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Sample records for cox-2 selective inhibitor

  1. Cox-2 is needed but not sufficient for apoptosis induced by Cox-2 selective inhibitors in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, B; Swaroop, P; Protiva, P; Raj, S V; Shirin, H; Holt, P R

    2003-12-01

    The role of Cox-2 in NSAID-induced apoptosis is debated. We studied the role of Cox-2 inhibition in apoptosis induced by a selective Cox-2 inhibitor, SC236 (a structural analogue of celecoxib) in two colon cancer cell lines, HT29 (expressing Cox-2 protein) and HCT116 (not expressing Cox-2 protein). Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. SC236 0-75 microM decreased cell numbers and induced apoptosis to identical levels in HT29 and HCT116 cells. However, SC236, concentrations >75 microM reduced Cox-2 protein expression in HT29 cells and induced greater levels of apoptosis in HT29 than in HCT116 cells. In contrast, sulindac sulfide (SSD) (which inhibits Cox-1 and Cox-2) 0-200 microM or sulindac sulfone (SSN) 0-500 microM (without significant activity against Cox-1 or Cox-2) caused identical decreases in cell number and increases in apoptosis in HT29 and HCT116 cells. Neither SSD nor SSN altered the expression of Cox-2 in HT29 cells. To determine that the higher levels of apoptosis in HT29 cells with SC236 >75 microM were related to decreased Cox-2 protein levels, we decreased Cox-2 protein expression in HT29 cells with curcumin (diferuloylmethane) and studied its effect on SC236-induced apoptosis. Curcumin augmented apoptosis induced by SC236 in HT29 cells but not in Cox-2 lacking HCT116 cells. In conclusion, selective Cox-2 inhibitors can induce apoptosis independent of Cox-2 expression. However they may selectively target cells that express Cox-2 by decreasing their Cox-2 protein expression. PMID:14739610

  2. Potent, orally available, selective COX-2 inhibitors based on 2-imidazoline core.

    PubMed

    Sarnpitak, Pakornwit; Mujumdar, Prashant; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce; Iurchenko, Vladimir; Zozulya, Sergey; Gavalas, Antonis; Geronikaki, Athina; Ivanenkov, Yan; Krasavin, Mikhail

    2014-09-12

    A novel series of compounds containing a polar, non-flat 2-imidazoline core was designed based on the SAR information available for aromatic azole cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. While the majority of the compounds prepared using an earlier developed imidazoline N-arylation methodology turned out to be inferior to the known COX-2 inhibitors, one lead compound displayed potency (300 nM) comparable to clinically used Celecoxib and was shown to be more selective. The series represents the first example of selective COX-2 inhibitors built around a distinctly polar core, contradicting an earlier accepted view that a lipophilic scaffold is required for high inhibitor potency. The lead compound demonstrated very good oral bioavailability in mice, slow metabolic degradation, modest distribution into the brain and a remarkable anti-inflammatory efficacy in carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema model. A foundation has therefore been laid for a chemically novel series of COX-2 inhibitors that has a potential for diverse therapeutic applications in inflammatory disease area. PMID:25016374

  3. Combination chemoprevention of HER2/neu-induced breast cancer using a COX-2 inhibitor and an RXR-selective retinoid

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Powel H.; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Salmon, Amoi P.; Baker, Rebecca; Newman, Robert A.; Yang, Peiying; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Bissonnette, Reid P.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Howe, Louise R.

    2008-01-01

    The inducible prostaglandin synthase isoform cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in ~40% of human breast carcinomas, and in precancerous breast lesions, particularly in association with overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). Experimental breast cancer can be suppressed by pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of Cox-2, suggesting potential clinical utility of COX-2 inhibitors with respect to breast cancer. Importantly, several clinical trials have found reduced colorectal adenoma formation in individuals administered selective COX-2 inhibitors. However, such trials also identified increased cardiovascular risk associated with COX-2 inhibitor use. The goal of this research was to test whether improved chemopreventive efficacy could be achieved by combining submaximal doses of a selective COX-2 inhibitor and a retinoid X receptor-selective retinoid (rexinoid). The rate of HER2/neu-induced mammary tumor formation was substantially delayed by coadministration of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (500 ppm in diet) and the rexinoid LGD1069 (10 mg/kg body weight; oral gavage) to MMTV/neu mice. Median time to tumor formation was increased from 304 days to >600 days (P<0.0001). The combination was substantially more effective than either drug individually. Similarly, potent suppression of aromatase activity was observed in mammary tissues from the combination cohort (44% of control; P<0.001). Regulation of aromatase expression and activity by COX-derived prostaglandins is well established. Interestingly however, single agent LGD1069 significantly reduced mammary aromatase activity (71% of control; P<0.001) without modulating eicosanoid levels. Our data demonstrate that simultaneous blockade of COX/prostaglandin signaling and retinoid X receptor-dependent transcription confers potent anticancer efficacy, suggesting a novel avenue for clinical evaluation. PMID:19138958

  4. Synthesis, cyclooxygenase inhibition, anti-inflammatory evaluation and ulcerogenic liability of novel triarylpyrazoline derivatives as selective COX-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Abdelgawad, Mohamed A; Labib, Madlen B; Zidan, Taha H

    2015-12-15

    A new series of triarylpyrazoline derivatives 8a-p containing the most important COX-2 pharmacophore (SO2CH3 or/and SO2NH2) were synthesized by reaction of propen-1-one derivatives 6a-h with different phenyl hydrazine hydrochloride derivatives 7a-b in aqueous ethanol. All prepared compounds were evaluated for their in vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibitory activity and the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. All compounds were more selective for COX-2 isozyme than COX-1 isozyme and showed good in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. Compounds 8g, 8j and 8o showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity and were less ulcerogenic (Ulcer Index=6.85, 7.7, 5.92, respectively) than indomethacin (Ulcer Index=12.3) and comparable to celecoxib (Ulcer Index=4.85). PMID:26546221

  5. Network Meta-Analysis Comparing Relatively Selective COX-2 Inhibitors Versus Coxibs for the Prevention of NSAID-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zhao, Miao; Meng, Wen-Bo; Ou, Jin-Qing; He, Jun-Hui; Zou, Bing; Lei, Ping-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Currently 2 difference classes of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, coxibs and relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors, are available for patients requiring nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy; their gastroprotective effect is hardly directly compared.The aim of this study was to compare the gastroprotective effect of relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors with coxibs.MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (from their inception to March 2015) were searched for potential eligible studies.We included randomized controlled trials comparing coxibs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, parecoxib, and lumiracoxib), relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors (nabumetone, meloxicam, and etodolac), and nonselective NSAIDs with a study duration ?4 weeks.Comparative effectiveness and safety data were pooled by Bayesian network meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were ulcer complications and symptomatic ulcer. Summary effect-size was calculated as risk ratio (RR), together with the 95% confidence interval (CI).This study included 36 trials with a total of 112,351 participants. Network meta-analyses indicated no significant difference between relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors and coxibs regarding ulcer complications (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 0.47-3.27), symptomatic ulcer (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.09-3.92), and endoscopic ulcer (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.37-2.96). Network meta-analyses adjusting potential influential factors (age, sex, previous ulcer disease, and follow-up time), and sensitivity analyses did not reveal any major change to the main results. Network meta-analyses suggested that relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors and coxibs were associated with comparable incidences of total adverse events (AEs) (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.93-1.31), gastrointestinal AEs (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.87-1.25), total withdrawals (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.74-1.33), and gastrointestinal AE-related withdrawals (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.57-1.74).Relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors appear to be associated with similar gastroprotective effect and tolerability as coxibs. Owing to the indirectness of the comparisons, future research is required to confirm the study conclusion. PMID:26448006

  6. Network Meta-Analysis Comparing Relatively Selective COX-2 Inhibitors Versus Coxibs for the Prevention of NSAID-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Man; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zhao, Miao; Meng, Wen-Bo; Ou, Jin-Qing; He, Jun-Hui; Zou, Bing; Lei, Ping-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Currently 2 difference classes of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, coxibs and relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors, are available for patients requiring nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy; their gastroprotective effect is hardly directly compared. The aim of this study was to compare the gastroprotective effect of relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors with coxibs. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (from their inception to March 2015) were searched for potential eligible studies. We included randomized controlled trials comparing coxibs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, parecoxib, and lumiracoxib), relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors (nabumetone, meloxicam, and etodolac), and nonselective NSAIDs with a study duration ?4 weeks. Comparative effectiveness and safety data were pooled by Bayesian network meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were ulcer complications and symptomatic ulcer. Summary effect-size was calculated as risk ratio (RR), together with the 95% confidence interval (CI). This study included 36 trials with a total of 112,351 participants. Network meta-analyses indicated no significant difference between relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors and coxibs regarding ulcer complications (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 0.47–3.27), symptomatic ulcer (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.09–3.92), and endoscopic ulcer (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.37–2.96). Network meta-analyses adjusting potential influential factors (age, sex, previous ulcer disease, and follow-up time), and sensitivity analyses did not reveal any major change to the main results. Network meta-analyses suggested that relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors and coxibs were associated with comparable incidences of total adverse events (AEs) (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.93–1.31), gastrointestinal AEs (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.87–1.25), total withdrawals (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.74–1.33), and gastrointestinal AE-related withdrawals (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.57–1.74). Relatively selective COX-2 inhibitors appear to be associated with similar gastroprotective effect and tolerability as coxibs. Owing to the indirectness of the comparisons, future research is required to confirm the study conclusion. PMID:26448006

  7. Synthesis and three-dimensional qualitative structure selectivity relationship of 3,5-disubstituted-2,4-thiazolidinedione derivatives as COX2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Saber, Gamal E; Mahfouz, Nadia M; El-Gendy, Mahmoud A; Radwan, Awwad A; Hamid, Mohamed A El

    2007-10-01

    In our effort for synthesis of selective COX2 inhibitors, certain new 2,4-thiazolidinedione derivatives were synthesized. It necessitates preparation of potassium salt of 2,4-thiazolidinedione 2, which condensed with intermediate 4a. The resulting 3-[2-(4-methylphenyl)-2-oxo-l-phenylethyl]-2,4-thiazolidinedione 8 was condensed with appropriate aldehyde to afford compounds 10a, 10i-l, 10o and 10p. Compounds (9a-l, 10a-n, 10p, 11 and 12) were obtained through the preparation of 5-arylmethylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones 6a-p and reaction of its potassium salt 7a-p with compounds 4a, 4b, and 5. Some compounds displayed significant analgesic activity as compared to reference standards. The anti-inflammatory activity of the synthesized compounds revealed that intermediate 8 and compounds 9c, 10c and 10d showed good results. Compound 10c produced no significant mucosal injury. HipHop methodology of Catalyst program was used to build up hypothetical model of selective COX2 inhibitors followed by fitting the synthesized compounds to this model. Compounds 10c and 10d were suspected to be promising selective COX2 inhibitors. Also, compounds (6c, 8, 9a,c,d,k, 10a,c,d,k, 11 and 12) were docked into COX1 and COX2 X-ray structures, using DOCK6 program. Docking results suggested that several of these derivatives are active COX inhibitors with a significant preference for COX2. PMID:18038897

  8. Enhancement of glioblastoma radioresponse by a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Khong Bee . E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg; Wang, Ting Ting; Woon, Chow Thai; Cheah, Elizabeth S.; Moore, Xiao Lei; Zhu Congju; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Toward improved glioblastoma multiforme treatment, we determined whether celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could enhance glioblastoma radiosensitivity by inducing tumor necrosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Methods and Materials: U-87MG cells treated with celecoxib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival and angiogenic factor protein analysis (angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). In vivo, survival of mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells and treated with celecoxib and/or irradiation was monitored. Isolated tumors were assessed for tumor necrosis and tumor microvascular density by von Williebrand's factor (vWF) immunohistochemical staining. Results: Celecoxib (4 and 30 {mu}M; 24, 48, and 72 h) enhanced U-87MG cell radiosensitivity by significantly reducing clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Angiopoietin-1 and VEGF proteins were decreased, whereas angiopoietin-2 expression increased after 72 h of celecoxib alone and when combined with irradiation. In vivo, median survival of control mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells was 18 days. Celecoxib (100 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) significantly extended median survival of irradiated mice (24 Gy total) from 34 to 41 days, with extensive tumor necrosis [24.5 {+-} 8.6% of tumor region, compared with irradiation alone (2.7 {+-} 1.8%)]. Tumor microvascular density was significantly reduced in combined celecoxib and irradiated tumors (52.5 {+-} 2.9 microvessels per mm{sup 2} tumor region), compared with irradiated tumors alone (65.4 {+-} 4.0 microvessels per mm{sup 2}). Conclusion: Celecoxib significantly enhanced glioblastoma radiosensitivity, reduced clonogenic survival, and prolonged survival of glioblastoma-implanted mice by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necr0010os.

  9. New Coumarin Derivatives as Potent Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Anti-Inflammatory, QSAR, and Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Dina H; Batran, Rasha Z; Farghaly, Thoraya A; Khedr, Mohammed A; Abdulla, Mohamed M

    2015-12-01

    Two new series of coumarin derivatives incorporating thiazoline and thiazolidinone moieties were designed, synthesized, and investigated in vivo for their anti-inflammatory activities using the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model and in vitro for their inhibitory activities against the human cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 isoforms. Most of the synthesized compounds demonstrated exceptionally high in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and displayed superior GI safety profiles (0-7% ulceration) as compared to indomethacin. All the bioactive compounds showed in vitro high affinity and selectivity toward the COX-2 isoenzyme, compared to the reference celecoxib with IC50 values ranging from 0.31 to 0.78??M. The ethyl thiosemicarbazone 2b, thiazoline derivatives 3a, 3b, 5b, 6a, and 7f, and the thiazolidinone compounds 8b and 9a showed the highest in vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory activities with remarkable COX-2 selectivity. Quantitative structure-activity relationship study (QSAR) was done and resulted in a highly predictive power R(2) (0.908). A molecular docking study revealed a relationship between the docking affinity and the biological results. PMID:26462142

  10. Targeting KSHV/HHV-8 latency with COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide: a potential chemotherapeutic modality for primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arun George; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Chandran, Bala

    2011-01-01

    The significance of inflammation in KSHV biology and tumorigenesis prompted us to examine the role of COX-2 in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), an aggressive AIDS-linked KSHV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using nimesulide, a well-known COX-2 specific NSAID. We demonstrate that (1) nimesulide is efficacious in inducing proliferation arrest in PEL (KSHV+/EBV-; BCBL-1 and BC-3, KSHV+/EBV+; JSC-1), EBV-infected (KSHV-/EBV+; Raji) and non-infected (KSHV-/EBV-; Akata, Loukes, Ramos, BJAB) high malignancy human Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) as well as KSHV-/EBV+ lymphoblastoid (LCL) cell lines; (2) nimesulide is selectively toxic to KSHV infected endothelial cells (TIVE-LTC) compared to TIVE and primary endothelial cells (HMVEC-d); (3) nimesulide reduced KSHV latent gene expression, disrupted p53-LANA-1 protein complexes, and activated the p53/p21 tumor-suppressor pathway; (4) COX-2 inhibition down-regulated cell survival kinases (p-Akt and p-GSK-3?), an angiogenic factor (VEGF-C), PEL defining genes (syndecan-1, aquaporin-3, and vitamin-D3 receptor) and cell cycle proteins such as cyclins E/A and cdc25C; (5) nimesulide induced sustained cell death and G1 arrest in BCBL-1 cells; (6) nimesulide substantially reduced the colony forming capacity of BCBL-1 cells. Overall, our studies provide a comprehensive molecular framework linking COX-2 with PEL pathogenesis and identify the chemotherapeutic potential of nimesulide in treating PEL. PMID:21980345

  11. QSAR analysis of 1,3-diaryl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-2H-isoindole derivatives as selective COX-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Silakari, Pratigya; Shrivastava, Savitri Devi; Silakari, Gyati; Kohli, Dharm Veer; Rambabu, Gundla; Srivastava, Soumya; Shrivastava, Santosh Kumar; Silakari, Om

    2008-07-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was performed on a series of 1,3-diaryl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-2H-isoindole for their cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition. QSAR investigations were based on Hansch's extra thermodynamic multi-parameter approach and receptor surface analysis (RSA). QSAR investigations reveal that steric and electrostatic interactions are primarily responsible for COX-2 enzyme-ligand interaction. QSAR model derived from Hansch analysis demonstrated that COX-2 inhibitory activity is correlated with sum of atomic polarizability (Apol), number of hydrogen-bond donor groups (HBD), energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), desolvation free energy for water (F(H(2)O)) and fraction of areas of molecular shadow in the XY and ZX planes over area of enclosing rectangle (Sxyf and Sxzf) with r ranges 0.870-0.904. The best model was obtained from RSA model having r = 0.940 with good predictive ability (predicted compounds in training set and test set within +/- 1.0 unit of pIC(50)) and can be used in designing better selective COX-2 inhibitors among the congeners in future. PMID:18023931

  12. NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells by induction of {eta}{omicron}-1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyoung Chul; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kwang Youn; Chang, Ki Churl Kang, Young Jin

    2008-11-28

    We investigated whether NS-398, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, induces HO-1 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). NS-398 reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} without modulation of expression of COX-2 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 increased HO-1 mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner, but inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. Furthermore, SnPPIX, a HO-1 inhibitor, reversed the effects of NS-398 on PGE{sub 2} production, suggesting that COX-2 activity can be affected by HO-1. Hemin, a HO-1 inducer, also reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} and proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. CORM-2, a CO-releasing molecule, but not bilirubin inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC in a HbO{sub 2}-sensitive manner. In conclusion, NS-398 inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC by HO-1-derived CO. Thus, NS-398 may facilitate the healing process of vessels in vascular inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis.

  13. COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: current status.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, A; Sharma, Rashmi

    2005-03-01

    Since, their introduction, COX (cyclooxygenase enzyme)-2 specific inhibitors have become a rapidly growing segment of the prescription drug market. Researchers have recently focused on the potentially lethal side effects associated with their. FDA has banned the use of nimesulide (hepatotoxic) in pediatric patients and rofecoxib (cardiovascular complications) in both adults and children. COX-2 inhibitors may decrease vascular prostacyclin production and may tip the balance in favour of prothrombotic eicosanoids (thromboxane A2) and lead to increased cardiovascular thrombotic events. COX-2 inhibitors can also result into increase blood pressure, macular eruptions, urticaria, pseudoporphyria, erythema multiforme, oedema, worsening of heart failure, fatal allergic vasculitis and aggravation of doxorubicin-mediated cardiac injury. The COX-2 enzyme is also involved in the development of many organ systems, and its inhibition may lead to various congenital defects in neonates. It has been reported that COX-2 inhibitors also interfere with implantation, hence their use should be avoided in sexually active women at risk of pregnancy. However, presently the choice of COX-2 selective inhibitors for a particular patient should be based upon their relative efficacy, toxicity, concomitant drug use, concurrent disease states, hepatic and renal function and relative cost. PMID:15926604

  14. The pharmacology of selective inhibition of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Tilo

    2006-10-01

    Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 were developed to improve the safety of anti-inflammatory therapy in patients at elevated risk for gastrointestinal complications which are thought to be caused primarily by depression of COX-1 derived mucosal prostanoids. They were not expected to be more efficacious analgesics than compounds acting on both cyclooxygenases, the traditional (t) non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). While these predictions were generally supported by clinical evidence, an elevated rate of severe cardiovascular complications was observed in randomized controlled trials of three chemically distinct COX-2 selective compounds. The cardiovascular hazard is plausibly explained by the depression of COX-2 dependent prostanoids formed in vasculature and kidney; vascular prostacyclin (PGI2) constrains the effect of prothrombotic and atherogenic stimuli, and renal medullary prostacyclin and prostaglandin (PG) E(2) formed by COX-2 contribute to arterial pressure homeostasis. A drug development strategy more closely linking research into the biology of the drug target with clinical drug development may have allowed earlier recognition of these mechanisms and the cardiovascular risk of COX-2 inhibition. Open questions are i) whether the gastrointestinal benefit of COX-2 selective compounds drugs can be conserved by identifying individuals at risk and excluding them from treatment; ii) whether the risk extends to tNSAIDs; iii) and whether alternative strategies to anti-inflammatory therapy with a more advantageous risk-benefit profile can be developed. PMID:17003913

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of cavidine in vitro and in vivo, a selective COX-2 inhibitor in LPS-induced peritoneal macrophages of mouse.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Hailin; Li, Weifeng; Mu, Qingli; Yao, Huan; Wang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Cavidine is an isoquinoline alkaloid which is isolated from Corydalis impatiens. In traditional Tibetan herb, C. impatiens has been widely used for treatment of skin injuries, hepatitis, cholecystitis, and scabies. The present study aimed to evaluate its anti-inflammatory effect and investigate the mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory action. We used different inflammation model animals and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine peritoneal macrophages to examine the anti-inflammatory function of cavidine. Results indicated pretreatment with cavidine (i.p.) decreased xylene-induced ear edema, formaldehyde-induced paw edema, leukocyte number, and the level of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) in acetic acid-induced peritonitis in mice. The data also demonstrated that cavidine significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-?, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and NO production in peritoneal macrophages. Moreover, cavidine regulated the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) instead of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) at protein levels. These results suggested that cavidine is a selective COX-2 inhibitor which possesses an anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25373916

  16. Reversal of gene expression changes in the colorectal normal-adenoma pathway by NS398 selective COX2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, O; Spisák, S; Sipos, F; Tóth, K; Solymosi, N; Wichmann, B; Krenács, T; Valcz, G; Tulassay, Z; Molnár, B

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims: Treatment of colorectal adenomas with selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors can contribute to the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the molecular background of their effect is not fully understood. We analysed the gene expression modulatory effect of N-(2-cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl)-methanesulfonamide (NS398) on HT29 cells to be correlated with expression data gained from biopsy samples. Methods: HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NS398, and global mRNA expression was analysed on HGU133Plus2.0 microarrays. Discriminatory transcripts between normal and adenoma and between adenoma and CRC biopsy samples were identified using HGU133Plus2.0 microarrays. The results were validated using RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results: Between normal and adenoma samples, 20 classifiers were identified, including overexpressed cadherin 3, KIAA1199, and downregulated peptide YY, glucagon, claudin 8. Seventeen of them changed in a reverse manner in HT29 cells under NS398 treatment, 14 (including upregulated claudin 8, peptide YY, and downregulated cadherin 3, KIAA1199) at a significance of P<0.05. Normal and CRC could be distinguished using 38 genes, the expression of 12 of them was changed in a reverse manner under NS398 treatment. Conclusion: NS398 has a reversal effect on the expression of several genes that altered in colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence. NS398 more efficiently inverted the expression changes seen in the normal-adenoma than in the normal-carcinoma transition. PMID:20087348

  17. COX-2 inhibitor reduces skeletal muscle hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Novak, Margaret L; Billich, William; Smith, Sierra M; Sukhija, Kunal B; McLoughlin, Thomas J; Hornberger, Troy A; Koh, Timothy J

    2009-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory strategies are often used to reduce muscle pain and soreness that can result from high-intensity muscular activity. However, studies indicate that components of the acute inflammatory response may be required for muscle repair and growth. The hypothesis of this study was that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity is required for compensatory hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. We used the synergist ablation model of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, along with the specific COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, to investigate the role of COX-2 in overload-induced muscle growth in mice. COX-2 was expressed in plantaris muscles during compensatory hypertrophy and was localized mainly in or near muscle cell nuclei. Treatment with NS-398 blunted the increases in mass and protein content in overloaded muscles compared with vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, the COX-2 inhibitor decreased activity of the urokinase type plasminogen activator, macrophage accumulation, and cell proliferation, all of which are required for hypertrophy after synergist ablation. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and p70S6K were increased following synergist ablation, but were not affected by NS-398. Additionally, expression of atrogin-1 was reduced during hypertrophy, but was also not affected by NS-398. These results demonstrate that COX-2 activity is required for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, possibly through facilitation of extracellular protease activity, macrophage accumulation, and cell proliferation. PMID:19176887

  18. Structure-based design of phthalimide derivatives as potential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors: anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Amer M; El-Azab, Adel S; Al-Suwaidan, Ibrahim A; ElTahir, Kamal Eldin H; Asiri, Yousif A; Abdel-Aziz, Naglaa I; Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A-M

    2015-03-01

    A group of 30 cyclic imides (1-10a-c) was designed for evaluation as a selective COX-2 inhibitor and investigated in vivo for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. Compounds 6a, 6b, 7a and 7b exhibit optimal COX-2 inhibitory potency (IC50 = 0.18, 0.24, 0.28 and 0.36 ?M; respectively) and selectivity index (SI) range of 363-668. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibition structure-activity studies identified compound 6a as a highly potent (IC50 = 0.18 ?M), and an extremely selective [COX-2 (SI) = 668] comparable to celecoxib [COX-2 (SI) > 384], COX-2 inhibitor that showed superior anti-inflammatory activity (ED50 = 54.0 mg/kg) relative to diclofenac (ED50 = 114 mg/kg). Molecular Docking study of the synthesized compound 6a into the active site of COX-2 revealed a similar binding mode to SC-558, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Docking study showed that the methoxy moeities of 6a inserted deep inside the 2°-pocket of the COX-2 active site, where the O-atoms of such groups underwent an H-bonding interaction with His(90) (3.02 ?), Arg(513) (1.94, 2.83 ?), and Gln(192) (3.25 ?). PMID:25549551

  19. Revisiting the role of COX-2 inhibitor for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Kenya

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating preclinical and clinical studies have shown that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor has some efficacy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitor in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy showed no survival benefit for “unselected” patients with advanced NSCLC. Thus, exploratory analyses of the association between biomarker and clinical outcome of NSCLC patients treated with COX-2 inhibitors have been warranted. A report by Edelman recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology demonstrated the results of a prospective randomized trial using a combination of chemotherapy (docetaxel or pemetrexed) and either COX-2 inhibitor or a placebo for patients with advanced NSCLC. The remarkable point of this study was that it adopted the eligible criteria requiring decreased urinary levels of prostaglandin E metabolite (PGE-M) after administration of COX-2 inhibitor in a run-in period, as a possible predictive marker for the COX-2 inhibitor. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). However, no improvement in PFS was observed between the patients treated with COX-2 inhibitor and those with placebo. A number of efforts from various investigators, including this report, have failed to demonstrate the meaningful clinical effect of COX-2 inhibitor for NSCLC. Is COX-2 inhibitor useless anymore? Here, we address the “difficult” character of this COX-2 inhibitor from various viewpoints and discuss potential future strategy using this drug. PMID:26629442

  20. 1,3-Diaryl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-2H-isoindole derivatives: a new series of potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors in which a sulfonyl group is not a structural requisite.

    PubMed

    Portevin, B; Tordjman, C; Pastoureau, P; Bonnet, J; De Nanteuil G

    2000-11-30

    Novel tetrahydro-2H-isoindoles have been prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of the COX-2 isoenzyme. A 1,3-diaryl substitution on the central polycyclic ring system and absence of a sulfonyl moiety are the two structural features of this chemical series. A short and easy synthetic pathway produced several derivatives which were shown to be potent and selective COX-2 vs COX-1 inhibitors (IC(50) = 0. 6-100 nM for COX-2, 100->1000 nM for COX-1). Structural modifications established that a bicyclic ring appended to the pyrrole nucleus and 4,4'-difluoro substitution on the phenyl rings were optimal for high inhibitory potency. Activity was confirmed in the human whole blood assay and subsequently in the murine air-pouch model in which in vivo PGE2 inhibitory activity was evaluated with respect to gastric tolerance (ED(50) for inhibition of exudate PGE2 of 3 mg/kg and gastric PGE2 of 20 mg/kg). Gastric tolerance was further assessed after administration to mice of high doses (up to 400 mg/kg) of the inhibitors by measurement of gastric damage. This panel of studies allowed selection of a number of tetrahydro-2H-isoindoles which were compared in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Compounds 32 and 37 showed the most potent activity with ED(50) values for edema inhibition in the noninjected paw of 0. 35 and 0.15 mg/kg/day, respectively, after oral administration. In addition, this interesting antiinflammatory profile was accompanied by a protective effect against arthritis-induced osteopenia, the decrease being 50% with a dose of 0.25 mg/kg/day. PMID:11101350

  1. Neuroprotection mediated by the EP? receptor avoids the detrimental side effects of COX-2 inhibitors following ischaemic injury.

    PubMed

    Akram, Asha; Gibson, Claire L; Grubb, Blair D

    2013-02-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of ischaemia has shown neuroprotection, clinical trials revealed long term side effects with COX-2 inhibitors. A more focussed approach is necessary to retain the therapeutic effects of prostaglandins. This study investigated the role of the PGE(2) EP(4) receptor using both in vitro and in vivo models of ischaemia. To demonstrate whether targeting the EP(4) receptor is as neuroprotective as COX-2 inhibition, simultaneous experiments were carried out using a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Organotypic hippocampal sliced cultures, exposed to 2 h of oxygen glucose deprivation, were treated with; DMSO only, COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398), EP(4) agonist (L-902688) or EP(4) antagonist (GW627368X) and cell death was assessed. The EP(4) agonist and the COX-2 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death following in vitro ischaemia, whereas treatment with the EP(4) antagonist significantly increased cell death in hippocampal cultures. Following a 1 h occlusion of middle cerebral artery, mice were treated with the COX-2 inhibitor (10 mg kg, I.P), EP(4) agonist (0.75 ?g/kg, I.P) or vehicle (I.P), at the onset of reperfusion and again at 24 h post stroke. The COX-2 inhibitor and EP(4) agonist treated animals showed a significant reduction in infarct volume (P < .05) at 48 h post stroke compared to the vehicle treated group. These results show that selective activation of the EP(4) receptor following acute ischaemic damage is neuroprotective, and support the concept of targeting protective prostaglandin receptor signalling as a potential therapeutic target for cerebral stroke. PMID:23041537

  2. CG100649, a novel COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits colorectal adenoma and carcinoma growth in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Margalit, Ofer; Katoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Dingzhi; Wu, Hong; Xia, Dianren; Holla, Vijaykumar R; Yang, Peiying; DuBois, Raymond N

    2014-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (COXIBs) can reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) and are being considered for use as adjuvant therapy for treatment of CRC patients. However, long-term use of most NSAIDs, except aspirin, increases cardiovascular risk, hampering use of these drugs in CRC prevention and possibly for treatment. CG100649 is a new member of the COXIB family, which is proposed to inhibit both COX-2 and carbonic anhydrase-I/-II (CA-I/-II) activity. Using mouse models, we show here that CG100649 inhibits premalignant and malignant colorectal lesions in mouse models, partly through inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. These pre-clinical findings suggest a need for further exploration of CG100649 for CRC prevention and treatment. The long-term safety profile of CG100649, particularly regarding its effect on cardiovascular risk, is yet to be determined. PMID:25085205

  3. Substrate-selective COX-2 inhibition as a novel strategy for therapeutic endocannabinoid augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, Daniel J; Gamble-George, Joyonna C; Marnett, Lawrence J; Patel, Sachin

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacologic augmentation of endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling is an emerging therapeutic approach for the treatment of a broad range of pathophysiological conditions. Thus far, pharmacological approaches have focused on inhibition of the canonical eCB inactivation pathways - fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) for anandamide and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) for 2-arachidonoylglycerol. We review here the experimental evidence that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated eCB oxygenation represents a third mechanism for terminating eCB action at cannabinoid receptors. We describe the development, molecular mechanisms, and in vivo validation of 'substrate-selective' COX-2 inhibitors (SSCIs) that prevent eCB inactivation by COX-2 without affecting prostaglandin (PG) generation from arachidonic acid (AA). Lastly, we review recent data on the potential therapeutic applications of SSCIs with a focus on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24845457

  4. Colonic delivery of celecoxib is a potential pharmaceutical strategy for repositioning the selective COX-2 inhibitor as an anti-colitic agent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Lee, Yonghyun; Jeong, Seongkeun; Nam, Joon; Lee, Sunyoung; Jung, Yunjin

    2015-10-01

    Celecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor applied to the treatment of arthritis. Repositioning the anti-inflammatory drug as an anti-inflammatory bowel disease drug has obstacles such as controversial anti-colitic efficacy and potential side effects. We examined whether colonic delivery of celecoxib could circumvent the therapeutic limitations. N-succinylglutam-1-yl celecoxib (SG1C), a colon-specific prodrug of celecoxib), was administered orally to rats with colitis and the anti-inflammatory activity and pharmacologic mechanisms were investigated. SG1C alleviated the colonic injury and lowered myeloperoxidase activity in the inflamed colonic tissues much more effectively than conventional celecoxib. While suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappaB gene products including cyclooxygenase-2, SG1C elevated an anti-inflammatory nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene product heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the inflamed colon. In contrast, no significant molecular effects were observed with conventional celecoxib. Unlike conventional celecoxib, SG1C did not lower the serum level of 6-keto-PGF1?, an inverse indicator of cardiovascular adverse effects. Collectively, colonic delivery of celecoxib, likely improving therapeutic and toxicological properties of celecoxib, may be a feasible pharmaceutical strategy to therapeutically switch celecoxib to an anti-colitic drug. PMID:25860026

  5. Antiinflammatory 2-benzyl-4-sulfonyl-4H-isoquinoline-1,3-diones: novel inhibitors of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Lazer, E S; Sorcek, R; Cywin, C L; Thome, D; Possanza, G J; Graham, A G; Churchill, L

    1998-05-19

    A series of 2-benzyl-4-sulfonyl-4H-isoquinoline-1,3-diones was prepared. Members of this series are potent and selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in both microsomal and cellular assays. Two representatives demonstrated activity in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats upon oral administration. PMID:9871731

  6. Antiproliferative effect of two novel COX-2 inhibitors on human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sticozzi, Claudia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Di Capua, Angela; Maioli, Emanuela; Cappelli, Andrea; Giordani, Antonio; Biava, Mariangela; Anzini, Maurizio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-05-13

    Selective COX-2 inhibitors (COXib) belonging to the class of diaryl heterocycles (e.g., celecoxib, rofecoxib, etc.), are devoid of the undesirable effects due to their capacity to inhibit selectively inducible (COX-2), responsible for inflammatory effects but not constitutive cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)(COX); responsible for cytoprotective effects on gastric mucosa. In addition, several reports have identified an increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with the use of COXib. We have developed a new series of anti-inflammatory agents (1,5-diarylpyrrole-3-alkoxyethyl esters and ethers). To evaluate the effect of two 1,5-diarylpyrrole-3-alkoxyethyl ethers, VA441 and VA428 (up to 100 ?M), respectively, in comparison with two well known COXib, celecoxib and rofecoxib, on HaCaT cell (keratinocytes) proliferation and toxicity. Crucial molecules in cell cycle progression, i.e. NF?B and ERK as targets/mediators and cyclin D1 and p21 Cip1/Kip as final effectors were evaluated by Western blot, immunohystochemistry and q-PCR analysis. Both compounds, VA441 and VA428, showed a strong inhibition of cell proliferation, and did not exhibit cytotoxicity. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by a strong activation of ERK and induction of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, there was a clear inhibition of the transcription factor NF-?B and downregulation of cyclin D1, with enforced inhibition of the HaCaT cell cycle progression. These data suggest that compounds VA441 and VA428, along with their role in inhibiting COX-2 and inflammation, could have a possible therapeutic (topical and systemic) use against skin proliferative disorders, such as psoriasis. PMID:23454135

  7. Oncogenic RAS mutations in myeloma cells selectively induce cox-2 expression, which participates in enhanced adhesion to fibronectin and chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Bao; Zhu, Li; Shi, Yijiang; Frost, Patrick; Yan, Huajun; Sharma, Sanjai; Sharma, Sherven; Goodglick, Lee; Dubinett, Steven; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Oncogenic RAS expression occurs in up to 40% of multiple myeloma (MM) cases and correlates with aggressive disease. Since activated RAS induces cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2) expression in other tumor models, we tested a role for cox-2 in mutant RAS–containing MM cells. We used the ANBL-6 isogenic MM cell lines in which the IL-6–dependent parental line becomes cytokine independent following transfection with mutated N-RAS or K-RAS. Both mutated N-RAS– and K-RAS–expressing ANBL-6 cells demonstrated a selective up-regulation of cox-2 expression and enhanced secretion of PGE2, a product of cox-2. Furthermore, in 3 primary marrow specimens, which contained MM cells expressing mutated RAS, 15% to 40% of tumor cells were positive for cox-2 expression by immunohistochemistry. We used cox-2 inhibitors, NS398 and celecoxib, and neutralizing anti-PGE2 antibody to test whether cox-2/PGE2 was involved in the aggressive phenotype of MM ANBL-6 cells containing mutated RAS. Although these interventions had no effect on IL-6–independent growth or adhesion to marrow stromal cells, they significantly inhibited the enhanced binding of mutant RAS– containing MM cells to fibronectin and the enhanced resistance to melphalan. These results indicate a selective induction of cox-2 in MM cells containing RAS mutations, which results in heightened binding to extracellular matrix protein and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. PMID:16497971

  8. Computational Structure-Based De Novo Design of Hypothetical Inhibitors against the Anti- Inflammatory Target COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Khushboo; Katiyar, Shashank Prakash; Goyal, Sukriti; Grover, Abhinav; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) produces prostaglandins in inflamed tissues and hence has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs since long. Administration of traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and other COX-2 selective inhibitors (COXIBS) for the treat of inflammation has been found to be associated with side effects, which mainly includes gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity. The present study involves developing a virtual library of novel molecules with high druglikeliness using structure-based de novo drug designing and 2D fingerprinting approach. A library of 2657 drug like molecules was generated. 2D fingerprinting based screening of the designed library gave a unique set of compounds. Molecular docking approach was then used to identify two compounds highly specific for COX-2 isoform. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand complexes revealed that the candidate ligands were dynamically stable within the cyclooxygenase binding site of COX-2. The ligands were further analyzed for their druglikeliness, ADMET properties and synthetic accessibility using knowledge based set of rules. The results revealed that the molecules are predicted to selectively bind to COX-2 enzyme thereby potentially overcoming the limitations posed by the drugs in clinical use. PMID:26241744

  9. Population impact of regulatory activity restricting prescribing of COX-2 inhibitors: ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Benedict W; Metcalfe, Chris; Gunnell, David; Stephens, Peter; Martin, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    AIMS To investigate impacts of withdrawal and regulatory advice regarding cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors on UK population rates of gastrointestinal haemorrhage and acute myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS Ecological time series study of prescribing, mortality and hospital admission trends in people aged ?55 years. RESULTS Withdrawal and regulatory advice limiting COX-2 inhibitor availability from 2004 were temporally associated with reversal of previously unfavourable trends in emergency MI admissions among people aged ?65 years. Annual admission rate trends changed from +4.6% to ?3.1% (P < 0.001) among women and from +2.1% to ?3.8% (P= 0.003) among men. Absolute changes in average annual trend in the number of individuals aged ?65 years admitted following MI were from +981 (1999–2004) to ?819 (2004–2006) per year for women and from +713 to ?995 for men. No change in trend was apparent among people aged 55–64 years, or in MI mortality trends. There was some suggestion of an unfavourable change in admission trends for gastrointestinal haemorrhage among 55?64-year-olds, although this appeared to occur prior to COX-2 inhibitor withdrawal/regulation by up to 2 years. These trends were not apparent in older people, or in gastrointestinal haemorrhage mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS Withdrawal/regulation of COX-2 inhibitors was temporally associated with a favourable reversal of population-level hospital admission trends in MI among people aged ?65 years. Unfavourable reversal of previous declines in gastrointestinal haemorrhage admissions probably occurred before changes in COX-2 inhibitor availability. Withdrawal/ regulation of COX-2 inhibitors did not appear to have any adverse impact on population health and may have been beneficial. PMID:19917000

  10. COX-2 inhibition prevents the appearance of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas accelerated by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Atefi, Mohammad; Fu, Yong; Cass, Ashley; Ng, Charles; Huang, Rong Rong; Yashar, Sharona; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Marais, Richard; Lo, Roger S.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Keratoacanthomas (KAs) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cuSCCs) develop in 15-30% of patients with BRAFV600E metastatic melanoma treated with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi). These lesions resemble mouse skin tumors induced by the two-stage DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis protocol; in this protocol BRAFi accelerates tumor induction. Since prior studies demonstrated cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is necessary for DMBA/TPA tumor induction, we hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition might prevent BRAFi-accelerated skin tumors. Celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, significantly delayed tumor acceleration by the BRAFi inhibitor PLX7420 and decreased tumor number by 90%. Tumor gene expression profiling demonstrated that celecoxib partially reversed the PLX4720-induced gene signature. In PDV cuSCC cells, vemurafenib (a clinically approved BRAFi) increased ERK phosphorylation and soft agar colony formation; both responses were greatly decreased by celecoxib. In clinical trials trametinib, a MEK inhibitor (MEKi) increases BRAFi therapy efficacy in BRAFV600E melanomas and reduces BRAFi-induced KA and cuSCC frequency. Trametinib also reduced vemurafenib-induced PDV soft agar colonies, but less efficiently than celecoxib. The trametinb/celecoxib combination was more effective than either inhibitor alone. In conclusion, celecoxib suppressed both BRAFi-accelerated skin tumors and soft-agar colonies, warranting its testing as a chemopreventive agent for non-melanoma skin lesions in patients treated with BRAFi alone or in combination with MEKi. PMID:24345644

  11. Pharmacophore Elucidation and Molecular Docking Studies on 5-Phenyl-1-(3-pyridyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic Acid Derivatives as COX-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Marc; Sippl, Wolfgang; Radwan, Awwad A.

    2010-01-01

    A set of 5-phenyl-1-(3-pyridyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives (16–32) showing anti-inflammatory activity was analyzed using a three-dimensional qualitative structure-selectivity relationship (3D QSSR) method. The CatalystHipHop approach was used to generate a pharmacophore model for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors based on a training set of 15 active inhibitors (1–15). The degree of fitting of the test set compounds (16–32) to the generated hypothetical model revealed a qualitative measure of the more or less selective COX-2 inhibition of these compounds. The results indicate that most derivatives (16, 18, 20–25, and 30–32) are able to effectively satisfy the proposed pharmacophore geometry using energy accessible conformers (Econf < 20 kcal/mol). In addition, the triazole derivatives (16–32) were docked into COX-1 and COX-2 X-ray structures, using the program GOLD. Based on the docking results it is suggested that several of these novel triazole derivatives are active COX inhibitors with a significant preference for COX-2. In principle, this work presents an interesting, comprehensive approach to theoretically predict the mode of action of compounds that showed anti-inflammatory activity in an in vivo model. PMID:21179343

  12. A novel iNOS and COX-2 inhibitor from the aerial parts of Rodgersia podophylla

    E-print Network

    Suh, Young-Ger

    Ltd. All rights reserved. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxgen- ase-2 (COX-2 effects on protein expression of iNOS and COX-2 in vitro using Raw 246.7 cells. The air-dried aerial parts to fractionation using Sephadex LH-20, fol- lowed by silica gel column chromatography, and re- versed-phase HPLC

  13. Nanoemulsion-based gel formulations of COX-2 inhibitors for enhanced efficacy in inflammatory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, R. R.; Awari, N. G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the potential of a nanoemulsion (thermodynamically stable transparent dispersions of oil and water having a droplet size <200 nm) formulation for the topical delivery of COX-2 inhibitors using etoricoxib as a model drug. Various oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method. The nanoemulsion area was identified by constructing pseudo-ternary phase diagrams. The prepared nanoemulsions were subjected to thermodynamic stability testing. Those that passed these tests were characterized for viscosity, droplet size and differential scanning calorimetry. Topical permeation of etoricoxib through porcine abdominal skin was estimated using the Franz diffusion cell. The ex vivo skin permeation profile of optimized formulations was compared with that of etoricoxib conventional gel. A significant increase in permeability was observed in optimized nanoemulsion formulations consisting of 2 % w/w of etoricoxib, 20 % w/w of Triacetin, 38 % w/w of a surfactant mixture (Cremophor RH 40:Transcutol P), and 42 % w/w of water. The anti-inflammatory effects of this formulation on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats showed a significant increase in the percent inhibition value (84.61 % with the nanoemulsion gel and 92.30 % with the nanoemulsion) as compared with the conventional gel (69.23 %) after 6 h when compared with etoricoxib conventional gel. These results suggest that nanoemulsions can serve as potential vehicles for improved transdermal delivery of anti-inflammatory agents such as etoricoxib.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole-2-oxides and 3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazoles as potential hybrid COX-2 inhibitor/nitric oxide donor agents.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Carlos; Rao, P N Praveen; McDonald, Robert; Knaus, Edward E

    2005-04-15

    A group of 3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole-2-oxides (3,4-diphenylfuroxans) and the corresponding N-desoxy 3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazoles (3,4-diphenylfurazans) analogs, were synthesized for in vitro evaluation as hybrid cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor/nitric oxide donor agents. Reaction of 1-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-2-phenylethene with an aqueous sodium nitrite solution in acetic acid afforded a mixture (3:1 ratio) of the inseparable 4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-3-phenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole-2-oxide (13a) and 3-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-4-phenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole-2-oxide (13b) regioisomers. A group of related regioisomers possessing either a p-aminosulfonylphenyl (16) or a p-azidosulfonylphenyl (17), moiety were obtained by chlorosulfonation of the unsubstituted 3,4-diphenylfuroxan (10) and subsequent reaction with either ammonium hydroxide or sodium azide, respectively. The methanesulfonyl regioisomers 13a,b [COX-1 IC50=11.6 microM; COX-2 IC50=0.12 microM; COX-2 selectivity index (SI)=97] and aminosulfonyl regioisomers 16 (COX-1 IC50=9.8 microM; COX-2 IC50=0.78 microM; COX-2 SI=12), like the reference drug celecoxib (COX-1 IC50=33.1 microM; COX-2 IC50=0.07 microM; COX-2 SI=472), were potent in vitro COX-2 inhibitors with a good COX-2 selectivity index. Release of nitric oxide (NO) from the 3,4-diphenylfuroxan compounds (10, 13a,b, 16, 17) was thiol-dependent since the % NO released was higher upon incubation in the presence of l-cysteine (0.57-3.18%) compared to that in phosphate buffer solution at pH7.4 (0.06-0.15%). Molecular modeling (docking) studies show that the methanesulfonyl (MeSO2) COX-2 pharmacophore present in regioisomers 13a,b is positioned in the vicinity of the COX-2 secondary pocket. The in vitro NO release data, COX-1/COX-2 inhibition and COX-2 SI structure-activity relationships acquired, and molecular modeling docking studies suggest that the 1,2,5-oxadiazole-2-oxide (furoxan) ring possesses beneficial features that should be present in a suitable central ring template (bioisostere) pertinent to the design novel hybrid COX-2 inhibitor/nitric oxide donor agents with a low ulcerogenicity profile that may be free from adverse cardiovascular effects. PMID:15781386

  15. Recent Methodologies toward the Synthesis of Valdecoxib: A Potential 3,4-diarylisoxazolyl COX-2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Dadiboyena, Sureshbabu; Nefzi, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used therapeutic agents in the treatment of inflammation, pain and fever. Cyclooxygenase catalyzes the initial step of biotransformation of arachidonic acid to prostanoids, and exist as three distinct isozymes; COX-I, COX-II and COX-III. Selective COX-II inhibitors are a class of potential anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic drugs with reduced gastrointestinal (GI) side effects compared to nonselective inhibitors. 3,4-diarylisoxazole scaffold is recurrently found in a wide variety of NSAIDs, protein kinase inhibitors, hypertensive agents, and estrogen receptor (ER) modulators. In the present review, we document on the recent synthetic strategies of 3,4-diarylisoxazolyl scaffolds of valdecoxib and its relevant structural analogues. PMID:20724040

  16. COX-2 inhibitors from stem bark of Bauhinia rufescens Lam. (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Aminu; Sirat, Hasnah Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the stem bark of Bauhinia rufescens resulted in the isolation of a new cyanoglucoside and menisdaurin from methanol extract and oxepin from petroleum ether extract. The isolated compounds were tested for their anti-inflammatory potentials based on the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme (COX-2) model. Cyanoglucoside exhibited the highest activity among the compounds with an inhibition activity of 49.34 % at 100 µM (IC50 0.46 µM) compared to the positive control, indomethacin (79.20 %, IC50 0.24 µM).

  17. Antitumor activity of the MEK inhibitor trametinib on intestinal polyp formation in Apc(?716) mice involves stromal COX-2.

    PubMed

    Fujishita, Teruaki; Kajino-Sakamoto, Rie; Kojima, Yasushi; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Aoki, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase is an MAPK that is most closely associated with cell proliferation, and the MEK/ERK signaling pathway is implicated in various human cancers. Although epidermal growth factor receptor, KRAS, and BRAF are considered major targets for colon cancer treatment, the precise roles of the MEK/ERK pathway, one of their major downstream effectors, during colon cancer development remain to be determined. Using Apc(?716) mice, a mouse model of familial adenomatous polyposis and early-stage sporadic colon cancer formation, we show that MEK/ERK signaling is activated not only in adenoma epithelial cells, but also in tumor stromal cells including fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells. Eight-week treatment of Apc(?716) mice with trametinib, a small-molecule MEK inhibitor, significantly reduced the number of polyps in the large size class, accompanied by reduced angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. Trametinib treatment reduced the COX-2 level in Apc(?716) tumors in vivo and in primary culture of intestinal fibroblasts in vitro. Antibody array analysis revealed that trametinib and the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib both reduced the level of CCL2, a chemokine known to be essential for the growth of Apc mutant polyps, in intestinal fibroblasts in vitro. Consistently, trametinib treatment reduced the Ccl2 mRNA level in Apc(?716) tumors in vivo. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling plays key roles in intestinal adenoma formation in Apc(?716) mice, at least in part, through COX-2 induction in tumor stromal cells. PMID:25855137

  18. Antitumor activity of the MEK inhibitor trametinib on intestinal polyp formation in Apc?716 mice involves stromal COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Fujishita, Teruaki; Kajino-Sakamoto, Rie; Kojima, Yasushi; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Aoki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase is an MAPK that is most closely associated with cell proliferation, and the MEK/ERK signaling pathway is implicated in various human cancers. Although epidermal growth factor receptor, KRAS, and BRAF are considered major targets for colon cancer treatment, the precise roles of the MEK/ERK pathway, one of their major downstream effectors, during colon cancer development remain to be determined. Using Apc?716 mice, a mouse model of familial adenomatous polyposis and early-stage sporadic colon cancer formation, we show that MEK/ERK signaling is activated not only in adenoma epithelial cells, but also in tumor stromal cells including fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells. Eight-week treatment of Apc?716 mice with trametinib, a small-molecule MEK inhibitor, significantly reduced the number of polyps in the large size class, accompanied by reduced angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. Trametinib treatment reduced the COX-2 level in Apc?716 tumors in vivo and in primary culture of intestinal fibroblasts in vitro. Antibody array analysis revealed that trametinib and the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib both reduced the level of CCL2, a chemokine known to be essential for the growth of Apc mutant polyps, in intestinal fibroblasts in vitro. Consistently, trametinib treatment reduced the Ccl2 mRNA level in Apc?716 tumors in vivo. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling plays key roles in intestinal adenoma formation in Apc?716 mice, at least in part, through COX-2 induction in tumor stromal cells. PMID:25855137

  19. Original article Potent, orally available, selective COX-2 inhibitors based

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    , Mikhail Krasavin a, f, * a Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland & Technology (State University) Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700, Russia f Department of Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 Universitetskyi Prospekt, Peterhof 198504, Russia a r t i c l e i n f o

  20. Effect of structural modification of enol-carboxamide-type nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on COX-2/COX-1 selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lazer, E S; Miao, C K; Cywin, C L; Sorcek, R; Wong, H C; Meng, Z; Potocki, I; Hoermann, M; Snow, R J; Tschantz, M A; Kelly, T A; McNeil, D W; Coutts, S J; Churchill, L; Graham, A G; David, E; Grob, P M; Engel, W; Meier, H; Trummlitz, G

    1997-03-14

    Meloxicam (5), an NSAID in the enol-carboxamide class, was developed on the basis of its antiinflammatory activity and relative safety in animal models. In subsequent screening in microsomal assays using human COX-1 and COX-2, we discovered that it possessed a selectivity profile for COX-2 superior to piroxicam and other marketed NSAIDs. We therefore embarked on a study of enol-carboxamide type compounds to determine if COX-2 selectivity and potency could be dramatically improved by structural modification. Substitution at the 6- and 7-positions of the 4-oxo-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide, alteration of the N-methyl substituent, and amide modification were all examined. In addition we explored several related systems including the isomeric 3-oxo-1,2-benzothiazine-4-carboxamides, thienothiazines, indolothizines, benzothienothiazines, naphthothiazines, and 1,3- and 1,4-dioxoisoquinolines. While a few examples were found with greater potency in the COX-2 assay, no compound tested had a better COX-2/COX-1 selectivity profile than that of 5. PMID:9083488

  1. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van DIjk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the inflammation. Since herniated tissue swells, we investigated whether this simple mechanobiological stimulus alone could provoke an inflammatory response that could cause pain. Furthermore, we investigated whether sustained-release cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor would be beneficial in such conditions. Healthy bovine NP explants were allowed to swell freely or confined. The swelling explants were treated with Celecoxib, applied either as a bolus or in sustained-release. Swelling explants produced elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) for 28 days, while confined explants did not. Both a high concentration bolus and 10 times lower concentration in sustained release completely inhibited PGE2 production, but did not affect IL-6 production. Swelling of NP tissue, without the inflammatory system response, can trigger cytokine production and Celecoxib, even in bolus form, may be useful for pain control in extruded disc herniation. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1724-1731, 2015. PMID:25991050

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new phenidone analogues as potential dual cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) and human lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cusan, Claudia; Spalluto, Giampiero; Prato, Maurizio; Adams, Michael; Bodensieck, Antje; Bauer, Rudolf; Tubaro, Aurelia; Bernardi, Paolo; Da Ros, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    A new series of potential human 5-LOX inhibitors structurally related to the 1-phenyl-3-pyrazolidinone (phenidone, 2) has been synthesized and the activity against COX-1, COX-2, and human 5-LOX enzymes has been evaluated. In contrast with literature data, we observed that phenidone resulted to be inactive against human 5-LOX, while retains its activity against cyclooxygenases in a micromolar range. The present results suggest that the substitution of the amino function at the 4-position is detrimental in terms of activity toward COX-1 and COX-2, while the presence of a double bond at the 4,5-position does not alter the biological profile against COX. The absence of activity vs. human 5-LOX strongly suggests a re-consideration of phenidone and its analogs as 5-LOX inhibitors in humans. PMID:15652362

  3. Stretch-induced myoblast proliferation is dependent on the COX2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Jeffrey S.; Burkholder, Thomas J.; Pavlath, Grace K. . E-mail: gpavlat@emory.edu

    2005-11-01

    Skeletal muscle increases in size due to weight bearing loads or passive stretch. This growth response is dependent in part upon myoblast proliferation. Although skeletal muscles are responsive to mechanical forces, the effect on myoblast proliferation remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical stretch on myoblast proliferation, primary myoblasts isolated from Balb/c mice were subjected to 25% cyclical uniaxial stretch for 5 h at 0.5 Hz. Stretch stimulated myoblast proliferation by 32% and increased cell number by 41% 24 and 48 h after stretch, respectively. COX2 mRNA increased 3.5-fold immediately poststretch. Prostaglandin E2 and F{sub 2{alpha}} increased 2.4- and 1.6-fold 6 h after stretch, respectively. Because COX2 has been implicated in regulating muscle growth and regeneration, we hypothesized that stretched myoblasts may proliferate via a COX2-dependent mechanism. We employed two different models to disrupt COX2 activity: (1) treatment with a COX2-selective drug, and (2) transgenic mice null for COX2. Treating myoblasts with a COX2-specific inhibitor blocked stretch-induced proliferation. Likewise, stretched COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts failed to proliferate compared to controls. However, supplementing stretched, COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts with prostaglandin E2 or fluprostenol increased proliferation. These data suggest that the COX2 pathway is critical for myoblast proliferation in response to stretch.

  4. Perioperative pain relief by a COX-2 inhibitor affects ileal repair and provides a model for anastomotic leakage in the intestine.

    PubMed

    van der Vijver, R J; van Laarhoven, C J H M; de Man, B M; Lomme, R M L M; Hendriks, T

    2013-04-01

    The authors examined the potential of the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor carprofen to reproducibly induce anastomotic leakage. In experiment 1, an anastomosis was constructed in both ileum and colon of 20 rats, and they were given carprofen (5 mg/kg subcutaneously every 24 hours) or buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg subcutaneously every 12 hours). In another 20 rats an anastomosis was constructed in either ileum or colon, and all received carprofen (experiment 2). Animals were sacrificed after 3 days. In experiment 1, the ileal dehiscence rate was 60% in the carprofen group and 0% in the buprenorphine group (P = .0108). Colonic anastomoses in both groups remained patent. In experiment 2, the anastomotic leakage rate was 80% in ileum and 0% in colon. Thus, COX-2 inhibitors can severely interfere with intestinal healing, particularly in the ileum. Perioperative administration of carprofen yields a unique model for anastomotic leakage, which allows translational research on the effectiveness of perisuture line reinforcement. PMID:22532618

  5. COX-2-mediated stimulation of the lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Timoshenko, A V; Chakraborty, C; Wagner, G F; Lala, P K

    2006-01-01

    Increased expression of COX-2 or VEGF-C has been correlated with progressive disease in certain cancers. Present study utilized several human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, Hs578T and MDA-MB-231, varying in COX-2 expression) as well as 10 human breast cancer specimens to examine the roles of COX-2 and prostaglandin E (EP) receptors in VEGF-C expression or secretion, and the relationship of COX-2 or VEGF-C expression to lymphangiogenesis. We found a strong correlation between COX-2 mRNA expression and VEGF-C expression or secretion levels in breast cancer cell lines and VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Expression of LYVE-1, a selective marker for lymphatic endothelium, was also positively correlated with COX-2 or VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Inhibition of VEGF-C expression and secretion in the presence of COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitors or following downregulation of COX-2 with COX-2 siRNA established a stimulatory role COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis by breast cancer cells. EP1 as well as EP4 receptor antagonists inhibited VEGF-C production indicating the roles of EP1 and EP4 in VEGF-C upregulation by endogenous PGE2. Finally, VEGF-C secretion by MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited in the presence of kinase inhibitors for Her-2/neu, Src and p38 MAPK, indicating a requirement of these kinases for VEGF-C synthesis. These results, for the first time, demonstrate a regulatory role of COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis (and thereby lymphangiogenesis) in human breast cancer, which is mediated at least in part by EP1/EP4 receptors. PMID:16570043

  6. Prostaglandin E2 produced by late induced COX-2 stimulates hippocampal neuron loss after seizure in the CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Takako; Maehara, Michiyo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Yasuda, Shin; Sugiura, Hiroko; Yamagata, Kanato

    2006-09-01

    Injection of kainic acid (KA) into the brain causes severe seizures with hippocampal neuron loss. KA has been shown to immediately induce cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in hippocampal neurons, indicating that neuronal COX-2 might be involved in neuronal death. In this study, however, we reveal that the delayed COX-2 induction in non-neuronal cells after KA injection plays an important role in hippocampal neuron loss rather than early COX-2 expression in neurons. We find that KA microinjection into the hemilateral hippocampus shows a later induction of COX-2 expression in non-neuronal cells, such as endothelial cells and astrocytes. In the KA-injected side, PGE2 concentration gradually increases and peaks at 24 h after injection, when non-neuronal COX-2 expression also peaks. When this delayed PGE2 elevation is prevented by selective COX-2 inhibitor NS398, it can block hippocampal cell death. Moreover, COX-2 knockout mice are also resistant to neuronal death after KA treatment. These findings indicate that delayed PGE2 production by non-neuronal COX-2 may facilitate neuronal death after seizure. Inhibition of COX-2 to an extent similar to PGE2 elevation after onset of seizure may be useful to prevent neuronal death. PMID:16837093

  7. The role of COX-2/PGE2 in gossypol-induced apoptosis of colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Ko, Ching-Huai; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Yang, Liang-Yo; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study showed that gossypol (GOS) exhibits potent cytotoxic effects via apoptosis induction against human colorectal carcinoma cells; however, the role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2/prostaglandin (PG)E(2) on GOS-induced apoptosis is still unknown. In the present study, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) addition significantly inhibited GOS-induced apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells in accordance with inducing COX-2 protein/PGE(2) production. TPA inhibition of GOS-induced apoptosis was blocked by adding protein kinase (PK)C inhibitors including staurosporine (ST), GF109203X (GF), and H7, characterized by the occurrence of cleaved caspase 3 proteins and a decrease in COX-2 protein/PGE(2) production in HT-29 cells. The addition of COX activity inhibitors, including NS398 (NS), aspirin (AS), diclofenac (DI), and indomethacin (IN), suppressed TPA protection of GOS-induced apoptosis with decreased PGE(2) production in HT-29 cells. Application of PGE(2), but not it analogs PGD(2), PGJ(2), or PGF(2?), protected HT-29 cells from GOS-induced DNA ladders, and the E-prostanoid (EP(1)) receptor agonist, 17PT-PGE(2), mimicked the protection induced by PGE(2), whereas the selective EP(2) receptor agonist, butaprostol (BUT), the EP(3) receptor agonist, sulprostol (SUL), and the EP(4) receptor agonist, PGE(1) alcohol (PGE(1)), showed no significant effects on GOS-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. PGE(2) 's protection against GOS-induced apoptosis was reversed by adding the selective EP(1) receptor antagonist, SC-19220. Furthermore, GOS had an effective apoptotic effect on COLO205 colorectal carcinoma cells which expressed undetectable level of endogenous COX-2 protein than HT-29 cells, and the decreased COX-2 protein level via COX-2 siRNA or addition of COX-2 activity inhibitor NS significantly elevated GOS-induced cell death in HT-29 cells. COLO205-T cells were established through sustained TPA incubation of COLO205 cells, and COLO205-T cells showed a lower sensitivity to GOS-induced cell death with increased COX-2 (not Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) protein than parental COLO-205 cells. A decrease in COX-2 protein expression in COLO205-T cells by COX-2 siRNA transfection or enhanced GOS-induced cell death according to MTT assay and DNA integrity assay. The notion of COX-2/PGE(2) activation against GOS-induced apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells was demonstrated, and the combination of GOS and COX-2 inhibitors to treat colon carcinoma possesses clinical potential worthy of further investigation. PMID:22170686

  8. Functional expression cloning identifies COX-2 as a suppressor of antigen-specific cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Göbel, C; Breitenbuecher, F; Kalkavan, H; Hähnel, P S; Kasper, S; Hoffarth, S; Merches, K; Schild, H; Lang, K S; Schuler, M

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of immune surveillance and antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy equally depends on the activation of a sustained immune response targeting cancer antigens and the susceptibility of cancer cells to immune effector mechanisms. Using functional expression cloning and T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice, we have identified cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) as resistance factor against the cytotoxicity induced by activated, antigen-specific T cells. Expressing COX-2, but not a catalytically inactive COX-2 mutant, increased the clonogenic survival of E1A-transformed murine cancer cells when cocultured with lymphocytes from St42Rag2(-/-) mice harboring a transgenic TCR directed against an E1A epitope. COX-2 expressing tumors established in immune-deficient mice were less susceptible to adoptive immunotherapy with TCR transgenic lymphocytes in vivo. Also, immune surveillance of COX-2-positive tumor cells in TCR transgenic mice was less efficient. The growth of murine MC-GP tumors, which show high endogenous COX-2 expression, in immunocompetent mice was effectively suppressed by treatment with a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib. Mechanistically, COX-2 expression blunted the interferon-gamma release of antigen-specific T cells exposed to their respective cellular targets, and increased the expression of interleukin-4 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by tumor cells. Addition of interferon-gamma sensitized COX-2 expressing cancer cells to tumor suppression by antigen-specific T cells. In conclusion, COX-2, which is frequently induced in colorectal cancer, contributes to immune evasion and resistance to antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy by local suppression of T-cell effector functions. PMID:25501829

  9. Functional expression cloning identifies COX-2 as a suppressor of antigen-specific cancer immunity

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, C; Breitenbuecher, F; Kalkavan, H; Hähnel, P S; Kasper, S; Hoffarth, S; Merches, K; Schild, H; Lang, K S; Schuler, M

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of immune surveillance and antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy equally depends on the activation of a sustained immune response targeting cancer antigens and the susceptibility of cancer cells to immune effector mechanisms. Using functional expression cloning and T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice, we have identified cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) as resistance factor against the cytotoxicity induced by activated, antigen-specific T cells. Expressing COX-2, but not a catalytically inactive COX-2 mutant, increased the clonogenic survival of E1A-transformed murine cancer cells when cocultured with lymphocytes from St42Rag2?/? mice harboring a transgenic TCR directed against an E1A epitope. COX-2 expressing tumors established in immune-deficient mice were less susceptible to adoptive immunotherapy with TCR transgenic lymphocytes in vivo. Also, immune surveillance of COX-2-positive tumor cells in TCR transgenic mice was less efficient. The growth of murine MC-GP tumors, which show high endogenous COX-2 expression, in immunocompetent mice was effectively suppressed by treatment with a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib. Mechanistically, COX-2 expression blunted the interferon-gamma release of antigen-specific T cells exposed to their respective cellular targets, and increased the expression of interleukin-4 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by tumor cells. Addition of interferon-gamma sensitized COX-2 expressing cancer cells to tumor suppression by antigen-specific T cells. In conclusion, COX-2, which is frequently induced in colorectal cancer, contributes to immune evasion and resistance to antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy by local suppression of T-cell effector functions. PMID:25501829

  10. Viscum album-Mediated COX-2 Inhibition Implicates Destabilization of COX-2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Hegde, Pushpa; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive use of Viscum album (VA) preparations in the complementary therapy of cancer and in several other human pathologies has led to an increasing number of cellular and molecular approaches to explore the mechanisms of action of VA. We have recently demonstrated that, VA preparations exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect by selectively down-regulating the COX-2-mediated cytokine-induced secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the important molecular signatures of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we observed a significant down-regulation of COX-2 protein expression in VA-treated A549 cells however COX-2 mRNA levels were unaltered. Therefore, we hypothesized that VA induces destabilisation of COX-2 mRNA, thereby depleting the available functional COX-2 mRNA for the protein synthesis and for the subsequent secretion of PGE2. To address this question, we analyzed the molecular degradation of COX-2 protein and its corresponding mRNA in A549 cell line. Using cyclohexamide pulse chase experiment, we demonstrate that, COX-2 protein degradation is not affected by the treatment with VA whereas experiments on transcriptional blockade with actinomycin D, revealed a marked reduction in the half life of COX-2 mRNA due to its rapid degradation in the cells treated with VA compared to that in IL-1?-stimulated cells. These results thus demonstrate that VA-mediated inhibition of PGE2 implicates destabilization of COX-2 mRNA. PMID:25664986

  11. Viscum album-mediated COX-2 inhibition implicates destabilization of COX-2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Saha, Chaitrali; Hegde, Pushpa; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V

    2015-01-01

    Extensive use of Viscum album (VA) preparations in the complementary therapy of cancer and in several other human pathologies has led to an increasing number of cellular and molecular approaches to explore the mechanisms of action of VA. We have recently demonstrated that, VA preparations exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect by selectively down-regulating the COX-2-mediated cytokine-induced secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the important molecular signatures of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we observed a significant down-regulation of COX-2 protein expression in VA-treated A549 cells however COX-2 mRNA levels were unaltered. Therefore, we hypothesized that VA induces destabilisation of COX-2 mRNA, thereby depleting the available functional COX-2 mRNA for the protein synthesis and for the subsequent secretion of PGE2. To address this question, we analyzed the molecular degradation of COX-2 protein and its corresponding mRNA in A549 cell line. Using cyclohexamide pulse chase experiment, we demonstrate that, COX-2 protein degradation is not affected by the treatment with VA whereas experiments on transcriptional blockade with actinomycin D, revealed a marked reduction in the half life of COX-2 mRNA due to its rapid degradation in the cells treated with VA compared to that in IL-1?-stimulated cells. These results thus demonstrate that VA-mediated inhibition of PGE2 implicates destabilization of COX-2 mRNA. PMID:25664986

  12. A New Ligustrazine Derivative-Selective Cytotoxicity by Suppression of NF-?B/p65 and COX-2 Expression on Human Hepatoma Cells. Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenze; Yan, Wenqiang; Li, Bi; Xu, Bing; Gong, Yan; Chu, Fuhao; Zhang, Yuzhong; Yao, Qiuli; Wang, Penglong; Lei, Haimin

    2015-01-01

    A new anticancer ligustrazine derivative, 3?-hydroxyolea-12-en-28-oic acid-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-methylester (T-OA, C38H58O3N2), was previously reported. It was synthesized via conjugating hepatoprotective and anticancer ingredients of traditional Chinese medicine. We found that T-OA exerted its anticancer activity by preventing the expression of nuclear transcription factor NF-?B/p65 and COX-2 in S180 mice. However, the selective cytotoxicity of T-OA on various kinds of cell lines has not been studied sufficiently. In the present study, compared with Cisplatin, T-OA was more toxic to human hepatoma cell line Bel-7402 (IC50 = 6.36 ± 1.56 µM) than other three cancer cell lines (HeLa, HT-29, BGC-823), and no toxicity was observed toward Madin–Darby canine kidney cell line MDCK (IC50 > 150 µM). The morphological changes of Bel-7402 cells demonstrated that T-OA had an apoptosis-inducing effect which had been substantiated using 4?,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) staining, flow cytometry and mitochondrial membrane potential assay. Combining the immumohistochemical staining, we found T-OA could prevent the expression of NF-?B/p65 and COX-2 in Bel-7402 cells. Both of the proteins have been known to play roles in apoptosis and are mainly located in the nuclei. Moreover subcellular localization was performed to reveal that T-OA exerts in nuclei of Bel-7402 cells. The result was in accordance with the effects of down-regulating the expression of NF-?B/p65 and COX-2. PMID:26193270

  13. The novel anti-inflammatory agent VA694, endowed with both NO-releasing and COX2-selective inhibiting properties, exhibits NO-mediated positive effects on blood pressure, coronary flow and endothelium in an experimental model of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A; Testai, L; Anzini, M; Cappelli, A; Di Capua, A; Biava, M; Poce, G; Consalvi, S; Giordani, A; Caselli, G; Rovati, L; Ghelardini, C; Patrignani, P; Sautebin, L; Breschi, M C; Calderone, V

    2013-12-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibitors (COXIBs) are effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs with improved gastrointestinal (GI) safety compared to nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs known as traditional (tNSAIDs). However, their use is associated with a cardiovascular (CV) hazard (i.e. increased incidence of thrombotic events and hypertension) due to the inhibition of COX2-dependent vascular prostacyclin. Aiming to design COX2-selective inhibitors with improved CV safety, new NO-releasing COXIBs (NO-COXIBs) have been developed. In these hybrid drugs, the NO-mediated CV effects are expected to compensate for the COXIB-mediated inhibition of prostacyclin. This study evaluates the potential CV beneficial effects of VA694, a promising NO-COXIB, the anti-inflammatory effects of which have been previously characterized in several in vitro and in vivo experimental models. When incubated in hepatic homogenate, VA694 acted as a slow NO-donor. Moreover, it caused NO-mediated relaxant effects in the vascular smooth muscle. The chronic oral administration of VA694 to young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) significantly slowed down the age-related development of hypertension and was associated with increased plasma levels of nitrates, stable end-metabolites of NO. Furthermore, a significant improvement of coronary flow and a significant reduction of endothelial dysfunction were observed in SHRs submitted to chronic administration of VA694. In conclusion, VA694 is a promising COX2-inhibiting hybrid drug, showing NO releasing properties which may mitigate the CV deleterious effects associated with the COX2-inhibition. PMID:24083950

  14. Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced plasticity changes in the lateral amygdala are mediated by COX-2 and NO

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Doris

    2007-01-01

    It is known from studies outside the brain that upon binding to its receptor, angiotensin-(1-7) elicits the release of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Since there are no data available so far on the role of COX-2 in the amygdala, in a first step we demonstrated that the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 significantly reduced the probability of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala. Similarly, in COX-2?/? mice, LTP induced by external capsule (EC) stimulation was impaired. Second, we evaluated the action of angiotensin-(1-7) in the amygdala. In wild-type mice, angiotensin-(1-7) increased LTP. This LTP-enhancing effect of Ang-(1-7) was not observed in COX-2+/? mice. However, in COX-2?/? mice, Ang-(1-7) caused an enhancement of LTP similar to that in wild-type mice. The NO synthetase inhibitor L-NAME blocked this angiotensin-(1-7)-induced increase in LTP in COX-2?/? mice. Low-frequency stimulation of external capsule fibers did not cause long-term depression (LTD) in drug-free and angiotensin-(1-7)-treated brain slices in wild-type mice. In contrast, in COX-2?/? mice, angiotensin-(1-7) caused stable LTD. Increasing NO concentration by the NO-donor SNAP also caused LTD in wild-type mice. Our study shows for the first time that LTP in the amygdala is dependent on COX-2 activity. Moreover, COX-2 is involved in the mediation of angiotensin-(1-7) effects on LTP. Finally, it is recognized that there is a molecular cross-talk between COX-2 and NO that may regulate synaptic plasticity. PMID:17351141

  15. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro. PMID:25242400

  16. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New 1, 4-Dihydropyridine (DHP) Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sabakhi, Iman; Topuzyan, Vigen; Hajimahdi, Zahra; Daraei, Bahram; Arefi, Hadi; Zarghi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    As a continuous research for discovery of new COX-2 inhibitors, chemical synthesis, in vitro biological activity and molecular docking study of a new group of 1, 4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives were presented. Novel synthesized compounds possessing a COX-2 SO2Me pharmacophore at the para position of C-4 phenyl ring, different hydrophobic groups (R1) at C-2 position and alkoxycarbonyl groups (COOR2) at C-3 position of 1, 4-dihydropyridine, displayed selective inhibitory activity against COX-2 isozyme. Among them, compound 5e was identified as the most potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor with IC50 value of 0.30 ?M and COX-2 selectivity index of 92. Molecular docking study was performed to determine probable binding models of compound 5e. The study showed that the p-SO2Me-phenyl fragment of 5e inserted inside secondary COX-2 binding site (Arg513, Phe518, Gly519, and His90). The structure-activity relationships acquired reveal that compound 5e with methyl and ethoxycarbonyl as R1 and COOR2 substitutions has the necessary geometry to provide selective inhibition of the COX-2 isozyme and it can be a good basis for the development of new hits.

  17. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-11-15

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  18. COX-2 expression predicts prostate-cancer outcome: analysis of data from the RTOG 92-02 trial

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Li-Yan; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pollack, Alan; Hammond, M Elizabeth; Grignon, David J; Venkatesan, Varagur M; Rosenthal, Seth A; Ritter, Mark A; Sandler, Howard M; Hanks, Gerald E; Shipley, William U; Dicker, Adam P

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background COX-2 is overexpressed in some cancers, including prostate cancer; however, little is known about the effect of COX-2 overexpression on outcome in radiation-treated patients with prostate cancer. We aimed to study COX-2 overexpression and outcome in a well-defined cohort of men who received treatment with short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) plus radiotherapy or long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) plus radiotherapy. Methods Men with prostate cancer who had participated in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 92-02 trial and for whom sufficient diagnostic tissue was available for immunohistochemical staining and image analysis of COX-2 expression were enrolled in this study. Patients in the 92-02 trial had been randomly assigned to treatment with STAD plus radiotherapy or LTAD plus radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses by Cox proportional hazards models were done to assess whether associations existed between COX-2 staining intensity and the RTOG 92-02 primary endpoints of biochemical failure (assessed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO] and Phoenix criteria), local failure, distant metastasis, cause-specific mortality, overall mortality, and any failure. Findings 586 patients with sufficient diagnostic tissue for immunohistochemical staining and image analysis of COX-2 expression were included in this study. In the multivariate analyses, the intensity of COX-2 staining as a continuous covariate was an independent predictor of distant metastasis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.181 [95% CI 1.077–1.295], p=0.0004); biochemical failure by two definitions (ASTRO HR 1.073 [1.018–1.131], p=0.008; Phoenix HR 1.073 [1.014–1.134], p=0.014); and any failure (HR 1.068 [1.015–1.124], p=0.011). The higher the expression of COX-2, the greater the chance of failure. As a dichotomous covariate, COX-2 overexpression seemed to be most discriminating of outcome for those who received STAD compared with those who received LTAD. Interpretation To our knowledge, this is the first study to establish an association of COX-2 expression with outcome in patients with prostate cancer who have had radiotherapy. Increasing COX-2 expression was significantly associated with biochemical failure, distant metastasis, and any failure. COX-2 inhibitors might improve patient response to radiotherapy in those treated with or without androgen deprivation. Our findings suggest that LTAD might overcome the effects of COX-2 overexpression. Therefore, COX-2 expression might be useful in selecting patients who need LTAD. PMID:17881290

  19. COX-2 Promotes Migration and Invasion by the Side Population of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhe; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Hao-Jie; Yang, Fu-Quan; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zhong, Yan-Ping; Su, Jie; Yang, Ri-Rong; Li, Le-Qun; Xiang, Bang-De

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor relapse and metastasis due to their abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and give rise to new tumors. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in several kinds of CSCs, and it helps promote stem cell renewal, proliferation, and radioresistance. Whether and how COX-2 contributes to CSC migration and invasion is unclear. In this study, COX-2 was overexpressed in the CSC-like side population (SP) of the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line HCCLM3. COX-2 overexpression significantly enhanced migration and invasion of SP cells, while reducing expression of metastasis-related proteins PDCD4 and PTEN. Treating SP cells with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib down-regulated COX-2 and caused a dose-dependent reduction in cell migration and invasion, which was associated with up-regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN. These results suggest that COX-2 exerts pro-metastatic effects on SP cells, and that these effects are mediated at least partly through regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN expression. These results further suggest that celecoxib may be a promising anti-metastatic agent to reduce migration and invasion by hepatic CSCs. PMID:26554780

  20. Palbociclib inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis in breast cancer via c-Jun/COX-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ge; Xu, Fei; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Qiufan; Shi, Dingbo; Xia, Wen; Tian, Yun; Tang, Yanlai; Wang, Jingshu; Xiao, Xiangshen; Deng, Wuguo; Wang, Shusen

    2015-12-01

    Palbociclib, a highly selective CDK4/6 inhibitor, has been shown to be a novel anti-tumor agent that suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation. However, its anti-metastasis activity remains controversial. In the present study, we evaluated whether palbociclib prevented breast cancer cell metastasis and revealed its regulatory mechanism. We found that palbociclib inhibited migration and invasion in the breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T47D. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, vimentin and Snail, were down-regulated with palbociclib treatment. Moreover, we revealed that this inhibition was mediated by the c-Jun/COX-2 pathway. COX-2 was decreased after palbociclib treatment. The production of PGE2 was also reduced along with COX-2. Additionally, our data showed that c-Jun, a crucial transcriptional regulator of COX-2, was down-regulated by palbociclib. We found that palbociclib weakened the COX-2 promoter binding activity of c-Jun and prevented its translocation from the cytoplasm to cell nuclei. Bioluminescence imaging and tail intravenous injection were used to evaluate the anti-metastasis effect of palbociclib in vivo. The data demonstrated that palbociclib reduced breast cancer metastasis to the lung. These results therefore demonstrated that the anti-metastasis activity of palbociclib is mediated via the c-Jun/COX-2 signaling pathway by inhibiting EMT in breast cancer cells. PMID:26540629

  1. Induction of COX-2 protein expression by vanadate in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line through EGF receptor and p38 MAPK-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, P.-S.; Mak, O.-T.; Huang, H.-J. . E-mail: haojen@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-01-13

    Vanadate is a transition metal widely distributed in the environment. It has been reported that vanadate associated with air pollution particles can modify DNA synthesis, causing cell growth arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, vanadium exposure was also found to cause the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and prostaglandin E{sub 2}. Here, we found that exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma cells to vanadate led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal protein kinases (JNKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) activation, and COX-2 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, but not PD098059 and SP600125, specific inhibitor of MKK1 and selective inhibitor of JNK, respectively, suppressed COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the epithelial growth factor (EGF) receptor specific inhibitor (PD153035) reduced vanadate-induced COX-2 expression. However, scavenging of vanadate-induced reactive oxygen species by catalase, a specific H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibitor, or DPI, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, resulted in no inhibition on COX-2 expression. Together, we suggested that EGF receptor and p38 MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in vanadate-induced COX-2 protein expression in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line.

  2. Prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancer in zinc-deficient rodents: Inefficacy of genetic or pharmacological disruption of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Louise Y.Y.; Jiang, Yubao; Riley, Maurisa; Liu, Xianglan; Smalley, Karl J.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Farber, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is associated with an increased risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer. In rodents, zinc deficiency predisposes to carcinogenesis by causing proliferation and alterations in gene expression. We examined whether in zinc-deficient rodents, targeted disruption of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 pathway by the COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib or by genetic deletion prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Tongue cancer prevention studies were conducted in zinc-deficient rats previously exposed to a tongue carcinogen by celecoxib treatment with or without zinc replenishment, or by zinc replenishment alone. The ability of genetic COX-2 deletion to protect against chemically-induced for-estomach tumorigenesis was examined in mice on zinc-deficient versus zinc-sufficient diet. The expression of 3 predictive bio-markers COX-2, nuclear factor (NF)-? B p65 and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In zinc-deficient rats, celecoxib without zinc replenishment reduced lingual tumor multiplicity but not progression to malignancy. Celecoxib with zinc replenishment or zinc replenishment alone significantly lowered lingual squamous cell carcinoma incidence, as well as tumor multiplicity. Celecoxib alone reduced overexpression of the 3 biomarkers in tumors slightly, compared with intervention with zinc replenishment. Instead of being protected, zinc-deficient COX-2 null mice developed significantly greater tumor multiplicity and forestomach carcinoma incidence than wild-type controls. Additionally, zinc-deficient COX-2?/? forestomachs displayed strong LTA4H immunostaining, indicating activation of an alter-native pathway under zinc deficiency when the COX-2 pathway is blocked. Thus, targeting only the COX-2 pathway in zinc-deficient animals did not prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Our data suggest zinc supplementation should be more thoroughly explored in human prevention clinical trials for UADT cancer. PMID:17985342

  3. Involvement of COX-2/PGE2 signalling in hypoxia-induced angiogenic response in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lixing; Wu, Yeke; Xu, Zhenrui; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Zhihe; Li, Yu; Yang, Pu; Wei, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the impact of hypoxia on the angiogenic capability of endothelial cells (ECs), and further investigate whether the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signalling is involved in the angiogenic response of ECs to hypoxia. We explored the impact of various periods (1, 3, 6, 12, 24 hrs) of hypoxia (2% O2) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. We observed cell viability, migration, tube formation, analysed COX-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), AQP1 mRNA transcription, protein expression and measured PGE2, VEGF protein concentration in cell supernatants. Then we treated HUVECs with COX-2 selective inhibitor NS398, EP1/2 combined antagonist AH6809 and exogenous PGE2 to investigate the role of COX-2/PGE2 signalling in the angiogenic response of ECs to hypoxia. The results demonstrated that short-term hypoxic treatment enhanced HUVECs proliferation, migration, tube formation, significantly up-regulated COX-2, VEGF, AQP1 mRNA level, protein expression and promoted PGE2, VEGF release. The pharmacological inhibition study revealed that exposure of HUVEC to NS398 and AH6809 under hypoxia impaired the biological responses of ECs to hypoxia. Exogenous PGE2 augments the effects of hypoxia on HUVECs, and partially reversed the inhibitory effects of NS398 on HUVECs proliferation and angiogenic capability. Short-term hypoxic treatment enhanced angiogenic capability of ECs, and COX-2/PGE2 signalling may play a critical role in the biological response of ECs to hypoxia. PMID:22050691

  4. Effusanin E suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth by inhibiting NF-?B and COX-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-?B proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-?B to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-?B-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-?B/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-?B and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  5. Effusanin E Suppresses Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Growth by Inhibiting NF-?B and COX-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-?B proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-?B to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-?B-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-?B/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-?B and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  6. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of an (18) F-Labeled Radiotracer Based on Celecoxib-NBD for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jatinder; Tietz, Ole; Bhardwaj, Atul; Marshall, Alison; Way, Jenilee; Wuest, Melinda; Wuest, Frank

    2015-10-01

    A series of novel fluorine-containing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors was designed and synthesized based on the previously reported fluorescent COX-2 imaging agent celecoxib-NBD (3; NBD=7-nitrobenzofurazan). In vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibitory data show that N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (5; IC50 =0.36??M, SI>277) and N-fluoromethyl-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (6; IC50 =0.24??M, SI>416) are potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors. Compound 5 was selected for radiolabeling with the short-lived positron emitter fluorine-18 ((18) F) and evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent. Radiotracer [(18) F]5 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using human colorectal cancer model HCA-7. Although radiotracer uptake into COX-2-expressing HCA-7 cells was high, no evidence for COX-2-specific binding was found. Radiotracer uptake into HCA-7 tumors in vivo was low and similar to that of muscle, used as reference tissue. PMID:26287271

  8. Myeloid Cell COX-2 deletion reduces mammary tumor growth through enhanced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edward P.; Markosyan, Nune; Connolly, Emma; Lawson, John A.; Li, Xuanwen; Grant, Gregory R.; Grosser, Tilo; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Smyth, Emer M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is associated with poor prognosis across a range of human cancers, including breast cancer. The contribution of tumor cell-derived COX-2 to tumorigenesis has been examined in numerous studies; however, the role of stromal-derived COX-2 is ill-defined. Here, we examined how COX-2 in myeloid cells, an immune cell subset that includes macrophages, influences mammary tumor progression. In mice engineered to selectively lack myeloid cell COX-2 [myeloid-COX-2 knockout (KO) mice], spontaneous neu oncogene-induced tumor onset was delayed, tumor burden reduced, and tumor growth slowed compared with wild-type (WT). Similarly, growth of neu-transformed mammary tumor cells as orthotopic tumors in immune competent syngeneic myeloid-COX-2 KO host mice was reduced compared with WT. By flow cytometric analysis, orthotopic myeloid-COX-2 KO tumors had lower tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) infiltration consistent with impaired colony stimulating factor-1-dependent chemotaxis by COX-2 deficient macrophages in vitro. Further, in both spontaneous and orthotopic tumors, COX-2-deficient TAM displayed lower immunosuppressive M2 markers and this was coincident with less suppression of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in myeloid-COX-2 KO tumors. These studies suggest that reduced tumor growth in myeloid-COX-2 KO mice resulted from disruption of M2-like TAM function, thereby enhancing T-cell survival and immune surveillance. Antibody-mediated depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ cells, restored tumor growth in myeloid-COX-2 KO to WT levels, indicating that CD8+ CTLs are dominant antitumor effectors in myeloid-COX-2 KO mice. Our studies suggest that inhibition of myeloid cell COX-2 can potentiate CTL-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and may provide a novel therapeutic approach in breast cancer therapy. PMID:24590894

  9. Ku80 cooperates with CBP to promote COX-2 expression and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu; Xuan, Yang; Jia, Yunlu; Hu, Wenxian; Yu, Wendan; Dai, Meng; Li, Zhenglin; Yi, Canhui; Zhao, Shilei; Li, Mei; Du, Sha; Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Wu, Taihua; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shusen; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. Using streptavidin-agarose pulldown and proteomics assay, we identified and validated Ku80, a dimer of Ku participating in the repair of broken DNA double strands, as a new binding protein of the COX-2 gene promoter. Overexpression of Ku80 up-regulated COX-2 promoter activation and COX-2 expression in lung cancer cells. Silencing of Ku80 by siRNA down-regulated COX-2 expression and inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Ku80 knockdown suppressed phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in an inactivation of the MAPK pathway. Moreover, CBP, a transcription co-activator, interacted with and acetylated Ku80 to co-regulate the activation of COX-2 promoter. Overexpression of CBP increased Ku80 acetylation, thereby promoting COX-2 expression and cell growth. Suppression of CBP by a CBP-specific inhibitor or siRNA inhibited COX-2 expression as well as tumor cell growth. Tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis of lung adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between levels of Ku80 and COX-2 and clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression of Ku80 was associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung cancers. We conclude that Ku80 promotes COX-2 expression and tumor growth and is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:25797267

  10. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  11. Post-training cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition impairs memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Teather, Lisa A; Packard, Mark G; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    Evidence indicates that prostanoids, such as prostaglandins, play a regulatory role in several forms of neural plasticity, including long-term potentiation, a cellular model for certain forms of learning and memory. In these experiments, the significance of the COX isoforms cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in post-training memory processes was assessed. Adult male Long-Evans rats underwent an eight-trial (30-sec intertrial interval) training session on a hippocampus-dependent (hidden platform) or dorsal striatal-dependent (visible platform) tasks in a water maze. After the completion of training, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin, the COX-1-specific inhibitor piroxicam, the COX-2-specific inhibitor N-[2-cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398), vehicle (45% 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin in distilled water), or saline. On a two-trial retention test session 24 h later, latency to mount the escape platform was used as a measure of memory. In the hidden platform task, the retention test escape latencies of rats administered indomethacin (5 and 10 mg/kg) or NS-398 (2 and 5 mg/kg) were significantly higher than those of vehicle-treated rats, indicating an impairment in retention. Injections of indomethacin or NS-398 that were delayed 2 h post-training had no effect on retention. Post-training indomethacin or NS-398 had no influence on retention of the visible platform version of the water maze at any of the doses administered. Furthermore, selective inhibition of COX-1 via post-training piroxicam administration had no effect on retention of either task. These findings indicate that COX-2 is a required biochemical component mediating the consolidation of hippocampal-dependent memory. PMID:11917005

  12. Lasiodin Inhibits Proliferation of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells by Simultaneous Modulation of the Apaf-1/Caspase, AKT/MAPK and COX-2/NF-?B Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo; Tian, Yun; Chen, Wangbing; Wang, Jingshu; Fu, Lingyi; Shi, Dingbo; Zhao, Mouming; Luo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra has been widely used for the treatment of the various human diseases. However, the antiproliferative effects and underlying mechanisms of the compounds in this herb remain largely unknown. In this study, an antiproliferative compound against human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells from Rabdosia serra was purified and identified as lasiodin (a diterpenoid). The treatment with lasiodin inhibited cell viability and migration. Lasiodin also mediated the cell morphology change and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. The treatment with lasiodin induced the Apaf-1 expression, triggered the cytochrome-C release, and stimulated the PARP, caspase-3 and caspase-9 cleavages, thereby activating the apoptotic pathways. The treatment with lasiodin also significantly inhibited the phosphorylations of the AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and JNK proteins. The pretreatment with the AKT or MAPK-selective inhibitors considerably blocked the lasiodin-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, the treatment with lasiodin inhibited the COX-2 expression, abrogated NF-?B binding to the COX-2 promoter, and promoted the NF-?B translocation from cell nuclei to cytosol. The pretreatment with a COX-2-selective inhibitor abrogated the lasiodin-induced inhibition of cell proliferation. These results indicated that lasiodin simultaneously activated the Apaf-1/caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways and suppressed the AKT/MAPK and COX-2/NF-?B signaling pathways. This study also suggested that lasiodin could be a promising natural compound for the prevention and treatment of NPC. PMID:24845412

  13. Lasiodin inhibits proliferation of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by simultaneous modulation of the Apaf-1/caspase, AKT/MAPK and COX-2/NF-?B signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo; Tian, Yun; Chen, Wangbing; Wang, Jingshu; Fu, Lingyi; Shi, Dingbo; Zhao, Mouming; Luo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra has been widely used for the treatment of the various human diseases. However, the antiproliferative effects and underlying mechanisms of the compounds in this herb remain largely unknown. In this study, an antiproliferative compound against human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells from Rabdosia serra was purified and identified as lasiodin (a diterpenoid). The treatment with lasiodin inhibited cell viability and migration. Lasiodin also mediated the cell morphology change and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. The treatment with lasiodin induced the Apaf-1 expression, triggered the cytochrome-C release, and stimulated the PARP, caspase-3 and caspase-9 cleavages, thereby activating the apoptotic pathways. The treatment with lasiodin also significantly inhibited the phosphorylations of the AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and JNK proteins. The pretreatment with the AKT or MAPK-selective inhibitors considerably blocked the lasiodin-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, the treatment with lasiodin inhibited the COX-2 expression, abrogated NF-?B binding to the COX-2 promoter, and promoted the NF-?B translocation from cell nuclei to cytosol. The pretreatment with a COX-2-selective inhibitor abrogated the lasiodin-induced inhibition of cell proliferation. These results indicated that lasiodin simultaneously activated the Apaf-1/caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways and suppressed the AKT/MAPK and COX-2/NF-?B signaling pathways. This study also suggested that lasiodin could be a promising natural compound for the prevention and treatment of NPC. PMID:24845412

  14. The selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, the compound 11b improves haloperidol induced catatonia by enhancing the striatum dopaminergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Fathi-Moghaddam, Hadi; Shafiee Ardestani, Mehdi; Saffari, Mostafa; Jabbari Arabzadeh, Ali; Elmi, Mitra

    2010-01-01

    A substantial amount of evidence has proposed an important role for Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme in brain diseases and affiliate disorders. The purpose of this research was studying the effects of COX-2 selective inhibition on haloperidol-induced catatonia in an animal model of drug overdose and Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, the effect of acute and Sub-chronic oral administration of a new selective COX-2 inhibitor, i.e. the compound 11b or 1-(Phenyl)-5-(4-methylsulfonylphenyl)-2-ethylthioimidazole, in a dosage of 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg on haloperidol-induced catatonia was evaluated and compared to the standard drug scopolamine (1 mg/kg) by microanalysis of Striatum dopaminergic neurotransmission. The results showed a very high potency for 11b in improving the catalepsy by enhancing the dopaminergic neurotranmission (p < 0.05). In addition, statistical analysis showed the dose- and time-dependent behavior of the observed protective effect of 11b against the haloperidol-induced catatonia and enhancement of the dopaminergic neurotransmission. These findings are additional pharmacological data that suggest the effectiveness of COX-2 inhibition in treatment of schizophreny-associated rigidity. PMID:24381603

  15. Staurosporine synergistically potentiates the deoxycholate?mediated induction of COX?2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Tohru; Inui, Haruka; Fujioka, Saya; Fukuda, Suguru; Nomura, Ayumi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Park, Eun Young; Sato, Kenji; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer?related death in western countries, and thus there is an urgent need to elucidate the mechanism of colorectal tumorigenesis. A diet that is rich in fat increases the risk of colorectal tumorigenesis. Bile acids, which are secreted in response to the ingestion of fat, have been shown to increase the risk of colorectal tumors. The expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)?2, an inducible isozyme of cyclooxygenase, is induced by bile acids and correlates with the incidence and progression of cancers. In this study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways involved in the bile?acid?mediated induction of COX?2 expression. We found that staurosporine (sts), a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, synergistically potentiated the deoxycholate?mediated induction of COX?2 expression. Sts did not increase the stabilization of COX?2 mRNA. The sts? and deoxycholate?mediated synergistic induction of COX?2 expression was suppressed by a membrane?permeable Ca2+ chelator, a phosphoinositide 3?kinase inhibitor, a nuclear factor??B pathway inhibitor, and inhibitors of canonical and stress?inducible mitogen?activated protein kinase pathways. Inhibition was also observed using PKC inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of certain PKC isozymes (?, ?, ?, ?, or ?). Our results indicate that sts exerts its potentiating effects via the phosphorylation of p38. However, the effects of anisomycin did not mimic those of sts, indicating that although p38 activation is required, it does not enhance deoxycholate?induced COX?2 expression. We conclude that staurosporine synergistically enhances deoxycholate?induced COX?2 expression in RCM?1 colon cancer cells. PMID:25168879

  16. Albumin-induced podocyte injury and protection are associated with regulation of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shipra; Guess, Adam J; Chanley, Melinda A; Smoyer, William E

    2014-12-01

    Albuminuria is both a hallmark and a risk factor for progressive glomerular disease, and results in increased exposure of podocytes to serum albumin with its associated factors. Here in vivo and in vitro models of serum albumin-overload were used to test the hypothesis that albumin-induced proteinuria and podocyte injury directly correlate with COX-2 induction. Albumin induced COX-2, MCP-1, CXCL1, and the stress protein HSP25 in both rat glomeruli and cultured podocytes, whereas B7-1 and HSP70i were also induced in podocytes. Podocyte exposure to albumin induced both mRNA and protein and enhanced the mRNA stability of COX-2, a key regulator of renal hemodynamics and inflammation, which renders podocytes susceptible to injury. Podocyte exposure to albumin also stimulated several kinases (p38 MAPK, MK2, JNK/SAPK, and ERK1/2), inhibitors of which (except JNK/SAPK) downregulated albumin-induced COX-2. Inhibition of AMPK, PKC, and NF?B also downregulated albumin-induced COX-2. Critically, albumin-induced COX-2 was also inhibited by glucocorticoids and thiazolidinediones, both of which directly protect podocytes against injury. Furthermore, specific albumin-associated fatty acids were identified as important contributors to COX-2 induction, podocyte injury, and proteinuria. Thus, COX-2 is associated with podocyte injury during albuminuria, as well as with the known podocyte protection imparted by glucocorticoids and thiazolidinediones. Moreover, COX-2 induction, podocyte damage, and albuminuria appear mediated largely by serum albumin-associated fatty acids. PMID:24918154

  17. Cox-2 is regulated by toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling and is important for proliferation and apoptosis in response to intestinal mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Chen, Anli; Klepper, Arielle; Krishnareddy, Suneeta; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Thomas, Lisa S.; Xu, Ruliang; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Arditi, Moshe; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Background We have recently demonstrated that mice deficient in TLR4 or its adapter molecule MyD88 have increased signs of colitis compared to wild-type (WT) mice following dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced injury. We wished to test the hypothesis that Cox-2 derived PGE2 is important in TLR4-related mucosal repair. Methods Cox-2 expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and luciferase reporter constructs. siRNA was used to inhibit expression of MyD88. TLR4?/? or WT mice were given 2.5% DSS for 7 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using BrdU staining and TUNEL assays, respectively. PGE2 was given orally to DSS-treated mice. Results Intestinal epithelial cell lines upregulated Cox-2 expression in a TLR4- and MyD88-dependent fashion. LPS-mediated stimulation of PGE2 production was blocked by a selective Cox-2 inhibitor or siRNA against MyD88. Following DSS injury, Cox-2 expression increased only in WT mice. TLR4?/? mice have significantly reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis following DSS injury compared to WT mice. PGE2 supplementation of TLR4?/? mice resulted in improvement in clinical signs of colitis and restoration of proliferation and apoptosis to wild-type values. The mechanism for improved epithelial repair may be through PGE2-dependent activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Conclusion We describe an important link between TLR4 signaling and Cox-2 expression in the gut. TLR4 and MyD88 signaling are required for optimal proliferation and protection against apoptosis in the injured intestine. Although TLR4 signaling is beneficial in the short-term, chronic signaling through TLR4 may lower the threshold for colitis-associated cancer. PMID:16952555

  18. Investigating the Selectivity of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors, in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY) was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe3+ from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe3+ from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity. PMID:24074025

  19. Testosterone induces leucocyte migration by NADPH oxidase-driven ROS- and COX2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chignalia, Andreia Z; Oliveira, Maria Aparecida; Debbas, Victor; Dull, Randal O; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Touyz, Rhian M; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms whereby testosterone increases cardiovascular risk are not clarified. However, oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be determinants. Herein, we sought to determine whether exogenous testosterone, at physiological levels, induces leucocyte migration, a central feature in immune and inflammatory responses and the mediating mechanisms. We hypothesized that testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-driven reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanisms. Sixteen-week-old Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection (5 ml) of either testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or saline. Rats were pre-treated with 5 ml of sodium salicylate (SS, non-selective COX inhibitor, 1.25 × 10(-3) mol/l, 1 h prior to testosterone or saline), flutamide (androgen receptor antagonist, 10(-5) mol/l), apocynin (NADPHox inhibitor, 3 × 10(-4) mol/l), N-[2-Cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl]methanesulfonamide (NS398, COX2 inhibitor, 10(-4) mol/l) or saline, 4 h before testosterone or saline administration. Leucocyte migration was assessed 24 h after testosterone administration by intravital microscopy of the mesenteric bed. Serum levels of testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. NADPHox activity was assessed in membrane fractions of the mesenteric bed by dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence and in isolated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) by HPLC. NADPHox subunits and VCAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule) expression were determined by immunoblotting. Testosterone administration did not change serum levels of endogenous testosterone, but increased venular leucocyte migration to the adventia, NADPHox activity and expression (P < 0.05). These effects were blocked by flutamide. SS inhibited testosterone-induced leucocyte migration (P<0.05). Apocynin and NS398 abolished testosterone-induced leucocyte migration and NADPHox activity (P<0.05). Testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPHox- and COX2-dependent mechanisms and may contribute to inflammatory processes and oxidative stress in the vasculature potentially increasing cardiovascular risk. PMID:25700020

  20. Cyclooxygenase-1-Selective Inhibitors Based on the (E)-2?-Des-methyl-sulindac Sulfide Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are powerful lipid mediators in many physiological and pathophysiological responses. They are produced by oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA) by cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) followed by metabolism of endoperoxide intermediates by terminal PG synthases. PG biosynthesis is inhibited by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Specific inhibition of COX-2 has been extensively investigated, but relatively few COX-1-selective inhibitors have been described. Recent reports of a possible contribution of COX-1 in analgesia, neuroinflammation, or carcinogenesis suggest that COX-1 is a potential therapeutic target. We designed, synthesized, and evaluated a series of (E)-2?-des-methyl-sulindac sulfide (E-DMSS) analogues for inhibition of COX-1. Several potent and selective inhibitors were discovered, and the most promising compounds were active against COX-1 in intact ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR-3). The compounds inhibited tumor cell proliferation but only at concentrations >100-fold higher than the concentrations that inhibit COX-1 activity. E-DMSS analogues may be useful probes of COX-1 biology in vivo and promising leads for COX-1-targeted therapeutic agents. PMID:22263894

  1. COX-2-mediated inflammation in fat is crucial for obesity-linked insulin resistance and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chiang, Chih-Fan; Chan, Pei-Chi; Chen, Chih-Hao; Shih, Kuang-Chung

    2009-06-01

    The aim was to examine the role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-mediated inflammation in the development of obese linked insulin resistance and fatty liver. The rats were fed separately regular diet (CONT), high-fat diet (HFD) ad libitum, or energy restrictedly for 12 weeks. Rats fed HFD ad libitum were further divided into three subgroups co-treated with vehicle (HFa), or a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (HFa-Cel) or mesulid (HFa-Mes). Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC) experiment was performed at the end of study. Another set of rats with similar grouping was further divided into those with a 4, 8, or 12-week intervention period for hepatic sampling. Body weight was increased significantly and similarly in HFa, HFa-Cel, and HFa-Mes. Time-dependent increases in plasma insulin, glucose, 8-isoprostanes, leptin levels, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and hepatic triglyceride contents shown in HFa were significantly reversed in HFa-Cel and HFa-Mes. During EHC period, the reduction in stimulation of whole body glucose uptake, suppression of hepatic glucose production and metabolic clearance rate of insulin shown in HFa were significantly reversed in HFa-Cel and HFa-Mes. The enhanced COX-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) but attenuated PPAR-gamma and C/EBP-alpha mRNA expressions in epididymal fat shown in HFa were significantly reversed in HFa-Cel and HFa-Mes. The increases in average cell size of adipocytes and CD68 positive cells shown in HFa were also significantly reversed in HFa-Cel and HFa-Mes. Our findings suggest that COX-2 activation in fat inflammation is important in the development of insulin resistance and fatty liver in high fat induced obese rats. PMID:19247274

  2. Soman increases neuronal COX-2 levels: possible link between seizures and protracted neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kreipke, Christian W; Thomas, David M; Van Shura, Kerry E; Lyman, Megan; McDonough, John H; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-12-01

    Nerve agent-induced seizures cause neuronal damage in brain limbic and cortical circuits leading to persistent behavioral and cognitive deficits. Without aggressive anticholinergic and benzodiazepine therapy, seizures can be prolonged and neuronal damage progresses for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the nerve agent soman on expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the initial enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the proinflammatory prostaglandins and a factor that has been implicated in seizure initiation and propagation. Rats were exposed to a toxic dose of soman and scored behaviorally for seizure intensity. Expression of COX-2 was determined throughout brain from 4h to 7 days after exposure by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were assessed microscopically over the same time-course. Soman increased COX-2 expression in brain regions known to be damaged by nerve agents (e.g., hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex and thalamus). COX-2 expression was induced in neurons, and not in microglia or astrocytes, and remained elevated through 7 days. The magnitude of COX-2 induction was correlated with seizure intensity. COX-1 expression was not changed by soman. Increased expression of neuronal COX-2 by soman is a late-developing response relative to other signs of acute physiological distress caused by nerve agents. COX-2-mediated production of prostaglandins is a consequence of the seizure-induced neuronal damage, even after survival of the initial cholinergic crisis is assured. COX-2 inhibitors should be considered as adjunct therapy in nerve agent poisoning to minimize nerve agent-induced seizure activity. PMID:20600289

  3. Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Luo, Ying; Wang, Ying; Liao, Chenzhong; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs), which can be used to kill cancer cells through inhibiting histone deacetylase activity or altering the structure of chromatin, have emerged as efficacious agents in the treatment of cancer. With SAHA, FK228, belinostat and panobinostat approved by the FDA, displaying satisfying activity in both haematological and solid tumors of various tissues, efforts to create selective HDACIs have been attracted attention over the past several years. Herein, we mainly review the progress of selective HDAC inhibitors including class-selective and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26268343

  4. Functional Polymorphisms in COX-2 Gene Are Correlated with the Risk of Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Hao, Shu-Hong; Sun, Yan; Hu, Chun-Mei; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Zhi Ming; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu Fei; Yang, Dong Sheng; Shi, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Background. This meta-analysis investigated the association between functional COX-2 gene polymorphisms and the risk of oral cancer. Methods. Several electronic databases were searched for published studies using combinations of keywords related to COX-2 gene polymorphisms and oral cancer. After selection of relevant studies, following strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, data was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Results. We retrieved 83 studies from database search using specific search terms. After multiple rounds of selection and elimination, 7 studies were finally identified as suitable to be included in our present meta-analysis, based on their relevance and data integrity. These 7 studies contained a combined total of 2,296 oral cancer patients and 3,647 healthy controls. Our findings demonstrated that +837 T > C (rs5275) polymorphism in COX-2 showed statistically significant differences in gene frequencies in case and control groups in allele model and dominant model. Similar results were obtained with COX-2 gene polymorphism 765 G > C (rs20417). On the other hand, 1195 A > G (rs689466) polymorphism in COX-2 did not confer susceptibility to oral cancers. Conclusion. Based on our results, COX-2 gene polymorphisms, +837 T > C (rs5275) and ?765G > C (rs20417), showed clear links with oral cancer susceptibility, and the 1195A > G (rs689466) polymorphism did not show such a correlation. PMID:25977924

  5. Inhibitory effect of etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on stomach carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Hirohito; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Inada, Ken-ichi; Enomoto, Shotaro; Tomeki, Tatsuji; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki; Arii, Kenji; Nakata, Hiroya; Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Ichinose, Masao E-mail: ichinose@wakayama-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-26

    The effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, on Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated stomach carcinogenesis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils (MGs). Hp-infected MGs were fed for 23 weeks with drinking water containing 10 ppm N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. They were then switched to distilled water and placed on a diet containing 5-30 mg/kg/day etodolac for 30 weeks. We found that etodolac dose-dependently inhibited the development of gastric cancer, and no cancer was detected at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Etodolac did not affect the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration or oxidative DNA damage, but it significantly inhibited mucosal cell proliferation and dose-dependently repressed the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomachs of Hp-infected MGs. These results suggest that COX-2 is a key molecule in inflammation-mediated stomach carcinogenesis and that chemoprevention of stomach cancer should be possible by controlling COX-2 expression or activity.

  6. Rottlerin enhances IL-1?-induced COX-2 expression through sustained p38 MAPK activation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Jung

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important enzyme in inflammation. In this study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of the synergistic effect of rottlerin on interleukin1? (IL-1?)-induced COX-2 expression in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Treatment with rottlerin enhanced IL-1?-induced COX-2 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Combined treatment with rottlerin and IL-1? significantly induced COX-2 expression, at least in part, through the enhancement of COX-2 mRNA stability. In addition, rottlerin and IL-1? treatment drove sustained activation of p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is involved in induced COX-2 expression. Also, a pharmacological inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB 203580) and transient transfection with inactive p38 MAPK inhibited rottlerin and IL-1?-induced COX-2 upregulation. However, suppression of protein kinase C ? (PKC ?) expression by siRNA or overexpression of dominant-negative PKC ? (DN-PKC-?) did not abrogate the rottlerin plus IL-1?-induced COX-2 expression. Furthermore, rottlerin also enhanced tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that rottlerin causes IL-1?-induced COX-2 upregulation through sustained p38 MAPK activation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. PMID:21971413

  7. Mucin 1 Regulates Cox-2 Gene in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sritama; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Grover, Priyanka; Rao, Shanti; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eighty percent of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAs) overexpress mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein. MUC1high PDA patients also express high levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and show poor prognosis. The cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) partakes in oncogenic signaling, resulting in accelerated cancer progression. Our aim was to understand the regulation of Cox-2 expression by MUC1. Methods Levels of COX-2 and MUC1 were determined in MUC1?/?, MUC1low, and MUC1high PDA cells and tumors using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Proliferative and invasive potential was assessed using MTT and Boyden chamber assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to evaluate binding of MUC1-CT to the promoter of COX-2 gene. Results Significantly higher levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein were detected in MUC1high versus MUC1low/null cells, which were recapitulated in vivo. In addition, deletion of MUC1 gene and transient knockdown of MUC1 led to decreased COX-2 level. Also, MUC1-CT associated with the COX-2 promoter at ?1000 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site, the same gene locus where nuclear factor ?B p65 associates with the COX-2 promoter. Conclusions Data supports a novel regulation of COX-2 gene by MUC1 in PDA, the intervention of which may lead to a better therapeutic targeting in PDA patients. PMID:26035123

  8. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  9. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  10. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in lung cancer treatment: Bench to bed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Kang-Ping; Tan, Gui-Shan

    2015-12-15

    The most common and leading cause of cancer-related death in men is lung cancer. Despite the recent advances in chemotherapy, advanced lung cancer still remains incurable. For this, the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in lung carcinogenesis is necessary to provide potentially effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung cancer, and thus the therapeutic limitations can be overcome. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important inflammation factor that is reported to be up-regulated in different cancers. A number of COX-2 inhibitors have been developed, but most of them are restricted due to the different risk factors. Currently, the FDA has allowed celecoxib to remain on the market but advised physicians to apply this drug with alternative therapies or to use at a low dosage. Some other COX-2 inhibitors, such as, apricoxib and etoricoxib are under critical investigation currently. Celecoxib is being tested in clinical trials against lung cancer, as a single agent or in combination with other agents. Recent studies have suggested celecoxib as a feasible and clinically active regimen in the treatment of patients with lung cancer. However, more clinical trials are necessary for the better understanding of the role of selective COX-2 inhibitors in the prevention and treatment of lung cancer along with their assessment of toxicity. In this review, we have discussed the mechanism of actions of COX-2 in cancer progression and the therapeutic use of COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer with subsequent clinical studies and future management. PMID:26548623

  12. c-Src-dependent EGF receptor transactivation contributes to ET-1-induced COX-2 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is elevated and participates in the regulation of several brain inflammatory disorders. The deleterious effects of ET-1 on endothelial cells may aggravate brain inflammation mediated through the upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying ET-1-induced COX-2 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells remain unclear. Objective The goal of this study was to examine whether ET-1-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release were mediated through a c-Src-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway in brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3 cells). Methods The expression of COX-2 induced by ET-1 was evaluated by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. The COX-2 regulatory signaling pathways were investigated by pretreatment with pharmacological inhibitors, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and promoter activity reporter assays. Finally, we determined the PGE2 level as a marker of functional activity of COX-2 expression. Results First, the data showed that ET-1-induced COX-2 expression was mediated through a c-Src-dependent transactivation of EGFR/PI3K/Akt cascade. Next, we demonstrated that ET-1 stimulated activation (phosphorylation) of c-Src/EGFR/Akt/MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK1/2) and then activated the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) via Gq/i protein-coupled ETB receptors. The activated c-Jun/AP-1 bound to its corresponding binding sites within COX-2 promoter, thereby turning on COX-2 gene transcription. Ultimately, upregulation of COX-2 by ET-1 promoted PGE2 biosynthesis and release in bEnd.3 cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate that in bEnd.3 cells, c-Src-dependent transactivation of EGFR/PI3K/Akt and MAPKs linking to c-Jun/AP-1 cascade is essential for ET-1-induced COX-2 upregulation. Understanding the mechanisms of COX-2 expression and PGE2 release regulated by ET-1/ETB system on brain microvascular endothelial cells may provide rational therapeutic interventions for brain injury and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22747786

  13. Computational Modeling of Kinase Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An exhaustive computational exercise on a comprehensive set of 15 therapeutic kinase inhibitors was undertaken to identify as to which compounds hit which kinase off-targets in the human kinome. Although the kinase selectivity propensity of each inhibitor against ?480 kinase targets is predicted, we compared our predictions to ?280 kinase targets for which consistent experimental data are available and demonstrate an overall average prediction accuracy and specificity of ?90%. A comparison of the predictions was extended to an additional ?60 kinases for sorafenib and sunitinib as new experimental data were reported recently with similar prediction accuracy. The successful predictive capabilities allowed us to propose predictions on the remaining kinome targets in an effort to repurpose known kinase inhibitors to these new kinase targets that could hold therapeutic potential.

  14. PAR1-dependent COX-2/PGE2 production contributes to cell proliferation via EP2 receptors in primary human cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Peter Tzu-Yu; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Chi, Pei-Ling; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Different protease-activated receptors (PARs) activated by thrombin are involved in cardiovascular disease, via up-regulation of inflammatory proteins including COX-2. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-regulated COX-2 expression in human cardiomyocytes remain unclear. Experimental Approach Human cardiomyocytes were used in the study. Thrombin-induced COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, and signalling pathways were determined by Western blot, real-time PCR and COX-2 promoter luciferase reporter assays, and pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs. PGE2 generation and cell proliferation were also determined. Key Results Thrombin-induced COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, promoter activity and PGE2 release was attenuated by the PAR1 antagonist (SCH79797) or the inhibitors of proteinase activity (PPACK), MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190) or JNK1/2 (SP600125), and transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) of PAR1, p38, p42 or JNK2. These results suggested that PAR1-dependent MAPKs participate in thrombin-induced COX-2 expression in human cardiomyocytes. Moreover, thrombin stimulated phosphorylation of MAPKs, which was attenuated by PPACK and SCH79797. Furthermore, thrombin-induced COX-2 expression was blocked by the inhibitors of AP-1 (tanshinone IIA) and NF-?B (helenalin). Moreover, thrombin-stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun/AP-1 and p65/NF-?B was attenuated by tanshinone IIA and helenalin, respectively, suggesting that thrombin induces COX-2 expression via PAR1/MAPKs/AP-1 or the NF-?B pathway. Functionally, thrombin increased human cardiomyocyte proliferation through the COX-2/PGE2 system linking to EP2 receptors, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions and Implications These findings demonstrate that MAPKs-mediated activation of AP-1/NF-?B pathways is, at least in part, required for COX-2/PGE2/EP2-triggered cell proliferation in human cardiomyocytes. PMID:24902855

  15. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-?1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Helmy, Maged W; Ali, Rabab M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-??, TGF-??). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET(B) receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET(B) receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-?1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET(B) receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. PMID:24462674

  16. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Canine Osteosarcoma Stem Cells Reveals a Novel Role for COX-2 in Tumour Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Lisa Y.; Gatenby, Emma L.; Kamida, Ayako; Whitelaw, Bruce A.; Hupp, Ted R.; Argyle, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour of both children and dogs. It is an aggressive tumour in both species with a rapid clinical course leading ultimately to metastasis. In dogs and children distant metastasis occurs in >80% of individuals treated by surgery alone. Both canine and human osteosarcoma has been shown to contain a sub-population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may drive tumour growth, recurrence and metastasis, suggesting that naturally occurring canine osteosarcoma could act as a preclinical model for the human disease. Here we report the successful isolation of CSCs from primary canine osteosarcoma, as well as established cell lines. We show that these cells can form tumourspheres, and demonstrate relative resistance to chemotherapy. We demonstrate similar results for the human osteosarcma cell lines, U2OS and SAOS2. Utilizing the Affymetrix canine microarray, we are able to definitively show that there are significant differences in global gene expression profiles of isolated osteosarcoma stem cells and the daughter adherent cells. We identified 13,221 significant differences (p?=?0.05), and significantly, COX-2 was expressed 141-fold more in CSC spheres than daughter adherent cells. To study the role of COX-2 expression in CSCs we utilized the COX-2 inhibitors meloxicam and mavacoxib. We found that COX-2 inhibition had no effect on CSC growth, or resistance to chemotherapy. However inhibition of COX-2 in daughter cells prevented sphere formation, indicating a potential significant role for COX-2 in tumour initiation. PMID:24416158

  17. Global gene expression analysis of canine osteosarcoma stem cells reveals a novel role for COX-2 in tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lisa Y; Gatenby, Emma L; Kamida, Ayako; Whitelaw, Bruce A; Hupp, Ted R; Argyle, David J

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour of both children and dogs. It is an aggressive tumour in both species with a rapid clinical course leading ultimately to metastasis. In dogs and children distant metastasis occurs in >80% of individuals treated by surgery alone. Both canine and human osteosarcoma has been shown to contain a sub-population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may drive tumour growth, recurrence and metastasis, suggesting that naturally occurring canine osteosarcoma could act as a preclinical model for the human disease. Here we report the successful isolation of CSCs from primary canine osteosarcoma, as well as established cell lines. We show that these cells can form tumourspheres, and demonstrate relative resistance to chemotherapy. We demonstrate similar results for the human osteosarcma cell lines, U2OS and SAOS2. Utilizing the Affymetrix canine microarray, we are able to definitively show that there are significant differences in global gene expression profiles of isolated osteosarcoma stem cells and the daughter adherent cells. We identified 13,221 significant differences (p?=?0.05), and significantly, COX-2 was expressed 141-fold more in CSC spheres than daughter adherent cells. To study the role of COX-2 expression in CSCs we utilized the COX-2 inhibitors meloxicam and mavacoxib. We found that COX-2 inhibition had no effect on CSC growth, or resistance to chemotherapy. However inhibition of COX-2 in daughter cells prevented sphere formation, indicating a potential significant role for COX-2 in tumour initiation. PMID:24416158

  18. Selective Water-Soluble Gelatinase Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Lee, Mijoon; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Ikejiri, Masahiro; Suckow, Mark A.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2011-01-01

    SB-3CT (1), a selective and potent thiirane-based gelatinase inhibitor, is effective in animal models of cancer metastasis and stroke; however, it is limited by poor aqueous solubility and extensive metabolism. We addressed these issues by blocking the primary site of metabolism and capitalizing on a prodrug strategy to achieve >5000-fold increased solubility. The amide prodrugs were quantitatively hydrolyzed in human blood to a potent gelatinase inhibitor, ND-322 (3). The arginyl amide prodrug (ND-478, 5d) was metabolically stable in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes. Both 5d and 3 were non-mutagenic in the Ames II mutagenicity assay. The prodrug 5d showed moderate clearance of 0.0582 L/min/kg, remained mostly in the extracellular fluid compartment (Vd = 0.0978 L/kg), and had a terminal half-life of >4 h. The prodrug 5d had superior pharmacokinetic properties than 3, making the thiirane class of selective gelatinase inhibitors suitable for intravenous administration in treatment of acute gelatinase-dependent diseases. PMID:21866961

  19. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor compound 11b improves haloperidol-induced catatonia by enhancing the striatum dopaminergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Siadat, Seyyed Davar; Shafiee Ardestani, Mehdi; Jabbari Arabzadeh, Ali; Elmi, Mitra; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibition effect on haloperidol-induced catatonia. In this study, the effect of orally, acutely and Sub-chronically administrations of compound 11b [1-(phenyl)-5-(4-methylsulfonylphenyl)-2-ethylthioimidazole] (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg), a newly selective COX-2 inhibitor, was investigated against the haloperidol-induced catatonia phenomenon comparing to the standard drug scopolamine (1 mg/Kg) followed by microdialysis analysis of Striatum dopaminergic neurotransmission. The results showed a great potency for compound 11b in improvement of catalepsy followed by enhancing the dopaminergic neurotransmission p < 0.05. In addition, our statistical analysis showed that the protective effect of compound 11b against haloperidol-induced catatonia was both dose- and time-dependent. These findings are additional pharmacological data that suggest the effectiveness of compound 11b in treatment of schizophrenic drug overdoses and also Parkinson's disease (PD) affiliated rigidity. PMID:24250457

  20. Expression of STAT5, COX-2 and PIAS3 in Correlation with NSCLC Histhopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Karolina H.; Kordiak, Jacek; Migdalska-S?k, Monika; Nawrot, Ewa; Kisza?kiewicz, Justyna; Antczak, Adam; Górski, Pawe?; Brzezia?ska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs), their inhibitors and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) participate in transformations of many various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between STAT5A/B, COX-2, and PIAS3 mRNA expression and tumor staging, metastasis status, and histopathological subtype in 71 patients with confirmed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) diagnosis. Total RNA was isolated from NSCLC tissue samples and the expression of the studied genes was assessed using TaqMan probes in real-time PCR assay. The expression levels of STAT5A, STAT5B, and COX-2 genes were increased in 69%, 79%, and 71% NSCLC samples respectively, while PIAS3 expression was decreased in the majority (69%) of the studied tissues. Statistically significant differences were observed between STAT5 isoforms (P?=?0.0008), with higher expression of STAT5B. We found statistically significant positive correlation between STAT5B and COX-2 (rho?=?0.045), and significant negative correlation between STAT5B and PIAS3 (rho?=??0.049). The negative correlation between STAT5B and PIAS3 (rho?=??0.43) was also observed in T2a+T2b tumor group. Additionally, STAT5B and COX-2 expression levels were significantly different between T1a+T1b and T2a+T2b tumors (P?=?0.002 and P?=?0.041, respectively), with higher expression of both genes in T2 tumor stage. PIAS3 expression was significantly lower in NSCC subtype as compared with SCC subtype (P?=?0.017). Also, STAT5A and STAT5B immunoexpression was assessed, and the results indicated significantly higher protein levels in NSCLC patients as compared with controls (P?=?0.048 and P?=?0.034, respectively). High STAT5B immunoexpression was positively correlated with STAT5B gene expression in tumors (rho?=?0.755). STAT5B protein level was also significantly higher in T2a+T2b tumors, reflecting high STAT5B gene expression in this group. There was no statistically significant association between mRNA and protein expression levels of the studied genes and patients' characteristics: age, gender, smoking. The obtained results highlight the importance of the genes STAT5B and COX-2 in lung cancer progression. PMID:25137041

  1. Selecting a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: Clinically Important Distinguishing Features

    PubMed Central

    Marken, Patricia A.; Munro, J. Stuart

    2000-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed to treat depression. Although these drugs presumably have the same mechanism of action, they vary in several clinically important ways, including how long they remain in the body and the extent to which they interfere with the metabolism of other medications. This article reviews the pharmacologic differences among SSRIs and how these differences may affect various aspects of treatment, such as dosing, administration, and discontinuation. Understanding the distinct properties of SSRIs may help primary care physicians to design the most appropriate therapeutic plan for individual patients. PMID:15014630

  2. Parthenolide Inhibits Cancer Stem-Like Side Population of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells via Suppression of the NF-?B/COX-2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kun; Xia, Bin; Zhuang, Qun-Ying; Hou, Meng-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Luo, Bing; Qiu, Yang; Gao, Yan-Fang; Li, Xiao-Jie; Chen, Hui-Feng; Ling, Wen-Hua; He, Cheng-Yong; Huang, Yi-Jun; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Zhong-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and contribute to both disease initiation and relapse. In this study, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was found to regulate cancer stem-like side population cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and enhance cancer stem-like cells' characteristics such as higher colony formation efficiency and overexpression of stemness-associated genes. The regulatory effect of COX-2 on cancer stem-like characteristics may be mediated by ABCG2. COX-2 overexpression by a gain-of-function experiment increased the proportion of side population cells and their cancer stemness properties. The present study also demonstrated that in contrast to the classical chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, which increased the proportion of side population cells and upregulated the expression of COX-2, parthenolide, a naturally occurring small molecule, preferentially targeted the side population cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and downregulated COX-2. Moreover, we found that the cancer stem-like cells' phenotype was suppressed by using COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and CAY10404 or knocking down COX-2 with siRNA and shRNA. These findings suggest that COX-2 inhibition is the mechanism by which parthenolide induces cell death in the cancer stem-like cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In addition, parthenolide exhibited an inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) nucler translocation by suppressing both the phosphorylation of I?B kinase complex and I?B? degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that parthenolide may exert its cancer stem cell-targeted chemotherapy through the NF-?B/COX-2 pathway. PMID:25553117

  3. Arachidonic acid supplementation enhances in vitro skeletal muscle cell growth via a COX-2-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Markworth, James F; Cameron-Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the metabolic precursor to a diverse range of downstream bioactive lipid mediators. A positive or negative influence of individual eicosanoid species [e.g., prostaglandins (PGs), leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids] has been implicated in skeletal muscle cell growth and development. The collective role of AA-derived metabolites in physiological states of skeletal muscle growth/atrophy remains unclear. The present study aimed to determine the direct effect of free AA supplementation and subsequent eicosanoid biosynthesis on skeletal myocyte growth in vitro. C2C12 (mouse) skeletal myocytes induced to differentiate with supplemental AA exhibited dose-dependent increases in the size, myonuclear content, and protein accretion of developing myotubes, independent of changes in cell density or the rate/extent of myogenic differentiation. Nonselective (indomethacin) or cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)-selective (NS-398) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs blunted basal myogenesis, an effect that was amplified in the presence of supplemental free AA substrate. The stimulatory effects of AA persisted in preexisting myotubes via a COX-2-dependent (NS-389-sensitive) pathway, specifically implying dependency on downstream PG biosynthesis. AA-stimulated growth was associated with markedly increased secretion of PGF(2?) and PGE(2); however, incubation of myocytes with PG-rich conditioned medium failed to mimic the effects of direct AA supplementation. In vitro AA supplementation stimulates PG release and skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy via a COX-2-dependent pathway. PMID:23076795

  4. Association Between COX-2 Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Fan, Xinyun; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Yi; Yang, Siyuan; Li, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple relevant risk factors for lung cancer have been reported in different populations, but results of previous studies were not consistent. Therefore, a meta-analysis is necessary to summarize these outcomes and reach a relatively comprehensive conclusion. MATERIAL AND METHODS STATA 12.0 software was used for all statistical of the relationship between COX-2 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Inter-study heterogeneity was examined with the Q statistic (significance level at P<0.1). The publication bias among studies in the meta-analysis was analyzed with Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested in all controls of the studies. RESULTS COX-2 rs20417 polymorphism had a significant association with reduced risk of lung cancer under homozygous and recessive models, and similar results were observed in white and population-based subgroups under 2 and 3 contrasts, respectively. Additionally, rs2066826 polymorphism manifested a strong correlation with increased risk of lung cancer under 5 genetic models. CONCLUSIONS In COX-2 gene, rs20417 may have a certain relationship with reduced risk of lung cancer, while rs2066826 may increase the risk of lung cancer. PMID:26624903

  5. Association Between COX-2 Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Fan, Xinyun; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Yi; Yang, Siyuan; Li, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple relevant risk factors for lung cancer have been reported in different populations, but results of previous studies were not consistent. Therefore, a meta-analysis is necessary to summarize these outcomes and reach a relatively comprehensive conclusion. Material/Methods STATA 12.0 software was used for all statistical of the relationship between COX-2 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Inter-study heterogeneity was examined with the Q statistic (significance level at P<0.1). The publication bias among studies in the meta-analysis was analyzed with Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested in all controls of the studies. Results COX-2 rs20417 polymorphism had a significant association with reduced risk of lung cancer under homozygous and recessive models, and similar results were observed in white and population-based subgroups under 2 and 3 contrasts, respectively. Additionally, rs2066826 polymorphism manifested a strong correlation with increased risk of lung cancer under 5 genetic models. Conclusions In COX-2 gene, rs20417 may have a certain relationship with reduced risk of lung cancer, while rs2066826 may increase the risk of lung cancer. PMID:26624903

  6. The effects of a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and inhibition on human uveal melanoma cell proliferation and macrophage nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean-Claude; Caissie, Amanda L; Cruess, Stephanie R; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Burnier, Miguel N

    2007-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has previously been identified in uveal melanoma although the biological role of COX-2 in this intraocular malignancy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a COX-2 inhibitor on the proliferation rate of human uveal melanoma cells, as well as its effect on the cytotoxic response of macrophages. Methods Human uveal melanoma cell lines were transfected to constitutively express COX-2 and the proliferative rate of these cells using two different methods, with and without the addition of Amfenac, was measured. Nitric oxide production by macrophages was measured after exposure to melanoma-conditioned medium from both groups of cells as well as with and without Amfenac, the active metabolite of Nepafenac. Results Cells transfected to express COX-2 had a higher proliferation rate than those that did not. The addition of Amfenac significantly decreased the proliferation rate of all cell lines. Nitric oxide production by macrophages was inhibited by the addition of melanoma conditioned medium, the addition of Amfenac partially overcame this inhibition. Conclusion Amfenac affected both COX-2 transfected and non-transfected uveal melanoma cells in terms of their proliferation rates as well as their suppressive effects on macrophage cytotoxic activity. PMID:18042295

  7. Development of a potent and selective cell penetrant Legumain inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kerry A; Eddie, Sharon L; Higgins, Catherine A; Templeman, Amy; D'Costa, Zenobia; Gaddale, Kishore K D; Bouzzaoui, Samira; Jordan, Linda; Janssen, Dominic; Harrison, Timothy; Burkamp, Frank; Young, Andrew; Burden, Roberta; Scott, Christopher J; Mullan, Paul B; Williams, Rich

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes the continued SAR exploration of small molecule Legumain inhibitors with the aim of developing a potent and selective in vitro tool compound. Work continued in this Letter explores the use of alternative P2-P3 linker units and the P3 group SAR which led to the identification of 10t, a potent, selective and cellularly active Legumain inhibitor. We also demonstrate that 10t has activity in both cancer cell viability and colony formation assays. PMID:26522952

  8. Feedback amplification of fibrosis through matrix stiffening and COX-2 suppression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Mih, Justin D.; Shea, Barry S.; Kho, Alvin T.; Sharif, Asma S.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue stiffening is a hallmark of fibrotic disorders but has traditionally been regarded as an outcome of fibrosis, not a contributing factor to pathogenesis. In this study, we show that fibrosis induced by bleomycin injury in the murine lung locally increases median tissue stiffness sixfold relative to normal lung parenchyma. Across this pathophysiological stiffness range, cultured lung fibroblasts transition from a surprisingly quiescent state to progressive increases in proliferation and matrix synthesis, accompanied by coordinated decreases in matrix proteolytic gene expression. Increasing matrix stiffness strongly suppresses fibroblast expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) and synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an autocrine inhibitor of fibrogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 or an agonist of the prostanoid EP2 receptor completely counteracts the proliferative and matrix synthetic effects caused by increased stiffness. Together, these results demonstrate a dominant role for normal tissue compliance, acting in part through autocrine PGE2, in maintaining fibroblast quiescence and reveal a feedback relationship between matrix stiffening, COX-2 suppression, and fibroblast activation that promotes and amplifies progressive fibrosis. PMID:20733059

  9. COX-2 inhibition in schizophrenia and major depression.

    PubMed

    Müller, Norbert; Schwarz, Markus J

    2008-01-01

    In schizophrenia and depression, opposite patterns of type-1 - type-2 immune response seem to be associated with differences in the activation of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and in the tryptophan - kynurenine metabolism resulting in increased production of kynurenic acid in schizophrenia and decreased production of kynurenic acid in depression. These differences are associated with an imbalance in the glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may contribute to an overweight of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonism in depression and of NMDA antagonism in schizophrenia. The differential activation of microglia cells and astrocytes may be an additional mechanism contributing to this imbalance. The immunological imbalance results both in schizophrenia and in depression in an increased Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production and probably also in an increased Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Although there is strong evidence for the view, that the interactions of the immune system, IDO, the serotonergic system, and the glutamatergic neurotransmission play a key role in schizophrenia and in depression, several gaps, e.g. the roles of genetics, disease course, sex, different psychopathological states, etc. have to be bridged by intense further research. There are already hints that anti-inflammatory therapy may have beneficial effects in schizophrenia and major depression. COX-2 inhibititors have been tested in animal models of depression and in preliminary clinical trials, the latter showing favourable effects compared to placebo, both, in schizophrenia and in major depression. The effects of COX-2 inhibition in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as the different components of the inflammatory system, the kynurenine-metabolism and the glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, still need careful further validation including clinical studies with sufficient sample size. PMID:18537668

  10. Estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of selected selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    POP, ANCA; LUPU, DIANA IOANA; CHERFAN, JULIEN; KISS, BELA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most prescribed classes of psychotropics. Even though the SSRI class consists of 6 molecules (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline), only fluoxetine was intensively studied for endocrine disruptive effects, while the other SSRIs received less attention. This study was designed to evaluate the estrogenic/antiestrogenic effect of fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine. Methods The in vitro (anti)estrogenic activity was assessed using a firefly luciferase reporter construct in the T47D-KBluc breast cancer cell line. These cells express nuclear estrogen receptors that can activate the transcription of the luciferase reporter gene upon binding of estrogen receptor agonists. Results All three compounds were found to interact with the estrogen receptor. Fluoxetine had dual properties, weak estrogenic at lower concentrations and antiestrogenic effect at higher concentrations. Sertraline shared the same properties with fluoxetine, but also increased the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Paroxetine presented only one type of effect, the ability to increase the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Conclusions Overall, our results indicate a possible interaction of SSRIs with the estrogen receptor. As SSRIs are being used by all categories of population, including pregnant women or children, establishing whether they can affect the endocrine mediated mechanisms should be a priority. PMID:26609273

  11. Selective N-Hydroxyhydantoin Carbamate Inhibitors of Mammalian Serine Hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Cognetta, Armand B; Niphakis, Micah J; Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Martini, Michael L; Hulce, Jonathan J; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2015-07-23

    Serine hydrolase inhibitors, which facilitate enzyme function assignment and are used to treat a range of human disorders, often act by an irreversible mechanism that involves covalent modification of the serine hydrolase catalytic nucleophile. The portion of mammalian serine hydrolases for which selective inhibitors have been developed, however, remains small. Here, we show that N-hydroxyhydantoin (NHH) carbamates are a versatile class of irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitors that can be modified on both the staying (carbamylating) and leaving (NHH) groups to optimize potency and selectivity. Synthesis of a small library of NHH carbamates and screening by competitive activity-based protein profiling furnished selective, in vivo-active inhibitors and tailored activity-based probes for multiple mammalian serine hydrolases, including palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1, mutations of which cause the human disease infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:26120000

  12. miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Hung; Department of Medicine, Veterans Affair Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073 ; Ekaterina Rodriguez, C.; Donald, Graham W.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Jung, Xiaoman S.; Chang, Hui-Hua; Moro, Aune; Reber, Howard A.; Hines, O. Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Pancreatic cancer cells express low miR-143 levels and elevated p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1. •MEK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 increase miR-143 expression. •miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression and PGE{sub 2}. •miR-143 decreases p-p38MAPK, p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1 expression. -- Abstract: Small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNA), inhibit the translation or accelerate the degradation of message RNA (mRNA) by targeting the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) in regulating growth and survival through gene suppression. Deregulated miRNA expression contributes to disease progression in several cancers types, including pancreatic cancers (PaCa). PaCa tissues and cells exhibit decreased miRNA, elevated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) resulting in increased cancer growth and metastases. Human PaCa cell lines were used to demonstrate that restoration of miRNA-143 (miR-143) regulates COX-2 and inhibits cell proliferation. miR-143 were detected at fold levels of 0.41 ± 0.06 in AsPC-1, 0.20 ± 0.05 in Capan-2 and 0.10 ± 0.02 in MIA PaCa-2. miR-143 was not detected in BxPC-3, HPAF-II and Panc-1 which correlated with elevated mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK) activation. Treatment with 10 ?M of MEK inhibitor U0126 or PD98059 increased miR-143, respectively, by 187 ± 18 and 152 ± 26-fold in BxPC-3 and 182 ± 7 and 136 ± 9-fold in HPAF-II. miR-143 transfection diminished COX-2 mRNA stability at 60 min by 2.6 ± 0.3-fold in BxPC-3 and 2.5 ± 0.2-fold in HPAF-II. COX-2 expression and cellular proliferation in BxPC-3 and HPAF-II inversely correlated with increasing miR-143. PGE{sub 2} levels decreased by 39.3 ± 5.0% in BxPC-3 and 48.0 ± 3.0% in HPAF-II transfected with miR-143. Restoration of miR-143 in PaCa cells suppressed of COX-2, PGE{sub 2}, cellular proliferation and MEK/MAPK activation, implicating this pathway in regulating miR-143 expression.

  13. Targeting COX-2 and EP4 to control tumor growth, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis to the lungs and lymph nodes in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiping; Majumder, Mousumi; Girish, Gannareddy V; Mohindra, Vik; Maruyama, Takayuki; Lala, Peeyush K

    2012-08-01

    We reported that cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 expression in human breast cancer stimulated cancer cell migration and invasiveness, production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and lymphangiogenesis in situ, largely from endogenous PGE2-mediated stimulation of prostaglandin E (EP)1 and EP4 receptors, presenting them as candidate therapeutic targets against lymphatic metastasis. As human breast cancer xenografts in immuno-compromised mice have limitations for preclinical testing, we developed a syngeneic murine breast cancer model of spontaneous lymphatic metastasis mimicking human and applied it for mechanistic and therapeutic studies. We tested the roles of COX-2 and EP receptors in VEGF-C and -D production by a highly metastatic COX-2 expressing murine breast cancer cell line C3L5. These cells expressed all EP receptors and produced VEGF-C and -D, both inhibited with COX-2 inhibitors or EP4 (but not EP1, EP2 or EP3) antagonists. C3H/HeJ mice, when implanted SC in both inguinal regions with C3L5 cells suspended in growth factor-reduced Matrigel, exhibited rapid tumor growth, tumor-associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis (respectively measured with CD31 and LYVE-1 immunostaining), metastasis to the inguinal and axillary lymph nodes and the lungs. Chronic oral administration of COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin, COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib and an EP4 antagonist ONO-AE3-208, but not an EP1 antagonist ONO-8713 at nontoxic doses markedly reduced tumor growth, lymphangiogenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Residual tumors in responding mice revealed reduced VEGF-C and -D proteins, AkT phosphorylation and increased apoptotic/proliferative cell ratios consistent with blockade of EP4 signaling. We suggest that EP4 antagonists deserve clinical testing for chemo-intervention of lymphatic metastasis in human breast cancer. PMID:22641101

  14. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  15. HIV protease inhibitors: a review of molecular selectivity and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhengtong; Chu, Yuan; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is recognized as the most effective treatment method for AIDS, and protease inhibitors play a very important role in HAART. However, poor bioavailability and unbearable toxicity are their common disadvantages. Thus, the development of safer and potentially promising protease inhibitors is eagerly needed. In this review, we introduced the chemical characteristics and associated side effects of HIV protease inhibitors, as well as the possible off-target mechanisms causing the side effects. From the chemical structures of HIV protease inhibitors and their possible off-target molecules, we could obtain hints for optimizing the molecular selectivity of the inhibitors, to provide help in the design of new compounds with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects. PMID:25897264

  16. Endothelium-mediated control of vascular tone: COX-1 and COX-2 products

    PubMed Central

    Félétou, Michel; Huang, Yu; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent contractions contribute to endothelial dysfunction in various animal models of aging, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In the spontaneously hypertensive rat, the archetypal model for endothelium-dependent contractions, the production of the endothelium-derived contractile factors (EDCF) involves an increase in endothelial intracellular calcium concentration, the production of reactive oxygen species, the predominant activation of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and to a lesser extent that of COX-2, the diffusion of EDCF towards the smooth muscle cells and the subsequent stimulation of their thromboxane A2-endoperoxide TP receptors. Endothelium-dependent contractions are also observed in various models of hypertension, aging and diabetes. They generally also involve the generation of COX-1- and/or COX-2-derived products and the activation of smooth muscle TP receptors. Depending on the model, thromboxane A2, PGH2, PGF2?, PGE2 and paradoxically PGI2 can all act as EDCFs. In human, the production of COX-derived EDCF is a characteristic of the aging and diseased blood vessels, with essential hypertension causing an earlier onset and an acceleration of this endothelial dysfunction. As it has been observed in animal models, COX-1, COX-2 or both isoforms can contribute to these endothelial dysfunctions. Since in most cases, the activation of TP receptors is the common downstream effector, selective antagonists of this receptor should curtail endothelial dysfunction and be of therapeutic interest in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Vascular Endothelium in Health and Disease. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-3 PMID:21323907

  17. COX-2 activity determines the level of renin expression but is dispensable for acute upregulation of renin expression in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Matzdorf, Corina; Kurtz, A; Höcherl, Klaus

    2007-06-01

    The role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in the control of renin is still a matter of debate, since studies with COX-2-deficient mice or with COX-2 inhibitors produced conflicting findings. Therefore, we studied the effect of the COX-2 inhibitor SC-58236 on the regulation of the renin system in adult rat kidneys. Renocortical tissue levels and urinary excretion of PGE(2) were reduced to 65 and 40% of control values, respectively, after a single gavage of SC-58236 and did not further decrease on prolonged treatment. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and renin mRNA levels began to decrease after 3 days and reached a constant level of approximately 60% of control values after 5 days of treatment. Isoproterenol or left renal artery clipping for 2 days increased PRA and renin mRNA to similar levels in both vehicle- and SC-58236-treated rats after 2 days. Pretreatment with SC-58236 for 5 days, however, reduced the absolute increase in PRA and renin mRNA levels. Notably, the relative increases were not different between vehicle- and SC-58236-treated rats. Similar findings were observed for the stimulation of the renin system by angiotensin II inhibition and low salt intake. These findings indicate that COX-2 inhibition attenuates renin secretion and renin gene expression stimulated by a variety of parameters in proportion to the lowering of basal renin activity, while it does not interfere with the different stimulatory mechanism per se. As a consequence, it appears as if COX-2 activity relevantly determines the set point of the activity of the renin system in rat kidneys. PMID:17376760

  18. Compressive force inhibits adipogenesis through COX-2-mediated down-regulation of PPARgamma2 and C/EBPalpha.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Golam; Iwata, Takeo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Shima, Shahidan Wan Nazatul; Okutsu, Toru; Ishimoto, Kyoko; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko

    2010-03-01

    Various mechanical stimuli affect differentiation of mesoderm-derived cells such as osteoblasts or myoblasts, suggesting that adipogenesis may also be influenced by mechanical stimulation. However, effects of mechanical stimuli on adipogenesis are scarcely known. Compressive force was applied to a human preadipocyte cell line, SGBS. Levels of gene expression were estimated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The accumulation of lipids was evaluated by Sudan III or Oil Red O staining. In SGBS cells subjected to a compressive force of 226 Pa for 12 h before adipogenic induction, adipogenesis was inhibited. Compressive force immediately after adipogenic induction did not affect the adipogenesis. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma2 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) alpha mRNA during adipogenesis was inhibited by compressive force, whereas C/EBPbeta and C/EBPdelta mRNA levels were unaffected. In preadipocytes, compressive force increased mRNA levels of Krüppel-like factor 2, preadipocyte factor 1, WNT10b, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which are known as negative regulators for the PPARgamma2 and C/EBPalpha genes. Furthermore, a COX-2 inhibitor completely reversed the inhibition of adipogenesis by compressive force. In conclusion, compressive force inhibited adipogenesis by suppressing expression of PPARgamma2 and C/EBPalpha in a COX-2-dependent manner. PMID:20159581

  19. SAR156497, an exquisitely selective inhibitor of aurora kinases.

    PubMed

    Carry, Jean-Christophe; Clerc, François; Minoux, Hervé; Schio, Laurent; Mauger, Jacques; Nair, Anil; Parmantier, Eric; Le Moigne, Ronan; Delorme, Cécile; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; Krick, Alain; Abécassis, Pierre-Yves; Crocq-Stuerga, Véronique; Pouzieux, Stéphanie; Delarbre, Laure; Maignan, Sébastien; Bertrand, Thomas; Bjergarde, Kirsten; Ma, Nina; Lachaud, Sylvette; Guizani, Houlfa; Lebel, Rémi; Doerflinger, Gilles; Monget, Sylvie; Perron, Sébastien; Gasse, Francis; Angouillant-Boniface, Odile; Filoche-Rommé, Bruno; Murer, Michel; Gontier, Sylvie; Prévost, Céline; Monteiro, Marie-Line; Combeau, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases is essential for mitosis. Their crucial role in cell cycle regulation and aberrant expression in a broad range of malignancies have been demonstrated and have prompted intensive search for small molecule Aurora inhibitors. Indeed, over 10 of them have reached the clinic as potential anticancer therapies. We report herein the discovery and optimization of a novel series of tricyclic molecules that has led to SAR156497, an exquisitely selective Aurora A, B, and C inhibitor with in vitro and in vivo efficacy. We also provide insights into its mode of binding to its target proteins, which could explain its selectivity. PMID:25369539

  20. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-? type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  1. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-? type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  2. Cardiac Toxicity in Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the occurrence of arrhythmias, which may be involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart, which may be caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use and their possible role in the occurrence of sudden cardiac death. A total of 40 cases were included in the study and were divided evenly into 2 groups: 20 cases of patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and 20 cases of sudden deaths involving patients void of any drug treatment. The first group included 16 patients treated with citalopram and 4 with sertraline. Autopsies, histology, biochemistry, and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor users consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as a small degree of perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, the results of this study seem to confirm former observations on this topic, suggesting that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may play a potential, causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic concentrations. PMID:26448056

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations for selection of kinetic hydrate inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Aasoldsen, Kjetil

    2005-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water and gas molecules that have long been a problem in petroleum industry. Heavy cost of alcohol and glycol injection has spurred an interest in called 'kinetic inhibitors' able to slow down the hydrate formation rather than prevent it. Since it is not possible to compare directly the macroscopic effects of different inhibitors on the kinetics of hydrate formation in computer experiments, a scheme capable of culling the list of candidates for experimental testing was proposed earlier [B. Kvamme, G. Huseby, O.K. Førrisdahl, Molecular dynamics simulations of PVP kinetic inhibitor in liquid water and hydrate/liquid water systems, Mol. Phys. 90 (1997) 979-991]. Molecular dynamics simulations were implemented to test several kinetic inhibitors in a multiphase water-hydrate system with rigid hydrate interface. In addition, a long-scale run was implemented for a system where the hydrate was free to melt and reform. Our conclusion that PVCap will outperform PVP as a kinetic hydrate inhibitor is supported by experimental data. We demonstrate that numerical experiments can be a valuable tool for selecting kinetic inhibitors as well as provide insight into mechanisms of kinetic inhibition and hydrate melting and reformation. PMID:15908248

  4. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?

    PubMed Central

    Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

  6. The Selectivity of CK2 Inhibitor Quinalizarin: A Reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cozza, Giorgio; Venerando, Andrea; Sarno, Stefania; Pinna, Lorenzo A.

    2015-01-01

    Many polyphenolic compounds have been reported to inhibit protein kinases, with special reference to CK2, a pleiotropic serine/threonine kinase, implicated in neoplasia, neurodegenerative disease, and viral infections. In general however these compounds are not endowed with stringent selectivity. Among them quinalizarin (1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone) turned out to be particularly potent (Ki = 0.058??M) and quite selective as judged by profiling it on a small panel of 70 protein kinases. Here, by profiling quinalizarin on a larger panel of 140 kinases we reach the conclusion that quinalizarin is one of the most selective inhibitors of CK2, superior to the first-in-class CK2 inhibitor, CX-4945, now in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Moreover here we show that quinalizarin is able to discriminate between the isolated CK2 catalytic subunit (CK2?) and CK2 holoenzyme (CK2?2?2), consistent with in silico and in vitro analyses. PMID:26558278

  7. Aflibercept, bevacizumab and ranibizumab prevent glucose-induced damage in human retinal pericytes in vitro, through a PLA2/COX-2/VEGF-A pathway.

    PubMed

    Giurdanella, Giovanni; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Olivieri, Melania; Lupo, Gabriella; Caporarello, Nunzia; Eandi, Chiara M; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio; Salomone, Salvatore

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a major cause of vision loss, is currently treated with anti-VEGF agents. Here we tested two hypotheses: (i) high glucose damages retinal pericytes, the cell layer surrounding endothelial cells, via VEGF induction, which may be counteracted by anti-VEGFs and (ii) activation of PLA2/COX-2 pathway by high glucose might be upstream and/or downstream of VEGF in perycites, as previously observed in endothelial cells. Human retinal pericytes were treated with high glucose (25mM) for 48h and/or anti-VEGFs (40?g/ml aflibercept, 25?g/ml bevacizumab, 10?g/ml ranibizumab). All anti-VEGFs significantly prevented high glucose-induced cell damage (assessed by LDH release) and improved cell viability (assessed by MTT and Evans blue). High glucose-induced VEGF-A expression, as detected both at mRNA (qPCR) and protein (ELISA) level, while receptor (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2) expression, detected in control condition, was unaffected by treatments. High glucose induced also activation of PLA2/COX-2 pathway, as revealed by increased phosphorylation of cPLA2, COX-2 expression and PGE2 release. Treatment with cPLA2 (50?M AACOCF3) and COX-2 (5?M NS-392) inhibitors prevented both cell damage and VEGF-A induced by high glucose. Finally, challenge with exogenous VEGF-A (10ng/ml) induced VEGF-A expression, while anti-VEGFs reduced VEGF-A expression induced by either high glucose or exogenous VEGF-A. These data indicate that high glucose directly damages pericytes through activation of PLA2/COX-2/VEGF-A pathway. Furthermore, a kind of feed-forward loop between cPLA2/COX-2/PG axis and VEGF appears to operate in this system. Thus, anti-VEGFs afford protection of pericytes from high glucose by inhibiting this loop. PMID:26056075

  8. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell proliferation induced by exposure to low concentration of cigarette smoke extract is mediated via targeting miR-101-3p/COX-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Chu, Yi; Xu, Meili; Huo, Jirong; Lv, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been implicated as a major risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Several lines of evidence have suggested that the promoting effect of cigarette smoking extract (CSE) on ESCC is mediated by upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Yet, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of how CSE stimulates COX-2 expression and facilitates ESCC development are largely unknown. In the present study, we revealed microRNA (miR)-101-3p expression was downregulated upon exposure to low concentration of CSE in Eca109 cancer cells, and suppression of miR-101-3p was required for low CSE-induced cell proliferation, presenting as overexpression of miR-101-3p reversing CSE stimulated cancer cell growth. Luciferase assay revealed that COX-2 was a direct target for miR-101-3p and overexpression of miR-101-3p decreased cellular COX-2 protein expression. Furthermore, we found that COX-2 inhibitor and knockdown of COX-2 by siRNA interference could abolish CSE-induced cell proliferation, indicating that promotion of cancer cell proliferation by low concentration of CSE was dependent on COX-2 activity. Finally, downregulation of miR-101-3p expression and upregulation of COX-2 was found in ESCC specimens from patients with smoking history. Taken together, our findings revealed a new post-transcriptional mechanism by which CSE regulated COX-2 expression to favor cancer cell proliferation, suggesting miR-101-3p as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for smoke-related ESCC. PMID:26530100

  9. Theranostic nanoemulsions for macrophage COX-2 inhibition in a murine inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sravan Kumar; Beaino, Wissam; Anderson, Carolyn J; Janjic, Jelena M

    2015-09-01

    Targeting macrophages for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes is an attractive approach applicable to multiple diseases. Here, we present a theranostic nanoemulsion platform for simultaneous delivery of an anti-inflammatory drug (celecoxib) to macrophages and monitoring of macrophage migration patterns by optical imaging, as measurement of changes in inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of the theranostic nanoemulsions was evaluated in a mouse inflammation model induced with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Nanoemulsions showed greater accumulation in the inflamed vs. control paw, with histology confirming their specific localization in CD68 positive macrophages expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) compared to neutrophils. With a single dose administration of the celecoxib-loaded theranostic, we observed a reduction in fluorescence in the paw with time, corresponding to a reduction in macrophage infiltration. Our data strongly suggest that delivery of select agents to infiltrating macrophages can potentially lead to new treatments of inflammatory diseases where macrophage behavior changes are monitored in vivo. PMID:25959685

  10. Origin of the spin reorientation transitions in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Ke, Liqin; Däne, Markus; Benedict, Lorin X.; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Taufour, Valentin; Jesche, Anton; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2015-02-13

    Low-temperature measurements of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy K in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are reported, and the origin of this anisotropy is elucidated using a first-principles electronic structure analysis. The calculated concentration dependence K(x) with a maximum near x = 0.3 and a minimum near x = 0.8 is in excellent agreement with experiment. This dependence is traced down to spin-orbital selection rules and the filling of electronic bands with increasing electronic concentration. At the optimal Co concentration, K depends strongly on the tetragonality and doubles under a modest 3% increase of the c/a ratio, suggesting that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy can bemore »further enhanced using epitaxial or chemical strain.« less

  11. Selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sara; Simithy, Johayra; Goodwin, Douglas C; Calderón, Angela I

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the persistence of tuberculosis (TB) as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) forms of the disease, the development of new antitubercular drugs is crucial. Developing inhibitors of shikimate kinase (SK) in the shikimate pathway will provide a selective target for antitubercular agents. Many studies have used in silico technology to identify compounds that are anticipated to interact with and inhibit SK. To a much more limited extent, SK inhibition has been evaluated by in vitro methods with purified enzyme. Currently, there are no data on in vivo activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (MtSK) inhibitors available in the literature. In this review, we present a summary of the progress of SK inhibitor discovery and evaluation with particular attention toward development of new antitubercular agents. PMID:25861218

  12. Reversible Suppression of Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) Expression In Vivo by Inducible RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Zuber, Johannes; Chu, Chun; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Jiao, Jing; Catapang, Arthur B.; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Gil, Jose S.; Lowe, Scott W.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), plays a critical role in many normal physiological functions and modulates a variety of pathological conditions. The ability to turn endogenous COX-2 on and off in a reversible fashion, at specific times and in specific cell types, would be a powerful tool in determining its role in many contexts. To achieve this goal, we took advantage of a recently developed RNA interference system in mice. An shRNA targeting the Cox2 mRNA 3?untranslated region was inserted into a microRNA expression cassette, under the control of a tetracycline response element (TRE) promoter. Transgenic mice containing the COX-2-shRNA were crossed with mice encoding a CAG promoter-driven reverse tetracycline transactivator, which activates the TRE promoter in the presence of tetracycline/doxycycline. To facilitate testing the system, we generated a knockin reporter mouse in which the firefly luciferase gene replaces the Cox2 coding region. Cox2 promoter activation in cultured cells from triple transgenic mice containing the luciferase allele, the shRNA and the transactivator transgene resulted in robust luciferase and COX-2 expression that was reversibly down-regulated by doxycycline administration. In vivo, using a skin inflammation-model, both luciferase and COX-2 expression were inhibited over 80% in mice that received doxycycline in their diet, leading to a significant reduction of infiltrating leukocytes. In summary, using inducible RNA interference to target COX-2 expression, we demonstrate potent, reversible Cox2 gene silencing in vivo. This system should provide a valuable tool to analyze cell type-specific roles for COX-2. PMID:24988319

  13. Characterisation of (R)-2-(2-Fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-yl)Propanamide as a Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Karlsson, Jessica; Deplano, Alessandro; Hashemian, Sanaz; Svensson, Mona; Fredriksson Sundbom, Marcus; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased endocannabinoid tonus by dual-action fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and substrate selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors is a promising approach for pain-relief. One such compound with this profile is 2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)propanamide (Flu-AM1). These activities are shown by Flu-AM1 racemate, but it is not known whether its two single enantiomers behave differently, as is the case towards COX-2 for the parent flurbiprofen enantiomers. Further, the effects of the compound upon COX-2-derived lipids in intact cells are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings COX inhibition was determined using an oxygraphic method with arachidonic acid and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) as substrates. FAAH was assayed in mouse brain homogenates using anandamide (AEA) as substrate. Lipidomic analysis was conducted in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon ?- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Both enantiomers inhibited COX-2 in a substrate-selective and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values in the absence of a preincubation phase of: (R)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 6 ?M; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 20 ?M; COX-2 (2-AG) 1 ?M; (S)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 3 ?M; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 10 ?M; COX-2 (2-AG) 0.7 ?M. The compounds showed no enantiomeric selectivity in their FAAH inhibitory properties. (R)-Flu-AM1 (10 ?M) greatly inhibited the production of prostaglandin D2 and E2 in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon ?- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Levels of 2-AG were not affected either by (R)-Flu-AM1 or by 10 ?M flurbiprofen, either alone or in combination with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1 ?M). Conclusions/Significance Both enantiomers of Flu-AM1 are more potent inhibitors of 2-AG compared to arachidonic acid oxygenation by COX-2. Inhibition of COX in lipopolysaccharide + interferon ?- stimulated RAW 264.7 cells is insufficient to affect 2-AG levels despite the large induction of COX-2 produced by this treatment. PMID:26406890

  14. Inflammation and depression: combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and NSAIDs or paracetamol and psychiatric outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Ole; Petersen, Liselotte; Mors, Ole; Gasse, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol have been shown to yield the potential of adjunctive antidepressant treatment effects to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); however, when investigating treatment effects of concomitant use, simultaneous evaluation of potential adverse events is important. The objective was thus to investigate treatment effectiveness and safety aspects of concomitant SSRI use with NSAIDs or paracetamol. Methods Within a 25% random sample of the Danish population, we identified all incident SSRI users between 1997 and 2006 (N = 123,351). Effectiveness and safety measures were compared between periods of SSRI use only and periods of combined SSRI and NSAID or paracetamol use by applying Cox regression. Results Among 123,351 SSRI users (follow-up: 53,697.8 person-years), 21,666 (17.5%) used NSAIDs and 10,232 (8.3%) paracetamol concomitantly. Concomitant NSAID use increased the risk of any psychiatric contact [Hazard rate ratio (95%-confidence interval): 1.22 (1.07; 1.38)] and with depression [1.31 (1.11; 1.55)]. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid reduced the risk of psychiatric contact in general [0.74 (0.56; 0.98)] and with depression [0.71 (0.50; 1.01)]. Ibuprofen reduced the risk of psychiatric contacts [0.76 (0.60; 0.98)]. Concerning safety, paracetamol was associated with increased mortality [3.18 (2.83; 3.58)], especially cardiovascular [2.51 (1.93; 3.28)]. Diclofenac [1.77 (1.22; 2.55)] and the selective COX-2 inhibitors [1.75 (1.21; 2.53)] increased mortality risks. Conclusions Concomitant use of SSRIs and NSAIDs occurred frequently, and effectiveness and safety outcomes varied across individual NSAIDs. Especially low-dose acetylsalicylic acid may represent an adjunctive antidepressant treatment option. The increased mortality risk of concomitant use of paracetamol needs further investigation. PMID:26357585

  15. Inflammation and depression: combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and NSAIDs or paracetamol

    E-print Network

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Keywords Antidepressants, depressionInflammation and depression: combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and NSAIDs the potential of adjunctive antidepressant treatment effects to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs

  16. Polyoxometalates--potent and selective ecto-nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yong; Fiene, Amelie; Li, Wenjin; Hanck, Theodor; Brylev, Konstantin A; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Lecka, Joanna; Haider, Ali; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Zimmermann, Herbert; Sévigny, Jean; Kortz, Ulrich; Stephan, Holger; Müller, Christa E

    2015-01-15

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic cluster metal complexes that possess versatile biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, antidiabetic, and antiviral effects. Their mechanisms of action at the molecular level are largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that the inhibition of several enzyme families (e.g., phosphatases, protein kinases or ecto-nucleotidases) by POMs may contribute to their pharmacological properties. Ecto-nucleotidases are cell membrane-bound or secreted glycoproteins involved in the hydrolysis of extracellular nucleotides thereby regulating purinergic (and pyrimidinergic) signaling. They comprise four distinct families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatases/phosphodiesterases (NPPs), alkaline phosphatases (APs) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN). In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory potency of a series of polyoxometalates as well as chalcogenide hexarhenium cluster complexes at a broad range of ecto-nucleotidases. [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (5, PSB-POM142) was discovered to be the most potent inhibitor of human NTPDase1 described so far (Ki: 3.88 nM). Other investigated POMs selectively inhibited human NPP1, [TiW11CoO40](8-) (4, PSB-POM141, Ki: 1.46 nM) and [NaSb9W21O86](18-) (6, PSB-POM143, Ki: 4.98 nM) representing the most potent and selective human NPP1 inhibitors described to date. [NaP5W30O110](14-) (8, PSB-POM144) strongly inhibited NTPDase1-3 and NPP1 and may therefore be used as a pan-inhibitor to block ATP hydrolysis. The polyoxoanionic compounds displayed a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition of NPPs and eN, but appeared to be competitive inhibitors of TNAP. Future in vivo studies with selected inhibitors identified in the current study are warranted. PMID:25449596

  17. Reactive oxygen species induce Cox-2 expression via TAK1 activation in synovial fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yuta; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Shigi, Kanae; Fukuda, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress within the arthritis joint has been indicated to be involved in generating mediators for tissue degeneration and inflammation. COX-2 is a mediator in inflammatory action, pain and some catabolic reactions in inflamed tissues. Here, we demonstrated a direct relationship between oxidative stress and Cox-2 expression in the bovine synovial fibroblasts. Furthermore, we elucidated a novel mechanism, in which oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of MAPKs and NF-?B through TAK1 activation and resulted in increased Cox-2 and prostaglandin E2 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that ROS-induced Cox-2 expression was inhibited by supplementation of an antioxidant such as N-acetyl cysteamine and hyaluronic acid in vitro and in vivo. From these results, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important factor for generation of Cox-2 in synovial fibroblasts and thus its neutralization may be an effective strategy in palliative therapy for chronic joint diseases. PMID:26110105

  18. Wnt/?-Catenin Signaling Enhances Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) Transcriptional Activity in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Felipe; Bravo, Soraya; Cruzat, Fernando; Montecino, Martín; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme (COX2) is one of the main characteristics of gastric cancer (GC), which is a leading cause of death in the world, particularly in Asia and South America. Although the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway has been involved in the transcriptional activation of the COX2 gene, the precise mechanism modulating this response is still unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we studied the transcriptional regulation of the COX2 gene in GC cell lines and assessed whether this phenomenon is modulated by Wnt/?-catenin signaling. We first examined the expression of COX2 mRNA in GC cells and found that there is a differential expression pattern consistent with high levels of nuclear-localized ?-catenin. Pharmacological treatment with either lithium or valproic acid and molecular induction with purified canonical Wnt3a significantly enhanced COX2 mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Serial deletion of a 1.6 Kbp COX2 promoter fragment and gain- or loss-of-function experiments allowed us to identify a minimal Wnt/?-catenin responsive region consisting of 0.8 Kbp of the COX2 promoter (pCOX2-0.8), which showed maximal response in gene-reporter assays. The activity of this pCOX2-0.8 promoter region was further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-protein binding assays. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the pCOX2-0.8 minimal promoter contains a novel functional T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF)-response element (TBE Site II; -689/-684) that responds directly to enhanced Wnt/?-catenin signaling and which may be important for the onset/progression of GC. PMID:21494638

  19. Regulation of COX-2 expression by miR-146a in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins are a class of molecules that mediate cellular inflammatory responses and control cell growth. The oxidative conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 is carried out by two isozymes of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is constitutively expressed, while COX-2 can be transiently induced by external stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, COX-2 is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including lung cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression. Previous studies have implicated an important role for miRNAs in human cancer. We demonstrate here that miR-146a expression levels are significantly lower in lung cancer cells as compared with normal lung cells. Conversely, lung cancer cells have higher levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA expression. Introduction of miR-146a can specifically ablate COX-2 protein and the biological activity of COX-2 as measured by prostaglandin production. The regulation of COX-2 by miR-146a is mediated through a single miRNA-binding site present in the 3? UTR. Therefore, we propose that decreased miR-146a expression contributes to the up-regulation and overexpression of COX-2 in lung cancer cells. Since potential miRNA-mediated regulation is a functional consequence of alternative polyadenylation site choice, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate COX-2 mRNA alternative polyadenylation and miRNA targeting will give us key insights into how COX-2 expression is involved in the development of a metastatic condition. PMID:25047043

  20. Variability in the response to cyclooxygenase inhibitors: toward the individualization of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Tilo

    2009-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) relieve pain, inflammation, and fever by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COXs). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs selective for COX-2 were developed to inhibit the major enzymatic source of the prostaglandins that mediate pain and inflammation while sparing COX-1-derived prostaglandins that contribute dominantly to gastric cytoprotection. Indeed, such purpose-designed COX-2 inhibitors reduced the incidence of serious gastrointestinal adverse effects when compared with traditional NSAIDs; however, they confer a small but absolute cardiovascular hazard. The hazard might also extend to traditional NSAIDs, which are relatively selective for COX-2, such as diclofenac, meloxicam, and etodolac. The occurrence of complications and the therapeutic responses to individual NSAIDs may vary substantially from patient to patient. Exploitation of detectable variability in the biochemical response to NSAIDs may offer an approach to the personalization of the management of risk and benefit. PMID:19602986

  1. New Frontiers in Selective Human MAO-B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Silvestri, Romano

    2015-09-10

    Accumulating evidence shows a relationship between the human MAO-B (hMAO-B) enzyme and neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorder, personality traits, type II alcoholism, borderline personality disorders, aggressiveness and violence in crime, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, suicide, schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, migraine, dementia, and PD. Thus, MAO-B represents an attractive target for the treatment of a number of human diseases. The discovery, development, and therapeutic use of drugs that inhibit MAO-B are major challenges for future therapy. Various compounds and drugs that selectively target this isoform have been discovered recently. These agents are synthetic compounds or natural products and their analogues, including chalcones, pyrazoles, chromones, coumarins, xanthines, isatin derivatives, thiazolidindiones, (thiazol-2-yl)hydrazones, and analogues of marketed drugs. Despite considerable efforts in understanding the binding interaction with specific substrates or inhibitors, structural information available for the rational design of new hMAO-B inhibitors remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the quest for novel, potent, and selective hMAO-B inhibitors remains of high interest. PMID:25915162

  2. Potent and selective nonpeptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase.

    PubMed

    Fish, Paul V; Allan, Gillian A; Bailey, Simon; Blagg, Julian; Butt, Richard; Collis, Michael G; Greiling, Doris; James, Kim; Kendall, Jackie; McElroy, Andrew; McCleverty, Dawn; Reed, Charlotte; Webster, Robert; Whitlock, Gavin A

    2007-07-26

    6-Cyclohexyl-N-hydroxy-3-(1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)hexanamides were previously disclosed as inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) culminating in the identification of amide 1. Our objective was to discover a second inhibitor that would have improved affinity for PCP and to optimize properties for transepidermal delivery (TED) to intact skin. Further investigation of this template identified a number of potent PCP inhibitors (IC50 values of 2-6 nM) with improved TED flux. Sulfonamide 56 had excellent PCP enzyme activity when measured with a peptide substrate (Ki 8.7 nM) or with the endogenous substrate procollagen (IC50 3.4 nM) and demonstrates excellent selectivity over MMPs involved in wound healing (>10 000-fold). In the fibroplasia model, 56 inhibited deposition of insoluble collagen by 76 +/- 2% at 10 microM and was very effective at penetrating human skin in vitro with a TED flux of 1.5 microg/cm2/h, which compares favorably with values for agents that are known to penetrate skin well in vivo. Based on this profile, 56 (UK-421,045) was selected as a candidate for further preclinical evaluation as a topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agent. PMID:17591762

  3. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenases with reference to their selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Shozo . E-mail: yamamosh@kyoto-wu.ac.jp; Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakano, Ayumi; Hiraki, Emi; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Yokota, Kazushige; Ueda, Natsuo

    2005-12-09

    Lipoxygenase is a dioxygenase recognizing a 1-cis,4-cis-pentadiene of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The enzyme oxygenates various carbon atoms of arachidonic acid as a substrate and produces 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid with a conjugated diene chromophore. The enzyme is referred to as 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. Earlier we found two isoforms of 12-lipoxygenase, leukocyte- and platelet-type enzymes, which were distinguished by substrate specificity, catalytic activity, primary structure, gene intron size, and antigenicity. Recently, the epidermis-type enzyme was found as the third isoform. Attempts have been made to find isozyme-specific inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase, and earlier we found hinokitol, a tropolone, as a potent inhibitor selective for the platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase. More recently, we tested various catechins of tea leaves and found that (-)-geotechnical gallate was a potent and selective inhibitor of human platelet 12-lipoxygenase with an IC{sub 5} of 0.14 {mu}M. The compound was much less active with 12-lipoxygenase of leukocyte-type, 15-, 8-, and 5-lipoxygenases, and cyclo oxygenases-1 and -2.

  4. Melittin suppresses VEGF-A-induced tumor growth by blocking VEGFR-2 and the COX-2-mediated MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Kang, Jung Won; Nam, Dongwoo; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Dong-Suk; Lee, Jae-Dong

    2012-11-26

    Melittin (1) is a major polypeptide in honey bee venom that has been used traditionally against chronic inflammation and cancer. However, its molecular mechanism has not been determined. In this study, the antitumor effect of 1 was compared with that of NS398, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, in vivo and in vitro. Subcutaneous injection of 1 at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg suppressed significantly vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A-transfected highly metastatic Lewis lung cancer (VEGF-A-hm LLC) tumor growth by 25% and 57%, respectively. Also, 1 inhibited significantly the number of vessels around VEGF-A-hm LLC cells. The results were superior to those obtained in the mice treated with NS398. Compound 1 dose-dependently inhibited proliferation and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (VEGF-A-HUVECs), without affecting cell viability in native HUVECs. In addition, 1 decreased the expression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in VEGF-A-transfected HUVECs. These effects were accompanied by a reduction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinase, whereas it increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). SB203580 abolished the downregulation of COX-2 and VEGFR-2 and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 1. The antitumor activity of 1 may be associated with antiangiogenic actions via inhibiting VEGFR-2 and inflammatory mediators involved in the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:23110475

  5. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1?)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer. PMID:26193871

  6. Action at a distance: mutations of peripheral residues transform rapid reversible inhibitors to slow, tight binders of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Blobaum, Anna L; Xu, Shu; Rowlinson, Scott W; Duggan, Kelsey C; Banerjee, Surajit; Kudalkar, Shalley N; Birmingham, William R; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2015-05-15

    Cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin G2. The inhibitory activity of rapid, reversible COX inhibitors (ibuprofen, naproxen, mefenamic acid, and lumiracoxib) demonstrated a significant increase in potency and time dependence of inhibition against double tryptophan murine COX-2 mutants at the 89/90 and 89/119 positions. In contrast, the slow, time-dependent COX inhibitors (diclofenac, indomethacin, and flurbiprofen) were unaffected by those mutations. Further mutagenesis studies suggested that mutation at position 89 was principally responsible for the changes in inhibitory potency of rapid, reversible inhibitors, whereas mutation at position 90 may exert some effect on the potency of COX-2-selective diarylheterocycle inhibitors; no effect was observed with mutation at position 119. Several crystal structures with or without NSAIDs indicated that placement of a bulky residue at position 89 caused a closure of a gap at the lobby, and alteration of histidine to tryptophan at position 90 changed the electrostatic profile of the side pocket of COX-2. Thus, these two residues, especially Val-89 at the lobby region, are crucial for the entrance and exit of some NSAIDs from the COX active site. PMID:25825493

  7. COX-2 mediated induction of endothelium-independent contraction to bradykinin in endotoxin-treated porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Kim, Hye Min; Zhao, Ru; Khang, Gilson; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Bernlöhr, Christian; Doods, Henri; Lee, Dongwon; Lee, Seung Hee; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Wu, Dongmei

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the vascular effects of bradykinin in health and vascular inflammation comparing responses of isolated pig coronary arteries in the absence and presence of endotoxins. Bradykinin induced contractions in lipopolysaccharide-treated, but not untreated, arterial rings without endothelium. The B2-receptor antagonist HOE140, but not the B1-receptor inhibitor SSR240612, blocked these endothelium-independent contractions in response to bradykinin. The bradykinin-induced contractions were blocked by indomethacin, celecoxib, and terbogrel but not valeryl salicylate, AH6809, AL 8810, or RO1138452. They were attenuated by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid, and by diethyldithiocarbamate plus tiron but not by L-NAME. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed significant upregulations of messenger RNA expressions of B1 receptors, COX-2, and thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXAS1) following lipopolysaccharide incubation but not of B2 receptors or COX-1. The present data demonstrate that bradykinin induces contractions mediated by the COX-2 pathway in endotoxin-treated pig coronary arteries. These results support differential roles of bradykinin in health and disease. PMID:25192543

  8. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors of Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase 3.

    PubMed

    Huard, Kim; Londregan, Allyn T; Tesz, Gregory; Bahnck, Kevin B; Magee, Thomas V; Hepworth, David; Polivkova, Jana; Coffey, Steven B; Pabst, Brandon A; Gosset, James R; Nigam, Anu; Kou, Kou; Sun, Hao; Lee, Kyuha; Herr, Michael; Boehm, Markus; Carpino, Philip A; Goodwin, Bryan; Perreault, Christian; Li, Qifang; Jorgensen, Csilla C; Tkalcevic, George T; Subashi, Timothy A; Ahn, Kay

    2015-09-24

    Inhibition of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthetic enzymes has been suggested as a promising strategy to treat insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 3 (MGAT3) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the acylation of both monoacylglycerol (MAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) to generate DAG and TAG, respectively. Herein, we report the discovery and characterization of the first selective small molecule inhibitors of MGAT3. Isoindoline-5-sulfonamide (6f, PF-06471553) selectively inhibits MGAT3 with high in vitro potency and cell efficacy. Because the gene encoding MGAT3 (MOGAT3) is found only in higher mammals and humans, but not in rodents, a transgenic mouse model expressing the complete human MOGAT3 was used to characterize the effects of 6f in vivo. In the presence of a combination of diacylglycerol acyltransferases 1 and 2 (DGAT1 and DGAT2) inhibitors, an oral administration of 6f exhibited inhibition of the incorporation of deuterium-labeled glycerol into TAG in this mouse model. The availability of a potent and selective chemical tool and a humanized mouse model described in this report should facilitate further dissection of the physiological function of MGAT3 and its role in lipid homeostasis. PMID:26258602

  9. [Sexsomnia during treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Krol, D G H

    2008-01-01

    Sexsomnia is a parasomnia characterised by sexual behaviour. A 30-year-old man, with no history of parasomnias or related precipitating factors, developed sexual behaviour during sleep after three weeks of treatment with escitalopram 10 mg daily. The parasomnia disappeared on the sixth day after the escitalopram had been stopped. The temporal relationship between the use of this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and the occurrence of the parasomnia suggests a causal relationship, possibly related to increased serotonergic neurotransmission in the raphe nucleus. PMID:18991234

  10. COX-2 expression induced by diesel particles involves chromatin modification and degradation of HDAC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the inflammatory response induced by physiologic and stress stimuli. Exposure to diesel exhaust particulate matter (DEP) has been shown to induce pulmonary inflammation and exacerbate asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary dis...

  11. Towards a universal barcode of oomycetes - a comparison of the cox1 and cox2 loci.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Beakes, Gordon; Glockling, Sally; Kruse, Julia; Nam, Bora; Nigrelli, Lisa; Ploch, Sebastian; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Shivas, Roger G; Telle, Sabine; Voglmayr, Hermann; Thines, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of eukaryotes in terrestrial, limnic and marine habitats worldwide and include several devastating plant pathogens, for example Phytophthora infestans (potato late blight). The cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 gene (cox2) has been widely used for identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of various oomycete groups. However, recently the cox1 gene was proposed as a DNA barcode marker instead, together with ITS rDNA. The cox1 locus has been used in some studies of Pythium and Phytophthora, but has rarely been used for other oomycetes, as amplification success of cox1 varies with different lineages and sample ages. To determine which out of cox1 or cox2 is best suited as a universal oomycete barcode, we compared these two genes in terms of (i) PCR efficiency for 31 representative genera, as well as for historic herbarium specimens, and (ii) sequence polymorphism, intra- and interspecific divergence. The primer sets for cox2 successfully amplified all oomycete genera tested, while cox1 failed to amplify three genera. In addition, cox2 exhibited higher PCR efficiency for historic herbarium specimens, providing easier access to barcoding-type material. Sequence data for several historic type specimens exist for cox2, but there are none for cox1. In addition, cox2 yielded higher species identification success, with higher interspecific and lower intraspecific divergences than cox1. Therefore, cox2 is suggested as a partner DNA barcode along with ITS rDNA instead of cox1. The cox2-1 spacer could be a useful marker below species level. Improved protocols and universal primers are presented for all genes to facilitate future barcoding efforts. PMID:25728598

  12. ?9-THC-caused synaptic and memory impairments are mediated through COX-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongqing; Zhang, Jian; Fan, Ni; Teng, Zhao-Qian; Wu, Yan; Yang, Hongwei; Tang, Ya-Ping; Sun, Hao; Song, Yunping; Chen, Chu

    2013-11-21

    Marijuana has been used for thousands of years as a treatment for medical conditions. However, untoward side effects limit its medical value. Here, we show that synaptic and cognitive impairments following repeated exposure to ?(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (?(9)-THC) are associated with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostanoids in the brain. COX-2 induction by ?(9)-THC is mediated via CB1 receptor-coupled G protein ?? subunits. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of COX-2 blocks downregulation and internalization of glutamate receptor subunits and alterations of the dendritic spine density of hippocampal neurons induced by repeated ?(9)-THC exposures. Ablation of COX-2 also eliminates ?(9)-THC-impaired hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity, working, and fear memories. Importantly, the beneficial effects of decreasing ?-amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration by ?(9)-THC in Alzheimer's disease animals are retained in the presence of COX-2 inhibition. These results suggest that the applicability of medical marijuana would be broadened by concurrent inhibition of COX-2. PMID:24267894

  13. Selective Visualization of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Inflammation and Cancer by Targeted Fluorescent Imaging Agents†

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Gorden, D. Lee; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Piston, David W.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Effective diagnosis of inflammation and cancer by molecular imaging is challenging because of interference from non-selective accumulation of the contrast agents in normal tissues. Here we report a series of novel fluorescence imaging agents that efficiently target cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is normally absent from cells, but is found at high levels in inflammatory lesions, and in many premalignant and malignant tumors. After either intraperitoneal or intravenous injection, these reagents become highly enriched in inflamed or tumor tissue compared to normal tissue and this accumulation provides sufficient signal for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Further, we show that only the intact parent compound is found in the region of interest. COX-2-specific delivery was unambiguously confirmed using animals bearing targeted deletions of COX-2 and by blocking the COX-2 active site with high affinity inhibitors in both in vitro and in vivo models. Because of their high specificity, contrast, and detectability, these COX-2 beacons are ideal candidates for detection of inflammatory lesions or early-stage COX-2-expressing human cancers, such as those in the esophagus, oropharynx, and colon. PMID:20430759

  14. Genetic determinants of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor related sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, James M; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a troubling obstacle for individuals being treated for depression and can be caused by both depressive symptoms as well as antidepressant drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent a class of antidepressants commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, even after symptomatic improvement. Candidate gene studies have identified associations between sexual dysfunction and altered SSRI pharmacokinetics or to the neurotransmitter systems affected by depression and SSRI treatment. The multifactorial nature of this phenotype and study heterogeneity are currently limitations to the translation of these findings to clinical use. Larger, prospective studies of genetic-guided antidepressant selection may help to clarify the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics in minimizing sexual side effects. PMID:25493571

  15. Benzimidazole Derivatives as Potent JAK1-Selective Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Shin, Heerim; Park, Kwang-su; Kim, Hyungmi; Park, Jiseon; Kim, Kangjeon; Nam, Joonwoo; Choo, Hyunah; Chong, Youhoon

    2015-09-24

    The Janus kinase (JAK) family comprises four members (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and Tyk2) that play a key role in mediating cytokine receptor signaling. JAK inhibition thus modulates cytokine-mediated effects. In particular, selective inhibition of JAK1 or JAK3 may provide an efficient therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, with minimized side effects. In this study, as part of our continued efforts to develop a selective JAK1 inhibitor, a series of 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazole-5-carboxamide derivatives was prepared and their inhibitory activities against all four JAK isozymes were evaluated. A clear structure-activity relationship was observed with respect to JAK1 selectivity; this highlighted the importance of hydrogen bond donors at both N(1) and R2 positions located within a specific distance from the benzimidazole core. One of the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-aminoethyl)-2-(piperidin-4-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxamide (5c), showed remarkable JAK1 selectivity (63-fold vs JAK2, 25-fold vs JAK3, and 74-fold vs Tyk2). Molecular docking revealed that the 2-aminoethyl and piperidin-4-yl substituents of 5c function as probes to differentiate the ATP-binding site of JAK1 from that of JAK2, resulting in preferential JAK1 binding. A kinase panel assay confirmed the JAK1 selectivity of 5c, which showed no appreciable inhibitory activity against 26 other protein kinases at 10 ?M. PMID:26351728

  16. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and deserves further investigation. PMID:23316477

  17. Reboxetine: the first selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kasper, S; el Giamal, N; Hilger, E

    2000-05-01

    Several treatment approaches are available for treatment of depression. However, reboxetine is the first selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor. Whereas formerly only noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors with a mixed mechanism of action were available. These included action not only at noradrenergic, but also at serotonergic and other neurotransmitter-sites. Thus, reboxetine represents the first of a new class of antidepressant agents with specificity for the noradrenergic system. Reboxetine has been shown to be an effective first-line treatment for patients with all grades of depression, to be effective in the prevention of relapse and recurrence and to offer significant benefits in terms of relieving the impaired social functioning associated with depressive disorders. Reboxetine was significantly superior to the serotonergic compound fluoxetine in improvement of social functioning in both the general depressed population and in those patients who achieved symptomatic remission, indicating a superior quality of remission. Altogether reboxetine was well tolerated during the acute and long-term treatment phase; side-effects such as increased sweating, constipation and dry mouth were the most prominent to be reported. The availability of reboxetine represents a significant addition to the currently available pharmacologic armamentarium for the treatment of depression. PMID:11249515

  18. Synthesis of proline analogues as potent and selective cathepsin S inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mira; Jeon, Jiyoung; Song, Jiyeon; Suh, Kwee Hyun; Kim, Young Hoon; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Ok

    2013-06-01

    Cathepsin S is a potential target of autoimmune disease. A series of proline derived compounds were synthesized and evaluated as cathepsin S inhibitors. We discovered potent cathepsin S inhibitors through structure-activity relationship studies of proline analogues. In particular, compound 19-(S) showed promising in vitro/vivo pharmacological activities and properties as a selective cathepsin S inhibitor. PMID:23639544

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Masand, P S; Rangwani, S

    1998-12-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have become the agents of first choice in the treatment of depression because of their safe side effect profile. This paper reviews the current literature on the use of SSRIs in pregnancy and lactation concerning their safety. There are human studies that only used fluoxetine in pregnancy, which established its safety. SSRIs are excreted in breast milk, and their long-term effects on the newborn are unknown at this time. The decision to use SSRIs in pregnancy should be made on a case by case basis with active involvement of the patient in the informed consent process during which the risks and benefits are discussed and documented. PMID:9870234

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors selectively suppress expression of HDAC7.

    PubMed

    Dokmanovic, Milos; Perez, Gisela; Xu, Weisheng; Ngo, Lang; Clarke, Cathy; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Marks, Paul A

    2007-09-01

    There are 18 histone deacetylases (HDAC) generally divided into four classes based on homology to yeast HDACs. HDACs have many protein substrates in addition to histones that are involved in regulation of gene expression, cell proliferation, and cell death. Inhibition of HDACs can cause accumulation of acetylated forms of these proteins, thus altering their function. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), such as the hydroxamic acid-based vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), inhibit the zinc-containing classes I, II, and IV, but not the NAD(+)-dependent class III, enzymes. HDACis are a group of novel anticancer agents. Vorinostat is the first HDACi approved for clinical use in the treatment of the cancer cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Factors affecting expression of HDACs are not well understood. This study focuses on the effect of the HDACi vorinostat on the expression of class I and class II HDACs. We found that vorinostat selectively down-regulates HDAC7 with little or no effect on the expression of other class I or class II HDACs. Fourteen cell lines were examined, including normal, immortalized, genetically transformed, and human cancer-derived cell lines. Down-regulation of HDAC7 by vorinostat is more pronounced in transformed cells sensitive to inhibitor-induced cell death than in normal cells or cancer cells resistant to induced cell death. Modulation of HDAC7 levels by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown or by HDAC7 overexpression is associated with growth arrest but without detectable changes in acetylation of histones or p21 gene expression. Selective down-regulation of HDAC7 protein may serve as a marker of response of tumors to HDACi. PMID:17876049

  1. Analysis of the correlation between P53 and Cox-2 expression and prognosis in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUN; WU, FANG; PEI, HONG-LEI; GU, WEN-DONG; NING, ZHONG-HUA; SHAO, YING-JIE; HUANG, JIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the importance of P53 and Cox-2 protein expression in esophageal cancer and assess their influence on prognosis. The expression of P53 and Cox-2 was assessed in esophageal cancer samples from 195 patients subjected to radical surgery at Changzhou First People's Hospital (Changzhou, China) between May 2010 and December 2011. Expression of P53 and Cox-2 proteins were detected in 60.5% (118/195) and 69.7% (136/195) of the samples, respectively, and were co-expressed in 43.1% (84/195) of the samples. A correlation was identified between P53 expression and overall survival (OS) (P=0.0351) as well as disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.0307). In addition, the co-expression of P53 and Cox-2 also correlated with OS (P=0.0040) and DFS (P=0.0042). P53 expression (P=0.023), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.009) were identified as independent factors affecting OS in patients with esophageal cancer via a Cox multivariate regression model analysis. A similar analysis also identified P53 expression (P=0.020), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.008) as independent prognostic factors influencing DFS in these patients. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between P53 expression (P=0.012), TNM staging (P<0.001), tumor differentiation level (P=0.023) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.021), and local recurrence or distant esophageal cancer metastasis. The results of the present study indicate that P53 and Cox-2 proteins may act synergistically in the development of esophageal cancer, and the assessment of P53/Cox-2 co-expression status in esophageal cancer biopsies may become an important diagnostic criterion to evaluate the prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer.

  2. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process. PMID:26335727

  3. Targeted disruption of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) in mouse skin epithelial cells impairs postnatal hair follicle morphogenesis that is partially rescued through inhibition of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aniruddha; Lichti, Ulrike F.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Cataisson, Christophe; Ryscavage, Andrew O.; Mikulec, Carol; Conrad, Marcus; Fischer, Susan M.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    Selenoproteins are essential molecules for the mammalian antioxidant network. We previously demonstrated that targeted loss of all selenoproteins in mouse epidermis disrupted skin and hair development and caused premature death. In the current study we targeted specific selenoproteins for epidermal deletion to determine whether similar phenotypes developed. Keratinocyte-specific knockout mice lacking either the glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) or thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) gene were generated by cre-lox technology using K14-cre. TR1 knockout mice had a normal phenotype in resting skin while GPx4 loss in epidermis caused epidermal hyperplasia, dermal inflammatory infiltrate, dysmorphic hair follicles and alopecia in perinatal mice. Unlike epidermal ablation of all selenoproteins, mice ablated for GPx4 recovered after 5 weeks and had a normal lifespan. GPx1 and TR1 were upregulated in the skin and keratinocytes of GPx4 knockout mice. GPx4 deletion reduces keratinocyte adhesion in culture and increases lipid peroxidation and COX-2 levels in cultured keratinocytes and whole skin. Feeding a COX-2 inhibitor to nursing mothers partially prevents development of the abnormal skin phenotype in knockout pups. These data link the activity of cutaneous GPx4 to the regulation of COX-2 and hair follicle morphogenesis and provide insight into the function of individual selenoprotein activity in maintaining cutaneous homeostasis. PMID:23364477

  4. Chemokine CXCL1 enhances inflammatory pain and increases NMDA receptor activity and COX-2 expression in spinal cord neurons via activation of CXCR2

    PubMed Central

    Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Rou-Gang; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Ji, Ru-Rong; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that CXCL1 upregulation in spinal astrocytes is involved in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, whether and how CXCL1 regulates inflammatory pain remains unknown. Here we show that intraplantar injection of CFA increased mRNA and protein expressions of CXCL1 and its major receptor CXCR2 in the spinal cord at 6 hours and 3 days after the injection. Immunofluorescence double staining showed that CXCL1 and CXCR2 were expressed in spinal astrocytes and neurons, respectively. Intrathecal injection of CXCL1 neutralizing antibody or CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 attenuated CFA-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity on post-CFA day 3. Patch-clamp recordings showed that CXCL1 potentiated NMDA-induced currents in lamina II neurons via CXCR2, and this potentiation was further increased in CFA-treated mice. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of CXCL1 increased COX-2 expression in dorsal horn neurons, which was blocked by pretreatment with SB225002 or MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitor PD98059. Finally, pretreatment with SB225002 or PD98059 decreased CFA-induced heat hyperalgesia and COX-2 mRNA/protein expression and ERK activation in the spinal cord. Taken together, our data suggest that CXCL1, upregulated and released by spinal astrocytes after inflammation, acts on CXCR2-expressing spinal neurons to increase ERK activation, synaptic transmission and COX-2 expression in dorsal horn neurons and contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory pain. PMID:24852102

  5. Antinociceptive Effect of Tetrandrine on LPS-Induced Hyperalgesia via the Inhibition of IKK? Phosphorylation and the COX-2/PGE2 Pathway in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hengguang; Luo, Fuling; Li, Hongzhong; Zhang, Li; Yi, Yongfen; Wan, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that is isolated from the Stephania Tetrandra. It is known to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. We have shown that TET can effectively suppress the production of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenases (COXs), in macrophages. However, whether TET has an antinociceptive effect on LPS-induced hyperalgesia is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the potential antinociceptive effects of TET and the mechanisms by which it elicits its effects on LPS-induced hyperalgesia. LPS effectively evoked hyperalgesia and induced the production of PGE2 in the sera, brain tissues, and cultured astroglia. TET pretreatment attenuated all of these effects. LPS also activated inhibitor of ?B (I?B) kinase ? (IKK?) and its downstream components in the I?B/nuclear factor (NF)-?B signaling pathway, including COX-2; the increase in expression levels of these components was significantly abolished by TET. Furthermore, in primary astroglia, knockdown of IKK?, but not IKK?, reversed the effects of TET on the LPS-induced increase in I?B phosphorylation, P65 phosphorylation, and COX-2. Our results suggest that TET can effectively exert antinociceptive effects on LPS-induced hyperalgesia in mice by inhibiting IKK? phosphorylation, which leads to the reduction in the production of important pain mediators, such as PGE2 and COX-2, via the IKK?/I?B/NF-?B pathway. PMID:24722146

  6. Antinociceptive effect of tetrandrine on LPS-induced hyperalgesia via the inhibition of IKK? phosphorylation and the COX-2/PGE? pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengguang; Luo, Fuling; Li, Hongzhong; Zhang, Li; Yi, Yongfen; Wan, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that is isolated from the Stephania Tetrandra. It is known to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. We have shown that TET can effectively suppress the production of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenases (COXs), in macrophages. However, whether TET has an antinociceptive effect on LPS-induced hyperalgesia is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the potential antinociceptive effects of TET and the mechanisms by which it elicits its effects on LPS-induced hyperalgesia. LPS effectively evoked hyperalgesia and induced the production of PGE2 in the sera, brain tissues, and cultured astroglia. TET pretreatment attenuated all of these effects. LPS also activated inhibitor of ?B (I?B) kinase ? (IKK?) and its downstream components in the I?B/nuclear factor (NF)-?B signaling pathway, including COX-2; the increase in expression levels of these components was significantly abolished by TET. Furthermore, in primary astroglia, knockdown of IKK?, but not IKK?, reversed the effects of TET on the LPS-induced increase in I?B phosphorylation, P65 phosphorylation, and COX-2. Our results suggest that TET can effectively exert antinociceptive effects on LPS-induced hyperalgesia in mice by inhibiting IKK? phosphorylation, which leads to the reduction in the production of important pain mediators, such as PGE2 and COX-2, via the IKK?/I?B/NF-?B pathway. PMID:24722146

  7. Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression in human erythroleukemia cells but only cyclopamine has a pro-apoptotic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezali, Lamia; Leger, David Yannick; Limami, Youness; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Liagre, Bertrand

    2013-04-15

    Erythroleukemia is generally associated with a very poor response and survival to current available therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been described to play a crucial role in the proliferation and differentiation of leukemia cells, this enzyme seems to play an important role in chemoresistance in different cancer types. Previously, we demonstrated that diosgenin, a plant steroid, induced apoptosis in HEL cells with concomitant COX-2 overexpression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of cyclopamine and jervine, two steroidal alkaloids with similar structures, on HEL and TF1a human erythroleukemia cell lines and, for the first time, their effect on COX-2 expression. Cyclopamine, but not jervine, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in these cells. Both compounds induced COX-2 overexpression which was responsible for apoptosis resistance. In jervine-treated cells, COX-2 overexpression was NF-?B dependent. Inhibition of NF-?B reduced COX-2 overexpression and induced apoptosis. In addition, cyclopamine induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression via PKC activation. Inhibition of the PKC pathway reduced both apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression in both cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the p38/COX-2 pathway was involved in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis since p38 inhibition reduced COX-2 overexpression and increased apoptosis in both cell lines. - Highlights: ? Cyclopamine alone but not jervine induces apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells. ? Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression. ? COX-2 overexpression is implicated in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis. ? Apoptotic potential of jervine is restrained by NF-?B pathway activation. ? PKC is involved in cyclopamine-induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression.

  8. Development of a novel class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Meng, Dongfang; Parker, Dann L; Qian, Xiaoxia; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Shu, Min; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Nolting, Andrew F; Orr, Robert; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-01

    Using structure based drug design (SBDD), a novel class of potent coagulation Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds demonstrated oral bioavailability in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules was evaluated in Thrombin Generation Assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:25978966

  9. Development of a novel tricyclic class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dongfang; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Berger, Richard; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Dewnani, Sunita; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Feng, Daming; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Li, Hong; Metzger, Joe; Parker, Dann L; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Wu, Jane; Xu, Jiayi; Zhang, Ting; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Orr, Robert; Poirier, Marc; McCabe-Dunn, Jamie; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Hirabayashi, Tomokazu; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-15

    Using structure based drug design, a novel class of potent coagulation factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds were evaluated in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and demonstrated desirable oral PK profiles. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules were evaluated in thrombin generation assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:26318999

  10. The development of potent and selective bisarylmaleimide GSK3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Engler, Thomas A; Malhotra, Sushant; Burkholder, Timothy P; Henry, James R; Mendel, David; Porter, Warren J; Furness, Kelly; Diefenbacher, Clive; Marquart, Angela; Reel, Jon K; Li, Yihong; Clayton, Joshua; Cunningham, Brian; McLean, Johnathan; O'toole, John C; Brozinick, Joseph; Hawkins, Eric; Misener, Elizabeth; Briere, Daniel; Brier, Richard A; Wagner, Jill R; Campbell, Robert M; Anderson, Bryan D; Vaughn, Renee; Bennett, Donald B; Meier, Timothy I; Cook, James A

    2005-02-15

    Many 3-aryl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[6,7,1-hi]indol-7-yl)maleimides exhibit potent GSK3 inhibitory activity (<100 nM IC(50)), although few show significant selectivity (>100x) versus CDK2, CDK4, or PKCbetaII. However, combining 3-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl), 3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-3-yl) or aza-analogs with a 4-(2-acyl-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[6,7,1-hi]indol-7-yl)) group on the maleimide resulted in very potent inhibitors of GSK3 (160 to >10,000-fold selectivity versus CDK2/4 and PKCbetaII. These compounds also inhibited tau phosphorylation in cells and were effective in lowering plasma glucose in a rat model of type 2 diabetes (ZDF rat). PMID:15686883

  11. Scaffold hopping approach on the route to selective tankyrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liscio, Paride; Carotti, Andrea; Asciutti, Stefania; Ferri, Martina; Pires, Maira M.; Valloscuro, Sara; Ziff, Jacob; Clark, Neil R.; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Pellicciari, Roberto; Camaioni, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    A virtual screening procedure was applied to identify new tankyrase inhibitors. Through pharmacophore screening of a compounds collection from the SPECS database, the methoxy[l]benzothieno[2,3-c]quinolin-6(5H)-one scaffold was identified as nicotinamide mimetic able to inhibit tankyrase activity at low micromolar concentration. In order to improve potency and selectivity, tandem structure-based and scaffold hopping approaches were carried out over the new scaffold leading to the discovery of the 2-(phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one as powerful chemotype suitable for tankyrase inhibition. The best compound 2-(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one (23) displayed nanomolar potencies (IC50s TNKS-1 = 21 nM and TNKS-2= 29 nM) and high selectivity when profiled against several other PARPs. Furthermore, a striking Wnt signaling, as well as cell growth inhibition, was observed assaying 23 in DLD-1 cancer cells. PMID:25299683

  12. Curcumin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting p300/CBP Histone Acetyltransferase Activity-Regulated Expression of BDNF and Cox-2 in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Qian; Chang, Ruimin; Yang, Dong; Song, Zongbing; Guo, Qulian; Huang, Changsheng

    2014-01-01

    The management of neuropathic pain is still a major challenge because of its unresponsiveness to most common treatments. Curcumin has been reported to play an active role in the treatment of various neurological disorders, such as neuropathic pain. Curcumin has long been recognized as a p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP) inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. However, this mechanism has never been investigated for the treatment of neuropathic pain with curcumin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive role of curcumin in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, with this model we investigated the effect of curcumin on P300/CBP HAT activity-regulated release of the pro-nociceptive molecules, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). Treatment with 40 and 60 mg/kg body weight curcumin for 7 consecutive days significantly attenuated CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, whereas 20 mg/kg curcumin showed no significant analgesic effect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that curcumin dose-dependently reduced the recruitment of p300/CBP and acetyl-Histone H3/acetyl-Histone H4 to the promoter of BDNF and Cox-2 genes. A similar dose-dependent decrease of BDNF and Cox-2 in the spinal cord was also observed after curcumin treatment. These results indicated that curcumin exerted a therapeutic role in neuropathic pain by down-regulating p300/CBP HAT activity-mediated gene expression of BDNF and Cox-2. PMID:24603592

  13. Pirfenidone attenuates IL-1?-induced COX-2 and PGE2 production in orbital fibroblasts through suppression of NF-?B activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn-Hee; Back, Keum Ok; Kim, Hee Ja; Lee, Sang Yeul; Kook, Koung Hoon

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pirfenidone on interleukin (IL)-1?-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and prostaglandin (PG)E2 expression in orbital fibroblasts from patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). Primary cultures of orbital fibroblasts from patients with TAO (n = 4) and non-TAO subjects (n = 4) were prepared. The level of PGE2 in orbital fibroblasts treated with IL-1? in the presence or absence of pirfenidone was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effect of pirfenidone on IL-1?-induced COX-2 expression in orbital fibroblasts from patients with TAO was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR analyses, and verified by Western blot. Activation of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) was evaluated by immunoblotting for inhibitor of ?B (I?B)? and phosphorylated I?B?, and DNA-binding activity of p50/p65 NF-?B was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) expression was assessed by RT-PCR in IL-1?-treated cells with or without pirfenidone. Pirfenidone significantly attenuated IL-1?-induced PGE2 release in both TAO and non-TAO cells. IL-1?-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression decreased significantly following co-treatment with pirfenidone. IL-1?-induced I?B? phosphorylation and degradation decreased in the presence of pirfenidone and led to decreased nuclear translocation and DNA binding of the active NF-?B complex. In our system, neither IL-1? nor pirfenidone co-treatment influenced IL-1R1 expression. Our results suggest that pirfenidone attenuates the IL-1?-induced PGE2/COX-2 production in TAO orbital fibroblasts, which is related with suppression of the NF-?B activation. PMID:23664858

  14. Exposure to diesel exhaust upregulates COX-2 expression in ApoE knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ni; Tranfield, Erin M.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We have shown that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation caused progression of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. We hypothesize that exposure to DE upregulates cyclooxygenase (COX) expression and activity, which could play a role in DE-induced atherosclerosis. Methods ApoE knockout mice (30-week old) fed with regular chow were exposed to DE (at 200 ?g/m3 of particulate matter) or filtered air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The protein and mRNA expression of COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry analysis and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. To examine COX activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated vasoconstriction was measured with and without the presence of COX antagonists (indomethacin). COX-2 activity was further assessed by urine 2,3-dinor-6-keto PGF1? level, a major metabolite of prostacyclin I2 (PGI2). Results Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrates that DE exposure enhanced COX-2 expression in both thoracic aorta (p < 0.01) and aortic root (p < 0.03), with no modification of COX-1 expression. The increased COX-2 expression was positively correlated with smooth muscle cell content in aortic lesions (R2 = 0.4081, p < 0.008). The fractional changes of maximal vasoconstriction in the presence of indomethacin was attenuated by 3-fold after DE exposure (p < 0.02). Urine 2,3-dinor-6-keto PGF1? level was 15-fold higher in DE group than the control (p < 0.007). The mRNA expression of COX-2 (p < 0.006) and PGI synthase (p < 0.02), but not COX-1, was significantly augmented after DE exposure. Conclusion We show that DE inhalation enhanced COX-2 expression, which is also associated with phenotypic changes of aortic lesion. PMID:22746401

  15. Chemoprevention of colon cancer by a novel COX-2 inhibitor | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  16. The pharmacokinetics of mavacoxib, a long-acting COX-2 inhibitor, in young adult laboratory dogs.

    PubMed

    Cox, S R; Lesman, S P; Boucher, J F; Krautmann, M J; Hummel, B D; Savides, M; Marsh, S; Fielder, A; Stegemann, M R

    2010-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mavacoxib were evaluated in an absolute bioavailability study, a dose-proportionality study and a multi-dose study in young healthy adult laboratory Beagle dogs and in a multi-dose safety study in Beagle-sized laboratory Mongrel dogs. When administered as the commercial tablet formulation at 4 mg/kg body weight (bw) to fasted dogs, the absolute bioavailability (F) of mavacoxib was 46.1%; F increased to 87.4% when mavacoxib was administered with food. Following intravenous administration, the total body plasma clearance of mavacoxib was 2.7 mL·h/kg, and the apparent volume of distribution at steady-state was 1.6 L/kg. The plasma protein binding of mavacoxib was approximately 98% in various in vitro and ex vivo studies. The dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve was similar in Beagle and Beagle-sized Mongrel dogs when mavacoxib was administered with food. Mavacoxib exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics for single oral doses of 2-12 mg/kg in Beagle dogs and for multiple oral doses of 5-25 mg/kg in Beagle-sized Mongrel dogs. Only minor accumulation occurred when mavacoxib was administered at doses of 2-25 mg/kg bw orally to laboratory dogs with a 2-week interval between the 1st two doses but with a monthly interval thereafter. Across all three Beagle studies (n = 63) the median terminal elimination half-life (t(½) ) was 16.6 days, with individual values ranging 7.9-38.8 days. The prolonged t(½) for mavacoxib supports the approved regimen in which doses are separated by 2-4 weeks. PMID:20840390

  17. Novel and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Bu, Chunya; Peng, Bo; Cao, Yang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Qing; Li, Jinling; Shi, Guanglu

    2015-11-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an economically important and extremely polyphagous herbivorous pest, with the title of "resistance champion" among arthropods. Anticholinesterase insecticides such as organophosphate and carbamate account for more than one-third of global insecticide sales. The non-target toxicity and resistance problem of organophosphate and carbamate have become of growing concern, which may be due to the fact that they target the ubiquitous catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in mammals, birds, and beneficial insects. In this study, the structural differences between T. cinnabarinus AChE and human AChE, at or near the catalytic pocket, were illustrated. From the SPECS chemical lead-compound database, 55 AChE inhibitor candidates were screened for high affinity for T. cinnabarinus AChE, but low affinity for human AChE, using the DOCK 6 and AutoDock Vina software. Three of the fifty-five candidates had inhibitory activity greater than that of the reversible AChE inhibitor eserine, with no observed inhibitory activities against human AChE. Two of the three had toxicity to T. cinnabarinus comparable to that of natural insecticidal pyrethrins. However, their potency is low compared with that of etoxazole, and further work is needed to optimize their potency. The selectivity of the three compounds over human and mite AChE may be due to their interaction with the mite-specific residues, as analyzed by Cyscore. The three compounds are potential lead compounds for development of novel acaricides against T. cinnabarinus with reduced toxicity to non-target species and a low propensity for resistance. PMID:26520174

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for premature ejaculation: review of erectile and ejaculatory side effects.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Halis, Fikret; Gokce, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is one of the most prevalent sexual disorders affecting men today. The lack of approved therapies has resulted in the prescription of many 'off-label' treatments to manage the condition. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have an interesting side effect of prolonging ejaculatory latency. Consequently, these agents are often considered a first line treatment for patients suffering from premature ejaculation. Erectile dysfunction is another common side effect reported by men treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Nitric oxide is the primary mediator of erectile function. Preclinical studies have provided evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors decrease nitric oxide bioavailability. This invited mini-review aims to examine the physiology of the erectile and ejaculatory responses, discuss the indicated and 'off-label' clinical utility of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and to summarize evidence from basic science and clinical studies pertaining to mechanisms of how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy modifies ejaculatory and erectile function. PMID:24446888

  19. Inhibitor Fingerprinting of Rhomboid Proteases by Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Inhibitor Selectivity and Rhomboid Autoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Zeissler, Annett; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2015-10-16

    Rhomboid proteases were discovered almost 15 years ago and are structurally the best characterized intramembrane proteases. Apart from the general serine protease inhibitor 3,4-dichloro-isocoumarin (DCI) and a few crystal structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with other inhibitors, there is surprisingly little information about inhibitors of rhomboids from other species, probably because of a lack of general methods to measure inhibition against different rhomboid species. We here present activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) as a general method to screen rhomboids for their activity and inhibition. Using ABPP, we compare the inhibitory capacity of 50 small molecules against 13 different rhomboids. We find one new pan rhomboid inhibitor and several inhibitors that display selectivity. We also demonstrate that inhibition profile and sequence similarity of rhomboids are not related, which suggests that related rhomboids may be selectively inhibited. Finally, by making use of the here discovered inhibitors, we were able to show that two bacterial rhomboids autoprocess themselves in their N-terminal part. PMID:26218717

  20. Structural Biology Insight for the Design of Sub-type Selective Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sarvagalla, Sailu; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A, B and C, are key regulators of mitosis and are over expressed in many of the human cancers, making them an ideal drug target for cancer chemotherapy. Currently, over a dozen of Aurora kinase inhibitors are in various phases of clinical development. The majority of the inhibitors (VX-680/MK-0457, PHA-739358, CYC116, SNS-314, AMG 900, AT-9283, SCH- 1473759, ABT-348, PF-03814735, R-763/AS-703569, KW-2449 and TAK-901) are pan-selective (isoform non-selective) and few are Aurora A (MLN8054, MLN8237, VX-689/MK5108 and ENMD 2076) and Aurora B (AZD1152 and GSK1070916) sub-type selective. Despite the intensive research efforts in the past decade, no Aurora kinase inhibitor has reached the market. Recent evidence suggests that the sub-type selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor could possess advantages over pan-selective Aurora inhibitors, by avoiding Aurora B mediated neutropenia. However, sub-type selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor design is very challenging due to the similarity in the active site among the isoforms. Structural biology and computational aspects pertaining to the design of Aurora kinase inhibitors were analyzed and found that a possible means to develop sub-type selective inhibitor is by targeting Aurora A specific residues (Leu215, Thr217 and Arg220) or Aurora B specific residues (Arg159, Glu161 and Lys164), near the solvent exposed region of the protein. Particularly, a useful strategy for the design of sub-type selective Aurora A inhibitor could be by targeting Thr217 residue as in the case of MLN8054. Further preclinical and clinical studies with the sub-type selective Aurora inhibitors could help bring them to the market for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25895501

  1. Role of COX-2 in carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer and its relationship with tumor biological characteristics and patients’ prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Wen; Gu, Jin; Ji, Jia-Fu; Li, Zhen-Fu; Xu, Guang-Wei

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Recent clinical epidemiological studies have demonstrated the preventive effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against colorectal cancer. The underlying mechanism might be the inhibition of rate-limiting enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in metabolism of arachidonic acid. The role of COX-2 in carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer and its relationship with tumor biological characteristics and patients’ prognosis still remain unclear. This study was to investigate the role of COX-2 expression in carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer and its relationship with tumor biological characteristics and patients’ prognosis. METHODS: A total of 139 colorectal cancers and 19 adenomas surgically treated in School of Oncology, Peking University, from January 1993 to September 2001 were retrospectively studied. COX-2 expression was detected with tissue microarray (TMA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) procedure. The association between COX-2 expression and clinicopathological features and its influence on patients’ prognosis were studied. RESULTS: COX-2 expression was strong in colorectal cancer, moderate in adenoma and weak in normal mucosa, which demonstrated statistically significant difference (?2 = 46.997, P < 0.001). COX-2 expression had no association with clinicopathological features such as gross type, differentiation, invasion depth, vessel emboli and TNM staging. Cox proportional hazards modeling analysis and Log rank test revealed no prognostic role of COX-2 expression in colorectal cancer patients. CONCLUSION: COX-2 may play an important role in the early stage of carcinogenesis, and its expression in colorectal cancer is not associated with clinicopathological features and patients’ prognosis. PMID:12970891

  2. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs. PMID:26124697

  3. Concurrent targeting of EP1/EP4 receptors and COX-2 induces synergistic apoptosis in KSHV and EBV associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arun George; Chandran, Bala; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    The effective anti-tumorigenic potential of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and eicosonoid (EP; EP1–4) receptor antagonists prompted us to test their efficacy in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related lymphomas. Our study demonstrated that (1) EP1–4 receptor protein levels vary among the various non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) cell lines tested (BCBL-1:KSHV+/EBV?;BC-3: KSHV+/EBV?; Akata/EBV+: KSHV?/EBV+; and JSC-1 cells: KSHV+/EBV+ cells); (2) 5.0 µM of EP1 antagonist (SC-51322) had a significant anti-proliferative effect on BCBL-1, BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (3) 50.0 µM of EP2 antagonist (AH6809) was required to induce a significant anti-proliferative effect on BCBL-1, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (4) 5.0 µM of EP4 antagonist (GW 627368X) had a significant anti-proliferative effect on BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (5) COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib (5.0µM) had significant anti-proliferative effects on BCBL-1, BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; and (6) a combination of 1.0µM each of celecoxib, SC-51322 and GW 627368X could potentiate the pro-apoptotic properties of celecoxib or vice-versa. Overall, our studies identified the synergistic anti-proliferative effect of NSAIDs and EP receptor blockers on KSHV and EBV related B cell malignancies. PMID:23523954

  4. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Endothelial Function in Women

    PubMed Central

    Czarkowski, Kathryn A.; Child, Josiah; Howes, Christopher; Epperson, C. Neill

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Among women worldwide, major depression (MDD) and heart disease rank first and second, respectively, in burden of disease. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently prescribed, possible inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) function has caused concerns about their effects on protective vascular mechanisms. Our study aimed to determine the effect of SSRIs on flow-mediated vascular dilatation (FMD), platelet aggregation, and platelet NO production among women. Methods: Women (n=28) without known cardiovascular disease were recruited prior to undergoing SSRI treatment for MDD, postpartum depression (PPD), or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Symptoms were quantified using the Hamilton Depression/Anxiety and Beck Depression scales. FMD, platelet aggregation, and platelet NO production were measured before and after 1 month of SSRI (sertraline, fluoxetine, or paroxetine) therapy. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms decreased significantly with SSRI treatment (ps <0.01). FMD and platelet aggregation did not differ between pre- and posttreatment, although FMD rose to the normal range (?8%) in two of three women with abnormal FMD prior to SSRI treatment. We observed a 21% decrease (p=0.024) in platelet NO production. Conclusions: SSRI treatment had little effect on FMD or platelet aggregation. The health impact of decreased NO production is unclear, particularly in this relatively young group of women without cardiovascular disease, but should be considered in future studies focusing on SSRI safety in patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24886268

  5. Selectivity Profiling and Biological Activity of Novel ?-Carbolines as Potent and Selective DYRK1 Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rüben, Katharina; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Walte, Agnes; Sippl, Wolfgang; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2015-01-01

    DYRK1A is a pleiotropic protein kinase with diverse functions in cellular regulation, including cell cycle control, neuronal differentiation, and synaptic transmission. Enhanced activity and overexpression of DYRK1A have been linked to altered brain development and function in Down syndrome and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. The ?-carboline alkaloid harmine is a high affinity inhibitor of DYRK1A but suffers from the drawback of inhibiting monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) with even higher potency. Here we characterized a series of novel harmine analogs with minimal or absent MAO-A inhibitory activity. We identified several inhibitors with submicromolar potencies for DYRK1A and selectivity for DYRK1A and DYRK1B over the related kinases DYRK2 and HIPK2. An optimized inhibitor, AnnH75, inhibited CLK1, CLK4, and haspin/GSG2 as the only off-targets in a panel of 300 protein kinases. In cellular assays, AnnH75 dose-dependently reduced the phosphorylation of three known DYRK1A substrates (SF3B1, SEPT4, and tau) without negative effects on cell viability. AnnH75 inhibited the cotranslational tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A and threonine phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate protein with similar potency. In conclusion, we have characterized an optimized ?-carboline inhibitor as a highly selective chemical probe that complies with desirable properties of drug-like molecules and is suitable to interrogate the function of DYRK1A in biological studies. PMID:26192590

  6. Selectivity Profiling and Biological Activity of Novel ?-Carbolines as Potent and Selective DYRK1 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rüben, Katharina; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Walte, Agnes; Sippl, Wolfgang; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2015-01-01

    DYRK1A is a pleiotropic protein kinase with diverse functions in cellular regulation, including cell cycle control, neuronal differentiation, and synaptic transmission. Enhanced activity and overexpression of DYRK1A have been linked to altered brain development and function in Down syndrome and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The ?-carboline alkaloid harmine is a high affinity inhibitor of DYRK1A but suffers from the drawback of inhibiting monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) with even higher potency. Here we characterized a series of novel harmine analogs with minimal or absent MAO-A inhibitory activity. We identified several inhibitors with submicromolar potencies for DYRK1A and selectivity for DYRK1A and DYRK1B over the related kinases DYRK2 and HIPK2. An optimized inhibitor, AnnH75, inhibited CLK1, CLK4, and haspin/GSG2 as the only off-targets in a panel of 300 protein kinases. In cellular assays, AnnH75 dose-dependently reduced the phosphorylation of three known DYRK1A substrates (SF3B1, SEPT4, and tau) without negative effects on cell viability. AnnH75 inhibited the cotranslational tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A and threonine phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate protein with similar potency. In conclusion, we have characterized an optimized ?-carboline inhibitor as a highly selective chemical probe that complies with desirable properties of drug-like molecules and is suitable to interrogate the function of DYRK1A in biological studies. PMID:26192590

  7. Novel mutant-selective EGFR kinase inhibitors against EGFR T790M

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wenjun; Ercan, Dalia; Chen, Liang; Yun, Cai-Hong; Li, Danan; Capelletti, Marzia; Cortot, Alexis B.; Chirieac, Lucian; Iacob, Roxana E.; Padera, Robert; Engen, John R.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Eck, Michael J.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2010-01-12

    The clinical efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limited by the development of drug-resistance mutations, including the gatekeeper T790M mutation. Strategies targeting EGFR T790M with irreversible inhibitors have had limited success and are associated with toxicity due to concurrent inhibition of wild-type EGFR. All current EGFR inhibitors possess a structurally related quinazoline-based core scaffold and were identified as ATP-competitive inhibitors of wild-type EGFR. Here we identify a covalent pyrimidine EGFR inhibitor by screening an irreversible kinase inhibitor library specifically against EGFR T790M. These agents are 30- to 100-fold more potent against EGFR T790M, and up to 100-fold less potent against wild-type EGFR, than quinazoline-based EGFR inhibitors in vitro. They are also effective in murine models of lung cancer driven by EGFR T790M. Co-crystallization studies reveal a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of these agents. These mutant-selective irreversible EGFR kinase inhibitors may be clinically more effective and better tolerated than quinazoline-based inhibitors. Our findings demonstrate that functional pharmacological screens against clinically important mutant kinases represent a powerful strategy to identify new classes of mutant-selective kinase inhibitors.

  8. ZN2+ INDUCES COX-2 EXPRESSION THROUGH DOWNREGULATION OF LIPID PHOSPHATASE PTEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zn2+ Induces COX-2 Expression through Downregulation of Lipid Phosphatase PTEN
    Weidong Wu*, James M. Samet, Philip A. Bromberg*?, Young E. Whang?, and Lee M. Graves* ?
    *CEMALB, ?Department of Medicine, and ?Department of Pharmacology, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC27599; Human Studie...

  9. Elevated COX2 expression and PGE2 production by downregulation of RXR? in senescent macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huimin; Ma, Feng; Hu, Xiaona; Jin, Ting; Xiong, Chuhui; Teng, Xiaochun

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Downregulation of RXR? in senescent macrophage. •RXR? suppresses NF-?B activity and COX2 expression. •Increased PGE2 production due to downregulation of RXR?. -- Abstract: Increased systemic level of inflammatory cytokines leads to numerous age-related diseases. In senescent macrophages, elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production contributes to the suppression of T cell function with aging, which increases the susceptibility to infections. However, the regulation of these inflammatory cytokines and PGE2 with aging still remains unclear. We have verified that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and PGE2 production are higher in LPS-stimulated macrophages from old mice than that from young mice. Downregulation of RXR?, a nuclear receptor that can suppress NF-?B activity, mediates the elevation of COX2 expression and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages. We also have found less induction of ABCA1 and ABCG1 by RXR? agonist in senescent macrophages, which partially accounts for high risk of atherosclerosis in aged population. Systemic treatment with RXR? antagonist HX531 in young mice increases COX2, TNF-?, and IL-6 expression in splenocytes. Our study not only has outlined a mechanism of elevated NF-?B activity and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages, but also provides RXR? as a potential therapeutic target for treating the age-related diseases.

  10. A COX2 PHYLOGENETIC HYPOTHESIS FOR THE DOWNY MILDEWS AND WHITE RUSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondrially encoded cox2 sequences were used to infer evolutionary relationships of downy mildew and white rust taxa in a data set of 36 peronosporomycete isolates. The data set of 599 aligned nucleotides was analyzed using neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. These phylo...

  11. The Relative Contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 to Vascular Biosynthesis of Prostacyclin and Thromboxane 

    E-print Network

    Osborn, Pamela

    2014-01-17

    The relative contributions of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) versus COX-2 to vascular biosynthesis of prostacyclin (PGI_(2)) and thromboxane (TxA_(2)) and the role of estrogen in the regulation of COX function were studied in the thoracic aorta of age...

  12. From prostaglandin replacement to specific COX-2 inhibition: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kremer, J

    2000-10-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide. While these agents are efficacious for the relief of both pain and the signs and symptoms of inflammation, the use of traditional NSAID is associated with a high prevalence of toxic events. It is estimated that 2-4% of traditional NSAID users will have a serious adverse gastrointestinal (GI) event per year, with a point prevalence of GI ulcers at any given time of 10-30%. The mortality rate associated with these NSAID is one of the highest attributed to the use of any agent. Prostaglandin replacement with misoprostol has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of serious GI toxicity related to the use of conventional NSAID. All conventional NSAID inhibit both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 enzymes. As COX-1 is constitutively expressed in many tissues and contributes to the maintenance of the normal physiologic state in the GI tract, the kidney, and platelets, an agent that specifically inhibits COX-2, an inducible enzyme associated with the inflammatory response, would be highly desirable. Specific COX-2 inhibition would have the advantage of improving the signs and symptoms of inflammation, while avoiding the possibly significant toxicity of traditional NSAID. This article describes the biology of eicosanoids and the effects of NSAID, the toxicity profile of conventional NSAID, and the rationale for the use of gastroprotective agents or agents that specifically inhibit the COX-2 isozyme. PMID:11032096

  13. Novel selective and metabolically stable inhibitors of anandamide cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Ortar, Giorgio; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2003-05-01

    Novel aromatic analogues of N-oleoylethanolamine and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) were synthesized and, based on the capability of similar compounds to interact with proteins of the endocannabinoid and endovanilloid signaling systems, were tested on: (i) cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors; (ii) vanilloid VR1 receptors; (iii) anandamide cellular uptake (ACU); and (iv) the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The (R)- and, particularly, the (S)-1'-(4-hydroxybenzyl) derivatives of N-oleoylethanolamine and AEA (OMDM-1, OMDM-2, OMDM-3, and OMDM-4) inhibited to a varied extent ACU in RBL-2H3 cells (K(i) ranging between 2.4 and 17.7 micro M), the oleoyl analogues (OMDM-1 and OMDM-2, K(i) 2.4 and 3.0 micro M, respectively) being 6- to 7-fold more potent than the arachidonoyl analogues (OMDM-3 and OMDM-4). These four compounds exhibited: (i) poor affinity for either CB(1) (K(i)> or = 5 micro M) or CB(2) (K(i)>10 micro M) receptors in rat brain and spleen membranes, respectively; (ii) almost no activity at vanilloid receptors in the intracellular calcium assay carried out with intact cells over-expressing the human VR1 (EC(50)> or = 10 micro M); and (iii) no activity as inhibitors of FAAH in N18TG2 cell membranes (K(i)>50 micro M). The oleoyl- and arachidonoyl-N'-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)hydrazines (OMDM-5 and OMDM-6), inhibited ACU (K(i) 4.8 and 7.0 micro M, respectively), and were more potent as VR1 agonists (EC(50) 75 and 50nM, respectively), weakly active as CB(1) receptor ligands (K(i) 4.9 and 3.2 micro M, respectively), and inactive as CB(2) ligands (K(i)>5 micro M) as well as on FAAH (K(i)> or = 40 micro M). In conclusion, we report two novel potent and selective inhibitors of ACU (OMDM-1 and OMDM-2) and one "hybrid" agonist of CB(1) and VR1 receptors (OMDM-6). Unlike other compounds of the same type, OMDM-1, OMDM-2, and OMDM-6 were very stable to enzymatic hydrolysis by rat brain homogenates. PMID:12732359

  14. Association between COX-2 gene polymorphisms and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Si-Cong; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Tan, Jun-Tao; Tang, Hua-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun; Peng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) polymorphism and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of COX-2 polymorphism and risk of HCC development among people with or without HCC. Data sources EMBASE, PubMed, Public Library of Science, SCOPUS, Web of Knowledge and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for all clinical and experimental case–control studies of COX-2 polymorphism and HCC risk. Studies published up to March 2015 were included. Review method Ten studies were included for data extraction, which were mainly from Asian countries. Results 2538 people with HCC and 3714 without HCC were found to satisfy the inclusion criteria and included in the review. The associations of specific genotypes in the eight polymorphic variants of COX-2 and the risk of HCC development were analysed. GG genotype at the A-1195G polymorphism may be associated with a reduced risk of HCC development: the OR across all studies was 0.87 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.02) for the G allele versus the A allele, 0.72 (0.53 to 0.97) for GG versus AA, 0.72 (0.57 to 0.92) for GG versus GA+AA and 1.05 (0.77 to 1.44) for AA versus GA+GG. Similar results were found when the meta-analysis was repeated separately for the Chinese subgroup. However, more reliable data are needed to demonstrate associations between variants in G-765C, T+8473C, A-1290G, G-899C and introns 1, 5 and 6 polymorphisms and the risk of HCC development. Conclusions Only the COX-2 A-1195G gene polymorphism may be associated with a decreased risk of HCC development. These conclusions should be verified in further studies. PMID:26438136

  15. Inhibitors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caregivers to learn how to care for the device. CDC Research CDC is interested in learning more about why some people develop inhibitors and how they could be prevented. The Inhibitor Project began in 2005 and was implemented to explore ...

  16. Kinetic characterization of 4,4'-biphenylsulfonamides as selective non-zinc binding MMP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Salvatore; Nuti, Elisa; Cercignani, Giovanni; La Regina, Giuseppe; Silvestri, Romano; Supuran, Claudiu T; Rossello, Armando

    2015-12-01

    We describe the characterisation of a series of 4,4'-biphenylsulfonamides as selective inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases MMP-2 and -13, two enzymes involved in cell invasion and angiogenesis. Double-inhibitor studies in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid show that these molecules do not bind the catalytic zinc. Moreover, two of the characterised inhibitors (11 and 19) act as non-competitive inhibitors, whereas the para-methyl ester derivative 13 behaves as a competitive inhibitor. This finding suggests that this class of molecules binds to a catalytic subsite, possibly the S1'-pocket. Moreover, since these compounds also act as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs), another family of enzymes involved in cell invasion, they could be potentially useful as CA/MMP dual target inhibitors with increased efficacy as anticancer agents. PMID:25694065

  17. Monofluorophosphate is a selective inhibitor of respiratory sulfate-reducing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Justice, Nicholas B; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Mosqueda, Lorraine A; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-03-17

    Despite the environmental and economic cost of microbial sulfidogenesis in industrial operations, few compounds are known as selective inhibitors of respiratory sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM), and no study has systematically and quantitatively evaluated the selectivity and potency of SRM inhibitors. Using general, high-throughput assays to quantitatively evaluate inhibitor potency and selectivity in a model sulfate-reducing microbial ecosystem as well as inhibitor specificity for the sulfate reduction pathway in a model SRM, we screened a panel of inorganic oxyanions. We identified several SRM selective inhibitors including selenate, selenite, tellurate, tellurite, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, chlorate, monofluorophosphate, vanadate, molydate, and tungstate. Monofluorophosphate (MFP) was not known previously as a selective SRM inhibitor, but has promising characteristics including low toxicity to eukaryotic organisms, high stability at circumneutral pH, utility as an abiotic corrosion inhibitor, and low cost. MFP remains a potent inhibitor of SRM growing by fermentation, and MFP is tolerated by nitrate and perchlorate reducing microorganisms. For SRM inhibition, MFP is synergistic with nitrite and chlorite, and could enhance the efficacy of nitrate or perchlorate treatments. Finally, MFP inhibition is multifaceted. Both inhibition of the central sulfate reduction pathway and release of cytoplasmic fluoride ion are implicated in the mechanism of MFP toxicity. PMID:25698072

  18. Optimisation of a triazolopyridine based histone demethylase inhibitor yields a potent and selective KDM2A (FBXL11) inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Krojer, Tobias; Scozzafava, Giuseppe; Ng, Stanley S.; Daniel, Michelle; Szykowska, Aleksandra; Che, KaHing; von Delft, Frank; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A.; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.; Brennan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    A potent inhibitor of the JmjC histone lysine demethylase KDM2A (compound 35, pIC50 7.2) with excellent selectivity over representatives from other KDM subfamilies has been developed; the discovery that a triazolopyridine compound binds to the active site of JmjC KDMs was followed by optimisation of the triazole substituent for KDM2A inhibition and selectivity. PMID:26682034

  19. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  20. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  1. Crystal structures of human RIP2 kinase catalytic domain complexed with ATP-competitive inhibitors: Foundations for understanding inhibitor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Adam K; Convery, Máire A; Lakdawala Shah, Ami; Jones, Emma; Hardwicke, Philip; Bridges, Angela; Ouellette, Michael; Totoritis, Rachel; Schwartz, Benjamin; King, Bryan W; Wisnoski, David D; Kang, James; Eidam, Patrick M; Votta, Bartholomew J; Gough, Peter J; Marquis, Robert W; Bertin, John; Casillas, Linda

    2015-11-01

    Receptor interacting protein 2 (RIP2) is an intracellular kinase and key signaling partner for the pattern recognition receptors NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins 1 and 2). As such, RIP2 represents an attractive target to probe the role of these pathways in disease. In an effort to design potent and selective inhibitors of RIP2 we established a crystallographic system and determined the structure of the RIP2 kinase domain in an apo form and also in complex with multiple inhibitors including AMP-PCP (?,?-Methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a non-hydrolysable adenosine triphosphate mimic) and structurally diverse ATP competitive chemotypes identified via a high-throughput screening campaign. These structures represent the first set of diverse RIP2-inhibitor co-crystal structures and demonstrate that the protein possesses the ability to adopt multiple DFG-in as well as DFG-out and C-helix out conformations. These structures reveal key protein-inhibitor structural insights and serve as the foundation for establishing a robust structure-based drug design effort to identify both potent and highly selective inhibitors of RIP2 kinase. PMID:26455654

  2. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Molecular Simulation of Chalcones and Aurones as Selective MAO-B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Morales-Camilo, Nicole; Salas, Cristian O; Sanhueza, Claudia; Espinosa-Bustos, Christian; Sepúlveda-Boza, Silvia; Reyes-Parada, Miguel; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Caroli-Rezende, Marcos; Fierro, Angélica

    2015-06-01

    A series of chalcones and aurones were synthesized and evaluated in vitro as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOi). Our results show that aurones, which had not been previously reported as MAOi, are MAO-B inhibitors. Thus, both families inhibited selectively the B isoform of MAO in the micromolar range, offering novel scaffolds for the design of new and potent MAO inhibitors. The main structural requirements for their activity were characterized with the aid of 3D-QSAR and docking studies. PMID:25346162

  3. Discovery of N-substituted pyridinones as potent and selective inhibitors of p38 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Monahan, Joseph B.; Boehm, Terri L.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Durley, Richard C.; Kurumbail, Ravi; Shieh, Huey; Xing, Li; Hepperle, Michael; Rucker, Paul V.; Jerome, Kevin D.; Benson, Alan G.; Marrufo, Laura D.; Madsen, Heather M.; Hitchcock, Jeff; Owen, Tom J.; Christie, Lance; Promo, Michele A.; Hickory, Brian S.; Alvira, Edgardo; Naing, Win; Blevis-Bal, Radhika; Pfizer

    2010-10-18

    The identification and evolution of a series of potent and selective p38 inhibitors is described. p38 inhibitors based on a N-benzyl pyridinone high-throughput screening hit were prepared and their SAR explored. Their design was guided by ligand bound co-crystals of p38{alpha}. These efforts resulted in the identification of 12r and 19 as orally active inhibitors of p38 with significant efficacy in both acute and chronic models of inflammation.

  4. Biochemical And Structural Evaluation of Highly Selective 2-Arylbenzoxazole-Based Transthyretin Amyloidogenesis Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.; Connelly, S.; Wilson, I.A.; Kelly, J.W.

    2009-05-18

    To develop potent transthyretin (TTR) amyloidogenesis inhibitors that also display high binding selectivity in blood, it proves useful to systematically optimize each of the three substructural elements that comprise a typical inhibitor: the two aryl rings and the linker joining them. In the first study, described herein, structural modifications to one aryl ring were evaluated by screening a library of 2-arylbenzoxazoles bearing thyroid hormone-like aryl substituents on the 2-aryl ring. Several potent and highly selective amyloidogenesis inhibitors were identified that exhibit minimal thyroid hormone nuclear receptor and COX-1 binding. High resolution crystal structures (1.3-1.5 A) of three inhibitors (2f, 4f, and 4d) in complex with TTR were obtained to characterize their binding orientation. Collectively, the results demonstrate that thyroid hormone-like substitution patterns on one aryl ring lead to potent and highly selective TTR amyloidogenesis inhibitors that lack undesirable thyroid hormone receptor or COX-1 binding.

  5. Enhanced Responsiveness to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Jury, Nicholas J.; McCormick, Betsy A.; Horseman, Nelson D.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Gregerson, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence has cast doubt on the effectiveness of SSRIs, these results support their therapeutic use in the treatment of PPD. PMID:25689282

  6. Enhanced responsiveness to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during lactation.

    PubMed

    Jury, Nicholas J; McCormick, Betsy A; Horseman, Nelson D; Benoit, Stephen C; Gregerson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence has cast doubt on the effectiveness of SSRIs, these results support their therapeutic use in the treatment of PPD. PMID:25689282

  7. Selection by phage display of a variant mustard trypsin inhibitor toxic against aphids.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Luigi R; Volpicella, Mariateresa; Rahbé, Yvan; Gallerani, Raffaele; Beekwilder, Jules; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2003-02-01

    The mustard trypsin inhibitor, MTI-2, is a potent inhibitor of trypsin with no activity towards chymotrypsin. MTI-2 is toxic for lepidopteran insects, but has low activity against aphids. In an attempt to improve the activity of the inhibitor towards aphids, a library of inhibitor variants was constructed and cloned into the pRlac3 phagemid vector. The library of 9.3 x 107 independent colonies was created by randomisation of a stretch of five consecutive codons in the reactive site. Repeated selection rounds against bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin allowed the identification of novel, MTI-2 derived, antitrypsin and antichymotrypsin inhibitors. Chy8, the selected variant with highest affinity for bovine chymotrypsin (Ki = 32 nm versus >1000 nm for the wild-type) represents the strongest known recombinant chymotrypsin inhibitor of the MTI-2 family. It is highly toxic to nymphs of the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, and moderately toxic to nymphs of Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae. The LC50 of 73 microg ml-1 towards A. pisum is the lowest value known among chymotrypsin inhibitors. The aphicidal activity of Chy8 was improved eightfold compared to the wild-type inhibitor. This demonstrates, for the first time, that bovine chymotrypsin provides a useful template to select engineered proteins highly toxic against these aphids. The selected gene will allow the development of transgenic crops that are protected against sucking insect pests. PMID:12581313

  8. The design and synthesis of 5- and 6-isoxazolylbenzimidazoles as selective inhibitors of the BET bromodomains†‡

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Duncan; Fedorov, Oleg; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Martin, Sarah; Philpott, Martin; Picaud, Sarah; Hewings, David S.; Uttakar, Sagar; Heightman, Tom D.; Conway, Stuart J.; Knapp, Stefan; Brennan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Simple 1-substituted 5- and 6-isoxazolyl-benzimidazoles have been shown to be potent inhibitors of the BET bromodomains with selectivity over the related bromodomain of CBP. The reported inhibitors were prepared from simple starting materials in two steps followed by separation of the regioisomers or regioselectively in three steps.

  9. The Tpl2 Kinase Regulates the COX-2/Prostaglandin E2 Axis in Adipocytes in Inflammatory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Berthou, Flavien; Ceppo, Franck; Dumas, Karine; Massa, Fabienne; Vergoni, Bastien; Alemany, Susana; Cormont, Mireille; Tanti, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    Bioactive lipid mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) have emerged as potent regulator of obese adipocyte inflammation and functions. PGE2 is produced by cyclooxygenases (COXs) from arachidonic acid, but inflammatory signaling pathways controlling COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in adipocytes remain ill-defined. Here, we demonstrated that the MAP kinase kinase kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) controls COX-2 expression and PGE2 secretion in adipocytes in response to different inflammatory mediators. We found that pharmacological- or small interfering RNA-mediated Tpl2 inhibition in 3T3-L1 adipocytes decreased by 50% COX-2 induction in response to IL-1?, TNF-?, or a mix of the 2 cytokines. PGE2 secretion induced by the cytokine mix was also markedly blunted. At the molecular level, nuclear factor ?B was required for Tpl2-induced COX-2 expression in response to IL-1? but was inhibitory for the TNF-? or cytokine mix response. In a coculture between adipocytes and macrophages, COX-2 was mainly increased in adipocytes and pharmacological inhibition of Tpl2 or its silencing in adipocytes markedly reduced COX-2 expression and PGE2 secretion. Further, Tpl2 inhibition in adipocytes reduces by 60% COX-2 expression induced by a conditioned medium from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages. Importantly, LPS was less efficient to induce COX-2 mRNA in adipose tissue explants of Tpl2 null mice compared with wild-type and Tpl2 null mice displayed low COX-2 mRNA induction in adipose tissue in response to LPS injection. Collectively, these data established that activation of Tpl2 by inflammatory stimuli in adipocytes and adipose tissue contributes to increase COX-2 expression and production of PGE2 that could participate in the modulation of adipose tissue inflammation during obesity. PMID:26020725

  10. Role of COX-2/mPGES-1/Prostaglandin E2 Cascade in Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhanjun; Zhang, Yue; Ding, Guixia; Heiney, Kristina Marie; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2 cascade plays critical roles in modulating many physiological and pathological actions in different organs. In the kidney, this cascade is of high importance in regulating fluid metabolism, blood pressure, and renal hemodynamics. Under some disease conditions, this cascade displays various actions in response to the different pathological insults. In the present review, the roles of this cascade in the pathogenesis of kidney injuries including diabetic and nondiabetic kidney diseases and acute kidney injuries were introduced and discussed. The new insights from this review not only increase the understanding of the pathological role of the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2 pathway in kidney injuries, but also shed new light on the innovation of the strategies for the treatment of kidney diseases. PMID:25729216

  11. Structural characterizations of nonpeptidic thiadiazole inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases reveal the basis for stromelysin selectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, B. C.; Baldwin, E. T.; Bryant, G. L.; Hess, G. F.; Wilks, J. W.; Trepod, C. M.; Mott, J. E.; Marshall, V. P.; Petzold, G. L.; Poorman, R. A.; O'Sullivan, T. J.; Schostarez, H. J.; Mitchell, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of two 5-substituted-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thione inhibitors to the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin (MMP-3) have been characterized by protein crystallography. Both inhibitors coordinate to the catalytic zinc cation via an exocyclic sulfur and lay in an unusual position across the unprimed (P1-P3) side of the proteinase active site. Nitrogen atoms in the thiadiazole moiety make specific hydrogen bond interactions with enzyme structural elements that are conserved across all enzymes in the matrix metalloproteinase class. Strong hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the side chain of tyrosine-155 appear to be responsible for the very high selectivity of these inhibitors for stromelysin. In these enzyme/inhibitor complexes, the S1' enzyme subsite is unoccupied. A conformational rearrangement of the catalytic domain occurs that reveals an inherent flexibility of the substrate binding region leading to speculation about a possible mechanism for modulation of stromelysin activity and selectivity. PMID:9792098

  12. Treatment discontinuation with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with tricyclic antidepressants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, I. M.; Tomenson, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess treatment discontinuation rates with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with tricyclic antidepressants. DESIGN--Meta-analysis of 62 randomised controlled trials. SUBJECTS--6029 patients with major unipolar depression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Pooled risk ratios for drop out rates with respect to all cases of discontinuation and those due to side effects and treatment failure. RESULTS--The total discontinuation rate was 10% lower with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors than with tricyclic antidepressants (risk ratio 0.90; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.97) and the drop out rate due to side effects was 25% lower (risk ratio 0.75; 0.66 to 0.84). There was no significant difference between drug classes in the drop out rates for treatment failure. The risk ratios for drop out did not differ significantly between individual selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS--Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are better tolerated than tricyclic antidepressants as measured by total numbers of drop outs. The definite advantage to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is explained by fewer drop outs due to side effects. The overall difference, however, is comparatively small and may not be clinically relevant. Analyses of cost effectiveness should not overestimate the advantage to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:7613276

  13. Aspirin analogues as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, nitric oxide release, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation as anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jatinder; Bhardwaj, Atul; Huang, Zhangjian; Knaus, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    Analogues of aspirin were synthesized through an efficient one-step reaction in which the carboxyl group was replaced by an ethyl ester, and/or the acetoxy group was replaced by an N-substituted sulfonamide (SO(2)NHOR(2):R(2) =H, Me, CH(2)Ph) pharmacophore. These analogues were designed for evaluation as dual cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitors. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition studies identified compounds 11 (CO(2) H, SO(2)NHOH), 12 (CO(2)H, SO(2)NHOCH(2)Ph), and 16 (CO(2)Et, SO(2)NHOH) as highly potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors (IC(50) range: 0.07-0.7 ?M), which exhibited appreciable in vivo anti-inflammatory activity (ED(50) range: 23.1-31.4 mg kg(-1)). Moreover, compounds 11 (IC(50) =0.2 ?M) and 16 (IC(50) =0.3 ?M), with a sulfohydroxamic acid (SO(2)NHOH) moiety showed potent 5-LOX inhibitory activity. Furthermore, the SO(2)NHOH moiety present in compounds 11 and 16 was found to be a good nitric oxide (NO) donor upon incubation in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. Molecular docking studies in the active binding site of COX-2 and 5-LOX provided complementary theoretical support for the experimental biological structure-activity data acquired. PMID:22095955

  14. Cyanohydrin as an Anchoring Group for Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Enterovirus 71 3C Protease.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yangyang; Zhao, Xiangshuai; Cui, Zhengjie; Wang, Man; Wang, Yaxin; Li, Linfeng; Sun, Qi; Yang, Xi; Zeng, Debin; Liu, Ying; Sun, Yuna; Lou, Zhiyong; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2015-12-10

    Cyanohydrin derivatives as enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease (3C(pro)) inhibitors have been synthesized and assayed for their biochemical and antiviral activities. Compared with the reported inhibitors, cyanohydrins (1S,2S,2'S,5S)-16 and (1R,2S,2'S,5S)-16 exhibited significantly improved activity and attractive selectivity profiles against other proteases, which were a result of the specific interactions between the cyanohydrin moiety and the catalytic site of 3C(pro). Cyanohydrin as an anchoring group with high selectivity and excellent inhibitory activity represents a useful choice for cysteine protease inhibitors. PMID:26571192

  15. Selective and potent furin inhibitors protect cells from anthrax without significant toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Remacle, Albert G.; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Golubkov, Vladislav S.; Cadwell, Gregory W.; Liddington, Robert C.; Cieplak, Piotr; Millis, Sherri Z.; Desjardins, Roxane; Routhier, Sophie; Yuan, Xue Wen; Neugebauer, Witold A.; Day, Robert; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2010-01-01

    Furin and related proprotein convertases cleave the multibasic motifs R-X-R/K/X-R in the precursor proteins and, as a result, transform the latent proproteins into biologically active proteins and peptides. Furin is present both in the intracellular secretory pathway and at the cell surface. Intracellular furin processes its multiple normal cellular targets in the Golgi and secretory vesicle compartments while cell-surface furin appears to be essential only for the processing of certain pathogenic proteins and, importantly, anthrax. To design potent, safe and selective inhibitors of furin, we evaluated the potency and selectivity of the derivatized peptidic inhibitors modeled from the extended furin cleavage sequence of avian influenza A H5N1. We determined that the N- and C-terminal modifications of the original RARRRKKRT inhibitory scaffold produced selective and potent, nanomolar range, inhibitors of furin. These inhibitors did not interfere with the normal cellular function of furin because of the likely functional redundancy existing between furin and other proprotein convertases. These furin inhibitors, however, were highly potent in blocking the furin-dependent cell-surface processing of anthrax protective antigen-83 both in vitro and cell-based assays and in vivo. We conclude that the inhibitors we have designed have a promising potential as selective anthrax inhibitors, without affecting major cell functions. PMID:20197107

  16. Structural Basis for Binding and Selectivity of Antimalarial and Anticancer Ethylenediamine Inhibitors to Protein Farnesyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Fletcher, Steven; Cummings, Christopher G.; Pusateri, Erin E.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Rivas, Kasey; Gelb, Michael H.; Voorhis, Wesley C.Van; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Beese, Lorena S. ); ); ); )

    2009-03-20

    Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes an essential posttranslational lipid modification of more than 60 proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction networks. FTase inhibitors have emerged as a significant target for development of anticancer therapeutics and, more recently, for the treatment of parasitic diseases caused by protozoan pathogens, including malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). We present the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of mammalian FTase with five inhibitors based on an ethylenediamine scaffold, two of which exhibit over 1000-fold selective inhibition of P. falciparum FTase. These structures reveal the dominant determinants in both the inhibitor and enzyme that control binding and selectivity. Comparison to a homology model constructed for the P. falciparum FTase suggests opportunities for further improving selectivity of a new generation of antimalarial inhibitors.

  17. Computational design of a time-dependent histone deacetylase 2 selective inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwei; Li, Min; Chen, Nanhao; Wang, Shenglong; Luo, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Yingkai; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-03-20

    Development of isoform-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is of great biological and medical interest. Among 11 zinc-dependent HDAC isoforms, it is particularly challenging to achieve isoform inhibition selectivity between HDAC1 and HDAC2 due to their very high structural similarities. In this work, by developing and applying a novel de novo reaction-mechanism-based inhibitor design strategy to exploit the reactivity difference, we have discovered the first HDAC2-selective inhibitor, ?-hydroxymethyl chalcone. Our bioassay experiments show that this new compound has a unique time-dependent selective inhibition on HDAC2, leading to about 20-fold isoform-selectivity against HDAC1. Furthermore, our ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, a state-of-the-art approach to study reactions in biological systems, have elucidated how the ?-hydroxymethyl chalcone can achieve the distinct time-dependent inhibition toward HDAC2. PMID:25546141

  18. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  19. Effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy and interferon tau on expression of cyclooxygenase two (COX-2) in ovine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seokwoon; Choi, Youngsok; Spencer, Thomas E; Bazer, Fuller W

    2003-01-01

    In sheep, the uterus produces luteolytic pulses of prostaglandin F2? (PGF) on Days 15 to 16 of estrous cycle to regress the corpus luteum (CL). These PGF pulses are produced by the endometrial lumenal epithelium (LE) and superficial ductal glandular epithelium (sGE) in response to binding of pituitary and/or luteal oxytocin to oxytocin receptors (OTR) and liberation of arachidonic acid, the precursor of PGF. Cyclooxygenase-one (COX-1) and COX-2 are rate-limiting enzymes in PGF synthesis, and COX-2 is the major form expressed in ovine endometrium. During pregnancy recognition, interferon tau (IFN?), produced by the conceptus trophectoderm, acts in a paracrine manner to suppress development of the endometrial epithelial luteolytic mechanism by inhibiting transcription of estrogen receptor ? (ER?) (directly) and OTR (indirectly) genes. Conflicting studies indicate that IFN? increases, decreases or has no effect on COX-2 expression in bovine and ovine endometrial cells. In Study One, COX-2 mRNA and protein were detected solely in endometrial LE and sGE of both cyclic and pregnant ewes. During the estrous cycle, COX-2 expression increased from Days 10 to 12 and then decreased to Day 16. During early pregnancy, COX-2 expression increased from Days 10 to 12 and remained higher than in cyclic ewes. In Study Two, intrauterine infusion of recombinant ovine IFN? in cyclic ewes from Days 11 to 16 post-estrus did not affect COX-2 expression in the endometrial epithelium. These results clearly indicate that IFN? has no effect on expression of the COX-2 gene in the ovine endometrium. Therefore, antiluteolytic effects of IFN? are to inhibit ER? and OTR gene transcription, thereby preventing endometrial production of luteolytic pulses of PGF. Indeed, expression of COX-2 in the endometrial epithelia as well as conceptus is likely to have a beneficial regulatory role in implantation and development of the conceptus. PMID:12956885

  20. Evolution of NADPH Oxidase Inhibitors: Selectivity and Mechanisms for Target Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Altenhöfer, Sebastian; Radermacher, Kim A.; Kleikers, Pamela W.M.; Wingler, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress, an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production versus consumption, may be involved in the pathogenesis of different diseases. The only known enzymes solely dedicated to ROS generation are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases with their catalytic subunits (NOX). After the clinical failure of most antioxidant trials, NOX inhibitors are the most promising therapeutic option for diseases associated with oxidative stress. Recent Advances: Historical NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and diphenylene iodonium, are un-specific and not isoform selective. Novel NOX inhibitors stemming from rational drug discovery approaches, for example, GKT137831, ML171, and VAS2870, show improved specificity for NADPH oxidases and moderate NOX isoform selectivity. Along with NOX2 docking sequence (NOX2ds)-tat, a peptide-based inhibitor, the use of these novel small molecules in animal models has provided preliminary in vivo evidence for a pathophysiological role of specific NOX isoforms. Critical Issues: Here, we discuss whether novel NOX inhibitors enable reliable validation of NOX isoforms' pathological roles and whether this knowledge supports translation into pharmacological applications. Modern NOX inhibitors have increased the evidence for pathophysiological roles of NADPH oxidases. However, in comparison to knockout mouse models, NOX inhibitors have limited isoform selectivity. Thus, their use does not enable clear statements on the involvement of individual NOX isoforms in a given disease. Future Directions: The development of isoform-selective NOX inhibitors and biologicals will enable reliable validation of specific NOX isoforms in disease models other than the mouse. Finally, GKT137831, the first NOX inhibitor in clinical development, is poised to provide proof of principle for the clinical potential of NOX inhibition. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 406–427. PMID:24383718

  1. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Molero, Yasmina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Zetterqvist, Johan; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Fazel, Seena

    2015-01-01

    Background Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain. Methods and Findings From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08–1.32, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 1.0%). With age stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19–1.73, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 3.0%). However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25–34 y (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95–1.52, p = 0.125, absolute risk = 1.6%), in those aged 35–44 y (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.83–1.35, p = 0.666, absolute risk = 1.2%), or in those aged 45 y or older (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.84–1.35, p = 0.594, absolute risk = 0.3%). Associations in those aged 15 to 24 y were also found for violent crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16–1.41, p < 0.001), non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10–1.34, p < 0.001), non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07–1.20, p < 0.001), non-fatal injuries from accidents (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.22–1.36, p < 0.001), and emergency inpatient or outpatient treatment for alcohol intoxication or misuse (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.76–2.21, p < 0.001). With age and sex stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for males aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.13–1.73, p = 0.002) and females aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.08–2.84, p = 0.023). However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25 y or older. One important limitation is that we were unable to fully account for time-varying factors. Conclusions The association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions and violent crime arrests varied by age group. The increased risk we found in young people needs validation in other studies. PMID:26372359

  2. Novel synthesis of 3,4-diarylisoxazole analogues of valdecoxib: reversal cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity by sulfonamide group removal.

    PubMed

    Di Nunno, Leonardo; Vitale, Paola; Scilimati, Antonio; Tacconelli, Stefania; Patrignani, Paola

    2004-09-23

    3,4-Diarylisoxazole analogues of valdecoxib [4-(5-methyl-3-phenylisoxazol-4-yl)-benzensulfonamide], a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, were synthesized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of arylnitrile oxides to the enolate ion of phenylacetone regioselectively prepared in situ with lithium diisopropylamide at 0 degrees C. The corresponding 3-aryl-5-methyl-4-phenylisoxazoles were easily generated by a dehydration/aromatization reaction under basic conditions of 3-aryl-5-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-phenyl-2-isoxazolines and further transformed into their benzenesulfonamide derivatives. The biochemical COX-1/COX-2 selectivity was evaluated in vitro by using the human whole blood assays of COX isozyme activity. Three compounds not bearing the sulfonamide group present in valdecoxib were selective COX-1 inhibitors. PMID:15369392

  3. Concurrent targeting of eicosanoid receptor 1/eicosanoid receptor 4 receptors and COX-2 induces synergistic apoptosis in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arun George; Chandran, Bala; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2013-06-01

    The effective antitumorigenic potential of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and eicosonoid (EP; EP1-4) receptor antagonists prompted us to test their efficacy in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related lymphomas. Our study demonstrated that (1) EP1-4 receptor protein levels vary among the various non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cell lines tested (BCBL-1:KSHV+/EBV-;BC-3: KSHV+/EBV-; Akata/EBV+: KSHV-/EBV+; and JSC-1 cells: KSHV+/EBV + cells); (2) 5.0 ?M of EP1 antagonist (SC-51322) had a significant antiproliferative effect on BCBL-1, BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (3) 50.0 ?M of EP2 antagonist (AH6809) was required to induce a significant antiproliferative effect on BCBL-1, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (4) 5.0 ?M of EP4 antagonist (GW 627368X) had a significant antiproliferative effect on BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; (5) COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib (5.0 ?M) had significant antiproliferative effects on BCBL-1, BC-3, Akata/EBV+, and JSC-1 cells; and (6) a combination of 1.0 ?M each of celecoxib, SC-51322 and GW 627368X could potentiate the proapoptotic properties of celecoxib or vice-versa. Overall, our studies identified the synergistic antiproliferative effect of NSAIDs and EP receptor blockers on KSHV and EBV related B cell malignancies. PMID:23523954

  4. Potent selective nonpeptidic inhibitors of human lung tryptase

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Laurence E.; Newhouse, Bradley J.; Ibrahim, Prabha; Rizzi, James; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Hartman, Ann; Brandhuber, Barbara J.; Wright, Clifford D.; Thomson, David S.; Vigers, Guy P. A.; Koch, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Human lung tryptase, a homotetrameric serine protease unique to mast cell secretory granules, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. A hypothesis that tethered symmetrical inhibitors might bridge two adjacent active sites was explored via a rationally designed series of bisbenzamidines. These compounds demonstrated a remarkable distanced-defined structure–activity relationship against human tryptase with one series possessing subnanomolar potencies. Additional evidence supporting the concept of active-site bridging is also presented. PMID:10411878

  5. Src Tyrosine Kinase Activation by 4-Hydroxynonenal Upregulates p38, ERK/AP-1 Signaling and COX-2 Expression in YPEN-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Ji; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeon Ja; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, Min Hi; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major end product of lipid peroxidation, is highly reactive and involved in various cellular processes, such as inflammatory signaling. However, to date, the mechanistic roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling related to protein tyrosine kinases have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between 4-HNE and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) for its involvement in the molecular modulation of the inflammatory signaling pathway utilizing the YPEN-1 cell system. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that 4-HNE phosphorylates (activates) Src at Tyr416 via adduct formation. In addition, LC-MS/MS and a docking simulation model revealed an addiction site at the Cys248 residue of Src, resulting in the stimulation of downstream p38, ERK/AP-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling in YPEN-1 cells. The role of 4-HNE-activated Src in downstream inflammatory signaling was further investigated using dasatinib (a Src inhibitor) and by siRNA knockdown of Src. p38 and ERK were directly regulated by Src, as revealed by immunoblotting of the phosphorylated forms of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are key elements in the signaling transduction pathway initiated by Src. The study also shows that Src modulates the HNE-enhanced activation of AP-1 and the expression of COX-2 (a target gene of AP-1). Together, the results of this study show that 4-HNE stimulates Src tyrosine kinase in activation of the inflammation process. PMID:26466383

  6. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors for ADAMTS-4 through DNA-Encoded Library Technology (ELT).

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; O'Keefe, Heather; DeLorey, Jennifer L; Israel, David I; Messer, Jeffrey A; Chiu, Cynthia H; Skinner, Steven R; Matico, Rosalie E; Murray-Thompson, Monique F; Li, Fan; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Arico-Muendel, Christopher; Morgan, Barry A

    2015-08-13

    The aggrecan degrading metalloprotease ADAMTS-4 has been identified as a novel therapeutic target for osteoarthritis. Here, we use DNA-encoded Library Technology (ELT) to identify novel ADAMTS-4 inhibitors from a DNA-encoded triazine library by affinity selection. Structure-activity relationship studies based on the selection information led to the identification of potent and highly selective inhibitors. For example, 4-(((4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)-6-(((4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino)methyl)-N-ethyl-N-(m-tolyl)benzamide has IC50 of 10 nM against ADAMTS-4, with >1000-fold selectivity over ADAMT-5, MMP-13, TACE, and ADAMTS-13. These inhibitors have no obvious zinc ligand functionality. PMID:26288689

  7. Discovery of chemical inhibitors of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by the HDL

    E-print Network

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    Discovery of chemical inhibitors of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by the HDL receptor for review July 16, 2002) The high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI), mediates both the selective uptake of lipids, mainly cholesterol esters, from HDL to cells

  8. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  9. Sulfated Pentagalloylglucoside is a Potent, Allosteric, and Selective Inhibitor of Factor XIa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Ponnusamy, Pooja; Mehta, Akul Y.; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of factor XIa (FXIa) is a novel paradigm for developing anticoagulants without major bleeding consequences. We present the discovery of sulfated pentagalloylglucoside (6) as a highly selective inhibitor of human FXIa. Biochemical screening of a focused library led to the identification of 6, a sulfated aromatic mimetic of heparin. Inhibitor 6 displayed a potency of 551 nM against FXIa, which was at least 200-fold more selective than other relevant enzymes. It also prevented activation of factor IX and prolonged human plasma and whole blood clotting. Inhibitor 6 reduced VMAX of FXIa hydrolysis of chromogenic substrate without affecting the KM suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Competitive studies showed that 6 bound in the heparin-binding site of FXIa. No allosteric small molecule has been discovered to date that exhibits equivalent potency against FXIa. Inhibitor 6 is expected to open up a major route to allosteric FXIa anticoagulants with clinical relevance. PMID:23316863

  10. A reversible and selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase ameliorates multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Torres, Gloria; Cipriano, Mariateresa; Hedén, Erika; Björklund, Emmelie; Canales, Ángeles; Zian, Debora; Feliú, Ana; Mecha, Miriam; Guaza, Carmen; Fowler, Christopher J; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Silvia; López-Rodríguez, María L

    2014-12-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is the enzyme responsible for the inactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). MAGL inhibitors show analgesic and tissue-protecting effects in several disease models. However, the few efficient and selective MAGL inhibitors described to date block the enzyme irreversibly, and this can lead to pharmacological tolerance. Hence, additional classes of MAGL inhibitors are needed to validate this enzyme as a therapeutic target. Here we report a potent, selective, and reversible MAGL inhibitor (IC50=0.18??M) which is active in vivo and ameliorates the clinical progression of a multiple sclerosis (MS) mouse model without inducing undesirable CB1 -mediated side effects. These results support the interest in MAGL as a target for the treatment of MS. PMID:25298214

  11. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  12. Selective Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) with a (4-Quinolinoyl)-glycyl-2-cyanopyrrolidine Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease that is generally accepted to play an important role in tumor growth and other diseases involving tissue remodeling. Currently there are no FAP inhibitors with reported selectivity toward both the closely related dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs) and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP). We present the discovery of a new class of FAP inhibitors with a N-(4-quinolinoyl)-Gly-(2-cyanopyrrolidine) scaffold. We have explored the effects of substituting the quinoline ring and varying the position of its sp2 hybridized nitrogen atom. The most promising inhibitors combined low nanomolar FAP inhibition and high selectivity indices (>103) with respect to both the DPPs and PREP. Preliminary experiments on a representative inhibitor demonstrate that plasma stability, kinetic solubility, and log D of this class of compounds can be expected to be satisfactory. PMID:24900696

  13. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-01-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3K?-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  14. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Selective LeishmaniaN-Myristoyltransferase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of LeishmaniaN-myristoyltransferase (NMT), a potential target for the treatment of leishmaniasis, obtained from a high-throughput screen, were resynthesized to validate activity. Crystal structures bound to Leishmania major NMT were obtained, and the active diastereoisomer of one of the inhibitors was identified. On the basis of structural insights, enzyme inhibition was increased 40-fold through hybridization of two distinct binding modes, resulting in novel, highly potent Leishmania donovani NMT inhibitors with good selectivity over the human enzyme. PMID:25238611

  15. Corrosion inhibitor selection for arctic and subsea high-velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    2000-03-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high-velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The criteria include high-velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125-in. (0.318-cm) capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance of using these criteria for inhibitor selection.

  16. Synthesis of benzothiophene-based hydroxamic acids as potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Vreese, Rob; Van Steen, Nicholas; Verhaeghe, Tom; Desmet, Tom; Bougarne, Nadia; De Bosscher, Karolien; Benoy, Veronick; Haeck, Wanda; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2015-06-18

    A small library of 3-[(4-hydroxycarbamoylphenyl)aminomethyl]benzothiophenes was prepared and assessed as a novel class of HDAC6 inhibitors, leading to the identification of three representatives as potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors. Further tests with regard to inflammatory responses indicated that HDAC6 inhibition can be uncoupled from transcriptional inhibition at the level of activated NF-?B, AP-1, and GR. PMID:25994553

  17. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Monika A.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Wagner, Jacob P.; Eide, Christopher A.; Goodman, James R.; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib’s dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1G2032R mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure–function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies. PMID:26372962

  18. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  19. Translational approach utilizing COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pratik N; Thennavan, Aatish; Sen, Subhalakshmi; Chandrashekar, Chetana; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2015-09-01

    About 20% of the world's population uses some form of betel nut, which suggests that the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is higher than current estimates. OSF has the potential to undergo malignant transformation; thus, there is a need to identify relevant markers to assess its aggressiveness. We evaluated changes in COX-2, p53, and MDM2 expressions in progressive OSF. Expressions of COX-2, p53, and MDM2 increased with OSF progression. There was a strong association between COX-2 overexpression and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (P < 0.001) and a positive relation between increased MDM2 expression and failure of radiotherapy (P = 0.007). These findings suggest that COX-2 is an important marker of disease progression and that MDM2 expression is useful for treatment planning. PMID:26369479

  20. KRAS, EGFR, PDGFR-?, KIT and COX-2 status in carcinoma showing thymus-like elements (CASTLE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background CASTLE (Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the thyroid resembling lymphoepithelioma-like and squamous cell carcinoma of the thymus with different biological behaviour and a better prognosis than anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid. Methods We retrospectively investigated 6 cases of this very rare neoplasm in order to investigate the mutational status of KRAS, EGFR, PDGFR-? and KIT, as well as the immunohistochemical expression pattern of CD117, EGFR and COX-2, and possibly find new therapeutic targets. Results Diagnosis was confirmed by a moderate to strong expression of CD5, CD117 and CK5/6, whereas thyroglobulin, calcitonin and TTF-1 were negative in all cases. Tumors were also positive for COX-2 and in nearly all cases for EGFR. In four cases single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be detected in exon 12 of the PDGFR-? gene (rs1873778), in three cases SNPs were found in exon 20 of the EGFR gene (rs1050171). No mutations were found in the KIT and KRAS gene. Conclusions All tumors showed a COX-2 expression as well as an EGFR expression except for one case and a wild-type KRAS status. No activating mutations in the EGFR, KIT and PDGFR-? gene could be detected. Our data may indicate a potential for targeted therapies, but if these therapeutic strategies are of benefit in CASTLE remains to be determined. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1658499296115016 PMID:24934485

  1. Food Polyphenols Fail to Cause a Biologically Relevant Reduction of COX-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Willenberg, Ina; Meschede, Anna K.; Gueler, Faikah; Jang, Mi-Sun; Shushakova, Nelli; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a correlation between the dietary intake of food polyphenols and beneficial health effects. Several in vitro studies indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of polyphenols is, at least in part, mediated by a modulation of the enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade, such as the prostaglandin forming cyclooxygenases (COXs). Evidence that this mode of action can be transferred to the situation in vivo is scarce. This study characterized effects of a subset of polyphenols on COX2 expression and activity in vitro and compared the potency with known drugs. Next, the in vivo relevance of the observed in vitro effects was tested. Enzyme assays and incubations of polyphenols with the cancer cell line HCA–7 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated primary monocytes support the hypothesis that polyphenols can effect COX2 expression and activity in vitro. The effects were most pronounced in the monocyte assay for wogonin, apigenin, resveratrol and genistein with IC50 values of 1.5 ?M, 2.6 ?M, 2.8 ?M and 7.4 ?M. However, these values are 100- to 1000-fold higher in comparison to those of the known pharmaceuticals celecoxib, indomethacin and dexamethasone. In an animal model of LPS induced sepsis, pretreatment with polyphenols (i. p. 100 mg/kg bw) did not result in decreased plasma or tissue prostaglandin levels, whereas the positive control celecoxib effectively attenuated LPS induced prostaglandin formation. These data suggest that despite the moderate potency in vitro, an effect of polyphenols on COX2 during acute inflammation is unlikely, even if a high dose of polyphenols is ingested. PMID:26440517

  2. Use of Cyclo-Oxygenase Inhibitors Is Not Associated with Clinical Relapse in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Abigail; Beales, Ian L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often have associated conditions, for which anti-inflammatory medication with cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors may be helpful. The current evidence is conflicting regarding the role of COX-inhibitors in causing relapse in IBD. This case-control study examined the association between the use of COX inhibitors and relapse of IBD. Logistic regression was used to analyse the relationship between COX-inhibitors and IBD relapse. Overall COX inhibitor use (combined non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective COX-2 agents) had a negative association with relapse of IBD (adjusted OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09–0.80). This negative association was confined to ulcerative colitis (UC) (adjusted OR = 0.06, 95% CI 0.01–0.50) and no association was found in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (adjusted OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.18–7.46). The significant negative association between UC relapse and medication use was also seen with non-specific NSAIDs. Selective COX-2 inhibitor use was rare but non-significantly more common in stable patients. There was no association between low-dose aspirin or paracetamol use and relapse of CD or UC. We conclude that COX-inhibitor use was not associated with an increased risk of relapse in UC or CD, and may be protective in UC. Where indicated, NSAIDs should not be withheld from IBD patients. PMID:26371009

  3. The cytosol-synthesized subunit II (Cox2) precursor with the point mutation W56R is correctly processed in yeast mitochondria to rescue cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Valentín; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; García-Villegas, Rodolfo; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of the yeast mitochondrial gene COX2 encoding subunit 2 (Cox2) of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) results in loss of respiration (?cox2 strain). Supekova et al. (2010) [1] transformed a ?cox2 strain with a vector expressing Cox2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) and the point mutation W56R (Cox2(W56R)), restoring respiratory growth. Here, the CcO carrying the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) was characterized. Yeast mitochondria from the wild-type (WT) and the ?cox2+Cox2(W56R) strains were subjected to Blue Native electrophoresis. In-gel activity of CcO and spectroscopic quantitation of cytochromes revealed that only 60% of CcO is present in the complemented strain, and that less CcO is found associated in supercomplexes as compared to WT. CcOs from the WT and the mutant exhibited similar subunit composition, although activity was 20-25% lower in the enzyme containing Cox2(W56R) than in the one with Cox2(WT). Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed that W(56) was substituted by R(56) in Cox2(W56R). In addition, Cox2(W56R) exhibited the same N-terminus than Cox2(WT), indicating that the MTS of Oxa1 and the leader sequence of 15 residues were removed from Cox2(W56R) during maturation. Thus, Cox2(W56R) is identical to Cox2(WT) except for the point mutation W56R. Mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis is strongly reduced in ?cox2 mutants, but the Cox2(W56R) complemented strain led to full restoration of Cox1 synthesis. We conclude that the cytosol-synthesized Cox2(W56R) follows a rate-limiting process of import, maturation or assembly that yields lower steady-state levels of CcO. Still, the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) restores CcO activity and allows mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis to advance at WT levels. PMID:22985601

  4. Lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors selectively inhibit/deactivate cellulase performance.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Sizwe I; den Haan, Riaan; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we monitored the inhibition and deactivation effects of various compounds associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates on individual and combinations of cellulases. Tannic acid representing polymeric lignin residues strongly inhibited cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH1) and ?-glucosidase 1 (BGL1), but had a moderate inhibitory effect on endoglucanase 2 (EG2). Individual monomeric lignin residues had little or no inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes. However, coniferyl aldehyde and syringaldehyde substantially decreased the activity of CBH1 and deactivated BGL1. Acetic and formic acids also showed strong inhibition of BGL1 but not CBH1 and EG2, whereas tannic, acetic and formic acid strongly inhibited a combination of CBH1 and EG2 during Avicel hydrolysis. Diminishing enzymatic hydrolysis is largely a function of inhibitor concentration and the enzyme-inhibitor relationship, rather than contact time during the hydrolysis process (i.e. deactivation). This suggests that decreased rates of hydrolysis during the enzymatic depolymerisation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates may be imparted by other factors related to substrate crystallinity and accessibility. PMID:26453468

  5. Regulation of Cox-2 by cyclic AMP response element binding protein in prostate cancer: potential role for nexrutine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rita; Garcia, Gretchen E; Crosby, Katherine; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Thompson, Ian M; Troyer, Dean A; Kumar, Addanki P

    2007-11-01

    We recently showed that Nexrutine, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Our data also indicate that the anti-proliferative effects of Nexrutine are emediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2), a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and suppresses apoptosis. Treatment of LNCaP cells with Nexrutine reduced tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced enzymatic as well as promoter activities of Cox-2. Nexrutine also reduced the expression and promoter activity of Cox-2 in PC-3 cells that express high constitutive levels of Cox-2. Deletion analysis coupled with mutational analysis of the Cox-2 promoter identified CRE as being sufficient for mediating Nexrutine response. Immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate tumors show increased expression of CREB and DNA binding activity in high-grade tumors (three-fold higher in human prostate tumors compared to normal prostate; P = .01). We have identified CREB-mediated activation of Cox-2 as a potential signaling pathway in prostate cancer which can be blocked with a nontoxic, cost-effective dietary supplement like Nexrutine, demonstrating a prospective for development of Nexrutine for prostate cancer management. PMID:18030357

  6. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; DeRocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim GJ; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds designed to be inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site at residue 128. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii cells expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to this class of selective kinase inhibitors. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  7. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D?Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  8. Selective inhibitors of death in mutant huntingtin cells

    E-print Network

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    culture HD model that uses immortalized striatal neurons (ST14A). ST14A cells were stably transfected Figure 1 Novel compounds selectively suppress cell death and caspase-3 activation in N548 mutant cells

  9. Expression of integrin ?3?1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) are positively correlated in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of integrin ?3?1 is associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis in several cancers, including breast cancer. Moreover, preclinical studies have revealed important pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions for this integrin, including tumor growth, survival, invasion, and paracrine induction of angiogenesis. Our previously published work in a preclinical breast cancer model showed that integrin ?3?1 promotes expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2/PTGS2), a known driver of breast cancer progression. However, the clinical significance of this regulation was unknown. The objective of the current study was to assess the clinical relevance of the relationship between integrin ?3?1 and COX2 by testing for their correlated expression among various forms of human breast cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess co-expression of ?3 and COX2 in specimens of human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), either on a commercial tissue microarray (n?=?59 samples) or obtained from Albany Medical Center archives (n?=?68 samples). Immunostaining intensity for the integrin ?3 subunit or COX2 was scored, and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis was performed to assess their co-expression across and within different tumor subtypes or clinicopathologic criteria. Results Although expression of integrin ?3 or COX2 varied among clinical IDC samples, a statistically significant, positive correlation was detected between ?3 and COX2 in both tissue microarrays (rs?=?0.49, p?COX2 and ?3 are correlated in IDC independently of hormone receptor status or other clinicopathologic features, supporting the hypothesis that integrin ?3?1 is a determinant of COX2 expression in human breast cancer. These results support the clinical relevance of ?3?1-dependent COX2 gene expression that we reported previously in breast cancer cells. The findings also suggest that COX2-positive breast carcinomas of various subtypes might be vulnerable to therapeutic strategies that target ?3?1, and that ?3 expression might serve as an independent prognostic biomarker. PMID:24950714

  10. Structure-guided Design of Selective Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Li, Huiying; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) comprise three closely related isoforms that catalyze the oxidation of l-arginine to l-citrulline and the important second messenger nitric oxide (NO). Pharmacological selective inhibition of neuronal NOS (nNOS) has the potential to be therapeutically beneficial in various neurodegenerative diseases. Here we present a structure-guided, selective nNOS inhibitor design based on the crystal structure of lead compound 1 in nNOS. The best inhibitor, 7, exhibited low nanomolar inhibitory potency and good isoform selectivities (nNOS over eNOS and iNOS are 472-fold and 239-fold, respectively). Consistent with the good selectivity, 7 binds to nNOS and eNOS with different binding modes. The distinctly different binding modes of 7, driven by the critical residue Asp597 in nNOS, offers compelling insight to explain its isozyme selectivity, which should guide future drug design programs. PMID:23451760

  11. The selectivity of statine-based inhibitors against various human aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Jupp, R A; Dunn, B M; Jacobs, J W; Vlasuk, G; Arcuri, K E; Veber, D F; Perlow, D S; Payne, L S; Boger, J; de Laszlo, S

    1990-02-01

    The interactions of five human enzymes (renin, pepsin, gastricsin, cathepsin D and cathepsin E) and the aspartic proteinase from Endothia parasitica with several series of synthetic inhibitors were examined. All of the inhibitors contained the dipeptide analogue statine or its phenylalanine or cyclohexylalanine homologues in the P1-P1' positions. The residues occupying the peripheral sub-sites (P4 to P3') were varied systematically and inhibitory constants were determined for the interactions with each of the proteinases. Inhibitors were elucidated that specifically inhibited human renin and did not affect any of the other human enzymes or the fungal proteinase. With suitable selection of residues to occupy individual sub-sites, effective inhibitors of specific human aspartic proteinases may now be designed. PMID:2407237

  12. Dietary Blue Pigments Derived from Genipin, Attenuate Inflammation by Inhibiting LPS-Induced iNOS and COX-2 Expression via the NF-?B Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Xiang, Yaozu; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Lin, Ke-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The edible blue pigments produced by gardenia fruits have been used as value-added colorants for foods in East Asia for 20 years. However, the biological activity of the blue pigments derived from genipin has not been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments was studied in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage in vitro. The secretions of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were inhibited in concentration-dependent manner by blue pigments. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (Real-time RT-PCR) analyses demonstrated that the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) was inhibited, moreover, ELISA results showed that the productions of IL-6 and TNF-? were inhibited. Cell-based ELISA revealed the COX-2 protein expression was inhibited. The proteome profiler array showed that 12 cytokines and chemokines involved in the inflammatory process were down-regulated by blue pigments. Blue pigments inhibited the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-?B) activation induced by LPS, and this was associated with decreasing the DNA-binding activity of p65 and p50. Furthermore, blue pigments suppressed the degradation of inhibitor of ?B (I?B) ?, Inhibitor of NF-?B Kinase (IKK) ?, IKK-?, and phosphorylation of I?B-?. The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments in vivo was studied in carrageenan-induced paw edema and LPS-injecting ICR mice. Finally, blue pigments significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced plasma TNF-? and IL-6 production in vivo. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of blue pigments might be the results from the inhibition of iNOS, COX-2, IL-6, IL-1?, and TNF-? expression through the down-regulation of NF-?B activation, which will provide strong scientific evidence for the edible blue pigments to be developed as a new health-enhancing nutritional food for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:22479539

  13. Crystal Structure of Checkpoint Kinase 2 in Complex with Nsc 109555, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Zhang, Di; Jobson, Andrew G.; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2009-03-05

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a ser/thr kinase involved in the ATM-Chk2 checkpoint pathway, is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage and results in either arrest of the cell cycle to allow DNA repair to occur or apoptosis if the DNA damage is severe. Drugs that specifically target Chk2 could be beneficial when administered in combination with current DNA-damaging agents used in cancer therapy. Recently, a novel inhibitor of Chk2, NSC 109555, was identified that exhibited high potency (IC{sub 50} = 240 nM) and selectivity. This compound represents a new chemotype and lead for the development of novel Chk2 inhibitors that could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. To facilitate the discovery of new analogs of NSC 109555 with even greater potency and selectivity, we have solved the crystal structure of this inhibitor in complex with the catalytic domain of Chk2. The structure confirms that the compound is an ATP-competitive inhibitor, as the electron density clearly reveals that it occupies the ATP-binding pocket. However, the mode of inhibition differs from that of the previously studied structure of Chk2 in complex with debromohymenialdisine, a compound that inhibits both Chk1 and Chk2. A unique hydrophobic pocket in Chk2, located very close to the bound inhibitor, presents an opportunity for the rational design of compounds with higher binding affinity and greater selectivity.

  14. Species differential regulation of COX2 can be described by an NF?B-dependent logic AND gate.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lan K; Cavadas, Miguel A S; Kholodenko, Boris N; Frank, Till D; Cheong, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a key regulatory enzyme of the prostaglandin/eicosanoid pathway, is an important target for anti-inflammatory therapy. It is highly induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in a Nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B)-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms determining the amplitude and dynamics of this important pro-inflammatory event are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is significant difference between human and mouse COX2 expression in response to the inflammatory stimulus tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?). Here, we report the presence of a molecular logic AND gate composed of two NF?B response elements (NREs) which controls the expression of human COX2 in a switch-like manner. Combining quantitative kinetic modeling and thermostatistical analysis followed by experimental validation in iterative cycles, we show that the human COX2 expression machinery regulated by NF?B displays features of a logic AND gate. We propose that this provides a digital, noise-filtering mechanism for a tighter control of expression in response to TNF?, such that a threshold level of NF?B activation is required before the promoter becomes active and initiates transcription. This NF?B-regulated AND gate is absent in the mouse COX2 promoter, most likely contributing to its differential graded response in promoter activity and protein expression to TNF?. Our data suggest that the NF?B-regulated AND gate acts as a novel mechanism for controlling the expression of human COX2 to TNF?, and its absence in the mouse COX2 provides the foundation for further studies on understanding species-specific differential gene regulation. PMID:25697863

  15. Novel aminotetrazole derivatives as selective STAT3 non-peptide inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pallandre, Jean-René; Borg, Christophe; Rognan, Didier; Boibessot, Thibault; Luzet, Vincent; Yesylevskyy, Semen; Ramseyer, Christophe; Pudlo, Marc

    2015-10-20

    The development of inhibitors blocking STAT3 transcriptional activity is a promising therapeutic approach against cancer and inflammatory diseases. In this context, the selectivity of inhibitors against the STAT1 transcription factor is crucial as STAT3 and STAT1 play opposite roles in the apoptosis of tumor cells and polarization of the immune response. A structure-based virtual screening followed by a luciferase-containing promoter assay on STAT3 and STAT1 signaling were used to identify a selective STAT3 inhibitor. An important role of the aminotetrazole group in modulating STAT3 and STAT1 inhibitory activities has been established. Optimization of the hit compound leads to 23. This compound inhibits growth and survival of cells with STAT3 signaling pathway while displaying a minimal effect on STAT1 signaling. Moreover, it prevents lymphocyte T polarization into Th17 and Treg without affecting their differentiation into Th1 lymphocyte. PMID:26352675

  16. Effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, E M; Santos, O F P; Seguro, A C; Vattimo, M F F

    2004-07-01

    The frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in combination with gentamicin poses the additional risk of nephrotoxic renal failure. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is the main enzyme responsible for the synthesis of renal vasodilator prostaglandins, while COX-2 participates predominantly in the inflammatory process. Both are inhibited by non-selective NSAID such as indomethacin. Selective COX-2 inhibitors such as rofecoxib seem to have fewer renal side effects than non-selective inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the combined use of rofecoxib and gentamicin can prevent the increased renal injury caused by gentamicin and indomethacin. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were treated with gentamicin (100 mg/kg body weight, ip, N = 7), indomethacin (5 mg/kg, orally, N = 7), rofecoxib (1.4 mg/kg, orally, N = 7), gentamicin + rofecoxib (100 and 1.4 mg/kg, respectively) or gentamicin + indomethacin (100 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, N = 8) for 5 days. Creatinine clearance and alpha-glutathione-S-transferase concentrations were used as markers of renal injury. Animals were anesthetized with ether and sacrificed for blood collection. The use of gentamicin plus indomethacin led to worsened renal function (0.199 +/- 0.019 ml/min), as opposed to the absence of a nephrotoxic effect of rofecoxib when gentamicin plus rofexicob was used (0.242 +/- 0.011 ml/min). These results indicate that COX-2-selective inhibitors can be used as an alternative treatment to conventional NSAID, especially in situations in which risk factors for nephrotoxicity are present. PMID:15264004

  17. DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100600 Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Potassium

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100600 Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Potassium Channel Kv1] Jean-Francois Rolland,*[d] and Bert L. de Groot*[a] Introduction Potassium channels are necessary-dependent (Kv), calcium-activated (KCa), inward rectifier (Kir), and two-pore (K2P) potassium channels.[1

  18. [Psychopharmacological approach with the usage of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in functional dyspepsia treatment].

    PubMed

    Korendovych, I V; Svintsits'ky?, A S; Revenok, K M; Maliarov, S O

    2014-11-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). Treatment results showed reduction of dyspeptic symptoms as well as significant decrease of anxiety and depression and improvement of quality of life in patients, who were additionally prescribed SSRI. PMID:25528834

  19. Discovery of potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitors of interleukin-1 receptor-associate kinase-4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhulun; Sun, Daqing; Johnstone, Sheree; Cao, Zhaodan; Gao, Xiong; Jaen, Juan C; Liu, Jingqian; Lively, Sarah; Miao, Shichang; Sudom, Athena; Tomooka, Craig; Walker, Nigel P C; Wright, Matthew; Yan, Xuelei; Ye, Qiuping; Powers, Jay P

    2015-12-01

    In this Letter, we report the continued optimization of the N-acyl-2-aminobenzimidazole series, focusing in particular on the N-alkyl substituent and 5-position of the benzimidazole based on the binding mode and the early SAR. These efforts led to the discovery of 16, a highly potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of IRAK-4. PMID:26526214

  20. Supporting Information Selective ATP-competitive inhibitors of TOR suppress rapamycin insensitive

    E-print Network

    Sabatini, David M.

    Supporting Information Selective ATP-competitive inhibitors of TOR suppress rapamycin insensitive. Yeast strain SH121 and SH121 harboring pRS314[HA TOR2] plasmid were obtained from Yoshinori Ohsumi,000rpm for 1 min. One µl of supernatant was used as a template for PCR. The ATP pocket region in TOR1

  1. In Utero Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor; Yudell, Michael; Mortensen, Erik L.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status.…

  2. Selective Monocationic Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase. Binding Mode Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ji, Haitao; Li, Huiying; Jing, Qing; Labby, Kristin Jansen; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of pathophysiologic levels of nitric oxide through inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has the potential to be therapeutically beneficial in various neurodegenerative diseases. We have developed a series of pyrrolidine-based nNOS inhibitors that exhibit excellent potencies and isoform selectivities (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 5437). However, there are still important challenges, such as how to decrease the multiple positive charges derived from basic amino groups, which contribute to poor bioavailability, without losing potency and/or selectivity. Here we present an interdisciplinary study combining molecular docking, crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, synthesis, and enzymology to explore potential pharmacophoric features of nNOS inhibitors and to design potent and selective monocationic nNOS inhibitors. The simulation results indicate that different hydrogen bond patterns, electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and a water molecule bridge are key factors for stabilizing ligands and controlling ligand orientation. We find that a heteroatom in the aromatic head or linker chain of the ligand provides additional stability and blocks the substrate binding pocket. Finally, the computational insights are experimentally validated with double-headed pyridine analogs. The compounds reported here are among the most potent and selective monocationic pyrrolidine-based nNOS inhibitors reported to date, and 10 shows improved membrane permeability. PMID:22731813

  3. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  4. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic Athanasios Papakyriakou a,b

    E-print Network

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural Genetic polymorphisms in ERAP1 and ERAP2 have been associated with the individual's predisposition the development of potent and selective inhibitors for these enzymes that could potentially control the gen

  5. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  6. Structure activity relationship of selective GABA uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vogensen, Stine B; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten K; Jurik, Andreas; Borkar, Nrupa; Rosatelli, Emiliano; Nielsen, Birgitte; Ecker, Gerhard F; Schousboe, Arne; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2015-05-15

    A series of ?-amino acids with lipophilic diaromatic side chain was synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) transporter subtypes mGAT1-4 in order to investigate structure activity relationships (SAR) for mGAT2 (corresponding to hBGT-1). Variation in the lipophilic diaromatic side chain was probed to understand the role of the side chain for activity. This yielded several selective compounds of which the best (1R,2S)-5a was more than 10 fold selective towards other subtypes, although potency was moderate. A docking study was performed to investigate possible binding modes of the compounds in mGAT2 suggesting a binding mode similar to that proposed for Tiagabine in hGAT1. Specific interactions between the transporter and the amino acid part of the ligands may account for a reverted preference towards mGAT2 over mGAT1. PMID:25882526

  7. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor utilization patterns: consistency across research designs.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, D S; Klein, E G; Signa, W F; Young, C H; Gregor, K J

    1998-01-01

    We examined the impact of commonly applied selection criteria on the ability of patients who are initiating antidepressant therapy to reach a stable pattern, which was defined as receipt of only the initial agent at the initial dose for 90 or more consecutive days. Patients in a large US prescription database who initiated fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline therapy between February and April of 1995 were categorized as with (typical design) and without (relaxed design) commonly applied selection criteria. The percentage of patients achieving a stable pattern was then determined. We found that this percentage was significantly higher with the relaxed design (typical, 28.8%; relaxed, 32.4%) and for patients initiating fluoxetine therapy (>5.5% higher than for those initiating paroxetine or sertraline therapy). The results for fluoxetine were consistent across designs, whereas comparisons between paroxetine and sertraline yielded mixed results. Therefore, the relative relationship of the stable pattern is robust across designs for fluoxetine but not for paroxetine and sertraline. Further, application of commonly applied selection criteria may make a sample less representative and reduce the measured rates of stable antidepressant use, potentially leading to underestimation of the benefits of pharmacotherapy. PMID:9737838

  8. Steroidal and non-steroidal cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor anti-inflammatory drugs as pre-emptive medication in patients undergoing periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Peres, Maria Fernanda Santos; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Ruiz, Karina Gonzalez Silvério; Nociti-Jr, Francisco Humberto; Sallum, Enilson Antônio; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the pre-emptive use of a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor with a well established steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for pain and edema relief following periodontal surgery for crown lengthening. Thirty patients requiring periodontal surgery were randomly assigned to receive one of the following medications: selective COX-2 inhibitor or steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 60 min before the surgical procedure. To examine patient anxiety, a Corah's dental anxiety scale was applied before surgery. Using a visual analog scale, the extent of pain/discomfort during the trans-operative period and immediately after the surgery was measured. Additionally, intensity of pain/discomfort and edema were examined 4, 8, 12 and 24 h postoperatively. With regard to anxiety, no statistical differences between the groups were observed (p>0.05). With respect to the extent of pain/discomfort during the trans-operative, immediate and late postoperative period, data demonstrated no significant differences (p>0.05) between the COX-2 inhibitor and steroidal groups. With regard to edema, intragroup analysis did not reveal any statistically significant difference (p>0.05) during the 24 h following surgery in either group. In conclusion, both anti-inflammatory drugs presented a similar potential for pain and edema relief following periodontal surgery. PMID:23338252

  9. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 ?M, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets. PMID:26398879

  10. A roadmap to evaluate the proteome-wide selectivity of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Melissa M.; Douhan, John; Gilbert, Adam M.; Hett, Erik C.; Johnson, Theodore O.; Joslyn, Chris; Kath, John C.; Niessen, Sherry; Roberts, Lee R.; Schnute, Mark E.; Wang, Chu; Hulce, Jonathan J.; Wei, Baoxian; Whiteley, Laurence O.; Hayward, Matthew M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Kinases are principal components of signal transduction pathways and the focus of intense basic and drug discovery research. Irreversible inhibitors that covalently modify non-catalytic cysteines in kinase active-sites have emerged as valuable probes and approved drugs. Many protein classes, however, possess functional cysteines and therefore understanding the proteome-wide selectivity of covalent kinase inhibitors is imperative. Here, we accomplish this objective using activity-based protein profiling coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry to globally map the targets, both specific and non-specific, of covalent kinase inhibitors in human cells. Many of the specific off-targets represent non-kinase proteins that, interestingly, possess conserved, active-site cysteines. We define windows of selectivity for covalent kinase inhibitors and show that, when these windows are exceeded, rampant proteome-wide reactivity and kinase target-independent cell death conjointly occur. Our findings, taken together, provide an experimental roadmap to illuminate opportunities and surmount challenges for the development of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:25038787

  11. CD4, IL-17, and COX-2 Are Associated With Subclinical Inflammation in Malar Melasma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arámbula, Adriana; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Cortés-García, Diego; Fuentes-Ahumada, Cornelia; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-10-01

    The pathogenesis of melasma, a common, photo-induced hyperpigmentary disorder, is not clearly understood. Significant factors linked to melasma are ultraviolet radiation exposure and genetic predisposition. Histological analysis has demonstrated that melasma is caused by a network of cellular interactions among melanocytes, keratinocytes, mast cells, fibroblasts, and dermal vasculature exhibits, features similar to chronic sun damage. Dermal inflammation caused by ultraviolet radiation might play an important role in the hyperpigmentation and reactivation of melasma lesions through the production of melanogenic cytokines and growth factors. Because the role of inflammation in this disorder is unknown, we used histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate melasma lesions from healthy female patients (n = 20) with malar melasma. Lesional skin without specific solar exposure or photoprotection measures within the previous 4 weeks was compared with nonlesional skin. The increased lymphocytic infiltrate in lesional skin was mainly composed of CD4 T cells, mast cells, and macrophages. Levels of the cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 and the proinflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 were significantly elevated in affected skin compared with healthy skin. In addition, the Melasma Activity and Severity Index score, fraction of solar elastosis, and epidermal melanin were positively associated with COX-2 expression. There was no statistically significant difference in IL-1?, IL-1?, R-IL1, IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and tumor necrosis factor alpha expression levels. Together, these data indicated that melasma under unchallenged conditions is characterized by chronic inflammatory cells and mediators, which may explain its recurrent nature. PMID:26381025

  12. Sevoflurane Preconditioning Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Cav-3-Dependent COX-2 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianli; Zhang, Yanqing; Wang, Feng; Jiao, Liyuan; Lau, Wayne Bond; Wang, Lili; Liu, Baojiang; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J.; Ma, Xin-Liang; Wang, Yajing

    2013-01-01

    Background The inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane has been demonstrated to protect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury, via mechanisms involving AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and caveolin-3 (Cav-3). However, the relative contributions of AMPK and Cav-3 to sevoflurane preconditioning-mediated cardioprotection, and their precise underlying mechanisms of action, remain incompletely understood. Methods and Results Sevoflurane preconditioning (SF-PreCon, consisting of 3 cycles of 15 minute-exposures to 2% sevoflurane prior to 30 minutes of MI) decreased MI/R injury in WT mice (caspase-3 activity ?29.1%, infarct size ?20.2%, and LVEDP ?33.8%). In cardiac-specific AMPK?2 dominant negative overexpression (AMPK-DN) mice, the cardioprotective effect of SF-PreCon was largely retained (caspase-3 activity ?26.7%, infarct size ?16.7%, and LVEDP ?25.9%, P<0.01). In contrast, SF-PreCon failed to significantly protect Cav3-knockout (Cav3-KO) mice against MI/R injury (P>0.05). SF-PreCon significantly decreased MI/R-induced superoxide generation in WT (?43.6%) and AMPK-DN mice (?35.5%, P<0.01), but not in Cav3-KO mice. SF-PreCon did not affect NADPH oxidase expression, but significantly inhibited COX-2 expression in WT (?38.7%) and AMPK-DN mice (?35.8%), but not in Cav-3KO mice. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time sevoflurane preconditioning mediates cardioprotection against MI/R injury via Cav-3 dependent-COX-2 inhibition and anti-oxidative effects. PMID:24030395

  13. Acacia ferruginea inhibits inflammation by regulating inflammatory iNOS and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a local defensive reaction of a host to cellular injury or infection. Prolonged inflammation can contribute to pathogenesis of many disorders. Identification of naturally occurring phytoconstituents that can suppress inflammatory mediators can lead to the discovery of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Acacia ferruginea is used traditionally to treat numerous ailments including hemorrhage, irritable bowel syndrome and leprosy. The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of A. ferruginea extract against acute (carrageenan) and chronic (formaldehyde) inflammation in Balb/c mice. Pre-treatment with A. ferruginea extract (10?mg/kg BW) for 5 consecutive days via intraperitonial (IP) administration significantly inhibited subsequent induction of paw edema in both models; the effects were comparable to that of the standard drug indomethacin. The results also showed the A. ferruginea extract significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and iNOS expression (as measured in serum), diminished inflammation in - and neutrophil infiltration to - the paw tissues and led to a reduction in the number of COX-2(+) immunoreative cells (as evidenced by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses) in the paws relative to those in paws of mice that received the irritants only. Further, in vitro studies showed the extract could significantly scavenge free radicals generated as in DPPH and NO radical generating assays. Taken together, the results showed that A. ferruginea extract imparted potent anti-oxidant and -inflammatory effects, in part by maintaining oxidative homeostasis, inhibiting NO synthesis and suppressing iNOS and COX-2 expression and so could potentially be exploited as a potential plant-based medication against inflammatory disorders. PMID:25738525

  14. Brain Histamine Is Crucial for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors‘ Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Cassano, Tommaso; Benetti, Fernando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: The neurobiological changes underlying depression resistant to treatments remain poorly understood, and failure to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may result from abnormalities of neurotransmitter systems that excite serotonergic neurons, such as histamine. Methods: Using behavioral (tail suspension test) and neurochemical (in vivo microdialysis, Western-blot analysis) approaches, here we report that antidepressant responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram or paroxetine) are abolished in mice unable to synthesize histamine due to either targeted disruption of histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC-/-) or injection of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of this enzyme. Results: In the tail suspension test, all classes of antidepressants tested reduced the immobility time of controls. Systemic reboxetine or imipramine reduced the immobility time of histamine-deprived mice as well, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors did not even though their serotonergic system is functional. In in vivo microdialysis experiments, citalopram significantly increased histamine extraneuronal levels in the cortex of freely moving mice, and methysergide, a serotonin 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, abolished this effect, thus suggesting the involvement of endogenous serotonin. CREB phosphorylation, which is implicated in the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant treatment, was abolished in histamine-deficient mice treated with citalopram. The CREB pathway is not impaired in HDC-/- mice, as administration of 8-bromoadenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate increased CREB phosphorylation, and in the tail suspension test it significantly reduced the time spent immobile by mice of both genotypes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors selectively require the integrity of the brain histamine system to exert their preclinical responses. PMID:25899065

  15. Transforming growth factor ?2 promotes transcription of COX2 and EP4, leading to a prostaglandin E2-driven autostimulatory loop that enhances virulence of Theileria annulata-transformed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Malak; Echebli, Nadia; Ding, Ying; Kamau, Everlyn; Langsley, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) is a pleiotropic cytokine known to regulate cell growth, differentiation, and motility and is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-? consequently plays a central role in carcinogenesis, and a dampened TGF-?2 response by Theileria annulata-infected monocytes/macrophages underpins disease resistance to tropical theileriosis. Here, we show that concomitant with the loss of TGF-?2 production, there is ablated expression of COX2 and EP4, which leads to a drop in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and, consequently, reduced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and EPAC. This ablated phenotype can be rescued in attenuated macrophages by the addition of exogenous TGF-?2, which reactivates the expression of COX2 and EP4 while repressing that of protein kinase inhibitor gamma (PKIG) to the levels in virulent macrophages. TGF-?2 therefore promotes the adhesion and invasiveness of virulent macrophages by modulating COX2, EP4, and PKIG transcription to initiate a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-driven autostimulatory loop that augments PKA and EPAC activities. A virulence phenotype stemming from the double activation of PKA and EPAC is the induction of a CREB-mediated transcriptional program and the upregulation of JAM-L- and integrin 4??1-mediated adhesion of Theileria-infected macrophages. PMID:25690101

  16. Transforming Growth Factor ?2 Promotes Transcription of COX2 and EP4, Leading to a Prostaglandin E2-Driven Autostimulatory Loop That Enhances Virulence of Theileria annulata-Transformed Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Echebli, Nadia; Ding, Ying; Kamau, Everlyn

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) is a pleiotropic cytokine known to regulate cell growth, differentiation, and motility and is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-? consequently plays a central role in carcinogenesis, and a dampened TGF-?2 response by Theileria annulata-infected monocytes/macrophages underpins disease resistance to tropical theileriosis. Here, we show that concomitant with the loss of TGF-?2 production, there is ablated expression of COX2 and EP4, which leads to a drop in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and, consequently, reduced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and EPAC. This ablated phenotype can be rescued in attenuated macrophages by the addition of exogenous TGF-?2, which reactivates the expression of COX2 and EP4 while repressing that of protein kinase inhibitor gamma (PKIG) to the levels in virulent macrophages. TGF-?2 therefore promotes the adhesion and invasiveness of virulent macrophages by modulating COX2, EP4, and PKIG transcription to initiate a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-driven autostimulatory loop that augments PKA and EPAC activities. A virulence phenotype stemming from the double activation of PKA and EPAC is the induction of a CREB-mediated transcriptional program and the upregulation of JAM-L- and integrin 4??1-mediated adhesion of Theileria-infected macrophages. PMID:25690101

  17. Potent and selective inhibitors of an aspartyl protease-like endothelin converting enzyme identified in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Shiosaki, K; Tasker, A S; Sullivan, G M; Sorensen, B K; von Geldern, T W; Wu-Wong, J R; Marselle, C A; Opgenorth, T J

    1993-02-19

    Two structurally distinct series of potent and selective inhibitors of an aspartyl protease-like endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) activity identified in the rat lung have been developed. Pepstatin A, which potently inhibits the rat lung ECE, served as the basis for the first series. Alternatively, selected renin inhibitors containing the dihydroxyethylene moiety were shown to be inhibitors of rat lung activity. Subsequent modifications improved inhibition of the rat lung ECE while eliminating renin activity. Both series of ECE inhibitors demonstrated a range of selectivity over Cathepsin D. Water-solubilizing moieties were appended onto selected compounds to facilitate in vivo testing. Partial reduction of the pressor response to exogenously administered Big ET-1 was observed with selected rat lung ECE inhibitors. PMID:8474103

  18. Design and synthesis of highly selective, orally active Polo-like kinase-2 (Plk-2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Simeon; Truong, Anh P; Ye, Michael; Aubele, Danielle L; Sealy, Jennifer M; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Hom, Roy K; Chan, Wayman; Dappen, Michael S; Galemmo, Robert A; Konradi, Andrei W; Sham, Hing L; Zhu, Yong L; Beroza, Paul; Tonn, George; Zhang, Heather; Hoffman, Jennifer; Motter, Ruth; Fauss, Donald; Tanaka, Pearl; Bova, Michael P; Ren, Zhao; Tam, Danny; Ruslim, Lany; Baker, Jeanne; Pandya, Deepal; Diep, Linnea; Fitzgerald, Kent; Artis, Dean R; Anderson, John P; Bergeron, Marcelle

    2013-05-01

    Polo-like kinase-2 (Plk-2) is a potential therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease and this Letter describes the SAR of a series of dihydropteridinone based Plk-2 inhibitors. By optimizing both the N-8 substituent and the biaryl region of the inhibitors we obtained single digit nanomolar compounds such as 37 with excellent selectivity for Plk-2 over Plk-1. When dosed orally in rats, compound 37 demonstrated a 41-45% reduction of pS129-?-synuclein levels in the cerebral cortex. PMID:23522834

  19. 5-Amino-pyrazoles as potent and selective p38[alpha] inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jagabandhu; Moquin, Robert V.; Dyckman, Alaric J.; Li, Tianle; Pitt, Sidney; Zhang, Rosemary; Shen, Ding Ren; McIntyre, Kim W.; Gillooly, Kathleen; Doweyko, Arthur M.; Newitt, John A.; Sack, John S.; Zhang, Hongjian; Kiefer, Susan E.; Kish, Kevin; McKinnon, Murray; Barrish, Joel C.; Dodd, John H.; Schieven, Gary L.; Leftheris, Katerina

    2012-02-07

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of p38{alpha} MAP kinase inhibitors based on a 5-amino-pyrazole scaffold are described. These studies led to the identification of compound 2j as a potent and selective inhibitor of p38{alpha} MAP kinase with excellent cellular potency toward the inhibition of TNF{alpha} production. Compound 2j was highly efficacious in vivo in inhibiting TNF{alpha} production in an acute murine model of TNF{alpha} production. X-ray co-crystallography of a 5-amino-pyrazole analog 2f bound to unphosphorylated p38{alpha} is also disclosed.

  20. Accessible Chiral Linker to Enhance Potency and Selectivity of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The three important mammalian isozymes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Inhibitors of nNOS show promise as treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Eight easily synthesized compounds containing either one (20a,b) or two (9a–d; 15a,b) 2-amino-4-methylpyridine groups with a chiral pyrrolidine linker were designed as selective nNOS inhibitors. Inhibitor 9c is the best of these compounds, having a potency of 9.7 nM and dual selectivity of 693 and 295 against eNOS and iNOS, respectively. Crystal structures of nNOS complexed with either 9a or 9c show a double-headed binding mode, where each 2-aminopyridine headgroup interacts with either a nNOS active site Glu residue or a heme propionate. In addition, the pyrrolidine nitrogen of 9c contributes additional hydrogen bonds to the heme propionate, resulting in a unique binding orientation. In contrast, the lack of hydrogen bonds from the pyrrolidine of 9a to the heme propionate allows the inhibitor to adopt two different binding orientations. Both 9a and 9c bind to eNOS in a single-headed mode, which is the structural basis for the isozyme selectivity. PMID:24660051

  1. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  2. Tropolones As Lead-Like Natural Products: The Development of Potent and Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural products have long been recognized as a rich source of potent therapeutics but further development is often limited by high structural complexity and high molecular weight. In contrast, at the core of the thujaplicins is a lead-like tropolone scaffold characterized by relatively low molecular weight, ample sites for diversification, and metal-binding functionality poised for targeting a range of metalloenzyme drug targets. Here, we describe the development of this underutilized scaffold for the discovery of tropolone derivatives that function as isozyme-selective inhibitors of the validated anticancer drug target, histone deacetylase (HDAC). Several monosubstituted tropolones display remarkable levels of selectivity for HDAC2 and potently inhibit the growth of T-cell lymphocyte cell lines. The tropolones represent a new chemotype of isozyme-selective HDAC inhibitors. PMID:24900743

  3. Evaluation of Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and the Levels of mRNA Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 7, Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor and COX-2 for the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Cosme, Angel; Hijona, Elizabeth; Enríquez-Navascués, José M.; Placer, Carlos; Villarreal, Eloisa; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Giraldez, María D.; Gironella, Meritxell; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women in the majority of developed countries. Molecular tests of blood could potentially provide this ideal screening tool. Aim Our objective was to assess the usefulness of serum markers and mRNA expression levels in the diagnosis of CRC. Methods In a prospective study, we measured mRNA expression levels of 13 markers (carbonic anhydrase, guanylyl cyclase C, plasminogen activator inhibitor, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), urokinase-type plasminogen activator, survivin, tetranectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cytokeratin 20, thymidylate synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and CD44) and three proteins in serum (alpha 1 antitrypsin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and activated C3 in 42 patients with CRC and 33 with normal colonoscopy results. Results Alpha 1-antitrypsin was the serum marker that was most useful for CRC diagnosis (1.79±0.25 in the CRC group vs 1.27±0.25 in the control group, P<0.0005). The area under the ROC curve for alpha 1-antitrypsin was 0.88 (0.79–0.96). The mRNA expression levels of five markers were statistically different between CRC cases and controls: those for which the ROC area was over 75% were MMP7 (0.81) and tetranectin (0.80), COX-2 (0.78), uPAR (0.78) and carbonic anhydrase (0.77). The markers which identified early stage CRC (Stages I and II) were alpha 1-antitrypsin, uPAR, COX-2 and MMP7. Conclusions Serum alpha 1-antitrypsin and the levels of mRNA expression of MMP7, COX-2 and uPAR have good diagnostic accuracy for CRC, even in the early stages. PMID:23300952

  4. Effects of Enriched Environment on COX-2, Leptin and Eicosanoids in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nachat-Kappes, Rachida; Pinel, Alexandre; Combe, Kristell; Lamas, Bruno; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Rossary, Adrien; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Caldefie-Chezet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Basu, Samar

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer. This study investigated a possible link between COX-2 and adipokines in the development of mammary tumors. A model of environmental enrichment (EE), known to reduce tumor growth was used for a syngeneic murine model of mammary carcinoma. 3-week-old, female C57BL/6 mice were housed in standard environment (SE) or EE cages for 9 weeks and transplanted orthotopically with syngeneic EO771 adenocarcinoma cells into the right inguinal mammary fat pad. EE housing influenced mammary gland development with a decrease in COX-2 expressing cells and enhanced side-branching and advanced development of alveolar structures of the mammary gland. Tumor volume and weight were decreased in EE housed mice and were associated with a reduction in COX-2 and Ki67 levels, and an increase in caspase-3 levels. In tumors of SE mice, high COX-2 expression correlated with enhanced leptin detection. Non-tumor-bearing EE mice showed a significant increase in adiponectin levels but no change in those of leptin, F2-isoprostanes, PGF2?, IL-6, TNF-?, PAI-1, and MCP-1 levels. Both tumor-bearing groups (SE and EE housing) had increased resistin, IL-6, TNF-?, PAI-1 and MCP-1 levels irrespective of the different housing environment demonstrating higher inflammatory response due to the presence of the tumor. This study demonstrates that EE housing influenced normal mammary gland development and inhibited mammary tumor growth resulting in a marked decrease in intratumoral COX-2 activity and an increase in the plasma ratio of adiponectin/leptin levels. PMID:23272114

  5. Distinct states of methionyl-tRNA synthetase indicates inhibitor binding by conformational selection

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E.; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M.; Yu, Mingyan; Liu, Jiyun; Gillespie, J. Robert; Buckner, Frederick S.; Verlinde, Christophe L.M.J.; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary To guide development of new drugs targeting methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, crystal structure determinations of Trypanosoma brucei MetRS in complex with its substrate methionine and its intermediate product methionyl-adenylate were followed by those of the enzyme in complex with high-affinity aminoquinolone inhibitors via soaking experiments. Drastic changes in conformation of one of the two enzymes in the asymmetric unit allowed these inhibitors to occupy an enlarged methionine pocket and a new so-called auxiliary pocket. Interestingly, a small low-affinity compound caused the same conformational changes, removed the methionine without occupying the methionine pocket, and occupied the previously not existing auxiliary pocket. Analysis of these structures indicates that the binding of the inhibitors is the result of conformational selection, not induced fit. PMID:22902861

  6. Distinct states of methionyl-tRNA synthetase indicate inhibitor binding by conformational selection.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M; Yu, Mingyan; Liu, Jiyun; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-10-10

    To guide development of new drugs targeting methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, crystal structure determinations of Trypanosoma brucei MetRS in complex with its substrate methionine and its intermediate product methionyl-adenylate were followed by those of the enzyme in complex with high-affinity aminoquinolone inhibitors via soaking experiments. Drastic changes in conformation of one of the two enzymes in the asymmetric unit allowed these inhibitors to occupy an enlarged methionine pocket and a new so-called auxiliary pocket. Interestingly, a small low-affinity compound caused the same conformational changes, removed the methionine without occupying the methionine pocket, and occupied the previously not existing auxiliary pocket. Analysis of these structures indicates that the binding of the inhibitors is the result of conformational selection, not induced fit. PMID:22902861

  7. Design and Synthesis of Phenylpyrrolidine Phenylglycinamides As Highly Potent and Selective TF-FVIIa Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of the Tissue Factor/Factor VIIa (TF-FVIIa) complex are promising novel anticoagulants that show excellent efficacy and minimal bleeding in preclinical models. On the basis of a zwitterionic phenylglycine acylsulfonamide 1, a phenylglycine benzylamide 2 was shown to possess improved permeability and oral bioavailability. Optimization of the benzylamide, guided by X-ray crystallography, led to a potent TF-FVIIa inhibitor 18i with promising oral bioavailability, but promiscuous activity in an in vitro safety panel of receptors and enzymes. Introducing an acid on the pyrrolidine ring, guided by molecular modeling, resulted in highly potent, selective, and efficacious TF-FVIIa inhibitors with clean in vitro safety profile. The pyrrolidine acid 20 showed a moderate clearance, low volume of distribution, and a short t1/2 in dog PK studies. PMID:24900796

  8. Elaboration of a fragment library hit produces potent and selective aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Bharani; Bhansali, Pravin; Viola, Ronald E

    2015-10-15

    Aspartate-?-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) lies at the first branch point in the aspartate metabolic pathway which leads to the biosynthesis of several essential amino acids and some important metabolites. This pathway is crucial for many metabolic processes in plants and microbes like bacteria and fungi, but is absent in mammals. Therefore, the key microbial enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive potential targets for development of new antibiotics with novel modes of action. The ASADH enzyme family shares the same substrate binding and active site catalytic groups; however, the enzymes from representative bacterial and fungal species show different inhibition patterns when previously screened against low molecular weight inhibitors identified from fragment library screening. In the present study several approaches, including fragment based drug discovery (FBDD), inhibitor docking, kinetic, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been used to guide ASADH inhibitor development. Elaboration of a core structure identified by FBDD has led to the synthesis of low micromolar inhibitors of the target enzyme, with high selectivity introduced between the Gram-negative and Gram-positive orthologs of ASADH. This new set of structures open a novel direction for the development of inhibitors against this validated drug-target enzyme. PMID:26404410

  9. A small molecule screen identifies selective inhibitors of urea transporter UT-A.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2013-10-24

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar half-maximal inhibitory concentration that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a noncompetitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B nonselective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics ("urearetics") with a mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy. PMID:24055006

  10. Synthesis and Properties of a Selective Inhibitor of Homeodomain–Interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2)

    PubMed Central

    Cozza, Giorgio; Zanin, Sofia; Determann, Renate; Ruzzene, Maria; Kunick, Conrad; Pinna, Lorenzo A.

    2014-01-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase controlling cell proliferation and survival, whose investigation has been hampered by the lack of specific inhibitors able to dissect its cellular functions. SB203580, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, has been used as a tool to inhibit HIPK2 in cells, but here we show that its efficacy as HIPK2 inhibitor is negligible (IC50>40 µM). In contrast by altering the scaffold of the promiscuous CK2 inhibitor TBI a new class of HIPK2 inhibitors has been generated. One of these, TBID, displays toward HIPK2 unprecedented efficacy (IC50?=?0.33 µM) and selectivity (Gini coefficient 0.592 out of a panel of 76 kinases). The two other members of the HIPK family, HIPK1 and HIPK3, are also inhibited by TBID albeit less efficiently than HIPK2. The mode of action of TBID is competitive with respect to ATP, consistent with modelling. We also provide evidence that TBID is cell permeable by showing that HIPK2 activity is reduced in cells treated with TBID, although with an IC50 two orders of magnitude higher (about 50 µM) than in vitro. PMID:24586573

  11. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Aedes aegypti Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Swale, Daniel R.; Days, Emily; Weaver, C. David; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Konkel, Leah C.; Engers, Darren W.; Bollinger, Sean F.; Hopkins, Corey; Piermarini, Peter M.; Denton, Jerod S.

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening ‘hits’, the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels can be developed using conventional drug discovery approaches. Furthermore, it reinforces the notion that the physical and chemical properties that determine a compound's bioavailability in vivo will be critical in determining the efficacy of Kir channel inhibitors as insecticides. PMID:25375326

  12. A selective jumonji H3K27 demethylase inhibitor modulates the proinflammatory macrophage response

    PubMed Central

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Chung, Chun-wa; Cheng, Zhongjun; Liddle, John; Che, KaHing; Joberty, Gerard; Bantscheff, Marcus; Bountra, Chas; Bridges, Angela; Diallo, Hawa; Eberhard, Dirk; Hutchinson, Sue; Jones, Emma; Katso, Roy; Leveridge, Melanie; Mander, Palwinder K.; Mosley, Julie; Ramirez-Molina, Cesar; Rowland, Paul; Schofield, Christopher J.; Sheppard, Robert J.; Smith, Julia E.; Swales, Catherine; Tanner, Robert; Thomas, Pamela; Tumber, Anthony; Drewes, Gerard; Oppermann, Udo; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lee, Kevin; Wilson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The jumonji (JMJ) family of histone demethylases are Fe2+- and ?-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases that are essential components of regulatory transcriptional chromatin complexes1–4. These enzymes demethylate lysine residues in histones in a methylation-state and sequence-specific context5. Considerable effort has been devoted to gaining a mechanistic understanding of the roles of histone lysine demethylases in eukaryotic transcription, genome integrity and epigenetic inheritance2,4,6, as well as in development, physiology and disease3,7. However, because of the absence of any selective inhibitors, the relevance of the demethylase activity of JMJ enzymes in regulating cellular responses remains poorly understood. Here we present a structure-guided small-molecule and chemoproteomics approach to elucidating the functional role of the H3K27me3-specific demethylase subfamily (KDM6 subfamily members JMJD3 and UTX)8. The liganded structures of human and mouse JMJD3 provide novel insight into the specificity determinants for cofactor, substrate and inhibitor recognition by the KDM6 subfamily of demethylases. We exploited these structural features to generate the first small-molecule catalytic site inhibitor that is selective for the H3K27me3-specific JMJ subfamily. We demonstrate that this inhibitor binds in a novel manner and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by human primary macrophages, a process that depends on both JMJD3 and UTX. Our results resolve the ambiguity associated with the catalytic function of H3K27-specific JMJs in regulating disease-relevant inflammatory responses and provide encouragement for designing small-molecule inhibitors to allow selective pharmacological intervention across the JMJ family. PMID:22842901

  13. Selection of human elastase inhibitors from a conformationally constrained combinatorial peptide library.

    PubMed

    McBride, J D; Freeman, H N; Leatherbarrow, R J

    1999-12-01

    A resin-bound cyclic peptide library was constructed based on the sequence of the reactive-site loop of Bowman-Birk inhibitor, a proteinase inhibitor protein. The constrained loop sequence, which incorporates the minimal proteinase-binding motif, was retained throughout the library, but selected residues known to be important for inhibitor specificity were randomised. The approach was used to create a 'one bead, one peptide' library with 8000 variants resulting from randomization at three target locations in the sequence (P4, P1 and P2'). This library allows us to examine the degree to which variations in this proteinase-binding motif can redirect activity, as well as providing information about the binding specificity of a proteinase target. Screening this library for binding to human leucocyte elastase identified sequences with a strong consensus, and on resynthesis all were found to act as inhibitors, with Ki values as low as 65 nM. Human leucocyte elastase is known to have a substrate preference for small alkyl chains at the P1 locus, with valine being preferred. However, alanine and not the expected valine was found in 21 out of 23 identified sequences. The remaining two sequences had threonine at P1, a finding that would be hard to predict based on substrate specificity alone. Further analysis of resynthesized peptides demonstrated that valine substitution results in an analogue that is hydrolysed far more rapidly than ones having library-selected P1 residues. Testing of the human leucocyte elastase-selected sequences as inhibitors of porcine pancreatic elastase demonstrates a significant difference in the specificity of the P4 locus between these two proteinases. PMID:10561580

  14. A selective jumonji H3K27 demethylase inhibitor modulates the proinflammatory macrophage response

    SciTech Connect

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Chung, Chun-wa; Cheng, Zhongjun; Liddle, John; Che, KaHing; Joberty, Gerard; Bantscheff, Marcus; Bountra, Chas; Bridges, Angela; Diallo, Hawa; Eberhard, Dirk; Hutchinson, Sue; Jones, Emma; Katso, Roy; Leveridge, Melanie; Mander, Palwinder K.; Mosley, Julie; Ramirez-Molina, Cesar; Rowland, Paul; Schofield, Christopher J.; Sheppard, Robert J.; Smith, Julia E.; Swales, Catherine; Tanner, Robert; Thomas, Pamela; Tumber, Anthony; Drewes, Gerard; Oppermann, Udo; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lee, Kevin; Wilson, David M.

    2012-10-11

    The jumonji (JMJ) family of histone demethylases are Fe{sup 2+}- and {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases that are essential components of regulatory transcriptional chromatin complexes. These enzymes demethylate lysine residues in histones in a methylation-state and sequence-specific context. Considerable effort has been devoted to gaining a mechanistic understanding of the roles of histone lysine demethylases in eukaryotic transcription, genome integrity and epigenetic inheritance, as well as in development, physiology and disease. However, because of the absence of any selective inhibitors, the relevance of the demethylase activity of JMJ enzymes in regulating cellular responses remains poorly understood. Here we present a structure-guided small-molecule and chemoproteomics approach to elucidating the functional role of the H3K27me3-specific demethylase subfamily (KDM6 subfamily members JMJD3 and UTX). The liganded structures of human and mouse JMJD3 provide novel insight into the specificity determinants for cofactor, substrate and inhibitor recognition by the KDM6 subfamily of demethylases. We exploited these structural features to generate the first small-molecule catalytic site inhibitor that is selective for the H3K27me3-specific JMJ subfamily. We demonstrate that this inhibitor binds in a novel manner and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by human primary macrophages, a process that depends on both JMJD3 and UTX. Our results resolve the ambiguity associated with the catalytic function of H3K27-specific JMJs in regulating disease-relevant inflammatory responses and provide encouragement for designing small-molecule inhibitors to allow selective pharmacological intervention across the JMJ family.

  15. Design and Discovery of 2-Arylquinazolin-4-ones as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Tankyrases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tankyrases (TNKSs) are poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases (PARPs) that are overexpressed in several clinical cancers. They regulate elongation of telomeres, regulate the Wnt system, and are essential for the function of the mitotic spindle. A set of 2-arylquinazolin-4-ones has been designed and identified as potent and selective TNKS inhibitors, some being more potent and selective than the lead inhibitor XAV939, with IC50 = 3 nM vs. TNKS-2. Methyl was preferred at the 8-position and modest bulk at the 4-position of the 2-phenyl group; electronic effects and H-bonding were irrelevant, but charge in the 4?-substituent must be avoided. Molecular modeling facilitated initial design of the compounds and rationalization of the SAR of binding into the nicotinamide-binding site of the target enzymes. These compounds have potential for further development into anticancer drugs. PMID:24900625

  16. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; Derocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim G J; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-05-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to BKIs. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  17. Combination therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors in the treatment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Polat, E C; Ozbek, E; Otunctemur, A; Ozcan, L; Simsek, A

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of paroxetine and tadalafil combination in the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE). A total of 150 primary (lifelong)PE patients were randomly distributed into three groups of 50 patients each. Group 1 received 20 mg paroxetine every day for 1 month, Group 2 received 20 mg tadalafil on demand 2 h before intercourse, and Group 3 received paroxetine and tadalafil on demand 2 h before intercourse. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency times (IELT) scores were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the first month of therapy and 1 month after discontinuation of the treatment, while International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire scores were evaluated both prior to and after the treatment. At the end of the first month of therapy, IELT scores were compared with the basal values and statistically significant changes were detected (60.6 ± 30.2-117.3 ± 67.3, 68.5 ± 21.4-110.2 ± 37.3, 71.56 ± 40.23-175.2 ± 60.2)(P < 0.01). IELT scores after discontinuation of treatment were found to be close to the baseline IELT scores (P > 0.05). IIEF scores were evaluated both prior to and after the treatment, and no statistically significant difference was detected (P > 0.05). It is concluded that utilisation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5i) combination before intercourse seems to provide significantly longer ejaculatory latency times as compared with SSRI alone for a long time in patients with PE. PMID:24811578

  18. Biphasic Modulation of NOS Expression, Protein and Nitrite Products by Hydroxocobalamin Underlies Its Protective Effect in Endotoxemic Shock: Downstream Regulation of COX-2, IL-1?, TNF-?, IL-6, and HMGB1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, André L. F.; Dalli, Jesmond; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Perretti, Mauro; Wheatley, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background. NOS/•NO inhibitors are potential therapeutics for sepsis, yet they increase clinical mortality. However, there has been no in vivo investigation of the (in vitro) •NO scavenger, cobalamin's (Cbl) endogenous effects on NOS/•NO/inflammatory mediators during the immune response to sepsis. Methods. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), ELISA, Western blot, and NOS Griess assays, in a C57BL/6 mouse, acute endotoxaemia model. Results. During the immune response, pro-inflammatory phase, parenteral hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) treatment partially inhibits hepatic, but not lung, iNOS mRNA and promotes lung eNOS mRNA, but attenuates the LPS hepatic rise in eNOS mRNA, whilst paradoxically promoting high iNOS/eNOS protein translation, but relatively moderate •NO production. HOCbl/NOS/•NO regulation is reciprocally associated with lower 4?h expression of TNF-?, IL-1?, COX-2, and lower circulating TNF-?, but not IL-6. In resolution, 24?h after LPS, HOCbl completely abrogates a major late mediator of sepsis mortality, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) mRNA, inhibits iNOS mRNA, and attenuates LPS-induced hepatic inhibition of eNOS mRNA, whilst showing increased, but still moderate, NOS activity, relative to LPS only. experiments (LPS+D-Galactosamine) HOCbl afforded significant, dose-dependent protection in mice Conclusions. HOCbl produces a complex, time- and organ-dependent, selective regulation of NOS/•NO during endotoxaemia, corollary regulation of downstream inflammatory mediators, and increased survival. This merits clinical evaluation. PMID:23781123

  19. Enhanced in vitro percutaneous absorption and in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of a selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor using microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, N; Ghosal, Saroj K; Moulik, S P

    2005-05-01

    Celecoxib, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, was recently approved for the treatment of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, acute pain, familial adenomatous polyposis and primary dysmenorrhea. Oral administration of celecoxib is effective against ultraviolet B radiation (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis; however, its clinical use is restricted because of its failure to block the characteristic cutaneous inflammatory response and lower availability at the site of inflammation. Topical application of celecoxib has been effective compared with oral in certain clinical conditions. The present study was undertaken to develop and investigate the development of microemulsion system (isopropyl myristate/medium-chain glyceride/polysorbate 80/water) for topical delivery of celecoxib. The pseudoternary phase diagram was constructed with constant surfactant concentration, and several compositions were identified and characterized by using dynamic light scattering. The in vitro permeation rate of celecoxib through rat skin was determined for microemulsions, microemulsion gel, and cream by using the modified Franz-type diffusion cell. In all formulations tested, celecoxib permeated more quickly, and the microemulsions increased the permeation rate of celecoxib up to 5 and 11 times compared with those of microemulsion gel and cream, respectively. Increasing the concentration of medium-chain mono-/di-glyceride in microemulsion imparted increased droplet size and viscosity and decreased diffusion coefficient. In vivo anti-inflammatory study suggested that the developed microemulsion formulations might serve as potential drug vehicle for the prevention of UVB-induced skin cancer. PMID:16093206

  20. Selectivity by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Interactions Can Be Driven by Protein Surface Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David K.; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity) can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these “distinct” pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25706586

  1. Design of novel quinazoline derivatives and related analogues as potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gellibert, F.; Fouchet, M.-H.; Nguyen, V.-L.; Wang, R.; Krysa, G.; de Gouville, A.-C.; Huet, S.; Dodic, N.

    2009-07-23

    Starting from quinazoline 3a, we designed potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors over p38MAP kinase from a rational drug design approach based on co-crystal structures in the human ALK5 kinase domain. The quinazoline 3d exhibited also in vivo activity in an acute rat model of DMN-induced liver fibrosis when administered orally at 5 mg/kg (bid).

  2. Structural basis for the design of selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B; Gurney, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor -Tumor Necrosis Factor ? (TNF?) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  3. Structural Basis for the Design of Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B.; Gurney, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor –Tumor Necrosis Factor ? (TNF?) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  4. Angiotensin-(1-7)-Induced Plasticity Changes in the Lateral Amygdala Are Mediated by COX-2 and NO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Doris

    2007-01-01

    It is known from studies outside the brain that upon binding to its receptor, angiotensin-(1-7) elicits the release of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Since there are no data available so far on the role of COX-2 in the amygdala, in a first step we…

  5. Lead induces COX-2 expression in glial cells in a NFAT-dependent, AP-1/NF?B-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jinlong; Du, Kejun; Cai, Qinzhen; Ma, Lisha; Jiao, Zhenzhen; Tan, Jinrong; Xu, Zhou; Li, Jingxia; Luo, Wenjin; Chen, Jingyuan; Gao, Jimin; Zhang, Dongyun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided solid evidence for the neurotoxic effect of lead for decades of years. In view of the fact that children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxicity of lead, lead exposure has been an urgent public health concern for decades of years. The modes of action of lead neurotoxic effects include disturbance of neurotransmitter storage and release, damage of mitochondria, as well as induction of apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells, astroglia and oligodendroglia. Our studies here, from a novel point of view, demonstrates that lead specifically caused induction of COX-2, a well known inflammatory mediator in neurons and glia cells. Furthermore, we revealed that COX-2 was induced by lead in a transcription-dependent manner, which relayed on transcription factor NFAT, rather than AP-1 and NF?B, in glial cells. Considering the important functions of COX-2 in mediation of inflammation reaction and oxidative stress, our studies here provide a mechanistic insight into the understanding of lead-associated inflammatory neurotoxicity effect via activation of pro-inflammatory NFAT3/COX-2 axis. PMID:25193092

  6. Toxicological Effect of Manganese on NF-?B/iNOS-COX-2 Signaling Pathway in Chicken Testes.

    PubMed

    Du, Ye; Zhu, Yihao; Teng, Xiaojie; Zhang, Kun; Teng, Xiaohua; Li, Shu

    2015-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) pollution can cause tissue and organ dysfunction and structural damage. The toxicity of Mn in poultry was reported, but inflammatory damage that Mn induced in the testicular tissue has not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Mn poisoning on NF-?B/iNOS-COX-2 signaling pathway in chicken testes. One hundred eighty Hyline male chickens at 7 days of age were fed either commercial diet or MnCl2-added commercial diet containing 600, 900, and 1800 mg/kg Mn for 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO) content, iNOS activity, and histopathology were examined in chicken testes. The results showed that excess Mn upregulated mRNA expression of NF-?B, COX-2, TNF-?, and iNOS, NO content, and iNOS activity at 60th and 90th day. Mn had a time-dependent effect on NF-?B and TNF-? mRNA expression. Mn had a dose- and time-dependent effect on NO content and iNOS activity. Mn exposure induced chicken testis histological changes in dose- and time-dependent manner. It indicated that Mn exposure resulted in inflammatory injury of chicken testis tissue through NF-?B/iNOS-COX-2 signaling pathway. PMID:25904117

  7. Using Bioluminescent Kinase Profiling Strips to Identify Kinase Inhibitor Selectivity and Promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Zegzouti, Hicham; Hennek, Jacquelyn; Goueli, Said A

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of a kinase inhibitor throughout drug discovery and development is predicated upon its selectivity towards the target of interest. Thus, profiling the compound against a broad panel of kinases is important for providing a better understanding of its activity and for obviating any off-target activities that can result in undesirable consequences. To assess the selectivity and potency of an inhibitor against multiple kinases, it is desirable to use a universal assay that can monitor the activity of all classes of kinases regardless of the nature of their substrates. The luminescent ADP-Glo kinase assay is a universal platform that measures kinase activity by quantifying the amount of the common kinase reaction product ADP. Here we present a method using standardized kinase profiling systems for inhibitor profiling studies based on ADP detection by luminescence. The kinase profiling systems are sets of kinases organized by family, presented in multi-tube strips containing eight enzymes, each with corresponding substrate strips, and standardized for optimal kinase activity. We show that using the kinase profiling strips we could quickly and easily generate multiple selectivity profiles using small or large kinase panels, and identify compound promiscuity within the kinome. PMID:26501902

  8. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Reticulocyte 15- Lipoxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ganesha; Kenyon, Victor; Jadhav, Ajit; Schultz, Lena; Armstrong, Michelle; Jameson, J Brian; Hoobler, Eric; Leister, William; Simeonov, Anton; Holman, Theodore R.; Maloney, David J.

    2010-01-01

    There are a variety of lipoxygenases in the human body (hLO), each having a distinct role in cellular biology. Human reticulocyte 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (15-hLO-1), which catalyzes the dioxygenation of 1,4-cis,cis-pentadiene-containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, is implicated in a number of diseases including cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative conditions. Despite the potential therapeutic relevance of this target, few inhibitors have been reported that are both potent and selective. To this end, we have employed a quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) screen against ~74,000 small molecules in search of reticulocyte 15-hLO-1 selective inhibitors. This screen led to the discovery of a novel chemotype for 15-hLO-1 inhibition, which displays nM potency and is >7,500-fold selective against the related isozymes, 5-hLO, platelet 12-hLO, epithelial 15-hLO-2, ovine cyclooxygenase-1 and human cyclooxygenase-2. In addition, kinetic experiments were performed which indicate that this class of inhibitor is tight binding, reversible, and appears not to reduce the active-site ferric ion. PMID:20866075

  9. Identification of an Allosteric Small Molecule Inhibitor Selective for Inducible Form of Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Matthew K.; Bodoor, Khaldon; Carlson, David A.; Hughes, Philip F.; Alwarawrah, Yazan; Loiselle, David R.; Jaeger, Alex M.; Darr, David B.; Jordan, Jamie L.; Hunter, Lucas M.; Molzberger, Eileen T.; Gobillot, Theodore A.; Thiele, Dennis J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Spector, Neil L.; Haystead, Timothy A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inducible Hsp70 (Hsp70i) is overexpressed in a wide spectrum of human tumors and its expression correlates with metastasis, poor outcomes, and resistance to chemotherapy in patients. Identification of small molecule inhibitors selective for Hsp70i could provide new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment. In this work, we used fluorescence-linked enzyme chemoproteomic strategy (FLECS) to identify HS-72, an allosteric inhibitor selective for Hsp70i. HS-72 displays the hallmarks of Hsp70 inhibition in cells, promoting substrate protein degradation and growth inhibition. Importantly, HS-72 is selective for Hsp70i over the closely related constitutively active Hsc70. Studies with purified protein show HS-72 acts as an allosteric inhibitor, reducing ATP affinity. In vivo HS-72 is well-tolerated, showing bioavailability and efficacy, inhibiting tumor growth and promoting survival in a HER2+ model of breast cancer. The HS-72 scaffold is amenable to resynthesis and iteration, suggesting an ideal starting point for a new generation of anticancer therapeutics targeting Hsp70i. PMID:25500222

  10. Magnetic and structural properties of (Ru1-xCox)2FeSi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Bhargab; Srinivasan, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we report a systemetic study of Co substitution for Ru in Ru2FeSi. Our previous studies showed that Ru2FeSi and Co2FeSi are antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, respectively. In order to understand the influence of Co substitution for Ru, (Ru1-xCox)2FeSi alloys were prepared by arc melting, followed by annealing at 1273 K for 3 days. Structural and magnetic studies were carried out on the quaternary alloys by powder X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. At room temperature, Ru rich compositions i.e., x=0 and x=0.25 exhibited disordered B2 structure, but with increase in Co concentration L21 ordering appeared in the alloys. From magnetization measurements, it is seen that with increasing x, the ferromagnetic state becomes dominant with the appearance of spontaneous magnetization and increase in the value of magnetization of the alloys. Saturation magnetization measured at 15 kOe increased from 1.02 emu/g to 149.96 emu/g as x was increased from 0 to 1.

  11. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-06-25

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  12. Intracellular colon cancer-associated Escherichia coli promote protumoral activities of human macrophages by inducing sustained COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Raisch, Jennifer; Rolhion, Nathalie; Dubois, Anaëlle; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Bringer, Marie-Agnès

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis has been reported in patients with colorectal cancer, and there is a high prevalence of Escherichia coli belonging to B2 phylogroup and producing a genotoxin, termed colibactin. Macrophages are one of the predominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells supporting key processes in tumor progression by producing protumoral factors such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Here, we investigated whether B2 E. coli colonizing colon tumors could influence protumoral activities of macrophages. In contrast to commensal or nonpathogenic E. coli strains that were efficiently and rapidly degraded by macrophages at 24?h after infection, colon cancer-associated E. coli were able to resist killing by human THP-1 macrophages, to replicate intracellularly, and to persist inside host cells until at least 72?h after infection. Significant increases in COX-2 expression were observed in macrophages infected with colon cancer E. coli compared with macrophages infected with commensal and nonpathogenic E. coli strains or uninfected cells at 72?h after infection. Induction of COX-2 expression required live bacteria and was not due to colibactin production, as similar COX-2 levels were observed in macrophages infected with the wild-type colon cancer-associated E. coli 11G5 strain or a clbQ mutant unable to produce colibactin. Treatment of macrophages with ofloxacin, an antibiotic with intracellular tropism, efficiently decreased the number of intracellular bacteria and suppressed bacteria-induced COX-2 expression. This study provides new insights into the understanding of how tumor- infiltrating bacteria could influence cancer progression through their interaction with immune cells. Manipulation of microbes associated with tumors could have a deep influence on the secretion of protumoral molecules by infiltrating macrophages. PMID:25545478

  13. 2-Oxo-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridines as selective inhibitors of malarial protein farnesyltransferase and as anti-malarials

    E-print Network

    Gelb, Michael

    receptors to intracellular effectors, and also on Ras proteins, one of the most common oncopro- teins found to the SH of the cysteine near the C-termi- nus of proteins such as Ras. PFT inhibitors (PFTIs) have been2-Oxo-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridines as selective inhibitors of malarial protein farnesyltransferase

  14. Eur. J. Biochem. 243, 527-536 (1997) Biochemical and cellular effects of roscovitine, a potent and selective inhibitor

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    1997-01-01

    , a potent and selective inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinases cdc2, cdk2 and cdk5 Laurent MEIJER', Annie receptor tyrosine kinase, c-src, v-abl). Most kinases are not significantly inhibited by roscovitine. cdc2 kinase activities. Keywords: cell cycle ; cyclin-dependent kinase; kinase inhibitor; purine ;anti

  15. Selective mGAT2 (BGT-1) GABA uptake inhibitors: design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Vogensen, Stine B; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten K; Borkar, Nrupa; Wellendorph, Petrine; Skovgaard-Petersen, Jonas; Schousboe, Arne; White, H Steve; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2013-03-14

    ?-Amino acids sharing a lipophilic diaromatic side chain were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse GABA transporter subtypes mGAT1-4. The parent amino acids were also characterized. Compounds 13a, 13b, and 17b displayed more than 6-fold selectivity for mGAT2 over mGAT1. Compound 17b displayed anticonvulsive properties inferring a role of mGAT2 in epileptic disorders. These results provide new neuropharmacological tools and a strategy for designing subtype selective GABA transport inhibitors. PMID:23398473

  16. Parallel medicinal chemistry approaches to selective HDAC1/HDAC2 inhibitor (SHI-1:2) optimization.

    PubMed

    Kattar, Solomon D; Surdi, Laura M; Zabierek, Anna; Methot, Joey L; Middleton, Richard E; Hughes, Bethany; Szewczak, Alexander A; Dahlberg, William K; Kral, Astrid M; Ozerova, Nicole; Fleming, Judith C; Wang, Hongmei; Secrist, Paul; Harsch, Andreas; Hamill, Julie E; Cruz, Jonathan C; Kenific, Candia M; Chenard, Melissa; Miller, Thomas A; Berk, Scott C; Tempest, Paul

    2009-02-15

    The successful application of both solid and solution phase library synthesis, combined with tight integration into the medicinal chemistry effort, resulted in the efficient optimization of a novel structural series of selective HDAC1/HDAC2 inhibitors by the MRL-Boston Parallel Medicinal Chemistry group. An initial lead from a small parallel library was found to be potent and selective in biochemical assays. Advanced compounds were the culmination of iterative library design and possess excellent biochemical and cellular potency, as well as acceptable PK and efficacy in animal models. PMID:19138845

  17. The FGFR1 inhibitor PD 173074 selectively and potently antagonizes FGF-2 neurotrophic and neurotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Kee, W J; Facci, L; Macdonald, G; Doherty, P; Walsh, F S

    2000-10-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) promotes survival and/or neurite outgrowth from a variety of neurons in cell culture and regenerative processes in vivo. FGFs exert their effects by activating cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. FGF receptor (FGFR) inhibitors have not been characterized on neuronal cell behaviors to date. In the present study, we show that the FGFR1 inhibitor PD 173074 potently and selectively antagonized the neurotrophic and neurotropic actions of FGF-2. Nanomolar concentrations of PD 173074 prevented FGF-2, but not insulin-like growth factor-1, support of cerebellar granule neuron survival under conditions of serum/K(+) deprivation; another FGF-2 inhibitor, SU 5402, was effective only at a 1,000-fold greater concentration. Neither PD 173074 nor SU 5402, at 100 times their IC(50) values, interfered with the survival of dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted by nerve growth factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. PD 173074 and SU 5402 displayed 1,000-fold differential IC(50) values for inhibition of FGF-2-stimulated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and in granule neurons, and FGF-2-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (p44/42) phosphorylation. The two inhibitors failed to disturb downstream signalling stimuli of FGF-2. PD 173074 represents a valuable tool for dissecting the role of FGF-2 in normal and pathological nervous system function without compromising the actions of other neurotrophic factors. PMID:10987832

  18. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore »different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  19. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5?-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  20. Development and Characterization of 3-(Benzylsulfonamido)benzamides as Potent and Selective SIRT2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Quinti, Luisa; Wang, Hua; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Kazantsev, Aleksey G.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of sirtuin-2 deacetylase (SIRT2) have been shown to be protective in various models of Huntington's disease (HD) by decreasing polyglutamine aggregation, a hallmark of HD pathology. The present study was directed at optimizing the potency of SIRT2 inhibitors containing the neuroprotective sulfobenzoic acid scaffold and improving their pharmacology. To achieve that goal, 176 analogues were designed, synthesized, and tested in deacetylation assays against the activities of major human sirtuins SIRT1-3. This screen yielded 15 compounds with enhanced potency for SIRT2 inhibition and 11 compounds having SIRT2 inhibition equal to reference compound AK-1. The newly synthesized compounds also demonstrated higher SIRT2 selectivity over SIRT1 and SIRT3. These candidates were subjected to a dose-response bioactivity assay, measuring an increase in ?-tubulin K40 acetylation in two neuronal cell lines, which yielded five compounds bioactive in both cell lines and eight compounds bioactive in at least one of the cell lines tested. These bioactive compounds were subsequently tested in a tertiary polyglutamine aggregation assay, which identified five inhibitors. ADME properties of the bioactive SIRT2 inhibitors were assessed, which revealed a significant improvement of the pharmacological properties of the new entities, reaching closer to the goal of a clinically-viable candidate. PMID:24602787

  1. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  2. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Phosphodiesterase-8A and Implication on the Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Yan, Z; Yang, S; Cai, J; Robinson, H; Ke, H

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-8 (PDE8) is a family of cAMP-specific enzymes and plays important roles in many biological processes, including T-cell activation, testosterone production, adrenocortical hyperplasia, and thyroid function. However, no PDE8 selective inhibitors are available for trial treatment of human diseases. Here we report kinetic properties of the highly active PDE8A1 catalytic domain prepared from refolding and its crystal structures in the unliganded and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) bound forms at 1.9 and 2.1 Angstroms resolutions, respectively. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain has a KM of 1.8 eM, Vmax of 6.1 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 4.0 s-1 for cAMP, and a KM of 1.6 mM, Vmax of 2.5 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 1.6 s-1 for cGMP, thus indicating that the substrate specificity of PDE8 is dominated by KM. The structure of the PDE8A1 catalytic domain has similar topology as those of other PDE families but contains two extra helices around Asn685-Thr710. Since this fragment is distant from the active site of the enzyme, its impact on the catalysis is unclear. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain is insensitive to the IBMX inhibition (IC50 = 700 eM). The unfavorable interaction of IBMX in the PDE8A1-IBMX structure suggests an important role of Tyr748 in the inhibitor binding. Indeed, the mutation of Tyr748 to phenylalanine increases the PDE8A1 sensitivity to several nonselective or family selective PDE inhibitors. Thus, the structural and mutagenesis studies provide not only insight into the enzymatic properties but also guidelines for design of PDE8 selective inhibitors.

  3. Computational study of Gleevec and G6G reveals molecular determinants of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Yen -Lin; Meng, Yilin; Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2014-10-22

    Gleevec is a potent inhibitor of Abl tyrosine kinase but not of the highly homologous c-Src kinase. Because the ligand binds to an inactive form of the protein in which an Asp-Phe-Gly structural motif along the activation loop adopts a so-called DFG-out conformation, it was suggested that binding specificity was controlled by a “conformational selection” mechanism. In this context, the binding affinity displayed by the kinase inhibitor G6G poses an intriguing challenge. Although it possesses a chemical core very similar to that of Gleevec, G6G is a potent inhibitor of both Abl and c-Src kinases. Both inhibitors bind to themore »DFG-out conformation of the kinases, which seems to be in contradiction with the conformational selection mechanism. To address this issue and display the hidden thermodynamic contributions affecting the binding selectivity, molecular dynamics free energy simulations with explicit solvent molecules were carried out. Relative to Gleevec, G6G forms highly favorable van der Waals dispersive interactions upon binding to the kinases via its triazine functional group, which is considerably larger than the corresponding pyridine moiety in Gleevec. Upon binding of G6G to c-Src, these interactions offset the unfavorable free energy cost of the DFG-out conformation. When binding to Abl, however, G6G experiences an unfavorable free energy penalty due to steric clashes with the phosphate-binding loop, yielding an overall binding affinity that is similar to that of Gleevec. Such steric clashes are absent when G6G binds to c-Src, due to the extended conformation of the phosphate-binding loop.« less

  4. Computational Study of Gleevec and G6G Reveals Molecular Determinants of Kinase Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gleevec is a potent inhibitor of Abl tyrosine kinase but not of the highly homologous c-Src kinase. Because the ligand binds to an inactive form of the protein in which an Asp-Phe-Gly structural motif along the activation loop adopts a so-called DFG-out conformation, it was suggested that binding specificity was controlled by a “conformational selection” mechanism. In this context, the binding affinity displayed by the kinase inhibitor G6G poses an intriguing challenge. Although it possesses a chemical core very similar to that of Gleevec, G6G is a potent inhibitor of both Abl and c-Src kinases. Both inhibitors bind to the DFG-out conformation of the kinases, which seems to be in contradiction with the conformational selection mechanism. To address this issue and display the hidden thermodynamic contributions affecting the binding selectivity, molecular dynamics free energy simulations with explicit solvent molecules were carried out. Relative to Gleevec, G6G forms highly favorable van der Waals dispersive interactions upon binding to the kinases via its triazine functional group, which is considerably larger than the corresponding pyridine moiety in Gleevec. Upon binding of G6G to c-Src, these interactions offset the unfavorable free energy cost of the DFG-out conformation. When binding to Abl, however, G6G experiences an unfavorable free energy penalty due to steric clashes with the phosphate-binding loop, yielding an overall binding affinity that is similar to that of Gleevec. Such steric clashes are absent when G6G binds to c-Src, due to the extended conformation of the phosphate-binding loop. PMID:25243930

  5. Computational study of Gleevec and G6G reveals molecular determinants of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen -Lin; Meng, Yilin; Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2014-10-22

    Gleevec is a potent inhibitor of Abl tyrosine kinase but not of the highly homologous c-Src kinase. Because the ligand binds to an inactive form of the protein in which an Asp-Phe-Gly structural motif along the activation loop adopts a so-called DFG-out conformation, it was suggested that binding specificity was controlled by a “conformational selection” mechanism. In this context, the binding affinity displayed by the kinase inhibitor G6G poses an intriguing challenge. Although it possesses a chemical core very similar to that of Gleevec, G6G is a potent inhibitor of both Abl and c-Src kinases. Both inhibitors bind to the DFG-out conformation of the kinases, which seems to be in contradiction with the conformational selection mechanism. To address this issue and display the hidden thermodynamic contributions affecting the binding selectivity, molecular dynamics free energy simulations with explicit solvent molecules were carried out. Relative to Gleevec, G6G forms highly favorable van der Waals dispersive interactions upon binding to the kinases via its triazine functional group, which is considerably larger than the corresponding pyridine moiety in Gleevec. Upon binding of G6G to c-Src, these interactions offset the unfavorable free energy cost of the DFG-out conformation. When binding to Abl, however, G6G experiences an unfavorable free energy penalty due to steric clashes with the phosphate-binding loop, yielding an overall binding affinity that is similar to that of Gleevec. Such steric clashes are absent when G6G binds to c-Src, due to the extended conformation of the phosphate-binding loop.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for non-small-cell lung cancer: A phase II trial and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YOKOUCHI, HIROSHI; KANAZAWA, KENYA; ISHIDA, TAKASHI; OIZUMI, SATOSHI; SHINAGAWA, NAOFUMI; SUKOH, NORIAKI; HARADA, MASAO; OGURA, SHIGEAKI; MUNAKATA, MITSURU; DOSAKA-AKITA, HIROTOSHI; ISOBE, HIROSHI; NISHIMURA, MASAHARU

    2014-01-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are efficient for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two recent phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Thus, validation and discussion regarding the usefulness of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC are required. We conducted a prospective trial using COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of 50 NSCLC patients accrued between April, 2005 and July, 2006. Patients with untreated advanced NSCLC received oral meloxicam (150 mg daily), carboplatin (area under the curve = 5 mg/ml × min on day 1) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on day 1) every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was response rate. The response and disease control rates were 36.0 and 76.0%, respectively. The time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 5.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.6–6.7] and 13.7 months (95% CI: 11.4–15.9), respectively. The 1-year survival ratio was 56.0%. Grade 3 neuropathy was observed in only 1 patient. We performed tumor immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and p27 and investigated the correlation between their expression and clinical outcome. COX-2 expression in the tumor tended to correlate with a higher response rate (50.0% in the high- and 18.2% in the low-COX-2 group; P=0.092). Based on our results and previous reports, various trial designs, such as the prospective use of COX-2 inhibitors only for patients with COX-2-positive NSCLC, including the exploratory analysis of biomarkers associated with the COX-2 pathway, may be worth further consideration. PMID:25054040

  7. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  8. Tethering Small Molecules to a Phage Display Library: Discovery of a Selective Bivalent Inhibitor of Protein Kinase A

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Indraneel

    Tethering Small Molecules to a Phage Display Library: Discovery of a Selective Bivalent Inhibitor that allows for the discovery of protein surface-targeted cyclic peptides that are steered by an active site

  9. Sensitivity of selected human tumor models to PF-04217903, a novel selective c-Met kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Helen Y; Li, Qiuhua; Lee, Joseph H; Arango, Maria E; Burgess, Kristina; Qiu, Ming; Engstrom, Lars D; Yamazaki, Shinji; Parker, Max; Timofeevski, Sergei; Cui, Jingrong Jean; McTigue, Michele; Los, Gerrit; Bender, Steven L; Smeal, Tod; Christensen, James G

    2012-04-01

    The c-Met pathway has been implicated in a variety of human cancers for its critical role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. PF-04217903 is a novel ATP-competitive small-molecule inhibitor of c-Met kinase. PF-04217903 showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for c-Met compared with more than 150 kinases, making it one of the most selective c-Met inhibitors described to date. PF-04217903 inhibited tumor cell proliferation, survival, migration/invasion in MET-amplified cell lines in vitro, and showed marked antitumor activity in tumor models harboring either MET gene amplification or a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met autocrine loop at well-tolerated dose levels in vivo. Antitumor efficacy of PF-04217903 was dose-dependent and showed a strong correlation with inhibition of c-Met phosphorylation, downstream signaling, and tumor cell proliferation/survival. In human xenograft models that express relatively high levels of c-Met, complete inhibition of c-Met activity by PF-04217903 only led to partial tumor growth inhibition (38%-46%) in vivo. The combination of PF-04217903 with Recepteur d'origine nantais (RON) short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown in the HT29 model that also expresses activated RON kinase-induced tumor cell apoptosis and resulted in enhanced antitumor efficacy (77%) compared with either PF-04217903 (38%) or RON shRNA alone (56%). PF-04217903 also showed potent antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, PF-04217903 strongly induced phospho-PDGFR? (platelet-derived growth factor receptor) levels in U87MG xenograft tumors, indicating a possible oncogene switching mechanism in tumor cell signaling as a potential resistance mechanism that might compromise tumor responses to c-Met inhibitors. Collectively, these results show the use of highly selective inhibition of c-Met and provide insight toward targeting tumors exhibiting different mechanisms of c-Met dysregulation. PMID:22389468

  10. Identification of human cyclooxegenase-2 inhibitors from Cyperus scariosus (R.Br) rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Lavanya; Mathi, Pardhasaradhi; Allu, Prasada Rao; Rama, Chakravarthy; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2014-01-01

    Cyperus scariosus (R.Br) belongs to the family Cyperaceae and it has a diverse medicinal importance. To identify human cyclooxegenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors from C. scariosus, the rhizome powder was exhaustively extracted with various solvents based on the increasing polarity. Based on the presence and absence of secondary metabolites, we have selected the methanolic extract to evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. The same extract was further subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis to identify the active compounds. Binding affinities of these compounds towards anti-inflammatory protein COX-2 were analyzed using molecular docking interaction studies. Phytochemical analysis showed that methanol extract is positive for all secondary metabolites. The antioxidant activity of the C. scariosus rhizomes methanolic extract (CSRME) is half to that of ascorbic acid at 50 µg/ml. The anti-inflammatory activity of CSRME is higher than that of diclofenac sodium salt at high concentration, which is evident from the dose dependent inhibition of bovine serum albumin denaturation at 40 µg/ml–5 mg/ml. GC-MS analysis showed the presence of nine compounds, among all N-methyl-1-adamantaneacetamide and 1,5,diphenyl-2H-1,2,4- triazine form a hydrogen bond interactions with Ser-530 and Tyr-385 respectively and found similar interactions with crystal structure of diclofenac bound COX-2 protein. Benzene-1, 2-diol, 4-(4-bromo-3 chlorophenyl iminomethyl forms hydrogen bond interactions with Thr-199 and Thr-200 as similar to crystallized COX-2 protein with valdecoxib. Collectively our results suggest that CSRME contains medicinally important anti-inflammatory compounds and this justifies the use of this plant as a folklore medicine for preventing inflammation associated disorders. PMID:25489173

  11. Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Reticulocyte 12/15-Lipoxygenase as Anti-Stroke Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge facing drug discovery today is variability of the drug target between species, such as with 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX), which contributes to ischemic brain injury, but its human and rodent isozymes have different inhibitor specificities. In the current work, we have utilized a quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) screen to identify compound 1 (ML351), a novel chemotype for 12/15-LOX inhibition that has nanomolar potency (IC50 = 200 nM) against human 12/15-LOX and is protective against oxidative glutamate toxicity in mouse neuronal HT22 cells. In addition, it exhibited greater than 250-fold selectivity versus related LOX isozymes, was a mixed inhibitor, and did not reduce the active-site ferric ion. Lastly, 1 significantly reduced infarct size following permanent focal ischemia in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. As such, this represents the first report of a selective inhibitor of human 12/15-LOX with demonstrated in vivo activity in proof-of-concept mouse models of stroke. PMID:24684213

  12. Select microtubule inhibitors increase lysosome acidity and promote lysosomal disruption in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Dannie; Gebbia, Marinella; Prabha, Swayam; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Cho, Eunice E; Manolson, Morris F; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffrey; Minden, Mark D; Al-Awar, Rima; Aman, Ahmed; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-07-01

    To identify new biological vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a library of natural products for compounds cytotoxic to TEX leukemia cells. This screen identified the novel small molecule Deoxysappanone B 7,4' dimethyl ether (Deox B 7,4), which possessed nanomolar anti-leukemic activity. To determine the anti-leukemic mechanism of action of Deox B 7,4, we conducted a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified enrichment of genes related to mitotic cell cycle as well as vacuolar acidification, therefore pointing to microtubules and vacuolar (V)-ATPase as potential drug targets. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of Deox B 7,4 and a related analogue revealed that these compounds were reversible microtubule inhibitors that bound near the colchicine site. In addition, Deox B 7,4 and its analogue increased lysosomal V-ATPase activity and lysosome acidity. The effects on microtubules and lysosomes were functionally important for the anti-leukemic effects of these drugs. The lysosomal effects were characteristic of select microtubule inhibitors as only the Deox compounds and nocodazole, but not colchicine, vinca alkaloids or paclitaxel, altered lysosome acidity and induced lysosomal disruption. Thus, our data highlight a new mechanism of action of select microtubule inhibitors on lysosomal function. PMID:25832785

  13. LP99: Discovery and Synthesis of the First Selective BRD7/9 Bromodomain Inhibitor**

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter G K; Vieira, Lucas C C; Tallant, Cynthia; Fedorov, Oleg; Singleton, Dean C; Rogers, Catherine M; Monteiro, Octovia P; Bennett, James M; Baronio, Roberta; Müller, Susanne; Daniels, Danette L; Méndez, Jacqui; Knapp, Stefan; Brennan, Paul E; Dixon, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    The bromodomain-containing proteins BRD9 and BRD7 are part of the human SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes BAF and PBAF. To date, no selective inhibitor for BRD7/9 has been reported despite its potential value as a biological tool or as a lead for future therapeutics. The quinolone-fused lactam LP99 is now reported as the first potent and selective inhibitor of the BRD7 and BRD9 bromodomains. Development of LP99 from a fragment hit was expedited through balancing structure-based inhibitor design and biophysical characterization against tractable chemical synthesis: Complexity-building nitro-Mannich/lactamization cascade processes allowed for early structure–activity relationship studies whereas an enantioselective organocatalytic nitro-Mannich reaction enabled the synthesis of the lead scaffold in enantioenriched form and on scale. This epigenetic probe was shown to inhibit the association of BRD7 and BRD9 to acetylated histones in?vitro and in cells. Moreover, LP99 was used to demonstrate that BRD7/9 plays a role in regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. PMID:25864491

  14. Molecular Basis of Differential Selectivity of Cyclobutyl-Substituted Imidazole Inhibitors against CDKs: Insights for Rational Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Soumya Lipsa; Senapati, Sanjib

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) belong to the CMGC subfamily of protein kinases and play crucial roles in eukaryotic cell division cycle. At least seven different CDKs have been reported to be implicated in the cell cycle regulation in vertebrates. These CDKs are highly homologous and contain a conserved catalytic core. This makes the design of inhibitors specific for a particular CDK difficult. There is, however, growing need for CDK5 specific inhibitors to treat various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, cis-substituted cyclobutyl-4-aminoimidazole inhibitors have been identified as potent CDK5 inhibitors that gave up to 30-fold selectivity over CDK2. Available IC50 values also indicate a higher potency of this class of inhibitors over commercially available drugs, such as roscovitine. To understand the molecular basis of higher potency and selectivity of these inhibitors, here, we present molecular dynamics simulation results of CDK5/p25 and CDK2/CyclinE complexed with a series of cyclobutyl-substituted imidazole inhibitors and roscovitine. The atomic details of the stereospecificity and selectivity of these inhibitors are obtained from energetics and binding characteristics to the CDK binding pocket. The study not only complements the experimental findings, but also provides a wealth of detailed information that could help the structure-based drug designing processes. PMID:24058495

  15. Discovery of potent and selective benzothiazole hydrazone inhibitors of Bcl-XL.

    PubMed

    Sleebs, Brad E; Kersten, Wilhemus J A; Kulasegaram, Sanji; Nikolakopoulos, George; Hatzis, Effie; Moss, Rebecca M; Parisot, John P; Yang, Hong; Czabotar, Peter E; Fairlie, W Douglas; Lee, Erinna F; Adams, Jerry M; Chen, Lin; van Delft, Mark F; Lowes, Kym N; Wei, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Colman, Peter M; Street, Ian P; Baell, Jonathan B; Watson, Keith; Lessene, Guillaume

    2013-07-11

    Developing potent molecules that inhibit Bcl-2 family mediated apoptosis affords opportunities to treat cancers via reactivation of the cell death machinery. We describe the hit-to-lead development of selective Bcl-XL inhibitors originating from a high-throughput screening campaign. Small structural changes to the hit compound increased binding affinity more than 300-fold (to IC50 < 20 nM). This molecular series exhibits drug-like characteristics, low molecular weights (Mw < 450), and unprecedented selectivity for Bcl-XL. Surface plasmon resonance experiments afford strong evidence of binding affinity within the hydrophobic groove of Bcl-XL. Biological experiments using engineered Mcl-1 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, reliant only on Bcl-XL for survival) and Bax/Bak deficient MEFs (insensitive to selective activation of Bcl-2-driven apoptosis) support a mechanism-based induction of apoptosis. This manuscript describes the first series of selective small-molecule inhibitors of Bcl-XL and provides promising leads for the development of efficacious therapeutics against solid tumors and chemoresistant cancer cell lines. PMID:23767404

  16. Inhibition of neutrophil migration by a selective inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase: analysis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Nagai, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of the microcirculation of the hamster cheek pouch by intravital microscopy revealed five steps of neutrophil migration from the venules after topical application of leukotriene B4 to the microvasculature: rolling along the venular wall (Step 1), adhesion to it (Step 2), disappearance from the vascular lumen (Step 3), presence between the endothelial cells and the subendothelial basement membrane (Step 4) and passage through the basement membrane (Step 5). The present study was performed to examine whether a metalloproteinase inhibitor inhibits neutrophil migration at any of the above five steps. Chymostatin and leupeptin did not inhibit any of these five steps. In contrast, FN-439, a selective inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase, reduced the number of neutrophils in the perivascular space without affecting Steps 1 to 3. It was concluded that neutrophils may use metalloproteinase (collagenase/gelatinase) to penetrate the subendothelial basement membrane. PMID:18475630

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, R; Mercolini, L; Saracino, M A; Raggi, M A

    2012-01-01

    New-generation antidepressants are a heterogeneous class of drugs used in the treatment of depression and related disorders. This review deals with the first new-generation antidepressant class to enter the pharmaceutical market, i.e., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are still the most prescribed and widely used ones. Their common characteristics are the comparable clinical efficacy, good tolerability and relative safety in comparison to "first generation antidepressants", i.e. classic tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. This class of drugs includes fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine and, since 2011, vilazodone. In this review, the main pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the six commercially available SSRIs are described, focusing on side and toxic effects, chemical-clinical correlations, interactions with other drugs, the role of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and related bioanalytical methodologies. PMID:22414078

  18. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of CDPK1 from C. parvum and T. gondii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The protozoans Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii are parasites of major health concern to humans. Both parasites contain a group of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) which are found in plants and ciliates but not in humans or fungi. Here, we describe a series of potent inhibitors that target CDPK1 in C. parvum (CpCDPK1) and T. gondii (TgCDPK1). These inhibitors are highly selective for CpCDPK1 and TgCDPK1 over the mammalian kinases SRC and ABL. Furthermore, they are able to block an early stage of C. parvum invasion of HCT-8 host cells, which is similar to their effects on T. gondii invasion of human fibroblasts. PMID:21116453

  19. Effects of isozyme-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on eosinophil infiltration in the guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed

    Lagente, V; Moodley, I; Perrin, S; Mottin, G; Junien, J L

    1994-04-01

    The effects of selective phosphodiesterase isozyme inhibitors on eosinophil infiltration induced by antigen challenge or by exposure to an aerosol of platelet-activating factor (PAF) were investigated in the guinea-pig. Pretreatment 24 h and 3 h before antigen challenge or PAF exposure with theophylline (100 mg/kg), rolipram (5 mg/kg) and Ro 20-1724 (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced the increase in eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In contrast, milrinone, SK&F 94-120 and zaprinast were ineffective against antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment. Theophylline, rolipram and Ro 20-1724 also significantly reduced the release of eosinophil peroxidase into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It is suggested that inhibitors of type IV phosphodiesterase have anti-inflammatory effects in the airways and may be useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:8026552

  20. Selective ALK inhibitor alectinib with potent antitumor activity in models of crizotinib resistance.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tatsushi; Tsukaguchi, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Miyuki; Kondoh, Osamu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The clinical efficacy of the ALK inhibitor crizotinib has been demonstrated in ALK fusion-positive NSCLC; however, resistance to crizotinib certainly occurs through ALK secondary mutations in clinical use. Here we examined the efficacy of a selective ALK inhibitor alectinib/CH5424802 in models of crizotinib resistance. Alectinib led to tumor size reduction in EML4-ALK-positive xenograft tumors that failed to regress fully during the treatment with crizotinib. In addition, alectinib inhibited the growth of some EML4-ALK mutant-driven tumors, including the G1269A model. These results demonstrated that alectinib might provide therapeutic opportunities for crizotinib-treated patients with ALK secondary mutations. PMID:24887559

  1. Toward isozyme-selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ononye, Sophia N; van Heyst, Michael; Falcone, Eric M; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2013-01-01

    Since post-translational modifications of proteins are key mechanisms for controlling cellular function, targeting the machinery involved in these modifications offers new opportunities for the development of therapeutic agents. The histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent an important family of enzymes that are involved in controlling the acetylation state of key lysine residues in histones and other proteins. The development of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of several diseases, most notably cancer, has proceeded rapidly. Recent attention has turned towards the development of isozyme-specific inhibitors that will provide selective targeting. It is believed that the ability to target-specific HDACs rather than all family members will lead to superior therapeutics with better efficacy and lower toxicity. A review of recent patents shows that researchers are targeting a wide range of isozymes and that key advances in the structural biology of HDACs are providing important design information. PMID:24163736

  2. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs. PMID:26503701

  3. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B.; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs. PMID:26503701

  4. Triple-Helical Transition State Analogs: A New Class of Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lauer-Fields, Janelle; Brew, Keith; Whitehead, John K.; Li, Shunzi; Hammer, Robert P.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in activities of one family of proteases, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been implicated in primary and metastatic tumor growth, angiogenesis, and pathological degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as collagen and laminin. Since hydrolysis of the collagen triple-helix is one of the committed steps in ECM turnover, we envisioned modulation of collagenolytic activity as a strategy for creating selective MMP inhibitors. In the present study, a phosphinate transition state analog has been incorporated within a triple-helical peptide template. The template sequence was based on the ?1(V)436-450 collagen region, which is hydrolyzed at the Gly439~Val440 bond selectively by MMP-2 and MMP-9. The phosphinate acts as a tetrahedral transition state analog, which mimics the water-bound peptide bond of a protein substrate during hydrolysis. The phosphinate replaced the amide bond between Gly-Val in the P1-P1? subsites of the triple-helical peptide. Inhibition studies revealed Ki values in the low nanomolar range for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and low to middle micromolar range for MMP-8 and MMP-13. MMP-1, MMP-3, and MT1-MMP/MMP-14 were not inhibited effectively. Melting of the triple-helix resulted in a decrease in inhibitor affinity for MMP-2. The phosphinate triple-helical transition state analog has high affinity and selectivity for the gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), and represents a new class of protease inhibitors that maximizes potential selectivity via interactions with both prime and non-prime active site subsites as well as with secondary binding sites (exosites). PMID:17672455

  5. Furafylline is a potent and selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450IA2 in man.

    PubMed Central

    Sesardic, D; Boobis, A R; Murray, B P; Murray, S; Segura, J; de la Torre, R; Davies, D S

    1990-01-01

    1. Furafylline (1,8-dimethyl-3-(2'-furfuryl)methylxanthine) is a methylxanthine derivative that was introduced as a long-acting replacement for theophylline in the treatment of asthma. Administration of furafylline was associated with an elevation in plasma levels of caffeine, due to inhibition of caffeine oxidation, a reaction catalysed by one or more hydrocarbon-inducible isoenzymes of P450. We have now investigated the selectivity of inhibition of human monooxygenase activities by furafylline. 2. Furafylline was a potent, non-competitive inhibitor of high affinity phenacetin O-deethylase activity of microsomal fractions of human liver, a reaction catalysed by P450IA2, with an IC50 value of 0.07 microM. 3. Furafylline had either very little or no effect on human monooxygenase activities catalysed by other isoenzymes of P450, including P450IID1, P450IIC, P450IIA. Of particular interest, furafylline did not inhibit P450IA1, assessed from aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity of placental samples from women who smoked cigarettes. 4. It is concluded that furafylline is a highly selective inhibitor of P450IA2 in man. 5. Furafylline was a potent inhibitor of the N3-demethylation of caffeine and of a component of the N1- and N7-demethylation. This confirms earlier suggestions that caffeine is a selective substrate of a hydrocarbon-inducible isoenzyme of P450 in man, and identifies this as P450IA2. Thus, caffeine N3-demethylation should provide a good measure of the activity of P450IA in vivo in man. 6. Although furafylline selectively inhibited P450IA2, relative to P450IA1, in the rat, this was at 1000-times the concentration required to inhibit the human isoenzyme, suggesting a major difference in the active site geometry between the human and the rat orthologues of P50IA2. PMID:2378786

  6. Diverse modes of binding in structures of Leishmania major N-myristoyltransferase with selective inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, James A.; Roberts, Shirley M.; Bell, Andrew S.; Hutton, Jennie A.; Hodgkinson, Michael R.; Tate, Edward W.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Smith, Deborah F.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a spectrum of global diseases of poverty associated with immune dysfunction and are the cause of high morbidity. Despite the long history of these diseases, no effective vaccine is available and the currently used drugs are variously compromised by moderate efficacy, complex side effects and the emergence of resistance. It is therefore widely accepted that new therapies are needed. N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT) has been validated pre-clinically as a target for the treatment of fungal and parasitic infections. In a previously reported high-throughput screening program, a number of hit compounds with activity against NMT from Leishmania donovani have been identified. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of representative compounds from four hit series in ternary complexes with myristoyl-CoA and NMT from the closely related L. major are reported. The structures reveal that the inhibitors associate with the peptide-binding groove at a site adjacent to the bound myristoyl-CoA and the catalytic ?-carboxylate of Leu421. Each inhibitor makes extensive apolar contacts as well as a small number of polar contacts with the protein. Remarkably, the compounds exploit different features of the peptide-binding groove and collectively occupy a substantial volume of this pocket, suggesting that there is potential for the design of chimaeric inhibitors with significantly enhanced binding. Despite the high conservation of the active sites of the parasite and human NMTs, the inhibitors act selectively over the host enzyme. The role of conformational flexibility in the side chain of Tyr217 in conferring selectivity is discussed. PMID:25075346

  7. Induction of HO-1 by carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 attenuates thrombin-induced COX-2 expression and hypertrophy in primary human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chien, Peter Tzu-Yu; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the cytoprotective byproducts of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and exerts anti-inflammatory action in various models. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying CO-induced HO-1 expression in primary human cardiomyocytes remain largely unidentified. We used primary left ventricle myocytes as a model and applied CO releasing molecule (CORM)-2 to investigate the relationship of CO and HO-1 expression. We herein used Western blot, real-time PCR, promoter activity and EIA to investigate the role of HO-1 expression protecting against thrombin-mediated responses. We found that thrombin-induced COX-2 expression, PGE2 release and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy markers (increase in ANF/BNP, ?-actin expression and cell surface area) was attenuated by pretreatment with CORM-2 which was partially reversed by hemoglobin (Hb) or ZnPP (an inhibitor of HO-1 activity), suggesting that HO-1/CO system may be of clinical importance to ameliorate heart failure through inhibition of inflammatory responses. CORM-2-induced HO-1 protein expression, mRNA and promoter was attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitors of Pyk2 (PF431396), PDGFR (AG1296), PI3K (LY294002), Akt (SH-5), p38 (SB202530), JNK1/2 (SP600125), FoxO1 (AS1842856) and Sp1 (mithramycin A). The involvement of these signaling components was further confirmed by transfection with respective siRNAs, consistent with those of pharmacological inhibitors. These results suggested that CORM-2-induced HO-1 expression is mediated through a Pyk2/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/FoxO1/Sp1-dependent manner and exerts a cytoprotective effect in human cardiomyocytes. PMID:26385185

  8. A guide to picking the most selective kinase inhibitor tool compounds for pharmacological validation of drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Uitdehaag, Joost CM; Verkaar, Folkert; Alwan, Husam; de Man, Jos; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido JR

    2012-01-01

    To establish the druggability of a target, genetic validation needs to be supplemented with pharmacological validation. Pharmacological studies, especially in the kinase field, are hampered by the fact that many reference inhibitors are not fully selective for one target. Fortunately, the initial trickle of selective inhibitors released in the public domain has steadily swelled into a stream. However, rationally picking the most selective tool compound out of the increasing amounts of available inhibitors has become progressively difficult due to the lack of accurate quantitative descriptors of drug selectivity. A recently published approach, termed ‘selectivity entropy’, is an improved way of expressing selectivity as a single-value parameter and enables rank ordering of inhibitors. We provide a guide to select the best tool compounds for pharmacological validation experiments of candidate drug targets using selectivity entropy. In addition, we recommend which inhibitors to use for studying the biology of the 20 most investigated kinases that are clinically relevant: Abl (ABL1), AKT1, ALK, Aurora A/B, CDKs, MET, CSF1R (FMS), EGFR, FLT3, ERBB2 (HER2), IKBKB (IKK2), JAK2/3, JNK1/2/3 (MAPK8/9/10), MEK1/2, PLK1, PI3Ks, p38? (MAPK14), BRAF, SRC and VEGFR2 (KDR). PMID:22250956

  9. COX-2 Expression and Survival in Patients with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy and Celecoxib: A Quantitative Immunohistochemical Analysis of RTOG C0128

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Corinne M; Winter, Kathryn; Gaffney, David K; Ryu, Janice K; Jhingran, Anuja; Dicker, Adam P; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Miller, Brigitte E; Magliocco, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To measure expression of COX-2 and CD34 in pre-treatment tumor biopsies from patients on the RTOG C0128 phase II study, and to correlate expression of these biomarkers, using quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC), with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials Pre-treatment biopsies were placed into tissue microarrays. COX-2 and CD34 expression were measured using automated quantitative IHC (AQUA®). Cox regression models and Fisher's exact test were used to explore associations between expression of the biomarkers and clinical endpoints. Results 84 patients were accrued between 2001 and 2004; 78 were eligible and analyzable. Pathology specimen submission was optional; COX-2 expression was determined for 37 (47%) of patients, and CD34 scoring was determined for 34 (44%) of patients. Median follow-up was 44.5 months. In tumors where COX-2 data was available, 6 of 37 (16%) patients had local-regional failure; 4 of these patients had tumors with COX-2 scores below the AQUA® score median [HR=0.39; 95%CI= (0.07, 2.16); p=0.28]. Of the 8 patients with DFS failures, 5 had tumors with COX-2 levels below the median [HR=0.49; 95%CI= (0.12, 2.04); p=0.32]. The 4 patients who died all had COX-2 levels below the median value. COX-2 levels below the median were associated with worse 2-year survival (Fisher's p=0.046). There was no statistically significant association between CD34 status and clinical outcome. Conclusions Low COX-2 expression measured by AQUA® was associated with worse overall survival in this subset of patients available for analysis from RTOG C0128. Application of AQUA® technology, in a larger study, will be required to definitively evaluate the association COX-2 with clinical outcome in cervical cancer. PMID:23221733

  10. Using self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine (SVM) for classification of selectivity of ACAT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Maolin; Yan, Aixia; Dai, Bin

    2013-02-01

    Using a self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine, two classification models were built to predict whether a compound is a selective inhibitor toward the two Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) isozymes, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. A dataset of 97 ACAT inhibitors was collected. For each molecule, the global descriptors, 2D and 3D property autocorrelation descriptors and autocorrelation of surface properties were calculated from the program ADRIANA.Code. The prediction accuracies of the models (based on the training/ test set splitting by SOM method) for the test sets are 88.9 % for SOM1, 92.6 % for SVM1 model. In addition, the extended connectivity fingerprints (ECFP_4) for all the molecules were calculated and the structure-activity relationship of selective ACAT inhibitors was summarized, which may help find important structural features of inhibitors relating to the selectivity of ACAT isozymes. PMID:23124952

  11. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Selective 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Jesus R.; Becker, Christopher J.; Blackledge, Charles W.; Duquenne, Celine; Feng, Yanhong; Grant, Seth W.; Heerding, Dirk; Li, William H.; Miller, William H.; Romeril, Stuart P.; Scherzer, Daryl; Shu, Arthur; Bobko, Mark A.; Chadderton, Antony R.; Dumble, Melissa; Gardiner, Christine M.; Gilbert, Seth; Liu, Qi; Rabindran, Sridhar K.; Sudakin, Valery; Xiang, Hong; Brady, Pat G.; Campobasso, Nino; Ward, Paris; Axten, Jeffrey M.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a master regulator of the AGC family of kinases and an integral component of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. As this pathway is among the most commonly deregulated across all cancers, a selective inhibitor of PDK1 might have utility as an anticancer agent. Herein we describe our lead optimization of compound 1 toward highly potent and selective PDK1 inhibitors via a structure-based design strategy. The most potent and selective inhibitors demonstrated submicromolar activity as measured by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates as well as antiproliferative activity against a subset of AML cell lines. In addition, reduction of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates was demonstrated in vivo in mice bearing OCl-AML2 xenografts. These observations demonstrate the utility of these molecules as tools to further delineate the biology of PDK1 and the potential pharmacological uses of a PDK1 inhibitor.

  12. The small-molecule inhibitor selectivity between IKK? and IKK? kinases in NF-?B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feifei; Zhou, Peng; Kang, Wenyuan; Luo, Li; Fan, Xia; Yan, Jun; Liang, Huaping

    2015-08-01

    The enzyme complex I?B kinase (IKK) is an essential activator of NF-?B signaling pathway involved in propagating the cellular response to inflammation. The complex contains two functional subunits IKK? and IKK?, which are structurally conserved kinases and selective inhibition of them would result in distinct biological effects. However, most existing IKK inhibitors show moderate or high promiscuity for the two homologous kinases. Understanding of the molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying the specific interactions in IKK-ligand recognition is thus fundamentally important for the rational design of selective IKK inhibitors. In the current work, we integrated molecular docking, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculation and Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area analysis to investigate the structural basis and energetic property of the selective binding of small-molecule ligands to IKK? and IKK?. It was found that the selectivity is primarily determined by the size and topology difference in ATP-binding pocket of IKK? and IKK? kinase domains; bulky inhibitor molecules commonly have, respectively, low and appropriate affinities towards IKK? and IKK?, and thus exhibit relatively high selectivity for IKK? over IKK?, whereas small ligands can only bind weakly to both the two kinases with low selectivity. In addition, the conformation, arrangement and distribution of residues in IKK pockets are also responsible for constituting the exquisite specificity of ligand binding to KK? and IKK?. Next, a novel quantitative structure-selectivity relationship model was developed to characterize the relative contribution of each kinase residue to inhibitor selectivity and to predict the selectivity and specificity for a number of known IKK inhibitors. Results showed that the active-site residues contribute significantly to the selectivity by directly interacting with inhibitor ligands, while those protein portions far away from the kinase active sites may also play an important role in determining the selectivity through long-range non-bonded forces and indirect allosteric effect. PMID:25386663

  13. ABT-199, a potent and selective BCL-2 inhibitor, achieves antitumor activity while sparing platelets.

    PubMed

    Souers, Andrew J; Leverson, Joel D; Boghaert, Erwin R; Ackler, Scott L; Catron, Nathaniel D; Chen, Jun; Dayton, Brian D; Ding, Hong; Enschede, Sari H; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Huang, David C S; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jin, Sha; Khaw, Seong Lin; Kovar, Peter J; Lam, Lloyd T; Lee, Jackie; Maecker, Heather L; Marsh, Kennan C; Mason, Kylie D; Mitten, Michael J; Nimmer, Paul M; Oleksijew, Anatol; Park, Chang H; Park, Cheol-Min; Phillips, Darren C; Roberts, Andrew W; Sampath, Deepak; Seymour, John F; Smith, Morey L; Sullivan, Gerard M; Tahir, Stephen K; Tse, Chris; Wendt, Michael D; Xiao, Yu; Xue, John C; Zhang, Haichao; Humerickhouse, Rod A; Rosenberg, Saul H; Elmore, Steven W

    2013-02-01

    Proteins in the B cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family are key regulators of the apoptotic process. This family comprises proapoptotic and prosurvival proteins, and shifting the balance toward the latter is an established mechanism whereby cancer cells evade apoptosis. The therapeutic potential of directly inhibiting prosurvival proteins was unveiled with the development of navitoclax, a selective inhibitor of both BCL-2 and BCL-2-like 1 (BCL-X(L)), which has shown clinical efficacy in some BCL-2-dependent hematological cancers. However, concomitant on-target thrombocytopenia caused by BCL-X(L) inhibition limits the efficacy achievable with this agent. Here we report the re-engineering of navitoclax to create a highly potent, orally bioavailable and BCL-2-selective inhibitor, ABT-199. This compound inhibits the growth of BCL-2-dependent tumors in vivo and spares human platelets. A single dose of ABT-199 in three patients with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia resulted in tumor lysis within 24 h. These data indicate that selective pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 shows promise for the treatment of BCL-2-dependent hematological cancers. PMID:23291630

  14. Use of Selective Inhibitors and Chromogenic Substrates to Differentiate Bacteria Based on Toluene Oxygenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, William Kelvin; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Walton, Michelle Rene; Partin, Judy Kaye; Watwood, Mary Elizabeth; Smith, William Aaron; Chingenpeel, S. R.

    2001-09-01

    In whole-cell studies, two alkynes, 1-pentyne and phenylacetylene, were selective, irreversible inhibitors of monooxygenase enzymes in catabolic pathways that permit growth of bacteria on toluene. 1-Pentyne selectively inhibited growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4 (toluene 2-monooxygenase [T2MO] pathway) and B. pickettii PKO1 (toluene 3-monooxygenase [T3MO] pathway) on toluene, but did not inhibit growth of bacteria expressing other pathways. In further studies with strain G4, chromogenic transformation of a,a,a-Trifluoro-m-cresol (TFC) was irreversibly inhibited by 1-pentyne, but the presence of phenol prevented this inhibition. Transformation of catechol by G4 was unaffected by 1-pentyne. With respect to the various pathways and bacteria tested, phenylacetylene selectively inhibited growth of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 (toluene 4-monooxygenase [T4MO] pathway) on toluene, but not on p-cresol. An Escherichia coli transformant expressing T4MO transformed indole or naphthalene in chromogenic reactions, but not after exposure to phenylacetylene. The naphthalene reaction remained diminished in phenylacetylene-treated cells relative to untreated cells after phenylacetylene was removed, indicating irreversible inhibition. These techniques were used to differentiate toluene-degrading isolates from an aquifer. Based on data generated with these indicators and inhibitors, along with results from Biolog analysis for sole carbon source oxidation, the groundwater isolates were assigned to eight separate groups, some of which apparently differ in their mode of toluene catabolism.

  15. Nanomolar Inhibitors of the Transcription Factor STAT5b with High Selectivity over STAT5a**

    PubMed Central

    Elumalai, Nagarajan; Berg, Angela; Natarajan, Kalaiselvi; Scharow, Andrej; Berg, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Src homology?2 (SH2) domains play a central role in signal transduction. Although many SH2 domains have been validated as drug targets, their structural similarity makes development of specific inhibitors difficult. The cancer-relevant transcription factors STAT5a and STAT5b are particularly challenging small-molecule targets because their SH2 domains are 93?% identical on the amino acid level. Here we present the natural product-inspired development of the low-nanomolar inhibitor Stafib-1, as the first small molecule which inhibits the STAT5b SH2 domain (Ki=44?nm) with more than 50-fold selectivity over STAT5a. The binding site of the core moiety of Stafib-1 was validated by functional analysis of point mutants. A prodrug of Stafib-1 was shown to inhibit STAT5b with high selectivity over STAT5a in tumor cells. Stafib-1 provides the first demonstration that naturally occurring SH2 domains with more than 90?% sequence identity can be selectively targeted with small organic molecules. PMID:25702814

  16. Combined targeting of Stat3/NF?B/Cox-2/EP4 for effective management of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jingjing; Xie, Jianping; Bedolla, Roble; Rivas, Paul; Chakravarthy, Divya; Freeman, James W; Reddick, Robert; Kopetz, Scott; Peterson, Amanda; Wang, Huamin; Fischer, Susan M; Kumar, Addanki P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Near equal rates of incidence and mortality emphasize the need for novel targeted approaches for better management of pancreatic cancer patients. Inflammatory molecules NF?B and Stat3 are overexpressed in pancreatic tumors. Inhibition of one protein allows cancer cells to survive using the other. The goal of the present study is to determine whether targeting Stat3/NF?B cross talk with a natural product Nexrutine (Nx) can inhibit inflammatory signaling in pancreatic cancer. Experimental design HPNE, HPNE-Ras, BxPC3, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cells were tested for growth, apoptosis, Cox-2, NF?B and Stat3 level in response to Nx treatment. Transient expression, gel shift, ChIP was used to examine transcriptional regulation of Cox-2. Stat3 knockdown was used to decipher Stat3/NF?B cross talk. Histopathological and immunoblotting evaluation was performed on BK5-Cox2 transgenic mice treated with Nx. In vivo expression of prostaglandin receptor EP4 was analyzed in a retrospective cohort of pancreatic tumors using a TMA. Results Nx treatment inhibited growth of pancreatic cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. Reduced levels and activity of Stat3, NF?B and their cross talk led to transcriptional suppression of Cox-2 and subsequent decreased levels of PGE2 and PGF2. Stat3 knockdown studies suggest Stat3 as negative regulator of NF?B activation. Nx intervention reduced the levels of NF?B, Stat3 and fibrosis in vivo. Expression of prostaglandin receptor EP4 that is known to play a role in fibrosis was significantly elevated in human pancreatic tumors. Conclusions Dual inhibition of Stat3-NF?B by Nx may overcome problems associated with inhibition of either pathway. PMID:24520096

  17. Modulation of COX2 and hTERT expression by photodynamic therapy in human colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yow, Christine Li Miu N.; Chu, Ellie Shihng M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was employed as a cancer therapy with photosensitizer (PS)-loaded cancer cells, eradicated by the reactive oxygen species after light activation. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) is an enzyme expressed in 80% of colon adenocarcinoma and is one of the targets for effective cancer treatment. There is also uprising evidence that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a catalytic component of telomerase, is reported as a promising indicator for monitoring cancer treatment. In this study, NPe6 mediated PDT on COX2 induced apoptosis in HT-29 was investigated. The cell cycle changes was analysed by flow cytometry and the hTERT expression at pre and post PDT was evaluated at transcription level by Taqman real time PCR. NPe6-PDT in HT-29 cells demonstrated anti-proliferating effect in a drug and light dose dependent manner. LD50 was achieved at 16?g/mL and 2J/cm2 at 4 hour-post treatment with a significant down-regulation of COX2 expression at LD30 and LD50 by immunohistochemical staining (IHC) (p<0.05, One-Way ANOVA). Membrane blebbing was detected in over 60% of cells. 35.2% of treated cells arrested in S-phase at LD50 after 24 hours by flow cytometry. A 0.25- and 0.6-fold down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression was achieved at LD30 and LD50 respectively by TaqMan real-time PCR. To summarize, NPe6 mediated PDT down-regulated COX2 expression and triggered cell apoptosis. The hTERT can serve as an indicative marker for monitoring NPe6-PDT cancer treatment efficacy.

  18. Phase I evaluation of XL019, an oral, potent, and selective JAK2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Tam, Constantine S.; Wadleigh, Martha; Sokol, Lubomir; Smith, Catherine C.; Bui, Lynne A.; Song, Chunyan; Clary, Douglas O.; Olszynski, Patrycja; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Shah, Neil P.

    2015-01-01

    This phase I study evaluated selective JAK2 inhibitor XL019 in 30 patients with myelofibrosis. The initial dose cohorts were 100, 200, and 300 mg orally on days 1–21 of a 28-day cycle. Central and/or peripheral neurotoxicity developed in all patients. Subsequently, patients were treated on lower doses; neurotoxicity was again observed, leading to study termination. Peripheral neuropathy resolved in 50%, and central neurotoxicity in all patients within months after therapy cessation. Myelosuppression was minimal. The terminal half-life of XL019 was approximately 21 h, with steady state reached by Day 8. International Working Group defined responses were seen in three (10%) patients. PMID:24374145

  19. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer Schoelles; Moore, Thea; Collins, Candace L.; Thomas, Kerry-Ann E.

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been a major advance in pediatric psychiatry, while contemporary advances in the understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) phenomenon in children have facilitated its identification and treatment. Currently, fluvoxamine and sertraline are the only SSRIs that have received FDA approval for the treatment of childhood OCD. The purpose of this article is to review the safety and efficacy of SSRIs in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents. PMID:23118677

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk for suicidality in adolescents: an update.

    PubMed

    Giner, Lucas; Nichols, C Matthew; Zalsman, Gil; Oquendo, Maria A

    2005-01-01

    The controversy regarding Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) and suicidality dates back to the early 1990s. The first agent reported to be associated with suicidality was fluoxotine. In 2003, the British Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) warned about possible risk of suicidality in children and adolescents treated with paroxetine for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This warning was soon extended to all the SSRIs as well as venlafaxine and mirtazapine. Similarly, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a "black box warning" on these medications in 2004. We address the debate concerning this warning and its clinical implications and review the latest contributions to the literature. PMID:16231472

  1. Delayed effects of daphnia intoxication with selective and nonselective inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Zobov, V V; Berezinskii, L A; Aslyamova, A A; Reznik, V S

    2005-01-01

    Chronic experiments on successive generations of laboratory Daphnia magna culture demonstrated higher (compared to proserin) embryotoxicity of a new selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor 1,3-bis[5-(diethyl-o-nitrobenzilammonio)pentyl]-6-methyluracyl dibromide (compound No. 547). The concentrations of proserin (neostigmine) and compound No. 547 not exceeding 1/60 LC50 (0.39 mol/liter for compound No. 547 and 0.045 mol/liter for proserin) were absolutely safe for the reproductive function of daphnia. PMID:16142279

  2. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sperm and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Riggin, Lauren; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question Some of my male patients who are taking antidepressants are planning to become fathers. Do selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect sperm, causing either decreased fertility or increased risk of congenital anomalies? Answer There is limited evidence regarding paternal SSRI use before conception and its effects on reproductive outcomes; however, there might be some increased risk of subfertility based on animal studies and sperm-quality studies. There are insufficient data at this time to change prescribing practices of SSRIs in men who are hoping to become fathers.

  3. Structure based drug design: development of potent and selective factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Beck, Richard; Burd, Andrew; Blench, Toby; Marlin, Frederic; Ayele, Tenagne; Buxton, Stuart; Dagostin, Claudio; Malic, Maja; Joshi, Rina; Barry, John; Sajad, Mohammed; Cheung, Chiming; Shaikh, Shaheda; Chahwala, Suresh; Chander, Chaman; Baumgartner, Christine; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Murray, Elizabeth; Blackney, Michael; Giddings, Amanda

    2010-02-25

    On the basis of our understanding on the binding interactions of the benzothiophene template within the FIXa active site by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling studies, we developed our SAR strategy by targeting the 4-position of the template to access the S1 beta and S2-S4 sites. A number of highly selective and potent factor Xa (FXa) and FIXa inhibitors were identified by simple switch of functional groups with conformational changes toward the S2-S4 sites. PMID:20121197

  4. Interrogating a Hexokinase-Selected Small-Molecule Library for Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hexokinase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael T.; Walker, Dawn M.; Drew, Mark E.; Mitchell, William G.; Dao, Kevin; Schroeder, Chad E.; Flaherty, Daniel P.; Weiner, Warren S.; Golden, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites in the genus Plasmodium cause disease throughout the tropic and subtropical regions of the world. P. falciparum, one of the deadliest species of the parasite, relies on glycolysis for the generation of ATP while it inhabits the mammalian red blood cell. The first step in glycolysis is catalyzed by hexokinase (HK). While the 55.3-kDa P. falciparum HK (PfHK) shares several biochemical characteristics with mammalian HKs, including being inhibited by its products, it has limited amino acid identity (?26%) to the human HKs, suggesting that enzyme-specific therapeutics could be generated. To that end, interrogation of a selected small-molecule library of HK inhibitors has identified a class of PfHK inhibitors, isobenzothiazolinones, some of which have 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of <1 ?M. Inhibition was reversible by dilution but not by treatment with a reducing agent, suggesting that the basis for enzyme inactivation was not covalent association with the inhibitor. Lastly, six of these compounds and the related molecule ebselen inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro (50% effective concentration [EC50] of ?0.6 and <6.8 ?M). These findings suggest that the chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future development of therapeutics against P. falciparum. PMID:23716053

  5. Selective killing of G2 decatenation checkpoint defective colon cancer cells by catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chetan Kumar; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Majumder, Hemanta Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Cancer cells with defective DNA decatenation checkpoint can be selectively targeted by the catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II? (topo II?) enzyme. Upon treatment with catalytic topo II? inhibitors, cells with defective decatenation checkpoint fail to arrest their cell cycle in G2 phase and enter into M phase with catenated and under-condensed chromosomes resulting into impaired mitosis and eventually cell death. In the present work we analyzed decatenation checkpoint in five different colon cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT-29, Caco2, COLO 205 and SW480) and in one non-cancerous cell line (HEK293T). Four out of the five colon cancer cell lines i.e. HCT116, HT-29, Caco2, and COLO 205 were found to be compromised for the decatenation checkpoint function at different extents, whereas SW480 and HEK293T cell lines were found to be proficient for the checkpoint function. Upon treatment with ICRF193, decatenation checkpoint defective cell lines failed to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase and entered into M phase without proper chromosomal decatenation, resulting into the formation of tangled mass of catenated and under-condensed chromosomes. Such cells underwent mitotic catastrophe and rapid apoptosis like cell death and showed higher sensitivity for ICRF193. Our study suggests that catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II? are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of colon cancers with defective DNA decatenation checkpoint. PMID:25746763

  6. Osteocyte expression of caspase-3, COX-2, IL-6 and sclerostin are spatially and temporally associated following stress fracture initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Andy C; Kidd, Lisa J; Cowling, Nicholas R; Kelly, Wendy L; Forwood, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures (SFxs) are debilitating injuries and exact mechanisms that initiate their repair incompletely understood. We hypothesised that osteocyte apoptosis and expression of cytokines and proteins such as sclerostin, VEGF, TGF-?, COX-2 and IL-6 were early signalling events to facilitate the formation of periosteal woven bone and recruitment of osteoclast precursors to the site of remodelling. A SFx was created in the right ulna of mature female wistar rats using cyclic end loading. Rats were killed 1, 4 and 7 days after loading (n=5 per group). Standard histological staining was used to examine SFx morphology and immunohistochemistry to detect the localisation of these proteins and in situ hybridisation to detect mRNA along the SFx line or gene expression to quantify the target genes. Unloaded ulnae served as controls. The labelling index of caspase-3, COX-2 and IL-6 was significantly elevated in the region of SFxs at all time points compared with controls (P<0.001). In addition, the labelling index of sclerostin protein was significantly reduced in osteocytes adjacent to the SFx region when compared with controls at all three time points (P<0.001). Both VEGF and TGF-? expressions were only localised in the woven bone. These data reinforce the involvement of osteocyte apoptosis in the healing of fatigue damage in bone, and demonstrate that local regulation of sclerostin, COX-2 and IL-6 are important signalling events associated with new bone formation and SFx remodelling. PMID:25228984

  7. COX-2-765G>C Polymorphism Increases the Risk of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-wei; Hua, Rui-xi; Guo, Wei-jian

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation has been regarded as an important mechanism in carcinogenesis. Inflammation-associated genetic variants have been highly associated with cancer risk. Polymorphisms in the gene cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pro-inflammation factor, have been suggested to alter the risk of multiple tumors, but the findings of various studies are not consistent. Methods A literature search through February 2013 was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, and CNKI databases. We used odds ratios (ORs) with confidence intervals (CIs) of 95% to assess the strength of the association between the COX-2-765G>C polymorphism and cancer risk in a random-effect model. We also assessed heterogeneity and publication bias. Results In total, 65 articles with 29,487 cancer cases and 39,212 non-cancer controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR (95% CIs) in the co-dominant model (GC vs. GG) was 1.11 (1.02–1.22), and in the dominant model ((CC+GC) vs. GG), the pooled OR was 1.12 (1.02–1.23). In the subgroup analysis, stratified by cancer type and race, significant associations were found between the-765 C allele and higher risk for gastric cancer, leukemia, pancreatic cancer, and cancer in the Asian population. Conclusion In summary, the COX-2-765 C allele was related to increased cancer susceptibility, especially gastric cancer and cancer in the Asian population. PMID:24023834

  8. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents. PMID:22064367

  9. Preclinical Effectiveness of Selective Inhibitor of IRS-1/2 NT157 in Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Cecilia; Capristo, Mariantonietta; Mancarella, Caterina; Reunevi, Hadas; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor in children and young adults. Several studies have confirmed the involvement of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in the regulation of OS cell proliferation and differentiation as well as in the protection of cells from chemotherapy. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 is a critical mediator of IGF-1R signaling, and we recently reported that its overexpression in OS cells increases proliferation, migration, and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of NT157, a selective inhibitor of IRS-1/2, in a panel of OS cells. A strong dose-dependent inhibition of growth was observed in the MG-63, OS-19, and U-2OS OS cell lines, displaying IC50 values at sub-micromolar doses after 72?h of treatment. Exposure to NT157 elicited dose- and time-dependent decreases in IRS-1 levels. Moreover, a protein analysis showed that the degradation of IRS-1 inhibited the activation of principal downstream mediators of the IGF pathway. NT157 significantly affected the cells’ migratory ability, as confirmed by a wound-healing assay. The inhibitor induced cytostatic effects, as evidenced by G2/M cell cycle arrest, and did not affect apoptosis. Consequently, NT157 was combined with drugs used to treat OS in order to capitalize on its therapeutic potential. Simultaneous treatments were made in association with chemotherapeutic agents in a fixed ratio for 72?h and cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. Synergistic or addictive effects with respect to single agents are expressed as the combination index. Significant synergistic effects were obtained with several targeted drugs, such as Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, and NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI-3K/mTOR. Overall, these findings provide evidence for the effectiveness of a selected inhibitor of IRS-1/2 NT157 in OS cells, displaying a promising approach based on the targeting of IRS-1 combined with other therapies for the treatment of this pediatric solid tumor. PMID:26029165

  10. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  11. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Parker, Erica N; Song, Jiangli; Kishore Kumar, G D; Odutola, Samuel O; Chavarria, Gustavo E; Charlton-Sevcik, Amanda K; Strecker, Tracy E; Barnes, Ashleigh L; Sudhan, Dhivya R; Wittenborn, Thomas R; Siemann, Dietmar W; Horsman, Michael R; Chaplin, David J; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G

    2015-11-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results from studies on benzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin inhibitors, a series of fourteen benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against cathepsins L and B. Thiosemicarbazone inhibitors 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1, 1,3-bis(4-fluorobenzoyl)benzene thiosemicarbazone 8, and 1,3-bis(2-fluorobenzoyl)-5-bromobenzene thiosemicarbazone 32 displayed the greatest potency against cathepsin L with low IC50 values of 9.9nM, 14.4nM, and 8.1nM, respectively. The benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues evaluated were selective in their inhibition of cathepsin L compared to cathepsin B. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 32 inhibited invasion through Matrigel of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by 70% at 10?M. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 8 significantly inhibited the invasive potential of PC-3ML prostate cancer cells by 92% at 5?M. The most active cathepsin L inhibitors from this benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone series (1, 8, and 32) displayed low cytotoxicity toward normal primary cells [in this case human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs)]. In an initial in vivo study, 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (1) was well-tolerated in a CDF1 mouse model bearing an implanted C3H mammary carcinoma, and showed efficacy in tumor growth delay. Low cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell invasion, and in vivo tolerability are desirable characteristics for anti-metastatic agents functioning through an inhibition of cathepsin L. Active members of this structurally diverse group of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin L inhibitors show promise as potential anti-metastatic, pre-clinical drug candidates. PMID:26462052

  12. A New Class of Multimerization Selective Inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Slaughter, Alison; Jena, Nivedita; Feng, Lei; Kessl, Jacques J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Wu, Li; Poeschla, Eric; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-01-01

    The quinoline-based allosteric HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (ALLINIs) are promising candidates for clinically useful antiviral agents. Studies using these compounds have highlighted the role of IN in both early and late stages of virus replication. However, dissecting the exact mechanism of action of the quinoline-based ALLINIs has been complicated by the multifunctional nature of these inhibitors because they both inhibit IN binding with its cofactor LEDGF/p75 and promote aberrant IN multimerization with similar potencies in vitro. Here we report design of small molecules that allowed us to probe the role of HIV-1 IN multimerization independently from IN-LEDGF/p75 interactions in infected cells. We altered the rigid quinoline moiety in ALLINIs and designed pyridine-based molecules with a rotatable single bond to allow these compounds to bridge between interacting IN subunits optimally and promote oligomerization. The most potent pyridine-based inhibitor, KF116, potently (EC50 of 0.024 µM) blocked HIV-1 replication by inducing aberrant IN multimerization in virus particles, whereas it was not effective when added to target cells. Furthermore, KF116 inhibited the HIV-1 IN variant with the A128T substitution, which confers resistance to the majority of quinoline-based ALLINIs. A genome-wide HIV-1 integration site analysis demonstrated that addition of KF116 to target or producer cells did not affect LEDGF/p75-dependent HIV-1 integration in host chromosomes, indicating that this compound is not detectably inhibiting IN-LEDGF/p75 binding. These findings delineate the significance of correctly ordered IN structure for HIV-1 particle morphogenesis and demonstrate feasibility of exploiting IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, pyridine-based compounds present a novel class of multimerization selective IN inhibitors as investigational probes for HIV-1 molecular biology. PMID:24874515

  13. Tandem Benzophenone Amino Pyridines, Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Leukotriene C4 Synthase.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Thea K; Haraldsson, Martin; Basavarajappa, Devaraj; Lundeberg, Erik; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Ekoff, Maria; Fauland, Alexander; Lehmann, Christoph; Kahnt, Astrid S; Lindbom, Lennart; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2015-10-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs) are lipid mediators of inflammation. The enzyme catalyzing synthesis of cys-LTs, leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S), is considered an important drug target. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of three tandem benzophenone amino pyridines as inhibitors of LTC4S in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitors were characterized in vitro using recombinant human LTC4S, MonoMac 6 cells, and a panel of peripheral human immune cells. In vivo, the compounds were tested in the Zymosan A-induced peritonitis mouse model. The molecules, denoted TK04, TK04a, and TK05, were potent and selective inhibitors of LTC4S with IC50 values of 116, 124, and 95 nM, respectively. Molecular docking revealed binding in a hydrophobic crevice between two enzyme monomers and interaction with two catalytic residues, Arg104 and Arg31. The TK compounds potently inhibited cys-LT biosynthesis in immune cells. In coincubations of platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, inhibition of LTC4S led to shunting of LTA4 toward anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4, which was significantly enhanced by simultaneous inhibition of LTA4H. Finally, we found that TK05 (6 mg?kg(-1)?body weight) reduces LTE4 levels in peritoneal lavage fluid by 88% and significantly decreases vascular permeability in vivo. Our findings indicate that the TK compounds are valuable experimental tools in eicosanoid research in vitro and in vivo. Their chemical structures may serve as leads for further inhibitor design. Novel drugs depleting cys-LT production could be beneficial for treatment of inflammatory diseases associated with overexpression of LTC4S. PMID:26283693

  14. Molecular design of a highly selective and strong protein inhibitor against matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2).

    PubMed

    Higashi, Shouichi; Hirose, Tomokazu; Takeuchi, Tomoka; Miyazaki, Kaoru

    2013-03-29

    Synthetic inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), designed previously, as well as tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) lack enzyme selectivity, which has been a major obstacle for developing inhibitors into safe and effective MMP-targeted drugs. Here we designed a fusion protein named APP-IP-TIMP-2, in which the ten amino acid residue sequence of APP-derived MMP-2 selective inhibitory peptide (APP-IP) is added to the N terminus of TIMP-2. The APP-IP and TIMP-2 regions of the fusion protein are designed to interact with the active site and the hemopexin-like domain of MMP-2, respectively. The reactive site of the TIMP-2 region, which has broad specificity against MMPs, is blocked by the APP-IP adduct. The recombinant APP-IP-TIMP-2 showed strong inhibitory activity toward MMP-2 (Ki(app) = 0.68 pm), whereas its inhibitory activity toward MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, or MT1-MMP was six orders of magnitude or more weaker (IC50 > 1 ?m). The fusion protein inhibited the activation of pro-MMP-2 in the concanavalin A-stimulated HT1080 cells, degradation of type IV collagen by the cells, and the migration of stimulated cells. Compared with the decapeptide APP-IP (t½ = 30 min), APP-IP-TIMP-2 (t½ ? 96 h) showed a much longer half-life in cultured tumor cells. Therefore, the fusion protein may be a useful tool to evaluate contributions of proteolytic activity of MMP-2 in various pathophysiological processes. It may also be developed as an effective anti-tumor drug with restricted side effects. PMID:23395821

  15. HCV NS5A Up-Regulates COX-2 Expression via IL-8-Mediated Activation of the ERK/JNK MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-hsien; Wang, Shen-Nien; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to intrahepatic inflammation and liver cell injury, which are considered a risk factor for virus-associated hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Inflammatory cytokines are critical components of the immune system and influence cellular signaling, and genetic imbalances. In this study, we found that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were significantly induced by HCV infection and HCV NS5A expression, and induction of COX-2 correlated with HCV-induced IL-8 production. We also found that the ERK and JNK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of IL-8-mediated COX-2 induction in response to HCV infection. Using a promoter-linked reporter assay, we identified that the C/EBP regulatory element within the COX-2 promoter was the dominant factor responsible for the induction of COX-2 by HCV. Silencing C/EBP attenuated HCV-induced COX-2 expression. Our results revealed that HCV-induced inflammation promotes viral replication, providing new insights into the involvement of IL-8-mediated COX-2 induction in HCV replication. PMID:26231035

  16. Benzoylbenzimidazole-based selective inhibitors targeting Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongsheng; Ojo, Kayode K; Johnson, Steven M; Larson, Eric T; He, Penqing; Geiger, Jennifer A; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; White, A Clinton; Parsons, Marilyn; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Fan, Erkang

    2012-08-15

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Cryptosporidium parvum (CpCDPK1) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgCDPK1) have become attractive targets for discovering selective inhibitors to combat infections caused by these protozoa. We used structure-based design to improve a series of benzoylbenzimidazole-based compounds in terms of solubility, selectivity, and potency against CpCDPK1 and TgCDPK1. The best inhibitors show inhibitory potencies below 50 nM and selectivity well above 200-fold over two human kinases with small gatekeeper residues. PMID:22795629

  17. Benzoylbenzimidazole-based selective inhibitors targeting Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongsheng; Ojo, Kayode K.; Johnson, Steven M.; Larson, Eric T.; He, Penqing; Geiger, Jennifer A.; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; White, A. Clinton; Parsons, Marilyn; Merritt, Ethan A.; Maly, Dustin J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Fan, Erkang

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Cryptosporidium parvum (CpCDPK1) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgCDPK1) have become attractive targets for discovering selective inhibitors to combat infections caused by these protozoa. We used structure-based design to improve a series of benzoylbenzimidazole-based compounds in terms of solubility, selectivity, and potency against CpCDPK1 and TgCDPK1. The best inhibitors show inhibitory potencies below 50 nM and selectivity well above 200-fold over two human kinases with small gatekeeper residues. PMID:22795629

  18. Structure-Based Design of 2-Aminopyridine Oxazolidinones as Potent and Selective Tankyrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway has been implicated in the development and formation of many cancers. TNKS inhibition has been shown to antagonize Wnt signaling via Axin stabilization in APC mutant colon cancer cell lines. We employed structure-based design to identify a series of 2-aminopyridine oxazolidinones as potent and selective TNKS inhibitors. These compounds exhibited good enzyme and cell potency as well as selectivity over other PARP isoforms. Co-crystal structures of these 2-aminopyridine oxazolidinones complexed to TNKS reveal an induced-pocket binding mode that does not involve interactions with the nicotinamide binding pocket. Oral dosing of lead compounds 3 and 4 resulted in significant effects on several Wnt-pathway biomarkers in a three day DLD-1 mouse tumor PD model. PMID:24900633

  19. Novel selective and potent inhibitors of malaria parasite dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: discovery and optimization of dihydrothiophenone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghao; Zhu, Junsheng; Diao, Yanyan; Zhou, Hongchang; Ren, Xiaoli; Sun, Deheng; Huang, Jin; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Zhu, Lili; Xu, Yufang; Li, Honglin

    2013-10-24

    Taking the emergence of drug resistance and lack of effective antimalarial vaccines into consideration, it is of significant importance to develop novel antimalarial agents for the treatment of malaria. Herein, we elucidated the discovery and structure-activity relationships of a series of dihydrothiophenone derivatives as novel specific inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH). The most promising compound, 50, selectively inhibited PfDHODH (IC50 = 6 nM, with >14,000-fold species-selectivity over hDHODH) and parasite growth in vitro (IC50 = 15 and 18 nM against 3D7 and Dd2 cells, respectively). Moreover, an oral bioavailability of 40% for compound 50 was determined from in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. These results further indicate that PfDHODH is an effective target for antimalarial chemotherapy, and the novel scaffolds reported in this work might lead to the discovery of new antimalarial agents. PMID:24073986

  20. CBP30, a selective CBP/p300 bromodomain inhibitor, suppresses human Th17 responses.

    PubMed

    Hammitzsch, Ariane; Tallant, Cynthia; Fedorov, Oleg; O'Mahony, Alison; Brennan, Paul E; Hay, Duncan A; Martinez, Fernando O; Al-Mossawi, M Hussein; de Wit, Jelle; Vecellio, Matteo; Wells, Christopher; Wordsworth, Paul; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Bowness, Paul

    2015-08-25

    Th17 responses are critical to a variety of human autoimmune diseases, and therapeutic targeting with monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 and IL-23 has shown considerable promise. Here, we report data to support selective bromodomain blockade of the transcriptional coactivators CBP (CREB binding protein) and p300 as an alternative approach to inhibit human Th17 responses. We show that CBP30 has marked molecular specificity for the bromodomains of CBP and p300, compared with 43 other bromodomains. In unbiased cellular testing on a diverse panel of cultured primary human cells, CBP30 reduced immune cell production of IL-17A and other proinflammatory cytokines. CBP30 also inhibited IL-17A secretion by Th17 cells from healthy donors and patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Transcriptional profiling of human T cells after CBP30 treatment showed a much more restricted effect on gene expression than that observed with the pan-BET (bromo and extraterminal domain protein family) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. This selective targeting of the CBP/p300 bromodomain by CBP30 will potentially lead to fewer side effects than with the broadly acting epigenetic inhibitors currently in clinical trials. PMID:26261308

  1. Selective inhibitors of a PAF biosynthetic enzyme lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2[S

    PubMed Central

    Tarui, Megumi; Shindou, Hideo; Kumagai, Kazuo; Morimoto, Ryo; Harayama, Takeshi; Hashidate, Tomomi; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagase, Takahide; Shimizu, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent pro-inflammatory phospholipid mediator. In response to extracellular stimuli, PAF is rapidly biosynthesized by lyso-PAF acetyltransferase (lyso-PAFAT). Previously, we identified two types of lyso-PAFATs: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT)1, mostly expressed in the lungs where it produces PAF and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine essential for respiration, and LPCAT2, which biosynthesizes PAF and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the inflammatory cells. Under inflammatory conditions, LPCAT2, but not LPCAT1, is activated and upregulated to produce PAF. Thus, it is important to develop inhibitors specific for LPCAT2 in order to ameliorate PAF-related inflammatory diseases. Here, we report the first identification of LPCAT2-specific inhibitors, N-phenylmaleimide derivatives, selected from a 174,000-compound library using fluorescence-based high-throughput screening followed by the evaluation of the effects on LPCAT1 and LPCAT2 activities, cell viability, and cellular PAF production. Selected compounds competed with acetyl-CoA for the inhibition of LPCAT2 lyso-PAFAT activity and suppressed PAF biosynthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with a calcium ionophore. These compounds had low inhibitory effects on LPCAT1 activity, indicating that adverse effects on respiratory functions may be avoided. The identified compounds and their derivatives will contribute to the development of novel drugs for PAF-related diseases and facilitate the analysis of LPCAT2 functions in phospholipid metabolism in vivo. PMID:24850807

  2. A selective inhibitor of PRMT5 with in vivo and in vitro potency in MCL models.

    PubMed

    Chan-Penebre, Elayne; Kuplast, Kristy G; Majer, Christina R; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Wigle, Tim J; Johnston, L Danielle; Rioux, Nathalie; Munchhof, Michael J; Jin, Lei; Jacques, Suzanne L; West, Kip A; Lingaraj, Trupti; Stickland, Kimberly; Ribich, Scott A; Raimondi, Alejandra; Scott, Margaret Porter; Waters, Nigel J; Pollock, Roy M; Smith, Jesse J; Barbash, Olena; Pappalardi, Melissa; Ho, Thau F; Nurse, Kelvin; Oza, Khyati P; Gallagher, Kathleen T; Kruger, Ryan; Moyer, Mikel P; Copeland, Robert A; Chesworth, Richard; Duncan, Kenneth W

    2015-06-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase-5 (PRMT5) is reported to have a role in diverse cellular processes, including tumorigenesis, and its overexpression is observed in cell lines and primary patient samples derived from lymphomas, particularly mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Here we describe the identification and characterization of a potent and selective inhibitor of PRMT5 with antiproliferative effects in both in vitro and in vivo models of MCL. EPZ015666 (GSK3235025) is an orally available inhibitor of PRMT5 enzymatic activity in biochemical assays with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 22 nM and broad selectivity against a panel of other histone methyltransferases. Treatment of MCL cell lines with EPZ015666 led to inhibition of SmD3 methylation and cell death, with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Oral dosing with EPZ015666 demonstrated dose-dependent antitumor activity in multiple MCL xenograft models. EPZ015666 represents a validated chemical probe for further study of PRMT5 biology and arginine methylation in cancer and other diseases. PMID:25915199

  3. Impairment of prostate cancer cell growth by a selective and reversible lysine-specific demethylase 1 inhibitor

    E-print Network

    Just, Armin

    Impairment of prostate cancer cell growth by a selective and reversible lysine-specific demethylase to treat androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths that selective LSD1 inhibitors are useful precursors for the development of novel drugs for prostate cancer

  4. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  5. Up-regulation of COX-2/PGE2 by endothelin-1 via MAPK-dependent NF-?B pathway in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a proinflammatory mediator and elevated in the regions of several brain injury and inflammatory diseases. The deleterious effects of ET-1 on endothelial cells may aggravate brain inflammation mediated through the regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) system in various cell types. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying ET-1-induced COX-2 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells remain unclear. Herein we investigated the effects of ET-1 in COX-2 regulation in mouse brain microvascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells. Results The data obtained with Western blotting, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescent staining analyses showed that ET-1-induced COX-2 expression was mediated through an ETB-dependent transcriptional activation. Engagement of Gi- and Gq-protein-coupled ETB receptors by ET-1 led to phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK1/2 and then activated transcription factor NF-?B. Moreover, the data of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and promoter reporter assay demonstrated that the activated NF-?B was translocated into nucleus and bound to its corresponding binding sites in COX-2 promoter, thereby turning on COX-2 gene transcription. Finally, up-regulation of COX-2 by ET-1 promoted PGE2 release in these cells. Conclusions These results suggested that in mouse bEnd.3 cells, activation of NF-?B by ETB-dependent MAPK cascades is essential for ET-1-induced up-regulation of COX-2/PGE2 system. Understanding the mechanisms of COX-2 expression and PGE2 release regulated by ET-1/ETB system on brain microvascular endothelial cells may provide rationally therapeutic interventions for brain injury or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23343326

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  7. 2-Oxo-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridines as Selective Inhibitors of Malarial Protein Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors and as Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Olepu, Srinivas; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Rivas, Kasey; Yokoyama, Kohei; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    A new class of 2-oxo-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridine-based protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors were synthesized and found to inhibit protein farnesyl transferase from the malaria parasite with potencies in the low nanomolar range. The compounds were much less potent on mammalian protein prenyltransferases. Two of the compounds block the growth of malaria growth in culture with potencies in the sub-micromolar range. Some of the compounds also were found to be much more metabolically stable than previously described tetrahydroquinoline-based protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors. PMID:18077162

  8. Insight into selectivity of peptidomimetic inhibitors with modified statine core for plasmepsin II of Plasmodium falciparum over human cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Dali, Brice; Keita, Melalie; Megnassan, Eugene; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2012-04-01

    Plasmepsin II (PlmII), an aspartic protease expressed in the food vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum (pf), cleaves the hemoglobin of the host during the erythrocytic stage of the parasite life cycle. Various peptidomimetic inhibitors of PlmII reported so far discriminate poorly between the drug target and aspartic proteases of the host organism, e.g., human cathepsinD (hCatD). hCatD is a protein digestion enzyme and signaling molecule involved in a variety of physiological processes; therefore, inhibition of hCatD by PlmII inhibitors may lead to pathophysiological conditions. In this study, binding of PlmII inhibitors has been modeled using the crystal structures of pfPlmII and hCatD complexes to gain insight into structural requirements underlying the target selectivity. A series of 26 inhibitors were modeled in the binding clefts of the pfPlmII and hCatD to establish QSAR models of the protease inhibition. In addition, 3D-QSAR pharmacophore models were generated for each enzyme. It was concluded that the contributions of the P(2) and P(3') residues to the inhibitor's binding affinity are responsible for the target selectivity. Based on these findings, new inhibitor candidates were designed with predicted inhibition constants K (pre)(i PlmII) reaching 0.2nm and selectivity index (S.I.)=K(pre)(i PlmII)?>1200. PMID:22129033

  9. EGFR-mediated Akt and MAPKs signal pathways play a crucial role in patulin-induced cell proliferation in primary murine keratinocytes via modulation of Cyclin D1 and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Das, Mukul; Ansari, Kausar M

    2014-12-01

    Patulin (PAT), a present day major contaminant of commercial apple and apple products is reported to be carcinogenic, embryotoxic, and immunotoxic. While oral and inhalation are considered to be the most prevalent routes of exposure to this toxin, exposure through skin is now being extensively investigated. Our previous study showed that short-term dermal exposure to PAT resulted in toxicological injury to the skin, while long-term exposure induced skin tumorigenesis. In this study, we explore the mechanism involve in proliferation of mouse keratinocytes by PAT. Our study revealed that PAT rapidly induces phosphorylation of EGFR, activation of the Ras/MAPKs, and Akt pathways. This in-turn leads to the activation of NF-?B/AP-1 transcription factors which then binds to the promoter region of the cell growth regulatory genes Cyclin D1 and COX-2 inducing their expression leading ultimately to PMKs proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR or the Ras/MAPKs, PI3/Akt pathways with different pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of NF-?B, c-jun, c-fos, Cyclin D1, and COX-2 with siRNA inhibited PAT-induced PMKs proliferation. PMID:23813870

  10. Maximizing diversity from a kinase screen: identification of novel and selective pan-Trk inhibitors for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Shawn J; Sanders, John M; Henze, Darrell A; Rudd, Mike T; Su, Hua-Poo; Li, Yiwei; Nanda, Kausik K; Egbertson, Melissa S; Manley, Peter J; Jones, Kristen L G; Brnardic, Edward J; Green, Ahren; Grobler, Jay A; Hanney, Barbara; Leitl, Michael; Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Murphy, Dennis; Rickert, Keith; Riley, Daniel; Krasowska-Zoladek, Alicja; Daley, Christopher; Zuck, Paul; Kane, Stephanie A; Bilodeau, Mark T

    2014-07-10

    We have identified several series of small molecule inhibitors of TrkA with unique binding modes. The starting leads were chosen to maximize the structural and binding mode diversity derived from a high throughput screen of our internal compound collection. These leads were optimized for potency and selectivity employing a structure based drug design approach adhering to the principles of ligand efficiency to maximize binding affinity without overly relying on lipophilic interactions. This endeavor resulted in the identification of several small molecule pan-Trk inhibitor series that exhibit high selectivity for TrkA/B/C versus a diverse panel of kinases. We have also demonstrated efficacy in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain models upon oral dosing. Herein we describe the identification process, hit-to-lead progression, and binding profiles of these selective pan-Trk kinase inhibitors. PMID:24914455

  11. Characterization of mutants of influenza A virus selected with the neuraminidase inhibitor 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en.

    PubMed

    Gubareva, L V; Bethell, R; Hart, G J; Murti, K G; Penn, C R; Webster, R G

    1996-03-01

    The development of viral resistance to the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en, of influenza viruses was studied by serial passage of A/Turkey/Minnesota/833/80 (H4N2) in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in the presence of increasing concentrations of inhibitor. Resistant mutants selected after eight passages, had a 10,000-fold reduction in sensitivity to the inhibitor in plaque assays, but their affinity (1/Kd) to the inhibitor was similar to that of the parental virus. Electron microscopic analysis revealed aggregation of the mutant virus at the cell surface in the presence of the inhibitor. Sequence analysis established that a substitution had occurred in the NA (Arg-249 to Lys) and in the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin (Gly-75 to Glu), in the vicinity of the proposed second sialic acid binding site. The change of residue 249 appears to be a chance mutation, for we were unable to reisolate this mutant, whereas subsequent experiments indicate changes in the hemagglutinin. After 13 passages of the parental virus, mutants that were resistant to the high concentrations of inhibitor tested were obtained. These viruses retained their drug-resistant phenotype even after five passages without the inhibitor. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no aggregation of virus on the surface of infected cells in the presence of the inhibitor. Sequence analysis of the NA gene from these drug-resistant mutants revealed an additional substitution of Glu to Ala at the conserved amino acid residue 119. This substitution is responsible for reducing the affinity of the inhibitor to the NA. Our findings suggest that the emergence of mutants resistant to 4-guanidine-Neu5Ac2en is a multistep process requiring prolonged exposure to the inhibitor. PMID:8627706

  12. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE U.S. AND ASSOCIATIONS WITH LUNG INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IL -8, COX -2 AND HO -1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Associations are well established between particulate matter (PM) and increased human mortality and morbidity. The association between fine PM sources and lung inflammatory markers IL-8, COX-2, and HO-1 was evaluated in this study.

  13. In vitro COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme inhibitory activities of iridoids from Penstemon barbatus, Castilleja tenuiflora, Cresentia alata and Vitex mollis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Cisneros, M Ángeles; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, A Berenice; Rao, Praveen P N; Aburto-Amar, Rola; Rodríguez-López, Verónica

    2015-10-15

    A group of sixteen iridoids isolated from plants used as anti-inflammatory remedies in Mexican folk medicine were evaluated for their potential to inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymes. From these assays, loganic acid (10) was identified as the most promising compound with both COX-1 (36.0±0.6%) and COX-2 (80.8±4.0%) inhibition at 10?M. Compound 10 shows a better inhibition against the COX-2 enzyme. Other iridoids tested in the present study showed weak or no inhibition against these enzymes. Furthermore, herein are presented key interactions of iridoid 10 with COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes through molecular docking studies. These studies suggest that 10 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity due to COX inhibition. PMID:26351040

  14. PFI-1 – A highly Selective Protein Interaction Inhibitor Targeting BET Bromodomains

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Costa, David Da; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fish, Paul V.; Philpott, Martin; Fedorov, Oleg; Brennan, Paul; Bunnage, Mark E.; Owen, Dafydd R.; Bradner, James E.; Taniere, Philippe; O’Sullivan, Brendan; Müller, Susanne; Schwaller, Juerg; Stankovic, Tatjana; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of several growth promoting and anti-apoptotic genes as well as for cell cycle progression. BET proteins are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin via their two N-terminal bromodomains (BRDs), a protein interaction module that specifically recognizes acetylated lysine residues in histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction results in transcriptional down-regulation of a number of oncogenes providing a novel pharmacological strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here we present a potent and highly selective dihydroquinazoline-2-one inhibitor, PFI-1 that efficiently blocks the interaction of BET BRDs with acetylated histone tails. Co-crystal structures showed that PFI-1 acts as an acetyl-lysine (Kac) mimetic inhibitor efficiently occupying the Kac binding site in BRD4 and BRD2. PFI-1 has antiproliferative effects on leukaemic cell lines and efficiently abrogates their clonogenic growth. Exposure of sensitive cell lines with PFI-1 results in G1 cell cycle arrest, down-regulation of MYC expression as well as induction of apoptosis and induces differentiation of primary leukaemic blasts. Intriguingly, cells exposed to PFI-1 showed significant down-regulation of Aurora B kinase, thus attenuating phosphorylation of the Aurora substrate H3S10 providing an alternative strategy for the specific inhibition of this well established oncology target. PMID:23576556

  15. Pyrimidinone nicotinamide mimetics as selective tankyrase and wnt pathway inhibitors suitable for in vivo pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Jeffrey W; Almeida, Lynsie; Barlaam, Bernard; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Casella, Robert; Croft, Rosemary A; Dishington, Allan P; Gingipalli, Lakshmaiah; Gu, Chungang; Hawkins, Janet L; Holmes, Jane L; Howard, Tina; Huang, Jian; Ioannidis, Stephanos; Kazmirski, Steven; Lamb, Michelle L; McGuire, Thomas M; Moore, Jane E; Ogg, Derek; Patel, Anil; Pike, Kurt G; Pontz, Timothy; Robb, Graeme R; Su, Nancy; Wang, Haiyun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Xiaolan; Wang, Tao

    2015-03-12

    The canonical Wnt pathway plays an important role in embryonic development, adult tissue homeostasis, and cancer. Germline mutations of several Wnt pathway components, such as Axin, APC, and ß-catenin, can lead to oncogenesis. Inhibition of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) catalytic domain of the tankyrases (TNKS1 and TNKS2) is known to inhibit the Wnt pathway via increased stabilization of Axin. In order to explore the consequences of tankyrase and Wnt pathway inhibition in preclinical models of cancer and its impact on normal tissue, we sought a small molecule inhibitor of TNKS1/2 with suitable physicochemical properties and pharmacokinetics for hypothesis testing in vivo. Starting from a 2-phenyl quinazolinone hit (compound 1), we discovered the pyrrolopyrimidinone compound 25 (AZ6102), which is a potent TNKS1/2 inhibitor that has 100-fold selectivity against other PARP family enzymes and shows 5 nM Wnt pathway inhibition in DLD-1 cells. Moreover, compound 25 can be formulated well in a clinically relevant intravenous solution at 20 mg/mL, has demonstrated good pharmacokinetics in preclinical species, and shows low Caco2 efflux to avoid possible tumor resistance mechanisms. PMID:25815142

  16. Selectively targeting an inactive conformation of interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase by allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Czerwinski, Robert M; Caspers, Nicole L; Limburg, David C; Ding, WeiDong; Wang, Hong; Ohren, Jeffrey F; Rajamohan, Francis; McLellan, Thomas J; Unwalla, Ray; Choi, Chulho; Parikh, Mihir D; Seth, Nilufer; Edmonds, Jason; Phillips, Chris; Shakya, Subarna; Li, Xin; Spaulding, Vikki; Hughes, Samantha; Cook, Andrew; Robinson, Colin; Mathias, John P; Navratilova, Iva; Medley, Quintus G; Anderson, David R; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Aulabaugh, Ann

    2014-06-01

    ITK (interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase) is a critical component of signal transduction in T-cells and has a well-validated role in their proliferation, cytokine release and chemotaxis. ITK is an attractive target for the treatment of T-cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. In the present study we describe the discovery of kinase inhibitors that preferentially bind to an allosteric pocket of ITK. The novel ITK allosteric site was characterized by NMR, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, enzymology and X-ray crystallography. Initial screening hits bound to both the allosteric pocket and the ATP site. Successful lead optimization was achieved by improving the contribution of the allosteric component to the overall inhibition. NMR competition experiments demonstrated that the dual-site binders showed higher affinity for the allosteric site compared with the ATP site. Moreover, an optimized inhibitor displayed non-competitive inhibition with respect to ATP as shown by steady-state enzyme kinetics. The activity of the isolated kinase domain and auto-activation of the full-length enzyme were inhibited with similar potency. However, inhibition of the activated full-length enzyme was weaker, presumably because the allosteric site is altered when ITK becomes activated. An optimized lead showed exquisite kinome selectivity and is efficacious in human whole blood and proximal cell-based assays. PMID:24593284

  17. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:26382939

  18. Development of highly potent and selective diaminothiazole inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrunn, Ernst; Betzi, Stephane; Alam, Riazul; Martin, Mathew P.; Becker, Andreas; Han, Huijong; Francis, Rawle; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Jakkaraj, Sudhakar; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Sebti, Said M.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Gebhard, Anthony W.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Tash, Joseph S.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases that act as key regulatory elements in cell cycle progression. We describe the development of highly potent diaminothiazole inhibitors of CDK2 (IC50 = 0.0009 – 0.0015 µM) from a single hit compound with weak inhibitory activity (IC50 = 15 µM), discovered by high-throughput screening. Structure-based design was performed using 35 co-crystal structures of CDK2 liganded with distinct analogues of the parent compound. The profiling of compound 51 against a panel of 339 kinases revealed high selectivity for CDKs, with preference for CDK2 and CDK5 over CDK9, CDK1, CDK4 and CDK6. Compound 51 inhibited the proliferation of 13 out of 15 cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 0.27 and 6.9 µM, which correlated with the complete suppression of retinoblastoma phosphorylation and the onset of apoptosis. Combined, the results demonstrate the potential of this new inhibitors series for further development into CDK-specific chemical probes or therapeutics. PMID:23600925

  19. Effect of selective phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor, rolipram, on fluid and cellular phases of inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Griswold, D E; Webb, E F; Breton, J; White, J R; Marshall, P J; Torphy, T J

    1993-06-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of rolipram, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE IV), was studied. Rolipram did not inhibit 5-lipoxygenase activity but did inhibit human monocyte production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4, IC50 3.5 microM). Likewise, murine mast cell release of leukotriene C4 and histamine was inhibited. In vivo, rolipram inhibited arachidonic acid-induced inflammation in the mouse, while the low Km-cyclic-GMP PDE inhibitor, zaprinast, did not inhibit. Rolipram had a modest effect on LTB4 production in the mouse, but markedly reduced LTB4-induced PMN infiltration. Beta-adrenergic receptor activation of adenylate cyclase was important for rolipram antiinflammatory activity since beta blockade abrogated arachidonic acid-induced inflammation. Thus, the antiinflammatory profile of rolipram is novel and may result from inhibition of PMN function and perhaps vasoactive amine release and leukotriene biosynthesis. These actions may be dependent upon endogenous beta-adrenergic activity and are likely mediated through inhibition of PDE IV. PMID:7687237

  20. Kukoamine A and other hydrophobic acylpolyamines: potent and selective inhibitors of Crithidia fasciculata trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ponasik, J A; Strickland, C; Faerman, C; Savvides, S; Karplus, P A; Ganem, B

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme trypanothione reductase (TR), together with its substrate, the glutathione-spermidine conjugate trypanothione, plays an essential role in protecting parasitic trypanosomatids against oxidative stress and is a target for drug design. Here we show that a naturally occurring spermine derivative, the antihypertensive agent kukoamine A [N1N12-bis(dihydrocaffeoyl)-spermine] inhibits TR as a mixed inhibitor (Ki = 1.8 microM, Kii = 13 microM). Kukoamine shows no significant inhibition of human glutathione reductase (Ki > 10 mM) and thus provides a novel selective drug lead. The corresponding N1N8-bis(dihydrocaffeoyl)spermidine derivative was synthesized and acted as a purely competitive inhibitor with Ki = 7.5 microM. A series of mono- and di-acylated spermines and spermidines were synthesized to gain an insight into the effect of polyamine chain length, the nature and position of the acyl substituent and the importance of conformational mobility. These compounds inhibited TR with Ki values ranging from 11 to 607 microM. PMID:7487870

  1. BDNF and COX-2 participate in anti-depressive mechanisms of catalpol in rats undergoing chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Ming; Yang, Lian-He; Zhang, Yue-Yue; Niu, Chun-Ling; Cui, Ying; Feng, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Fang

    2015-11-01

    Catalpol, a major compound in Rehmannia glutinosa with both medicinal and nutritional values, has been previously confirmed to shorten the duration of immobility in mice exposed to tail suspension and forced swimming tests. This study attempted to examine the anti-depressive mechanisms of catalpol in rats undergoing chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) by involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). CUMS-exposed rats were given catalpol daily (5, 10, and 20mg/kg, ig) or a reference drug, fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH, 10mg/kg, ig), at 5weeks after starting the CUMS procedure. Sucrose preference test was performed to observe depression-like behavior, and serum and brain tissues were used for neurochemical and fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. CUMS induced depression-like behavior, whereas catalpol and FH administration attenuated this symptom. Moreover, CUMS caused excessively elevated levels of serum corticosterone, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivation, in a manner attenuated by catalpol and FH administration. Catalpol administration also further decreased BDNF activities, downregulated the mRNA expression of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), and reversed the excessive elevation in the activities and mRNA expression levels of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats undergoing CUMS. Results indicate that catalpol can ameliorate CUMS-induced depression-like behavior, and suggest its mechanisms may partially be ascribed to restoring HPA axis dysfunctions, upregulating BDNF expression and its cognate receptor TrkB, and downregulating COX-2 expression, thereby reducing PGE2 levels in the brain. PMID:26255123

  2. SAR and in vivo evaluation of 4-aryl-2-aminoalkylpyrimidines as potent and selective Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Timothy; Kearney, Patrick C; Kim, Byung Gyu; Johnson, Henry W B; Aay, Naing; Arcalas, Arlyn; Brown, David S; Chan, Vicky; Chen, Jeff; Du, Hongwang; Epshteyn, Sergey; Galan, Adam A; Huynh, Tai P; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Kane, Brian; Koltun, Elena S; Mann, Grace; Meyr, Lisa E; Lee, Matthew S; Lewis, Gary L; Noguchi, Robin T; Pack, Michael; Ridgway, Brian H; Shi, Xian; Takeuchi, Craig S; Zu, Peiwen; Leahy, James W; Nuss, John M; Aoyama, Ron; Engst, Stefan; Gendreau, Steven B; Kassees, Robert; Li, Jia; Lin, Shwu-Hwa; Martini, Jean-Francois; Stout, Thomas; Tong, Philip; Woolfrey, John; Zhang, Wentao; Yu, Peiwen

    2012-12-15

    We report the discovery of a series of 4-aryl-2-aminoalkylpyrimidine derivatives as potent and selective JAK2 inhibitors. High throughput screening of our in-house compound library led to the identification of hit 1, from which optimization resulted in the discovery of highly potent and selective JAK2 inhibitors. Advanced lead 10d demonstrated a significant dose-dependent pharmacodynamic and antitumor effect in a mouse xenograft model. Based upon the desirable profile of 10d (XL019) it was advanced into clinical trials. PMID:23127890

  3. 4-Acylamino-6-arylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines: potent and selective glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yutaka; Nakano, Masato; Sato, Hideyuki; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Schweiker, Stephanie L; Smith, Jeffery L; Truesdale, Anne T

    2004-08-01

    Modeling studies of a furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine GSK-3 hit compound 1 superimposed onto the X-ray crystal structure of a legacy pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridazine GSK-3 inhibitor 2 led to the identification of 4-acylamino-6-arylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidine template 3. Synthesis of analogues based on template 3 has resulted in a number of potent and selective GSK-3beta inhibitors. The most potent and selective compound was the m-pyridyl analogue 24. PMID:15225695

  4. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2014-09-01

    Urea transport (UT) proteins of the UT-A class are expressed in epithelial cells in kidney tubules, where they are required for the formation of a concentrated urine by countercurrent multiplication. Here, using a recently developed high-throughput assay to identify UT-A inhibitors, a screen of 50,000 synthetic small molecules identified UT-A inhibitors of aryl-thiazole, ?-sultambenzosulfonamide, aminocarbonitrile butene, and 4-isoxazolamide chemical classes. Structure-activity analysis identified compounds that inhibited UT-A selectively by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 down to ?1 ?M. Molecular modeling identified putative inhibitor binding sites on rat UT-A. To test compound efficacy in rats, formulations and administration procedures were established to give therapeutic inhibitor concentrations in blood and urine. We found that intravenous administration of an indole thiazole or a ?-sultambenzosulfonamide at 20 mg/kg increased urine output by 3-5-fold and reduced urine osmolality by ?2-fold compared to vehicle control rats, even under conditions of maximum antidiuresis produced by 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). The diuresis was reversible and showed urea > salt excretion. The results provide proof of concept for the diuretic action of UT-A-selective inhibitors. UT-A inhibitors are first in their class salt-sparing diuretics with potential clinical indications in volume-overload edemas and high-vasopressin-associated hyponatremias. PMID:24843071

  5. Differential Cytotoxicity but Augmented IFN-? Secretion by NK Cells after Interaction with Monocytes from Humans, and Those from Wild Type and Myeloid-Specific COX-2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Arasteh, Aida; Kaur, Kawaljit; Kozlowska, Anna; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    The list of genes, which augment NK cell function when knocked out in neighboring cells is increasing, and may point to the fundamental function of NK cells targeting cells with diminished capability to differentiate optimally since NK cells are able to target less differentiated cells, and aid in their differentiation. In this paper, we aimed at understanding the effect of monocytes from targeted knockout of COX-2 in myeloid cells (Cox-2flox/flox;LysMCre/+) and from control littermates (Cox-2flox/flox;LysM+/+) on ex vivo function of NK cells. Furthermore, we compared the effect of monocytes treated with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on NK cells from mice and humans. NK cells purified from Cox-2flox/flox;LysMCre/+ mice had heightened cytotoxic activity when compared to those obtained from control littermates. In addition, NK cells cultured with autologous Cox-2flox/flox;LysMCre/+ monocytes and DCs, mouse embryonic fibroblasts from global knockout COX-2, but not with knockout of COX-2 in T cells, had increased cytotoxic function as well as augmented IFN-? secretion when compared to NK cells from control littermates cultured with monocytes. LPS inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity while increasing IFN-? secretion when cultured in the presence of monocytes from either Cox-2flox/flox;LysMCre/+ or control littermates. In contrast to mice, NK cells from humans when cultured with monocytes lost cytotoxic function and gained ability to secrete large amounts of IFN-?, a process, which we had previously coined as “split anergy.” Similar to mice, LPS potentiated the loss of human NK cell cytotoxicity while increasing IFN-? secretion in the presence of monocytes. Greater loss of cytotoxicity and larger secretion of IFN-? in NK cells induced by gene knockout cells may be important for the greater need of these cells for differentiation. PMID:26106386

  6. HIF?1 signaling pathway involving iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 mediates the neuroprotection provided by erythropoietin in the retina of chronic ocular hypertension rats.

    PubMed

    Gui, Dongmei; Li, Yanfeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Gao, Dianwen; Yang, Yang; Li, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impacts of erythropoietin (EPO) on the electroretinogram b?wave (ERG?b), and on the mRNA and protein expression levels of hypoxia?inducible factor?1? (HIF?1?), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase?2 (COX?2) and caspase?9 in chronic ocular hypertension rats. Episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) was used to establish the chronic ocular hypertension rat model based on the intraocular pressure (IOP) value. ERG?b and mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF?1?, iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 in normal, EVC?treated and EVC combined with EPO (EVC+EPO)?treated rats were measured by electroretinography, RT?PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, the correlations of HIF?1? with IOP, ERG?b, iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 were evaluated. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF?1?, iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 in EVC?treated rats were increased significantly compared with normal rats. The peak expression levels of HIF?1?, iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 were respectively obtained 7, 7, 7 and 14 days postoperatively. Compared with EVC?treated rats, EPO administration weakened the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF?1?, iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9. The mRNA expression level of HIF?1? demonstrated a significant positive correlation with IOP and ERG?b. HIF?1? was positively correlated with iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9 at the mRNA and protein levels. The protective effect of EPO on the retina of chronic ocular hypertension rats may be mediated by the HIF?1 signaling pathway involving iNOS, COX?2 and caspase?9. PMID:25370745

  7. Selective CNS Uptake of the GCP-II Inhibitor 2-PMPA following Intranasal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Niwa, Minae; Stathis, Marigo; Alt, Jesse; Giroux, Marc; Sawa, Akira; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP-II) is a brain metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to NAA and glutamate. Small molecule GCP-II inhibitors increase brain NAAG, which activates mGluR3, decreases glutamate, and provide therapeutic utility in a variety of preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases wherein excess glutamate is presumed pathogenic. Unfortunately no GCP-II inhibitor has advanced clinically, largely due to their highly polar nature resulting in insufficient oral bioavailability and limited brain penetration. Herein we report a non-invasive route for delivery of GCP-II inhibitors to the brain via intranasal (i.n.) administration. Three structurally distinct classes of GCP-II inhibitors were evaluated including DCMC (urea-based), 2-MPPA (thiol-based) and 2-PMPA (phosphonate-based). While all showed some brain penetration following i.n. administration, 2-PMPA exhibited the highest levels and was chosen for further evaluation. Compared to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration, equivalent doses of i.n. administered 2-PMPA resulted in similar plasma exposures (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 1.0) but dramatically enhanced brain exposures in the olfactory bulb (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 67), cortex (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 46) and cerebellum (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 6.3). Following i.n. administration, the brain tissue to plasma ratio based on AUC0-t in the olfactory bulb, cortex, and cerebellum were 1.49, 0.71 and 0.10, respectively, compared to an i.p. brain tissue to plasma ratio of less than 0.02 in all areas. Furthermore, i.n. administration of 2-PMPA resulted in complete inhibition of brain GCP-II enzymatic activity ex-vivo confirming target engagement. Lastly, because the rodent nasal system is not similar to humans, we evaluated i.n. 2-PMPA also in a non-human primate. We report that i.n. 2-PMPA provides selective brain delivery with micromolar concentrations. These studies support intranasal delivery of 2-PMPA to deliver therapeutic concentrations in the brain and may facilitate its clinical development. PMID:26151906

  8. Dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin transport inhibitor for the treatment of premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Kendirci, Muammer; Salem, Emad; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2007-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual disorder, estimated to affect up to 30% of men. Over the past one or two decades, clinical investigators have participated in an increasing number of studies that are helping in our understanding of PE, which will undoubtedly facilitate future treatments. Apart from a number of behavioral approaches, the treatment of PE consists of primarily off-label use of oral selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) via either on-demand or daily delivery. However, various undesirable side-effects of these medications have led researchers to search for and develop new therapeutic approaches for PE. Dapoxetine is a short-acting SSRI developed specifically for the treatment of PE. Early trials with dapoxetine have documented successful outcomes without serious short- or long-term side-effects. This review addresses the definition, classification, diagnosis, physiology, and neurobiopathology of PE, and evaluates therapeutic strategies with novel treatments for PE. PMID:18360636

  9. Chlorpheniramine, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and over-the-counter (OTC) treatment.

    PubMed

    Hellbom, Einar

    2006-01-01

    Some old antihistamines were selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the SSRI effect was discovered by Nobel Laureate Professor Arvid Carlsson as early as 1969. Chlorpheniramine was the most active of the tested drugs, and it compares favourably with amitriptyline and imipramine with respect to actions on both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Chlorpheniramine can be called a SSRI, since the blocking of 5HT is stronger than the effect on noradrenaline neurons; however it might also be called a selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI) and be compared with new drugs, such as venlafaxine. Carlsson suggested the potential value of clinical studies of the antidepressant properties of this and related antihistamine drugs. But, in the event, no such trials were ever performed at the time. However, later clinical observations of the benefits of dex-chlorpheniramine treatment in panic disorder have been published. Clinical experience suggests that patients using chlorpheniramine, and having also a concomitant depression or panic disorder, may experience a return of symptoms when their old drug is changed to a new antihistamine lacking SSRI effects. Yet this phenomenon is not known to many doctors, and even less known to the large number of patients buying chlorpheniramine under various trade names over-the-counter (OTC) at a low price for self-treatment of hay fewer or as a cold remedy. Chlorpheniramine was introduced in USA under the name Chlor-Trimeton as long ago as July 1950, and is still on the market. Therefore, this SSRI is now over 50 years old. If chlorpheniramine had been tested in depression in the nineteen seventies, it is probable that a safe, inexpensive SSRI drug could have been used some 15 years earlier than fluoxetine - which became available in 1987. Chlorpheniramine might have been the first safe, non-cardiotoxic and well-tolerated antidepressant. Billions of dollars in the development and marketing costs would have been saved, and the suffering of millions of patients alleviated. PMID:16413139

  10. Fluorine modulates species selectivity in the triazolopyrimidine class of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; El Mazouni, Farah; White, John; Burrows, Jeremy N; Kaminsky, Werner; Charman, Susan A; Matthews, David; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Phillips, Margaret A

    2014-06-26

    Malaria is one of the most serious global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) is an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. We describe a detailed analysis of protein-ligand interactions between DHODH and a triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitor series to explore the effects of fluorine on affinity and species selectivity. We show that increasing fluorination dramatically increases binding to mammalian DHODHs, leading to a loss of species selectivity. Triazolopyrimidines bind Plasmodium and mammalian DHODHs in overlapping but distinct binding sites. Key hydrogen-bond and stacking interactions underlying strong binding to PfDHODH are absent in the mammalian enzymes. Increasing fluorine substitution leads to an increase in the entropic contribution to binding, suggesting that strong binding to mammalian DHODH is a consequence of an enhanced hydrophobic effect upon binding to an apolar pocket. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions between fluorine and hydrocarbons provide significant binding energy to protein-ligand interactions. Our studies define the requirements for species-selective binding to PfDHODH and show that the triazolopyrimidine scaffold can alternatively be tuned to inhibit human DHODH, an important target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:24801997

  11. Structure-guided design of a selective BCL-X(L) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lessene, Guillaume; Czabotar, Peter E; Sleebs, Brad E; Zobel, Kerry; Lowes, Kym N; Adams, Jerry M; Baell, Jonathan B; Colman, Peter M; Deshayes, Kurt; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Flygare, John A; Gibbons, Paul; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Kulasegaram, Sanji; Moss, Rebecca M; Parisot, John P; Smith, Brian J; Street, Ian P; Yang, Hong; Huang, David C S; Watson, Keith G

    2013-06-01

    The prosurvival BCL-2 family protein BCL-X(L) is often overexpressed in solid tumors and renders malignant tumor cells resistant to anticancer therapeutics. Enhancing apoptotic responses by inhibiting BCL-X(L) will most likely have widespread utility in cancer treatment and, instead of inhibiting multiple prosurvival BCL-2 family members, a BCL-X(L)-selective inhibitor would be expected to minimize the toxicity to normal tissues. We describe the use of a high-throughput screen to discover a new series of small molecules targeting BCL-X(L) and their structure-guided development by medicinal chemistry. The optimized compound, WEHI-539 (7), has high affinity (subnanomolar) and selectivity for BCL-X(L) and potently kills cells by selectively antagonizing its prosurvival activity. WEHI-539 will be an invaluable tool for distinguishing the roles of BCL-X(L) from those of its prosurvival relatives, both in normal cells and notably in malignant tumor cells, many of which may prove to rely upon BCL-X(L) for their sustained growth. PMID:23603658

  12. Relationship between serum levels of triglycerides and vascular inflammation, measured as COX-2, in arteries from diabetic patients: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a common feature in the majority of cardiovascular disease, including Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Levels of pro-inflammatory markers have been found in increasing levels in serum from diabetic patients (DP). Moreover, levels of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are increased in coronary arteries from DP. Methods Through a cross-sectional design, patients who underwent CABG were recruited. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were cultured and COX-2 was measured by western blot. Biochemical and clinical data were collected from the medical record and by blood testing. COX-2 expression was analyzed in internal mammary artery cross-sections by confocal microscopy. Eventually, PGI2 and PGE2 were assessed from VSMC conditioned media by ELISA. Results Only a high glucose concentration, but a physiological concentration of triglycerides exposure of cultured human VSMC derived from non-diabetic patients increased COX-2 expression .Diabetic patients showed increasing serum levels of glucose, Hb1ac and triglycerides. The bivariate analysis of the variables showed that triglycerides was positively correlated with the expression of COX-2 in internal mammary arteries from patients (r2?=?0.214, P?COX-2 in arteries from DP. PMID:23642086

  13. The novel ?2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P.; Weyburne, Emily S.; Mirabella, Anne C.; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R.; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F.; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the ?5 and ?1 activity, but not the ?2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate ?2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the ?2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the ?2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of ?1 and ?5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-? has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, ?2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro PMID:26069288

  14. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Urea transport (UT) proteins of the UT-A class are expressed in epithelial cells in kidney tubules, where they are required for the formation of a concentrated urine by countercurrent multiplication. Here, using a recently developed high-throughput assay to identify UT-A inhibitors, a screen of 50,000 synthetic small molecules identified UT-A inhibitors of aryl-thiazole, ?-sultambenzosulfonamide, aminocarbonitrile butene, and 4-isoxazolamide chemical classes. Structure-activity analysis identified compounds that inhibited UT-A selectively by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 down to ?1 ?M. Molecular modeling identified putative inhibitor binding sites on rat UT-A. To test compound efficacy in rats, formulations and administration procedures were established to give therapeutic inhibitor concentrations in blood and urine. We found that intravenous administration of an indole thiazole or a ?-sultambenzosulfonamide at 20 mg/kg increased urine output by 3–5-fold and reduced urine osmolality by ?2-fold compared to vehicle control rats, even under conditions of maximum antidiuresis produced by 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). The diuresis was reversible and showed urea > salt excretion. The results provide proof of concept for the diuretic action of UT-A-selective inhibitors. UT-A inhibitors are first in their class salt-sparing diuretics with potential clinical indications in volume-overload edemas and high-vasopressin-associated hyponatremias.—Esteva-Font, C., Cil, O., Phuan, P.-W., Su, T., Lee, S., Anderson, M. O., Verkman, A. S. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors. PMID:24843071

  15. Towards the selection of a produced water enrichment for biological gas hydrate inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sandra L; Voordouw, Gerrit; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-09-01

    Economic concerns associated with the recovery of non-conventional hydrocarbon reserves include unexpected ice as well as ice-like gas hydrate formation. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit ice growth, and experiments with fish, plant, and insect AFPs have shown promise of effective gas hydrate inhibition in lab-scale experiments. If produced on an industrial scale, AFPs could provide a more environmentally friendly alternative to kinetic inhibitors, but a large-scale production of these AFPs is not currently feasible. We believe that these difficulties could be surmounted by the production of microbial AFPs, but to date, only a few such proteins have been identified and purified, and none of these are associated with hydrocarbon reserves. Here, we have used ice-affinity and freeze-thaw stress to select microbes derived from oil and gas formation water, or produced water, as a source of anaerobic microbial communities. Ice-affinity successfully incorporated anaerobic bacteria under aerobic conditions, and the mixed culture had ice-associating properties. Under these conditions, ice-affinity selection does not result in cultivatable isolates, but similar, cultivable microbes were obtained following freeze-thaw selection under anaerobic conditions. Since these mixed cultures inhibited the growth of ice crystals, they also have the potential to inhibit hydrate growth. Overall, freeze-thaw selection provides a promising first step towards the isolation of microbes capable of the inhibition of ice and gas hydrate growth, for possible application for energy exploration and recovery at high-latitudes and in-deep, cold waters. PMID:24819435

  16. Natural Selection as an Inhibitor of Genetic Diversity Multiplicative Weights Updates Algorithm and a Conjecture of Haploid Genetics

    E-print Network

    Stephan, Frank

    Natural Selection as an Inhibitor of Genetic Diversity Multiplicative Weights Updates Algorithm and a Conjecture of Haploid Genetics Ruta Mehta Georgia Institute of Technology rmehta@cc.gatech.edu Ioannis of genetic diversity in the long term limit, a widely believed conjecture in genetics [4]. In game theoretic

  17. 3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines: A Novel Class of Potent, Selective, and Orally Active GlyT1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines were discovered as a novel structural class of GlyT1 inhibitors. The structure–activity relationship, which was developed, led to the identification of highly potent compounds exhibiting excellent selectivity against the GlyT2 isoform, drug-like properties, and in vivo activity after oral administration. PMID:24900853

  18. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  19. Novel 2,4-Disubstituted Pyrimidines as Potent, Selective, and Cell-Permeable Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Selective inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an important therapeutic approach to target neurodegenerative disorders. However, the majority of the nNOS inhibitors developed are arginine mimetics and, therefore, suffer from poor bioavailability. We designed a novel strategy to combine a more pharmacokinetically favorable 2-imidazolylpyrimidine head with promising structural components from previous inhibitors. In conjunction with extensive structure–activity studies, several highly potent and selective inhibitors of nNOS were discovered. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that these type II inhibitors utilize the same hydrophobic pocket to gain strong inhibitory potency (13), as well as high isoform selectivity. Interestingly, select compounds from this series (9) showed good permeability and low efflux in a Caco-2 assay, suggesting potential oral bioavailability, and exhibited minimal off-target binding to 50 central nervous system receptors. Furthermore, even with heme-coordinating groups in the molecule, modifying other pharmacophoric fragments minimized undesirable inhibition of cytochrome P450s from human liver microsomes. PMID:25489882

  20. Potent and Selective Inhibitors of CDPK1 from T. gondii and C. parvum Based on a 5-Aminopyrazole-4-carboxamide Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    5-Aminopyrazole-4-carboxamide was used as an alternative scaffold to substitute for the pyrazolopyrimidine of a known “bumped kinase inhibitor” to create selective inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 from both Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Compounds with low nanomolar inhibitory potencies against the target enzymes were obtained. The most selective inhibitors also exhibited submicromolar activities in T. gondii cell proliferation assays and were shown to be nontoxic to mammalian cells. PMID:24494061

  1. Potent and selective inhibitors of CDPK1 from T. gondii and C. parvum based on a 5-aminopyrazole-4-carboxamide scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongsheng; Ojo, Kayode K; Vidadala, Ramasubbarao; Huang, Wenlin; Geiger, Jennifer A; Scheele, Suzanne; Choi, Ryan; Reid, Molly C; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Rivas, Kasey; Siddaramaiah, Latha Kallur; Comess, Kenneth M; Robinson, Kenneth P; Merta, Philip J; Kifle, Lemma; Hol, Wim G J; Parsons, Marilyn; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Fan, Erkang

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminopyrazole-4-carboxamide was used as an alternative scaffold to substitute for the pyrazolopyrimidine of a known "bumped kinase inhibitor" to create selective inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 from both Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Compounds with low nanomolar inhibitory potencies against the target enzymes were obtained. The most selective inhibitors also exhibited submicromolar activities in T. gondii cell proliferation assays and were shown to be non-toxic to mammalian cells. PMID:24494061

  2. Effect of a selective thromboxane synthase inhibitor on arterial graft patency and platelet deposition in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, M.D.; Huntsman, W.T.; Miett, T.O.; Cronenwett, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This study examined the effect of selective thromboxane synthase inhibition and nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibition on vascular graft patency and indium 111-labeled platelet deposition in 35 mongrel dogs undergoing carotid artery replacement with 4 mm X 4 cm polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (one side) and Dacron (opposite side) end-to-end grafts. Aspirin-dipyridamole therapy improved one-week graft patency, from 46% in untreated dogs to 93% in treated dogs. Thromboxane synthase inhibition (U-63557A) improved graft patency in these dogs to 81%. Both drug treatments reduced platelet deposition on Dacron and PTFE grafts by 48% to 68% compared with control dogs. Dacron grafts accumulated significantly more platelets than PTFE grafts but had comparable patency rates. Low-dose aspirin therapy had no significant effect on either graft patency or platelet deposition. All treatment groups showed a 60% to 76% reduction in serum thromboxane B2, but only thromboxane synthase inhibitor treatment increased plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha by 100%. Selective thromboxane synthase inhibition improved small-caliber prosthetic graft patency to the same extent as did conventional cyclooxygenase inhibition in this preliminary study.

  3. Potent and selective hydroxynaphthoquinone inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in Eimeria tenella (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Fry, M; Hudson, A T; Randall, A W; Williams, R B

    1984-07-01

    Novel hydroxynaphthoquinones have been shown to be potent and selective inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in the protozoan Eimeria tenella, inhibiting at concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-11)M. The primary site of electron transport inhibition has been localized to the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase span of the respiratory chain, whereas a secondary site of inhibition occurs in the NADH- and succinate-ubiquinone reductase complexes. Inhibition at the primary site is selective for the E. tenella enzyme; inhibition at the secondary sites is comparable in both E. tenella and chick (Gallus gallus) liver mitochondria. Hydroxynaphthoquinone inhibition of chick liver succinate-cyto-chrome c reductase was fully reversible by addition of the exogenous ubiquinone-2 analogue, 6-decyl-2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone; inhibition of the corresponding E. tenella enzyme was not reversed by this ubiquinone. E. tenella lines made resistant to the anticoccidial agents decoquinate or clopidol showed no cross-resistance to the hydroxynaphthoquinones, either at the level of electron transport or in vivo. PMID:6331460

  4. PND-1186 FAK inhibitor selectively promotes tumor cell apoptosis in three-dimensional environments.

    PubMed

    Tanjoni, Isabelle; Walsh, Colin; Uryu, Sean; Tomar, Alok; Nam, Ju-Ock; Mielgo, Ainhoa; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Liang, Congxin; Koenig, Marcel; Sun, Connie; Patel, Neela; Kwok, Cheni; McMahon, Gerald; Stupack, Dwayne G; Schlaepfer, David D

    2010-05-15

    Tumor cells can grow in an anchorage-independent manner. This is mediated in part through survival signals that bypass normal growth restraints controlled by integrin cell surface receptors. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase that associates with integrins and modulates various cellular processes including growth, survival, and migration. As increased FAK expression and tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with tumor progression, inhibitors of FAK are being tested for anti-tumor effects. Here, we analyze PND-1186, a substituted pyridine reversible inhibitor of FAK activity with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.5 nM in vitro. PND-1186 has an IC50 of ~100 nM in breast carcinoma cells as determined by anti-phospho-specific immunoblotting to FAK Tyr-397. PND-1186 did not alter c?Src or p130Cas tyrosine phosphorylation in adherent cells, yet functioned to restrain cell movement. Notably, 1.0 µM PND-1186 (>5-fold above IC50) had limited effects on cell proliferation. However, under non-adherent conditions as spheroids and as colonies in soft agar, 0.1 µM PND-1186 blocked FAK and p130Cas tyrosine phosphorylation, promoted caspase-3 activation, and triggered cell apoptosis. PND-1186 inhibited 4T1 breast carcinoma subcutaneous tumor growth correlated with elevated tumor cell apoptosis and caspase 3 activation. Addition of PND-1186 to the drinking water of mice was well tolerated and inhibited ascites- and peritoneal membrane-associated ovarian carcinoma tumor growth associated with the inhibition of FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation. Our results with low-level PND-1186 treatment support the conclusion that FAK activity selectively promotes tumor cell survival in three-dimensional environments. PMID:20234191

  5. Pharmacology and Antitumor Activity of ABC294640, a Selective Inhibitor of Sphingosine Kinase-2

    PubMed Central

    French, Kevin J.; Zhuang, Yan; Maines, Lynn W.; Gao, Peng; Wang, Wenxue; Beljanski, Vladimir; Upson, John J.; Green, Cecelia L.; Keller, Staci N.

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes control the dynamic balance of the cellular levels of important bioactive lipids, including the apoptotic compound ceramide and the proliferative compound sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Many growth factors and inflammatory cytokines promote the cleavage of sphingomyelin and ceramide leading to rapid elevation of S1P levels through the action of sphingosine kinases (SK1 and SK2). SK1 and SK2 are overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, making these enzymes potential molecular targets for cancer therapy. We have identified an aryladamantane compound, termed ABC294640 [3-(4-chlorophenyl)-adamantane-1-carboxylic acid (pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amide], that selectively inhibits SK2 activity in vitro, acting as a competitive inhibitor with respect to sphingosine with a Ki of 9.8 ?M, and attenuates S1P formation in intact cells. In tissue culture, ABC294640 suppresses the proliferation of a broad panel of tumor cell lines, and inhibits tumor cell migration concomitant with loss of microfilaments. In vivo, ABC294640 has excellent oral bioavailability, and demonstrates a plasma clearance half-time of 4.5 h in mice. Acute and chronic toxicology studies indicate that ABC294640 induces a transient minor decrease in the hematocrit of rats and mice; however, this normalizes by 28 days of treatment. No other changes in hematology parameters, or gross or microscopic tissue pathology, result from treatment with ABC294640. Oral administration of ABC294640 to mice bearing mammary adenocarcinoma xenografts results in dose-dependent antitumor activity associated with depletion of S1P levels in the tumors and progressive tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, this newly developed SK2 inhibitor provides an orally available drug candidate for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. PMID:20061445

  6. Synthesis and SAR of new pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as potent and selective MPS1 kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Caldarelli, Marina; Angiolini, Mauro; Disingrini, Teresa; Donati, Daniele; Guanci, Marco; Nuvoloni, Stefano; Posteri, Helena; Quartieri, Francesca; Silvagni, Marco; Colombo, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    The synthesis and SAR of a series of novel pyrazolo-quinazolines as potent and selective MPS1 inhibitors are reported. We describe the optimization of the initial hit, identified by screening the internal library collection, into an orally available, potent and selective MPS1 inhibitor. PMID:21723120

  7. Establishment of a selective evaluation method for DPP4 inhibitors based on recombinant human DPP8 and DPP9 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglong; Huan, Yi; Li, Caina; Liu, Minzhi; Shen, Zhufang

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is recognised as an attractive anti-diabetic drug target, and several DPP4 inhibitors are already on the market. As members of the same gene family, dipeptidyl peptidase 8 (DPP8) and dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) share high sequence and structural homology as well as functional activity with DPP4. However, the inhibition of their activities was reported to cause severe toxicities. Thus, the development of DPP4 inhibitors that do not have DPP8 and DPP9 inhibitory activity is critical for safe anti-diabetic therapy. To achieve this goal, we established a selective evaluation method for DPP4 inhibitors based on recombinant human DPP8 and DPP9 proteins expressed by Rosetta cells. In this method, we used purified recombinant 120 kDa DPP8 or DPP9 protein from the Rosetta expression system. The optimum concentrations of the recombinant DPP8 and DPP9 proteins were 30 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL, respectively, and the corresponding concentrations of their substrates were both 0.2 mmol/L. This method was highly reproducible and reliable for the evaluation of the DPP8 and DPP9 selectivity for DPP4 inhibitor candidates, which would provide valuable guidance in the development of safe DPP4 inhibitors.

  8. Antimalarial Activity of Potential Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Lactate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Selected by Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Penna-Coutinho, Julia; Cortopassi, Wilian Augusto; Oliveira, Aline Alves; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2011-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (PfLDH) has been considered as a potential molecular target for antimalarials due to this parasite's dependence on glycolysis for energy production. Because the LDH enzymes found in P. vivax, P. malariae and P. ovale (pLDH) all exhibit ?90% identity to PfLDH, it would be desirable to have new anti-pLDH drugs, particularly ones that are effective against P. falciparum, the most virulent species of human malaria. Our present work used docking studies to select potential inhibitors of pLDH, which were then tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum in vitro and P. berghei malaria in mice. A virtual screening in DrugBank for analogs of NADH (an essential cofactor to pLDH) and computational studies were undertaken, and the potential binding of the selected compounds to the PfLDH active site was analyzed using Molegro Virtual Docker software. Fifty compounds were selected based on their similarity to NADH. The compounds with the best binding energies (itraconazole, atorvastatin and posaconazole) were tested against P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant blood parasites. All three compounds proved to be active in two immunoenzymatic assays performed in parallel using monoclonals specific to PfLDH or a histidine rich protein (HRP2). The IC50 values for each drug in both tests were similar, were lowest for posaconazole (<5 µM) and were 40- and 100-fold less active than chloroquine. The compounds reduced P. berghei parasitemia in treated mice, in comparison to untreated controls; itraconazole was the least active compound. The results of these activity trials confirmed that molecular docking studies are an important strategy for discovering new antimalarial drugs. This approach is more practical and less expensive than discovering novel compounds that require studies on human toxicology, since these compounds are already commercially available and thus approved for human use. PMID:21779323

  9. Cidan inhibits liver cancer cell growth by reducing COX-2 and VEGF expression and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    LI, NAN; ZHENG, DONGHAI; XUE, JIE; GUO, WEIXING; SHI, JIE; SUN, JUXIAN; LU, CHONGDE; ZHENG, WEIDA; WU, MENGCHAO; CHENG, SHUQUN

    2015-01-01

    Cidan is a traditional Chinese medicine formula that has been used for >10 years as an antitumor drug. In the present study, the antitumor effect of cidan on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. A total of 372 patients with primary HCC, as confirmed by pathological examination in the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital and Beijing Oncology Hospital of Weida TCM, were prospectively enrolled in the study. In total, 92 patients were treated with cidan capsules for three months postoperatively, while 280 patients served as controls. The efficacy of cidan was analyzed by monitoring associated symptoms and liver function tests, including measuring the levels of ?-1-fetoprotein, ?-L-fucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and ?-glutamyl transferase. In addition, in vivo analysis was performed using mice Hepa1-6 xenograft models, while in vitro studies were performed with SMMC-7721 and CSQT-1 cells; this included cidan-dependent cell viability and migration assays, cell cycle analyses and the evaluation of cidan effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA transcription rates using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The postoperative two-year overall survival (77 and 58% for the cidan and control groups, respectively; P<0.01) and disease-free survival (36 and 24% for the cidan and control groups, respectively; P<0.01) rates were superior in the cidan-treated group when compared with the control. In addition, the size and weight of the tumor xenografts in the C57BL/6 mice were significantly reduced in a time- and dose-dependent manner following cidan treatment (P<0.01). Cidan significantly reduced the cell viability of SMMC-7721 and CSQT-1 cells after four and five days when compared with the control (P<0.01). Furthermore, COX-2 and VEGF mRNA expression levels decreased following cidan treatment (P<0.01), and cidan treatment resulted in enhanced G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest of CSQT-1 cells. Therefore, cidan effectively inhibited cell proliferation, reduced cell viability and downregulated COX-2 and VEGF expression levels in hepatoma cells. PMID:26136881

  10. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Jönsson, Maria E.; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J.

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3?,4,4?,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on ?-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24 h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC{sub 50} values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2 nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells. -- Highlights: ? PCB126 caused cellular changes in the developing swim bladder. ? Swim bladder inflation was not related to expression of CYP1 or cox-2. ? Failure of swim bladder inflation is mediated via an Ahr2-dependent mechanism. ? PCB126-exposed zebrafish larvae showed upregulation of the oncogene myca.

  11. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N.

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  12. Voltage-current characteristics of epitaxial and misoriented Ba(Fe1-xCox) 2As2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O.; Mariño, A.

    2015-06-01

    Ba(Fe1-xCox) 2As2 thin films were produced by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). Epitaxial thin films were obtained when the deposition temperature was 700 °C while at 875 °C misoriented films were obtained. The presence of grain boundaries reduces the transport critical current Jc in almost two order of magnitude with respect to the textured thin films. The Voltage-Current (V-I) curves of misoriented films, exhibit a mixture of a non-ohmic linear differential (NOLD) and power law behaviors, due to the viscous flow of the flux lines along the grain boundaries lines, corresponding to the Jc limited by grain boundaries and Jc limited by intragrain, respectively. The misoriented thin films also present a kinked V-I curves attributed to a vortex channeling along the boundaries.

  13. Structure-Based Approach to the Development of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Dihydrofolate Reductase from Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, David B.; Bolstad, Erin S. D.; Frey, Kathleen M.; Wright, Dennis L.; Anderson, Amy C.

    2008-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an emerging infectious disease that can be life-threatening in an immune-compromised individual and causes gastrointestinal distress lasting up to 2 weeks in an immune-competent individual. There are few therapeutics available for effectively treating this disease. We have been exploring dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) as a potential target in Cryptosporidium. On the basis of the structure of the DHFR enzyme from C. hominis, we have developed a novel scaffold that led to the discovery of potent (38 nM) and efficient inhibitors of this enzyme. Recently, we have advanced these inhibitors to the next stage of development. Using the structures of both the protozoal and human enzymes, we have developed inhibitors with nanomolar potency (1.1 nM) against the pathogenic enzyme and high levels (1273-fold) of selectivity over the human enzyme. PMID:18834108

  14. Discovery and Validation of a Series of Aryl Sulfonamides as Selective Inhibitors of Tissue-Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase (TNAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Russell; Sergienko, Eduard A.; Mostofi, Yalda S.; Yang, Li; Su, Ying; Simao, Ana Maria; Narisawa, Sonoko; Brown, Brock; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Vicchiarelli, Michael; Smith, Layton H.; O’Neill, W. Charles; Millán, José Luis; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.

    2009-01-01

    We report the characterization and optimization of drug-like small molecule inhibitors of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), an enzyme critical for the regulation of extracellular matrix calcification during bone formation and growth. High-throughput screening (HTS) of a small molecule library led to the identification of arylsulfonamides as potent and selective inhibitors of TNAP. Critical structural requirements for activity were determined, and the compounds were subsequently profiled for in vitro activity and bioavailability parameters including metabolic stability and permeability. The plasma levels following subcutaneous administration of a member of the lead series in rat was determined, demonstrating the potential of these TNAP inhibitors as systemically active therapeutic agents to target various diseases involving soft tissue calcification. A representative member of the series was also characterized in mechanistic and kinetic studies. PMID:19821572

  15. Selection and analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased resistance to ABT-538, a novel protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, M; Mo, H; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D W; Bhat, T N; Erickson, J W; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus protease represent a promising new class of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of AIDS. We now report the in vitro selection of viral variants with decreased sensitivity to a symmetry-based protease inhibitor, ABT-538, currently being tested in clinical trials. Molecular characterization of the variants shows that an isoleucine-to-valine substitution at position 84 results in a substantial decrease in sensitivity to the drug. Moreover, an additional mutation at position 82, valine to phenylalanine, further decreases viral susceptibility to ABT-538. Three-dimensional analysis of the protease-drug complex provides a structural explanation for the relative drug resistance induced by these two mutations. These findings emphasize the importance of closely monitoring patients receiving ABT-538 for the emergence of viral resistance and provide information that may prove useful in designing the next generation of protease inhibitors. PMID:7815532

  16. Kinetics of radical-scavenging activity of hesperetin and hesperidin and their inhibitory activity on COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Atsusi; Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2005-01-01

    The radical-scavenging activities of the flavanones hesperetin and hesperidin were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) monitoring of the polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, an R* radical) or benzoylperoxide (BPO, a PhCOO* radical) at 70 degrees C under nearly anaerobic conditions. Their stoichiometric factor (number of free radicals trapped by one mole of antioxidant moiety (n)) and the ratio of the rate constant of inhibition to that of propagation (k(inh)/k(p)) were determined and compared with that for trolox The n value declined in the order trolox (2.0) > hesperetin (0.8) > hesperidin (0.2) in the AIBN system, whereas it declined in the order hesperetin (0.9) > trolox (0.1) > hesperidin (0.0) in the BPO system. The k(inh)/k(p) value declined in the order hesperidin (195) > hesperetin (33) > trolox (12) in the AIBN system, whereas it declined in the order hesperidin (362) > trolox (127) > hesperetin (18) in the BPO system. The n value of about 1 for hesperetin with a relatively small k(inh)/k(p) value suggests the formation of dimers, as a result of the coupling reaction of phenolic monomers. In contrast, n values < 1 for hesperidin and trolox in the BPO system resulted in very high values for k(inh)/k(p). Hesperidin was also much more able to suppress the growth of methyl methacrylate radicals, although its n value was small, suggesting that this compound may also suppress polyunsaturated fatty acid radicals. In the concentration range 250-500 microM, hesperetin and hesperidin showed potent inhibition of LPS-induced expression of the COX-2 gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting the anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds. The ability of hesperetin and hesperidin to suppress COX-2 gene expression may be a consequence of their antioxidant activity. PMID:16101151

  17. Inhibition of Src kinases by a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor causes mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Moasser, M M; Srethapakdi, M; Sachar, K S; Kraker, A J; Rosen, N

    1999-12-15

    src kinase activity is elevated in some human tumors, including breast and colon cancers. The precise cellular function of the src family kinases is not clearly understood, but they appear to be involved in numerous signaling pathways. We studied the effects of PD173955, a novel src family-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cancer cell lines and found that it has significant antiproliferative activity due to a potent arrest of mitotic progression. The mitotic block occurs after chromosome condensation in prophase, before spindle assembly and without loss of cyclin A and B kinase activities. This effect is seen in cancer cell lines of all types with low or high activities of src kinases as well as in untransformed cell lines. In MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells, this drug produces a rapid inhibition of cellular src and yes kinase activities as well as suppression of the mitotic hyperactivity of these kinases. This compound defines a novel class of antimitotic drugs that work through inhibition of src kinases and possibly other protein kinases that are required for progression through the initial phases of mitosis. PMID:10626805

  18. Novel Selective and Irreversible Mosquito Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Controlling Malaria and Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Dengfeng; Park, Jewn Giew; Rana, Sandeep; Madden, Benjamin J.; Jiang, Haobo; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that insect acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) could be selectively and irreversibly inhibited by methanethiosulfonates presumably through conjugation to an insect-specific cysteine in these enzymes. However, no direct proof for the conjugation has been published to date, and doubts remain about whether such cysteine-targeting inhibitors have desirable kinetic properties for insecticide use. Here we report mass spectrometric proof of the conjugation and new chemicals that irreversibly inhibited African malaria mosquito AChE with bimolecular inhibition rate constants (kinact/KI) of 3,604-458,597 M-1sec-1 but spared human AChE. In comparison, the insecticide paraoxon irreversibly inhibited mosquito and human AChEs with kinact/KI values of 1,915 and 1,507 M-1sec-1, respectively, under the same assay conditions. These results further support our hypothesis that the insect-specific AChE cysteine is a unique and unexplored target to develop new insecticides with reduced insecticide resistance and low toxicity to mammals, fish, and birds for the control of mosquito-borne diseases.

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pediatric depression: is the balance between benefits and risks favorable?

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, Christopher J; Vitiello, Benedetto; Walkup, John; Emslie, Graham; Waslick, Bruce D; Weller, Elizabeth B; Burke, William J; March, John S

    2006-01-01

    Recent controversies surrounding the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have highlighted the need to reassess potential benefits, as well as potential risks of this class of medications in the treatment of pediatric depression. The recent availability of data from meta-analyses of published and unpublished antidepressant trials, epidemiological studies, and the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) has facilitated a reanalysis of this risk/benefit relationship. Despite reviewing similar data, various regulatory agencies have arrived at rather disparate conclusions regarding the data, resulting in continued controversy. Although all groups appear to agree that careful assessment, education regarding risks, and closer monitoring are essential for SSRIs, only the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.K. Medicine and Health Care Products Regulatory Agency maintain that an acceptable risk/benefit relationship exists for fluoxetine. The European Medicines Agency concluded that the SSRIs should not be used in the treatment of depression in children and adolescents. The authors of this review have taken into consideration many of these same data and offer a critical discussion of the pros and cons of SSRIs in pediatric depression. The authors have concluded that SSRIs -- in particular, fluoxetine -- do have a role in the treatment of pediatric depression. PMID:16553525

  20. Selective growth inhibition of human malignant melanoma cells by syringic acid-derived proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been shown that proteasome inhibition leads to growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and/or induction of apoptosis. However, it was found that some of these inhibitors do not induce apoptosis in several human normal cell lines. This selective activity makes proteasome inhibition a promising target for new generation of anticancer drugs. Clinical validation of the proteasome, as a therapeutic target in oncology, has been provided by the dipeptide boronic acid derivative; bortezomib. Bortezomib has proven to be effective as a single agent in multiple myeloma and some forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Syringic acid (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid, 1), a known phenolic acid, was isolated from the methanol extract of Tamarix aucheriana and was shown to possess proteasome inhibitory activity. Methods Using Surflex-Dock program interfaced with SYBYL, the docking affinities of syringic acid and its proposed derivatives to 20S proteasome were studied. Several derivatives were virtually proposed, however, five derivatives: benzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (2), benzyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (3), 3'-methoxybenzyl 3,5-dimethoxy-4-(3'-methoxybenzyloxy)benzoate (4), 3'-methoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (5) and 3',5'-dimethoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (6), were selected based on high docking scores, synthesized, and tested for their anti-mitogenic activity against human colorectal, breast and malignant melanoma cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Results Derivatives 2, 5, and 6 showed selective dose-dependent anti-mitogenic effect against human malignant melanoma cell lines HTB66 and HTB68 with minimal cytotoxicity on colorectal and breast cancer cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Derivatives 2, 5 and 6 significantly (p???0.0001) inhibited the various proteasomal chymotrypsin, PGPH, and trypsin like activities. They growth arrested the growth of HTB66 cells at G1 and G2-phases. They also arrested the growth of HTB68 cells at S- and G2-phase, respectively. Moreover, derivatives 2, 5, and 6 markedly induced apoptosis (? 90%) in both HTB66 and HTB68. Conclusions Computer-derived syringic acid derivatives possess selective anti-mitogenic activity on human malignant melanoma cells that may be attributed to perturbation of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of various 26S proteasomal activities. PMID:23958424

  1. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert practitioners are vital for communicating emerging clinical standards. Already, new treatments targeting genetic alterations in other, less common driver oncogenes are being evaluated in lung cancer, and testing for these may be addressed in future versions of these guidelines. PMID:23552377

  2. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert practitioners are vital for communicating emerging clinical standards. Already, new treatments targeting genetic alterations in other, less common driver oncogenes are being evaluated in lung cancer, and testing for these may be addressed in future versions of these guidelines. PMID:23551194

  3. Anti-virulence strategy against Brucella suis: synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of selective histidinol dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Marie-Rose; Joseph, Pascale; Mortier, Jérémie; Turtaut, François; Montero, Jean-Louis; Masereel, Bernard; Köhler, Stephan; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2011-05-21

    In the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella suis, histidinol dehydrogenase (HDH) activity, catalyzing the last step in histidine biosynthesis, is essential for intramacrophagic replication. The inhibition of this virulence factor by substituted benzylic ketones was a proof of concept that disarming bacteria leads to inhibition of intracellular bacterial growth in macrophage infection. This work describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of 19 new potential HDH inhibitors, using a combination of classical approaches and docking studies. The IC(50)-values of these inhibitors on HDH activity were in the nanomolar range, and several of them showed a 70-100% inhibition of Brucella growth in minimal medium. One selected compound yielded a strong inhibitory effect on intracellular replication of B. suis in human macrophages at concentrations as low as 5 ?M, with an overall survival of intramacrophagic bacteria reduced by a factor 10(3). Docking studies with two inhibitors showed a good fitting in the catalytic pocket and also interaction with the second lipophilic pocket binding the cofactor NAD(+). Experimental data confirmed competition between inhibitors and NAD(+) at this site. Hence, these inhibitors can be considered as promising tools in the development of novel anti-virulence drugs. PMID:21461427

  4. Etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sunao; Tajima, Koyuki; Nogawa, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Kyoi, Takashi; Takahashi, Yosuke; Sasagawa, Takahiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kotera, Takashi; Ueda, Makoto; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Banno, Kouji

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor etodolac on the mechanical allodynia induced by paclitaxel was investigated in mice and compared with the effects of the nonselective COX inhibitors indomethacin and diclofenac, the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, the calcium channel ?(2)? subunit inhibitor pregabalin, the sodium channel blocker mexiletine, and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. The decrease in the paw-withdrawal threshold induced by paclitaxel was reversed by oral administration of etodolac at 10 mg/kg but was not affected by indomethacin, diclofenac, or celecoxib. The antiallodynic effect of etodolac gradually increased during repeated administration, and after 2 weeks the paw-withdrawal threshold at the preadministration point was significantly increased. Pregabalin, duloxetine, and mexiletine also showed an antiallodynic effect in this model. Whereas pregabalin had a preadministration effect similar to that of etodolac during repeated administration, mexiletine or duloxetine had no such effect. There was almost no difference in the distribution of etodolac and diclofenac in nervous tissue, indicating that COX inhibition is unlikely to be involved in the antiallodynic effect of etodolac. Etodolac did not show a neuroprotective effect against morphological transformations such as the axonal degeneration induced by paclitaxel. Instead, etodolac probably acts at the level of functional changes accompanying paclitaxel treatment, such as alterations in the activation state of components of the pain transmission pathway. Our findings suggest that etodolac attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by a COX-independent pathway and that it might be useful for the treatment of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22460833

  5. Mycobacterial 3-hydroxyacyl-l-thioester dehydratase Y derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces COX-2 expression in mouse macrophages through MAPK-NF-?B pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Sun, Zhan-Qiang; Zhang, Xiang-Yan; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jun; Ye, Juan; Chen, Cui-Cui; Samten, Buka; Wang, Hong-Hai; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of global mortality due to infectious diseases. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) acts as an important influencing factor favoring bacillary survival during TB infection. In this study, we investigated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins recognized by sera from TB patient collected before and after anti-TB therapy by dynamic immunoproteomics and identified a novel immune-regulating protein 3-hydroxyacyl-l-thioester dehydratase Y (HtdY), which could induce COX-2 expression in mouse macrophages. Signaling perturbation data showed that the activation of p38, ERK 1/2 and JNK 1/2 MAPK as well as NF-?B played critical role in this immune response. Taken together, our findings indicated that mycobacterial HtdY might contribute to the persistence of the TB infection by inducing COX-2 expression through MAPK-NF-?B signaling pathway. PMID:24907510

  6. Curcumin inhibits interferon-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 in human A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeeyun |; Im, Young-Hyuck | E-mail: imyh@smc.samsung.co.kr; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Park, Joon Oh |; Kim, Kihyun |; Kim, Won Seog |; Ahn, Jin Seok

    2005-08-26

    The A549 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cell line from human, were resistant to interferon (IFN)-{alpha} treatment. The IFN-{alpha}-treated A549 cells showed increase in protein expression levels of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2. IFN-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B binding activity within 30 min and this increased binding activity was markedly suppressed with inclusion of curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited IFN-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression in A549 cells. Within 10 min, IFN-{alpha} rapidly induced the binding activity of a {gamma}-{sup 32}P-labeled consensus GAS oligonucleotide probe, which was profoundly reversed by curcumin. Taken together, IFN-{alpha}-induced activations of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 were inhibited by the addition of curcumin in A549 cells.

  7. Chemical intervention in bacterial lignin degradation pathways: Development of selective inhibitors for intradiol and extradiol catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Paul D; Mineyeva, Yelena; Mycroft, Zoe; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial lignin degradation could be used to generate aromatic chemicals from the renewable resource lignin, provided that the breakdown pathways can be manipulated. In this study, selective inhibitors of enzymatic steps in bacterial degradation pathways were developed and tested for their effects upon lignin degradation. Screening of a collection of hydroxamic acid metallo-oxygenase inhibitors against two catechol dioxygenase enzymes, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (3,4-PCD) and 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase (MhpB), resulted in the identification of selective inhibitors D13 for 3,4-PCD (IC50 15?M) and D3 for MhpB (IC50 110?M). Application of D13 to Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 in minimal media containing ferulic acid led to the appearance of metabolic precursor protocatechuic acid at low concentration. Application of 1mM disulfiram, an inhibitor of mammalian aldehyde dehydrogenase, to R. jostii RHA1, gave rise to 4-carboxymuconolactone on the ?-ketoadipate pathway, whereas in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 disulfiram treatment gave rise to a metabolite found to be glycine betaine aldehyde. PMID:25984987

  8. Role of IL-1 beta and C