the USDA Agricultural Research Service Northern Great Plains Research Labor...

  1. Assessment of Spectral Indices for Crop Residue Cover Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quantification of surficial crop residue (non-photosynthetic vegetation) cover is important for assessing agricultural tillage practices, rangeland health, and brush fire hazards. The Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI) and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI) are two...

  2. The Use of Cover Crops as Climate-Smart Management in Midwest Cropping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basche, A.; Miguez, F.; Archontoulis, S.; Kaspar, T.

    2014-12-01

    The observed trends in the Midwestern United States of increasing rainfall variability will likely continue into the future. Events such as individual days of heavy rain as well as seasons of floods and droughts have large impacts on agricultural productivity and the natural resource base that underpins it. Such events lead to increased soil erosion, decreased water quality and reduced corn and soybean yields. Winter cover crops offer the potential to buffer many of these impacts because they essentially double the time for a living plant to protect and improve the soil. However, at present, cover crops are infrequently utilized in the Midwest (representing 1-2% of row cropped land cover) in particular due to producer concerns over higher costs and management, limited time and winter growing conditions as well as the potential harm to corn yields. In order to expand their use, there is a need to quantify how cover crops impact Midwest cropping systems in the long term and namely to understand how to optimize the benefits of cover crops while minimizing their impacts on cash crops. We are working with APSIM, a cropping systems platform, to specifically quantify the long term future impacts of cover crop incorporation in corn-based cropping systems. In general, our regional analysis showed only minor changes to corn and soybean yields (<1% differences) when a cover crop was or was not included in the simulation. Further, a "bad spring" scenario (where every third year had an abnormally wet/cold spring and cover crop termination and planting cash crop were within one day) did not result in any major changes to cash crop yields. Through simulations we estimate an average increase of 4-9% organic matter improvement in the topsoil and an average decrease in soil erosion of 14-32% depending on cover crop planting date and growth. Our work is part of the Climate and Corn-based Cropping Systems Coordinated Agriculture Project (CSCAP), a collaboration of eleven Midwestern

  3. Cover crops and crop residue management under no-till systems improve soils and environmental quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Wegner, Brianna; Vahyala, Ibrahim; Osborne, Shannon; Schumacher, Thomas; Lehman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Crop residue harvest is a common practice in the Midwestern USA for the ethanol production. However, excessive removal of crop residues from the soil surface contributes to the degradation of important soil quality indicators such as soil organic carbon (SOC). Addition of a cover crop may help to mitigate these negative effects. The present study was set up to assess the impacts of corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal and cover crops on various soil quality indicators and surface greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The study was being conducted on plots located at the North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL) in Brookings, South Dakota, USA. Three plots of a corn and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) rotation under a no-till (NT) system are being monitored for soils and surface gas fluxes. Each plot has three residue removal (high residue removal, HRR; medium residue removal, MRR; and low residue removal, LRR) treatments and two cover crops (cover crops and no cover crops) treatments. Both corn and soybean are represented every year. Gas flux measurements were taken weekly using a closed static chamber method. Data show that residue removal significantly impacted soil quality indicators while more time was needed for an affect from cover crop treatments to be noticed. The LRR treatment resulted in higher SOC concentrations, increased aggregate stability, and increased microbial activity. The LRR treatment also increased soil organic matter (SOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations. Cover crops used in HRR (high corn residue removal) improved SOC (27 g kg-1) by 6% compared to that without cover crops (25.4 g kg-1). Cover crops significantly impacted POM concentration directly after the residue removal treatments were applied in 2012. CO2 fluxes were observed to increase as temperature increased, while N2O fluxes increased as soil moisture increased. CH4 fluxes were responsive to both increases in temperature and moisture. On average, soils under

  4. Winter Cover Crop Seeding Rate and Variety Affects during 8 Years of Organic Vegetables 1. Cover Crop Biomass Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term research on cover crops (CC) is needed to help farmers design optimal rotations. Winter CC shoot dry matter (DM) of rye (Secale cereale L.), legume-rye, and mustard mixtures was determined in December, January, and February or March during the first 8 yr of the Salinas Organic Cropping Sy...

  5. Winter Cover Crop Seeding Rate and Variety Affects during 8 Years of Organic Vegetables 2. Cover Crop Nitrogen Accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops (CC) can improve nutrient-use efficiency in vegetable systems. Nitrogen uptake (NU), and shoot residue quality of rye (Secale cereale L.), legume-rye, and mustard was determined in December, January, and February or March during the first 8 yr of the Salinas Organic Cropping Syst...

  6. Hairy vetch seedbank persistence and implications for cover crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) is a fast growing, winter hardy annual legume that can produce shoot biomass levels upwards of 6500 kg ha-1. This cover crop is well suited for summer annual grain rotations, as it fixes considerable amounts of nitrogen, reduces erosion through rapid ground cover, an...

  7. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Deputy Administrator in individual cases, eligible causes of loss for covered tropical crops will... application for coverage is filed. In this regard: (1) Producers may be selected on a random or targeted...

  8. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrator in individual cases, eligible causes of loss for covered tropical crops will only include... coverage is filed. In this regard: (1) Producers may be selected on a random or targeted basis...

  9. Cover crops effectiveness for soil erosion control in Sicilian vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gristina, L.; Novara, A.; Saladino, S.; Santoro, A.

    2009-04-01

    In vineyards, which are very common in Mediterranean area, cover crops are becoming increasingly used to reduce soil erosion. Cover crops reduce runoff by increasing infiltration and increasing roughness and then reducing the ovelandflow velocity. The aim of the present study was to quantify soil and water losses under different soil managements systems on vineyards. The study site was a Sauvignon blanc winegrape vineyard located in Southwestern Sicily. Vineyards were managed both traditionally (conventional tillage) and alternative management using cover crops: 1) Vicia faba ; 2) Vicia faba and Vicia sativa; 3) Trifolium subterraneum, Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra; 4)Trifolium subterraneum, Festuca rubra and Festuca ovina, 5) Triticum durum, 6) Triticum durum and Vicia sativa. To monitor water and sediment yield, a Gerlach trough was installed at each treatment on the vineyard inter-row, with the row vineyard used as a border (topographical border). Runoff was measured after each rainfall event (raingauge 0.2 mm accuracy) from November 2005 to April 2007. And sediments were measured after desiccation. The results show that runoff and erosion were reduced considerably under the treatments with Trifolium subterraneum, Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra and Trifolium subterraneum, Festuca rubra and Festuca ovina (treatments 3 and 4). The soil losses were reduced by 73% under treatment 4 compared to the tillage plot. Conventional tillage and alternative management using Vicia faba cover crop (treatment 1) result the most ineffective treatment to soil erosion. These results show that the use of a cover crop can be a simple soil and water conservation practice in Sicilian vineyards. Key words: soil erosion, cover crops, vineyard, Mediterranean area.

  10. Cover crop roller-crimper contributes to weed management in no-till soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Termination of cover crops prior to no-till planting of soybean is typically accomplished with a burndown herbicide. Recent advances in cover crop roller-crimper design offer the possibility of physical termination of cover crops without tillage. We hypothesized that 1) cover crop termination with a...

  11. Using cash cover crops to provide pollinator provisions in the Upper Midwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, the use of winter cover crops in MN and SD has been slow to be adopted. The short growing season and potential for late, wet springs make cover crops risky to farmers with little economic return. The use of cash cover crops in this area offers the standard advantages of other cover crops, w...

  12. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops. 1437.503 Section 1437.503 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER...

  13. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops. 1437.503 Section 1437.503 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER...

  14. Using Mustard Seed Meal and Cover Crops for Weed Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There continues to be a steady growth in the use of fall planted brassica cover crops in the Columbia Basin especially prior to potatoes. Several benefits include better water infiltration, reclaiming nitrogen, reduced erosion, and suppression of nematodes, diseases, and weeds. Weed suppression is...

  15. Tillage and Cover Crops Effects on Potato Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delayed tillage and the inclusion of cover crops can substantially reduce erosion in intensively tilled potato systems. Both of these practices can potentially impact potato yield and quality via changes in soil temperature and soil water status. Research was conducted over seven rotation cycles a...

  16. Modeling cover Crop Effectiveness on Maryland's Eastern Shore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping has become a widely used conservation practice on Maryland’s Eastern shore. It is one of the main practices funded by the Maryland Department of Agriculture’s (MDA) Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost Share (MACS) program. The major benefits of this practice include reduction of ...

  17. Corn Belt Assessment of Cover Crop Management and Preferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveying end-users about their use of technologies and preferences provides information for researchers and educators to develop relevant research and educational programs. A mail survey was sent to Corn Belt farmers during 2006 to quantify cover crop management and preferences. Results indicated t...

  18. Delayed tillage and cover crop effects in potato systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delayed tillage and the inclusion of cover crops can substantially reduce erosion in intensively tilled potato systems. Both of these practices can potentially impact potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)yield and quality via changes in soil temperature and soil water status, and suppression or enhancement...

  19. MANAGING COVER CROPS IN CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE USING ROLLERS/CRIMPERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rollers may provide a viable alternative to herbicides for terminating cover crops, however, excessive vibration generated by rollers and transferred to tractors hinders adoption of this technology in the US. To avoid excessive vibration, producers must limit their operational speed, which increases...

  20. Rolled cover crop mulches for organic corn and soybean production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in cover crop mulches has increased out of both economic and soil conservation concerns. The number of tractor passes required to produce corn and a soybean organically is expensive and logistically challenging. Farmers currently use blind cultivators, such as a rotary hoe or flex-tine harr...

  1. COVER CROP SYSTEMS AFFECT WEED COMMUNITIES IN A CALIFORNIA VINEYARD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vineyard weed communities were examined under four dormant season cover crop systems representative of those used in the north-coastal grape-growing region of California: no-till annuals (rose clover, soft brome, zorro fescue; ANoT), no-till perennials (blue wildrye, California brome, meadow barley,...

  2. Cover cropping impacts on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil aggregation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are a management tool which can extend the period of time that a living plant is growing and conducting photosynthesis. This is critical for soil health, because most of the soil organisms, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, are limited by carbon. Research, on-farm, and demon...

  3. Assessment of spectral indicies for crop residue cover estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quantification of surficial crop residue cover is important for assessing agricultural tillage practices, rangeland health, and brush fire hazards. The Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI) and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI) are two spectral indices that have show...

  4. Cover crop and organic weed control integration in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased adoption of conservation tillage in organic vegetable production requires more information on the role of various cover crops in weed control, tomato quality and yield. An experiment was established in autumn 2005 and 2006 at the North Alabama Horticulture Experiment Station, Cullman,...

  5. Enhancing Nutrient Cycling by Coupling Cover Crops with Manure Injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling winter small grain cover crops (CC) with liquid manure injection may increase manure nutrient capture. The objectives of this research were to quantify manure injection effects using target manure N rates of 112, 224, and 336 kg N ha-1 on CC plant density, fall and spring shoot biomass, N, ...

  6. Aggregate distribution and associated organic carbon influenced by cover crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barquero, Irene; García-González, Irene; Benito, Marta; Gabriel, Jose Luis; Quemada, Miguel; Hontoria, Chiquinquirá

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow with cover crops during the non-cropping period seems to be a good alternative to diminish soil degradation by enhancing soil aggregation and increasing organic carbon. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of replacing fallow by different winter cover crops (CC) on the aggregate distribution and C associated of an Haplic Calcisol. The study area was located in Central Spain, under semi-arid Mediterranean climate. A 4-year field trial was conducted using Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Vetch (Vicia sativa L.) as CC during the intercropping period of maize (Zea mays L.) under irrigation. All treatments were equally irrigated and fertilized. Maize was directly sown over CC residues previously killed in early spring. Composite samples were collected at 0-5 and 5-20 cm depths in each treatment on autumn of 2010. Soil samples were separated by wet sieving into four aggregate-size classes: large macroaggregates ( >2000 µm); small macroaggregates (250-2000 µm); microaggregates (53-250 µm); and < 53 µm (silt + clay size). Organic carbon associated to each aggregate-size class was measured by Walkley-Black Method. Our preliminary results showed that the aggregate-size distribution was dominated by microaggregates (48-53%) and the <53 µm fraction (40-44%) resulting in a low mean weight diameter (MWD). Both cover crops increased aggregate size resulting in a higher MWD (0.28 mm) in comparison with fallow (0.20 mm) in the 0-5 cm layer. Barley showed a higher MWD than fallow also in 5-20 cm layer. Organic carbon concentrations in aggregate-size classes at top layer followed the order: large macroaggregates > small macroaggregates > microaggregates > silt + clay size. Treatments did not influence C concentration in aggregate-size classes. In conclusion, cover crops improved soil structure increasing the proportion of macroaggregates and MWD being Barley more effective than Vetch at subsurface layer.

  7. Cover crops can affect subsequent wheat yield in the central great plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop production systems in the water-limited environment of the semi-arid central Great Plains may not have potential to profitably use cover crops because of lowered subsequent wheat (Triticum asestivum L.) yields following the cover crop. Cover crop mixtures have reportedly shown less yield-reduci...

  8. Manipulating cover crops to increase mycorrhizal colonization in corn (Zea mays)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were performed to determine the influence of cover crop treatments on the abundance of mycorrhizal fungi which can increase nutrient uptake by cash crops. Replicated plots established in spring wheat were assigned to eight cover crop treatments: No cover crop, winter canola, oats, hai...

  9. Cover Crop Effects on the Fate of Swine Manure-N Applied to Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal grain cover crops increase surface cover, anchor corn and soybean residues, increase infiltration, reduce both rill and interrill erosion, scavenge excess nutrients from the soil, and are easily obtained and inexpensive compared to other cover crop options. The use of cereal grain cover crops...

  10. Sustainable cropping systems using cover crops, native species field borders and riparian buffers for environmental quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation will focus on the application of sustainable management practices for no-till cultivation using cover crops, native species field borders, and fast growing woody species integrated in vegetative strips and riparian buffers. An ongoing field project at the Bradford Research and Exte...

  11. Cellulosic Biofuel Production with Winter Cover Crops: Yield and Nitrogen Implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in renewable energy sources derived from plant biomass is increasing. Growing cover crops after harvest of the primary crop has been proposed as a solution to producing cellulosic biomass on existing crop-producing land without reducing food-harvest potential. Growing cover crops is a recom...

  12. The potential for cereal rye cover crops to host corn seedling pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping is a prevalent conservation practice that offers substantial benefits to soil health and water quality. However, winter cereal cover crops preceding corn may diminish beneficial rotation effects by growing two grass species in succession. Here, we show that rye cover crops host pathog...

  13. Living cover crops have immediate impacts on soil microbial community structure and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping is a widely promoted strategy to enhance soil health in agricultural systems. Despite a substantial body of literature demonstrating links between cover crops and soil biology, an important component of soil health, research evaluating how specific cover crop species influence soil mi...

  14. Improving soybean performance in the Northern Great Plains through the use of cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are capable of providing “multiple services” for improving soil quality and enhancing annual crop growth. Maintaining continuous plant cover on agricultural fields with cover crop is of great interest to improve nutrient cycling, prevent soil degradation, and promote further adoption of...

  15. Cover crop biomass production and water use in the central great plains under varying water availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water-limited environment of the semi-arid central Great Plains may not have potential to produce enough cover crop biomass to generate benefits associated with cover crop use in more humid regions. There have been reports that cover crops grown in mixtures produce more biomass with greater wate...

  16. Rye cover crop effects on soil properties in no-till corn silage/soybean agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers in the U.S. Corn Belt are showing increasing interest in winter cover crops. Known benefits of winter cover crops include reductions in nutrient leaching, erosion mitigation, and weed suppression, however little research has investigated the effects of winter cover crops on soil properties. ...

  17. Soil carbon accumulation after short-term use of rye as a winter cover crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of winter cover crops has been proposed to protect and enhance soil resources. Cereal rye (Secale cereale L.) can be an effective cover crop since it can produce large amounts of biomass in certain climates. However, short-term benefits of cover crop use on soil carbon accumulation are not w...

  18. Cover crops in mixtures do not use water differently than single-species plantings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. One of those stated benefits is greatly reduced water use by cover crops grown in mixtures. The objectives of this study were to characterize soil wat...

  19. ACCUMULATION AND CROP UPTAKE OF SOIL MINERAL NITROGEN AS INFLUEMCED BY TILLAGE, COVER CROPS, AND NITROGEN FERTILIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and crop management practices may influence soil mineral N, crop N uptake, and N leaching. We evaluated the effects of three tillage practices [no-till (NT), strip till (ST), and chisel till (CT)], four cover crops {legume [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth)], nonlegume [rye (Secaele cereale L.)]...

  20. Soil Water Improvements with the Long Term Use of a Winter Rye Cover Crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basche, A.; Kaspar, T.; Archontoulis, S.; Jaynes, D. B.; Sauer, T. J.; Parkin, T.; Miguez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Midwestern United States, a region that produces one-third of maize and one-quarter of soybeans globally, is projected to experience increasing rainfall variability with future climate change. One approach to mitigate climate impacts is to utilize crop and soil management practices that enhance soil water storage, reducing the risks of flooding and runoff as well as drought-induced crop water stress. While some research indicates that a winter cover crop in a maize-soybean rotation increases soil water, producers continue to be concerned that water use by cover crops will reduce water for a following cash crop. We analyzed continuous in-field soil moisture measurements over from 2008-2014 at a Central Iowa research site that has included a winter rye cover crop in a maize-soybean rotation for thirteen years. This period of study included years in the top third of wettest years on record (2008, 2010, 2014) as well as years in the bottom third of driest years (2012, 2013). We found the cover crop treatment to have significantly higher soil water storage from 2012-2014 when compared to the no cover crop treatment and in most years greater soil water content later in the growing season when a cover crop was present. We further found that the winter rye cover crop significantly increased the field capacity water content and plant available water compared to the no cover crop treatment. Finally, in 2012 and 2013, we measured maize and soybean biomass every 2-3 weeks and did not see treatment differences in crop growth, leaf area or nitrogen uptake. Final crop yields were not statistically different between the cover and no cover crop treatment in any of the years of this analysis. This research indicates that the long-term use of a winter rye cover crop can improve soil water dynamics without sacrificing cash crop growth.

  1. Impacts of Cover Crops on Water and Nutrient Dynamics in Agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williard, K.; Swanberg, S.; Schoonover, J.

    2013-05-01

    Intensive cropping systems of corn (Zea Mays L.) and soybeans (Glycine max) are commonly leaky systems with respect to nitrogen (N). Reactive N outputs from agroecosystems can contribute to eutrophication and hypoxic zones in downstream water bodies and greenhouse gas (N2O) emissions. Incorporating cover crops into temperate agroecosystem rotations has been promoted as a tool to increase nitrogen use efficiency and thus limit reactive N outputs to the environment. Our objective was determine how cereal rye (Secale cereal L.) and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) cover crops impact nutrient and soil water dynamics in an intensive corn and soybean cropping rotation in central Illinois. Cover crops were planted in mid to late October and terminated in early April prior to corn or soybean planting. In the spring just prior to cover crop termination, soil moisture levels were lower in the cover crop plots compared to no cover plots. This can be a concern for the subsequent crop in relatively dry years, which the Midwestern United States experienced in 2012. No cover plots had greater nutrient leaching below the rooting zone compared to cover crop areas, as expected. The cover crops were likely scavenging nutrients during the fall and early spring and should provide nutrients to the subsequent crop via decomposition and mineralization of the cover crop residue. Over the long term, cover crop systems should produce greater inputs and cycling of carbon and N, increasing the productivity of crops due to the long-term accumulation of soil organic matter. This study demonstrates that there may be short term trade-offs in reduced soil moisture levels that should be considered alongside the long term nutrient scavenging and recycling benefits of cover crops.

  2. Using satellite remote sensing to estimate winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The practice of planting winter cover crops following summer row crops is recognized as an important agricultural conservation measure with potential to reduce nitrogen losses to groundwater. Sequestration of residual soil nitrogen in growing cover crop biomass can significantly reduce wintertime nu...

  3. Growth of tropical legume cover crops as influenced by nitrogen fertilization and Rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical legume cover crops are important components in cropping systems due to their role in improving soil quality. Information is limited on the influence of nitrogen (N) fertilization on growth of tropical legume cover crops grown on Oxisols. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the...

  4. 7 CFR 1412.31 - Direct payment yields for covered commodities, except pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... commodities, except pulse crops. (a) The direct payment yield for each covered commodity, except pulse crops... for covered commodities at part 1412 of this chapter in effect on January 1, 2008 (see 7 CFR part 1412... pulse crops. 1412.31 Section 1412.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  5. 7 CFR 1412.31 - Direct payment yields for covered commodities, except pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... commodities, except pulse crops. (a) The direct payment yield for each covered commodity, except pulse crops... for covered commodities at part 1412 of this chapter in effect on January 1, 2008 (see 7 CFR part 1412... pulse crops. 1412.31 Section 1412.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  6. 7 CFR 1412.31 - Direct payment yields for covered commodities, except pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... commodities, except pulse crops. (a) The direct payment yield for each covered commodity, except pulse crops... for covered commodities at part 1412 of this chapter in effect on January 1, 2008 (see 7 CFR part 1412... pulse crops. 1412.31 Section 1412.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  7. Winter rye cover crops as a host for corn seedling pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping is a prevalent conservation practice that offers substantial benefits to soil protection, soil health and water quality. However, emerging implementations of cover cropping, such as winter cereals preceding corn, may dampen beneficial rotation effects by putting similar crop species i...

  8. Winter rye cover crop management influences on soil water, soil nitrate, and corn development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A winter rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop can be seeded after corn (Zea mays L.) silage to mitigate some of the environmental concerns associated with this cropping system. Rye can be managed as a cover crop by chemical termination or harvested as for forage. A field study was conducted in Morris,...

  9. Sweet corn production and efficiency of nitrogen use in high cover crop residue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can provide many benefits to cropping systems including provision of significant quantities of fixed N (legumes) that is readily mineralized. In the humid, temperate mid-Atlantic area of the U.S.A., winter annual cover crops such as hairy vetch produce abundant biomass and N before summ...

  10. Agronomic responses to late-seeded cover crops in a semiarid region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensification of cropping systems in the Great Plains beyond annual cropping practices may be limited by inadequate precipitation, short growing seasons, and highly variable climatic conditions. Inclusion of cover crops in dryland cropping systems may serve as an effective intensification strateg...

  11. Management of Overwintering Cover Crops Influences Floral Resources and Visitation by Native Bees.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katherine E; Barbercheck, Mary E

    2015-08-01

    The incorporation of cover crops into annual crop rotations is one practice that is used in the Mid-Atlantic United States to manage soil fertility, suppress weeds, and control erosion. Additionally, flowering cover crops have the potential to support beneficial insect communities, such as native bees. Because of the current declines in managed honey bee colonies, the conservation of native bee communities is critical to maintaining "free" pollination services. However, native bees are negatively affected by agricultural intensification and are also in decline across North America. We conducted two experiments to assess the potential of flowering cover crops to act as a conservation resource for native bees. We evaluated the effects of cover crop diversity and fall planting date on floral resource availability and visitation by native bees for overwintering flowering cover crop species commonly used in the Mid-Atlantic region. Cover crop species, crop rotation schedule, and plant diversity significantly influenced floral resource availability. Different cover crop species not only had different blooming phenologies and winter survival responses to planting date, but attracted unique bee communities. Flower density was the primary factor influencing frequency of bee visitation across cover crop diversity and fall planting date treatments. The results from these experiments will be useful for informing recommendations on the applied use of flowering cover crops for pollinator conservation purposes. PMID:26314045

  12. Predicting Crop Water Use from Ground Cover and Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheduling irrigations for horticultural crops with evapotranspiration calculations is difficult. Horticultural crops are grown under a wide range of cultural practices and conditions, making it difficult to select appropriate crop coefficients. A primary determinant of crop water use is light in...

  13. Responses of reniform nematode and browntop millet to tillage, cover crop, and herbicides in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping practices that reduce competition from reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) and browntop millet (Urochlora ramosum) may help minimize losses in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The impacts of tillage, rye cover crop, and preemergence and postemergence herbicides on cotton yields, renifo...

  14. Increased Productivity of a Cover Crop Mixture Is Not Associated with Enhanced Agroecosystem Services

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard G.; Atwood, Lesley W.; Warren, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    Cover crops provide a variety of important agroecological services within cropping systems. Typically these crops are grown as monocultures or simple graminoid-legume bicultures; however, ecological theory and empirical evidence suggest that agroecosystem services could be enhanced by growing cover crops in species-rich mixtures. We examined cover crop productivity, weed suppression, stability, and carryover effects to a subsequent cash crop in an experiment involving a five-species annual cover crop mixture and the component species grown as monocultures in SE New Hampshire, USA in 2011 and 2012. The mean land equivalent ratio (LER) for the mixture exceeded 1.0 in both years, indicating that the mixture over-yielded relative to the monocultures. Despite the apparent over-yielding in the mixture, we observed no enhancement in weed suppression, biomass stability, or productivity of a subsequent oat (Avena sativa L.) cash crop when compared to the best monoculture component crop. These data are some of the first to include application of the LER to an analysis of a cover crop mixture and contribute to the growing literature on the agroecological effects of cover crop diversity in cropping systems. PMID:24847902

  15. Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar data for Crop Cover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, K. V.; Srikanth, P.; Deepika, U.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.

    2014-11-01

    The interest in crop inventory through the use of microwave sensors is on the rise owing to need for accurate crop forecast and the availability of multi polarization data. Till recently, the temporal amplitude data has been used for crop discrimination as well as acreage estimation. With the availability of dual and quadpol data, the differential response of crop geometry at various crop growth stages to various polarizations is being exploited for discrimination and classification of crops. An attempt has been made in the current study with RISAT1 and Radarsat2 C-band single, dual, fully and hybrid polarimetric data for crop inventory. The single date hybrid polarimetric data gave comparable results to the three date single polarization data as well as with the single date fully polarimetric data for crops like rice and cotton.

  16. Cover crop options and pros and cons in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivation of sugarcane in Louisiana usually involves planting seed and waiting 18 months before the harvest of the plant-cane crop. Additional stubble crops are harvested each year between Oct. and Jan. until the stubble is broken out to make the way for a new seed crop the following year. Typical...

  17. Assessing crop residue cover as scene moisture conditions change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residue or plant litter is the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest. Crop residues on the soil surface provide a first line of defense against water and wind erosion and reduce the amounts of soil, nutrients, and pesticides that reach streams and rivers. Thus, quantification of cro...

  18. Soil Organic Carbon Response to Cover Crop and Nitrogen Fertilization under Bioenergy Sorghum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, U. M.; Singh, H. P.; Singh, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Removal of aboveground biomass for bioenergy/feedstock in bioenergy cropping systems may reduce soil C storage. Cover crop and N fertilization may provide additional crop residue C and sustain soil C storage compared with no cover crop and N fertilization. We evaluated the effect of four winter cover crops (control or no cover crop, cereal rye, hairy vetch, and hairy vetch/cereal rye mixture) and two N fertilization rates (0 and 90 kg N ha-1) on soil organic C (SOC) at 0-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm depths under forage and sweet sorghums from 2010 to 2013 in Fort Valley, GA. Cover crop biomass yield and C content were greater with vetch/rye mixture than vetch or rye alone and the control, regardless of sorghum species. Soil organic C was greater with vetch/rye than rye at 0-5 and 15-30 cm in 2011 and 2013 and greater with vetch than rye at 5-15 cm in 2011 under forage sorghum. Under sweet sorghum, SOC was greater with cover crops than the control at 0-5 cm, but greater with vetch and the control than vetch/rye at 15-30 cm. The SOC increased at the rates of 0.30 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at 0-5 cm for rye and the control to 1.44 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at 15-30 cm for vetch/rye and the control from 2010 to 2013 under forage sorghum. Under sweet sorghum, SOC also increased linearly at all depths from 2010 to 2013, regardless of cover crops. Nitrogen fertilization had little effect on SOC. Cover crops increased soil C storage compared with no cover crop due to greater crop residue C returned to the soil under forage and sweet sorghum and hairy vetch/cereal rye mixture had greater C storage than other cover crops under forage sorghum.

  19. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW), which is located in the mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized, and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops to improve water quality at the watershed scale (~ 50 km2) and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data to simulate hydrological processes and agricultural nutrient cycling over the period of 1990-2000. To accurately simulate winter cover crop biomass in relation to growing conditions, a new approach was developed to further calibrate plant growth parameters that control the leaf area development curve using multitemporal satellite-based measurements of species-specific winter cover crop performance. Multiple SWAT scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops and to investigate how nitrate loading could change under different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting dates, and implementation areas. The simulation results indicate that winter cover crops have a negligible impact on the water budget but significantly reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading from agricultural lands was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was the most effective species, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of cover crops (~ 30

  20. Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W.

    2006-04-15

    A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

  1. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991-2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but it decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha-1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils and those

  2. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeo, In-Young; Lee, Sangchui; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Beeson, Peter C.; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Greg W.; Lang, Megan W.

    2013-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991–2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha−1, but it decreased to 4.6–10.1 kg ha−1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27–67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha−1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils

  3. Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on Winter Cover Crops Used in Cotton Production.

    PubMed

    Timper, Patricia; Davis, Richard F; Tillman, P Glynn

    2006-03-01

    Substantial reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on winter cover crops may lead to damaging populations in a subsequent cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) crop. The amount of population increase during the winter depends on soil temperature and the host status of the cover crop. Our objectives were to quantify M. incognita race 3 reproduction on rye (Secale cereale) and several leguminous cover crops and to determine if these cover crops increase population densities of M. incognita and subsequent damage to cotton. The cover crops tested were 'Bigbee' berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum), 'Paradana' balansa clover (T. balansae), 'AU Sunrise' and 'Dixie' crimson clover (T. incarnatum), 'Cherokee' red clover (T. pratense), common and 'AU Early Cover' hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), 'Cahaba White' vetch (V. sativa), and 'Wrens Abruzzi' rye. In the greenhouse tests, egg production was greatest on berseem clover, Dixie crimson clover, AU Early Cover hairy vetch, and common hairy vetch; intermediate on Balansa clover and AU Sunrise crimson clover; and least on rye, Cahaba White vetch, and Cherokee red clover. In both 2002 and 2003 field tests, enough heat units were accumulated between 1 January and 20 May for the nematode to complete two generations. Both AU Early Cover and common hairy vetch led to greater root galling than fallow in the subsequent cotton crop; they also supported high reproduction of M. incognita in the greenhouse. Rye and Cahaba White vetch did not increase root galling on cotton and were relatively poor hosts for M. incognita. Only those legumes that increased populations of M. incognita reduced cotton yield. In the southern US, M. incognita can complete one to two generations on a susceptible winter cover crop, so cover crops that support high nematode reproduction may lead to damage and yield losses in the following cotton crop. Planting rye or Meloidogyne-resistant legumes as winter cover crops will lower the risk of increased nematode populations

  4. Impact of Winter Cover Crop Biomass Removal on Soil Properties and Cotton Yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest on alternatives sources of energy, especially renewable sources. Numerous materials can be used for this purpose, including crop residues. The use of crop residues would give farmers a new source of income. The use of winter cover crops (WCC) is recommende...

  5. Effects of soil composition and mineralogy on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The management of crop residues in agricultural fields influences soil erosion and soil carbon sequestration. Remote sensing methods can efficiently assess crop residue cover and tillaje intensity over many fields in a region. Although the reflectance spectra of soils and crop residues are often s...

  6. Mapping crop Residue Cover and Soil Tillage Intensity Using Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently crop residues were managed primarily to reduce soil erosion and increase soil organic carbon, but demands for biofuels may remove much of the residue. Current methods of measuring crop residue cover are inadequate for characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of crop residu...

  7. Evaluation of Cowpea Germplasm Lines Adapted for Use as a Cover Crop in the Southeastern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) are desirable as a cover crop, because they are tolerant of heat, drought and poor soils, grow vigorously and compete well against weeds, and provide nitrogen for rotational crops. Cowpeas were grown extensively as a forage and green manure crop in the southeastern U.S. ...

  8. The effect of cover cropping systems and nitrogen fertilization on sorghum grain characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No-till farming has become an increasing popular cropping practice, due to increased water and soil conservation. Recently, cover cropping has been added to the system to aid in weed prevention and also increase soil fertility. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of cropping sy...

  9. Winter Cover Crops and Vinegar for Early-Season Weed Control in Sustainable Cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds in cotton may be suppressed by winter cover crops and the use of organic herbicides such as vinegar. Black oat (Avena strigosa), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), winter cover crops were planted in a sustainable production field in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and were tilled prior to ...

  10. 7 CFR 1412.31 - Direct payment yields for covered commodities, except pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for covered commodities at part 1412 of this chapter in effect on January 1, 2008 (see 7 CFR part 1412... pulse crops. 1412.31 Section 1412.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... commodities, except pulse crops. (a) The direct payment yield for each covered commodity, except pulse...

  11. A comparison of drill and broadcast methods for establishing cover crops on beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops stands that are sufficiently dense soon after planting are more likely to suppress weeds, scavenge nutrients, and reduce erosion. Small-scale organic vegetable farmers often use broadcasting methods to establish cover crops but lack information on the most effective tool to incorporate ...

  12. Ruminant Grazing of Cover Crops: Effects on Soil Properties and Agricultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poffenbarger, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    Integrating livestock into a cropping system by allowing ruminant animals to graze cover crops may yield economic and environmental benefits. The effects of grazing on soil physical properties, soil organic matter, nitrogen cycling and agricultural production are presented in this literature review. The review found that grazing cover crops…

  13. Effect of water content and organic carbon on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residue cover is an important indicator of tillage method. Remote sensing of crop residue cover is an attractive and efficient method when compared with traditional ground-based methods, e.g., the line-point transect or windshield survey. A number of spectral indices have been devised for res...

  14. Remote Sensing of Cover Crop Nutrient Uptake on Maryland's Eastern Shore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover cropping is recognized as an important agricultural best management practice with great promise for reducing nutrient inputs to the Chesapeake Bay. Accordingly, state-run cost share programs have been established to promote cover cropping on farms throughout Maryland. However, current estimate...

  15. Grazing winter rye cover crop in a cotton no-till system: yield and economics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crop adoption in conservation management systems continues to be limited in the US but could be encouraged if establishment costs could be offset. A 4-yr field experiment was conducted near Watkinsville, Georgia in which a rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop was either grazed by catt...

  16. Do cover crops increase or decrease nitrous oxide emissions? A meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few studies have examined the factors that affect the impact of cover crops on nitrous oxide emissions. A meta-analysis of the data obtained from twenty-six peer reviewed articles was conducted using the natural log of the nitrous oxide flux with a cover crop divided by the nitrous oxide flux withou...

  17. Integrating choice of variety, soil amendments, and cover crops to optimize organic rice production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have completed our first year of this project to determine the impact of winter cover crops, soil amendments, and rice varieties on organic rice production at Beaumont, TX. Two winter cover crops were established successfully and the amounts of dry biomass produced were 4,690 and 5,157 lb/acre f...

  18. Winter Cover Crop Effects on Nitrate Leaching in Subsurface Drainage as Simulated by RZWQM-DSSAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting winter cover crops such as winter rye after corn and soybean harvest is one of the more promising practices to reduce nitrate loss to streams from tile drainage systems. Because use of cover crops to reduce nitrate loss has only been tested over a few years with limited environmental and ma...

  19. Utilizing cover crop mulches to reduce tillage in organic systems in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic sytems in the southeast offer unique challenges and solutions due to regional soil and climate characterized by highly weather soil types, high precipitation, and the capacity to grow cover crops in the winter. Recently high-residue cover crops and conservation tillage systems have increased...

  20. Utilizing Cover Crop Mulches to Reduce TIllage in Organic Systems in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crop roller-crimper trials have been conducted across the southeastern U.S. during the past decade. Regional climatic conditions make the system particularly attractive but also pose their own challenges. Winter annual cover crops productivity can exceed 8 Mg ha-1 (dry weight) for rye (Secale ...

  1. COVER CROPS ENHANCE SOIL ORGANIC MATTER, CARBON DYNAMICS AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FUNCTION IN A MEDITERRANEAN VINEYARD AGROECOSYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impacts of soil tillage and cover crops on soil carbon (C) dynamics and microbiological function were investigated in a vineyard grown in California’s Mediterranean climate. We 1) compared soil organic matter (SOM), C dynamics and microbiological activity of two cover crops [Trios 102 (Triticale x T...

  2. Self-seeding small grain cover crops in a soybean-corn rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops provide environmental benefits, yet adoption in agronomic farming systems is low. Winter rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) were used to develop self-seeding cover crop systems in a soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]-corn (Zea m...

  3. Self-Seeded Cereal Cover Crop Effects on Interspecific Competition with Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perpetuating cereal cover crops through self-seeding may increase adoption by reducing risk and cost. Winter rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) were used to develop self-seeding cover crop systems in a soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]-corn...

  4. The effects of combined cover crop termination and planting in a cotton no-till system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One method to save resources while positively impacting the environment is combining agricultural field operations. In no-till systems, cover crop termination and cash crop planting can be performed simultaneously utilizing a tractor as a single power source. A no-till field experiment merging cover...

  5. US-1136, US-1137, and US-1138 Cowpea Germplasm Lines for Use as a Cover Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adoption of sustainable and organic cultural practices in recent years has resulted in an increased use of cover crops. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) is an excellent warm season cover crop due to its tolerance of heat and drought stress, ability to grow well in sandy, poor, acidic soils, high b...

  6. Innovative methods for measuring cover crop nutrient uptake on a landscape scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because winter cover crops are recognized as an effective agricultural conservation practice for reducing nitrogen losses to groundwater, state cost-share programs have been established to promote cover crops on farms throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Remote sensing provides a tool for real-t...

  7. Rye cover crop effects on soil properties in no-till corn silage/soybean agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers in the U.S. Corn Belt are showing increasing interest in winter cover crops. The known benefits of winter cover crops include reduced nitrate leaching, soil erosion, and weed germination, but evidence of improvements in soil productivity would provide further incentive for famers to implemen...

  8. Low-altitude aircraft imagery for assessment of winter cover-crop biomass and nitrogen content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are planted during the autumn to reduce nitrogen inputs to the surface water system. The objective of this research is to determine a method to quickly assess the amount of nitrogen stored in the biomass before the cover crop is removed in the early spring. Two digital cameras were mo...

  9. Forage radish winter cover crop suppresses winter annual weeds in fall and before corn planting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. longipinnatus) is a new winter cover crop in the Mid-Atlantic region. The objective of this project was to characterize the repeatability, amount, and duration of weed suppression during and after a fall-planted forage radish cover crop and to quantify the sub...

  10. Dealing with drought: Securing nitrogen with cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year the drought in the Midwest has significantly reduced the growth and yield of all crops. When the growth of the cash crop has been reduced by drought or any other cause it is important to remember that more nitrogent than normal will remain in the soil after harvest. This nitrogen will be v...

  11. Cotton population and yield following different cover crops termination practices in an Alabama no-till system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Alabama, under optimal weather conditions, a three-week time period is required after rolling down a cover crop to achieve termination rates above 90%, and to eliminate competition for soil moisture between the cover crop and cash crop. A common method to enhance the cover crop termination proces...

  12. Evaluating stocker cattle in a southern Piedmont conservation tillage cotton-cover crop system to increase productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers are often reluctant to plant winter cover crops because of added cost. However, grazing of winter annual cover crops by stocker cattle may help offset cover crop costs and increase farm revenue. Identifying temporal and spatial management needs within cropped/grazed fields can help ...

  13. Effect of Winter Cover Crops on Nematode Population Levels in North Florida

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.-H.; McSorley, R.; Gallaher, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in north-central Florida to examine the effects of various winter cover crops on plant-parasitic nematode populations through time. In the first experiment, six winter cover crops were rotated with summer corn (Zea mays), arranged in a randomized complete block design. The cover crops evaluated were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum). At the end of the corn crop in year 1, population densities of Meloidogyne incognita were lowest on corn following rye or oat (P ≤ 0.05), but no treatment differences were observed in year 2. Wheat was a good host to Paratrichodorus minor, whereas vetch was a poor host, but numbers of P. minor were not lower in vetch-planted plots after corn was grown. The second experiment used a split-plot design in which rye or lupine was planted into field plots with histories of five tropical cover crops: soybean (Glycine max), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor × S. sudanense), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), and corn. Population densities of M. incognita and Helicotylenchus dihystera were affected by previous tropical cover crops (P ≤ 0.05) but not by the winter cover crops present at the time of sampling. Plots planted to sunn hemp in the fall maintained the lowest M. incognita and H. dihystera numbers. Results suggest that winter cover crops tested did not suppress plant-parasitic nematodes effectively. Planting tropical cover crops such as sunn hemp after corn in a triple-cropping system with winter cover crops may provide more versatile nematode management strategies in northern Florida. PMID:19262833

  14. Effect of winter cover crops on nematode population levels in north Florida.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R; Gallaher, R N

    2004-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted in north-central Florida to examine the effects of various winter cover crops on plant-parasitic nematode populations through time. In the first experiment, six winter cover crops were rotated with summer corn (Zea mays), arranged in a randomized complete block design. The cover crops evaluated were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum). At the end of the corn crop in year 1, population densities of Meloidogyne incognita were lowest on corn following rye or oat (P cover crops: soybean (Glycine max), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. sudanense), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), and corn. Population densities of M. incognita and Helicotylenchus dihystera were affected by previous tropical cover crops (P cover crops present at the time of sampling. Plots planted to sunn hemp in the fall maintained the lowest M. incognita and H. dihystera numbers. Results suggest that winter cover crops tested did not suppress plant-parasitic nematodes effectively. Planting tropical cover crops such as sunn hemp after corn in a triple-cropping system with winter cover crops may provide more versatile nematode management strategies in northern Florida. PMID:19262833

  15. Population dynamics of caterpillars on three cover crops before sowing cotton in Mato Grosso (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Silvie, P J; Menzel, C A; Mello, A; Coelho, A G

    2010-01-01

    Direct seeding mulch-based cropping systems under a preliminary cover crop such as millet are common in some areas of Brazil. Lepidopteran pests that damage cotton, soybean and maize crops can proliferate on cover crops, so preventive chemical treatments are necessary. Very little data is available on these pests on cover crops. This paper presents the dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda, S. eridania, Mocis latipes and Diatraea saccharalis caterpillars monitored at Primavera do Leste, Mato Grosso state (Brazil) during the of 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 cropping seasons on four cover crops, i.e. finger millet (Eleusine coracana), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and ruzigrass (Brachiaria ruziziensis). The pests were visually counted on plants within a 1 m2 transect (wooden frame). Caterpillars were reared to facilitate identification of collected species and parasitoids. Many S. frugiperda caterpillars were observed on millet in 2005, with a maximum of 37 caterpillars/m2. On sorghum, we found 30 caterpillars/m2, or 0.83 caterpillars/plant. The Diatraea borer attacked sorghum later than the other pests. M. latipes was also observed on millet. The millet cover crop had to be dried for at least 1 month before direct drilling the main cotton crop in order to impede S. frugiperda infestations on cotton plantlets, thus avoiding the need for substantial resowing. The comparative methodological aspects are discussed. PMID:21539250

  16. Root-knot Nematode Management in Dryland Taro with Tropical Cover Crops

    PubMed Central

    Sipes, B. S.; Arakaki, A. S.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-two cover crops were evaluated for their ability to reduce damage by root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, to taro, Colocastia esculenta, in a tropical cropping system. Cover crops were grown and incorporated into the soil before taro was planted. Barley, greenpanic, glycine, marigold, sesame, sunn hemp, and sorghum x sudangrass DeKalb ST6E were poor or nonhosts to the nematode as measured by low population changes of nematodes in soil between cover crop planting and taro planting. Alfalfa, buckwheat, cowpea, lablab, Lana vetch, mustard, oat, okra, rhodes grass, ryegrain, ryegrass, siratro, sweet corn, and wheat allowed nematode populations to increase dramatically. Taro yields were greatest in the marigold plots and lowest in the ryegrain plots. Taro corm weight decreased with increasing initial nematode population (Pi) (r = 0.22, P = 0.056). Siratro, ryegrass, and Blizzard wheat plots had higher taro yield than plots with similar Pi's but planted to other cover crops. These cover crops may have antagonism to other soil microorganisms or their decomposition products may be toxic or adversely affect the nematodes. Cover crops can be an effective and valuable nematode management tactic for use in minor tropical cropping systems such as taro. PMID:19274275

  17. The Potential for Cereal Rye Cover Crops to Host Corn Seedling Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Matthew G; Acharya, Jyotsna; Moorman, Thomas B; Robertson, Alison E; Kaspar, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    Cover cropping is a prevalent conservation practice that offers substantial benefits to soil and water quality. However, winter cereal cover crops preceding corn may diminish beneficial rotation effects because two grass species are grown in succession. Here, we show that rye cover crops host pathogens capable of causing corn seedling disease. We isolated Fusarium graminearum, F. oxysporum, Pythium sylvaticum, and P. torulosum from roots of rye and demonstrate their pathogenicity on corn seedlings. Over 2 years, we quantified the densities of these organisms in rye roots from several field experiments and at various intervals of time after rye cover crops were terminated. Pathogen load in rye roots differed among fields and among years for particular fields. Each of the four pathogen species increased in density over time on roots of herbicide-terminated rye in at least one field site, suggesting the broad potential for rye cover crops to elevate corn seedling pathogen densities. The radicles of corn seedlings planted following a rye cover crop had higher pathogen densities compared with seedlings following a winter fallow. Management practices that limit seedling disease may be required to allow corn yields to respond positively to improvements in soil quality brought about by cover cropping. PMID:26926485

  18. USE OF COVER CROPS FOR WEED SUPPRESSION IN HAZELNUT (CORYLUS AVELLANA L.) IN TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Isik, D; Dok, M; Ak, K; Macit, I; Demir, Z; Mennan, H

    2014-01-01

    Weed management is critical in hazelnut (Corylus avellana) production. Weeds reduce nutrient availability, interfere with tree growth, and reduce hand-harvesting efficiency. Field experiments were conducted to test effects of cover crops as alternative weed management strategies in hazelnut. The cover crop treatments consisted of Trifolium repens L., Festuca rubra subsp. rubra L., Festuca arundinacea Schreb., Vicia villosa Roth. And Trifolium meneghinianum Celmand fallow with no cover crop. Control plots such as weedy control, herbicide control and mechanical control were added as reference plots. The lowest weed dry biomass was obtained from Vicia villosa plots, and there were no significant differences among all other cover crop treatments. The highest cover crop dry biomass was measured in the Trifolium meneghinianum plots. Regarding the effect of cover crops on hazelnut yields, the lowest yield was ob- tained from weedy control plots, while the highest yield was obtained from F. arundinacea plots. This research indicated that cover crops could be used as living mulch in integrated weed management programs to manage weeds in the hazelnut orchards. PMID:26084088

  19. Erosion control in orchards and vineyards by a new soil and cover crop management method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Wilfried; Guettler, Hans; Auer, Karl; Erhart, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Cover crops are the basis for an erosion-free soil management in orchards and vineyards. The soil cover provided by the foliage and the intensive root formation counteract erosion. Cover crops provide the soil microfauna with fresh organic matter which improves soil structure and porosity. The water demand of cover crops, however, may pose problems for the water supply of the trees and vines in dry seasons. Therefore it is necessary to adjust the growth of the cover crops to the actual water conditions. In years with ample precipitation cover crops may be allowed lush vegetative growth till flowering and formation of seeds. In dry years, the growth of the cover crop must be restricted to stop the competition for water, sometimes even by cutting off the cover crop roots. The course of the weather is incalculable and rainfall may be very variable during the year, so it is sometimes necessary to adust the cover crop management several times a year. A new special equipment, which can perform all the tasks necessary for the flexible cover crop management has been developed together with the agricultural machinery manufacturers Bodenwerkstatt Ertl-Auer GmbH and Güttler GmbH. The GreenManager® device consists of three modules, namely a specific type of cultivator, a harrow and a prismatic roller with seeding equipment, which can be used separately or in combination. The GreenManager® can reduce cover crops by flattening the plants in the whole row middle, by bringing down the cover crops with the harrow, or by horizontally cutting the cover crop roots a few centimetres beneath the soil surface in the central part of the row middle or in the whole row middle. These measures reduce the water competition by cover crops without generating further losses of soil moisture through intensive soil cultivation. At the same time the risk of soil erosion is kept to a minimum, because the soil remains covered by dead plant biomass. In one passage the GreenManager® can direct

  20. Climate response to Amazon forest replacement by heterogeneous crop cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, A. M.; Dirmeyer, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Previous modeling studies with atmospheric general circulation models and basic land surface schemes to balance energy and water budgets have shown that by removing the natural vegetation over the Amazon, the region's climate becomes warmer and drier. In this study we use a fully coupled Earth system model and replace tropical forests by a distribution of six common tropical crops with variable planting dates, physiological parameters and irrigation. There is still general agreement with previous studies as areal averages show a warmer (+1.4 K) and drier (-0.35 mm day-1) climate. Using an interactive crop model with a realistic crop distribution shows that regions of vegetation change experience different responses dependent upon the initial tree coverage and whether the replacement vegetation is irrigated, with seasonal changes synchronized to the cropping season. Areas with initial tree coverage greater than 80 % show an increase in coupling with the atmosphere after deforestation, suggesting land use change could heighten sensitivity to climate anomalies, while irrigation acts to dampen coupling with the atmosphere.

  1. Capturing residual soil nitrogen with winter cereal cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wide-spread drought during the 2012 summer has resulted in reduced crop growth, poor yields, and an anticipated increase in residual nitrate (NO3) nitrogen (N) in the soil profile. This residual N can potentially increase NO3-N losses to ground and/or surface waters, as well as increase carry-ov...

  2. Climate response to Amazon forest replacement by heterogeneous crop cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, A. M.; Dirmeyer, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous modeling studies with atmospheric general circulation models and basic land surface schemes to balance energy and water budgets have shown that by removing the natural vegetation over the Amazon, the region's climate becomes warmer and drier. In this study we use a fully coupled Earth System Model and replace tropical forests by a distribution of six common tropical crops with variable planting dates, physiological parameters and irrigation. There is still general agreement with previous studies as areal averages show a warmer (+1.4 K) and drier (-0.35 mm day-1) climate. Using an interactive crop model with a realistic crop distribution shows that regions of vegetation change experience different responses dependent upon the initial tree coverage and whether the replacement vegetation is irrigated, with seasonal changes synchronized to the cropping season. Areas with initial tree coverage greater than 80% show an increase in coupling with atmosphere after deforestation, suggesting land use change could heighten sensitivity to climate anomalies, while irrigation acts to dampen coupling with atmosphere.

  3. Multispectral determination of vegetative cover in corn crop canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1972-01-01

    The relationship between different amounts of vegetative ground cover and the energy reflected by corn canopies was investigated. Low altitude photography and an airborne multispectral scanner were used to measure this reflected energy. Field plots were laid out, representing four growth stages of corn. Two plot locations were chosen-on a very dark and a very light surface soil. Color and color infrared photographs were taken from a vertical distance of 10 m. Estimates of ground cover were made from these photographs and were related to field measurements of leaf area index. Ground cover could be predicted from leaf area index measurements by a second order equation. Microdensitometry and digitzation of the three separated dye layers of color infrared film showed that the near infrared dye layer is most valuable in ground cover determinations. Computer analysis of the digitized photography provided an accurate method of determining precent ground cover.

  4. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using water quality simulation model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops are an important conservation practice with potential to improve water quality by reducing excess nitrogen (N), remaining during the winter/early spring in soil, from leaching, runoff, and sediment loss into surface waters after harvest of summer crops. Throughout the Chesapeake B...

  5. The impact of fall cover crops on soil nitrate and corn growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporating cover crops into current production systems can have many beneficial impacts on the current cropping system including decreasing erosion, improving water infiltration, increasing soil organic matter and biological activity but in water limited areas caution should be utilized. A fiel...

  6. Cover crop in Missouri: putting them to work on your farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunlight powers agriculture and fortunately is free to all farmers. The challenge is harvesting as much sunlight as possible. With commodity crops that may only be in the field for 4 to 5 months, there are several months each year when fields are receiving untapped sunlight. Fortunately, cover crop...

  7. Using satellite remote sensing to estimate winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The practice of planting winter cover crops (rye, wheat, barley) following summer row crops (corn, soybean) is recognized as an effective agricultural conservation practice that can significantly reduce nitrogen losses to groundwater. Accordingly, state cost-share programs have been established to p...

  8. The Challenges of Implementing Conservation Tillage and Cover Crops in Clay Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices, such as reduced tillage and cover crops, can improve soil quality and increase soil moisture for crop production. Benefits to production, soil quality, and water conservation have been observed especially in areas with rapidly draining soils. While historically enjoying high ...

  9. Cover crop and poultry litter management influence spatiotemporal availability of topsoil nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green and animal manures provide plant-available nitrogen (N) in annual cropping systems and contribute to improved soil quality. Our objectives were to determine the effects of cover crop residue type and pelletized poultry litter (PPL) application method on: 1) the spatiotemporal distribution of s...

  10. Increasing diveristy of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agroecosystems using specific cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall-planted cover crops provide a plant host for obligate symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) during otherwise fallow periods and thus may increase AMF numbers in agroecosystems. Increased AMF numbers should increase mycorrhizal colonization of the subsequent cash crops, which has been li...

  11. Short-Term Impact of Winter Cover Crop Biomass Removal On Soil Physical Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) is often recommended as a winter cover crop for conservation systems in the southeastern United States. Typically, rye is terminated with a glyphosate application 2-3 weeks prior to planting a summer crop. The glyphosate application is followed by a rolling operation to fla...

  12. Legume proportions, poultry litter, and tillage effects on cover crop decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.)–cereal rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop mixtures can provide N scavenging and N provisioning benefits in grain cropping systems. The objectives of this research were to determine, under field conditions, the effects of species proportions, tillage, and pelletized...

  13. Decomposition and Nutrient Release of Cover Crops on Different Landscape Positions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decomposition patterns of cover crops determine availability of nutrients to subsequent crops. Decomposition and mineralization patterns of Lupinus albus L. (white lupin), Avena strigosa Shreb (black oat), Trifolium incarnatum L. (crimson clover) and Brassica napus L. (rape) were studied under fiel...

  14. Effects of a custom cover crop residue manager in a no-till cotton system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an important part of no-till conservation agriculture, and these crops must produce optimum biomass amounts to effectively protect the soil surface from erosion and runoff, conserve soil water, and provide a physical barrier against weeds. Because of the large amount of residue produ...

  15. Replacing fallow with cover crops in a semiarid soil: effects on soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replacement of fallow in crop-fallow systems with cover crops (CCs) may improve soil properties. We assessed whether replacing fallow in no-till winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-fallow with winter and spring CCs for five years reduced wind and water erosion, increased soil organic carbon (SOC), a...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.504 - Notice of loss for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of loss for covered tropical crops. 1437.504 Section 1437.504 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP...

  17. 7 CFR 1437.504 - Notice of loss for covered tropical crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of loss for covered tropical crops. 1437.504 Section 1437.504 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP...

  18. Influence of Cover Crops in Rotation on Populations of Soil Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pot experiment was carried out in south Florida to elucidate suppressive or antagonistic effects of several cover crops grown in rotation on soil nematode populations. The crops were two marigolds, Tagetes patula L. 'Dwarf Double French Mix' (MI), and Tagetes patula L. 'Lemon Drop' (MII), Indian m...

  19. Mitigating the effects of water on remotely sensed estimates of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues on the soil surface decrease soil erosion and increase soil organic carbon and the management of crop residues is an integral part of many conservation tillage systems. Current methods of measuring residue cover are inadequate for characterizing the spatial variability of residue cove...

  20. TILLAGE, COVER CROP, AND NITROGEN FERTILIZER SOURCE EFFECTS ON SOIL CARBON AND NITROGEN SEQUESTRATION.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 10-yr effect of combinations of tillage (no-till, mulch till, and conventional till), cover crop (rye vs. none), and N fertilization source and rate (0 and 100 kg N ha-1 from NH4NO3 and 100 and 200 kg N ha-1 from poultry manure) was evaluated on crop residues and soil organic C (SOC) and organic...

  1. Soil carbon and nitrogen affected by perennial grass, cover crop, and nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil C and N sequestration and the potential for N leaching can be influenced by the type of perennial grass, cover crop, and N fertilization due to differences in crop yields and the amount of residue returned to the soil. We evaluated the effects of the combinations of perennial grasses (energy ca...

  2. Soil response to corn residue removal and cover crops in Eastern South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of crop residue has been shown to degrade soil organic carbon (SOC), and hence soil quality. The present study was conducted to assess the impacts of corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal and cover crops on various soil quality parameters. The experimental site was located in Brookings County, ...

  3. Effect of Seeding Rate and Planting Arrangement on Rye Cover Crop and Weed Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed growth in winter cover crops in warm climates may contribute to weed management costs in subsequent crops. A two year experiment was conducted on an organic vegetable farm in Salinas, California, to determine the impact of seeding rate and planting arrangement on rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Merc...

  4. Effectiveness of oat and rye cover crops in reducing nitrate losses in drainage water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much of the NO3 in the riverine surface waters of the upper Mississippi River basin originates from artificially drained agricultural land used for corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) production. Cover crops grown between maturity and planting of these crops are one approach to r...

  5. Alleyway Cover Crops have Little Influence on Pinot Noir Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) in Two Western Oregon Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven cover crop treatments were compared in two north Willamette Valley ‘Pinot noir’ vineyards over two years to test if alleyway cover crops that are mowed in spring and summer compete with grapevines for water or nutrients. Five different cover crop mixtures (planted in the fall of 2003) were com...

  6. Biomass production of 12 winter cereal cover crop cultivars and their effect on subsequent no-till corn yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can improve the sustainability and resilience of corn and soybean production systems. However, there have been isolated reports of corn yield reductions following winter rye cover crops. Although there are many possible causes of corn yield reductions following winter cereal cover crops,...

  7. Winter cover crop seeding rate and variety effects during eight years of organic vegetables: III. Cover crop residue quality and nitrogen mineralization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops (CC) can improve nutrient-use efficiency in tillage-intensive systems. Shoot residue quality and soil mineral N following incorporation of rye (Secale cereale L.), legume-rye, and mustard CC was determined in December to February or March during the first 8 yr of the Salinas Orga...

  8. Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on Winter Cover Crops Used in Cotton Production

    PubMed Central

    Timper, Patricia; Davis, Richard F.; Tillman, P. Glynn

    2006-01-01

    Substantial reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on winter cover crops may lead to damaging populations in a subsequent cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) crop. The amount of population increase during the winter depends on soil temperature and the host status of the cover crop. Our objectives were to quantify M. incognita race 3 reproduction on rye (Secale cereale) and several leguminous cover crops and to determine if these cover crops increase population densities of M. incognita and subsequent damage to cotton. The cover crops tested were ‘Bigbee’ berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum), ‘Paradana’ balansa clover (T. balansae), ‘AU Sunrise’ and ‘Dixie’ crimson clover (T. incarnatum), ‘Cherokee’ red clover (T. pratense), common and ‘AU Early Cover’ hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), ‘Cahaba White’ vetch (V. sativa), and ‘Wrens Abruzzi’ rye. In the greenhouse tests, egg production was greatest on berseem clover, Dixie crimson clover, AU Early Cover hairy vetch, and common hairy vetch; intermediate on Balansa clover and AU Sunrise crimson clover; and least on rye, Cahaba White vetch, and Cherokee red clover. In both 2002 and 2003 field tests, enough heat units were accumulated between 1 January and 20 May for the nematode to complete two generations. Both AU Early Cover and common hairy vetch led to greater root galling than fallow in the subsequent cotton crop; they also supported high reproduction of M. incognita in the greenhouse. Rye and Cahaba White vetch did not increase root galling on cotton and were relatively poor hosts for M. incognita. Only those legumes that increased populations of M. incognita reduced cotton yield. In the southern US, M. incognita can complete one to two generations on a susceptible winter cover crop, so cover crops that support high nematode reproduction may lead to damage and yield losses in the following cotton crop. Planting rye or Meloidogyne-resistant legumes as winter cover crops will lower the risk of

  9. Microbial community structure and abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil of a tomato cropping system that includes cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this report we use Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (TRFLP) in a tomato production system to “finger printing” the soil microbial community structure with Phylum specific primer sets. Factors influencing the soil microbes are a cover crop of Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) or Rye (...

  10. Root characteristics of cover crops and their erosion-reducing potential during concentrated runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baets, S.; Poesen, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the loam region in central Belgium, a lot of research has been conducted on the effects of cover crops for preventing splash and interrill erosion and on their nutrient pumping effectiveness. As this is a very effective erosion and environment conservation technique, planting cover crops during the winter season is widely applied in the loess belt. Most of these cover crops freeze at the beginning of the winter period. Consequently, the above-ground biomass becomes less effective in protecting the soil from water erosion. Apart from the effects of the above-ground biomass in protecting the soil against raindrop impacts and reducing flow velocities by the retarding effects of their stems, plant roots also play an important role in improving soil strength. Previous research showed that roots contribute to a large extent to the resistance of topsoils against concentrated flow erosion. Unfortunately, information on root properties of common cover crops (e.g. Sinapis alba, Phacelia tanacetifoli, Lolium perenne, Avena sativa, Secale cereale, Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus) is very scarce. Therefore, root density distribution with depth and their erosion-reducing effects during concentrated flow erosion were assessed by conducting root auger measurements and concentrated flow experiments at the end of the growth period (December). The preliminary results indicate that the studied cover crops are not equally effective in preventing soil loss by concentrated flow erosion at the end of the growing season. Cover crops with thick roots, such as Sinapis alba and Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus are less effective than cover crops with fine-branched roots such as Phacelia tanacetifoli, Lolium perenne (Ryegrass), Avena sativa (Oats) and Secale cereale (Rye) in preventing soil losses by concentrated flow erosion. These results enable soil managers to select the most suitable crops and maximize soil protection.

  11. Impact of cover crops and tillage on porosity of podzolic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błażewicz-Woźniak, M.; Konopiñski, M.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of cover crops biomass, mixed with the soil on different dates and with the use of different tools in field conditions. The cover crop biomass had a beneficial influence on the total porosity of the 0-20 cm layer of the soil after winter. The highest porosity was achievedwith cover crops of buckwheat, phacelia and mustard, the lowest with rye. During the vegetation period the highest porosity of soil was observed in the ridges. Among the remaining non-ploughing cultivations, pre-winter use of stubble cultivator proved to have a beneficial influence on the soil porosity, providing results comparable to those achieved in conventional tillage. The differential porosity of the soil was modified not only by the catch crops and the cultivation methods applied, but also by the sample collection dates, and it did change during the vegetation period. The highest content of macropores after winter was observed for the phacelia cover crop, and the lowest in the case of cultivation without any cover crops. Pre-winter tillage with the use of a stubble cultivator increased the amount of macropores in soil in spring, and caused the biggest participation of mesopores as compared with other non-ploughing cultivation treatments of the soil. The smallest amount of mesopores was found in the ridges.

  12. Cover crop water quality benefits in intensive production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh market tomatoes are typically grown in in raised beds covered in polyethylene mulch with bare-soil furrows between the beds. Field experiments were conducted over five years to examine two alternative management strategies. In side-by-side comparison with the traditional management practice, t...

  13. Mapping crop ground cover using airborne multispectral digital imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Empirical relationships between remotely sensed vegetation indices and density information, such as leaf area index or ground cover (GC), are commonly used to derive spatial information in many precision farming operations. In this study, we modified an existing methodology that does not depend on e...

  14. Comparison of rye and legume-rye cover crop mixtures for vegetable production in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) is an important cover crop in high-value vegetable production in California but legume-rye mixes have received little research attention. A 2-yr winter study on organic farms in Salinas and Hollister, CA evaluated ground cover, above ground dry matter (DM) and C:N, and weed ...

  15. Cover crops promote aggregation of omnivorous predators in seed patches and facilitate weed biological control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Omnivores are important consumers of both weed seeds and insect pests, and habitat provisions like cover crops are suggested to promote their ecosystem services in agricultural systems. However, few studies establish direct links between cover, food, and pest suppression because they are entangled a...

  16. Impact of different cover crop residues and shank types on no-till tomato yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three year experiment with no-till tomatoes was conducted in Cullman, AL (2006 to 2008) to determine the effect of plastic mulch (control), rye and crimson clover cover crops, and different subsoiler shanks on no–till tomato yield. In 2006 and 2008, plastic cover provided higher yield compared wit...

  17. Cover crops increase foraging activity of omnivorous predators in seed patches and facilitate weed biological control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Omnivores are important consumers of both weed seeds and insect pests, and habitat provisions like cover crops are suggested to promote their ecosystem services in agricultural systems. However, few studies establish direct links between cover, food, and pest suppression because they are entangled a...

  18. Improved Remotely-Sensed Estimates of Crop Residue Cover by Incorporating Soils Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing allows for the rapid determination of crop residue cover. The Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI) has been shown to more accurately estimate residue cover and non-photosynthetic vegetation than other indices. CAI is useful as values are linear areal mixtures of soil and residue spectra...

  19. Winter Cover Crop Effects on Nitrate Leaching in Subsurface Drainage as Simulated by RZWQM-DSSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, R. W.; Chu, X.; Ma, L.; Li, L.; Kaspar, T.; Jaynes, D.; Saseendran, S. A.; Thorp, K.; Yu, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Planting winter cover crops such as winter rye (Secale cereale L.) after corn and soybean harvest is one of the more promising practices to reduce nitrate loss to streams from tile drainage systems without negatively affecting production. Because availability of replicated tile-drained field data is limited and because use of cover crops to reduce nitrate loss has only been tested over a few years with limited environmental and management conditions, estimating the impacts of cover crops under the range of expected conditions is difficult. If properly tested against observed data, models can objectively estimate the relative effects of different weather conditions and agronomic practices (e.g., various N fertilizer application rates in conjunction with winter cover crops). In this study, an optimized winter wheat cover crop growth component was integrated into the calibrated RZWQM-DSSAT hybrid model and then we compare the observed and simulated effects of a winter cover crop on nitrate leaching losses in subsurface drainage water for a corn-soybean rotation with N fertilizer application rates over 225 kg N ha-1 in corn years. Annual observed and simulated flow-weighted average nitrate concentration (FWANC) in drainage from 2002 to 2005 for the cover crop treatments (CC) were 8.7 and 9.3 mg L-1 compared to 21.3 and 18.2 mg L-1 for no cover crop (CON). The resulting observed and simulated FWANC reductions due to CC were 59% and 49%. Simulations with the optimized model at various N fertilizer rates resulted in average annual drainage N loss differences between CC and CON to increase exponentially from 12 to 34 kg N ha-1 for rates of 11 to 261 kg N ha-1. The results suggest that RZWQM-DSSAT is a promising tool to estimate the relative effects of a winter crop under different conditions on nitrate loss in tile drains and that a winter cover crop can effectively reduce nitrate losses over a range of N fertilizer levels.

  20. Evaluation of cover crop and reduced cultivation for reducing nitrate leaching in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Hooker, K V; Coxon, C E; Hackett, R; Kirwan, L E; O'Keeffe, E; Richards, K G

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate (NO(3)) loss from arable systems to surface and groundwater has attracted considerable attention in recent years in Ireland. Little information exists under Irish conditions, which are wet and temperate, on the effects of winter cover crops and different tillage techniques on NO(3) leaching. This study investigated the efficacy of such practices in reducing NO(3) leaching from a spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) system in the Barrow River valley, southeast Ireland. The study compared the effect of two tillage systems (plow-based tillage and noninversion tillage) and two over-winter alternatives (no vegetative cover and a mustard cover crop) on soil solution NO(3) concentrations at 90 cm depth over two winter drainage seasons (2003/04 and 2004/05). Soil samples were taken and analyzed for inorganic N. During both years of the study, the use of a mustard cover crop significantly reduced NO(3) losses for the plowed and reduced cultivation treatments. Mean soil solution NO(3) concentrations were between 38 and 70% lower when a cover crop was used, and total N load lost over the winter was between 18 and 83% lower. Results from this study highlight the importance of drainage volume and winter temperatures on NO(3) concentrations in soil solution and overall N load lost. It is suggested that cover crops will be of particular value in reducing NO(3) loss in temperate regions with mild winters, where winter N mineralization is important and high winter temperatures favor a long growing season. PMID:18178886

  1. Intercropping Cover Crops with Pineapple for the Management of Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; Sipes, B S; Schmitt, D P

    2003-03-01

    Effect of cover crops intercropped with pineapple (Ananas comosus) on Rotylenchulus reniformis population densities and activity of nematode-trapping fungi (NTF) were evaluated in two cycles of cover crop and pineapple. Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), rapeseed (Brassica napus), African marigold (Tagetes erecta), or weeds were intercropped with pineapples. Beds planted with sunn hemp or rapeseed had lower population densities of R. reniformis than African marigold, weeds, or pineapple plots during cover crop growth, and the subsequent pineapple-growing periods. Rapeseed was a good host to Meloidogyne javanica and resulted in high population densities of M. javanica in the subsequent pineapple crop. Fireweed (Erigeron canadensis) occurred commonly and was a good host to R. reniformis. Bacterivorous nematode population densities increased (P cover crops than weeds or pineapples during the first crop cycle (P < 0.05). Although pineapple produced heavier fruits following sunn hemp than in the other treatments (P < 0.05), commercial yields were not different among rapeseed, weed, and sunn hemp treatments. PMID:19265973

  2. Intercropping Cover Crops with Pineapple for the Management of Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.-H.; Sipes, B. S.; Schmitt, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of cover crops intercropped with pineapple (Ananas comosus) on Rotylenchulus reniformis population densities and activity of nematode-trapping fungi (NTF) were evaluated in two cycles of cover crop and pineapple. Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), rapeseed (Brassica napus), African marigold (Tagetes erecta), or weeds were intercropped with pineapples. Beds planted with sunn hemp or rapeseed had lower population densities of R. reniformis than African marigold, weeds, or pineapple plots during cover crop growth, and the subsequent pineapple-growing periods. Rapeseed was a good host to Meloidogyne javanica and resulted in high population densities of M. javanica in the subsequent pineapple crop. Fireweed (Erigeron canadensis) occurred commonly and was a good host to R. reniformis. Bacterivorous nematode population densities increased (P ≤ 0.05) most in sunn hemp, especially early after planting. Nematode-trapping fungi required a long period to develop measurable population densities. Population densities of NTF were higher in cover crops than weeds or pineapples during the first crop cycle (P < 0.05). Although pineapple produced heavier fruits following sunn hemp than in the other treatments (P < 0.05), commercial yields were not different among rapeseed, weed, and sunn hemp treatments. PMID:19265973

  3. Cover cropping alters the diet of arthropods in a banana plantation: a metabarcoding approach.

    PubMed

    Mollot, Gregory; Duyck, Pierre-François; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lescourret, Françoise; Martin, Jean-François; Piry, Sylvain; Canard, Elsa; Tixier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Plant diversification using cover crops may promote natural regulation of agricultural pests by supporting alternative prey that enable the increase of arthropod predator densities. However, the changes in the specific composition of predator diet induced by cover cropping are poorly understood. Here, we hypothesized that the cover crop can significantly alter the diet of predators in agroecosystems. The cover crop Brachiaria decumbens is increasingly used in banana plantations to control weeds and improve physical soil properties. In this paper, we used a DNA metabarcoding approach for the molecular analysis of the gut contents of predators (based on mini-COI) to identify 1) the DNA sequences of their prey, 2) the predators of Cosmopolites sordidus (a major pest of banana crops), and 3) the difference in the specific composition of predator diets between a bare soil plot (BSP) and a cover cropped plot (CCP) in a banana plantation. The earwig Euborellia caraibea, the carpenter ant Camponotus sexguttatus, and the fire ant Solenopsis geminata were found to contain C. sordidus DNA at frequencies ranging from 1 to 7%. While the frequencies of predators positive for C. sordidus DNA did not significantly differ between BSP and CCP, the frequency at which E. caraibea was positive for Diptera was 26% in BSP and 80% in CCP; the frequency at which C. sexguttatus was positive for Jalysus spinosus was 14% in BSP and 0% in CCP; and the frequency at which S. geminata was positive for Polytus mellerborgi was 21% in BSP and 3% in CCP. E. caraibea, C. sexguttatus and S. geminata were identified as possible biological agents for the regulation of C. sordidus. The detection of the diet changes of these predators when a cover crop is planted indicates the possible negative effects on pest regulation if predators switch to forage on alternative prey. PMID:24695585

  4. Cover Cropping Alters the Diet of Arthropods in a Banana Plantation: A Metabarcoding Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mollot, Gregory; Duyck, Pierre-François; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lescourret, Françoise; Martin, Jean-François; Piry, Sylvain; Canard, Elsa; Tixier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Plant diversification using cover crops may promote natural regulation of agricultural pests by supporting alternative prey that enable the increase of arthropod predator densities. However, the changes in the specific composition of predator diet induced by cover cropping are poorly understood. Here, we hypothesized that the cover crop can significantly alter the diet of predators in agroecosystems. The cover crop Brachiaria decumbens is increasingly used in banana plantations to control weeds and improve physical soil properties. In this paper, we used a DNA metabarcoding approach for the molecular analysis of the gut contents of predators (based on mini-COI) to identify 1) the DNA sequences of their prey, 2) the predators of Cosmopolites sordidus (a major pest of banana crops), and 3) the difference in the specific composition of predator diets between a bare soil plot (BSP) and a cover cropped plot (CCP) in a banana plantation. The earwig Euborellia caraibea, the carpenter ant Camponotus sexguttatus, and the fire ant Solenopsis geminata were found to contain C. sordidus DNA at frequencies ranging from 1 to 7%. While the frequencies of predators positive for C. sordidus DNA did not significantly differ between BSP and CCP, the frequency at which E. caraibea was positive for Diptera was 26% in BSP and 80% in CCP; the frequency at which C. sexguttatus was positive for Jalysus spinosus was 14% in BSP and 0% in CCP; and the frequency at which S. geminata was positive for Polytus mellerborgi was 21% in BSP and 3% in CCP. E. caraibea, C. sexguttatus and S. geminata were identified as possible biological agents for the regulation of C. sordidus. The detection of the diet changes of these predators when a cover crop is planted indicates the possible negative effects on pest regulation if predators switch to forage on alternative prey. PMID:24695585

  5. Short-term soil responses to late-seeded cover crops in a semi-arid environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can expand ecosystem services, though sound management recommendations for their use within semi-arid cropping systems is currently constrained by a lack of information. This study was conducted to determine agroecosystem responses to late-summer seeded cover crops under no-till managem...

  6. Cover crop mulches influence biological control of the imported cabbageworm (Pieris rapae L., Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in cabbage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing structural complexity within crop fields can provide a way to manipulate pest abundance and biological control in agroecosystems. Here, we examine the effect of cover crop mulches in cabbage on the structure and function of an insect food web, investigating the role of cover crop species,...

  7. Registration of four winter-hardy faba bean germplasm lines for use in winter pulse and cover crop development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is a versatile crop grown for food, feed, vegetable, or cover crop purposes in many countries. In response to the growing demand for winter annual legumes for cover crop development in the United States, we developed four winter-hardy faba bean germplasm lines, WH-1 (Reg. N...

  8. Does grazing of cover crops impact biologically active soil C and N fractions under inversion and no tillage management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are a key component of conservation cropping systems. They can also be a key component of integrated crop-livestock systems by offering high-quality forage during short periods between cash crops. The impact of cattle grazing on biologically active soil C and N fractions has not receiv...

  9. Salt and N leaching and soil accumulation due to cover cropping practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, J. L.; Quemada, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate leaching beyond the root zone can increase water contamination hazards and decrease crop available N. Cover crops used in spite of fallow are an alternative to reduce nitrate contamination in the vadose zone, because reducing drainage and soil mineral N accumulation. Cover crops can improve important characteristics in irrigated land as water retention capacity or soil aggregate stability. However, increasing evapotranspiration and consequent drainage below the root system reduction, could lead to soil salt accumulation. Salinity affects more than 80 million ha of arable land in many areas of the world, and one of the principal causes for yield reduction and even land degradation in the Mediterranean region. Few studies dealt with both problems at the same time. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term evaluation of the potential effect on soil salinity and nitrate leaching, in order to ensure that potential disadvantages that could originate from soil salt accumulation are compensated with all advantages of cover cropping. A study of the soil salinity and nitrate leaching was conducted during 4 years in a semiarid irrigated agricultural area of Central Spain. Three treatments were studied during the intercropping period of maize (Zea mays L.): barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), vetch (Vicia villosa L.) and fallow. Cover crops were killed in March allowing seeding of maize of the entire trial in April, and all treatments were irrigated and fertilised following the same procedure. Before sowing, and after harvesting maize and cover crops, soil salt and nitrate accumulation was determined along the soil profile. Soil analysis was conducted at six depths every 0.20 m in each plot in samples from four 0 to 1.2-m depth holes dug. The electrical conductivity of the saturated paste extract and soil mineral nitrogen was measured in each soil sample. A numerical model based on the Richards water balance equation was applied in order to calculate drainage at 1.2 m depth

  10. Increased Risk of Insect Injury to Corn Following Rye Cover Crop.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Mike W; O'Neal, Matthew E; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2016-08-01

    Decreased pest pressure is sometimes associated with more diverse agroecosystems, including the addition of a rye cover crop (Secale cereale L.). However, not all pests respond similarly to greater vegetational diversity. Polyphagous pests, such as true armyworm (Mythimna unipuncta Haworth), black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon Hufnagel), and common stalk borer (Papaipema nebris Guenee), whose host range includes rye have the potential to cause injury to crops following a rye cover crop. The objectives of this study were to compare the abundance of early-season insect pests and injury to corn (Zea mays L.) from fields with and without a rye cover crop on commercial farms. Fields were sampled weekly to quantify adult and larval pests and feeding injury to corn plants from mid-April until corn reached V8 stage, during 2014 and 2015. Measurements within fields were collected along transects that extended perpendicularly from field edges into the interior of cornfields. Adult true armyworm and adult black cutworm were captured around all cornfields, but most lepidopteran larvae captured within cornfields were true armyworm and common stalk borer. Cornfields with a rye cover crop had significantly greater abundance of true armyworm and greater proportion of injured corn. Both true armyworm abundance and feeding injury were significantly greater in the interior of cornfields with rye. Common stalk borer abundance did not differ between cornfields with or without rye cover. Farmers planting corn following a rye cover crop should be aware of the potential for increased presence of true armyworm and for greater injury to corn. PMID:27325884

  11. Managing soil nitrate with cover crops and buffer strips in Sicilian vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Guaitoli, F.; Santoro, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2013-08-01

    When soil nitrate levels are low, plants suffer nitrogen (N) deficiency but when the levels are excessive, soil nitrates can pollute surface and subsurface waters. Strategies to reduce the nitrate pollution are necessary to reach a sustainable use of resources such as soil, water and plant. Buffer strips and cover crops can contribute to the management of soil nitrates, but little is known of their effectiveness in semiarid vineyards plantations. The research was carried out in the south coast of Sicily (Italy) to evaluate nitrate trends in a vineyard managed both conventionally and using two different cover crops (Triticum durum and Vicia sativa cover crop). A 10 m-wide buffer strip was seeded with Lolium perenne at the bottom of the vineyard. Soil nitrate was measured monthly and nitrate movement was monitored by application of a 15N tracer to a narrow strip between the bottom of vineyard and the buffer and non-buffer strips. Lolium perenne biomass yield in the buffer strips and its isotopic nitrogen content were monitored. Vicia sativa cover crop management contributed with an excess of nitrogen, and the soil management determined the nitrogen content at the buffer areas. A 6 m buffer strip reduced the nitrate by 42% with and by 46% with a 9 m buffer strip. Thanks to catch crops, farmers can manage the N content and its distribution into the soil over the year, can reduced fertilizer wastage and reduce N pollution of surface and groundwater.

  12. Evaluation of native bees as pollinators of cucurbit crops under floating row covers.

    PubMed

    Minter, Logan M; Bessin, Ricardo T

    2014-10-01

    Production of cucurbit crops presents growers with numerous challenges. Several severe pests and diseases can be managed through the use of rotation, trap cropping, mechanical barriers, such as row covers, and chemical applications. However, considerations must also be made for pollinating insects, as adequate pollination affects the quantity and quality of fruit. Insecticides may negatively affect pollinators; a concern enhanced in recent years due to losses in managed Apis melifera L. colonies. Row covers can be used in place of chemical control before pollination, but when removed, pests have access to fields along with the pollinators. If pollination services of native bees could be harnessed for use under continuous row covers, both concerns could be balanced for growers. The potential of two bee species which specialize on cucurbit flowers, Peponapis pruinosa Say and Xenoglossa strenua Cresson, were assessed under continuous row covers, employed over acorn squash. Experimental treatments included plots with either naturally or artificially introduced bees under row covers and control plots with row covers either permanently removed at crop flowering, or employed continuously with no added pollinating insects. Pests in plots with permanently removed row covers were managed using standard practices used in certified organic production. Marketable yields from plots inoculated with bees were indistinguishable from those produced under standard practices, indicating this system would provide adequate yields to growers without time and monetary inputs of insecticide applications. Additionally, application of this technique was investigated for muskmelon production and discussed along with considerations for farm management. PMID:25199100

  13. Cover crops effect on farm benefits and nitrate leaching: linking economic and environmental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Vanclooster, Marnik; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Introducing cover crops interspersed with intensively fertilized crops in rotation has the potential to reduce nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of the technique is still limited because growing CC could lead to extra costs for the farm in three different forms: direct, indirect, and opportunity costs. Environmental studies are complex, and evaluating the indicators that are representative of the environmental impact of an agricultural system is a complicated task that is conducted by specialized groups and methodologies. Multidisciplinary studies may help to develop reliable approaches that would contribute to choosing the best agricultural strategies based on linking economic and environmental benefits. This study evaluates barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo) as cover crops between maize, leaving the residue in the ground or selling it for animal feeding, and compares the economic and environmental results with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. Nitrate leaching for different weather conditions was calculated using the mechanistic-deterministic WAVE model, using the Richards equation parameterised with a conceptual model for the soil hydraulic properties for describing the water flow in the vadose zone, combined with field observed data. The economic impact was evaluated through stochastic (Monte-Carlo) simulation models of farms' profits using probability distribution functions of maize yield and cover crop biomass developed fitted with data collected from various field trials (during more than 5 years) and probability distribution functions of maize and different cover crop forage prices fitted from statistical sources. Stochastic dominance relationships are obtained to rank the most profitable strategies from a farm financial perspective

  14. Effect of a Terminated Cover Crop and Aldicarb on Cotton Yield and Meloidogyne incognita Population Density

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Leser, J. F.; Keeling, J. W.; Mullinix, B.

    2008-01-01

    Terminated small grain cover crops are valuable in light textured soils to reduce wind and rain erosion and for protection of young cotton seedlings. A three-year study was conducted to determine the impact of terminated small grain winter cover crops, which are hosts for Meloidogyne incognita, on cotton yield, root galling and nematode midseason population density. The small plot test consisted of the cover treatment as the main plots (winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat) and rate of aldicarb applied in-furrow at-plant (0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg a.i./ha) as subplots in a split-plot design with eight replications, arranged in a randomized complete block design. Roots of 10 cotton plants per plot were examined at approximately 35 days after planting. Root galling was affected by aldicarb rate (9.1, 3.8 and 3.4 galls/root system for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by cover crop. Soil samples were collected in mid-July and assayed for nematodes. The winter fallow plots had a lower density of M. incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) (transformed to Log10 (J2 + 1)/500 cm3 soil) than any of the cover crops (0.88, 1.58, 1.67 and 1.75 Log10(J2 + 1)/500 cm3 soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). There were also fewer M. incognita eggs at midseason in the winter fallow (3,512, 7,953, 8,262 and 11,392 eggs/500 cm3 soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). Yield (kg lint per ha) was increased by application of aldicarb (1,544, 1,710 and 1,697 for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by any cover crop treatments. These results were consistent over three years. The soil temperature at 15 cm depth, from when soils reached 18°C to termination of the grass cover crop, averaged 9,588, 7,274 and 1,639 centigrade hours (with a minimum threshold of 10°C), in 2005, 2006 and 2007, respectively. Under these conditions, potential reproduction of M. incognita on the cover crop did not result in a yield penalty. PMID:19259531

  15. Organic farming and cover crops as an alternative to mineral fertilizers to improve soil physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Cima, Diego; Luik, Anne; Reintam, Endla

    2015-10-01

    For testing how cover crops and different fertilization managements affect the soil physical properties in a plough based tillage system, a five-year crop rotation experiment (field pea, white potato, common barley undersown with red clover, red clover, and winter wheat) was set. The rotation was managed under four different farming systems: two conventional: with and without mineral fertilizers and two organic, both with winter cover crops (later ploughed and used as green manure) and one where cattle manure was added yearly. The measurements conducted were penetration resistance, soil water content, porosity, water permeability, and organic carbon. Yearly variations were linked to the number of tillage operations, and a cumulative effect of soil organic carbon in the soil as a result of the different fertilization amendments, organic or mineral. All the systems showed similar tendencies along the three years of study and differences were only found between the control and the other systems. Mineral fertilizers enhanced the overall physical soil conditions due to the higher yield in the system. In the organic systems, cover crops and cattle manure did not have a significant effect on soil physical properties in comparison with the conventional ones, which were kept bare during the winter period. The extra organic matter boosted the positive effect of crop rotation, but the higher number of tillage operations in both organic systems counteracted this effect to a greater or lesser extent.

  16. COVER CROP EFFECT ON SOIL CARBON FRACTIONS UNDER CONSERVATION TILLAGE COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops may influence soil carbon (C) sequestration and microbial activities by providing additional residue C to soil. We examined the influence of legume [crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.)], nonlegume [rye (Secaele cereale L.)], blend [a mixture of legumes containing balansa clover (Tri...

  17. Organic supplemental nitrogen sources for field corn production following a hairy vetch cover crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combined use of legume cover crops and animal byproduct organic amendments could provide agronomic and environmental benefits to organic farmers by increasing corn grain yield while optimizing N and P inputs. To test this hypothesis we conducted a two-year field study and a laboratory soil incu...

  18. Addition of cover crops enhances no-till potential for improving soil physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in the use of cover crops (CC) is growing. Inclusion of CC may be a potential strategy to boost no-till performance by improving soil physical properties. To assess this potential, we utilized a wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)]-grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] rotation, four N rate...

  19. Can leguminous cover crops partially replace nitrogen fertilization in Mississippi delta cotton production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Petroleum prices impacts cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) N fertilization cost. A 3-year field study was conducted on a Dundee silt loam to assess the interactions of leguminous cover crops [none, Austrian winter field pea (Pisum sativum L.) or hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth] and N fertilization rate...

  20. Utilization of sunn hemp for cover crops and weed control in temperate climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need to develop increasingly integrated pest management and sustainable food production systems has encouraged a greater interest to thoroughly evaluate effective utilization of cover crops in agricultural systems. Sunn hemp, a tropical legume that originated most likely from the Indo-Pakistani ...

  1. Effects of organic fertilization and cover crops on organic pepper production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirement for certified organic vegetable producers to implement a soil-building plan has led to the development of soil fertility systems based on combinations of organic fertilizers and cover crops. In order to determine optimal soil fertility combinations, conventional and organic bell pepp...

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation of crop residue cover: Soil mineralogy, surface conditions, and their effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices can enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), improve soil structure, and reduce erosion. However, direct assessment of tillage practice for monitoring SOC change over large regions is difficult. Remote sensing of crop residue cover (CRC) can help assess tillage pra...

  3. Impact of five cover crop green manures and Actinovate on Fusarium Wilt of watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triploid watermelon cultivars are grown on more than 2,023 ha in Maryland and in Delaware. Triploid watermelons have little host resistance to Fusarium wilt of watermelon (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum). The effects of four different fall-planted cover crops that were tilled in the spring as gree...

  4. Changes in Soil Moisture with Cover Crops and Tillage: Impact on Cotton Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alluvial soils of the lower Mississippi River flood plain are highly productive, but low in organic matter. Use of irrigation in the area has increased in order to ensure adequate yield return. Use of cover crops has been used in other areas to increase soil organic matter and improve infiltrati...

  5. Cover crops alter phosphorus soil fractions and organic matter accumulation in a Peruvian cacao agroforestry system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many tropical soils, excessive weathering of primary minerals confounded by intense agricultural production has resulted in the depletion of organic matter and plant available forms of phosphorus (P). Long-term growth of cover crops in tropical agroforestry systems have been shown to influence nu...

  6. Sunn Hemp cover cropping and organic fertilizer effects on the nematode community under temperate growing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plantings of sunn hemp as a cover crop have been experimentally shown to improve soil health, reduce plant-parasitic nematodes, and increase nematode-antagonistic microorganisms. However, these studies have been largely conducted in tropical and subtropical regions. To investigate the impacts of sun...

  7. Mechanism of disease suppression of Fusarium wilt of watermelon by cover crop green manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fall planted Vicia villosa cover crop incorporated in spring as a green manure can suppress Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON)] of watermelon in Maryland and Delaware. Experiments were conducted to determine whether the mechanism of this suppression was general or specific, and ...

  8. Sunn hemp as a cover crop to reduce nitrogen inputs for winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) has the potential to perform as a beneficial cover crop in the southeastern United States due to its ability to accumulate large amounts of biomass and symbiotic nitrogen (N) in a short period of time during the summer months. Planting sunn hemp,...

  9. Legume Cover Crops are More Beneficial than Natual Fallows in MInimally Tilled Ugandan Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important to establish the various eff ects of legume cover crops on soil physicochemical properties because they have been considered for use as improved fallows (with shorter rest periods) to enhance development and maintenance of soil productivity. Our objectives were to assess: (i) abovegr...

  10. Agronomic feasibility of sunflower as an oilseed cover crop for Florida vegetable production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil producing sunflower (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated as a cover crop for Florida vegetable growers. The performance of a traditional, dwarf and herbicide resistant hybrid was evaluated at two locations (Martin and St. Lucie counties) in replicated 0.6 acre plots and a grain combine was used ha...

  11. Improved Remote Crop Residue Cover Estimation by Incorporation of Soil and Residue Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern agricultural practices are increasingly making use of conservation (reduced- and no-till) methods, in order to minimize soil erosion and increase soil organic carbon (SOC) content. These methods result in increased crop residue cover after planting when compared to conventional tillage metho...

  12. Soil organic carbon and water content effects on remote crop residue cover estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage (CT) systems help protect the soil and environment, and improve net farm profitability. CT methods leave increased amounts of crop residue cover (CRC) on the soil surface, minimizing soil erosion and evaporation. CT uses less fuel, disturbs soil less, and requires less fertili...

  13. Cover Crop Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emission from a Manure-Treated Mollisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture contributes 40% to 60% of the total annual N2O emissions to the atmosphere. Development of management practices to reduce these emissions would have a significant impact on greenhouse gas levels. Non-leguminous cover crops are efficient scavengers of residual soil NO3, thereby reducing l...

  14. Rye cover crop effects on nitrous oxide emissions from a corn-soybean system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural activities are a major source nitrous oxide emitted to the atmosphere. Development of management practices to reduce these emissions is needed. Non-leguminous cover crops are efficient scavengers of residual soil nitrate, but their effects on nitrous oxide emissions have not been well d...

  15. The mechanism for weed suppression by a forage radish cover crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Mid-Atlantic region, forage radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. longipinnatus) winter cover crops planted prior to 1 September suppress winter annual weeds from fall until early April. Little is known about the mechanism of this weed suppression. Published research reports suggest that allelopat...

  16. Response of representative cover crops to aluminum toxicity, phosphorus deprivation, and organic amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to: a) determine the effect of P depletion and presence of Al on root and shoot growth of representative cover crops, and on their nutrient uptake; b) characterize the composition of root exudation under P and Al stress in nutrient solution; c) evaluate the ability of aqueous extrac...

  17. Cover crops and organic mulches for nematode, weed, and plant health management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two field experiments were conducted in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate ‘Tropic Sun’ sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) and ‘Iron Clay’ cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) as summer cover crops and as organic mulches. Both experiments were a 3 x 3 split-plot design in which the main plots were summer planting of sunn h...

  18. Effect of cover crop in mitigation of greenhouse gases emission from plots amended with swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse gas emissions nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and methane (N2O, CO2 and CH4,) were measured from corn-soybean plots amended with different rates of liquid swine manure, and in the presence or absence of a rye winter cover crop. Emission measurements include two periods: 1) from October 20...

  19. Accounting for green vegetation and soil spectral properties to improve remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage methods are beneficial as they disturb soil less and leaves increased crop residue cover (CRC) after planting on the soil surface. CRC helps reduce soil erosion, evaporation, and the need for tillage operations in fields. Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to due to less fos...

  20. A Killed-Cover Crop Production System For Sweetpotatoes: Effects on Pests and Beneficial Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three sweetpotato genotypes were grown in either conventionally tilled plots (CT) or in a killed-cover crop (KCC) tillage system. In general, injury to sweetpotato roots by soil insect pests was significantly lower in the KCC plots than in the CT plots. Also, injury by sweetpotato weevils was sign...

  1. Fall cover crops boost soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which can lead to reduced inputs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall cover crops provide multiple benefits to producers. These benefits include pathogen and pest protection, drought protection, weed control, reduced soil erosion, nutrient acquisition and retention, increased soil organic matter, and conservation of soil water by improvement of soil structure th...

  2. US-1136, US-1137, and US-1138 cowpea lines for cover crop use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following five years of field evaluation, three cowpea populations were selected as best adapted for use as a cover crop. A pure line selection procedure was used to develop genetically uniform lines from the segregating populations. Field evaluations demonstrated that the lines grow rapidly for u...

  3. Cover crop, soil amendments, and variety effects on organic rice production in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major challenges in organic rice production include optimization of nutrient utilization, weed management, and variety selection. In this study, we tested the effects of two soil amendment products, two fertilizer rates, and three cover cropping systems (clover, ryegrass, and fallow) on organic ...

  4. Rye-legume winter cover crop mixtures and Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth is a significant challenge for cotton production in Georgia and much of the Southern US. Winter cover crops, rye and rye mixtures with legumes, were evaluated for weed suppression and their influence on cotton production. Two studies were ini...

  5. Replacing fallow with cover crops in a semiarid soil:Effects on soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replacement of fallow in crop–fallow systems with cover crops (CCs) may improve soil properties. We assessed whether replacing fallow in no-till winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–fallow with winter and spring CCs for 5 years reduced wind and water erosion, increased soil organic carbon (SOC), and ...

  6. Nitrogen and Winter Cover Crop Effects on Spring and Summer Nutrient Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fertilization of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] with swine-lagoon effluent in summer, April to September, does not match the period of productivity of the winter annual cover crops, annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.), cereal rye (Secale cereale), and berseem clover (Trifolium alexan...

  7. Impact of different cover crops and types of transplanter mounted subsoiler shanks on tomato yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A four year experiment with different tillage practices for tomatoes was conducted in Cullman, AL to determine the impact of plastic mulch (control), rye and crimson clover cover crops, and different subsoiler shanks (no shank, slim 13 mm thick, and wide 20 mm thick) on tomato yield. Overall, in 200...

  8. Cover crop effects on soil microbial communities and enzyme activity in semiarid agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare a fallow-winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotation to several cover crop-winter wheat rotations under dryland and irrigated conditions in the semiarid US High Plains. We carried out a study that included two sites (Sidney, NE, and Akron, CO), and three s...

  9. Nitrogen Applications to Increase Cover Crop Biomass and Benefits in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benefits associated with conservation tillage in the Southeast are improved by using a winter annual cover crop. In order to maximize associated benefits, biomass production should also be maximized. For the highly weathered, infertile soils of the Southeast, additional N (inorganic or organic) is...

  10. Peanut Performance and Weed Management in a High Residue Cover crop System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research indicates conservation tillage is a viable option for successful peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) production, but more study is needed to help understand interactions between cover crop residues and peanut production. Specifically, additional information is needed about the effects o...