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Sample records for covering hospital foodservice

  1. Assessment of foodservice quality and identification of improvement strategies using hospital foodservice quality model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungjoo; Kim, Minyoung

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess hospital foodservice quality and to identify causes of quality problems and improvement strategies. Based on the review of literature, hospital foodservice quality was defined and the Hospital Foodservice Quality model was presented. The study was conducted in two steps. In Step 1, nutritional standards specified on diet manuals and nutrients of planned menus, served meals, and consumed meals for regular, diabetic, and low-sodium diets were assessed in three general hospitals. Quality problems were found in all three hospitals since patients consumed less than their nutritional requirements. Considering the effects of four gaps in the Hospital Foodservice Quality model, Gaps 3 and 4 were selected as critical control points (CCPs) for hospital foodservice quality management. In Step 2, the causes of the gaps and improvement strategies at CCPs were labeled as "quality hazards" and "corrective actions", respectively and were identified using a case study. At Gap 3, inaccurate forecasting and a lack of control during production were identified as quality hazards and corrective actions proposed were establishing an accurate forecasting system, improving standardized recipes, emphasizing the use of standardized recipes, and conducting employee training. At Gap 4, quality hazards were menus of low preferences, inconsistency of menu quality, a lack of menu variety, improper food temperatures, and patients' lack of understanding of their nutritional requirements. To reduce Gap 4, the dietary departments should conduct patient surveys on menu preferences on a regular basis, develop new menus, especially for therapeutic diets, maintain food temperatures during distribution, provide more choices, conduct meal rounds, and provide nutrition education and counseling. The Hospital Foodservice Quality Model was a useful tool for identifying causes of the foodservice quality problems and improvement strategies from a holistic point of view

  2. Labor time spent in foodservice activities in one hospital: a 12-year profile.

    PubMed

    Matthews, M E; Zardain, M V; Mahaffey, M J

    1986-05-01

    Labor minutes per meal equivalent and percentage of time spent in direct work, indirect work, delay time, and total time were determined in an annual study of foodservice workers in a community hospital. Twelve activity sampling studies (from 1973 through 1984) were conducted for 7 days (Monday through Sunday), usually during the second week of February. The conventional foodservice, with the cook/hot-hold method of food production and service, averaged about 10 minutes for direct work, 1 minute for indirect work, 2 minutes for delay time, and 13 total labor minutes per meal equivalent for the 12 years. The data were similar to those of the study in the 1960s, of conventional hospital foodservices, with high productivity, which averaged about 11 minutes for direct work, 1 minute for indirect work, 2 minutes for delay time, and 14 total labor minutes per meal equivalent. Data averaged from the 1973 through 1984 studies compared with the data from the 1960s study showed that transportation, cleaning, and service required the most labor time (total of 58% in this study and total of 62% in the 1960s study). Methods reported in this article may be applied in other foodservices to identify labor time spent in work and delay activities to establish productivity guidelines for a foodservice department. PMID:3700926

  3. Bacterial biogeographical patterns in a cooking center for hospital foodservice.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; La Storia, Antonietta; Cirillo, Teresa; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-01-16

    Microbial contamination in foodservice environments plays a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In such environments the composition of the microbiota is influenced by the characteristics of the specific surfaces and by food handling and processing and a resident microbiota may be present in each site. In this study, the bacterial biogeographical patterns in a hospital cooking center was studied by 16S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing in order to provide a comprehensive mapping of the surfaces and tools that come in contact with foods during preparation. Across all area, surface swab-samples from work surfaces of different zones were taken: food pre-processing rooms (dedicated to fish, vegetables, and red and white meat), storage room and kitchen. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 500 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with extremely variable relative abundances (0.02-99%) depending on the species. A core microbiota was found that was common to more than 70% of the samples analyzed and that included microbial species that were common across all areas such as Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, Moraxellaceae, and Alicyclobacillus, although their abundances were below 10% of the microbiota. Some surfaces were contaminated by high levels of either Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter, Paracoccus, or Kocuria. However, beta diversity analysis showed that, based on the composition of the microbiota, the environmental samples grouped according to the sampling time but not according to the specific area of sampling except for the case of samples from the vegetable pre-processing room that showed a higher level of similarity. The cleaning procedures can have a very strong impact on the spatial distribution of the microbial communities, as the use of the same cleaning tools can be even a possible vector of bacterial diffusion. Most of the microbial taxa found are not those commonly found in food as

  4. Getting a taste for food waste: a mixed methods ethnographic study into hospital food waste before patient consumption conducted at three New Zealand foodservice facilities.

    PubMed

    Goonan, Sarah; Mirosa, Miranda; Spence, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Foodservice organizations, particularly those in hospitals, are large producers of food waste. To date, research on waste in hospitals has focused primarily on plate waste and the affect of food waste on patient nutrition outcomes. Less focus has been placed on waste generation at the kitchen end of the hospital food system. We used a novel approach to understand reasons for hospital food waste before consumption and offer recommendations on waste minimization within foodservices. A mixed methods ethnographic research approach was adopted. Three New Zealand hospital foodservices were selected as research sites, all of which were contracted to an external foodservice provider. Data collection techniques included document analyses, observations, focus groups with kitchen staff, and one-on-one interviews with managers. Thematic analysis was conducted to generate common themes. Most food waste occurred during service and as a result of overproduction. Attitudes and habits of foodservice personnel were considered influential factors of waste generation. Implications of food waste were perceived differently by different levels of staff. Whereas managers raised discussion from a financial perspective, kitchen staff drew upon social implications. Organizational plans, controls, and use of pre-prepared ingredients assisted in waste minimization. An array of factors influenced waste generation in hospital foodservices. Exploring attitudes and practices of foodservice personnel allowed an understanding of reasons behind hospital food waste and ways in which it could be minimized. This study provides a foundation for further research on sustainable behavior within the wider foodservice sector and dietetics practice. PMID:24231365

  5. Use of capital budgeting techniques by foodservice directors in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Daniels, R D; Gregoire, M B

    1993-01-01

    Foodservice directors, who often control one of the largest cost centers in the hospital, are being challenged to manage resources more effectively. Capital budgeting techniques can help enhance a department's cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to assess the use by foodservice directors in nongovernment, not-for-profit and investor-owned, for-profit hospitals of capital budgeting techniques such as payback period, average accounting rate of return, net present value, profitability index, and internal rate of return. Data collected from 84 directors included their use of capital budgeting techniques and operational information about their department. Results indicated that not-for-profit hospital foodservices had significantly more full-time equivalent employees than for-profit hospital foodservices--means of 66 and 52, respectively. Size of capital budget was not strongly correlated with any of the operational variables measured. Many of the directors in both types of hospitals used some capital budgeting techniques. However, directors in for-profit hospitals were much more likely than those in not-for-profit hospitals (92% vs 72%) to use capital budgeting techniques. PMID:8417095

  6. [Control of carotenoid loss in vegetables prepared in a hospital foodservice].

    PubMed

    Della Lucia, Ceres Mattos; Campos, Flávia Milagres; Mata, Gardênia Márcia Silva Campos; Sant'Ana, Helena Maria Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the handling procedures of kale and tomatoes in a hospital foodservice (HFS) in order to control loss of beta-carotene and licopene. The adopted measures, up to then not used by the HFS, were: 24-h storage under refrigeration (10 degrees C), hygienizing for 15 min and distribution immediately after preparation. Vegetable samples were collected after reception and after each stage of manipulation in the HFS. The samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a mobile phase of methanol, ethyl acetate and acetonitrile (50:40:10). ANOVA (alpha = 0.05) was used to detect significant differences. No significant differences in the content of the components were found between the different stages of manipulation but there was an important decrease in the retention rates. In kale a retention rate of 68.2% for beta-carotene was verified 60 minutes after preparation whereas in tomatoes 91.96% of this compound were preserved for 120 minutes after preparation. No important decrease was observed in the retention of licopene. The high retention rates showed that the evaluated procedures contributed to control the loss of carentoids in vegetables and therefore these measures should be adopted in other HFS. PMID:18813663

  7. Technology in School Foodservice Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Tom; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the current state of technology to manage school food-service operations, including, for example, the use of automation to identify and feed needy students and the use of the Internet. Describes challenges of implementing an automated system. (PKP)

  8. School Foodservice: The Next Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Patricia L.

    1998-01-01

    Examines trends identified in the American School Food Service Association's research-based "1998-2000 Strategic Plan." Forecasters are projecting that student enrollments will rise over the next five years, labor shortages will continue, competition from fast-food providers is increasing, food-service providers' roles are expanding, and…

  9. Assessment of a Foodservice Management Sanitation Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Charlotte C.; Casey, Ralph

    1979-01-01

    This study determined the extent to which a course in foodservice sanitation using National Institute for the Foodservice Industry materials affected the postcourse sanitation inspection scores in selected establishments. Both experimental and control establishments had significantly higher inspection scores after the course than they had prior to…

  10. Exploring patient satisfaction with foodservice through focus groups and meal rounds.

    PubMed

    Watters, Corilee A; Sorensen, Janice; Fiala, Anna; Wismer, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate adult patients' perceptions of hospital foodservice through focus groups with patients postdischarge and with nurses. The focus group themes included an emphasis on health, quality, freshness, and appropriateness; variety, selection, and choice; inability to provide feedback; menu errors; accessibility to food on the units; service; tray layout; and waste. The themes emerging from the focus groups were further explored through meal round interviews with patients (n=116) to determine areas for improvement. Patients thought food served in the hospital should be a model for a healthy diet. Ongoing education and communication with patients and nurses is important in improving satisfaction with foodservice. PMID:14520255

  11. Foodservice Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist vocational teachers in developing and implementing a cluster program in food service occupations, this guide contains sections on cluster organization and implementation and instructional emphasis areas. The cluster organization and implementation section covers goal-based planning and includes a proposed cluster curriculum, a…

  12. Development of Career Progression Systems for Employees in the Foodservice Industry. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Restaurant Association, Chicago, IL.

    Firms representing four segments of the foodservice industry (institutional foodservice (9 jobs), commercial restaurants (19 jobs), hotel foodservice (100 jobs), and airline foodservice (10 jobs), participated in a career and training study to test the feasibility of designing and implementing career progression (c.p.) systems within these…

  13. Labor Productivity Standards in Texas School Foodservice Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrin, A. Rachelle; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this research was to investigate utilization of labor productivity standards and variables that affect productivity in Texas school foodservice operations. Methods: A questionnaire was developed, validated, and pilot tested, then mailed to 200 randomly selected Texas school foodservice directors. Descriptive statistics for…

  14. 24 CFR 242.90 - Eligibility of mortgages covering hospitals in certain neighborhoods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hospitals in certain neighborhoods. 242.90 Section 242.90 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating... UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.90 Eligibility of mortgages covering hospitals in certain neighborhoods. (a) A...

  15. Foodservice industry market profile study: nutritional and objective textural profile of foodservice ground beef.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L P; Williams, S E; Neel, S W; Reagan, J O

    1994-06-01

    Ground beef patties of three types (regular, lean, extra-lean) destined for the foodservice industry were collected from foodservice purveyors in 12 cities equally distributed across six geographical regions of the United States to assess nutritional and objective texture characteristics. Patties were cooked on a foodservice-style clamshell grill to a well (approximately 80 degrees C) degree of doneness (internal temperature) for nutritional analysis and objective texture measurements. Single 5.08-cm2 samples were removed from the center of each patty and sheared with a multiple-blade Allo-Kramer shearing device. Nutritional composition, including proximate analysis values and fatty acid profiles, was determined on both raw and cooked samples of the ground beef. Extra-lean ground beef contained the least (P < .05) fat (12.43%), lean had an intermediate level (17.45%), and regular ground beef contained the most fat (P < .05) (20.20%), on a raw basis. However, after cooking, fat content was similar (P > .05) for regular and lean ground beef. Fatty acid composition of lipid and cholesterol content of ground beef did not differ (P > .05) across types of ground beef or between raw and cooked samples and was similar to USDA Handbook 8-13 values. Cooking loss decreased (P < .05) as fat percentages decreased. Regular and lean ground beef was easier (P < .05) to shear (4.20 and 4.24 kg/g of sample, respectively) than extra-lean ground beef (5.08 kg/g of sample). On average, foodservice ground beef sampled in the present study is 15.5% leaner than retail ground beef as presented in the National Beef Market Basket Survey and 22.2% leaner than USDA Handbook 8-13 values. PMID:8071173

  16. Forecasting in foodservice: model development, testing, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miller, J L; Thompson, P A; Orabella, M M

    1991-05-01

    This study was designed to develop, test, and evaluate mathematical models appropriate for forecasting menu-item production demand in foodservice. Data were collected from residence and dining hall foodservices at Ohio State University. Objectives of the study were to collect, code, and analyze the data; develop and test models using actual operation data; and compare forecasting results with current methods in use. Customer count was forecast using deseasonalized simple exponential smoothing. Menu-item demand was forecast by multiplying the count forecast by a predicted preference statistic. Forecasting models were evaluated using mean squared error, mean absolute deviation, and mean absolute percentage error techniques. All models were more accurate than current methods. A broad spectrum of forecasting techniques could be used by foodservice managers with access to a personal computer and spread-sheet and database-management software. The findings indicate that mathematical forecasting techniques may be effective in foodservice operations to control costs, increase productivity, and maximize profits. PMID:2019699

  17. Trends impacting food safety in retail foodservice: implications for dietetics practice.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Jeannie; Strohbehn, Catherine H

    2008-07-01

    Food safety in retail foodservice is increasingly important to consumers. Trends that impact food safety concerns include the increasing number of meals eaten away from home, increasing consumer awareness about food safety, an aging population, changes in the foodservice workforce, changing technology in work environments, changes in food procurement, foodservice risk factors, and food defense concerns. Each of these trends has implications for dietetics practice, both in working with consumers and managing foodservice operations. PMID:18589025

  18. A Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs: Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to introduce the need for securing foodservice operations from bioterrorism, provide a checklist of suggestions for improving the security of foodservice operations, and assist individuals responsible for school food service programs in strengthening the safety of the foodservice operation. While not mandatory, the…

  19. 76 FR 62341 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-School Foodservice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Request--School Foodservice Indirect Cost Study AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), United States... School Foodservice Indirect Cost Study. DATES: Written comments on this notice must be received by...@fns.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: School Foodservice Indirect Cost Study. OMB...

  20. The food-service industry, dietary guidelines and change.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R G; Harvey, P W; Heywood, P F

    1997-08-01

    The influence of the food-service industry on compliance with the Australian dietary guidelines was investigated through three separate methods of data collection and analysis: a telephone survey of 1683 randomly selected Brisbane residents; telephone interviews with 69 food-service-industry operators and 10 face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders in industry and government. Nearly 40 per cent of respondents had consumed foods prepared by the food-service industry at least once on the day before the interview, mainly from restaurants, cafes and takeaway shops, in the form of fast-food or snacks. Consumption of these foods declined with age. Those consuming foods prepared by the food-service industry ate significantly less fruit, vegetables and dairy food and were therefore less likely to comply with the dietary guidelines. Outcomes from interviews with operators in the food-service industry show that food choices offered to consumers were the result of a dynamic interaction between consumer demand and operators' own tastes and perceptions of food quality. Key informant interviews show that public health nutrition programs will have limited effect without supportive environmental changes in the food-service industry supply. An effective means of increasing the likelihood of compliance with the Australian dietary guidelines will be to encourage food suppliers in ways that address their core business concerns simultaneously with the goals of health professionals. PMID:9343901

  1. Comparison of students' foodservice satisfaction between Korea and US

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunkyung; Chun, Youngah; Joo, Nami

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes important factors of foodservice in school through comparison of students' satisfaction of using foodservice in Korea and US in order to meet students' expectations. The survey was composed of 4 categories including menu, service, hygiene, and facility and it was carried out in both countries to evaluate satisfaction. First, comparison of satisfaction between two countries was made using t-test. Secondly, multiple regression was performed to identify factors affecting satisfaction. As a result Korean students were more satisfied than American students in all aspects. However, regardless of nationality, the top three factors affecting the students' satisfaction were the same. The predictors were food taste (Korean 0.375 and American 0.350), menu variety (Korean 0.305 and American 0.278), and service line (Korean 0.226 and American 0.192). Despite the similarity of the predicators, it can be concluded that the difference in satisfaction level between the two nationscan be explained by the approaches to create comfortable and acceptable changes in schools' foodservice. Korea has been increasing the foodservice quality based on their objectives to provide students comfortable and positive environment when eating nutritious meals. However, US have made their main objectives on making changes to decrease youth obesity. Foodservice improvements according to continuous evaluations and surveys are necessary in order to increase students' satisfaction. PMID:23422683

  2. Workplace foodservice; perception of quality and trust.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah; Hartwell, Heather; Hemingway, Ann; Chapleo, Chris

    2016-02-01

    In settings such as workplaces there is a growing acceptance that the food provided has a significant impact on health and wellbeing. This is a captive environment where the overall contribution of the meal served could be an important element of the overall diet and represents an under researched area. Despite growing demand, little information is available; time pressure when making food choice alongside the challenge of understanding information provided can act as barriers for healthy selection and can also decrease confidence in the food system. We would also argue that the fundamental human right of informing consumers what they are eating is not currently being addressed and is underscored. This study used focus groups to explore criteria that motivate peoples' food choice in a workplace foodservice setting. Thematic analysis was applied to categorise data according to frequently occurring responses. Data were collected from four focus groups in Germany and the UK with a total of 23 participants. Although there is little expectation in the quality of food served in the workplace, respondents valued any transparency of information and the opportunity to socialise with other work colleagues. Criteria of importance were identified as: Value for money, Variety, Naturalness, Nutrition, Portion Size, Taste, Visual Appearance, Origin, Animal welfare, Environmental impact, Fair Trade and Organic. Gaining insight into these criteria can enable operators to meet the needs and expectations of their customers in order to increase confidence in the food provided and in addition signpost a healthier selection. PMID:26686582

  3. School Foodservice Costs: Location Matters. ERS Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollinger, Michael; Ralston, Katherine; Guthrie, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which location influences school foodservice costs per meal. It does not examine the effects of cost variation on financial solvency of an school food authority (SFA) or the adequacy of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) meal reimbursements. Higher per meal costs do not necessarily indicate that an SFA is…

  4. Measuring School Foodservice Workers’ Perceptions of Organizational Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    School foodservice workers (SFW) are a direct link to children eating school meals. SFW who perceive positive and supportive organizational culture at their school nutrition departments also may perceive that such environments foster their own promotion of healthful food choices by students. To date...

  5. Training Guide for Foodservice Personnel in Programs for Young Children. A Manual for Nutritionists, Dietitians, and Foodservice Specialists Who Are Developing and Conducting Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This manual is a competency-based curriculum planning guide for nutritionists, dietitians, and foodservice specialists to use in conducting preservice and inservice training programs for foodservice personnel in Head Start, day care, and other preschool programs. After an introductory chapter, which states the purpose of the manual, defines…

  6. HB 1347 and Its Relationship to Foodservice Outsourcing in Illinois Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashear, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined foodservice outsourcing in the State of Illinois. School administrators currently outsourcing foodservice were surveyed about their perceptions of HB1347 and its components. This study looked at HB1347 in Illinois, and its effects on outsourcing in school districts. Data for this study was collected from a survey sent to 100%…

  7. Training: An Opportunity for People with Disabilities in School Foodservice Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paez, Paola; Arendt, Susan; Strohbehn, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study assessed current training methods and topics used at public school foodservice operations as well as school foodservice representatives' attitudes toward training employees with disabilities. Methods: A mixed method approach of data collection included two phases. Phase I used a more qualitative approach; interviews…

  8. Microbial assessment in school foodservices and recommendations for food safety improvement.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Y; Kim, S R; Kang, D H; Shim, W B; Seo, E; Chung, D H

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated microbial food safety in school foodservices. Five school foodservices were randomly selected, and samples from water, cooking utensils, tableware, foodservice surroundings, and linen were collected in summer and winter (N=420). Tap and drinking water samples were collected, samples of food contact surfaces were collected by swab-kit, and samples for foodservice workers' hands and gloves were prepared by glove juice method. Aerobic plate count (APC) and coliform bacterial populations were enumerated on plate count agar (PCA) and desoxycholate lactose agar, respectively. The presence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus was also examined by biochemical identification tests. In addition, PCA agar for APCs and Baird-Parker agar for S. aureus were used to enumerate airborne microorganisms. Higher APCs (< 0 to 5.1 log CFU/mL) than acceptable level were generally observed in water samples, while low coliform counts were found in the samples. High APCs were enumerated in cooking utensils, foodservice workers, tableware, and food-service surroundings, and coliforms were also found in the samples for both seasons. The presence of Salmonella was found from only 10% of plastic glove samples (summer), and the presence of L. monocytogenes was not observed in all samples. S. aureus was detected in some of water, cooking utensils, tableware, employees, and foodservice surroundings, and E. coli was observed in cooking utensils (10% to 20%; summer). No obvious airborne bacteria were detected. These results showed that sanitation practice in school foodservices should be improved, and the results may be useful in microbial assessment of school foodservices. PMID:19241563

  9. A new approach to the design of information systems for foodservice management in health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Matthews, M E; Norback, J P

    1984-06-01

    An organizational framework for integrating foodservice data into an information system for management decision making is presented. The framework involves the application to foodservice of principles developed by the disciplines of managerial economics and accounting, mathematics, computer science, and information systems. The first step is to conceptualize a foodservice system from an input-output perspective, in which inputs are units of resources available to managers and outputs are servings of menu items. Next, methods of full cost accounting, from the management accounting literature, are suggested as a mechanism for developing and assigning costs of using resources within a foodservice operation. Then matrix multiplication is used to illustrate types of information that matrix data structures could make available for management planning and control when combined with a conversational mode of computer programming. PMID:6725798

  10. Comparison of foodservice management performance level between dietitians and non-dietitians in senior centers using IPA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the management importance and performance level of foodservice managers at senior centers. Using the survey, perceived importance and performance levels of seven foodservice management areas were evaluated and analyzed. Data showed the foodservice facilities were being managed by dietitians (61.6%) or non-dietitians (38.9%). The result indicated that overall importance level (3.43) was higher than performance level (3.02) (p<.01). As of the IPA result, dietitians and non-dietitians had different perspectives in terms of managing the eight categories of foodservice areas. The differences in the IPA results between the two groups may reflect bias attributable to the respondents' degrees of knowledge and professional preparation. The research findings could enhance our understanding of importance of hiring professional dietitians to operate foodservice at senior centers and find out which management area should be concentrated for more effective foodservice management. PMID:20016702

  11. Consumer perceptions on sustainable practices implemented in foodservice organizations in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Seyoung

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Sustainable practices in foodservice organizations including commercial and noncommercial ones are critical to ensure the protection of the environment for the future. With the rapid growth of the foodservice industry, wiser usage of input sources such as food, utilities, and single use packaging should be reconsidered for future generations. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the customer's perceptions on sustainable practices and to identify the relationship among sustainable practices, social contribution and purchase intention. SUBJECTS/METHODS The study was conducted using content analyses by reviewing articles on sustainable food service practices published domestically and abroad. Thereafter, data were collected with a face-to-face survey using a questionnaire and analyzed with factor analyses and multiple regressions. RESULTS Sustainable practices classified with factor analysis consisted of 6 dimensions of green food material procurement, sustainable food preparation, green packaging, preservation of energy, waste management, and public relations on green activity, with a total of 25 green activities in foodservice operations. Consumers were not very familiar with the green activities implemented in the foodservice unit, with the lowest awareness of "green food material procurement (2.46 out of 5 points)", and the highest awareness of "green packaging (3.74)" and "waste management (3.28). The factors influencing the perception of social contribution by foodservice organizations among 6 sustainable practice dimensions were found to be public relations on green activity (β = 0.154), waste management (β = 0.204) and sustainable food preparation (β = 0.183). Green packaging (β = 0.107) and the social contribution of the foodservice organization (β = 0.761) had strong relationships with the image of the organization. The purchase intentions of customers was affected only by the foodservice image (β = 0.775). CONCLUSIONS The

  12. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. 413.118 Section 413.118 Public... PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.118... ASC surgical procedures (covered under § 416.65 of this chapter) is equal to the lesser of— (1)...

  13. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. 413.118 Section 413.118 Public... PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.118... ASC surgical procedures (covered under § 416.65 of this chapter) is equal to the lesser of— (1)...

  14. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. 413.118 Section 413.118 Public... PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.118... ASC surgical procedures (covered under § 416.65 of this chapter) is equal to the lesser of— (1)...

  15. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. 413.118 Section 413.118 Public... PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.118... ASC surgical procedures (covered under § 416.65 of this chapter) is equal to the lesser of— (1)...

  16. School competitive food policies: perceptions of Pennsylvania public high school foodservice directors and principals.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Elaine; Probart, Claudia; Weirich, J Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Bailey-Davis, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the extent, nature, and enforcement of school competitive food policies in Pennsylvania public high schools and to determine if there are differences between school foodservice directors' and principals' perceptions of the existence and enforcement of these policies. A survey was distributed to 271 school foodservice directors and 100 principals in a representative, random sample of high schools. Two hundred twenty-eight school foodservice directors (84%) and 79 principals (79%) returned surveys. Descriptive statistics, chi2 analyses, and a proportions test were done using SPSS statistical software (SPSS base 11.5 for Windows, 2002, SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Few nutrition policies were reported related to setting nutritional standards for competitive foods (0.5% to 15.0%). Respondents' reporting of existence of policies not always enforced ranged from 0% to 12.8%. School foodservice directors reported uncertainty about existence of several policies outside their direct domain, but with potential effect on school meals participation. Differences were found between school foodservice directors' and principals' reporting of policies, with principals more often reporting policy existence and enforcement. These findings suggest the need for communication, both about existence of policies and chain of command in enforcement of policies. Given the local wellness policy provision of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, opportunities exist for nutrition professionals to contribute to development of policies that influence the nutritional quality of school foods. PMID:16442877

  17. Decision making and senior management: the implementation of change projects covering clinical management in SUS hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José Márcio da Cunha; Gomes, Romeu

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyses the decision making process for senior management in public hospitals that are a part of the National Health Service in Brazil (hereafter SUS) in relation to projects aimed at changing clinical management. The methodological design of this study is qualitative in nature taking a hermeneutics-dialectics perspective in terms of results. Hospital directors noted that clinical management projects changed the state of hospitals through: improving their organizations, mobilizing their staff in order to increase a sense of order and systemizing actions and available resources. Technical rationality was the principal basis used in the decision making process for managers. Due to the reality of many hospitals having fragmented organizations, this fact impeded the use of aspects related to rationality, such as economic and financial factors in the decision making process. The incremental model and general politics also play a role in this area. We concluded that the decision making process embraces a large array of factors including rational aspects such as the use of management techniques and the ability to analyze, interpret and summarize. It also incorporates subjective elements such as how to select values and dealing with people's working experiences. We recognized that management problems are wide in scope, ambiguous, complex and do not come with a lot of structure in practice. PMID:27557021

  18. Promoting nutrition in commercial foodservice establishments: a realistic approach.

    PubMed

    Regan, C

    1987-04-01

    Americans are eating out an average of 3.7 times per week and are spending almost 40% of their food dollar doing so. A Gallup Survey shows about 39% of consumers claim to have improved their eating habits while eating out, but restaurant patrons are most concerned about nutrition when dining out on a routine visit or while in a family-style restaurant. Restaurant patrons are also now more likely to order lower sodium meals, small-size portions, and lower calorie entrées. Although the opportunity to promote nutrition in the foodservice setting exists, restaurant chefs and managers often lack the background to take advantage of it and could benefit from the services of qualified nutrition professionals. Dietitians could assist in identifying menu items appropriate for nutrition promotion, recipe development, and staff training. However, a realistic approach must be maintained, and the following facts should be kept in mind: Nutritious restaurant fare should blend with the theme of the menu and be promoted primarily on its sensory attributes. Nutrition in restaurants is best received when promoted generally and within the scope of health and wellness. Descriptive menu items should be carefully used. A restaurant consultant should be current on controversial food and nutrition trends. The wait staff should be properly trained. PMID:3559009

  19. Foodservice employees benefit from interventions targeting barriers to food safety.

    PubMed

    York, Valerie K; Brannon, Laura A; Shanklin, Carol W; Roberts, Kevin R; Howells, Amber D; Barrett, Elizabeth B

    2009-09-01

    The number of foodborne illnesses traced to improper food handling in restaurants indicates a need for research to improve food safety in these establishments. Therefore, this 2-year longitudinal study investigated the effectiveness of traditional ServSafe (National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, Chicago, IL) food-safety training and a Theory of Planned Behavior intervention program targeting employees' perceived barriers and attitudes toward important food-safety behaviors. The effectiveness of the training and intervention was measured by knowledge scores and observed behavioral compliance rates related to food-safety practices. Employees were observed for handwashing, thermometer usage, and proper handling of work surfaces at baseline, after receiving ServSafe training, and again after exposure to the intervention targeting barriers and negative attitudes about food-safety practices. Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated training improved handwashing knowledge, but the intervention was necessary to improve overall behavioral compliance and handwashing compliance. Results suggest that registered dietitians; dietetic technicians, registered; and foodservice managers should implement a combination of training and intervention to improve knowledge and compliance with food-safety behaviors, rather than relying on training alone. Challenges encountered while conducting this research are discussed, and recommendations are provided for researchers interested in conducting this type of research in the future. PMID:19699837

  20. Diabetes Preparedness in Schools: What Do Foodservice Personnel Need to Know to Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenci, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is increasing in youth, presenting a serious public health threat. Although type 1 diabetes has historically been more common in children, type 2 diabetes is on the rise, linked to increases in overweight and obesity among American youth, particularly those of high risk racial and ethnic groups. Foodservice personnel, along with other…

  1. School Foodservice Personnel's Struggle with Using Labels to Identify Whole-Grain Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yen Li; Orsted, Mary; Marquart, Len; Reicks, Marla

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe how school foodservice personnel use current labeling methods to identify whole-grain products and the influence on purchasing for school meals. Methods: Focus groups explored labeling methods to identify whole-grain products and barriers to incorporating whole-grain foods in school meals. Qualitative analysis procedures and…

  2. School Foodservice Employees' Perceptions of Practice: Differences by Generational Age and Hours Worked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Catherine; Jun, Jinhyun; Arendt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the influences of school foodservice employees' age and average number of hours worked per week on perceived safe food handling practices, barriers, and motivators. Methods: A bilingual survey (English and Spanish) was developed to assess reported food safety practices, barriers, and motivators to…

  3. Educating Immigrant Hispanic Foodservice Workers about Food Safety Using Visual-Based Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2013-01-01

    Providing food safety training to a diverse workforce brings with it opportunities and challenges that must be addressed. The study reported here provides evidence for benefits of using visual-based tools for food safety training when educating immigrant, Hispanic foodservice workers with no or minimal English language skills. Using visual tools…

  4. Attitudes of School Foodservice Directors about the Potential Benefits of School Wellness Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longley, Carol; Sneed, Jeannie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Reauthorization Act of 2004 requires schools participating in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to establish a wellness policy. The purpose of this study was to examine school foodservice directors' attitudes about the potential benefits of the wellness policy. Methods: A survey research design was…

  5. Barriers and Opportunities Related to Whole Grain Foods in Minnesota School Foodservice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, David; Braun, Curtis; Dostal, Allison; Jeffery, Robert; Marquart, Len

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to identify barriers and opportunities associated with the introduction of whole grain foods into school cafeterias. The primary objective was to elicit input from school foodservice personnel (SFP) regarding their experiences in ordering, purchasing, preparing, and serving whole grain foods in…

  6. Work/Life Practices and the Recruitment and Retention of Large School Districts' Foodservice Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Mary Kate

    2010-01-01

    With the forthcoming retirement of school foodservice directors, the increasing pressures faced by employees at home and work, and the financial constraints of school districts, recruiting and retaining skilled and diverse employees will be challenging. Marketing work/life benefits to potential employees and supporting these policies to current…

  7. Food Safety Training Is Associated with Improved Knowledge and Behaviours among Foodservice Establishments' Workers

    PubMed Central

    Adesokan, Hezekiah Kehinde; Akinseye, Victor Oluwatoyin; Adesokan, Grace Abiodun

    2015-01-01

    Though several studies have evaluated the association between food safety training and behavior, little has investigated different training components in association with food handlers' performance. Foodservice workers (N = 211) with at least two years' experience were willing to participate and were selected from major foodservice establishments in Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria, and completed a survey to evaluate the association between training, training area, duration, and refresher training and food safety knowledge and practices. We observed an association between training and knowledge (P = 0.000) as well as practices (P = 0.05) of food safety while different training areas contributed similarly to food handlers' knowledge (P = 0.17) and practices (P = 0.08). However, there was a significant decline in knowledge (P = 0.01) and practices (P = 0.001) with an increase in training duration. Furthermore, foodservice employees with refresher training demonstrated significantly higher knowledge (P = 0.000) and practice (P = 0.003) levels than those without, being about 45 and 14 times more likely to, respectively, improve their knowledge (OR = 45; 95% CI: 3.47–584.34) and practice (OR = 13.5; 95% CI: 2.01–90.69). Researchers should always consider varying training components before making assertions regarding effectiveness of training on foodservice workers' behaviour. PMID:26904658

  8. Whole-Grain Continuing Education for School Foodservice Personnel: Keeping Kids from Falling Short

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth-Yousey, Lori; Barno, Trina; Caskey, Mary; Asche, Kimberly; Reicks, Marla

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this project was to develop and test whole-grain continuing education for school foodservice personnel. Methods: A continuing education program was developed to address planning, purchasing, preparing, and serving whole-grain food in schools. Participants completed a pre-post questionnaire to assess changes in knowledge,…

  9. Associations among School Characteristics and Foodservice Practices in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Schools

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Jessica L.; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M.; Martin, Corby K.; LeBlanc, Monique M.; Onufrak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Determine school characteristics associated with healthy/unhealthy foodservice offerings or healthy food preparation practices. Design Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting Nationally representative sample of public and private elementary, middle and high schools. Participants 526 and 520 schools with valid data from the 2006 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) Food Service School Questionnaire. Main Outcome Measure(s) Scores for healthy/unhealthy foodservice offerings and healthy food preparation practices. Analysis Multivariable regression to determine significant associations among school characteristics and offerings/preparation practices. Results Public schools and schools participating in USDA Team Nutrition reported more healthy offerings and preparation than private or non-participating schools, respectively. Elementary schools reported less unhealthy offerings than middle or high schools; middle schools reported less unhealthy offerings than high schools. Schools requiring foodservice managers to have a college education reported more healthy preparation while those requiring completion of a foodservice training program reported less unhealthy offerings and more healthy preparation than schools without these requirements. Conclusions and Implications Results suggest the school nutrition environment may be improved by requiring foodservice managers to hold a nutrition-related college degree and/or successfully pass a foodservice training program, and by participating in a school-based nutrition program, such as USDA Team Nutrition. PMID:22963956

  10. A decision tree for selecting the most cost-effective waste disposal strategy in foodservice operations.

    PubMed

    Wie, Seunghee; Shanklin, Carol W; Lee, Kyung-Eun

    2003-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine costs of disposal strategies for wastes generated in foodservice operations and to develop a decision tree to determine the most cost-effective disposal strategy for foodservice operations. Four cases, including the central food processing center (CFPC) in a school district, a continuing-care retirement center (CCRC), a university dining center (UDC), and a commercial chain restaurant (CCR), were studied to determine the most cost-effective disposal strategy. Annual costs for the current and projected strategies were determined for each case. Results of waste characterization studies and stopwatch studies, interviews with foodservice directors, and water flow and electrical requirements from manufacturers' specifications were used to determine cost incurred. The annual percentage increases for labor, fees, and services were used to reflect an inflated economic condition for the ensuing 10 years of the study period. The Net Present Worth method was used to compare costs of strategies, and the multiparameter sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the tolerance of the chosen strategy. The most cost-effective strategy differed among foodservice operations because of the composition of food and packaging wastes, the quantity of recyclable materials, the waste-hauling charges, labor costs, start-up costs, and inflation rate. For example, the use of a garbage disposal for food waste and landfills and recycling for packaging waste were the most cost-effective strategies for the CCRC. A decision tree was developed to illustrate the decision-making process that occurs when conducting cost analysis and subsequent decisions. Dietetics practitioners can use the decision tree when evaluating the results of the cost analysis. PMID:12669011

  11. A research model for relating job characteristics to job satisfaction of university foodservice employees.

    PubMed

    Duke, K M; Sneed, J

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between demographic variables and job satisfaction for university foodservice employees. A three-part survey was developed which included the 30-item Job Characteristics Inventory, 6 items related to job satisfaction, and 7 demographic items. Separate written questionnaires were administered to 32 managerial and 147 non-managerial employees of a large state university foodservice department. The response rate was 98% (32 managers and 143 non-managers). The reliability for the instrument, as determined by Cronbach's alpha, was 0.88 for employees and 0.91 for supervisors. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to test research hypotheses at a significance level of p less than or equal to .05. There was a positive relationship between job characteristics (autonomy, task identity, feedback, variety, dealing with others, and friendship opportunities) and job satisfaction for both employees and supervisors. Feedback and dealing with others were the individual job characteristics that were significant. Only one job characteristic, dealing with others, was rated higher by managerial than by non-managerial employees. There was no difference in job satisfaction by role (managerial vs. non-managerial) or demographic variables, except age for non-managerial employees. Older, non-managerial employees tended to be more satisfied with their jobs than did younger employees. Dietitians and foodservice managers can use the findings for implementing job design strategies, such as job enrichment and job rotation, to improve employee satisfaction. PMID:2760368

  12. Menu label accuracy at a university's foodservices. An exploratory recipe nutrition analysis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Murray, Douglas; Chavarria, Stephanie; Zhao, Hang

    2015-09-01

    The increase in the weight of American adults and children has been positively associated with the prevalence of the consumption of food-away-from-home. The objective was to assess the accuracy of claimed nutritional information of foods purchased in contracted foodservices located on the campus of an institution of higher education. Fifty popular food items were randomly collected from five main dining outlets located on a selected campus in the northeastern United States. The sampling was repeated three times on separate occasions for an aggregate total of 150 food samples. The samples were then weighed and assessed for nutrient composition (protein, cholesterol, fiber, carbohydrates, total fat, calories, sugar, and sodium) using nutrient analysis software. Results were compared with foodservices' published nutrition information. Two group comparisons, claimed and measured, were performed using the paired-sample t-test. Descriptive statistics were used as well. Among the nine nutritional values, six nutrients (total fat, sodium, protein, fiber, cholesterol, and weight) had more than 10% positive average discrepancies between measured and claimed values. Statistical significance of the variance was obtained in four of the eight categories of nutrient content: total fat, sodium, protein, and cholesterol (P < .05). Significance was also reached in the variance of actual portion weight compared to the published claims (P < .001). Significant differences of portion size (weight), total fat, sodium, protein, and cholesterol were found among the sampled values and the foodservices' published claims. The findings from this study raise the concern that if the actual nutritional information does not accurately reflect the declared values on menus, conclusions, decisions and actions based on posted information may not be valid. PMID:25958116

  13. Bidding: Getting the Best Price for School Foodservice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBella, Cecilia M.

    1998-01-01

    Sharon (Massachusetts) Public Schools developed an alternative procurement process for school food services that complies with state public bidding laws while evading "low-bid" constraints. The new process features evaluative criteria covering nutrition education, community outreach, management expertise, site visits, and price proposal/budget…

  14. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL..., which is based on hospital-specific cost and charge data and rates paid to free-standing ASCs....

  15. Use of Visuals for Food Safety Education of Spanish-Speaking Foodservice Workers: A Case Study in Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2012-01-01

    Providing food safety training to an audience whose native language is not English is always a challenge. In the study reported here, minimal-text visuals in Spanish were used to train Hispanic foodservice workers about proper handwashing technique and glove use based on the 2005 Food Code requirements. Overall, results indicated that visuals…

  16. Using student opinion and design inputs to develop an informed university foodservice menu.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Harwell, Heather; Brusca, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The potential for Universities and Colleges to be settings that promote health and wellbeing has become the subject for debate where the role of foodservice has been acknowledged as influential. The aim of this research was to evaluate an effective design to promote healthy selections from university foodservice menus. The research was designed around a grounded theory approach utilizing semiological prompts based on different existing nutrition labeling schemes. A total of 39 students (17 male, 22 female) participated in seven focus groups at Montclair State University, US. The participants of this study clearly called for nutrition labeling on college menus and a prototype design had been agreed. The students also itemized five nutrients they wanted listed in a Traffic Light system of colors and then quantified on the menu: calories, sodium, sugar, fat and carbohydrates, plus beneficial ingredients or nutrients for display in menu icons. The nutrients and display order varies somewhat from industry and government standards, though the student recommendations are suggestive of common understandings of published nutrient guidelines. Students have a stake in how menu information is presented on campus and their opinions could positively impact the general selection of healthy foods. PMID:23707359

  17. Importance of relationship quality and communication on foodservice for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sunhee; Back, Ki Joon; Shanklin, Carol W

    2011-02-01

    In order to promote foodservice for the elderly, foodservice managers in Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) must identify the main factors to enhance the satisfaction and behavioral intentions with food service. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between relationship quality (consisting of trust, commitment, and satisfaction) and communication in the formation of elderly's behavioral intentions with food services at CCRCs. A survey was administered to residents in two CCRCs and a total of 327 residents participated. A tested structural equation model exhibited good model fit and explanatory power of the study construct. Satisfaction directly influenced word-of-mouth and service quality has an influence on commitment. Commitment was a significant determinant of behavioral intentions to eat more often in the dining room. Also, communication showed positive association with trust. The results provided strong evidence for the importance of satisfaction and communication as a consequence of relationship marketing efforts. Suggestions for future research to better understand the elderly' behavioral intention judgments were given. PMID:21487500

  18. Importance of relationship quality and communication on foodservice for the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Back, Ki Joon; Shanklin, Carol W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote foodservice for the elderly, foodservice managers in Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) must identify the main factors to enhance the satisfaction and behavioral intentions with food service. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between relationship quality (consisting of trust, commitment, and satisfaction) and communication in the formation of elderly's behavioral intentions with food services at CCRCs. A survey was administered to residents in two CCRCs and a total of 327 residents participated. A tested structural equation model exhibited good model fit and explanatory power of the study construct. Satisfaction directly influenced word-of-mouth and service quality has an influence on commitment. Commitment was a significant determinant of behavioral intentions to eat more often in the dining room. Also, communication showed positive association with trust. The results provided strong evidence for the importance of satisfaction and communication as a consequence of relationship marketing efforts. Suggestions for future research to better understand the elderly' behavioral intention judgments were given. PMID:21487500

  19. Microbiological evaluation of foodservice contact surfaces in Iowa assisted-living facilities.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Jeannie; Strohbehn, Catherine; Gilmore, Shirley A; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2004-11-01

    A study of 40 assisted-living facilities in Iowa was conducted to assess the microbiological quality of food-contact surfaces (work tables/counters, cooking equipment such as mixing bowls, and cutting boards) and a surface that could cross-contaminate food (refrigerator or freezer handles) to determine the effectiveness of cleaning and sanitation. Standards were set for foodservice for aerobic plate count, Enterobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus aureus . Two facilities met standards for all five surfaces for each of the three tests. Fewer facilities met the standard for aerobic plate count than for the other two tests, and nearly three fourths of the facilities failed to meet the aerobic plate count for cutting boards. Critically, cross-contamination from these surfaces could result in contamination of food; thus, attention needs to be given to training and supervision to ensure proper hand washing and appropriate cleaning and sanitation procedures to reduce or eliminate cross-contamination. PMID:15499361

  20. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1992-93. Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Food Sciences Department, Food Production Program, Food Production Management Program, Pastry and Specialty Baking Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    In the 1992-93 academic year, the Hospitality and Food Sciences Department at South Seattle Community College conducted surveys of current and former students and local foodservice employers to determine the level of satisfaction with Department programs. Specifically, the surveys focused on four key outcomes: determining the extent to which…

  1. Hospital food waste and environmental and economic indicators--A Portuguese case study.

    PubMed

    Dias-Ferreira, C; Santos, T; Oliveira, V

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a comprehensive characterization of plate waste (food served but not eaten) at an acute care hospital in Portugal and elaborates on possible waste reduction measures. Even though waste prevention is a priority in Europe, large amounts of food are still being wasted every day, with hospitals giving rise to two to three times more food waste than other foodservice sectors. For this work the plate waste arising at the ward level was audited during 8 weeks, covering almost 8000 meals, using a general hospital as case study. Weighing the food served to patients and that returned after the meal allowed calculating plate waste for the average meal, as well as for individual meal items. Comparison of food waste arising showed that differences exist among wards, with some generating more waste than others. On average each patient throws away 953 g of food each day, representing 35% of the food served. This equates to 8.7 thousand tonnes of food waste being thrown away each year at hospitals across Portugal. These tonnes of food transformed into waste represent economic losses and environmental impacts, being estimated that 16.4 thousand tonnes of CO2 (equivalent) and 35.3 million euros are the annual national indicators in Portugal. This means that 0.5% of the Portuguese National Health budget gets thrown away as food waste. Given the magnitude of the food problem five measures were suggested to reduce food waste, and their potential impact and ease of implementation were discussed. Even though food waste is unavoidable the results obtained in this work highlight the potential financial and environmental savings for Portuguese hospitals, providing a basis to establish future strategies to tackle food waste. PMID:26427934

  2. A comparison of food policy and practice reporting between credentialed and noncredentialed Ohio school foodservice directors.

    PubMed

    Mincher, Jeanine L; Symons, Cynthia W; Thompson, Amy

    2012-12-01

    With rising childhood obesity rates and the increasing complexity of the school food environment, practitioners working in school nutrition need adequate preparation for their responsibilities. School foodservice directors (SFSDs) vary widely in their academic preparation, and there are no established standards for individuals in this occupation. Credentialing provides a way in which baseline knowledge of SFSDs can be established; however, little is known about the influence of such credentials on food-related policies and practices in public schools. Our cross-sectional study compared the reported food policies and practices between credentialed and noncredentialed SFSDs within all districts (N=364) of the Ohio public school system during the 2009-2010 school year. Using a Likert-type format, policy and practice scores were measured by asking participants to respond to statements adapted from the School Health Index assessment tool. Differences in the policy and practice scores reported by SFSDs holding a food-related credential and those not holding a credential were determined by t test. Results indicated that respondents with a food-related credential were more likely to report both comprehensive food-related policies (14.51 vs 13.39; range=0 to 21) and practices (33.86 vs 32.50; range=0 to 39). These findings support the value of credentialing SFSDs. However, further research is required to establish which credential provides the optimal match in the provision of high quality nutrition care to schoolchildren. PMID:23000026

  3. Microbial evaluation of foodservice surfaces in Texas child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Staskel, Deanna M; Briley, Margaret E; Field, Leanne H; Barth, Suzanne S

    2007-05-01

    Children under the age of 5 years experience a disproportionately high rate of bacterial enteric infections. Research has shown a relationship between inadequate child-care center sanitation and illnesses in children. This cross-sectional study assessed the sanitation levels of foodservice surfaces in a sample of 36 Texas child-care centers via recovery and identification of selected enteric gram-negative bacteria. The centers in this study had the capacity to care for 50 to 332 children and represented diverse socioeconomic and racial profiles. Forty-one percent (68 of 167) of total swab samples collected tested positive for bacteria. Twenty-seven different types of bacteria were identified from positive swab samples. Most of the bacteria found are considered opportunistic pathogens, which can pose serious health risks to those with compromised immune systems, such as young children. Two types of bacteria recovered, Salmonella paratyphi A and Klebsiella pneumonia, are considered nonopportunistic and can infect healthy individuals. The most common areas of bacterial contamination were the sink drain area of the dishwashing sink, the hand-washing sink faucet handles, the handle of the garbage can lid, and cutting boards. It is vital for child-care staff to wash their hands often and disinfect all surfaces, because even surfaces that appear clean can harbor microorganisms. PMID:17467385

  4. How do the work environment and work safety differ between the dry and wet kitchen foodservice facilities?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Won; Ju, Se-Young; Go, Eun-Sun

    2012-01-01

    In order to create a worker-friendly environment for institutional foodservice, facilities operating with a dry kitchen system have been recommended. This study was designed to compare the work safety and work environment of foodservice between wet and dry kitchen systems. Data were obtained using questionnaires with a target group of 303 staff at 57 foodservice operations. Dry kitchen facilities were constructed after 2006, which had a higher construction cost and more finishing floors with anti-slip tiles, and in which employees more wore non-slip footwear than wet kitchen (76.7%). The kitchen temperature and muscular pain were the most frequently reported employees' discomfort factors in the two systems, and, in the wet kitchen, "noise of kitchen" was also frequently reported as a discomfort. Dietitian and employees rated the less slippery and slip related incidents in dry kitchens than those of wet kitchen. Fryer area, ware-washing area, and plate waste table were the slippery areas and the causes were different between the functional areas. The risk for current leakage was rated significantly higher in wet kitchens by dietitians. In addition, the ware-washing area was found to be where employees felt the highest risk of electrical shock. Muscular pain (72.2%), arthritis (39.1%), hard-of-hearing (46.6%) and psychological stress (47.0%) were experienced by employees more than once a month, particularly in the wet kitchen. In conclusion, the dry kitchen system was found to be more efficient for food and work safety because of its superior design and well managed practices. PMID:22977692

  5. A Comparison of Student Performance in a National Restaurant Association Foodservice Sanitation Exam by Students Taking versus Those Not Taking a Review Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleury, Ernest

    A practicum was conducted to examine and improve the performance of students enrolled in a college of culinary arts on the National Restaurant Association Foodservice (NRAF) sanitation certification examination. Because the pass rate among students retaking the examination was lower than that among students taking the examination for the first…

  6. Career Progression Systems in the Internal Labor Market of the Foodservice Industry and the Role of the National Restaurant Association. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Leonard; Pezzullo, Caroline

    The lack of visible career paths was universally recognized as a major factor leading to the extraordinarily high rate of turnover and absenteeism in the foodservice industry. The report evaluates the potential of a National Trade Association as a vehicle for improvements in this area and focuses on National Restaurant Association (NRA) efforts in…

  7. Moderating effects of leader-member exchange (LMX) on job burnout in dietitians and chefs of institutional foodservice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate job burnout and leader-member exchange (LMX) levels as well as to evaluate buffering effects of LMX on burnout among dietitians and chefs at institutional foodservices. Hypotheses were proposed based on the Job Demands-Resources model and LMX theory. The study population consisted of dietitians and chefs who were in charge of managing unit operations in a nationwide contract management company. Positive/negative affectivity, workload, job burnout, and LMX scales that had been validated in previous research were adopted. A total of 552 questionnaires were distributed and 154 responses were returned. Results indicated that respondents' burnout levels were moderate and emotional exhaustion was greater than cynicism. In terms of LMX, the surveyed dietitians and chefs showed higher respect toward their supervisors than loyalty. When positive affectivity and negative affectivity were controlled, workload influenced emotional exhaustion and professional efficacy significantly. With affectivity and workload controlled, however, LMX did not influence any dimensions of burnout. The moderating effect of LMX on the relationship between workload and cynicism was significant. That is, the effect of workload on cynicism was weak if the dietitians and chefs perceived the relationship with their supervisor positively. Based on the findings and literature reviewed, how to mitigate job burnout among foodservice managers is discussed. PMID:21487501

  8. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  9. A Survey to Determine if Significant Differences Exist in the Scoring of Select Management Areas for Fast Food and Full Service Restaurant Managers by Two-Year Foodservice Management Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Thomas A.

    A survey was conducted of students in 77 of the 144 two-year foodservice management programs in the United States to assess their knowledge of and attitudes toward fast food restaurant management as compared to full service restaurant management. A total of 1,403 students from 44 programs responded. Results indicated that the food service…

  10. Covering Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Ryan; Wind, Andrew; Trevidi, Neema

    2000-01-01

    Presents four articles considering: (1) the media's role in the coverage of politics; (2) the influence of photography particularly in terms of the president; (3) an event where an Iowa student had a chance to work with professionals while covering politics; and (4) considering scholastic reporters covering national candidates as they learn and…

  11. Sky cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Jordan J.

    Of all of the standard meteorological parameters collected and observed daily, sky cover is not only one of the most complex, but the one that is fairly ambiguously defined and difficult to quantify. Despite that, the implications of how cloud fraction and sky cover are understood not only impact daily weather forecasts, but also present challenges to assessing the state of the earth's climate system. Part of the reason for this is the lack of observational methods for verifying the skill of clouds represented and parameterized in numerical models. While human observers record sky cover as part of routine duties, the spatial coverage of such observations in the United States is relatively sparse. There is greater spatial coverage of automated observations, and essentially complete coverage from geostationary weather satellites that observe the Americas. A good analysis of sky cover reconciles differences between manual observations, automated observations, and satellite observations, through an algorithm that accounts for the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset. This work describes the decision structure for trusting and weighting these similar observations. Some of the issues addressed include: human and instrument error resulting from approximations and estimations, a deficiency in high cloud detectability using surface-based ceilometers, poorly resolved low cloud using infrared channels on space-based radiometers during overnight hours, and decreased confidence in satellite-detected cloud during stray light periods. Using the blended sky cover analysis as the best representation of cloudiness, it is possible to compare the analysis to numerical model fields in order to assess the performance of the model and the parameterizations therein, as well as confirm or uncover additional relationships between sky cover and pertinent fields using an optimization methodology. The optimizer minimizes an affine expression of adjusted fields to the "truth" sky cover

  12. 21 CFR 880.6185 - Cast cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cast cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6185 Cast cover. (a) Identification. A...

  13. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  14. Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are great tools to improve soil quality and health, and great tools to increase carbon sequestration. They are nutrient management tools that can help scavenge nitrate, cycle nitrogen to the following crop, mine NO3 from groundwater, and increase nitrogen use efficiency of cropping syste...

  15. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  16. Foodservices at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Egmond-Pannell, Dorothy

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" provides an overview of the history, regulation, and administration of school lunch programs and related food services. The historical review discusses factors prompting federal intervention in food programs for school children and cites legislation mandating funding. The chapter then…

  17. Cover Picture.

    PubMed

    Krömer; Rios-Carreras; Fuhrmann; Musch; Wunderlin; Debaerdemaeker; Mena-Osteritz; Bäuerle

    2000-10-01

    The cover picture shows the synthesis of novel conjugated macrocycles assembled from oligothiophenes bearing terminal acetylene groups. Under pseudo-high-dilution conditions the oxidative cyclooligomerization first gives the oligothiophenediynes, the precursors to the new class of alpha-cyclo[n]thiophenes. The detailed structure of macrocycles with up to 76 ring members and cavities of up to 3 nm could be investigated by means of X-ray structure analysis, scanning tunneling microscopy, and quantum chemical calculations (see the molecular model top right). The novel rings combine the excellent electronic properties of the corresponding linearly conjugated oligomers with the possibility of complexing large organic guest molecules or other objects (the tower of the Cathedral at Ulm represents a nanometer-sized, rodlike entity), which should have new fundamental properties and applications. The background shows the image obtained by scanning electron microscopy of a self-assembled and perfectly ordered monolayer of macrocycles on a graphite surface. More on these fascinating nanometer-sized rings can be found in the communication by P. Bäuerle et al. on p. 3481 ff. PMID:11091367

  18. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  19. Reliability of the hospital nutrition environment scan for cafeterias, vending machines, and gift shops.

    PubMed

    Winston, Courtney P; Sallis, James F; Swartz, Michael D; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Peskin, Melissa F

    2013-08-01

    According to ecological models, the physical environment plays a major role in determining individual health behaviors. As such, researchers have started targeting the consumer nutrition environment of large-scale foodservice operations when implementing obesity-prevention programs. In 2010, the American Hospital Association released a call-to-action encouraging health care facilities to join in this movement and improve their facilities' consumer nutrition environments. The Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan (HNES) for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops was developed in 2011, and the present study evaluated the inter-rater reliability of this instrument. Two trained raters visited 39 hospitals in southern California and completed the HNES. Percent agreement, kappa statistics, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. Percent agreement between raters ranged from 74.4% to 100% and kappa statistics ranged from 0.458 to 1.0. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the overall nutrition composite scores was 0.961. Given these results, the HNES demonstrated acceptable reliability metrics and can now be disseminated to assess the current state of hospital consumer nutrition environments. PMID:23747171

  20. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  1. Data from a Validation Study of Reporting Accuracy over Multiple Recalls, and School Foodservice Production Records Provide Insight into the Origins of Intrusions (Reports of Uneaten Food Items) in Children’s Dietary Recalls

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, James W.; Royer, Julie A.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Smith, Albert F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Intrusions in dietary recalls may originate in confusion of episodic memories manifested as temporal dating errors. Objective Data from a validation study (concerning reporting accuracy over multiple recalls) and school foodservice production records were used to investigate origins of intrusions in school meals in children’s 24-hour recalls. Design/subjects/setting During the 1999–2000 school year, 104 fourth-grade children were observed eating school meals on one to three non-consecutive days separated by ≥25 days, and interviewed about the previous day’s intake in the morning on the day after each observation day. Statistical analyses performed For breakfast and lunch separately, logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of time (i.e., days) before the interview day on the probability that intrusions referred to items available in the school foodservice environment. Exploratory analyses were conducted for breakfast options observed and/or reported eaten. Results For interviews in which reported meals met criteria to be considered school meals and that contained intrusions, of 634 and 699 items reported eaten at breakfast and lunch, respectively, 394 and 331 were intrusions. Availability in the school foodservice environment of items referred to by intrusions in reports of lunch, but not breakfast, decreased as days increased before the interview day (P values=0.031 and 0.285, respectively). Concerning breakfast, children observed eating a cold option (i.e., ready-to-eat [RTE] cereal, milk, juice, crackers [graham; animal]) almost always reported a cold option, whereas children observed eating a hot option (i.e., non-RTE-cereal entrée [e.g., sausage biscuit], milk, fruit or juice) reported a cold option in approximately 50% of interviews. Conclusions In children’s 24-hour recalls, confusion of episodic memories contributes to intrusions in school lunch, and generic dietary information (e.g., cold option items available daily) or

  2. Hospital utilization and expenditures in a Medicaid population

    PubMed Central

    Buczko, William

    1989-01-01

    Determinants of hospital utilization and expenditures are analyzed for Medicaid enrollees in the State Medicaid household sample portion of the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey who were continuously enrolled throughout 1980. Health status measures were the best predictors of both the probability of hospitalization and total hospitalizations. Children covered by Aid to Families with Dependent Children were the Medicaid enrollees least likely to be hospitalized. Number of hospital days, surgery, and California residence directly increased hospital expenditures. Conditions responsible for hospitalization increased hospital expenditures indirectly by increasing the number of hospital days and the probability of surgery. PMID:10313353

  3. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  4. 42 CFR 424.126 - Payment to the hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment to the hospital. 424.126 Section 424.126... Foreign Country § 424.126 Payment to the hospital. (a) Conditions for payment. Medicare pays the hospital...) Reflects the hospital's intent to claim for all covered services furnished during a calendar year....

  5. Cover Your Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Cover Your Cough Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Posters only available as PDF files. Cover Your Cough, Flyer for Health Care Settings English [324 KB] ...

  6. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  7. Cover crops for Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are grown to benefit the following crop as well as to improve the soil, but they are normally not intended for harvest. Selecting the right cover crops for farming operations can improve yields, soil and water conservation and quality, and economic productivity. Properly managed cover ...

  8. Cover Crop Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential benefits of cover crops in vegetable production systems depend on the type of cover crop that is used and how it is managed from planting to termination date. This chapter focuses on management practices that are applicable to a broad range cover crops and vegetable production systems ...

  9. Detail view of radiator cover in front assembly room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of radiator cover in front assembly room - St. Elizabeths Hospital, Hagan Hall, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Southeast, 578-586 Redwood Street, Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. No place like the hospital.

    PubMed

    Gillick, Muriel R; Sabin, James E

    2011-10-01

    The gold standard for end-of-life care is home hospice. A case is presented in which a patient dying of irreversible small bowel obstruction from metastatic cancer insisted on remaining in the acute care hospital for care when alternative sites of care, including a skilled nursing facility and residential hospice, were available to her and covered by her health insurance plan. The ethical issues raised by this case are discussed from the perspective of the patient, the clinical team, the hospital, and the insurance company. Over the past decade, hospital-based palliative care consultation and general inpatient hospice care have sought to improve the quality of dying in the hospital. To the extent that such efforts have been successful, they may result in increasing demand for the hospital as the site for terminal care in the future. PMID:21889294

  11. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  12. Tamper resistant choke cover

    SciTech Connect

    Kneipkamp, L.E.

    1981-12-29

    A carburetor improvement is described for inhibiting tampering with a thermostatic choke coil after carburetor manufacture. A cover (3) fits over a choke coil housing (H) to enclose a choke lever, the thermostatic coil being mounted inside the cover. The cover has a circumferential flange (5) which abuts the outer surface of the housing, the flange having a notch (9) formed therein and the cover being rotatable about the outer surface of the housing to position one end of the coil relative to the choke lever. A retainer (7) locks the cover in a fixed position once the one end of the coil is located with respect to the choke lever. The retainer has a tab (11) insertable in the notch to prevent further rotation of the cover. A screw (15) having a detachable head (17) unremovably secures the retainer to the carburetor whereby once the retainer is secured, further movement of the cover is prevented.

  13. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  14. Oblique view of southeast and northeast sides with covered walk ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast and northeast sides with covered walk to Facility 367, Facility 324 beyond, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Hospital, Animal House, Near intersection of Hospital Way & Third Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 21 CFR 880.6190 - Mattress cover for medical purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mattress cover for medical purposes. 880.6190 Section 880.6190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6190 Mattress...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6190 - Mattress cover for medical purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mattress cover for medical purposes. 880.6190 Section 880.6190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  17. Available Equipment in School Foodservice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Kay

    This report provides data on the National Food Service Management Institute's multi-year research project that identified type, style, age, and condition of available food service equipment in K-12 schools nationwide. The study found that smaller schools, serving less than 400 lunches per day, had kitchens equipped with ranges, small…

  18. Armored Geomembrane Cover Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Foye, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Geomembranes are an important component of modern engineered barriers to prevent the infiltration of stormwater and runoff into contaminated soil and rock as well as waste containment facilities—a function generally described as a geomembrane cover. This paper presents a case history involving a novel implementation of a geomembrane cover system. Due to this novelty, the design engineers needed to assemble from disparate sources the design criteria for the engineering of the cover. This paper discusses the design methodologies assembled by the engineering team. This information will aid engineers designing similar cover systems as well as environmental and public health professionals selecting site improvements that involve infiltration barriers. PMID:21776229

  19. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described. PMID:17281875

  20. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  1. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  2. Silostop Bunker Covers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality of the seal provided by the plastic cover is a key issue for minimizing losses in bunker and pile silos. Most bunker covers are 6 to 8 mil polyethylene sheets held in place by tires or tire sidewalls. Frequently there are problems with spoilage at the shoulders (i.e., against the walls),...

  3. On the Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Kate F.

    2006-01-01

    This is a discussion with Judith Warren regarding her painting on the cover of the present issue of American Psychologist. To Warren, the painting on the cover of this issue, Pentimento, speaks to the interplay of spontaneity and intentionality in psychotherapy.

  4. Land Cover Trends Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acevedo, William

    2006-01-01

    The Land Cover Trends Project is designed to document the types, rates, causes, and consequences of land cover change from 1973 to 2000 within each of the 84 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Level III ecoregions that span the conterminous United States. The project's objectives are to: * Develop a comprehensive methodology using probability sampling and change analysis techniques and Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM), and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) data for estimating regional land cover change. * Characterize the spatial and temporal characteristics of conterminous U.S. land cover change for five periods from 1973 to 2000 (nominally 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). * Document the regional driving forces and consequences of change. * Prepare a national synthesis of land cover change.

  5. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  6. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  7. Evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

    PubMed

    Rock, Steve; Myers, Bill; Fiedler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, hazardous waste landfills, at industrial monofills, and at mine sites. Conventional cover systems use materials with low hydraulic permeability (barrier layers) to minimize the downward migration of water from the surface to the waste (percolation), ET cover systems use water balance components to minimize percolation. These cover systems rely on soil to capture and store precipitation until it is either transpired through vegetation or evaporated from the soil surface. Compared to conventional membrane or compacted clay cover systems, ET cover systems are expected to cost less to construct. They are often aesthetic because they employ naturalized vegetation, require less maintenance once the vegetative system is established, including eliminating mowing, and may require fewer repairs than a barrier system. All cover systems should consider the goals of the cover in terms of protectiveness, including the pathways of risk from contained material, the lifecycle of the containment system. The containment system needs to be protective of direct contact of people and animals with the waste, prevent surface and groundwater water pollution, and minimize release of airborne contaminants. While most containment strategies have been based on the dry tomb strategy of keeping waste dry, there are some sites where adding or allowing moisture to help decompose organic waste is the current plan. ET covers may work well in places where complete exclusion of precipitation is not needed. The U.S. EPA Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP), USDOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others have researched ET cover design and efficacy, including the history of their use, general considerations in their design, performance, monitoring, cost, current status, limitations on their use, and project specific examples. An on-line database has been developed with information

  8. Land Cover Characterization Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1997-01-01

    (2) identify sources, develop procedures, and organize partners to deliver data and information to meet user requirements. The LCCP builds on the heritage and success of previous USGS land use and land cover programs and projects. It will be compatible with current concepts of government operations, the changing needs of the land use and land cover data users, and the technological tools with which the data are applied.

  9. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  10. Curriculum Guide for Hospitality Education. Part I. Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalani, Henry

    A research project was designed to develop a hospitality education program model for Hawaii's community colleges. Primary data were gathered in a survey of the hospitality industry characteristics, manpower requirements, and training needs. This report of the project covers the following information: history and growth of the hospitality industry…

  11. Automatic cloud cover mapping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, J. P., III; Rosenfeld, A.

    1971-01-01

    A method of converting a picture into a 'cartoon' or 'map' whose regions correspond to differently textured regions is described. Texture edges in the picture are detected, and solid regions surrounded by these (usually broken) edges are 'colored in' using a propagation process. The resulting map is cleaned by comparing the region colors with the textures of the corresponding regions in the picture, and also by merging some regions with others according to criteria based on topology and size. The method has been applied to the construction of cloud cover maps from cloud cover pictures obtained by satellites.

  12. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  13. Instrument measures cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight solar sensing cells comprise inexpensive monitoring instrument. Four cells always track Sun while other four face sky and clouds. On overcast day, cloud-irradiance sensors generate as much short-circuit current as Sun sensor cells. As clouds disappear, output of cloud sensors decreases. Ratio of two sensor type outputs determines fractional cloud cover.

  14. Issue Cover (September 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Cover legend: Macrophages phagocytosing RFP-labeled E.coli. GFP-APPL2 labels the phagosomal membrane. Image produced by N. Condon. See Yeo et al. Traffic 2016; 17(9):1014-1026. Read the full article on doi:10.1111/tra.12415. PMID:27510703

  15. Success with cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an important tool for producers interested in improving soil and crop productivity. They help control erosion, improve soil quality, improve soil properties that impact water infiltration and conservation, provide habitat and food for beneficial insects, and provide food for wildlif...

  16. Issue Cover (June 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Cover legend: Yeast cells were labeled with the fluorescent viability dyes propidium iodide (Red) and DiBAC4(3) (green) and the nucleus was stained with DAPI (blue). Cells were visualized using wide-field fluorescent microscopy. See Chadwick et al. Traffic 2016; 17(6):689-703. Read the full article on doi:10.1111/tra.12391. PMID:27174376

  17. Covering All Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The day a school opens its doors for the first time, the flooring will be new and untarnished. When the flooring is in such pristine condition, many flooring materials--carpeting, vinyl, terrazzo, wood or some other surface--will look good. But school and university planners who decide what kind of material covers the floors of their facilities…

  18. Medicaid Expansion Affects Rural And Urban Hospitals Differently.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Brystana G; Reiter, Kristin L; Pink, George H; Holmes, George M

    2016-09-01

    Rural hospitals differ from urban hospitals in many ways. For example, rural hospitals are more reliant on public payers and have lower operating margins. In addition, enrollment in the health insurance Marketplaces of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has varied across rural and urban areas. This study employed a difference-in-differences approach to evaluate the average effect of Medicaid expansion in 2014 on payer mix and profitability for urban and rural hospitals, controlling for secular trends. For both types of hospitals, we found that Medicaid expansion was associated with increases in Medicaid-covered discharges. However, the increases in Medicaid revenue were greater among rural hospitals than urban hospitals, and the decrease in the proportion of costs for uncompensated care were greater among urban hospitals than rural hospitals. This preliminary analysis of the early effects of Medicaid expansion suggests that its financial impacts may be different for hospitals in urban and rural locations. PMID:27605649

  19. Issue Cover (July 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Cover legend: N-cadherin clusters colocalize with Rab5 at the macropinosomes. Confocal microscopy image of an Ncad-GFP (green) transfected COS7 cell fed with fluorescent-dextran to label macropinosomes (blue) followed by immunofluorescence staining of Rab5 (red) and the nucleus (cyan). See Wen et al. Traffic 2016; 17(7):769-785. Read the full article on doi: 10.1111/tra.12402. PMID:27297702

  20. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  1. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  2. Issue Cover (August 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Cover legend: Absence of the novel endolysosomal trafficking regulator WDR81 (green) induces the accumulation of tetherin (red) in enlarged early endosomes. WDR81 knock-out HeLa cells were genetically complemented with an HA-tagged WDR81 construct and imaged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. The original image was processed with photo editing software and overlaid with artistic effects. See Rapiteanu et al. Traffic 2016; 17(8):940-958. Read the full article on doi: 10.1111/tra.12409. PMID:27412792

  3. Issue Cover (May 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Cover legend: Distribution of organelles that bound TYRP1-FKBP-mCherry (red) and mitochondria revealed with MitoTracker Deep Red dye (green) in the cytoplasm of a Xenopus melanophore. Rezaul et al. show TYRP1-FKBP-mCherry specifically binds to pigment granules and in the presence of rapalog recruits exogenous microtubule motor protein kinesin-1-EGFP-FRB, which changes net direction of granule movement. See Rezaul et al Traffic 2016; 17(5):475-486. Read the full article on doi:10.1111/tra.12385. PMID:27093334

  4. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  5. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  6. [Hospital comparison--status quo and prospects].

    PubMed

    Betzler, M; Haun, P

    1998-12-01

    Hospitals are competing with each other for the limited financial resources available in the health care sector. Comparison of hospitals is legally required (BPf1V section 5) to improve financial efficiency in the health care sector and make competition between hospitals keener, while also objectivizing it. If comparison of the hospitals is really to enhance profitability or efficiency, and not just to reduce the prices for hospital stays regardless of quality, it must extend to far more than the global figures in the compilation summarizing performance and calculation and the hospital statistics (no. of cases, days of care, length of stay, case lump sums and special fees). Documentation of particular features of the patient population, the potentials of the hospital and description of the treatment processes yield valuable information on capacity and performance level. With rising costs, the danger is growing that the quality and risk dimension of the actual medical treatment will not be promoted with the same enthusiasm by those offering the service. Hospital audit does not only allow a check on the hospital's own situation with regard to performance, quality, efficiency and patient satisfaction, but can also provide a basis of structural planning. The fact is that all efforts made and steps taken by the responsible persons in the hospital to improve the quality of structures, processes and results can only be successful if they are also perceived by the patients, the doctors who refer them and the visitors. If hospital audit is restricted to the bed occupancy and the invoicing data, it is only realistic to expect cuts in performance level. This would be bad for the patient and, in view of the consequent costs, also for the overall costs in the health care sector. Against the backdrop of a future performance-related system of remuneration instead of the principle of covering one's own costs that has been in place hitherto, openness about treatment results gains

  7. Are You a Hospital Inpatient or Outpatient? If You have Medicare -- Ask!

    MedlinePlus

    ... care you get in a skilled nursing facility (SNF) following your hospital stay. • You’re an inpatient ... covers my care in a skilled nursing facility (SNF)? Medicare will only cover care you get in ...

  8. VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of municipal ahd hazardous waste in the United States is primarily accomplished by containment in lined and capped landfills. Evapotranspiration cover systems offer an alternative to conventional landfill cap systems. These covers work on completely different principles ...

  9. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  10. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  11. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  12. Japanese hospitals--culture and competition: a study of ten hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anbäcken, O

    1994-01-01

    Japanese health care is characterized by a pluralistic system with a high degree of private producers. Central government regulates the prices and the financing system. All citizens are covered by a mandatory employment-based health insurance operating on a non-profit basis. The consumer has a free choice of physician and hospital. A comparison between Japan, Sweden and some other countries shows significant dissimilarities in the length of stay, number of treatments per hospital bed and year and the staffing of hospitals. About 80 per cent of the hospitals and 94 per cent of the clinics are privately owned. The typical private hospital owned by a physician has less than 100 beds. In this paper, data collected (1992/93) in an empirical study of Japanese hospitals and their leadership is presented. Also discussed are the hospitals' style of management, tools and strategies for competition and competences--personal and formal skills required of the leadership in the hospital. There follows a study of ten hospitals, among which hospital directors and chief physicians were interviewed. Interviews are also made with key persons in the Ministry of Health and Welfare and other organizations in the health care field. The result is also analysed from a cultural perspective--'what kind of impact does the Japanese culture have on the health care organization?' and/or 'what kind of sub-culture is developed in the Japanese hospitals'. Some comparisons are made with Sweden, USA, Canada and Germany. The different roles of the professions in the hospital are included in the study as well as the incentives for different kinds of strategies--specialization, growing in size, investments in new equipment, different kind of ownership and hospitals. Another issue discussed is the attempt to uncover whether there is an implicit distribution of specialties--silent agreements between hospitals, etc. PMID:10137135

  13. Cover crops and N credits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops often provide many short- and long-term benefits to cropping systems. Legume cover crops can significantly reduce the N fertilizer requirement of non-legume cash crops that follow. The objectives of this presentation were to: I) educate stakeholders about the potential benefits of cover ...

  14. Impact of Critical Access Hospital Conversion on Beneficiary Liability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Boyd H.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While the Medicare Critical Access Hospital (CAH) program has improved the financial viability of small rural hospitals and enhanced access to care in rural communities, the program puts beneficiaries at risk for paying a larger share of the cost of services covered under the Medicare part B benefit. Purpose: This paper examines the…

  15. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41 087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57 622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27 732 and 44 142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13 204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177 141); craniotomy (rupees 75 982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53 398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  16. Hospital and patient characteristics of uncompensated hospital care: policy implications.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Chu, D K; MacBeth, C A; Sechrist, M E

    1989-01-01

    For this study, a sample of 1,689 patients classified as "charity" and "bad debt" cases in 1986 were identified from 27 general acute care hospitals and one tertiary hospital in Indiana. Half of the hospitals were in rural areas and 57 percent were small (less than 150 beds). Most of the patients (87.2 percent) incurred uncompensated amounts under $2,500, and 40 percent of the cases were below $500. About 72 percent of the patients with uncompensated care were from the same county as the location of the hospital (range from 30.9% to 100.0%). The majority of the cases (79.4 percent) with over $5,000 in uncompensated care were treated in urban hospitals. The average age of these patients was 27.2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients were single, 60.7 percent were female, and nearly all (83.0 percent) were discharged to home care. Only 44.6 percent of the patients with uncompensated care had no insurance; 46.8 percent had some form of commercial insurance which covered part of the charges for care. The most common diagnosis for these patients was pregnancy and childbirth (22.8 percent), with injury and poisoning second (10.7 percent). The cases with $5,000 or more in bad debt (about 4 percent of the cases) account for 28.3 percent of the total uncollected amount. Bad debt represents a cost of doing business. Any national effort to contain health care costs must address this problem. PMID:2738351

  17. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  18. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  19. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  20. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  1. Judging Books by Their Covers: A Cover Art Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    A group of 21 young adults (11-17) were asked to rate books by their cover art only and write explanations for their ratings. Discusses ratings and their rationales and concludes that the participants expected a cover to give them an idea of what a story was about. Includes a list of the books evaluated. (PEN)

  2. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  3. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  4. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  5. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting the help you need, consider hiring a medical-billing advocate. Advocates charge an hourly fee or a ... American Hospital Association. Hospital Billing and Collection ... 15, 2015. Family Doctor.org. Understanding your Medical Bills. ...

  6. Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

  7. Satisfactions and dissatisfactions with public and private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chetwynd, S J

    1988-09-14

    A fully national sample of 1255 people were questioned about their degree of satisfaction with hospital care in New Zealand. Questions covered both public and private hospitals and concerned actual experience of care as well as general attitudes to that care. Almost half the sample (49%) rated public hospital care as "excellent" or "very good", and a similar proportion (48%) assigned those grades to private hospitals. Only 7% of the sample rated public hospital care as "poor" or "very poor" and only 1% rated private hospitals in this way. Major reasons for satisfaction with public hospital care were the high standard of nursing care (41% of sample), the high qualifications of staff (34%) and the availability of appropriate equipment for emergencies (17%). The most common complaints were that hospitals are short-staffed/overworked (15%) and there are long waiting lists (14%). Reasons for satisfaction with private hospital care were no waiting (26%), good standard of care (20%) and good hotel facilities (14%). In general, both public and private hospitals were highly regarded. Dissatisfaction with public hospitals was most evident amongst younger, working people and amongst those in the north and central regions. Dunedin respondents were more satisfied with their hospital care than those in other parts of the country. PMID:3419682

  8. Cover crops and vegetable rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have long known that winter cover crops can decrease soil erosion, increase soil organic matter and fertility, and provide a beneficial impact on the following crop, but it is not always known which cover crop will provide the best results for a specific region and cropping system. Research...

  9. Midwest Cover Crops Field Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers who want to prevent soil erosion, improve nutrient cycling, sustain their soils, and protect/maintain the environment have been returning to a very old practice: planting cover crops. Cover crops are effective tools for reducing soil erosion and increasing nutrient recycling on farmlands, ...

  10. High plains cover crop research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. Those stated benefits have included greatly reduced water use, enhanced soil microbiological activity, increased biomass productivity, and enhanced wa...

  11. Set covering, partition and packing

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, B.L.; Baca, L.S.

    1984-03-01

    Set covering problems are known to be solvable by Boolean algebraic methods. This report shows that set partition and set packing problems can be solved by the same algebraic methods because these problems can be converted into covering problems. Many applications are possible including security patrol assignment which is used as an example.

  12. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  13. Automatic design of magazine covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanian, Ali; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel R.; Lin, Qian; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Lee, Seungyon; Fan, Jian; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a system for automatic design of magazine covers that quantifies a number of concepts from art and aesthetics. Our solution to automatic design of this type of media has been shaped by input from professional designers, magazine art directors and editorial boards, and journalists. Consequently, a number of principles in design and rules in designing magazine covers are delineated. Several techniques are derived and employed in order to quantify and implement these principles and rules in the format of a software framework. At this stage, our framework divides the task of design into three main modules: layout of magazine cover elements, choice of color for masthead and cover lines, and typography of cover lines. Feedback from professional designers on our designs suggests that our results are congruent with their intuition.

  14. 42 CFR 403.321 - State systems for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State systems for hospital outpatient services. 403... Control Systems § 403.321 State systems for hospital outpatient services. CMS may approve a State's..., projections for the first 12-month period covered by the assurance for each hospital, in both the...

  15. 42 CFR 416.75 - Performance of listed surgical procedures on an inpatient hospital basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient hospital basis. 416.75 Section 416.75 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... on an inpatient hospital basis. The inclusion of any procedure as a covered surgical procedure under § 416.65 does not preclude its coverage in an inpatient hospital setting under Medicare....

  16. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  17. LANDFILL CONTAINMENT AND COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its research and field experiences has developed control strategies for hazardous and municipal solid waste landfills and surface impoundments. hese control strategies include liner and cover systems. he liner systems include doubl...

  18. Land-cover change detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Xuexia; Giri, Chandra; Vogelmann, James

    2012-01-01

    Land cover is the biophysical material on the surface of the earth. Land-cover types include grass, shrubs, trees, barren, water, and man-made features. Land cover changes continuously.  The rate of change can be either dramatic and abrupt, such as the changes caused by logging, hurricanes and fire, or subtle and gradual, such as regeneration of forests and damage caused by insects (Verbesselt et al., 2001).  Previous studies have shown that land cover has changed dramatically during the past sevearal centuries and that these changes have severely affected our ecosystems (Foody, 2010; Lambin et al., 2001). Lambin and Strahlers (1994b) summarized five types of cause for land-cover changes: (1) long-term natural changes in climate conditions, (2) geomorphological and ecological processes, (3) human-induced alterations of vegetation cover and landscapes, (4) interannual climate variability, and (5) human-induced greenhouse effect.  Tools and techniques are needed to detect, describe, and predict these changes to facilitate sustainable management of natural resources.

  19. The Relationship Between Self-Rated Health and Hospital Records.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) covaries with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Ageing with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995 to 2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current, and future hospital records. I use both measures separately to control for health in a regression of mortality on wealth. Using only historical and current hospitalization controls for health yields the common result that SRH is a stronger predictor of mortality than objective health measures. The addition of future hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that with a sufficiently long time series of individual records, objective health measures can predict mortality to the same extent as global self-rated measures. PMID:25702929

  20. [110 years--University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom"].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V

    2014-01-01

    The first specialized Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital in Bulgaria was founded based on the idea of Queen Maria Luisa (1883). Construction began in 1896 and the official opening of the hospital took place on November 19, 1903. What is unique about the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom" is above all the fact that the Bulgarian school of obstetrics and gynecology was founded within its institution. Currently, the hospital has nearly 400 beds and 600 employees who work at nine clinics and six laboratories, covering the entire spectrum of obstetric and gynecological activities. Its leading specialists still continue to embody the highest level of professionalism and dedication. The future development of the hospital is chiefly associated with the renovation of facilities, resources and equipment and with the enhancement of the professional competence of the staff and of the quality of hospital products to improve the health and satisfaction of the patients. PMID:24919335

  1. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  2. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  3. Thermal properties for vegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksyutina, D.; Motenko, R.

    2011-12-01

    Different samples of undisturbed vegetation cover were studied under laboratory conditions. Samples were collected from New Chara city, north of the Chita region. Vegetation cover in this area is represented by moss, lichen and tussock growth. Thermal properties were investigated by the I-st type regular mode method (a-calorimeter), the freezing temperature was studied by cryoscopic methods. The dry density of sampled specimens varies from 0.04 to 0.24 g/cm3, and humidity varies from 250 to 375 percent. The freezing temperature depends on moisture content and varies from -0.2 to 0 degrees centigrade. The vegetation cover had low thermal conductivities which varies from 0.05 to 0.46 W/(m*K) in unfrozen conditions, and from 0.07 to 1.14 W/(m*K) in frozen conditions, according to density and moisture content. Diffusivity of samples varies from 0.073*10-6 to 0.114*10-6 m2/s in thawed conditions, and from 0.174*10-6 to 0.584*10-6 m2/s in frozen conditions. The sod (bottom of vegetation cover) had relatively high thermal properties. Thermal properties of vegetation cover and peat (turf) were compared. The thermal conductivity of peat was much higher than thermal conductivity of vegetation cover. This data may be used for modeling of the thickness of the seasonally thawed layer and ground temperature variation. The knowledge of thermal properties of these samples allows us to view vegetation cover as a separate layer of geological section.

  4. MODIS Snow-Cover Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Salomonson, Vinvent V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo; Bayr, Klaus J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On December 18, 1999, the Terra satellite was launched with a complement of five instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Many geophysical products are derived from MODIS data including global snow-cover products. These products have been available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) since September 13, 2000. MODIS snow-cover products represent potential improvement to the currently available operation products mainly because the MODIS products are global and 500-m resolution, and have the capability to separate most snow and clouds. Also the snow-mapping algorithms are automated which means that a consistent data set is generated for long-term climates studies that require snow-cover information. Extensive quality assurance (QA) information is stored with the product. The snow product suite starts with a 500-m resolution swath snow-cover map which is gridded to the Integerized Sinusoidal Grid to produce daily and eight-day composite tile products. The sequence then proceeds to a climate-modeling grid product at 5-km spatial resolution, with both daily and eight-day composite products. A case study from March 6, 2000, involving MODIS data and field and aircraft measurements, is presented. Near-term enhancements include daily snow albedo and fractional snow cover.

  5. Audit to Target Food-Service Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's plan to look closely at whether the food-service-management companies running many school cafeterias are passing along all the discounts and rebates they receive from their suppliers to the districts that hire them. The plan to probe companies will begin in August, said Alison Decker, a…

  6. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Foodservice Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document of skill standards for the food service cluster serves as a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. These 41 occupational skill standards describe what people should know and be able to do in an…

  7. Foodservice. Subject Matter Update 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This publication recognizes the constantly changing requirements of the food service industry and varying conditions for employment opportunities. It addresses the goal of relevance in education by enabling the educator to make timely adjustments in the subject matter of the food service curriculum. There are six sections in this publication, each…

  8. Foodservice Cluster Brief. [Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Pauline

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational education food service training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The…

  9. The National Land Cover Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homer, Collin H.; Fry, Joyce A.; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) serves as the definitive Landsat-based, 30-meter resolution, land cover database for the Nation. NLCD provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface such as thematic class (for example, urban, agriculture, and forest), percent impervious surface, and percent tree canopy cover. NLCD supports a wide variety of Federal, State, local, and nongovernmental applications that seek to assess ecosystem status and health, understand the spatial patterns of biodiversity, predict effects of climate change, and develop land management policy. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey. All NLCD data products are available for download at no charge to the public from the MRLC Web site: http://www.mrlc.gov.

  10. MODIS Snow-Cover Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; DiGirolamo, Nicole E.; Bayr, Klaus J.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On December 18, 1999, the Terra satellite was launched with a complement of five instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Many geophysical products are derived from MODIS data including global snow-cover products. MODIS snow and ice products have been available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) since September 13, 2000. MODIS snow-cover products represent potential improvement to or enhancement of the currently-available operational products mainly because the MODIS products are global and 500-m resolution, and have the capability to separate most snow and clouds. Also the snow-mapping algorithms are automated which means that a consistent data set may be generated for long-term climate studies that require snow-cover information. Extensive quality assurance (QA) information is stored with the products. The MODIS snow product suite begins with a 500-m resolution, 2330-km swath snow-cover map which is then gridded to an integerized sinusoidal grid to produce daily and 8-day composite tile products. The sequence proceeds to a climate-modeling grid (CMG) product at about 5.6-km spatial resolution, with both daily and 8-day composite products. Each pixel of the CMG contains fraction of snow cover from 40 - 100%. Measured errors of commission in the CMG are low, for example, on the continent of Australia in the spring, they vary from 0.02 - 0.10%. Near-term enhancements include daily snow albedo and fractional snow cover. A case study from March 6, 2000, involving MODIS data and field and aircraft measurements, is presented to show some early validation work.

  11. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  12. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  13. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  14. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  15. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  16. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  17. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  18. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  19. Hospital-sponsored primary care: I. Organizational and financial effects.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Wickizer, T M; Wheeler, J R

    1984-01-01

    Findings are presented from a seven-year (1976-83) evaluation of the Community Hospital Program (CHP), a national demonstration program sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assist 54 community hospitals in improving the organization of access to primary care. Upon grant expiration, 66 per cent of hospital-sponsored group practices continued under some form of hospital sponsorship; over 90 per cent developed or were planning to develop spin-off programs; and new physicians were recruited and retained in the community. About 9 per cent of hospital admissions were accounted for by group physicians and grantee hospitals experienced a greater annual increase in their market share of admissions than competing hospitals in the area. While only three of the groups generated sufficient revenue to cover expenses during the grant period, 21 additional groups broke even during the first post-grant year. Productivity and cost per visit compared favorably with most other forms of care. Hospitalization rates from the hospital-sponsored practices were somewhat lower than those for other forms of care. Medical director leadership and involvement and the organization design of the practice were among several key factors associated with higher performing practices. The ability of such joint hospital-physician ventures to meet the needs of the poor and elderly in a time of Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks is discussed along with suggestions for targeting future initiatives in primary care. PMID:6742268

  20. Hospital efficiency and debt.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick Michael; Rosko, Michael D; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Hospitals rely heavily on debt financing to fund major capital investments. Hospital efficiency is at least partly determined by the amount and quality of plant and equipment it uses. As such, a hospital's access to debt and credit rating may be related to its efficiency. This study explores this relationship using a broad sample of hospitals and associated bond issuance histories. Employing stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), we measure cost inefficiency to gauge the impact of debt issuance and debt rating. We find that hospitals with recent bond issues were less inefficient. Although we do not find a perfectly linear relationship between debt rating and inefficiency, we have evidence that hints at such a relation. Finally, we find an increase in inefficiency in the years following bond issues, consistent with the possibility of a debt death spiral. PMID:21110482

  1. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  2. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  3. Cover times of random searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël

    2015-10-01

    How long must one undertake a random search to visit all sites of a given domain? This time, known as the cover time, is a key observable to quantify the efficiency of exhaustive searches, which require a complete exploration of an area and not only the discovery of a single target. Examples range from immune-system cells chasing pathogens to animals harvesting resources, from robotic exploration for cleaning or demining to the task of improving search algorithms. Despite its broad relevance, the cover time has remained elusive and so far explicit results have been scarce and mostly limited to regular random walks. Here we determine the full distribution of the cover time for a broad range of random search processes, including Lévy strategies, intermittent strategies, persistent random walks and random walks on complex networks, and reveal its universal features. We show that for all these examples the mean cover time can be minimized, and that the corresponding optimal strategies also minimize the mean search time for a single target, unambiguously pointing towards their robustness.

  4. ESTIMATING AND PROJECTING IMPERVIOUS COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective methods to estimate and project impervious cover can help identify areas where a watershed is at risk of changing rapidly from one with relatively pristine streams to one with streams with significant symptoms of degradation. In collaboration with the USEPA, Region 4, ...

  5. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  6. Release of information: are hospitals taking a hit?

    PubMed

    Bellenghi, G Michael; Coffey, Bonnie; Fournier, Joseph E; McDavid, Jan P

    2008-11-01

    Outsourcing release-of-information requests helps hospitals alleviate administrative and compliance burdens and expense. Recently, state lawmakers have begun to draft legislation reducing the maximum fee that may be charged for copies of electronically stored records. The reduced fees may not cover expenses. If such legislation makes it difficult for outsourcing companies to make a profit from this service, hospitals ultimately could bear the expense and risk. PMID:18990845

  7. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  8. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  9. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  10. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  11. Coney Island Hospital focuses on healthcare for ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    Since its beginnings as a first aid station on the famous New York beach, Coney Island Hospital has evolved as a well-known public hospital serving a multi-cultural community. Part of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corp. it has made extensive efforts to provide "ethnically correct" services to all of its constituents. These measures have been covered by National Public Radio and recognized as a "best practices" example by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Profile's article offers insights about how it's done and how it is publicized, including what its associate director calls "ethnic marketing on the cheap." PMID:11552591

  12. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J. C.; Berg, L. K.; Flynn, C.; Long, C. N.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  13. Stripline dipole with dielectric covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hansen, V.

    The use of stripline antennas has greatly increased during the last ten years. In connection with an employment of the antennas, it is often necessary to provide an additional dielectric covering layer to protect the antenna against atmospheric conditions. Water or ice layers can also be described as dielectric layers. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of such additional layers on the radiation characteristics of stripline dipoles. A description is presented of a procedure for the calculation of all important antenna characteristics, taking into account current distribution, input impedance, radiation characteristics, the excitation of surface waves, and aspects of coupling. With the aid of a number of examples it is shown that even a thin covering layer can have a pronounced effect. Such layers can, therefore, also be employed to modify the antenna radiation characteristics to improve their suitability for a given application.

  14. Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  15. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  16. Covers by polars of arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Eaves, B.C. . Systems Optimization Lab.); Hoffman, A.J. )

    1990-08-01

    For a collection of hyperplanes passing through the origin in euclidean space let S be the induced subdivision. Let T be the collection of polars of the full cells of S. If only the origin lies in all hyperplanes, T forms a {kappa} {approximately} fold cover of euclidean space. If, in addition, the collection of hyperplanes is of size m and is regular, then {kappa} is m {minus} 1 choose n {minus} 1. Other similar results relate to spheres, hemispheres, and linear programming.

  17. Covering and Reimbursing Telehealth Services.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers who are striving to achieve better health care, improved health outcomes and lower costs are considering new strategies and technologies. Telehealth is a tool that uses technology to provide health services remotely, and state leaders are looking to it now more than ever as a way to address workforce gaps and reach underserved patients. Among the challenges facing state lawmakers who are working to introduce or expand telehealth is how to handle covering patients and reimbursing providers. PMID:27032126

  18. Does health plan generosity enhance hospital market power?

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P

    2015-12-01

    We test whether the generosity of employer-sponsored health insurance facilitates the exercise of market power by hospitals. We construct indices of health plan generosity and the price and volume of hospital services using data from Truven MarketScan for 601 counties from 2001 to 2007. We use variation in the industry and union status of covered workers within a county over time to identify the causal effects of generosity. Although OLS estimates fail to reject the hypothesis that generosity facilitates the exercise of hospital market power, IV estimates show a statistically significant and economically important positive effect of plan generosity on hospital prices in uncompetitive markets, but not in competitive markets. Our results suggest that most of the aggregate effect of hospital market structure on prices found in previous work may be coming from areas with generous plans. PMID:26402570

  19. Not-for-profit hospitals fight tax-exempt challenges.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1990-10-20

    The message being sent by local tax boards, state agencies, and the Internal Revenue Service is clear: Not-for-profit hospitals will have to justify their tax-exempt status. But complying with this demand can be a costly administrative burden. Just ask the executives who have been through the experience. CEO Richard Anderson, of St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, PA, is luckier than some executives who have faced tax-exempt challenges. He won his hospital's case. But he still faces a yearly battle: The hospital must prove its compliance annually to the county board of assessors. Other executives report similar experiences. Our cover story takes an in-depth look at how administrators faced challenges to their hospital's tax status and what they learned about their relationship with their communities, as well as a complete state and federal legislative outlook for future developments. PMID:2227856

  20. [Ryazan hospital--80 years].

    PubMed

    Klimov, A S; Gromov, M F

    2012-02-01

    In December 2011 marked 80 years of the founding of the Ryazan garrison hospital, originally housed in two buildings: "Redut housed"--a monument of architecture of the XVIII century and the former almshouses room "for the maimed in the war", was built in 1884 now Ryazan garrison hospital (from 2010--Branch No 6 FSI "in 1586 the district military hospital in the Western Military District", the Defense Ministry of Russia)--a multi-field medical preventive institution on the basis of which soldiers, military retirees, family members and military retirees from Ryazan, Moscow, Tambov regions are treated. Every year more than 7 thousand patients get treatment here. During the counterterrorism operations in Chechnya over 800 wounded were brought to the hospital from the battle area. PMID:22558855

  1. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know whether your hospital charged a fair price. There are some web sites you can use ... zip code to find an average or estimated price in your area. www.healthcarebluebook.com www.fairhealth. ...

  2. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  3. Hospital financing in Norway.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, F

    1994-05-01

    The Norwegian block grant reform of 1980 replaced state reimbursements to hospitals by block grants allocated to counties according to objective criteria. The reform was accompanied by a general decentralization of budget authority to local level. The reform aimed to promote primary care, equalize the supply of health care across regions and give counties incentives to improve hospital efficiency. A decade later, the reform was reversed. The government has imposed restrictions which reduce the budget discretion of the counties and part of the block grant has been made dependent on the performance of the hospitals in the counties. The government has also issued a 'waiting-list guarantee' which states that patients who suffer from a serious disease are entitled to medical treatment within six months. This paper provides an overview of hospital financing in Norway during the last two decades and discusses why the block grant system did not fulfil the expectations of its architects. PMID:10136059

  4. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  5. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  6. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  7. Management of Feedyard Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fox, J T

    2015-11-01

    There are many considerations when managing feedyard hospitals. The type of hospital system must fit the facility design, the type of cattle fed at the feedyard, the crew that is employed by the feedyard, and the protocol established by the veterinarian. Ensuring the animals are well-cared for and have their basic needs met should be the priority of the feedyard personnel and the veterinarian maintaining the veterinarian-client-patient relationship with the feedyard. PMID:26210766

  8. ["Working together" at hospital?].

    PubMed

    Divay, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Working well together at hospital depends on several factors, on the level of a team as well as that of the ministry in charge of health. How can we encourage and promote cooperation between caregivers? If the hospital is the reflection of society as a whole, an analysis of the functioning of this universe provides a better understanding of the challenges and the missions of each player for the benefit of the patient. PMID:26144821

  9. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  10. Hospital air is sick.

    PubMed

    Brownson, K

    2000-11-01

    Indoor air quality has deteriorated so much since the 1970s oil shortage and subsequent energy-efficient construction of buildings that people are becoming seriously ill by just breathing the indoor air. This is a problem with all industrial buildings and hospital staff are at particular risk. There are various things that hospital managers from different departments can do to make the air safe for staff and patients to breathe. PMID:11185833

  11. Hospital accreditation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C

    1998-01-01

    Health service accreditation systems have explicit standards for organisation against which the participating hospital assesses itself before a structured visit by outside "surveyors". They submit a written report back to the hospital with commendations and recommendations for development prior to a follow-up survey. Accreditation may be awarded for a fixed term or may be with held by an independent assessment Board if the hospital does not meet a defined threshold of standards. In Europe, some government and medical organisations initially distanced themselves from the pilot hospital wide programmes, arguing that they would cost too much and undermine management, or that they were irrelevant to clinical practice. But gradually it became obvious that accreditation worked for hospitals; purchasers and insurers saw its potential for quality and resource management; and professional bodies recognised the links between clinical training, practice and outcome and the environment in which health care is provided. If nothing else, it offered a multi-professional bridge between the existing numerous fragmented systems such as inspecting (statutory safety), visiting (professional training), and monitoring (service contracts). The introduction of accreditation appears to benefit hospitals in many different countries and health systems and provides a vehicle for integrated quality management which is visible to funding agencies, government and the public. Interest is growing within Europe. PMID:10179643

  12. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  13. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk. PMID:18087914

  14. 46 CFR 171.117 - Dead covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead covers. 171.117 Section 171.117 Shipping COAST... Dead covers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each port light with the sill located below the margin line must have a hinged, inside dead cover. (b) The dead cover on a port...

  15. 7 CFR 319.8-10 - Covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Covers. 319.8-10 Section 319.8-10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Foreign Cotton and Covers Conditions of Importation and Entry of Cotton and Covers § 319.8-10 Covers....

  16. Hospital pharmacy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bachynsky, J A

    1980-04-01

    The status of Canadian hospital pharmacy and the impact of national hospital insurance on its development are discussed. The provision of health care services for Canadians is shared by the federal and provincial governments. The federal government enacts protective and regulatory legislation, compiles health statistics, promotes research, and provides direct health care for those citizens for whom it is directly responsible. Each province is responsible for hospitals, the education and training of health care professionals, public health, and the financing and administration of health insurance for all its citizens. Largely because of line-item budget allocations and a bureaucratic tendency to equalize services for the whole population, funds for existing pharmaceutical services have been assured but the introduction of upgraded or innovative programs has been difficult to achieve. The result has been an even quality of health care services, including pharmacy, throughout the country and a deficiency in clinical pharmacy programs and the trained personnel to run them. The last decade has brought advances, however, as allocation methods have changed and both hospital and insurance administrators have recognized the patient benefits and cost effectiveness of many of the newer pharmacy programs. The main challenges facing Canadian hospital pharmacy are to upgrade clinical services and education and to improve managerial and bureaucratic competence among department directors. PMID:7377213

  17. Measuring community hospital service in Michigan.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, J R; Restuccia, J D; Tedeschi, P J; Wilson, P A; Zuckerman, H S

    1981-01-01

    Using discharge abstracts from Michigan hospitals, we divided the state into hospital use communities with measured populations. We constructed population-based rates measuring use, cost, and some aspects of quality. The results cover 54 communities comprising 90 percent of the Michigan population and ranging in size from Detroit (population 600,000) to very small (population less than 25,000) communities. Age-adjusted patient days per 1,000 population, length of stay, cost per person per year, hospitalization rates for surgery, trauma and vascular disease, and childbirth problems show large variations, generally ranging from 2 to 1. High values usually are positively associated with each other and with population size. Patient days per 1,000 (mean 1,114, range 600-1,700) and cost per person(mean +223, range +110-+290) are distributed such that almost 75 percent of communities are below the mean. We believe this information will be useful to community hospital trustees, physicians, and administrators. PMID:7263271

  18. Hospitals as interpretation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J B; McDaniel, R R; Anderson, R A

    1991-01-01

    In this study of 162 hospitals, it was found that the chief executive officer's (CEO's) interpretation of strategic issues is related to the existing hospital strategy and the hospital's information processing structure. Strategy was related to interpretation in terms of the extent to which a given strategic issue was perceived as controllable or uncontrollable. Structure was related to the extent to which an issue was defined as positive or negative, was labeled as controllable or uncontrollable, and was perceived as leading to a gain or a loss. Together, strategy and structure accounted for a significant part of the variance in CEO interpretations of strategic events. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1991677

  19. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Glenn A; Fonkych, Katya

    2016-01-01

    A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission) across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113%) than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%). Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission). By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country. PMID:27284126

  20. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations. PMID:15982957

  1. Methods for Cloud Cover Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Huning, J. R.; Smith, J. H.; Logan, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods for cloud cover estimation are described relevant to assessing the performance of a ground-based network of solar observatories. The methods rely on ground and satellite data sources and provide meteorological or climatological information. One means of acquiring long-term observations of solar oscillations is the establishment of a ground-based network of solar observatories. Criteria for station site selection are: gross cloudiness, accurate transparency information, and seeing. Alternative methods for computing this duty cycle are discussed. The cycle, or alternatively a time history of solar visibility from the network, can then be input to a model to determine the effect of duty cycle on derived solar seismology parameters. Cloudiness from space is studied to examine various means by which the duty cycle might be computed. Cloudiness, and to some extent transparency, can potentially be estimated from satellite data.

  2. The influence of hospital integration on hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang K; Stoskopf, Carleen H; Glover, Saundra H; Park, Eun C

    2004-01-01

    A clinical and functional integration strategy has a positive influence on increasing hospital revenue, and a solely functional integration strategy has a negative influence on increasing hospital expenses. Functional integration and clinical/functional integration strategies have a positive influence on hospital profit and the overall operations of the hospital. The mechanism of influence differs, however, based on the strategy used. Clinical/functional strategy has an impact on increasing hospital revenue, while functional integration strategy has an impact on reducing hospital expenses. Overall, the study shows that a functional integration strategy is more profitable than a clinical/functional integration strategy. PMID:15816230

  3. Hospital structure and consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, G V

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and patient satisfaction with hospital care. Teaching hospitals and private hospitals were expected to receive higher ratings of patient satisfaction than were nonteaching and government-controlled hospitals, because they generally are reputed to be technologically superior. Results show that, in general, most patients are satisfied with their hospital stays, but they are clearly more dissatisfied with their stays in teaching hospitals. Although a number of other correlates of patient satisfaction with the hospital stay are identified, no measure succeeds in reducing to insignificance the strong relationship between teaching status and dissatisfaction. Some suggestions are made as to why teaching hospital receive relatively poor evaluations from their patients. PMID:7228714

  4. Introduction to hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Vegoda, P R

    1987-01-01

    The phrase, 'hospital information system', is frequently used in discussions about the flow of information throughout a hospital with the assumption that everybody has the same concept in mind. Closer examination shows that this is not necessarily the case. The author draws on his experience as the Chief Information Officer at University Hospital at Stony Brook to define a hospital information system in terms of the implementation at Stony Brook. The University Hospital Information System at University Hospital (UHIS), has received international acclaim and was recently selected by the IBM Quarterly of Australia as the world leader in hospital information systems. This paper answers four questions: What is a hospital information system? How does a hospital information system work? How do you implement a hospital information system? After the system is operational, where do you go, e.g., critical care data management, physician's office management? University Hospital at Stony Brook is located on eastern Long Island and is the tertiary care referral hospital for approximately 1.4 million people. Nothing in the hospital happens without computers. Doctors, nurses, administrators and staff at all levels rely on the system daily. The system operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Access to the system is through 300 terminals and 128 printers throughout the hospital. In addition to the UHIS terminals, the critical care management system which is called Patient Data Management System, (PDMS), is available at over 90 ICU beds and in the operating rooms. PMID:3585130

  5. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  6. Construction Costs of Six Landfill Cover Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-12-23

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side for direct comparison. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  7. Cost comparisons of alternative landfill final covers

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-02-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle ``D`` Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle ``C`` Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed of uniform size, side-by-side. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  8. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes. PMID:10273268

  9. Hospital restructuring and burnout.

    PubMed

    Greenglass, Esther R; Burke, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly, organizations are experiencing changes as a result of extensive downsizing, restructuring, and merging. In Canada, government-sponsored medicine has been affected as hospitals have merged or closed, reducing essential medical services and resulting in extensive job loss for hospital workers, particularly nurses. Hospital restructuring has also resulted in greater stress and job insecurity in nurses. The escalation of stressors has created burnout in nurses. This study examines predictors of burnout in nurses experiencing hospital restructuring using the MBI-General Survey which yields scores on three scales: Emotional exhaustion, Cynicism, and Professional efficacy. Multiple regressions were conducted where each burnout scale was the criterion and stressors (e.g., amount of work, use of generic workers to do nurses' work), restructuring effects, social support, and individual resources (e.g., control coping, self-efficacy, prior organizational commitment) were predictors. There were differences in the amount of variance accounted for in the burnout components by stressors and resources. Stressors contributed most to emotional exhaustion and least to professional efficacy. Individual resources were more likely to contribute to professional efficacy and least to emotional exhaustion. Stressors and resources accounted for approximately equal amounts of variance in cynicism. Three conclusions were drawn. First, present findings parallel others by showing that individual coping patterns contribute to professional efficacy. Second, emotional exhaustion was found to be the prototype of stress. Third, prior organizational commitment, self-efficacy, and control coping resulted in lower burnout. PMID:15137570

  10. Hospital Library Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Although this handbook is addressed primarily to the hopital administrator, it contains material of interest to the librarian as well. Basic requirements for providing good library services to hospital staff are identified as: (1) well chosen and well trained manpower; (2) a current collection of information materials; and (3) appropriate space in…

  11. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  12. HOSPITAL FOOD NEEDS

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, R. G.

    1919-01-01

    There are eight classes of men in the military hospital including attendants, and for each class there should be a different dietary. Major Hoskins explains this, tells clearly the common sources of waste of food, notes the amount, and suggests lines of conservation. Imagesp435-a PMID:18010115

  13. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  14. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly. PMID:12220092

  15. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments. PMID:19545081

  16. The value of snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    only and not even the main outcome from snow cover use. The value of snow cover for agriculture, water resources, industry and transportation is so naturally inside the activities that is not often quantified. However, any considerations of adaptation strategies for climate change with changing snow conditions need such quantification.

  17. 36 CFR 312.1 - Areas covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES IN WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 312.1 Areas covered. The regulation covered in this part shall be applicable to all water resource project lands under the supervision of...

  18. 36 CFR 312.1 - Areas covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES IN WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 312.1 Areas covered. The regulation covered in this part shall be applicable to all water resource project lands under the supervision of...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 'tween-decks unless all hatch beams are in place under the hatch covers. (c) Missing, broken, or poorly... covers and hatch beams not of uniform size shall be placed only in the hatch, deck, and section in...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 'tween-decks unless all hatch beams are in place under the hatch covers. (c) Missing, broken, or poorly... covers and hatch beams not of uniform size shall be placed only in the hatch, deck, and section in...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 'tween-decks unless all hatch beams are in place under the hatch covers. (c) Missing, broken, or poorly... covers and hatch beams not of uniform size shall be placed only in the hatch, deck, and section in...

  2. 36 CFR 312.1 - Areas covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Areas covered. 312.1 Section... DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES IN WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 312.1 Areas covered. The regulation covered in this part shall be applicable to all water resource project lands under the supervision of...

  3. 36 CFR 312.1 - Areas covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Areas covered. 312.1 Section... DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES IN WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 312.1 Areas covered. The regulation covered in this part shall be applicable to all water resource project lands under the supervision of...

  4. THE ALTERNATIVE COVERS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (ACAP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative covers attempt to achieve equivalent performance to conventional impermeable covers through an action that has been described as 'sponge and pump'. In this type of cover system, the soil and plants absorb moisture from precipitation, store it in the plant and soil str...

  5. 12 CFR 1010.105 - Cover page.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cover page. 1010.105 Section 1010.105 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION LAND REGISTRATION (REGULATION J) Reporting Requirements § 1010.105 Cover page. The cover page of the Property Report shall be prepared in accordance with...

  6. 16 CFR 436.3 - Cover page.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cover page. 436.3 Section 436.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS CONCERNING FRANCHISING Contents of a Disclosure Document § 436.3 Cover page. Begin the disclosure document with a cover page, in the order and form...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2167 Covered systems. A covered impounding system is prohibited except for concrete wall designed tanks where the concrete wall is an...

  8. Cover Crop Basics for Nutrient Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an under-utilized tool in Mid-Atlantic agriculture. Among their many benefits, cover crops supply N for the next crop and/or conserve residual N, and have great potential to improve soil quality. Before using cover crops, growers must identify niches within their cropping system an...

  9. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  10. Going all digital in a university hospital: a unified large-scale PACS for multiple departments and hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Raimund

    2001-08-01

    In 1997, a large PACS was first introduced at Innsbruck University Hospital in the context of a new traumatology centre. In the subsequent years, this initial PACS setting covering only one department was expanded to most of the hospital campus, with currently some 250 viewing stations attached. Constantly connecting new modalities and viewing stations created the demand for several redesigns from the original PACS configuration to cope with the increasing data load. We give an account of these changes necessary to develop a multi hospital PACS and the considerations that lead us there. Issues of personnel for running a large scale PACS are discussed and we give an outlook to the new information systems currently under development for archiving and communication of general medical imaging data and for simple telemedicine networking between several large university hospitals.