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Sample records for cpes power electronics

  1. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) -- Rutgers University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Manish

    2014-03-06

    The CPES scientific simulations run at scale on leadership class machines, collaborate at runtime and produce and exchange large data sizes, which present multiple I/O and data management challenges. During the CPES project, the Rutgers team worked with the rest of the CPES team to address these challenges at different levels, and specifically (1) at the data transport and communication level through the DART (Decoupled and Asynchronous Remote Data Transfers) framework, and (2) at the data management and services level through the DataSpaces and ActiveSpaces frameworks. These frameworks and their impact are briefly described.

  2. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2012-01-14

    The Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) project was a multi-institutional research effort funded jointly by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The effort was led by our Principal Investigator, CS Chang, at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at New York University. The Center included participants from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Rutgers University, University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, University of California at Irvine, North Carolina State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology. This report concerns the work performed by Dr. Julian C. Cummings, who was the institutional Principal Investigator for the CPES project at Caltech.

  3. Intermediate binding of phycocyanobilin to the lyase, CpeS1, and transfer to apoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jun-Ming; Kupka, Michaela; Böhm, Stephan; Plöscher, Matthias; Eichacker, Lutz; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Scheer, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    The phycobilin: Cysteine-84-phycobiliprotein lyase, CpeS1, catalyzes phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin attachment to nearly all cysteine-84 (consensus sequence) binding sites of phycoerythrin, phycoerythrocyanin, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin (Zhao et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci 104:14300-14305). We now show that CpeS1 can bind PCB, as assayed by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography. Binding is rapid, and the chromophore is bound in an extended conformation similar to that in phycobiliproteins but only poorly fluorescent. Upon addition of apo-biliproteins, the chromophore is transferred to the latter much slower ( approximately 1 h), indicating that chromophorylated CpeS1 is an intermediate in the enzymatic reaction. In addition, imidazole is bound to PCB, as shown by mass spectroscopy of tryptic digests of the intermediate CpeS1-PCB complex. PMID:17912606

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  5. Power electronics reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2009-12-01

    This report provides the DOE and industry with a general process for analyzing power electronics reliability. The analysis can help with understanding the main causes of failures, downtime, and cost and how to reduce them. One approach is to collect field maintenance data and use it directly to calculate reliability metrics related to each cause. Another approach is to model the functional structure of the equipment using a fault tree to derive system reliability from component reliability. Analysis of a fictitious device demonstrates the latter process. Optimization can use the resulting baseline model to decide how to improve reliability and/or lower costs. It is recommended that both electric utilities and equipment manufacturers make provisions to collect and share data in order to lay the groundwork for improving reliability into the future. Reliability analysis helps guide reliability improvements in hardware and software technology including condition monitoring and prognostics and health management.

  6. Power electronics for low power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.

    1991-01-01

    In anticipation of the needs of future light-weight low-power spacecraft, arcjet power electronics in the 100- to 400-W operating range were developed. Power topologies similar to those in the higher 2-kW and 5- to 30-kW power range were implemented, including a four-transistor bridge-switching circuit, current-mode pulse-width modulated control, and an output current averaging inductor with an integral pulse generation winding. Reduction of switching transients was accomplished using a low inductance power distribution network, and no passive snubber circuits were necessary for power switch protection. Phase shift control of the power bridge was accomplished using an improved pulse width modulation to phase shift converter circuit. These features, along with conservative magnetics designs, allowed power conversion efficiencies of greater than 92.5 percent to be achieved into resistive loads over the entire operating range of the converter.

  7. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  8. Power electronics for low power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.

    1991-01-01

    In anticipation of the needs of future light-weight, low-power spacecraft, arcjet power electronics in the 100 to 400 W operating range were developed. Limited spacecraft power and thermal control capacity of these small spacecraft emphasized the need for high efficiency. Power topologies similar to those in the higher 2 kW and 5 to 30 kW power range were implemented, including a four transistor bridge switching circuit, current mode pulse-width modulated control, and an output current averaging inductor with an integral pulse generation winding. Reduction of switching transients was accomplished using a low inductance power distribution network, and no passive snubber circuits were necessary for power switch protection. Phase shift control of the power bridge was accomplished using an improved pulse width modulation to phase shift converter circuit. These features, along with conservative magnetics designs allowed power conversion efficiencies of greater than 92.5 percent to be achieved into resistive loads over the entire operating range of the converter. Electromagnetic compatibility requirements were not considered in this work, and control power for the converter was derived from AC mains. Addition of input filters and control power converters would result in an efficiency of on the order of 90 percent for a flight unit. Due to the developmental nature of arcjet systems at this power level, the exact nature of the thruster/power processor interface was not quantified. Output regulation and current ripple requirements of 1 and 20 percent respectively, as well as starting techniques, were derived from the characteristics of the 2 kW system but an open circuit voltage in excess of 175 V was specified. Arcjet integration tests were performed, resulting in successful starts and stable arcjet operation at power levels as low as 240 W with simulated hydrazine propellants.

  9. Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2010-05-05

    Thermal management plays an important part in the cost of electric drives in terms of power electronics packaging. Very promising results have been obtained by using microporous coatings and skived surfaces in conjunction with single-phase and two-phase flows. Sintered materials and thermoplastics with embedded fibers show significant promise as thermal interface materials, or TIMs. Appropriate cooling technologies depend on the power electronics package application and reliability.

  10. Low inductance power electronics assembly

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S.; Korich, Mark D.; Chou, Cindy; Tang, David; Carlson, Douglas S.; Barry, Alan L.

    2012-10-02

    A power electronics assembly is provided. A first support member includes a first plurality of conductors. A first plurality of power switching devices are coupled to the first support member. A first capacitor is coupled to the first support member. A second support member includes a second plurality of conductors. A second plurality of power switching devices are coupled to the second support member. A second capacitor is coupled to the second support member. The first and second pluralities of conductors, the first and second pluralities of power switching devices, and the first and second capacitors are electrically connected such that the first plurality of power switching devices is connected in parallel with the first capacitor and the second capacitor and the second plurality of power switching devices is connected in parallel with the second capacitor and the first capacitor.

  11. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  12. Bidirectional power converter control electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this program was to design, build, test, and deliver a set of control electronics suitable for control of bidirectional resonant power processing equipment of the direct output type. The program is described, including the technical background, and results discussed. Even though the initial program tested only the logic outputs, the hardware was subsequently tested with high-power breadboard equipment, and in the testbed of NASA contract NAS3-24399. The completed equipment is now operating as part of the Space Station Power System Test Facility at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  13. Modeling of power electronic systems with EMTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Dravid, Narayan V.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the potential impact of power electronics on power systems, there is need for a computer modeling/analysis tool to perform simulation studies on power systems with power electronic components as well as to educate engineering students about such systems. The modeling of the major power electronic components of the NASA Space Station Freedom Electric Power System is described along with ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) and it is demonstrated that EMTP can serve as a very useful tool for teaching, design, analysis, and research in the area of power systems with power electronic components. EMTP modeling of power electronic circuits is described and simulation results are presented.

  14. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  15. X2000 power system electronics development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2005-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for potential use on future deep space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems.

  16. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  17. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  18. Monopoly Power and Electronic Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Rising periodical prices and lagging library budgets have many academics hoping that scholarly print journals will migrate to online versions. Examines economic factors shaping the electronic journal market, emerging new electronic journals, access versus ownership, consortial purchasing, self-maintained infrastructures, elimination of tenure and…

  19. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  20. Integrated Power Adapter: Isolated Converter with Integrated Passives and Low Material Stress

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is developing an extremely efficient power converter that could be used in power adapters for small, lightweight laptops and other types of mobile electronic devices. Power adapters convert electrical energy into useable power for an electronic device, and they currently waste a lot of energy when they are plugged into an outlet to power up. CPES at Virginia Tech is integrating high-density capacitors, new magnetic materials, high-frequency integrated circuits, and a constant-flux transformer to create its efficient power converter. The high-density capacitors enable the power adapter to store more energy. The new magnetic materials also increase energy storage, and they can be precisely dispensed using a low-cost ink-jet printer which keeps costs down. The high-frequency integrated circuits can handle more power, and they can handle it more efficiently. And, the constant-flux transformer processes a consistent flow of electrical current, which makes the converter more efficient.

  1. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  2. Electronic and photonic power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.T.; Renschler, C.L. ); Shepodd, T.J. ); Ellefson, R.E.; Gill, J.T. ); Leonard, L.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Efficient conversion of radioactive decay to electrical power has been the goal of a number of past research efforts. One of these was the Elgin-Kidde nuclear battery. In this concept promethium-147 was used as a beta source which was then mixed with a phosphor to produce a radioluminescent (RL) source of light. The light source was coupled to silicon photovoltaic converters to create electricity. This photoelectric approach is being revisited using tritium based solid state compounds and advanced gas concepts to produce RL light sources being disclosed at this conference. Efficient conversion of the RL light energy to electrical energy imposes certain requirements on the semiconductor converter. These requirements will be discussed. Projections of power source electrical and physical characteristics will be presented based on reasonable design parameter assumptions. The words Power Supply'' usually evoke a vision of a rotating machine or chemical battery. However, today's technology is making increasing use of photonics, where information and even power can be moved through optical fibers. Brighter volumetric RL light sources open a whole new range of photonics-based applications, while solid state tritiated compounds provide the foundation for improved mechanical adaptability and safety. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Polymer Electronics: Power from Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, D.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2012-06-19

    We review polymer-based electronics and photovoltaics to provide the reader with a sense of how the field has developed, where we stand at present, and what possibilities are looming in the future. Expertise in areas ranging from synthesis to morphology to device design was sought to achieve this end. While these reviews cannot be exhaustive, they do provide a snapshot of the field at present and give some sense of where the key impediments are.

  4. Electronic power generators for ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciovica, D.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of an ultrasonic frequency electronic power generator are discussed. The principle design elements of the generator are illustrated. The generator provides an inductive load with an output power of two kilowatts and a variable output frequency in the fifteen to thirty KiloHertz range. The method of conducting the tests and the results obtained with selected materials are analyzed.

  5. Power electronic applications for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, Roy L.; Lazbin, Igor

    1990-01-01

    NASA plans to orbit a permanently manned space station in the late 1990s, which requires development and assembly of a photovoltaic (PV) power source system to supply up to 75 kW of electrical power average during the orbital period. The electrical power requirements are to be met by a combination of PV source, storage, and control elements for the sun and eclipse periods. The authors discuss the application of power electronics and controls to manage the generation, storage, and distribution of power to meet the station loads, as well as the computer models used for analysis and simulation of the PV power system. The requirements for power source integrated controls to adjust storage charge power during the insolation period current limiting, breaker interrupt current values, and the electrical fault protection approach are defined. Based on these requirements, operating concepts have been defined which then become drivers for specific system and element design.

  6. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  7. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  8. Electronic Position Sensor for Power Operated Accessory

    DOEpatents

    Haag, Ronald H.; Chia, Michael I.

    2005-05-31

    An electronic position sensor for use with a power operated vehicle accessory, such as a power liftgate. The position sensor includes an elongated resistive circuit that is mounted such that it is stationary and extends along the path of a track portion of the power operated accessory. The position sensor further includes a contact nub mounted to a link member that moves within the track portion such that the contact nub is slidingly biased against the elongated circuit. As the link member moves under the force of a motor-driven output gear, the contact nub slides along the surface of the resistive circuit, thereby affecting the overall resistance of the circuit. The position sensor uses the overall resistance to provide an electronic position signal to an ECU, wherein the signal is indicative of the absolute position of the power operated accessory. Accordingly, the electronic position sensor is capable of providing an electronic signal that enables the ECU to track the absolute position of the power operated accessory.

  9. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  10. Multikilowatt power electronics development for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.; Rolandelli, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to several multikilowatt power electronic components developed by TRW for the Space Station Power Management and Distribution test bed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These components include a 12.5-kW DC-DC converter, a 6.25-kW battery charge/discharge regulator, an 82-channel sequential shunt unit, a 10-A remote power controllers, and three different types of 1-kW load converters. TRW is also monitoring the development of 120-V fuses for space applications. The authors discuss these developments and provide steady-state and dynamic performance parameters.

  11. Power control electronics for cryogenic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    In order to achieve a high-efficiency high-density cryogenic instrumentation system, the power processing electronics should be placed in the cold environment along with the sensors and signal-processing electronics. The typical instrumentation system requires low voltage dc usually obtained from processing line frequency ac power. Switch-mode power conversion topologies such as forward, flyback, push-pull, and half-bridge are used for high-efficiency power processing using pulse-width modulation (PWM) or resonant control. This paper presents several PWM and multiresonant power control circuits, implemented using commercially available CMOS and BiCMOS integrated circuits, and their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature (77 K) as compared to their room temperature (300 K) performance. The operation of integrated circuits at cryogenic temperatures results in an improved performance in terms of increased speed, reduced latch-up susceptibility, reduced leakage current, and reduced thermal noise. However, the switching noise increased at 77 K compared to 300 K. The power control circuits tested in the laboratory did successfully restart at 77 K.

  12. 5-kW arcjet power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.; Gott, R. W.; Haag, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    The initial design and evaluation of a 5 kW arcjet power electronics breadboard which as been integrated with a modified 1 kW design laboratory arcjet is presented. A single stage, 5 kW full bridge, pulse width modulated (PWM), power converter was developed which was phase shift regulated. The converter used metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) power switches and incorporated current mode control and an integral arcjet pulse ignition circuit. The unoptimized power efficiency was 93.5 and 93.9 percent at 5 kW and 50A output at input voltages of 130 and 150V, respectively. Line and load current regulation at 50A output was within one percent. The converter provided up to 6.6 kW to the arcjet with simulated ammonia used as a propellant.

  13. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  14. Power electronics for the flywheel system EMAFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Lodewijk J. J.; Sluiters, Hans E.; Smits, Eugenio J.

    1988-10-01

    A novel power electronic converter has been designed for the EMAFER (electromechanical accumulator for energy reuse) flywheel system to meet the requirements of the synchronous permanent magnet three-phase motor/generator drive. A new type of current source inverter with forced commutation by means of a commutation bridge has been developed and tested. This converter is capable of driving and braking the machine at full rated power in an operating range from 8,500 to 17,000 rpm. Test results are presented.

  15. Program Calculates Power Demands Of Electronic Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    CURRENT computer program calculates power requirements of electronic designs. For given design, CURRENT reads in applicable parts-list file and file containing current required for each part. Program also calculates power required for circuit at supply potentials of 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 volts. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19590). PC version of program (NPO-19111).

  16. Power electronics system modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1994-12-31

    This paper introduces control system design based softwares, SIMNON and MATLAB/SIMULINK, for power electronics system simulation. A complete power electronics system typically consists of a rectifier bridge along with its smoothing capacitor, an inverter, and a motor. The system components, featuring discrete or continuous, linear or nonlinear, are modeled in mathematical equations. Inverter control methods,such as pulse-width-modulation and hysteresis current control, are expressed in either computer algorithms or digital circuits. After describing component models and control methods, computer programs are then developed for complete systems simulation. Simulation results are mainly used for studying system performances, such as input and output current harmonics, torque ripples, and speed responses. Key computer programs and simulation results are demonstrated for educational purposes.

  17. The Small Explorer power system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakermanji, G.; Carlsson, U.; Temkin, D.; Culver, H.; Rodriguez, G. E.; Ahmad, A.

    1991-01-01

    The power system electronics for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer Satellites are intended to satisfy various planned missions. The selected topology is a direct energy transfer (DET) system with the battery connected directly to the bus. The shunt control technique is a linear sequential full shunt which provides a simple solar array interface and can support both 3 axis stabilized and spinner satellites. In addition, it can meet stringent electromagnetic interference requirements which are expected on some Small Explorer Missions. The Power Systems Electronics (PSE) performs battery charge control using both temperature compensated charge/discharge ratio ampere hour integration and voltage-temperature control. The PSE includes all the circuits needed to perform telemetry and command functions using an optical MIL-STD-1773 interface.

  18. EMC in power electronics and PCB design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chentian

    This dissertation consists of two parts. Part I is about Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) in power electronics and part II is about the Maximum Radiated Electromagnetic Emissions Calculator (MREMC), which is a software tool for EMC in printed circuit board (PCB) design. Switched-mode power converters can be significant sources of electromagnetic fields that interfere with the proper operation of nearby circuits or distant radio receivers. Part I of this dissertation provides comprehensive and organized information on the latest EMC developments in power converters. It describes and evaluates different technologies to ensure that power converters meet electromagnetic compatibility requirements. Chapters 2 and 3 describe EMC noise sources and coupling mechanisms in power converters. Chapter 4 reviews the measurements used to characterize and troubleshoot EMC problems. Chapters 5 -- 8 cover passive filter solutions, active filter solutions, noise cancellation methods and reduced-noise driving schemes. Part II describes the methods used, calculations made, and implementation details of the MREMC, which is a software tool that allows the user to calculate the maximum possible radiated emissions that could occur due to specific source geometries on a PCB. Chapters 9 -- 13 covers the I/O coupling EMI algorithm, Common-mode EMI algorithm, Power Bus EMI algorithm and Differential-Mode EMI algorithm used in the MREMC.

  19. Wireless powered electronic sensors for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Heer, R; Wissenwasser, J; Milnera, M; Farmer, L; Hopfner, C; Vellekoop, M

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification technology is used to power a novel platform of sensor devices. The employed energy harvesting system of the individual sensors enables a blanking of the radio frequency field for a defined period, while supplying the sensor electronics with a highly stable voltage. This guarantees interference free operation of the electronic circuitry during measurements. The implementation of this principle is demonstrated for a sensor system which is based on insets for state-of-the-art micro-titer-plates. Each inset is carrying electronic circuitry and an interdigitated electrode system which is acting as sensor for recording alterations of the cell metabolism. The presented sensor devices work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions. PMID:21095667

  20. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power Electronics,"…

  1. Electrochemistry in Organisms: Electron Flow and Power Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirpich, Thomas P.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a series of calculations, appropriate for the freshman level, to determine the flow of electrons to oxygen along the electron transport chain. States that living organisms resemble fuel cells and develops calculations for determining power output. (GS)

  2. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  3. Cryogenic Cermic Multilayer Capacitors for Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Alberta, E. F.; Hackenberger, W. S.

    2006-03-31

    Recent advances in the areas of high temperature superconductors and low temperature MOSFET devices have opened the door to the possibility of developing highly efficient low-temperature power electronics. The most commonly used high-efficiency capacitors are based on high dielectric constant (K {approx} 1000-4000) barium titanate doped to yield and X7R temperature dependence ({+-}15% change in capacitance from -55 deg. C to 125 deg. C); however, below their minimum use temperature the capacitance drops-off quickly leading to a low volumetric efficiency and high temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) at cryogenic temperatures.A series of low temperature materials with moderate to high dielectric constants have been specifically developed for low temperature operation (below 80K). The capacitors fall into three main categories: low TCC, high volumetric efficiency, and energy storage. In the low TCC category, co-fired multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) were fabricated with capacitance values up to 62nF at 30K, TCCs from 0.9 to 2% below 80K, and losses on the order of 0.0001. In the high volumetric efficiency category, dielectrics with permittivities ranging from 1,000 to 30,000 were demonstrated.

  4. Electronic load for testing power generating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. B.; Stepfer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Instrument tests various electric power generating devices by connecting the devices to the input of the load and comparing their outputs with a reference voltage. The load automatically adjusts until voltage output of the power generating device matches the reference.

  5. Applied Industrial Electronics: Power Control and Electronic Troubleshooting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Rick; Humler, John

    This curriculum guide is designed to build upon the skills and knowledge of industrial electronics gained by the student through the learning activities of the introductory volumes of the electronics program. Specifically, the student, whether in secondary, postsecondary, or adult education, will have the opportunity to expand those skills in…

  6. Opportunities and Challenges for Power Electronics in PV Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Deline, C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.

    2011-02-01

    The presentation describes the value of adding DC converters and other power electronics to modules to improve their output even when shading or bad cells would otherwise decrease the module output. The presentation was part of a workshop sponsored by ARPA-E exploring the opportunities for power electronics to support PV applications.

  7. A Survey of Power Electronics Applications in Aerospace Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Elbuluk, Malik E.

    2001-01-01

    The insertion of power electronics in aerospace technologies is becoming widespread. The application of semiconductor devices and electronic converters, as summarized in this paper, includes the International Space Station, satellite power system, and motor drives in 'more electric' technology applied to aircraft, starter/generators and reusable launch vehicles. Flywheels, servo systems embodying electromechanical actuation, and spacecraft on-board electric propulsion are discussed. Continued inroad by power electronics depends on resolving incompatibility of using variable frequency for 400 Hz-operated aircraft equipment. Dual-use electronic modules should reduce system development cost.

  8. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  9. High power, electron-beam induced switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpetti, R.D.; Hofer, W.W.; Kania, D.R.; Schoenbach, K.H.; Joshi, R.P.; Molina, C.; Brinkmann, R.P.

    1993-07-01

    We are developing a high voltage, high average power, electron-beam controlled diamond switch that could significantly impact high power solid-state electronics in industrial and defense applications. An electron-beam controlled thin-film diamond could switch well over 100 kW average power at MHz frequencies, greater than 5 kV, and with high efficiency. This performance is due to the excellent thermal and electronic properties of diamond, the high efficiency achieved with electron beam control, and the demonstrated effectiveness of microchannel cooling. Our electron beam penetration depth measurements agree with our Monte-Carlo calculations. We have not observed electron beam damage in diamond for beam energies up to 150 keV. In this paper we describe our experimental and calculational results and research objectives.

  10. Palm Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Douglas E.; Holliday, Ezekiel

    2007-01-01

    A prototype 35We, JP-8 fueled, soldier-wearable power system for the DARPA Palm Power program has been developed and tested by Sunpower. A hermetically-sealed 42We Sunpower Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) with integral linear alternator is the prime mover for this system. To maximize system efficiency over a broad range of output power, a non-dissipative, highly efficient electronic control system which modulates engine output power by varying piston stroke and converts the AC output voltage of the FPSE into 28Vdc for the Palm Power end user, has been designed and demonstrated as an integral component of the Palm Power system. This paper reviews the current status and progress made in developing the control electronics for the Palm Power system, in addition to describing the operation and demonstrated performance of the engine controller in the context of the current JP-8 fueled Palm Power system.

  11. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  12. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  13. Integrated low power digital gyro control electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    M'Closkey, Robert (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Grayver, Eugene (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention generally encompass a digital, application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been designed to perform excitation of a selected mode within a vibratory rate gyroscope, damping, or force-rebalance, of other modes within the sensor, and signal demodulation of the in-phase and quadrature components of the signal containing the angular rate information. The ASIC filters dedicated to each channel may be individually programmed to accommodate different rate sensor designs/technology or variations within the same class of sensors. The ASIC architecture employs a low-power design, making the ASIC, particularly suitable for use in power-sensitive applications.

  14. Power Converters Secure Electronics in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In order to harden power converters for the rigors of space, NASA awarded multiple SBIR contracts to Blacksburg, Virginia-based VPT Inc. The resulting hybrid DC-DC converters have proven valuable in aerospace applications, and as a result the company has generated millions in revenue from the product line and created four high-tech jobs to handle production.

  15. Titanium-Alloy Power Capacitor: High-Power Titanate Capacitor for Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: There is a constant demand for better performing, more compact, lighter weight, and lower cost electronic devices. Unfortunately, the materials traditionally used to make components for electronic devices have reached their limits. Case Western is developing capacitors made of new materials that could be used to produce the next generation of compact and efficient high-powered consumer electronics and electronic vehicles. A capacitor is an important component of an electronic device. It stores an electric charge and then discharges it into an electrical circuit in the device. Case Western is creating its capacitors from titanium, an abundant material extracted from ore which can be found in the U.S. Case Western's capacitors store electric charges on the surfaces of films, which are grown on a titanium alloy electrode that is formed as a spinal column with attached branches. The new material and spine design make the capacitor smaller and lighter than traditional capacitors, and they enable the component to store 300% more energy than capacitors of the same weight made of tantalum, the current industry standard. Case Western's titanium-alloy capacitors also spontaneously self-repair, which prolongs their life.

  16. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  17. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  18. Electron accleration using high power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    1998-04-01

    The 30 TW Nd:Glass Vulcan laser has been used to extensively study the Forward Raman Scatter instability in plasmas. This instability is of interest since it produces large amplitude relativistic plasma waves, which can trap and accelerate plasma electrons to high energies. Recently we have accelerated particles up to 100 MeV with this process. This is beyond the expected classical dephasing energy, for the plasma waves in our experiment which have a Lorentz factor γ ≈ 7. The greater acceleration has been attributed to the dynamics of the beam loading process of the plasma waves due to wavebreaking. By imaging the small angle Thomson scattered light from an orthogonally injected probe beam, we observe the dimensions of the accelerating plasma wave. It is seen that electron energies are almost independent of the length of the plasma wave. This is because the dephasing length is of the order of the Rayleigh length (≈ 100 μm). However the plasma wave is seen to extend to lengths as great as 3.5 mm. This is indicative of a high intensity being present throughout the length of the gas jet used, and indicates the presence of channelling of the laser beam. However the unstable nature of FRS, means that it is unsuitable for next generation high energy particle acclerators. For this we require much more controllable acceleration over greater distances. This can be achieved with the laser wakefield accelerator. For this purpose we have also been performing experiments at the LULI short pulse facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In these experiments we have been able to accelerate large numbers of injected electrons at 3 MeV to 4 MeV and above, after carefully taking into consideration sources of noise.

  19. Distributed Power Electronics for PV Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.

    2011-12-01

    An overview of the benefits and applications of microinverters and DC power optimizers in residential systems. Some conclusions from this report are: (1) The impact of shade is greater than just the area of shade; (2) Additional mismatch losses include panel orientation, panel distribution, inverter voltage window, soiling; (3) Per-module devices can help increase performance, 4-12% or more depending on the system; (4) Value-added benefits (safety, monitoring, reduced design constraints) are helping their adoption; and (5) The residential market is growing rapidly. Efficiency increases, cost reductions are improving market acceptance. Panel integration will further reduce price and installation cost. Reliability remains an unknown.

  20. Size, weight, and power in electronic payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haislet, Donald A.; Wilson, Larry

    A Tactical SIGINT System Hardware program developed by ESL, a subsidiary of TRW Avionics and Surveillance Group, is discussed. The program studied the parts of typical systems that have the greatest size, weight, and power leverage, namely, the chassis, circuit-card assemblies, thermal management techniques, and interconnections. Mechanical weight savings were achieved in both chassis and modules due to replacement of aluminum with metal matrix composites. Circuit miniaturization based on multichip modules made it possible to reduce a key digital circuit by 8:1.

  1. NSTAR Ion Propulsion System Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) program, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is currently developing a high performance, simplified ion propulsion system. This propulsion system, which is throttleable from 0.5- to 2.3-kW output power to the thruster, targets primary propulsion applications for planetary and Earth-space missions and has been baselined as the primary propulsion system for the first New Millennium spacecraft. The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the design and delivery of a breadboard power processing unit (PPU) and an engineering model thruster (EMT) for this system and will manage the contract for the delivery of the flight hardware to JPL. The PPU requirements, which dictate a mass of less than 12 kg with an efficiency of 0.9 or greater at a 2.3-kW output, forced a departure from the state-of-the-art ion thruster PPU design. Several innovations--including dual-use topologies, simplified thruster control, and the use of ferrite magnetic materials--were necessary to meet these requirements.

  2. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-09-19

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - 165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  3. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics

    PubMed Central

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Lochner, Claire M.; Arias, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components—inductors, capacitors, and resistors—perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application. PMID:26514331

  4. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Lochner, Claire M.; Arias, Ana C.

    2015-10-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components—inductors, capacitors, and resistors—perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application.

  5. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics.

    PubMed

    Ostfeld, Aminy E; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Lochner, Claire M; Arias, Ana C

    2015-01-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components-inductors, capacitors, and resistors-perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application. PMID:26514331

  6. Power Electronics for a Miniaturized Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1997-01-01

    A 0.3 kW Power Processing Unit (PPU) was designed, tested on resistive loads, and then integrated with a miniaturized arcjet. The main goal of the design was to minimize size and mass while maintaining reasonable efficiency. In order to obtain the desired reductions in mass, simple topologies and control methods were considered. The PPU design incorporates a 50 kHz, current-mode-control, pulse-width-modulated (PWM), push-pull topology. An input voltage of 28 +/- 4V was chosen for compatibility with typical unregulated low voltage busses anticipated for smallsats. An efficiency of 0.90 under nominal operating conditions was obtained. The component mass of the PPU was 0.475 kg and could be improved by optimization of the output filter design. The estimated mass for a flight PPU based on this design is less than a kilogram.

  7. Advanced power electronics and electric machinery program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as "FreedomCAR" (derived from "Freedom" and "Cooperative Automotive Research"), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001.

  8. A Low Power Photoemission Source for Electrons on Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S. A.

    2010-11-01

    Electrons on the surface of liquid helium are a widely studied system that may also provide a promising method to implement a quantum computer. One experimental challenge in these studies is to generate electrons on the helium surface in a reliable manner without heating the cryo-system. An electron source relying on photoemission from a zinc film has been previously described using a high power continuous light source that heated the low temperature system. This work has been reproduced more compactly by using a low power pulsed lamp that avoids any heating. About 5×103 electrons are collected on 1 cm2 of helium surface for every pulse of light. A time-resolved experiment suggests that electrons are either emitted over or tunnel through the 1 eV barrier formed by the thin superfluid helium film on the zinc surface. No evidence of trapping or bubble formation is seen.

  9. Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lassise, A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2012-04-15

    Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM{sub 110} mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO{sub 4}, chosen for the high relative permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}= 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan {delta}= 2 x 10{sup -4}). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

  10. The 10 kW power electronics for hydrogen arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Hill, Gerald M.

    1992-01-01

    A combination of emerging mission considerations such as 'launch on schedule', resource limitations, and the development of higher power spacecraft busses has resulted in renewed interest in high power hydrogen arcjet systems with specific impulses greater than 1000 s for Earth-space orbit transfer and maneuver applications. Solar electric propulsion systems with about 10 kW of power appear to offer payload benefits at acceptable trip times. This work outlines the design and development of 10 kW hydrogen arcjet power electronics and results of arcjet integration testing. The power electronics incorporated a full bridge switching topology similar to that employed in state of the art 5 kW power electronics, and the output filter included an output current averaging inductor with an integral pulse generation winding for arcjet ignition. Phase shifted, pulse width modulation with current mode control was used to regulate the current delivered to arcjet, and a low inductance power stage minimized switching transients. Hybrid power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors were used to minimize conduction losses. Switching losses were minimized using a fast response, optically isolated, totem-pole gate drive circuit. The input bus voltage for the unit was 150 V, with a maximum output voltage of 225 V. The switching frequency of 20 kHz was a compromise between mass savings and higher efficiency. Power conversion efficiencies in excess of 0.94 were demonstrated, along with steady state load current regulation of 1 percent. The power electronics were successfully integrated with a 10 kW laboratory hydrogen arcjet, and reliable, nondestructive starts and transitions to steady state operation were demonstrated. The estimated specific mass for a flight packaged unit was 2 kg/kW.

  11. Prognostics of Power Electronics, Methods and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose R.; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Failure of electronic devices is a concern for future electric aircrafts that will see an increase of electronics to drive and control safety-critical equipment throughout the aircraft. As a result, investigation of precursors to failure in electronics and prediction of remaining life of electronic components is of key importance. DC-DC power converters are power electronics systems employed typically as sourcing elements for avionics equipment. Current research efforts in prognostics for these power systems focuses on the identification of failure mechanisms and the development of accelerated aging methodologies and systems to accelerate the aging process of test devices, while continuously measuring key electrical and thermal parameters. Preliminary model-based prognostics algorithms have been developed making use of empirical degradation models and physics-inspired degradation model with focus on key components like electrolytic capacitors and power MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor). This paper presents current results on the development of validation methods for prognostics algorithms of power electrolytic capacitors. Particularly, in the use of accelerated aging systems for algorithm validation. Validation of prognostics algorithms present difficulties in practice due to the lack of run-to-failure experiments in deployed systems. By using accelerated experiments, we circumvent this problem in order to define initial validation activities.

  12. Power resource management and low-power remote wireless RF electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Degrood, Kevin; Lee, Kang; Gans, Eric; Walter, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    Battery power resource management becomes a critical issue in the case of self-powered remote wireless RF electronics, where the basic parameter is time of system operation before battery recharging or battery replacement. In such cases, very often related to physical protection against antitampering (AT), proper theoretical modeling of a battery driven power supply in the context of a given digital electronic system is of utmost importance. Such modeling should include various types of batteries (primary and secondary), various self-discharge processes in different temperatures, and even energy harvesting, the latter to supply power for long-term content, low-power electronic subsystems. In this paper we analyze simple modeling of resource power management, including variations of all of these parameters and energy harvesting.

  13. 10 kW power electronics for hydrogen arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamley, John A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Hill, Gerald M.

    1992-02-01

    A combination of emerging mission considerations such as launch on schedule, resource limitations, and the development of higher power spacecraft busses has resulted in renewed interest in high power hydrogen arcjet systems with specific impulses greater than 1000 s for Earth-space orbit transfer and maneuver applications. Solar electric propulsion systems with about 10 kW appear to offer payload benefits at acceptible trip times. The design and development of 10 kW hydrogen arcjet power electronics and the results of arcjet integration testing are discussed. The power electronics incorporated a full bridge switching topology similar to that employed in state of the art 5 kW power electronics, and the output filter included an output current averaging inductor with an integral pulse generation winding for arcjet ignition. Phase shifted, pulse width modulation with current mode control was used to regulate the current delivered to the arcjet; a low inductance power stage minimized switching transients. Hybrid power MOSFET's were used to minimize conduction losses. Switching losses were minimized using a fast response, optically isolated, totem-pole gate drive circuit. The input bus voltage for the unit was 150 V, with a maximum output voltage of 225 V. The switching frequency of 20 kHz was a compromise between mass savings and higher efficiency. Power conversion efficiencies in excess of 0.94 were demonstrated, along with steady state load current regulation of 1 percent. The power electronics were successfully integrated with a 10 kW laboratory hydrogen arcjet, and reliable, non-destrusive starts, and transitions to steady state operation were demonstrated. The estimated specific mass for a flight packaged unit was 2 kg/kW.

  14. Power Electronics Thermal Management R&D (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.

    2014-11-01

    This project will investigate and develop thermal-management strategies for wide bandgap (WBG)-based power electronics systems. Research will be carried out to deal with thermal aspects at the module- and system-level. Module-level research will focus on die- and substrate-integrated cooling strategies and heat-transfer enhancement technologies. System-level research will focus on thermal-management strategies for the entire power electronics system to enable smart packaging solutions. One challenge with WBG device-based power electronics is that although losses in the form of heat may be lower, the footprint of the components is also likely to be reduced to reduce cost, weight, and volume. Combined with higher operational temperatures, this creates higher heat fluxes which much be removed from a smaller footprint, requiring advanced cooling strategies.

  15. Ab initio electronic stopping power of protons in bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukri, Abdullah Atef; Bruneval, Fabien; Reining, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The electronic stopping power is a crucial quantity for ion irradiation: it governs the deposited heat, the damage profile, and the implantation depth. Whereas experimental data are readily available for elemental solids, the data are much more scarce for compounds. Here we develop a fully ab initio computational scheme based on linear response time-dependent density-functional theory to predict the random electronic stopping power (RESP) of materials without any empirical fitting. We show that the calculated RESP compares well with experimental data, when at full convergence, with the inclusion of the core states and of the exchange correlation. We evaluate the unexpectedly limited magnitude of the nonlinear terms in the RESP by comparing with other approaches based on the time propagation of time-dependent density-functional theory. Finally, we check the validity of a few empirical rules of thumbs that are commonly used to estimate the electronic stopping power.

  16. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  17. Single glucose biofuel cells implanted in rats power electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zebda, A; Cosnier, S; Alcaraz, J-P; Holzinger, M; Le Goff, A; Gondran, C; Boucher, F; Giroud, F; Gorgy, K; Lamraoui, H; Cinquin, P

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm(-2) and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL(-1). We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  18. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1993-03-04

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser afterburner (FEL afterburner) which consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher, is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a travelling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and so produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.57 GW can be obtained, at 17.12 GHz, from a l-kA, 5-MeV electron beam.

  19. Power electronic building block (PEDD) workshop. Trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.W.

    1995-10-09

    I attended the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) workshop at DOE HQ on June 21,1995. Accompanying me was Doug Hopkins, who is contracting with the Lab through Mark Newton on power electronics. The PEBB concept, and the workshop in particular, are sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and DOE. The general concept behind PEBB is a ``second electronics revolution`` facilitated by a single-package, smart, multi-function power control block. The PEBB will potentially replace all conventional power electronic elements at scales from watts to megawatts, thus shifting power engineering from circuit design to system design. ONR is interested because power distribution aboard ships is expensive, complex, and bulky, and getting worse. The same applies to aircraft and many other military systems. DOE`s interest is in electric vehicles, utility power systems, and various end-use applications such as adjustable speed drives. There was obvious enthusiasm from industry, academia, and Government at this workshop. The PEBB concept is in its infancy. Exactly what a PEBB will encompass is still up for discussion. What is certain is that everything is up to industry: standards, innovations, marketing strategies, etc. ONR and DOE are only acting as facilitators and coordinators, and perhaps offering a little seed money. The program will be long-term but fast-paced, relying on concurrent engineering in a serious way. Great strides are required in semiconductors, packaging, controls, and system design. ONR want to put a big knee in the historic power density and dollar-per-watt curves, starting right now.

  20. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  1. Simplification of power electronics for ion thruster neutralizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A need exists for less complex and lower cost ion thruster systems. Design approaches and the demonstration of neutralizer power electronics for relaxed neutralizer keeper, tip heater, and vaporizer requirements are discussed. The neutralizer circuitry is operated from a 200 to 400 V bus and demonstrates an order of magnitude reduction in parts count. Furthermore, a new technique is described for regulating tip heater power and automatically switching over to provide keeper power with only four additional components. A new design to control the flow rate of the neutralizer with one integrated circuit is also presented.

  2. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Dǎdârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a "sensor" or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  3. Low power electronic interface for electrostatic energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Phan, Tra; Azadmehr, Mehdi; Phu Le, Cuong; Halvorsen, Einar

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents design and simulation of a power electronic interface circuit for MEMS electrostatic energy harvesters. The designed circuit is applicable to highly miniaturized electrostatic harvesters with small transducer capacitances below 10 pF. It is based on comb- drive harvesters with two anti-phase capacitors that are connected as charge pumps and uses a flyback-path scheme. Controlled activation and deactivation of sub-circuits, some by help of clocking, were exploited to reduce power consumption down to 1.03 μW. Net power generation can be achieved with as low initial voltage as 3.0 V.

  4. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tudoran, Cristian D. Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  5. Power Block Geometry Applied to the Building of Power Electronics Converters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, E. C., Jr.; da Silva, E. R. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology, Power Block Geometry (PBG), for the presentation of power electronics topologies that process ac voltage. PBG's strategy uses formal methods based on a geometrical representation with particular rules and defines a universe with axioms and conjectures to establish a formation law. It allows power…

  6. Simulation Tools for Power Electronics Courses Based on Java Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canesin, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Flavio A. S.; Sampaio, Leonardo P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents interactive power electronics educational tools. These interactive tools make use of the benefits of Java language to provide a dynamic and interactive approach to simulating steady-state ideal rectifiers (uncontrolled and controlled; single-phase and three-phase). Additionally, this paper discusses the development and use of…

  7. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  8. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  9. High-power terahertz radiation from relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, G. L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G. P.

    2002-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation, which lies in the far-infrared region, is at the interface of electronics and photonics. Narrow-band THz radiation can be produced by free-electron lasers and fast diodes. Broadband THz radiation can be produced by thermal sources and, more recently, by table-top laser-driven sources and by short electron bunches in accelerators, but so far only with low power. Here we report calculations and measurements that confirm the production of high-power broadband THz radiation from subpicosecond electron bunches in an accelerator. The average power is nearly 20watts, several orders of magnitude higher than any existing source, which could enable various new applications. In particular, many materials have distinct absorptive and dispersive properties in this spectral range, so that THz imaging could reveal interesting features. For example, it would be possible to image the distribution of specific proteins or water in tissue, or buried metal layers in semiconductors; the present source would allow full-field, real-time capture of such images. High peak and average power THz sources are also critical in driving new nonlinear phenomena and for pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of materials.

  10. Thermo-electronic solar power conversion with a parabolic concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olukunle, Olawole C.; De, Dilip K.

    2016-02-01

    We consider the energy dynamics of the power generation from the sun when the solar energy is concentrated on to the emitter of a thermo-electronic converter with the help of a parabolic mirror. We use the modified Richardson-Dushman equation. The emitter cross section is assumed to be exactly equal to the focused area at a height h from the base of the mirror to prevent loss of efficiency. We report the variation of output power with solar insolation, height h, reflectivity of the mirror, and anode temperature, initially assuming that there is no space charge effect. Our methodology allows us to predict the temperature at which the anode must be cooled in order to prevent loss of efficiency of power conversion. Novel ways of tackling the space charge problem have been discussed. The space charge effect is modeled through the introduction of a parameter f (0 < f < 1) in the thermos-electron emission equation. We find that the efficiency of the power conversion depends on solar insolation, height h, apart from radii R of the concentrator aperture and emitter, and the collector material properties. We have also considered solar thermos electronic power conversion by using single atom-layer graphene as an emitter.

  11. Power electronics performance in cryogenic environment: evaluation for use in HTS power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P.; Valtchev, S.; Pina, J.; Gonçalves, A.; Ventim Neves, M.; Rodrigues, A. L.

    2008-02-01

    Power electronics (PE) plays a major role in electrical devices and systems, namely in electromechanical drives, in motor and generator controllers, and in power grids, including high-voltage DC (HVDC) power transmission. PE is also used in devices for the protection against grid disturbances, like voltage sags or power breakdowns. To cope with these disturbances, back-up energy storage devices are used, like uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) and flywheels. Some of these devices may use superconductivity. Commercial PE semiconductor devices (power diodes, power MOSFETs, IGBTs, power Darlington transistors and others) are rarely (or never) experimented for cryogenic temperatures, even when designed for military applications. This means that its integration with HTS power devices is usually done in the hot environment, raising several implementation restrictions. These reasons led to the natural desire of characterising PE under extreme conditions, e. g. at liquid nitrogen temperatures, for use in HTS devices. Some researchers expect that cryogenic temperatures may increase power electronics' performance when compared with room-temperature operation, namely reducing conduction losses and switching time. Also the overall system efficiency may increase due to improved properties of semiconductor materials at low temperatures, reduced losses, and removal of dissipation elements. In this work, steady state operation of commercial PE semiconductors and devices were investigated at liquid nitrogen and room temperatures. Performances in cryogenic and room temperatures are compared. Results help to decide which environment is to be used for different power HTS applications.

  12. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  13. Flexible Nanogenerators for Energy Harvesting and Self-Powered Electronics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Feng Ru; Tang, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    Flexible nanogenerators that efficiently convert mechanical energy into electrical energy have been extensively studied because of their great potential for driving low-power personal electronics and self-powered sensors. Integration of flexibility and stretchability to nanogenerator has important research significance that enables applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, organic optoelectronics, and wearable electronics. Progress in nanogenerators for mechanical energy harvesting is reviewed, mainly including two key technologies: flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) and flexible triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). By means of material classification, various approaches of PENGs based on ZnO nanowires, lead zirconate titanate (PZT), poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), 2D materials, and composite materials are introduced. For flexible TENG, its structural designs and factors determining its output performance are discussed, as well as its integration, fabrication and applications. The latest representative achievements regarding the hybrid nanogenerator are also summarized. Finally, some perspectives and challenges in this field are discussed. PMID:26748684

  14. Noise-Storm Continua: Power Estimates for Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Becker, Peter A.

    2004-11-01

    We use a generic stochastic acceleration formalism to examine the power Lin (erg s-1) input to non-thermal electrons that cause noise-storm continuum emission. The analytical approach includes the derivation of the Green’s function for a general second-order Fermi process, and its application to obtain the particular solution for the non-thermal electron distribution resulting from the acceleration of a Maxwellian source in the corona. We compare Lin with the power Lout observed in noise-storm radiation. Using typical values for the various parameters, we find that Lin ˜ 1023 1026 erg s-1, yielding an efficiency estimate η ≡ Lout/Lin in the range 10-10 ≲ η ≲ 10-6 for this non-thermal acceleration/radiation process. These results reflect the efficiency of the overall process, starting from electron acceleration and culminating in the observed noise-storm emission.

  15. Power electronics for a 1-kilowatt arc jet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    After more than two decades, new space mission requirements have revived interest in arcjet systems. The preliminary development and demonstration of new, high efficiency, power electronic concepts for start up and steady state control of dc arcjets is reported. The design comprises a pulse width modulated power converter which is closed loop configured to give fast current control. An inductor, in series with the arcjet, serves the dual role of providing instantaneous current control, as well as a high voltage arc ignition pulse. Benchmark efficiency, transient response, regulation, and ripple data are presented. Tests with arcjets demonstrate that the power electronics breadboard can start thrusters consistently with no apparent damage and transfer reliably to the nondestructive high voltage arc mode in less than a second.

  16. Power electronics for a 1-kilowatt arcjet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    After more than two decades, new space mission requirements have revived interest in arcjet systems. The preliminary development and demonstration of new, high efficiency, power electronic concepts for start up and steady state control of dc arcjets is reported. The design comprises a pulse width modulated power converter which is closed loop configured to give fast current control. An inductor, in series with the arcjet, serves the dual role of providing instantaneous current control, as well as a high voltage arc ignition pulse. Benchmark efficiency, transient response, regulation, and ripple data are presented. Tests with arcjets demonstrate that the power electronics breadboard can start thrusters consistently with no apparent damage and transfer reliably to the nondestructive high voltage arc mode in less than a second.

  17. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  18. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  19. Triboelectric generators and sensors for self-powered wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Ha, Minjeong; Park, Jonghwa; Lee, Youngoh; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, the field of wearable electronics has evolved at a rapid pace, requiring continued innovation in technologies in the fields of electronics, energy devices, and sensors. In particular, wearable devices have multiple applications in healthcare monitoring, identification, and wireless communications, and they are required to perform well while being lightweight and having small size, flexibility, low power consumption, and reliable sensing performances. In this Perspective, we introduce two recent reports on the triboelectric generators with high-power generation achieved using flexible and lightweight textiles or miniaturized and hybridized device configurations. In addition, we present a brief overview of recent developments and future prospects of triboelectric energy harvesters and sensors, which may enable fully self-powered wearable devices with significantly improved sensing capabilities. PMID:25790302

  20. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  1. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  2. Record High Power Terahertz Radiation from Relativistic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    G.L. Carr; Michael C. Martin; Wayne R. McKinney; Kevin Jordan; George R. Neil; Gwyn P. Williams

    2002-03-01

    Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 watts. The radiation has qualities closely analogous to the THz radiation produced by ultrafast laser techniques (spatially coherent, short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content). But in contrast to conventional THz radiation, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to a relativistic enhancement. The absorption and dispersive properties of materials in this spectral range provide contrast for a unique type of imaging [1,2]. The striking improvement in power reported here could revolutionize this application by allowing full-field, real-time image capture. High peak and average power THz sources are also critical in driving new non-linear phenomena with excellent signal to noise, and for pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, both of which are central to future high-speed electronic devices [3,4]. It should also be useful for studies of molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering and collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves).

  3. The 5-kW arcjet power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.; Gott, R. W.; Haag, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    The initial design and evaluation of a 5 kW arcjet power electronics breadboard which as been integrated with a modified 1 kW design laboratory arcjet is presented. A single stage, 5 kW full bridge, pulse width modulated (PWM), power converter was developed which was phase shift regulated. The converter used metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) power switches and incorporated current mode control and an integral arcjet pulse ignition circuit. The unoptimized power efficiency was 93.5 and 93.9 percent at 5 kW and 50A output at input voltages of 130 and 150V, respectively. Line and load current regulation at 50A output was within one percent. The converter provided up to 6.6 kW to the arcjet with simulated ammonia used as a propellant.

  4. Benefits of Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; DeBlasio, R.; Thomas, H.; Simoes, M.; Sen, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization of overall electrical system performance is important for the long-term economic viability of distributed energy (DE) systems. With the increasing use of DE systems in industry and its technological advancement, it is becoming more important to understand the integration of these systems with the electric power systems. New markets and benefits for distributed energy applications include the ability to provide ancillary services, improve energy efficiency, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice. Advanced power electronic (PE) interfaces will allow DE systems to provide increased functionality through improved power quality and voltage/VAR support, increase electrical system compatibility by reducing the fault contributions, and flexibility in operations with various other DE sources, while reducing overall interconnection costs. This paper examines the system integration and optimization issues associated with DE systems and show the benefits of using PE interfaces for such applications.

  5. Power Electronics Development for the SPT-100 Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Russian electric propulsion technologies have recently become available on the world market. Of significant interest is the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) which has a significant flight heritage in the former Soviet space program. The SPT has performance levels of up to 1600 seconds of specific impulse at a thrust efficiency of 0.50. Studies have shown that this level of performance is well suited for stationkeeping applications, and the SPT-100, with a 1.35 kW input power level, is presently being evaluated for use on Western commercial satellites. Under a program sponsored by the Innovative Science and Technology Division of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, a team of U.S. electric propulsion specialists observed the operation of the SPT-100 in Russia. Under this same program, power electronics were developed to operate the SPT-100 to characterize thruster performance and operation in the U.S. The power electronics consisted of a discharge, cathode heater, and pulse igniter power supplies to operate the thruster with manual flow control. A Russian designed matching network was incorporated in the discharge supply to ensure proper operation with the thruster. The cathode heater power supply and igniter were derived from ongoing development projects. No attempts were made to augment thruster electromagnet current in this effort. The power electronics successfully started and operated the SPT-100 thruster in performance tests at NASA Lewis, with minimal oscillations in the discharge current. The efficiency of the main discharge supply was measured at 0.92, and straightforward modifications were identified which could increase the efficiency to 0.94.

  6. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  7. Electron beam collector for a microwave power tube

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, Raphael A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a cylindrical, electron beam collector that efficiently couples the microwave energy out of a high power microwave source while stopping the attendant electron beam. The interior end walls of the collector are a pair of facing parabolic mirrors and the microwave energy from an input horn is radiated between the two mirrors and reassembled at the entrance to the output waveguide where the transmitted mode is reconstructed. The mode transmission through the collector of the present invention has an efficiency of at least 94%.

  8. Electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers for power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Pinhasi, Y.; Yakover, I.M.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    Novel concepts of electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers (EA-FELs) for energy transfer through the atmosphere are presented. The high average power attained from an EA-FEL makes it an efficient source of mm-wave for power beaming from a ground stations. General aspects of operating the FEL as a high power oscillator (like acceleration voltage, e-beam. current, gain and efficiency) are studied and design considerations are described. The study takes into account requirements of power beaming application such as characteristic dips in the atmospheric absorption spectrum, sizes of transmitting and receiving antennas and meteorological conditions. We present a conceptual design of a moderate voltage (.5-3 MeV) high current (1-10 Amp) EA-FEL operating at mm-wavelength bands, where the atmospheric attenuation allows efficient power beaming to space. The FEL parameters were calculated, employing analytical and numerical models. The performance parameters of the FEL (power, energy conversion efficiency average power) will be discussed in connection to the proposed application.

  9. Power Electronic Transformer based Three-Phase PWM AC Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Kaushik

    A Transformer is used to provide galvanic isolation and to connect systems at different voltage levels. It is one of the largest and most expensive component in most of the high voltage and high power systems. Its size is inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The central idea behind a power electronic transformer (PET) also known as solid state transformer is to reduce the size of the transformer by increasing the frequency. Power electronic converters are used to change the frequency of operation. Steady reduction in the cost of the semiconductor switches and the advent of advanced magnetic materials with very low loss density and high saturation flux density implies economic viability and feasibility of a design with high power density. Application of PET is in generation of power from renewable energy sources, especially wind and solar. Other important application include grid tied inverters, UPS e.t.c. In this thesis non-resonant, single stage, bi-directional PET is considered. The main objective of this converter is to generate adjustable speed and magnitude pulse width modulated (PWM) ac waveforms from an ac or dc grid with a high frequency ac link. The windings of a high frequency transformer contains leakage inductance. Any switching transition of the power electronic converter connecting the inductive load and the transformer requires commutation of leakage energy. Commutation by passive means results in power loss, decrease in the frequency of operation, distortion in the output voltage waveform, reduction in reliability and power density. In this work a source based partially loss-less commutation of leakage energy has been proposed. This technique also results in partial soft-switching. A series of converters with novel PWM strategies have been proposed to minimize the frequency of leakage inductance commutation. These PETs achieve most of the important features of modern PWM ac drives including 1) Input power factor correction, 2) Common

  10. Electronic Stopping Power in LiF from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, J. M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Artacho, Emilio

    2007-12-07

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory we calculate from first principles the rate of energy transfer from a moving proton or antiproton to the electrons of an insulating material, LiF. The behavior of the electronic stopping power versus projectile velocity displays an effective threshold velocity of {approx}0.2 a.u. for the proton, consistent with recent experimental observations, and also for the antiproton. The calculated proton/antiproton stopping-power ratio is {approx}2.4 at velocities slightly above the threshold (v{approx}0.4 a.u.), as compared to the experimental value of 2.1. The projectile energy loss mechanism is observed to be extremely local.

  11. Advanced Power Electronics for LED Drivers: Advanced Technologies for integrated Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: MIT is teaming with Georgia Institute of Technology, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) to create more efficient power circuits for energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through advances in 3 related areas. First, the team is using semiconductors made of high-performing gallium nitride grown on a low-cost silicon base (GaN-on-Si). These GaN-on-Si semiconductors conduct electricity more efficiently than traditional silicon semiconductors. Second, the team is developing new magnetic materials and structures to reduce the size and increase the efficiency of an important LED power component, the inductor. This advancement is important because magnetics are the largest and most expensive part of a circuit. Finally, the team is creating an entirely new circuit design to optimize the performance of the new semiconductors and magnetic devices it is using.

  12. Advanced manufacturing of SIMOX for low power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alles, Michael; Krull, Wade

    1996-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) has emerged as a key technology for low power electronics. The merits of SOI technology have been demonstrated, and are gaining acceptance in the semiconductor industry. In order for the SOI approach to be viable, several factors must converge, including the availability of SOI substrates in sufficient quantity, of acceptable quality, and at a competitive price. This work describes developments in SIMOX manufacturing technology and summarizes progress in each of these areas.

  13. First high power experiments with the Dutch free electron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Yu.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-05-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor [M. A. Makowski, F. Elio, and D. Loeser, April 97, Proc. 10th Workshop on ECE and ECRH, EC10, 549-559. World Scientific (1998)]. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion-FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at an output power exceeding 1 MW. In the first phase of the project, a so-called inverse setup is used. The electron gun is mounted inside the high-voltage terminal. The entire beam line was tested successfully with extremely low loss current, lower than 0.05%. This included the accelerating structure up to 2 MV level and the transport through the undulator. First generation of mm-waves was achieved in October 1997. With an electron beam current around 8 A and an accelerator voltage of 1.76 MV the mm-wave pulse starts after 3 μs and lasts for 3 μs, reaching a maximum saturated peak power level of more than 500 kW at a frequency of 200 GHz. Output power, start-up time, and frequency correspond well with simulation results.

  14. Electronic Power Conditioner for Ku-band Travelling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowstubha, Palle; Krishnaveni, K.; Ramesh Reddy, K.

    2016-07-01

    A highly sophisticated regulated power supply is known as electronic power conditioner (EPC) is required to energise travelling wave tubes (TWTs), which are used as RF signal amplifiers in satellite payloads. The assembly consisting of TWT and EPC together is known as travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA). EPC is used to provide isolated and conditioned voltage rails with tight regulation to various electrodes of TWT and makes its RF performance independent of solar bus variations which are caused due to varying conditions of eclipse and sunlit. The payload mass and their power consumption is mainly due to the existence of TWTAs that represent about 35 % of total mass and about 70-90 % (based on the type of satellite application) of overall dc power consumption. This situation ensures a continuous improvement in the design of TWTAs and their associated EPCs to realize more efficient and light products. Critical technologies involved in EPCs are design and configuration, closed loop regulation, component and material selection, energy limiting of high voltage (HV) outputs and potting of HV card etc. This work addresses some of these critical technologies evolved in realizing and testing the state of art of EPC and it focuses on the design of HV supply with a HV and high power capability, up to 6 kV and 170 WRF, respectively required for a space TWTA. Finally, an experimental prototype of EPC with a dc power of 320 W provides different voltages required by Ku-band TWT in open loop configuration.

  15. New stopping power formula for intermediate energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hasan

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a new stopping power (SP) formula for electrons. In the modified Bethe-Bloch SP expression, analytical expressions for the effective charge and effective mean excitation energies (EMEE) of target atoms are used, while for the effective charge of incoming electrons, Sugiyama's semiempirical formula from Peterson and Green is used. An analytical expression for practical SP calculations is obtained using the Bethe approximation and a Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. The calculated results of the SP for electrons in some materials, such as H(2)O, H(2), CO(2), N(2), and O(2), are compared with experimental data, together with Penelope code results and a number of other semiempirical and analytical calculations. PMID:18586505

  16. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-08-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  17. Theory of High Power Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Allan Watson

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Electron cyclotron resonance heating has been successfully used on a series of experiments in an attempt to raise plasma temperatures beyond the constraints of the resistive dissipation which occurs with ohmic heating. Recently progress in gyrotron design has allowed for significant increases in applied microwave power and for the first time a free electron laser will generate high power pulsed radio-frequency waves in the MTX experiment at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in 1987. Classically the theory of ECRH has been considered by a Fokker-Planck approach and by a quasilinear approach. Both lead to a diffusion equation in velocity space for the distribution function but as the applied power increases the approximations made in these approaches are likely to become unsatisfactory. Adopting a test particle approach we firstly consider modifications to the velocity space diffusion co-efficient at high powers and then dispense with the diffusion equation completely. We begin by deriving averaged particle equations from a Lagrangian formulation which require less computer processor time to integrate than the exact Lorentz-force equations. These have been incorporated in a particle code to simulate ECRH in a tokamak. The results for this code are compared with analytic expressions derived for a modified diffusion coefficient and a probability function P(v,Deltav). We show that for low fields the diffusive form is correct but for higher fields nonlinear effects become important.

  18. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  19. Single-stage electronic ballast with high-power factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chun-Yoon; Kwon, Jung-Min; Kwon, Bong-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    This article proposes a single-stage electronic ballast circuit with high-power factor. The proposed circuit was derived by sharing the switches of the power factor correction (PFC) and the half-bridge LCC resonant inverter. This integration of switches forms the proposed single-stage electronic ballast, which provides an almost unity power factor and a ripple-free input current by using a coupled inductor without increasing the voltage stress. In addition, it realises zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) by employing the self-oscillation technique. The saturable transformer constituting the self-oscillating drive limits the lamp current and dominates the switching frequency of the ballast. Therefore, the proposed single-stage ballast has the advantage of high-power factor, high efficiency, low cost and high reliability. Steady-state analysis of the PFC and the half-bridge LCC resonant inverter are described. The results of experiments performed using a 30 W fluorescent lamp are also presented to confirm the performance of the proposed ballast.

  20. Functional models of power electronic components for system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Yang, Lifeng; Dravid, Narayan

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to model power electronic circuits has been developed to facilitate simulation studies of system-level issues. The underlying concept for this approach is to develop an equivalent circuit, the functional model, that performs the same functions as the actual circuit but whose operation can be simulated by using larger time step size and the reduction in model complexity, the computation time required by a functional model is significantly shorter than that required by alternative approaches. The authors present this novel modeling approach and discuss the functional models of two major power electronic components, the DC/DC converter unit and the load converter, that are being considered by NASA for use in the Space Station Freedom electric power system. The validity of these models is established by comparing the simulation results with available experimental data and other simulation results obtained by using a more established modeling approach. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by incorporating these models into a power system model and simulating the system responses and interactions between components under various conditions.

  1. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  2. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  3. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  4. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  5. Multi-port power electronic interface for renewable energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei

    Energy intensive products and services are penetrating people's daily life as well as different sectors of industry during recent decades. Further effort to improve efficiency, reduce green house gas and hazardous particle emission lead to the emergence of the "more electric" concept in several industries including transportation. This trend, however, burdens the aging power system and existing local power networks. To offer a remedy to the problem and a smooth transition to a more reliable, more diverse, and more efficient power grid of the future, the concept of Multi-port Power Electronic Interface (MPEI) for localized power processing is introduced in this dissertation, which interfaces and manages various sources, loads and storages. Different means of integrating multiple sources and storages into the existing power system are studied and evaluated; the six phase-leg structure is chosen to interface five sources/loads: fuel cell, wind turbine, solar cell, battery and utility grid. Partitioning of source-interface and load-interface on a system level as well as analysis and modeling on small signal level are performed. A novel control structure for source-interface is proposed in the design, which forms Controlled Quasi Current Source (CQCS) during the load sharing operation and offers several salient advantages: • Inherent average current-mode control. • Easy share of steady state current/power. • Share of load dynamics for better source protection. Local control loops for various input ports are designed based on linearized system model; controller performance is tuned to accommodate the characteristics of different sources. To maintain a sustainable operation, different modes of operation are defined for MPEI; detailed state-transition with associated events are also defined in each operation mode. Prototype of MPEI is built and control system is implemented digitally in a digital signal processor; steady state and transient performance of MPEI is

  6. Maximum wind energy extraction strategies using power electronic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quincy Qing

    2003-10-01

    This thesis focuses on maximum wind energy extraction strategies for achieving the highest energy output of variable speed wind turbine power generation systems. Power electronic converters and controls provide the basic platform to accomplish the research of this thesis in both hardware and software aspects. In order to send wind energy to a utility grid, a variable speed wind turbine requires a power electronic converter to convert a variable voltage variable frequency source into a fixed voltage fixed frequency supply. Generic single-phase and three-phase converter topologies, converter control methods for wind power generation, as well as the developed direct drive generator, are introduced in the thesis for establishing variable-speed wind energy conversion systems. Variable speed wind power generation system modeling and simulation are essential methods both for understanding the system behavior and for developing advanced system control strategies. Wind generation system components, including wind turbine, 1-phase IGBT inverter, 3-phase IGBT inverter, synchronous generator, and rectifier, are modeled in this thesis using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The simulation results have been verified by a commercial simulation software package, PSIM, and confirmed by field test results. Since the dynamic time constants for these individual models are much different, a creative approach has also been developed in this thesis to combine these models for entire wind power generation system simulation. An advanced maximum wind energy extraction strategy relies not only on proper system hardware design, but also on sophisticated software control algorithms. Based on literature review and computer simulation on wind turbine control algorithms, an intelligent maximum wind energy extraction control algorithm is proposed in this thesis. This algorithm has a unique on-line adaptation and optimization capability, which is able to achieve maximum wind energy conversion efficiency through

  7. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  8. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

  9. Thermal Management of Power Electronics and Electric Motors for Electric-Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2014-09-01

    This presentation is an overview of the power electronics and electric motor thermal management and reliability activities at NREL. The focus is on activities funded by the Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program.

  10. Power Electronics Being Developed for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    Electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space missions need to operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments that include very low temperatures. Spacecraft that operate in such cold environments carry a large number of heaters so that the ambient temperature for the onboard electronics remains near 20 C. Electronics that can operate at cryogenic temperatures will simplify system design and reduce system size and weight by eliminating the heaters and their associated structures. As a result, system development and launch cost will be reduced. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, an ongoing program is focusing on the development of power electronics geared for deep space low-temperature environments. The research and development efforts include electrical components design, circuit design and construction, and system integration and demonstration at cryogenic temperatures. Investigations are being carried out on circuits and systems that are targeted for use in NASA missions where low temperatures will be encountered: devices such as ceramic and tantalum capacitors, metal film resistors, semiconductor switches, magnetics, and integrated circuits including dc/dc converters, operational amplifiers, voltage references, and motor controllers. Test activities cover a wide range of device and circuit performance under simple as well as complex test conditions, such as multistress and thermal cycling. The effect of low-temperature conditions on the switching characteristics of an advanced silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor is shown. For gate voltages (VGS) below 2.6 V, drain currents at -190 C are lower than drain currents at room temperature (20 C).

  11. Phase synchronized quasiperiodicity in power electronic inverter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Mosekilde, Erik; Andriyanov, Alexey I.; Shein, Vladimir V.

    2014-02-01

    The development of switch-mode operated power electronic converter systems has provided a broad range of new effective approaches to the conversion of electric power. In this paper we describe the transitions from regular periodic operation to quasiperiodicity and high-periodic resonance behavior that can be observed in a pulse-width modulated DC/AC converter operating with high feedback gain. We demonstrate the occurrence of two different types of torus birth bifurcations and present a series of phase portraits illustrating the appearance of phase-synchronized quasiperiodicity. Our numerical findings are verified through comparison with an experimental inverter system. The results shed light on the transitions to quasiperiodicity and to various forms of three-frequency dynamics in non-smooth systems.

  12. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  13. Diamond-based heat spreaders for power electronic packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemet, Thomas

    As any semiconductor-based devices, power electronic packages are driven by the constant increase of operating speed (higher frequency), integration level (higher power), and decrease in feature size (higher packing density). Although research and innovation efforts have kept these trends continuous for now more than fifty years, the electronic packaging technology is currently facing a challenge that must be addressed in order to move toward any further improvements in terms of performances or miniaturization: thermal management. Thermal issues in high-power packages strongly affect their reliability and lifetime and have now become one of the major limiting factors of power modules development. Thus, there is a strong need for materials that can sustain higher heat flux levels while safely integrating into the electronic package architecture. In such context, diamond is an attractive candidate because of its outstanding thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and high electrical resistivity. Its low heat capacity relative to metals such as aluminum or copper makes it however preferable for heat spreading applications (as a heat-spreader) rather than for dissipating the heat flux itself (as a heat sink). In this study, a dual diamond-based heat-spreading solution is proposed. Polycrystalline diamond films were grown through laser-assisted combustion synthesis on electronic substrates (in the U.S) while, in parallel, diamond-reinforced copper-matrix composite films were fabricated through tape casting and hot pressing (in France). These two types of diamond-based heat-spreading films were characterized and their microstructure and chemical composition were related to their thermal performances. Particular emphasize was put on the influence of interfaces on the thermal properties of the materials, either inside a single material (grain boundaries) or between dissimilar materials (film/substrate interface, matrix/reinforcement interface). Finally, the packaging

  14. HPM (high power microwave) testing of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Antinone, R.; Ng, W.C.

    1989-05-10

    This report documents the results of a study of high power microwave (HPM) vulnerability of electronic components commonly used in weapon systems. The study was carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from August through October 1988. The objective of this study was to determine the threshold levels for upset or disturbance and damage of the devices under test (DUT). In these tests pulsed microwave energy was directly injected into the terminal of the DUT and in most cases a 50-ohm microstrip test fixture was used to ensure that 50-ohm transmission was maintained as close to the DUT as possible. 3 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  16. An Educational Laboratory for Digital Control and Rapid Prototyping of Power Electronic Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sanghun; Saeedifard, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new educational power electronics laboratory that was developed primarily to reinforce experimentally the fundamental concepts presented in a power electronics course. The developed laboratory combines theoretical design, simulation studies, digital control, fabrication, and verification of power-electronic circuits based on…

  17. A Ferroelectric Cathode, Electron Gun for High Power Microwave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivers, J. D.; Flechtner, D.; Golkowski, Cz.; Kerslick, G. S.; Nation, J. A.

    1997-05-01

    A novel pulse modulator, previously described at the 1995 PAC meeting, has been reconfigured to give a better pulse shape at a slightly lower beam energy and with a higher current ( 500kV, 1000A ). The device has been run at rated voltage and current for pulse durations in excess of 200 ns and at a low ~ 0.1 Hz power supply limited repetition rate. The modulator, which is designed for use in our high power microwave research program, has been coupled to an electron gun which uses a ferroelectric cathode. We report in this paper on the revised design and performance of the modulator and present data on the electron gun design and characteristics. The recessed ferroelectric cathode is located in the fringing field of a 2 kG solenoidal magnetic field so that the 500 A. emitted current is compressed to about a 1 cm. diameter pencil beam. The cathode emission is initiated by a 100 ns. 2kV pulse inductively decoupled from the ground by a coaxial cable wound around the transformer core. The pulse transformer, which is driven by 8, 20 Ω Blumleins, feeds a fourteen to one step up transformer giving a source impedance of 500 Ω. It is switched independently of the ferroelectric trigger to provide maximum flexibility in the design. Results will be reported on all aspects of the system design and operation. Hypertext

  18. The Influence of Power on Trading Partner Trust in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnasingam, Pauline

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of power in electronic commerce focuses on the impact of power in the adoption of electronic data interchange. Presents a case study of Ford Motor Company in Australia that shows negative (coercive) power resulted in uncertainty, whereas positive (persuasive) power resulted in open communications, thus building trading partner trust.…

  19. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  20. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Meydbray, J.; Donovan, M.; Forrest, J.

    2012-05-01

    This document describes a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations, as would be experienced by typical residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. This type of shading test is particularly useful to evaluate the impact of different power conversion setups, including microinverters, DC power optimizers and string inverters, on overall system performance. The performance results are weighted based on annual estimates of shade to predict annual performance improvement. A trial run of the test procedure was conducted with a side by side comparison of a string inverter with a microinverter, both operating on identical 8kW solar arrays. Considering three different shade weighting conditions, the microinverter was found to increase production by 3.7% under light shading, 7.8% under moderate shading, and 12.3% under heavy shading, relative to the reference string inverter case. Detail is provided in this document to allow duplication of the test method at different test installations and for different power electronics devices.

  1. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-06-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  2. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  3. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-03-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  5. The power of glove: Soft microbial fuel cell for low-power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D.; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Rossiter, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    A novel, soft microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been constructed using the finger-piece of a standard laboratory natural rubber latex glove. The natural rubber serves as structural and proton exchange material whilst untreated carbon veil is used for the anode. A soft, conductive, synthetic latex cathode is developed that coats the outside of the glove. This inexpensive, lightweight reactor can without any external power supply, start up and energise a power management system (PMS), which steps-up the MFC output (0.06-0.17 V) to practical levels for operating electronic devices (>3 V). The MFC is able to operate for up to 4 days on just 2 mL of feedstock (synthetic tryptone yeast extract) without any cathode hydration. The MFC responds immediately to changes in fuel-type when the introduction of urine accelerates the cycling times (35 vs. 50 min for charge/discharge) of the MFC and PMS. Following starvation periods of up to 60 h at 0 mV the MFC is able to cold start the PMS simply with the addition of 2 mL fresh feedstock. These findings demonstrate that cheap MFCs can be developed as sole power sources and in conjunction with advancements in ultra-low power electronics, can practically operate small electrical devices.

  6. Calculation of runaway electrons stopping power in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igitkhanov, Yu.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.

    2011-08-01

    The energy loss rate of runaway electrons (RE) was analysed for ITER plasma facing components materials (Be and W). The stopping power, the energy deposition profiles, and the material erosion are estimated by using the codes MEMOS and ENDEP. The latter has been updated by including the effect of the target's polarizability. Our calculations show that this effect is significant for high RE energies and low Z materials such as Be. We also find that the conversion of the RE's magnetic energy into heat can explain the temperature rise on dump plate in JET. In the case of ITER, the calculated heat deposition due to RE is almost two times the melting threshold energy of Be but well below that of W.

  7. A High Power Density Power System Electronics for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, A.; Stone, R.; Travis, J.; Kercheval, B.; Alkire, G.; Ter-Minassian, V.

    2009-01-01

    A high power density, modular and state-of-the-art Power System Electronics (PSE) has been developed for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. This paper addresses the hardware architecture and performance, the power handling capabilities, and the fabrication technology. The PSE was developed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and is the central location for power handling and distribution of the LRO spacecraft. The PSE packaging design manages and distributes 2200W of solar array input power in a volume less than a cubic foot. The PSE architecture incorporates reliable standard internal and external communication buses, solid state circuit breakers and LiIon battery charge management. Although a single string design, the PSE achieves high reliability by elegantly implementing functional redundancy and internal fault detection and correction. The PSE has been environmentally tested and delivered to the LRO spacecraft for the flight Integration and Test. This modular design is scheduled to flight in early 2009 on board the LRO and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) spacecrafts and is the baseline architecture for future NASA missions such as Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS).

  8. The development of silicon carbide-based power electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Richard H.; Perkins, John F.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989 Westinghouse created an internally funded initiative to develop silicon carbide materials and device technology for a variety of potential commercial and military applications. Westinghouse saw silicon carbide as having the potential for dual use. For space applications, size and weight reductions could be achieved, together with increased reliability. Terrestrially, uses in harsh-temperature environments would be enabled. Theoretically, the physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide were highly promising for high-power, high-temperature, radiation-hardened electronics. However, bulk material with the requisite electronic qualities was not available, and the methods needed to produce a silicon carbide wafer—to fabricate high-quality devices—and to transition these technologies into a commercial product were considered to be a high-risk investment. It was recognized that through a collaborative effort, the CCDS could provide scientific expertise in several areas, thus reducing this risk. These included modeling of structures, electrical contacts, dielectrics, and epitaxial growth. This collaboration has been very successful, with developed technologies being transferred to Westinghouse.

  9. Analysis of Electron Trajectories in Magnetized High Power Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Dennis; Gallian, Sara; Trieschmann, Jan; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is an important example of magnetized technological plasmas. With HiPIMS the focus lies on the generation of a high density plasma with a remarkably high degree of ionization. It can be used for the deposition of thin films with superior density and quality. Theoretical approaches to the regime of magnetized low temperature plasmas encounter some fundamental difficulties, for example concerning the details of the magnetic field configuration, the strongly varying degree of magnetization, and the frequent wall interactions. A kinetic single particle model is used for the investigations. Single electron trajectories are analyzed with the widely used Boris algorithm within the magnetized zone above the target (racetrack). We further examine a configuration where symmetry breaking occurs due to a potential bump, which is rotating azimuthally around the racetrack (spoke). Observing the effects of this structure on the single electron motion may allow us to obtain further insight into this phenomenon. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  10. Biofuel cell as a power source for electronic contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Falk, Magnus; Andoralov, Viktor; Blum, Zoltan; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Arnebrant, Thomas; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Here we present unequivocal experimental proof that microscale cofactor- and membrane-less, direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells do produce significant amounts of electrical energy in human lachrymal liquid (tears). 100 μm diameter gold wires, covered with 17 nm gold nanoparticles, were used to fashion three-dimensional nanostructured microelectrodes, which were biomodified with Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of miniature glucose/oxygen biodevices operating in human tears were registered: 0.57 V open-circuit voltage, about 1 μW cm(-2) maximum power density at a cell voltage of 0.5 V, and more than 20 h operational half-life. Theoretical calculations regarding the maximum recoverable electrical energy can be extracted from the biofuel and the biooxidant, glucose and molecular oxygen, each readily available in human lachrymal liquid, fully support our belief that biofuel cells can be used as electrical power sources for so called smart contact lenses. PMID:22621980

  11. Stopping power of liquid water for low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The dielectric function epsilon(q,..omega..) for liquid water is determined from an insulator model with parameters fixed by available optical data. Ionization of the oxygen K shell is described by generalized oscillator strengths. This model dielectric function is used to calculate the stopping power of liquid water for electrons with energies from 10 eV to 10 keV. The results agree well in the common energy range with an existing tabulation for 256 eV less than or equal to E less than or equal to 10.2 MeV and with Bethe-theory predictions down to 200 eV. The peak in stopping power at approx.25% lower than the predictions of R. H. Ritchie, R. N. Hamm, J.E. Turner, and H. A. Wright (in Proceedings, Sixth Symposium on Microdosimetry, Brussels, Belgium (J. Booz and H. G. Ebert, Eds.), pp. 345-354, Commission of the European Communities, Harwood, London, 1978 (EUR 6064 d-e-f)).

  12. Low Power Silicon Germanium Electronics for Microwave Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doiron, Terence A.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Space-based radiometric observations of key hydrological parameters (e.g., soil moisture) at the spatial and temporal scales required in the post-2002 era face significant technological challenges. These measurements are based on relatively low frequency thermal microwave emission (at 1.4 GHz for soil moisture and salinity, 10 GHz and up for precipitation, and 19 and 37 GHz for snow). The long wavelengths at these frequencies coupled with the high spatial and radiometric resolutions required by the various global hydrology communities necessitate the use of very large apertures (e.g., greater than 20 m at 1.4 GHz) and highly integrated stable RF electronics on orbit. Radio-interferometric techniques such as Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometry (STAR), using silicon germanium (SiGe) low power radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC), is one of the most promising technologies to enable very large non-rotating apertures in space. STAR instruments are composed of arrays of small antenna/receiving elements that are arranged so that the collecting area is smaller than an equivalent real aperture system, allowing very high packing densities for launch. A 20 meter aperture at L-band, for example, will require greater than 1000 of these receiving elements. SiGe RFIC's reduce power consumption enough to make an array like this possible in the power-limited environment of space flight. An overview of the state-of-the-art will be given, and current work in the area of SiGe radiometer development for soil moisture remote sensing will be discussed.

  13. High-power traveling wave tubes powered by a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shiffler, D.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a high power traveling wave tube a high power, rippled wall waveguide TWT powered by a relativistic electron beam. Initially, the amplifiers consisted of a single section of slow wave structure. Two TWT's of this type were used, with lengths of 11 and 22 periods. These single state tubes were linear and operated in the Tm{sub 01} mode at maximum gains of 33 dB and bandwidths on order of 20 MHz centered at 8.76 GHz. The maximum efficiency was 11% corresponding to an output power of 110 MW. Below beam currents of 1.4 kA, the single stage tubes were monochromatic and phase stable to within {plus minus}8{degree}; however, above this current, a sideband-like structure developed in the frequency spectrum. The two sidebands were unequally displaced from the center frequency. As the current was increased still further to 1.6 kA, the single stage amplifier oscillated due to positive feedback arising from reflections at the exit taper of the TWT. At this point, the TWT was no longer useful as an amplifier. To reduce the positive feedback and stop the oscillations, the author severed the amplifier. Two different lengths of sever were used, the shorter of the two having the highest gain. The shorter sever saturated at 975 A, with a total gain of 37 dB and total power output of 410 MW. Beyond this current, the tube was no longer linear with respect to the input power. The bandwidth of severed tube was about 100 MHz centered at 8.76 GHz. The severed amplifiers showed the sideband-like behavior at all the beam currents used. The sideband frequency separation from the center frequency increased with beam current.

  14. Transformational electronics: a powerful way to revolutionize our information world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jhonathan P.; Torres Sevilla, Galo A.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Ahmed, Sally M.; Nassar, Joanna M.; Bahabry, Rabab R.; Nour, Maha; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Byas, Ernesto; Al-Saif, Bidoor; Alamri, Amal M.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    With the emergence of cloud computation, we are facing the rising waves of big data. It is our time to leverage such opportunity by increasing data usage both by man and machine. We need ultra-mobile computation with high data processing speed, ultra-large memory, energy efficiency and multi-functionality. Additionally, we have to deploy energy-efficient multi-functional 3D ICs for robust cyber-physical system establishment. To achieve such lofty goals we have to mimic human brain, which is inarguably the world's most powerful and energy efficient computer. Brain's cortex has folded architecture to increase surface area in an ultra-compact space to contain its neuron and synapses. Therefore, it is imperative to overcome two integration challenges: (i) finding out a low-cost 3D IC fabrication process and (ii) foldable substrates creation with ultra-large-scale-integration of high performance energy efficient electronics. Hence, we show a low-cost generic batch process based on trench-protect-peel-recycle to fabricate rigid and flexible 3D ICs as well as high performance flexible electronics. As of today we have made every single component to make a fully flexible computer including non-planar state-of-the-art FinFETs. Additionally we have demonstrated various solid-state memory, movable MEMS devices, energy harvesting and storage components. To show the versatility of our process, we have extended our process towards other inorganic semiconductor substrates such as silicon germanium and III-V materials. Finally, we report first ever fully flexible programmable silicon based microprocessor towards foldable brain computation and wirelessly programmable stretchable and flexible thermal patch for pain management for smart bionics.

  15. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-11-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  16. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  17. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 124 Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  18. Electronic stopping power calculation method for molecular dynamics simulations using local Firsov and free electron-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, J.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2006-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be accurate in predicting depth distributions of low-energy ions implanted in materials. Free parameters adjusted for every ion-target combination are conventionally used to obtain depth profiles in accordance with the experimental ones. We have previously developed a model for predicting depth profiles in crystalline Si without free parameters. The electronic stopping power was calculated using local total electron density. The model underestimated the stopping in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction. We have now taken a new approach to calculate the electronic stopping power. We use the local valence (3p(2)) electron density to account for the electronic energy loss between collisions and the Firsov model to account for the electronic energy loss during collision. The lowest electron densities are adjusted with a parametrization that is same for all ions in all implanting directions to correct the problems in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction.

  19. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm(2) with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10(-4) kg/cm(2)s. PMID:25852429

  20. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm2 with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10-4 kg/cm2s.

  1. Integration issues of a plasma contactor Power Electronics Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; York, Kenneth W.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1995-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  2. A High-Power RF-Focusing CW Electron LINAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobenin, N. P.; Kostin, D. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Trower, W. P.

    1997-05-01

    Using a biperiodic accelerating structure with rectangular cavities in a high-power Continuous Wave electron LINear ACcelerator simplifies accelerator construction and reduces beam losses. By optimizing the beam aperture and coupling slots, we have obtained high focusing gradients, shunt impedances (N.P. Sobenin, V.N. Kandurin, A.I. Karev, V.N. Melekhin, V.I. Shvedunov, and W.P. Trower, in Proc. 1995 Particle Accelerator Conf., L. Gennari ed. (IEEE, Piscataway,1996) v. 3, p. 1827.), and couplings (around 20 percent). By successively rotating six rectangular accelerating cavity sections through 90^o about the beam axis and separating the sections by axially symmetric cavities which serve as drift spaces, we obtain focusing similar to that of a quadrupole magnets system. We find that a 500 mA beam accelerated from 2 to 10 MeV in a 4 m structure suffers negligible beam losses. A similar axially symmetric structure without external focusing begins losing substantial beam at around 100 mA.

  3. Electronic Power Switch for Fault-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volp, J.

    1987-01-01

    Power field-effect transistors reduce energy waste and simplify interconnections. Current switch containing power field-effect transistor (PFET) placed in series with each load in fault-tolerant power-distribution system. If system includes several loads and supplies, switches placed in series with adjacent loads and supplies. System of switches protects against overloads and losses of individual power sources.

  4. Simulation of electron beam from two strip electron guns and control of power density by rotation of gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, G. K.; Baruah, S.; Thakur, K. B.

    2012-11-01

    Electron beam is preferably used for large scale evaporation of refractory materials. Material evaporation from a long and narrow source providing a well collimated wedge shaped atomic beam has applications in isotopic purification of metals relevant to nuclear industry. The electron beam from an electron gun with strip type filament provides a linear heating source. However, the high power density of the electron beam can lead to turbulence of the melt pool and undesirable splashing of molten metal. For obtaining quiet surface evaporation, the linear electron beam is generally scanned along its length. To further reduce the power density to maintain quiet evaporation the width of the vapour source can be controlled by rotating the electron gun on its plane, thereby scanning an inclined beam over the molten pool. The rotation of gun has further advantages. When multiple strip type electron guns are used for scaling up evaporation length, a dark zone appears between two beams due to physical separation of adjacent guns. This dark zone can be reduced by rotating the gun and thereby bringing two adjacent beams closer. The paper presented here provides the simulation results of the electron beam trajectory and incident power density originating from two strip electron guns by using in-house developed code. The effect of electron gun rotation on the electron beam trajectory and power density is studied. The simulation result is experimentally verified with the image of molten pool and heat affected zone taken after experiment. This technique can be gainfully utilized in controlling the time averaged power density of the electron beam and obtaining quiet evaporation from the metal molten pool.

  5. Voltage Regulator Chip: Power Supplies on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is finding ways to save real estate on a computer's motherboard that could be used for other critical functions. Every computer processor today contains a voltage regulator that automatically maintains a constant level of electricity entering the device. These regulators contain bulky components and take up about 30% of a computer's motherboard. CPES at Virginia Tech is developing a voltage regulator that uses semiconductors made of gallium nitride on silicon (GaN-on-Si) and high-frequency soft magnetic material. These materials are integrated on a small, 3D chip that can handle the same amount of power as traditional voltage regulators at 1/10 the size and with improved efficiency. The small size also frees up to 90% of the motherboard space occupied by current voltage regulators.

  6. Electronic Shore Power Station Based on Matrix-style Frequency Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia-sheng, Li; Lian-jun, Jiang; Biao, Qiu; Wu-mei, Yang

    The current port power supply to foreign ships, there are two ways power-type for owned diesel-powered and frequency conversion unit,In this paper,Proposed electronic shore power station, put forward electronic shore power station's concepts, and gives a whole building program of electronic shore power station based on matrix conversion algorithm, It will change 10 kV/50 Hz (35Kv/50 Hz) input voltage into 440 V/60 Hz low-voltage, not only eliminating intermediate links, but also simplify the hardware circuit and reduce the production cost and improve the competitiveness of enterprises. Simulation and experimental results show that this program has a built shore power station of high power factor, sinusoidal effective, low distortion, environmental pollution and the advantages,It will be very definite practical significance.

  7. Power Electronics Thermal Management R&D; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, Scot

    2015-06-10

    Presentation containing an update for the Power Electronics Thermal Management project in the Electric Drive Train task funded by the Vehicle Technology Office of DOE. This presentation outlines the purpose, plan, and results of research thus far for cooling and material selection strategies to manage heat in power electronic assemblies such as inverters, converters, and chargers.

  8. Power Electronics Design Laboratory Exercise for Final-Year M.Sc. Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Max, L.; Thiringer, T.; Undeland, T.; Karlsson, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experiences and results from a project task in power electronics for students at Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden, based on a flyback test board. The board is used in the course Power Electronic Devices and Applications. In the project task, the students design snubber circuits, improve the control of the…

  9. Energy regeneration model of self-consistent field of electron beams into electric power*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Trifanov, I. V.; Snezhko, A. A.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider physic-mathematical models of electric processes in electron beams, conversion of beam parameters into electric power values and their transformation into users’ electric power grid (onboard spacecraft network). We perform computer simulation validating high energy efficiency of the studied processes to be applied in the electric power technology to produce the power as well as electric power plants and propulsion installation in the spacecraft.

  10. Principles of gyrotron powered electromagnetic wigglers for free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Bekefi, G.; Davidson, R.C.; Temkin, R.J.; Tran, T.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of free-electron lasers (FEL's) with axial electron beams and high-power electromagnetic wiggler fields such as those produced by high-power gyrotrons is discussed. The use of short wavelength electromagnetic wigglers in waveguides and resonant cavities can significantly reduce required electron beam voltages, resulting in compact FEL's. Gain calculations in the low- and high-gain Compton regime are presented, including the effects of emittance, transverse wiggler gradient, and electron temperature. Optimized scaling laws for the FEL gain and the required electromagnetic wiggler field power are discussed. Several possible configurations for FEL's with electromagnetic wigglers powered by millimeter wavelength gyrotrons are presented. Gyrotron powered wigglers appear promising for operation of compact FEL's in the infrared regime using moderate energy (<10 MeV) electron beams.

  11. Power electronics and electric machinery challenges and opportunities in electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.J.; Hsu, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Peng, F.Z.

    1997-06-01

    The development of power electronics and electric machinery presents significant challenges to the advancement of electric and hybrid vehicles. Electronic components and systems development for vehicle applications have progressed from the replacement of mechanical systems to the availability of features that can only be realized through interacting electronic controls and devices. Near-term applications of power electronics in vehicles will enable integrated powertrain controls, integrated chassis system controls, and navigation and communications systems. Future applications of optimized electric machinery will enable highly efficient and lightweight systems. This paper will explore the areas where research and development is required to ensure the continued development of power electronics and electric machines to meet the rigorous demands of automotive applications. Additionally, recent advances in automotive related power electronics and electric machinery at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be explained. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Comparison of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, B.

    2004-01-02

    Recent developmental advances have allowed silicon (Si) semiconductor technology to approach the theoretical limits of the Si material; however, power device requirements for many applications are at a point that the present Si-based power devices cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. To overcome these limitations, new semiconductor materials for power device applications are needed. For high power requirements, wide-bandgap semiconductors like silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond, with their superior electrical properties, are likely candidates to replace Si in the near future. This report compares wide-bandgap semiconductors with respect to their promise and applicability for power applications and predicts the future of power device semiconductor materials.

  13. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  14. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  15. Low-power cholesteric LCDs and electronic books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad A.; Huang, Xiao-Yang; Doane, Joseph W.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss the state of the art of the bistable reflective cholesteric liquid crystal display technology. Numerous applications from low resolutions signs, to medium resolution instrumentation type displays, and high resolution electronic books are discussed. Different modes of the technology are discussed as being viable for the respective display applications. Special emphasis is paid to electronic book applications.

  16. Subdermal Flexible Solar Cell Arrays for Powering Medical Electronic Implants.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwangsun; Han, Jung Hyun; Lim, Taehoon; Kim, Namyun; Shin, Sungho; Kim, Juho; Choo, Hyuck; Jeong, Sungho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lee, Jongho

    2016-07-01

    A subdermally implantable flexible photovoltatic (IPV) device is proposed for supplying sustainable electric power to in vivo medical implants. Electric properties of the implanted IPV device are characterized in live animal models. Feasibility of this strategy is demonstrated by operating a flexible pacemaker with the subdermal IPV device which generates DC electric power of ≈647 μW under the skin. PMID:27139339

  17. Control Electronics for Solar/Flywheel Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Control circuit automatically directs flow of electrical energy to and from motor with flywheel that constitutes storage element of solar-power system. When insolation is sufficient for charging, power is supplied by solar-cell array to load and motor. During periods of darkness, motor made to act as generator, drawing kinetic energy from flywheel and supplying it to load.

  18. Electron energy distributions and electron impact source functions in Ar/N{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas using pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Michael D. Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-01-28

    In plasma materials processing, such as plasma etching, control of the time-averaged electron energy distributions (EEDs) in the plasma allows for control of the time-averaged electron impact source functions of reactive species in the plasma and their fluxes to surfaces. One potential method for refining the control of EEDs is through the use of pulsed power. Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are attractive for using pulsed power in this manner because the EEDs are dominantly controlled by the ICP power as opposed to the bias power applied to the substrate. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of EEDs and electron impact source functions in low pressure (5–50 mTorr) ICPs sustained in Ar/N{sub 2} for various duty cycles. We find there is an ability to control EEDs, and thus source functions, by pulsing the ICP power, with the greatest variability of the EEDs located within the skin depth of the electromagnetic field. The transit time of hot electrons produced in the skin depth at the onset of pulse power produces a delay in the response of the EEDs as a function of distance from the coils. The choice of ICP pressure has a large impact on the dynamics of the EEDs, whereas duty cycle has a small influence on time-averaged EEDs and source functions.

  19. Stretchable and Waterproof Self-Charging Power System for Harvesting Energy from Diverse Deformation and Powering Wearable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Liao, Qingliang; Xu, Youlong; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-07-26

    A soft, stretchable, and fully enclosed self-charging power system is developed by seamlessly combining a stretchable triboelectric nanogenerator with stretchable supercapacitors, which can be subject to and harvest energy from almost all kinds of large-degree deformation due to its fully soft structure. The power system is washable and waterproof owing to its fully enclosed structure and hydrophobic property of its exterior surface. The power system can be worn on the human body to effectively scavenge energy from various kinds of human motion, and it is demonstrated that the wearable power source is able to drive an electronic watch. This work provides a feasible approach to design stretchable, wearable power sources and electronics. PMID:27351212

  20. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The analysis, design, and development work to reduce the weight and size of a standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output was summarized. By integrating low cost commercial heat pipes in the redesign of this power supply, weight was reduced by 30% from that of the previous design. The temperature was also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A demonstration unit with a 100 watt output and a 15 volt regulator module, plus simulated output modules, was built and tested to evaluate the thermal performance of the redesigned power supply.

  1. Ultra high energy electrons powered by pulsar rotation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Machabeli, George; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration, driven by the rotational slow down of the Crab pulsar, is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the electron-positron (hereafter e(±)) plasma of the star magnetosphere. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV (~ 100 TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons. PMID:23405276

  2. A 1-kW power demonstration from the advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.; Conner, C.A.; Fortgang, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to engineer and procure an electron beamline compatible with the operation of a 1-kW free-electron laser (FEL). Another major task is the physics design of the electron beam line from the end of the wiggler to the electron beam dump. This task is especially difficult because electron beam is expected to have 20 kW of average power and to simultaneously have a 25% energy spread. The project goals were accomplished. The high-power electron design was completed. All of the hardware necessary for high-power operation was designed and procured.

  3. 1996 international conference on power electronics, drives and energy systems for industrial growth: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.S.; Roy, S.; Divan, D.; Doradla, S.R.; Murthy, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    This book contains Volume 1 of the proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Systems for Industrial Growth held January, 1996, in New Delhi. The topics of the papers include resonant and soft switching converters, induction motor drives, solar power generation, control aspects of power generation, PWM and DC/DC converters, field oriented control of AC machines, wind power generation, analysis of electrical machines, topology and control of power electronic converters, switched reluctance and permanent magnet motor drives, active filters and VAR compensation schemes, analysis and design of induction generators/motors, simulation of power electronics converters and drive, brushless and special electrical machines, UPS and battery energy storage systems.

  4. Effect of external signal on the output power of an oscillator with electron feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, N. S.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of an external single-frequency harmonic signal on the output power of an oscillator with electron feedback has been studied by analytical and numerical methods. It is established that an increase in the input signal power leads to sharp growth in the output power of the nonautonomous oscillator. Physical processes that take place in the electron beam with virtual cathode under the action of an external harmonic signal, which leads to velocity modulation in the electron beam entering the interaction space, have been analyzed. The obtained results well agree with the data of previous experimental investigations of the signal gain in a low-voltage vircator.

  5. Evaluation of induction motor performance using an electronic power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The concept of reducing the losses in an induction motor by electronically controlling the time interval between the zero crossing of the applied voltage and the zero crossing of the armature current was evaluated. The effect on power losses and power factor of reducing the applied sinusoidal voltages below the rated value was investigated experimentally. The reduction in power losses was measured using an electronic controller designed and built at MSFC. Modifications to the MSFC controller are described as well as a manually controlled electronic device which does not require that the motor be wye connected and the neutral available. Possible energy savings are examined.

  6. An efficient high power microwave source at 35 GHz using an induction linac free electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Yarema, S.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Electron Laser Facility (ELF) is a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier operating in the millimeter-wave regime. ELF uses the electron beam produced by the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which is a linear-induction accelerator. We discuss here (1) the experimental results reflecting the high-peak-power output and high-extraction efficiency obtained from an FEL amplifier operated with a tapered wiggler magnetic field and (2) the results of studies of the exponential gain and saturated power obtained from an FEL amplifier with a flat wiggler while we parametrically varied the input power to the amplifier and the beam current into the wiggler.

  7. Evaluation of the Benefits of High Temperature Electronics for Lunar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Edgar H.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is conducted of several approaches to the cooling of a lunar power system's power electronics, in view of the 400 K temperature of the 354-hour lunar day and lunar dust accumulation, which can contaminate power components and radiator surfaces. It is noted that, by raising the power electronics' baseplate temperature to 480 K, no thermal control system is required; the surface of the baseplate acts as its own, waste-heat-rejecting radiator, but the baseplate must be kept clean of lunar dust contamination.

  8. Beamline considerations for a compact, high current, high power linear RF electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.

    1987-06-01

    A design for a compact, high current, high power linear electron accelerator using an rf power source is investigated. It consists of adjacent cavities into which rf power is injected and through which electron pulses pass. The source is assumed to be capable of delivering sufficient rf power to the desired location at the proper phase. Beamline issues such as cavity loading, energy extraction, longitudinal and transverse pulse focusing, and beam breakup are considered. A device which, given the required source, can deliver beam parameters comparable to existing induction accelerators but which is more than an order of magnitude smaller appears feasible.

  9. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Low Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant.

  10. Toward integrated PV panels and power electronics using printing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ababei, Cristinel; Yuvarajan, Subbaraya; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, we review the latest developments in the area of printing technologies with an emphasis on the fabrication of control-embedded photovoltaics (PV) with on-board active and passive devices. We also review the use of power converters and maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuits with PV panels. Our focus is on the investigation of the simplest implementations of such circuits in view of their integration with solar cells using printing technologies. We see this concept as potentially enabling toward further cost reduction. Besides a discussion as to feasibility, we shall also present some projections and guidelines toward possible integration. (author)

  11. Mini-Scale Power Distribution Network Feeding Trapezoidal-Wave Voltages to Power Electronic Loads with Diode Rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Toshihiko; Imoto, Masaru; Sato, Yoshikazu

    This paper proposes a novel three-phase power distribution system feeding trapezoidal voltages to various power electronic loads with diode rectifier front-ends. The network distributes trapezoidal voltages generated by synchronous superposition of wave-shaping voltages onto sinusoidal voltages available from a utility power grid. The power distribution by the trapezoidal voltages allows reducing harmonics of the line currents without electronic switching devices because of a spontaneously widened conduction period of the current waveforms. The reduction of the harmonic currents also contributes to improve total power factor at the load input terminals and efficiency of the power transmission cables. Since the diodes of the rectifiers successively commutate the trapezoidal waves during periods of their flat parts, not only total harmonic distortion of the currents is improved, but also voltage ripple across the dc-buses of the rectifiers can effectively be reduced with less filter capacitors. In addition, the system offers an uninterruptible power supply function by immediately changing its outputs from the wave-shaping voltages to the trapezoidal voltages when interruption occurs in the power grid. In this paper, a prototype of the system is experimentally examined from various angles of operating characteristics and test results are presented to prove feasibility of the proposed system.

  12. The effects of nuclear power generators upon electronic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of electronic instruments susceptible to neutron and gamma radiation is evaluated by means of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator /RTG/. The gamma field of the RTG affects instrument operation and requires shielding, the neutron field does not affect operation via secondary capture-gamma production.

  13. Design Challenges in High Power Free-electron Laser Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Benson

    2005-08-21

    Several FELs have now demonstrated high power lasing and several projects are under construction to deliver higher power or shorter wavelengths. This presentation will summarize progress in upgrading FEL oscillators towards higher power and will discuss some of the challenges these projects face. The challenges fall into three categories: 1. energy recovery with large exhaust energy spread, 2. output coupling and maintaining mirror figure in the presence of high intracavity power loading, and 3. high current operation in an energy recovery linac (ERL). Progress in all three of these areas has been made in the last year. Energy recovery of over 12% of exhaust energy spread has been demonstrated and designs capable of accepting even larger energy spreads have been proposed. Cryogenic transmissive output couplers for narrow band operation and both hole and scraper output coupling have been developed. Investigation of short Rayleigh range operation has started as well. Energy recovery of over 20 mA CW has been demonstrated and several methods of mitigating transverse beam breakup instabilities were demonstrated. This talk will summarize these achievements and give a roadmap of where the field is headed.

  14. HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-07-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  15. A DSP based power electronics interface for alternative /renewable energy system.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-28

    This report is an update on the research project involving the implementation of a DSP-based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems, that was funded by the Department of Energy under the Inventions and Innovations program.

  16. Breakthrough in Power Electronics from SiC: May 25, 2004 - May 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Marckx, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    This report explores the premise that silicon carbide (SiC) devices would reduce substantially the cost of energy of large wind turbines that need power electronics for variable speed generation systems.

  17. Measurement of power density distribution and beam waist simulation for electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chunlong; Peng, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Qi

    2013-02-01

    The study aims to measure the power density distribution of the electron beam (EB) for further estimating its characteristics. A compact device combining deflection signal controller and current signal acquisition circuit of the EB was built. A software modelling framework was developed to investigate structural parameters of the electron beam. With an iterative algorithm, the functional relationship between the electron beam power and its power density was solved and the corresponding contour map of power density distribution was plotted through isoline tracking approach. The power density distribution of various layers of cross-section beam was reconstructed for beam volume by direct volume rendering technique. The further simulation of beam waist with all-known marching cubes algorithm reveals the evolution of spatial appearance and geometry measurement principle was explained in detail. The study provides an evaluation of promising to replace the traditional idea of EB spatial characteristics.

  18. Power deposition by mode converted electron Bernstein waves in the DIII-D heat pinch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2001-05-01

    Mode converted electron Bernstein waves are shown to play an important role in power deposition in the off-axis electron cyclotron heating experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in which the effect known as the 'heat pinch' was inferred. Ray tracing shows that the mode converted Bernstein modes (generated when the launched X mode reflects from an outboard upper hybrid layer) are damped in the central region where the previous analysis had assumed no power was being deposited.

  19. NREL Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing and demonstrating innovative heat-transfer technologies for cooling power electronics devices in hybrid and electric vehicles. In collaboration with 3M and Wolverine Tube, Inc., NREL is using surface enhancements to dissipate heat more effectively, permitting a reduction in the size of power electronic systems and potentially reducing the overall costs of electric vehicles.

  20. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe₂

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru₁₋xIrxSe₂ (x ≤ 0.2). RuSe₂ is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe₂ exceeds -200 µV/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru₀.₈Ir₀.₂Se₂ shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb₂.

  1. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru₁₋xIrxSe₂ (x ≤ 0.2). RuSe₂ is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe₂ exceeds -200 µV/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru₀.₈Ir₀.₂Se₂ shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb₂.

  2. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Tschalaer, Christoph; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray Franklin; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Legg, Robert A.; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barak Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  3. Cyclotron Maser Emission from Power-law Electrons with Strong Pitch-angle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Tang, J. F.; Liu, Q.

    2016-05-01

    Energetic electrons with power-law spectra are commonly observed in astrophysics. This paper investigates electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME) from the power-law electrons, in which strong pitch-angle anisotropy is emphasized. The electron distribution function proposed in this paper can describe various types of pitch-angle anisotropy. Results show that the emission properties of ECME, including radiation growth, propagation, and frequency properties, depend considerably on the types of electron pitch-angle anisotropy, and different wave modes show different dependences on the pitch angle of electrons. In particular, the maximum growth rate of the X2 mode rapidly decreases with respect to the electron pitch-angle cosine μ 0 at which the electron distribution peaks, while the growth rates for other modes (X1, O1, O2) initially increase before decreasing as μ 0 increases. Moreover, the O mode, as well as the X mode, can be the fastest growth mode, in terms of not only the plasma parameter but also the type of electron pitch-angle distribution. This result presents a significant extension of the recent researches on ECME driven by the lower energy cutoff of power-law electrons, in which the X mode is generally the fastest growth mode.

  4. Large space systems technology electronics: Data and power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of hardware technology and manufacturing techniques required to meet space platform and antenna system needs in the 1980s is discussed. Preliminary designs for manned and automatically assembled space power system cables, connectors, and grounding and bonding materials and techniques are reviewed. Connector concepts, grounding design requirements, and bonding requirements are discussed. The problem of particulate debris contamination for large structure spacecraft is addressed.

  5. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed. PMID:25314546

  6. Coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, microbunched for the FEL power outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kulipanov, G.N.; Sokolov, A.S.; Vinokurov, N.A.

    1995-12-31

    The spectral intensity of the coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, preliminarily microbunched by the FEL oscillator for the FEL power outcoupling, is approximately calculated by simple analytic considerations, taking into account the transverse emittances and the energy spread of the microbunched electron beams.

  7. Performance and Reliability of Interface Materials for Automotive Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; DeVoto, D.; Mihalic, M.; Paret, P.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal management and reliability are important because excessive temperature can degrade the performance, life, and reliability of power electronics and electric motors. Advanced thermal management technologies enable keeping temperature within limits; higher power densities; and lower cost materials, configurations and systems. Thermal interface materials, bonded interface materials and the reliability of bonded interfaces are discussed in this presentation.

  8. Building America Case Study: Photovoltaic Systems with Module-Level Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Direct current (DC) power optimizers and microinverters (together known as module-level power electronics, or MLPE) are one of the fastest growing market segments in the solar industry. According to GTM Research in The Global PV Inverter Landscape 2015, over 55% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in the United States used some form of MLPE in 2014.

  9. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Frasca, Albert J.; Wieserman, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) high capacity power project are presented: (1) neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  10. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E. ); Niedra, J.M. ); Frasca, A.J. ); Wieserman, W.R. )

    1993-01-15

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare-earth permanent magnets.

  11. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  12. Electronic structure modulation for low-power switching

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the transport characteristics of a novel transistor based on the electronic structure modulation of the channel. The gate voltage-controlled current modulation arises from the bandwidth manipulation of a midgap or a near-midgap state. We show that the transistor exhibits a gain and overcomes the 2.3 kBT/decade thermal limit in the inverse subthreshold slope where kB is the Boltzmann constant. The unique device physics also opens up many novel applications. PMID:23406380

  13. Wearable Triboelectric Generator for Powering the Portable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Cui, Nuanyang; Liu, Jinmei; Gu, Long; Bai, Suo; Chen, Xiaobo; Qin, Yong

    2015-08-26

    A cloth-base wearable triboelectric nanogenerator made of nylon and Dacron fabric was fabricated for harvesting body motion energy. Through the friction between forearm and human body, the generator can turn the mechanical energy of an arm swing into electric energy and power an electroluminescent tubelike lamp easily. The maximum output current and voltage of the generator reach up to 0.2 mA and 2 kV. Furthermore, this generator can be easily folded, kneaded, and cleaned like a common garment. PMID:25494528

  14. Design of space-type electronic power transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, J. F.; Lagadinos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Both open and encapsulated varieties of high reliability, low weight, and high efficiency moderate and high voltage transformers were investigated to determine the advantages and limitations of their construction in the ranges of power and voltage required for operation in the hard vacuum environment of space. Topics covered include: (1) selection of the core material; (2) preliminary calculation of core dimensions; (3) selection of insulating materials including magnet wire insulation, coil forms, and layer and interwinding insulation; (4) coil design; (5) calculation of copper losses, core losses and efficiency; (6) calculation of temperature rise; and (7) optimization of design with changes in core selection or coil design as required to meet specifications.

  15. Low Power/Low Noise Electronics Technologies for Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    2002-01-01

    We had previously written a Final Report for this award on August 1, 2001. At that time we provided ARO, as Appendix to Final Report, with three copies of the book 'RF Technologies for Low Power Wireless Communications'. Due to administrative reasons, we requested and were granted an extended contractual period to January 31, 2002. This period was used only to complete the last remaining technical activity that was carried out by the group of T. Itoh in the area of Active Integrated Antennas based on GaN transistor.

  16. Pulsed power and electron beams in the 21st century.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed power and accelerator technology for high energy density physics, radiography, and simulation has matured to the point that new facilities promise users reliability of quality data return unheard of just a short time ago. By this metric alone these machines and accelerators have graduated from being experiments in their own right, to the solid foundation of a new era of experimental science. The projected performance of a few of these new capabilities will be highlighted, along with some modest speculation concerning their future.

  17. The model of electrophysical processes increasing effectiveness of electric power technology based on electron beams *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Trifanov, I. V.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on electrophysical model of processes increasing energy efficiency of electric power technology based on electron beams that are generated by crossed electric field. The energy of beams is transformed with compression and simultaneous deceleration with crossed electric field into electric power to transfer into users’ electric power grid. We perform computer modeling of the processes to confirm the energy efficiency of the proposed model.

  18. A high voltage power supply for the AE-C and D low energy electron experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the electrical and mechanical design and operation of high voltage power supplies for space flight use. The supply was used to generate the spiraltron high voltage for low energy electron experiment on AE-C and D. Two versions of the supply were designed and built; one design is referred to as the low power version (AE-C) and the other as the high power version (AE-D). Performance is discussed under all operating conditions.

  19. Novel Power Electronics Three-Dimensional Heat Exchanger: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.; Cousineau, J.; Lustbader, J.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01

    Electric drive systems for vehicle propulsion enable technologies critical to meeting challenges for energy, environmental, and economic security. Enabling cost-effective electric drive systems requires reductions in inverter power semiconductor area. As critical components of the electric drive system are made smaller, heat removal becomes an increasing challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate an integrated approach to the design of thermal management systems for power semiconductors that matches the passive thermal resistance of the packaging with the active convective cooling performance of the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger concept builds on existing semiconductor thermal management improvements described in literature and patents, which include improved bonded interface materials, direct cooling of the semiconductor packages, and double-sided cooling. The key difference in the described concept is the achievement of high heat transfer performance with less aggressive cooling techniques by optimizing the passive and active heat transfer paths. An extruded aluminum design was selected because of its lower tooling cost, higher performance, and scalability in comparison to cast aluminum. Results demonstrated a heat flux improvement of a factor of two, and a package heat density improvement over 30%, which achieved the thermal performance targets.

  20. Overview of space power electronic's technology under the CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a NASA Program targeted at the development of specific technologies in the areas of transportation, operations and science. Each of these three areas consists of major elements and one of the operation's elements is the High Capacity Power element. The goal of this element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA initiatives. The High Capacity Power element is broken down into several subelements that includes energy conversion in the areas of the free piston Stirling power converter and thermoelectrics, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental compatibility and system's lifetime. A recent overview of the CSTI High capacity Power element and a description of each of the program's subelements is given by Winter (1989). The goals of the Power Management subelement are twofold. The first is to develop, test, and demonstrate high temperature, radiation-resistant power and control components and circuits that will be needed in the Power Conditioning, Control and Transmission (PCCT) subsystem of a space nuclear power system. The results obtained under this goal will also be applicable to the instrumentation and control subsystem of a space nuclear reactor. These components and circuits must perform reliably for lifetimes of 7-10 years. The second goal is to develop analytical models for use in computer simulations of candidate PCCT subsystems. Circuits which will be required for a specific PCCT subsystem will be designed and built to demonstrate their performance and, also, to validate the analytical models and simulations. The tasks under the Power Management subelement will now be described in terms of objectives, approach and present status of work.

  1. Learning Platform for Study of Power Electronic Application in Power Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, P.; Rompelman, O.

    2005-01-01

    Present engineering has to deal with increasingly complex systems. In particular, this is the case in electrical engineering. Though this is obvious in microelectronics, also in the field of power systems engineers have to design, operate and maintain highly complex systems such as power grids, energy converters and electrical drives. This is…

  2. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  3. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the area of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality of single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  4. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the areas of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  5. Electronic system for high power load control. [solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Parallel current paths are divided into two groups, with control devices in the current paths of one group each having a current limiting resistor, and the control devices in the other group each having no limiting resistor, so that when the control devices of the second group are turned fully on, a short circuit is achieved by the arrangement of parallel current paths. Separate but coordinated control signals are provided to turn on the control devices of the first group and increase their conduction toward saturation as a function of control input, and when fully on, or shortly before, to turn on the control devices of the second group and increase their conduction toward saturation as a function of the control input as that input continues to increase. Electronic means may be used to generate signals. The system may be used for 1-V characteristic measurements of solar arrays as well as for other load control purposes.

  6. Power dependence of electron density at various pressures in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Ju Ho; Jeon, Sang-Bum; Cho, Sung-Won; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-11-15

    Experimental observation of the electron density variation in inductively coupled plasmas with the electron energy probability function (EEPFs) was performed at various gas pressures at two RF powers (25 W and 200 W). The measured EEPFs at high power discharges (200 W) showed a Maxwellian distribution, while evolution of the EEPFs from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Druyvesteyn-like distribution was observed at low RF powers (25 W) with increasing pressure. A discrepancy of the electron density variation between the two RF powers was observed. This difference is explained by the modified collisional loss and the Bohm velocity from the EEPF of the bi-Maxwellian distribution and the Druyvesteyn–like distribution.

  7. Topology, Design, Analysis, and Thermal Management of Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, C.; Peng, F. Z.; Kelly, K. J.; O'Keefe, M.; Hassani, V.

    2008-01-01

    Power electronics circuits play an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicles include electric motor drive circuits and DC/DC converter circuits. Conventional circuit topologies, such as buck converters, voltage source inverters and bidirectional boost converters are challenged by system cost, efficiency, controllability, thermal management, voltage and current capability, and packaging issues. Novel topologies, such as isolated bidirectional DC/DC converters, multilevel converters, and Z-source inverters, offer potential improvement to hybrid vehicle system performance, extended controllability and power capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the topologies, design, and thermal management, and control of power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicle applications.

  8. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  9. Accurate measurements of the collision stopping powers for 5 to 30 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Miller Shawn

    Accurate knowledge of electron stopping powers is crucial for accurate radiation dosimetry and radiation transport calculations. Current values for stopping powers are based on a theoretical model, with estimated uncertainties of 0.5-1% (1σ) for electron energies greater than 100 keV. This work presents the first measurements of electron collision stopping powers capable of testing the theoretical values within these stated uncertainties. A large NaI spectrometer was used to measure the change in electron energy when an absorbing disk of known thickness was placed in an electron beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment were performed to account for the effects of surrounding materials. Energy differences between the calculated and measured spectra were used to determine corrections to the soft collision component of the theoretical stopping powers employed by the Monte Carlo simulations. Four different elemental materials were studied: Be, Al, Cu, and Ta. This provided a wide range of atomic numbers and densities over which to test the theory. In addition, stopping powers were measured for graphite (both standard and pyrolytic), A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-552 air equivalent plastic, and water. The incident electron energies ranged from 5 to 30 MeV. Generally, the measured stopping powers agree with the theoretical values within the experimental uncertainties, which range from 0.4% to 0.7% (1σ). Aluminum, however, exhibits a 0.7% discrepancy at higher electron energies. Furthermore, these measurements have established that the grain density stopping power is appropriate for graphite, contrary to the recommendations of ICRU Report 37. This removes a 0.2% uncertainty in air kerma calibrations, and impacts on dosimetric quantities determined via graphite calorimetry, such as ɛG for Fricke dosimetry and (W/ e)air for ion chamber measurements.

  10. Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

    2000-08-21

    Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities.

  11. Power Electronics Design of a Solar Powered In-car Wireless Tag for Asset Tracking and Parking Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Henaut, J.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports the design and testing of a power conditioning circuit for a solar powered in-car wireless tag for asset tracking and parking application. Existing long range asset tracking is based on the GSM/GPRS network, which requires expensive subscriptions. The EU FP7 project CEWITT aims at developing a credit card sized autonomous wireless tag with GNSS geo-positioning capabilities to ensure the integrity and cost effectiveness for parking applications. It was found in previous research that solar cells are the most suitable energy sources for this application. This study focused on the power electronics design for the wireless tag. A suitable solar cell was chosen for its high power density. Charging circuit, hysteresis control circuit and LDO were designed and integrated to meet the system requirement. Test results showed that charging efficiency of 80 % had been achieved.

  12. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  13. Computer Aided Design of Depressed Collectors for High Power Electron Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Valfells, A.; Kolander, M.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2003-12-01

    We present an overview of techniques and computer codes developed by us for systematic design of depressed collectors with special reference to devices that use gyrating electron beams. These techniques facilitate achievement of high power levels in electron tubes. ProfilEM is an aid to controlling the trajectories of primary electrons. BSCAT provides for tracing the trajectories of backscattered electrons. Multiple generations of backscatter can be obtained, while keeping the number of rays to be tracked within manageable limits. We describe examples of applying these codes to the case of two-stage depressed collectors for a 1.5 MW 110 GHz gyrotron.

  14. Microwave radiation power of relativistic electron beam with virtual cathode in the external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.; Koronovskii, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The study of the output power of the electromagnetic radiation of the relativistic electron beam (REB) with virtual cathode in the presence of external magnetic field has been found out. The typical dependencies of the output microwave power of the vircator versus external magnetic field have been analyzed by means of 3D electromagnetic simulation. It has been shown that the power of vircator demonstrates several maxima with external magnetic field growth. The characteristic features of the power behavior are determined by the conditions of the virtual cathode formation in the presence of the external transversal magnetic field and the REB self-magnetic fields.

  15. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  16. Proportional Drivewheel Power And Steering Electronics For A 3-Wheel Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1987-02-01

    A power electronics system for a mobile robot with ±12 volt batteries was developed, starting with a basic 3-wheel chassis with on-off drive motors, pneumatic tires, and manu-ally steered nosewheel. Power steering was provided by installing a suitable motor, gearbox, roller-chain, and sprockets. A steering servo was realized by adding a differential power amplifier and feedback potentiometer. Using an input pulse train of variable duty cycle, an independently controllable power module for each of the two drivewheel motors was designed for proportional no-load speed response. Circuit details and test results are presented.

  17. Batteryless wireless transmission system for electronic drum uses piezoelectric generator for play signal and power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Takemura, K.; Tanaka, A.; Douseki, T.

    2015-12-01

    A batteryless self-powered wireless transmission system has been developed that sends a signal from a drum pad to a synthesizer. The power generated by a piezoelectric generator functions both as the “Play” signal for the synthesizer and as the power source for the transmitter. An FM transmitter, which theoretically operates with zero latency, and a receiver with quick-response squelch of the received signal were developed for wireless transmission with a minimum system delay. Experimental results for an electronic drum without any connecting wires fully demonstrated the feasibility of self-powered wireless transmission with a latency of 900 μs.

  18. Microwave radiation power of relativistic electron beam with virtual cathode in the external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Saratov State Technical University, Politechnicheskaja 77, Saratov 410028

    2013-07-22

    The study of the output power of the electromagnetic radiation of the relativistic electron beam (REB) with virtual cathode in the presence of external magnetic field has been found out. The typical dependencies of the output microwave power of the vircator versus external magnetic field have been analyzed by means of 3D electromagnetic simulation. It has been shown that the power of vircator demonstrates several maxima with external magnetic field growth. The characteristic features of the power behavior are determined by the conditions of the virtual cathode formation in the presence of the external transversal magnetic field and the REB self-magnetic fields.

  19. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The EMA systems proposed for future space transportation applications are high power systems operating at voltages up to 270 Vdc and at current levels on the order of hundreds of amperes. The position of the actuator is controlled by modulating the flow of energy from the source to an electric motor with an inverter. Hard-switching of the semiconductor devices in the inverter results in considerable device switching stresses and losses and in the generation of substantial amounts of EMI. Both of these can be reduced by employing zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) techniques in the inverter. This project has focused on the development of a ZVS inverter for the Marshall Space Center EMA prototypes, which utilize brushless dc motors to convert electrical energy to mechanical energy. An inverter which permitted zero-voltage switching and a quasi-PWM operation was selected for study and implementation. A waveshaping circuit is added to the front of a standard three-phase inverter to achieve the desired switching properties. This circuit causes the input voltage of the three-phase inverter to ring to zero where it is clamped for a short period of time. During this zero-voltage period, any of the semiconductor switches in the three-phase inverter are switched on or off at zero voltage resulting in a reduction in switching losses and EMI. The operation of this waveshaping circuit and its interaction with the three-phase inverter are described. The different circuit modes were analyzed using equivalent circuits. Based on this analysis, design relationships were developed for calculating component values for the circuit elements in the waveshaping circuit. Waveforms of various voltages and currents in the waveshaping circuit were plotted and used to determine the ratings of the semiconductors in the waveshaping circuit. The implementation of this inverter are described. Block diagrams for the overall control system and the waveshaping circuit control are presented and discussed

  1. Electronic stopping power for heavy ions in SiC and SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Grove, David A.; Xue, Haizhou; Xue, Jianming; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate information of electronic stopping power is fundamental for broad advances in electronic industry, space exploration, national security, and sustainable energy technologies. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely applied to predict stopping powers and ion distributions for decades. Recent experimental results have, however, shown considerable errors in the SRIM predictions for stopping of heavy ions in compounds containing light elements, indicating an urgent need to improve current stopping power models. The electronic stopping powers of 35Cl, 80Br, 127I, and 197Au ions are experimentally determined in two important functional materials, SiC and SiO2, from tens to hundreds keV/u based on a single ion technique. By combining with the reciprocity theory, new electronic stopping powers are suggested in a region from 0 to 15 MeV, where large deviations from SRIM predictions are observed. For independent experimental validation of the electronic stopping powers we determined, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are utilized to measure the depth profiles of implanted Au ions in SiC with energies from 700 keV to 15 MeV. The measured ion distributions from both RBS and SIMS are considerably deeper (up to ~30%) than the predictions from the commercial SRIM code. In comparison, the new electronic stopping power values are utilized in a modified TRIM-85 (the original version of the SRIM) code, M-TRIM, to predict ion distributions, and the results are in good agreement with the experimentally measured ion distributions.

  2. High Efficiency Inverted Organic Solar Cells with a Neutral Fulleropyrrolidine Electron-Collecting Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; Yan, Congfei; Kan, Zhipeng; Wang, Yang; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A novel fulleropyrrolidine derivative, named FPNOH, was designed, synthesized, and utilized as an efficient electron-collecting (EC) layer for inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs). The grafted diethanolamino-polar moieties can not only trigger its function as an EC interlayer, but also induce orthogonal solubility that guarantees subsequent multilayer processing without interfacial mixing. A higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 8.34% was achieved for i-OSC devices with ITO/FPNOH EC electrode, compared to that of the sol-gel ZnO based reference devices with an optimized PCE value of 7.92%. High efficiency exceeding 7.7% was still achieved even for the devices with a relatively thick FPNOH film (16.9 nm). It is worthwhile to mention that this kind of material exhibits less thickness dependent performance, in contrast to widely utilized p-type conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) as well as the nonconjugated polyelectrolytes (NCPEs). Further investigation on illuminating intensity dependent parameters revealed the role of FPNOH in reducing interfacial trap-induced recombination at the ITO/active layer interface. PMID:27197741

  3. High-Voltage, High-Power Gaseous Electronics Switch For Electric Grid Power Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a high-voltage, high-power gas switch for use in low-cost power conversion terminals on the electric power grid. Direct-current (dc) power transmission has many advantages over alternating current (ac) transmission, but at present the high cost of ac-dc power interconversion limits the use of dc. The gas switch we are developing conducts current through a magnetized cold cathode plasma in hydrogen or helium to reach practical current densities > 1 A/cm2. Thermal and sputter damage of the cathode by the incident ion flux is a major technical risk, and is being addressed through use of a ``self-healing'' liquid metal cathode (eg, gallium). Plasma conditions and cathode sputtering loss are estimated by analyzing plasma spectral emission. A particle-in-cell plasma model is used to understand various aspects of switch operation, including the conduction phase (where plasma densities can exceed 1013 cm-3), the switch-open phase (where the high-voltage must be held against gas breakdown on the left side of Paschen's curve), and the switching transitions (especially the opening process, which is initiated by forming an ion-matrix sheath adjacent to a control grid). The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  4. Impact of Radiation Hardness and Operating Temperatures of Silicon Carbide Electronics on Space Power System Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) electronics operating temperatures on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD), or Power Conditioning (PC), subsystem radiator size and mass requirements was evaluated for three power output levels (100 kW(e) , 1 MW(e), and 10 MW(e)) for near term technology ( i.e. 1500 K turbine inlet temperature) Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) power systems with a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) heat source. The study was conducted for assumed PC radiator temperatures ranging from 370 to 845 K and for three scenarios of electrical energy to heat conversion levels which needed to be rejected to space by means of the PC radiator. In addition, during part of the study the radiation hardness of the PC electronics was varied at a fixed separation distance to estimate its effect on the mass of the instrument rated reactor shadow shield. With both the PC radiator and the conical shadow shield representing major components of the overall power system the influence of the above on total power system mass was also determined. As expected, results show that the greatest actual mass savings achieved by the use of SiC electronics occur with high capacity power systems. Moreover, raising the PC radiator temperature above 600 K yields only small additional system mass savings. The effect of increased radiation hardness on total system mass is to reduce system mass by virtue of lowering the shield mass.

  5. Impact of radiation hardness and operating temperatures of silicon carbide electronics on space power system mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) electronics operating temperatures on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD), or Power Conditioning (PC), subsystem radiator size and mass requirements was evaluated for three power output levels (100 kWe, 1 MWe, and 10 MWe) for near term technology (i.e. 1500 K turbine inlet temperature) Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) power systems with a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) heat source. The study was conducted for assumed PC radiator temperatures ranging from 370 to 845 K and for three scenarios of electrical energy to heat conversion levels which needed to be rejected to space by means of the PC radiator. In addition, during part of the study the radiation hardness of the PC electronics was varied at a fixed separation distance to estimate its effect on the mass of the instrument rated reactor shadow shield. With both the PC radiator and the conical shadow shield representing major components of the overall power system the influence of the above on total power system mass was also determined. As expected, results show that the greatest actual mass savings achieved by the use of SiC electronics occur with high capacity power systems. Moreover, raising the PC radiator temperature above 600 K yields only small additional system mass savings. The effect of increased radiation hardness on total system mass is to reduce system mass by virtue of lowering the shield mass.

  6. Comparison of bidirectional power electronics with unidirectional topologies using active discharging circuits for feeding DEAP transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    To enable a continuous operation of a DEAP transducer, the feeding power electronics must provide the capability to charge and discharge the transducer to enable a continuous voltage adjustment. While in case of energy harvesting applications a bidirectional power electronics is mandatory, for actuator applications also unidirectional power electronics with active discharging circuits can be used. Thus, in this contribution a bidirectional flyback-converter is compared to a unidirectional with different discharging circuits. For this purpose, the design of a resistive and an inductive-resistive discharging circuit is proposed, that are connected in parallel to the DEAP and activated when required. Modulation schemes for both discharging circuits are derived that enable a continuous voltage control. Based on realized prototypes of the investigated topologies the different converters are finally compared to each other.

  7. New continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, Tokushi

    1999-03-01

    Continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction (CIC-CPPFC) electronic ballasts are proposed in this paper. The CPPFC circuit and unity power factor condition using the charge pump concept are derived and analyzed. The average lamp current control with switching frequency modulation was developed so that the low crest factor and constant lamp power operation can be achieved. The developed electronic ballast has continuous input current, so that a small line input filter can be used. The proposed CIC-CPPFC electronic ballast was implemented and tested with two 45-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that the measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements.

  8. Low power hard-rad electronics for particle detection in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthomier, Matthieu; Techer, Jean-Denis

    2014-05-01

    Particle detection in highly-radiative environment is one of the experimental challenges of planetary exploration. We present the design and performances of a compact electron detector that takes advantage of the development of a hard-rad and ultra low-power front-end electronics. The Applied Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) consists of charge sensitive amplifiers and discriminators allowing a 4.5MHz periodic counting rate. The 16-channels ASIC only takes 30mW of power which is the power budget of single channel hybrid components with similar performances. Each channel can be independently configured in order to adjust the detection threshold of the discriminator. An internal test circuitry is used to monitor the behavior of the electronics. This component, that has been tested at high ionizing doses, is immune to Single Event Latchups up to at least 80 MeV.cm^2/mg and it will fly on the Solar Orbiter ESA mission.

  9. Compound Semiconductor Devices for Low-Power High-Efficiency Radio Frequency Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.; Sloan, L.R.

    1999-02-18

    The power consumption of Radio Frequency (RF) electronics is a significant issue for Wireless systems. Since most wireless systems are portable and thus battery operated, reductions in DC power consumption can significantly reduce the weight and/or increase the battery lifetime of the system. As transmission consumes significantly more power than reception for most Wireless applications, previous efforts have been focused on increasing the efficiency of RF power amplification. These efforts have resulted in large increases in transmit efficiencies with research-grade amplifier efficiencies approaching 100%. In this paper, they describe their efforts on reducing power consumption of reception and other small signal RF functions. Additionally, recent power efficiency measurements on InP HEMT devices for transmission are presented. This work focuses on the needs of today's typical portable Wireless systems, which operate at frequencies up to several GHz.

  10. A Switching-Mode Power Supply Design Tool to Improve Learning in a Power Electronics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miaja, P. F.; Lamar, D. G.; de Azpeitia, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Hernando, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The static design of ac/dc and dc/dc switching-mode power supplies (SMPS) relies on a simple but repetitive process. Although specific spreadsheets, available in various computer-aided design (CAD) programs, are widely used, they are difficult to use in educational applications. In this paper, a graphic tool programmed in MATLAB is presented,…

  11. Power supply design for the filament of the high-voltage electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lige; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jun; Huang, Jiang; Liu, Kaifeng; Zuo, Chen

    2015-12-01

    The filament is a key component for the electron emission in the high-voltage electron accelerator. In order to guarantee the stability of the beam intensity and ensure the proper functioning for the power supply in the airtight steel barrel, an efficient filament power supply under accurate control is required. The paper, based on the dual-switch forward converter and synchronous rectification technology, puts forward a prototype of power supply design for the filament of the high-voltage accelerator. The simulation is conducted with MATLAB-Simulink on the main topology and the control method. Loss analysis and thermal analysis are evaluated using the FEA method. Tests show that in this prototype, the accuracy of current control is higher than 97.5%, and the efficiency of the power supply reaches 87.8% when the output current is 40 A.

  12. FY2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2012-01-31

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  13. FY2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  14. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  15. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  16. Integrated smart two-phase spreader to enhance reliability of power electronic modules in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Mikael; Barremaecker, Laurent; Wilson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    Reliability of power electronic modules is a key characteristic of existing and innovative modules. An increasing quantity of these modules is used in a large range of applications and addresses from annex up to vital functions, especially with the more electronic aircraft and recent developments in transport applications. To propose a solution to this lifetime issue, Microsemi and EHP have designed, manufactured and tested an improved flat heat pipe to fulfil aeronautic requirements. The frame of this development is based on the existing SP3 power module of Microsemi and significant decrease of thermal resistance is demonstrated by thermal tests.

  17. Trapping hot quasi-particles in a high-power superconducting electronic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Aref, T.; Kauppila, V. J.; Meschke, M.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.; Pekola, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    The performance of hybrid superconducting electronic coolers is usually limited by the accumulation of hot quasi-particles in their superconducting leads. This issue is all the more stringent in large-scale and high-power devices, as required by the applications. Introducing a metallic drain connected to the superconducting electrodes via a fine-tuned tunnel barrier, we efficiently remove quasi-particles and obtain electronic cooling from 300 mK down to 130 mK with a 400 pW cooling power. A simple thermal model accounts for the experimental observations.

  18. An efficient microwave power source: The free-electron laser afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.M. )

    1993-10-15

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser (FEL) afterburner, that consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a traveling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and thus produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism, and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.4 GW at 17.12 GHz, can be obtained from a 1 kA, 5 MeV electron beam with an energy spread of less than 1% and an emittance of less than 0.5[times]10[sup [minus]3] [pi] rad m.

  19. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; B. Poelker; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-03-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy.

  20. Electronic stopping powers for heavy ions in SiC and SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, K.; Xue, H.; Zhang, Y. Weber, W. J.; Zhu, Z.; Grove, D. A.; Xue, J.

    2014-01-28

    Accurate information on electronic stopping power is fundamental for broad advances in materials science, electronic industry, space exploration, and sustainable energy technologies. In the case of slow heavy ions in light targets, current codes and models provide significantly inconsistent predictions, among which the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code is the most commonly used one. Experimental evidence, however, has demonstrated considerable errors in the predicted ion and damage profiles based on SRIM stopping powers. In this work, electronic stopping powers for Cl, Br, I, and Au ions are experimentally determined in two important functional materials, SiC and SiO{sub 2}, based on a single ion technique, and new electronic stopping power values are derived over the energy regime from 0 to 15 MeV, where large deviations from the SRIM predictions are observed. As an experimental validation, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are utilized to measure the depth profiles of implanted Au ions in SiC for energies from 700 keV to 15 MeV. The measured ion distributions by both RBS and SIMS are considerably deeper than the SRIM predictions, but agree well with predictions based on our derived stopping powers.

  1. Electronic Stopping Powers For Heavy Ions In SiC And SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Ke; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, Zihua; Grove, David A.; Xue, H.; Xue, Jianming; Weber, William J.

    2014-01-24

    Accurate information on electronic stopping power is fundamental for broad advances in materials science, electronic industry, space exploration, and sustainable energy technologies. In the case of slow heavy ions in light targets, current codes and models provide significantly inconsistent predictions, among which the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code is the most commonly used one. Experimental evidence, however, has demonstrated considerable errors in the predicted ion and damage profiles based on SRIM stopping powers. In this work, electronic stopping powers for Cl, Br, I, and Au ions are experimentally determined in two important functional materials, SiC and SiO2, based on a single ion technique, and new electronic stopping power values are derived over the energy regime from 0 to 15 MeV, where large deviations from the SRIM predictions are observed. As an experimental validation, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are utilized to measure the depth profiles of implanted Au ions in SiC for energies from 700 keV to 15MeV. The measured ion distributions by both RBS and SIMS are considerably deeper than the SRIM predictions, but agree well with predictions based on our derived stopping powers.

  2. Power Electronics for Distributed Energy Systems and Transmission and Distribution Applications: Assessing the Technical Needs for Utility Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.

    2005-12-21

    Power electronics can provide utilities the ability to more effectively deliver power to their customers while providing increased reliability to the bulk power system. In general, power electronics is the process of using semiconductor switching devices to control and convert electrical power flow from one form to another to meet a specific need. These conversion techniques have revolutionized modern life by streamlining manufacturing processes, increasing product efficiencies, and increasing the quality of life by enhancing many modern conveniences such as computers, and they can help to improve the delivery of reliable power from utilities. This report summarizes the technical challenges associated with utilizing power electronics devices across the entire spectrum from applications to manufacturing and materials development, and it provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) needs for power electronics systems in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) could make a substantial impact toward improving the reliability of the bulk power system.

  3. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  4. Intrinsic noise power spectrum for the electronic noise in radiography image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Eun; Shin, Choul Woo

    2015-03-01

    In order to design low-dose imaging systems, the radiography detector should have a good noise performance especially at low incident exposures. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance at low incident exposures is influenced by the electronic noise of readout circuits as well as the quantum noise of x-rays. Hence, analyzing the electronic noise of a detector is of importance in developing good detectors. However, the SNR value for electronic noise is zero and does not provide any useful information. Observing the standard deviation of the acquired image without exposure may confuse the analysis due to the inconsistent electronic gains of the readout circuits. Hence, it is required to find an appropriate evaluation scheme for the electronic noise. A blind electronic noise evaluation approach, which uses a set of acquired images at various incident exposures, is considered in this paper. We calculate the electronic gain and then derive an intrinsic noise power spectrum (NPS), which is independent of the electronic gain. Furthermore, we can obtain the intrinsic NPS only for the electronic noise. The proposed evaluation schemes are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from various development prototypes of direct and indirect detectors. It is shown that the proposed schemes can efficiently provide an evaluation for the electronic noise performance.

  5. Electron-Beam Diagnostics for Jefferson Lab's High Power Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, G. A.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.; Denard, J.; Feldl, E.; Piot, P.; Song, J.; Ursic, R.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the current plans for the diagnostic complement for Jefferson Lab's IRFEL are presented. Diagnostic devices include optical transition radiation beam viewers, both strip-line and button beam position monitors, multislit beam emittance measuring devices, coherent synchrotron and transition radiation bunch length monitoring devices, and synchrotron light cameras for measuring the beam profile at high average power. Most devices have update rates of order 1 sec or shorter, and all are controlled through an EPICS control system. Results of prototype testing in Jefferson Lab's Injector Test Stand are presented.

  6. A high-current microsecond thermionic-cathode electron accelerator for powerful microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, N.I.; Ilyakov, E.V.; Korablev, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    The high-current thermionic-cathode accelerator operates in single-shot mode. A magnetron-injection gun forms a tubular beam with either straight or helical electron trajectories, depending on the magnetic field intensity. When producing electrons with straight trajectories, the electron pulse has a voltage of 300 kV, a current of 300 A, and a width of 10 {mu}sec. A relativistic carcinotron using this beam emits radiation at a wavelength of 6.5 cm with a power of 7 MW and a pulse width of 10{mu}sec.

  7. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics: 2014 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Meydbray, J.; Donovan, M.

    2014-08-01

    The 2012 NREL report 'Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics' provides a standard methodology for estimating the performance benefit of distributed power electronics under partial shading conditions. Since the release of the report, experiments have been conducted for a number of products and for different system configurations. Drawing from these experiences, updates to the test and analysis methods are recommended. Proposed changes in data processing have the benefit of reducing the sensitivity to measurement errors and weather variability, as well as bringing the updated performance score in line with measured and simulated values of the shade recovery benefit of distributed PV power electronics. Also, due to the emergence of new technologies including sub-module embedded power electronics, the shading method has been extended to include power electronics that operate at a finer granularity than the module level. An update to the method is proposed to account for these emerging technologies that respond to shading differently than module-level devices. The partial shading test remains a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations as would be experienced by typical residential or commercial rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. Performance data for multiple products tested using this method are discussed, based on equipment from Enphase, Solar Edge, Maxim Integrated and SMA. In general, the annual recovery of shading losses from the module-level electronics evaluated is 25-35%, with the major difference between different trials being related to the number of parallel strings in the test installation rather than differences between the equipment tested.

  8. A novel technique for electronic phasing of high power fiber amplifier arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, T. M.; Baker, J. T.; Sanchez, Anthony D.; Robin, C. A.; Vergien, C. L.; Zeringue, C.; Gallant, D.; Lu, Chunte A.; Pulford, Benjamin; Bronder, T. J.; Lucero, Arthur

    2009-06-01

    We report high power phase locked fiber amplifier array using the Self-Synchronous Locking of Optical Coherence by Single-detector Electronic-frequency Tagging technique. We report the first experimental results for a five element amplifier array with a total locked power of more than 725-W. We will report on experimental measurements of the phase fluctuations versus time when the control loop is closed. The rms phase error was measured to be λ/60. Recent results will be reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the highest fiber laser power to be coherently combined.

  9. Robust, Rework-able Thermal Electronic Packaging: Applications in High Power TR Modules for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Hunter, Don; Miller, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires improvements in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and are now being implemented side-by-side with more standard technology typically used in flight hardware.

  10. Modeling Photovoltaic Module-Level Power Electronics in the System Advisor Model; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Module-level power electronics, such as DC power optimizers, microinverters, and those found in AC modules, are increasing in popularity in smaller-scale photovoltaic (PV) systems as their prices continue to decline. Therefore, it is important to provide PV modelers with guidelines about how to model these distributed power electronics appropriately in PV modeling software. This paper extends the work completed at NREL that provided recommendations to model the performance of distributed power electronics in NREL’s popular PVWatts calculator [1], to provide similar guidelines for modeling these technologies in NREL's more complex System Advisor Model (SAM). Module-level power electronics - such as DC power optimizers, microinverters, and those found in AC modules-- are increasing in popularity in smaller-scale photovoltaic (PV) systems as their prices continue to decline. Therefore, it is important to provide PV modelers with guidelines about how to model these distributed power electronics appropriately in PV modeling software.

  11. Electron Transport and Ion Acceleration in a Low-power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant. The plasma density peak observed at the axis of the 2.6 cm cylindrical Hall thruster is likely to be due to the convergent flux of ions, which are born in the annular part of the channel and accelerated towards the thruster axis.

  12. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2001-01-01

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  13. Design and power management of an offshore medium voltage DC microgrid realized through high voltage power electronics technologies and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainger, Brandon Michael

    The growth in the electric power industry's portfolio of Direct Current (DC) based generation and loads have captured the attention of many leading research institutions. Opportunities for using DC based systems have been explored in electric ship design and have been a proven, reliable solution for transmitting bulk power onshore and offshore. To integrate many of the renewable resources into our existing AC grid, a number of power conversions through power electronics are required to condition the equipment for direct connection. Within the power conversion stages, there is always a requirement to convert to or from DC. The AC microgrid is a conceptual solution proposed for integrating various types of renewable generation resources. The fundamental microgrid requirements include the capability of operating in islanding mode and/or grid connected modes. The technical challenges associated with microgrids include (1) operation modes and transitions that comply with IEEE1547 without extensive custom engineering and (2) control architecture and communication. The Medium Voltage DC (MVDC) architecture, explored by the University of Pittsburgh, can be visualized as a special type of DC microgrid. This dissertation is multi-faceted, focused on many design aspects of an offshore DC microgrid. The focal points of the discussion are focused on optimized high power, high frequency magnetic material performance in electric machines, transformers, and DC/DC power converters---all components found within offshore, power system architectures. A new controller design based upon model reference control is proposed and shown to stabilize the electric motor drives (modeled as constant power loads), which serve as the largest power consuming entities in the microgrid. The design and simulation of a state-of-the-art multilevel converter for High Voltage DC (HVDC) is discussed and a component sensitivity analysis on fault current peaks is explored. A power management routine is

  14. High-power microwave amplifier based on overcritical relativistic electron beam without external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkin, S. A. Koronovskii, A. A.; Frolov, N. S.; Hramov, A. E.; Rak, A. O.; Kuraev, A. A.

    2015-04-13

    The high-power scheme for the amplification of powerful microwave signals based on the overcritical electron beam with a virtual cathode (virtual cathode amplifier) has been proposed and investigated numerically. General output characteristics of the virtual cathode amplifier including the dependencies of the power gain on the input signal frequency and amplitude have been obtained and analyzed. The possibility of the geometrical working frequency tuning over the range about 8%–10% has been shown. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed virtual cathode amplifier scheme may be considered as the perspective high-power microwave amplifier with gain up to 18 dB, and with the following important advantages: the absence of external magnetic field, the simplicity of construction, the possibility of geometrical frequency tuning, and the amplification of relatively powerful microwave signals.

  15. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  16. Design, definition, and manufacture participation for the SAR Electronic Power Converter (EPC) breadboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassens, J. B.; Schwarz, F. C.

    1983-05-01

    A principle of fine regulation applied to the high voltage line supplying a pulsed load (radar tube) is presented. The high voltage power supply system is a combination of a single series resonant converter and a capacitor multiplier in the output stages. The electronic power conversion system uses a Schwarz converter employing a series resonant circuit for the transfer and control of power. An internal frequency of 35 kHz enhances the power density of the converter model. This model provides 16 kV for the helix-cathode circuit of a klystron with an accuracy of 0.5 per mill and 11 kV for the collector-cathode circuit with an accuracy of 5%. Experiments suggest that the improved power supply should alleviate problems associated with high voltage transformers and ensure the high accuracy required for the voltage control for the helix-cathode circuit to avoid distortion in the returning signal of a spaceborne radar system.

  17. Unique Power Electronics and Drives Experimental Bench (PEDEB) to Facilitate Learning and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, S.; Farswan, R. S.; Fernandes, B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Experimentation is important for learning and research in the field of power electronics and drives. However, a great deal of equipment is required to study the various topologies, controllers, and functionalities. Thus, the cost of establishing good laboratories and research centers is high. To address this problem, the authors have developed a…

  18. PowerCore{trademark}, NiMH production prototype for portable electronics. Quarterly report R02

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.C.

    1998-01-30

    The objective of this project is to build a production prototype of Power Core structural battery for applications as a hard case for portable electronic devices. The reports summarizes the work completed since the last report. It briefly describes the problems that were experienced. It also gives details of progress versus statement of work task definitions.

  19. Microwave generation power in a nonrelativistic electron beam with virtual cathode in a retarding electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, E. N.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Koronovskiĭ, A. A.; Hramov, A. E.; Morozov, M. Yu.

    2006-05-01

    The power of microwave generation in a nonrelativistic electron beam with virtual cathode formed in a static retarding electric field (low-voltage vircator system) has been studied experimentally and by means of numerical simulation within the framework of a one-dimensional theory. The limits of applicability of the one-dimensional theory have been experimentally determined.

  20. Hybridized Electromagnetic-Triboelectric Nanogenerator for a Self-Powered Electronic Watch.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ting; Wang, Xue; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-12-22

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator including a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and six electromagnetic generators (EMGs) that can effectively scavenge biomechanical energy for sustainably powering an electronic watch. Triggered by the natural motions of the wearer's wrist, a magnetic ball at the center in an acrylic box with coils on each side will collide with the walls, resulting in outputs from both the EMGs and the TENG. By using the hybridized nanogenerator to harvest the biomechanical energy, the electronic watch can be continuously powered under different motion types of the wearer's wrist, where the best approach is to charge a 100 μF capacitor in 39 s to maintain the continuous operation of the watch for 456 s. To increase the working time of the watch further, a homemade Li-ion battery has been utilized as the energy storage unit for realizing the continuous working of the watch for about 218 min by using the hybridized nanogenerator to charge the battery within 32 min. This work will provide the opportunities for developing a nanogenerator-based built-in power source for self-powered wearable electronics such as an electronic watch. PMID:26565597

  1. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn; Chris Behre; Stephen Vincent Benson; Michael Bevins; Don Bullard; James Coleman; L. Dillon-Townes; Tom Elliott; Joe Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; Ronald Lassiter; George Neil; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free-electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  2. High-power Čerenkov microwave oscillators utilizing High-Current nanosecond Electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, S. D.; Polevin, S. D.; Rostov, V. V.

    1996-12-01

    A short review is given of results obtained at the Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences on generating high-power microwave radiation. Most of the research was devoted to a study of stimulated Čerenkov radiation from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that the efficiency of a relativistic 3-cm backward wave tube with a nonuniform coupling resistance can reach 35%. High-frequency radiation was discovered in the emission spectrum of the Čerenkov oscillators and it was shown that the nature of the radiation was associated with the stimulated scattering of low-frequency radiation by the relativistic electrons. Radiation with a power of 500 MW was obtained in the 8-mm wavelength range using a two-beam Čerenkov oscillator. High-current pulse-periodic nanosecond accelerators with a charging device utilizing a Tesla transformer were used in the experiments. The possibility was demonstrated of generating high-power microwave radiation with a pulse-repetition frequency of up to 100 Hz. An average power of ˜500 W was achieved from the relativistic oscillators. A relativistic backward wave tube with a high-current electron beam was used to make a prototype nanosecond radar device. Some of the results presented were obtained jointly with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Applied Physics. Questions concerning multiwave Čerenkov interaction are not considered in this paper.

  3. Description and Assessment of Activities Oriented to Enhance a First Course on Power Electronics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, C.; Zumel, P.; Sanz, M.; Lazaro, A.; Barrado, A.

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing search for excellence in education requires the review and renewal of teaching strategies, concentrating efforts on courses that are not attractive to students or are considered to be unsuccessful. This paper is focused on an undergraduate power electronics course in which students had poor academic results in the past. The actions…

  4. Powerful electrostatic FEL: Regime of operation, recovery of the spent electron beam and high voltage generator

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo, I.; Gong, J.

    1995-02-01

    FEL, driven by a Cockcroft-Walton electrostatic accelerator with the recovery of the spent electron beam, is proposed as powerful radiation source for plasma heating. The low gain and high gain regimes are compared in view of the recovery problem and the high gain regime is shown to be much more favourable. A new design of the onion Cockcroft-Walton is presented.

  5. Electron heating mode transition induced by mixing radio frequency and ultrahigh frequency dual frequency powers in capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-05-01

    Electron heating mode transitions induced by mixing the low- and high-frequency power in dual-frequency nitrogen discharges at 400 mTorr pressure are presented. As the low-frequency (13.56 MHz) power decreases and high-frequency (320 MHz) power increases for the fixed power of 200 W, there is a transition of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) from Druyvesteyn to bi-Maxwellian type characterized by a distinguished warm electron population. It is shown that this EEDF evolution is attributed to the transition from collisional to collisionless stochastic heating of the low-energy electrons.

  6. A Unique Approach to Power Electronics and Motor Cooling in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Curtis William; Hsu, John S; Lowe, Kirk T; Conklin, Jim

    2007-01-01

    An innovative system for cooling the power electronics of hybrid electric vehicles is presented. This system uses a typical automotive refrigerant R-134a (1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane) as the cooling fluid in a system that can be used as either part of the existing vehicle passenger air conditioning system or separately and independently of the existing air conditioner. Because of the design characteristics, the cooling coefficient of performance is on the order of 40. Because liquid refrigerant is used to cool the electronics directly, high heat fluxes can result while maintaining an electronics junction temperature at an acceptable value. In addition, an inverter housing that occupies only half the volume of a conventional inverter has been designed to take advantage of this cooling system. Planned improvements should result in further volume reductions while maintaining a high power level.

  7. An automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Filarowski, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Precise welds with an electron beam welder are difficult to reproduce because the factors effecting the electron beam current density distribution are not easily controlled. One method for measuring the power density distribution in EB welds uses computer tomography to reconstruct an image of the current density distribution. This technique uses many separate pieces of hardware and software packages to obtain the data and then reconstruct it consequently, transferring this technology between different machines and operators is difficult. Consolidating all of the hardware and software into one machine to execute the same tasks will allow for real-time measurement of the EB power density distribution and will provide a facilitated means for transferring various welding procedure between different machines and operators, thereby enhancing reproducibility of electron beam welds.

  8. Electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    Atomistic calculations of the electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles are demonstrated without relying on linear response theory. The computational approach is based on nonequilibrium simulation of the electronic response using real-time time-dependent density functional theory. By quantifying the velocity dependence of the steady-state charge of the projectile proton and α particle from nonequilibrium electron densities, we examine the extent to which linear response theory is applicable. We further assess the influence of the exchange-correlation approximation in real-time time-dependent density functional theory on the stopping power with range-separated and regular hybrid functionals with exact exchange.

  9. Electron-beam and high speed optical diagnostics for the Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; McVey, B. D.; Greegor, R. B.; Dowell, D. H.

    The Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) program is a collaboration of Boeing and Los Alamos to build a free-electron laser (FEL) operating at a wavelength of 10 microns and an average power of 100 kW. This program includes demonstration experiments at Boeing on the injector and at Los Alamos on a single accelerator master oscillator power amplifier (SAMOPA). In response to the simulations of the expected electron beam properties, diagnostic plans have been developed for the low-duty and the 25 percent-duty operations of APLE. Preliminary evaluations of diagnostics based on information conversion to visible or near infrared light (optical transition radiation, Cerenkov radiation, synchrotron radiation, and spontaneous emission radiation) or electrical signals (striplines, toroids, flying wires, etc.) are addressed.

  10. Simulations of the high average power selene free electron laser prototype. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, D.D.

    1994-06-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) technology continues to advance, providing alternative solutions to existing and potential problems. The capabilities of an FEL with respect to tunability, power and efficiency make it an attractive choice when moving into new laser utilization fields. The initial design parameters, for any new system, offer a good base to begin system simulation tests in an effort to determine the best possible design. This is a study of the Novosibirsk design which is a prototype for the proposed SELENE FEL. The design uses a three-section, low-power optical klystron followed by a single-pass, high-power radiator. This system is inherently sensitive to electron beam quality, but affords flexibility in achieving the final design. The performance of the system is studied using the initial parameters. An FEL, configured as a simple, two section optical klystron is studied to determine the basic operating characteristics of a high current FEL klystron.

  11. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed.

  12. Power consumption and byproducts in electron beam and electrical discharge processing of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-02-20

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-process reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric-pressure air streams are based on non-thermal plasmas. Electron beam, pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge methods are among the more extensively investigated techniques for producing non-thermal plasmas. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. In this paper the authors present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, a pulsed corona and a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. They have used these reactors to study the removal of a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. They present a description of the reactions that control the efficiency of the plasma process. They have found that pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge reactors are most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For VOCs requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the use of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption. Electron beam processing is remarkably more effective for all of the VOCs tested. For control of VOC emissions from dilute, large volume sources such as paint spray booths, cost analysis shows that the electron beam method is cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  13. Impurity segregation behavior in polycrystalline silicon ingot grown with variation of electron-beam power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Kyu; Lee, Jin-Seok; Jang, Bo-Yun; Kim, Joon-Soo; Ahn, Young-Soo; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) systems have been used to improve the purity of metallurgical grade silicon feedstock for photovoltaic application. Our advanced EBM system is able to effectively remove volatile impurities using a heat source with high energy from an electron gun and to continuously allow impurities to segregate at the top of an ingot solidified in a directional solidification (DS) zone in a vacuum chamber. Heat in the silicon melt should move toward the ingot bottom for the desired DS. However, heat flux though the ingot is changed as the ingot becomes longer due to low thermal conductivity of silicon. This causes a non-uniform microstructure of the ingot, finally leading to impurity segregation at its middle. In this research, EB power irradiated on the silicon melt was controlled during the ingot growth in order to suppress the change of heat flux. EB power was reduced from 12 to 6.6 kW during the growth period of 45 min with a drop rate of 0.125 kW/min. Also, the silicon ingot was grown under a constant EB power of 12 kW to estimate the effect of the drop rate of EB power. When the EB power was reduced, the grains with columnar shape were much larger at the middle of the ingot compared to the case of constant EB power. Also, the present research reports a possible reason for the improvement of ingot purity by considering heat flux behaviors.

  14. Problem-Based and Project-Oriented Learning. An Efficient Way to Implement Research Based Teaching in Power Electronic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Chen, Zhe

    Power electronics is an emerging technology. New applications are added every year as well as the power handling capabilities is steadily increasing. One example is renewable energy, which is efficiently enabled by power electronics. The demands to the education of engineers in this field are also increasing. Generally, the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without extra study time. This paper presents a teaching approach, which very fast makes it possible for the students to obtain in-depth skills into new research areas, and this method is the problem-oriented and project-based learning. The necessary skills for power electronic engineers are outlined that is followed up by a description on how the problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum in power electronics and drives at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics related projects at different study levels are finally presented.

  15. Design of spherical electron gun for ultra high frequency, CW power inductive output tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Meenu; Joshi, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inductive Output Tube (IOT) is an amplifier that usually operates in UHF range. It is an electron tube whose basic structure is similar to conventional vacuum devices. This device is widely used in broadcast applications but is now being explored for scientific applications also specifically, particle accelerators and fusion plasma heating purposes. The paper describes the design approach of a spherical gridded electron gun of a 500 MHz, 100 kW CW power IOT. The electron gun structure has been simulated and optimized for operating voltage and current of 40kV and 3.5 A respectively. The electromagnetic analysis of this spherical electron gun has been carried out in CST and TRAK codes.

  16. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Drift Instability in a High-Power Pulsed Magnetron Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features.

  17. Modulated electron cyclotron drift instability in a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge.

    PubMed

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features. PMID:26001007

  18. Generation of Alfven waves by high power pulse at the electron plasma frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Compernolle, Bart Gilbert

    The physics of the interaction between plasmas and high power waves with frequencies in the electron plasma frequency range is of importance in many areas of space and plasma physics. A great deal of laboratory research has been done on the interaction of microwaves in a density gradient when o = ope in unmagnetized plasmas. [SWK74, WS78, KSW74]. Extensive studies of HF-ionospheric modifications have been performed [Fej79] as evidenced by experiments at Arecibo [HMD92, BHK86, CDF92, FGI85], at the HAARP facility [RKK98] in Alaska, at the EISCAT observatory in Norway [IHR99], and at SURA in Russia [FKS99]. This dissertation focusses on the interaction with a fully magnetized plasma, capable of supporting Alfven waves. The experiment is performed in the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA [GPL91] (Helium, n = 1012 cm-3, B = 1 kG - 2.5 kG). A number of experiments have been done at LAPD using antennas, skin depth scale currents and laser produced plasmas to generate Alfven waves [LGM99, GVL97a, GVL97b, VGV01]. In this work a high power pulse 6th, frequency in the electron plasma frequency range is launched into the radial density gradient, perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The microwave pulses last on the order of one ion gyro period and has a maximum power of |E|2/ nT ≃ .5 in the afterglow. The absorption of these waves leads to a pulse of field aligned suprathermal electrons. This electron current pulse then launches with Alfven wave with o ≤ o ci. The experiment was performed bath in ordinary node (O-mode) and extraordinary (X-mode), for different background magnetic fields B0, different temperatures (afterglow vs discharge) and different power levels of the incoming microwaves. It was found that the Alfven wave generation can be explained by Cherenkov radiation of Alfven waves by the suprathermal electron pulse. Theoretical solutions for the perturbed magnetic field due to a pulse of field aligned electrons were obtained, and shown to be

  19. Low power readout electronics for a UV MCP detector with cross strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, M.; Diebold, S.; Barnstedt, J.; Hermanutz, S.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Schanz, T.; Werner, K.

    2014-03-01

    After the shutdown of the Hubble Space Telescope in a few years, new astronomical missions for the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range between 91 and 300 nm with improved optics and detectors will be necessary. This fact drives our development of solar blind photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) UV detectors with high quantum efficiency, high spatial resolution, and low power readout electronics. We plan to use a cross-strip anode (XSA), which has a high spatial resolution and additionally allows a low gain operation of the MCPs which leads to an increased lifetime of the MCPs compared to detectors with other anode types. The main difficulty in implementing an XSA in a detector for space applications is the need for a (pre-) amplifier, a shaper, and an ADC for each of the strips, which means large power consumption and spatial requirements. The solution we are studying is the application of the so-called Beetle chip. This allows for an implementation of a readout electronics for an XSA with a power consumption of less then 10 W. For the tests of our readout electronics prototype, and for the burn-in of the MCPs, we recently finished a setup in a vacuum chamber that is similar to the configuration in the final detector. We present a brief overview of our detector design and details of the readout electronics setup as well as details of the setup in our vacuum chamber.

  20. Estimation and harvesting of human heat power for wearable electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurdzia, P.; Brzozowski, I.; Bratek, P.; Gelmuda, W.; Kos, A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of self-powered wearable electronic devices that are capable of harvesting free available energy dissipated by the user in the form of human heat. The free energy source is intended to be used as a secondary power source supporting primary battery in a sensor bracelet. The main scope of the article is a presentation of the concept for a measuring setup used to quantitative estimation of heat power sources in different locations over the human body area. The crucial role in the measurements of the human heat plays a thermoelectric module working in the open circuit mode. The results obtained during practical tests are confronted with the requirements of the dedicated thermoelectric generator. A prototype design of a human warmth energy harvester with an ultra-low power DC-DC converter based on the LTC3108 circuit is analysed.

  1. Tunable power law in the desynchronization events of coupled chaotic electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Gilson F. de Lorenzo, Orlando di; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Oriá, Marcos; Souza Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de

    2014-03-15

    We study the statistics of the amplitude of the synchronization error in chaotic electronic circuits coupled through linear feedback. Depending on the coupling strength, our system exhibits three qualitatively different regimes of synchronization: weak coupling yields independent oscillations; moderate to strong coupling produces a regime of intermittent synchronization known as attractor bubbling; and stronger coupling produces complete synchronization. In the regime of moderate coupling, the probability distribution for the sizes of desynchronization events follows a power law, with an exponent that can be adjusted by changing the coupling strength. Such power-law distributions are interesting, as they appear in many complex systems. However, most of the systems with such a behavior have a fixed value for the exponent of the power law, while here we present an example of a system where the exponent of the power law is easily tuned in real time.

  2. Development of a Power Electronics Controller for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leland, Douglas K.; Priest, Joel F.; Keiter, Douglas E.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Under a U.S. Department of Energy program for radioisotope power systems, Lockheed Martin is developing an Engineering Unit of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This is an advanced version of the previously reported SRG110 generator. The ASRG uses Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) developed by Sunpower Incorporated under a NASA Research Announcement contract. The ASRG makes use of a Stirling controller based on power electronics that eliminates the tuning capacitors. The power electronics controller synchronizes dual-opposed convertors and maintains a fixed frequency operating point. The controller is single-fault tolerant and uses high-frequency pulse width modulation to create the sinusoidal currents that are nearly in phase with the piston velocity, eliminating the need for large series tuning capacitors. Sunpower supports this effort through an extension of their controller development intended for other applications. Glenn Research Center (GRC) supports this effort through system dynamic modeling, analysis and test support. The ASRG design arrived at a new baseline based on a system-level trade study and extensive feedback from mission planners on the necessity of single-fault tolerance. This paper presents the baseline design with an emphasis on the power electronics controller detailed design concept that will meet space mission requirements including single fault tolerance.

  3. Development of Standardized Power Electronic Components, Subsystems, and Systems for Increased Modularity and Scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Pink, C.; Price, J.; Kroposki, B.; Kern, G.

    2007-11-01

    Power electronics devices hold substantial promise for making distributed energy applications more efficient and cost effective. This project is motivated towards developing and testing inverters that will allow distributed energy systems to provide ancillary services such as voltage and VAR regulation, and increased grid reliability by seamlessly transitioning between grid-tied and stand-alone operation modes. The objectives of this project are to identify system integration and optimization issues and technologies and to provide solutions through research, analysis, and testing of power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications that are cost-competitive and have substantially faster response times than conventional technologies. In addition, the testing of power electronics interfaces will develop a technical basis for performance assessment for distributed energy systems, subsystems, and components that will finally create a foundation for standardized measurements and test procedures. The ultimate goal for this research is to advance the potential benefits of distributed energy to provide ancillary services, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice.

  4. Design of the fundamental power coupler and photocathode inserts for the 112MHz superconducting electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, E.; Liang, X.

    2011-07-25

    A 112 MHz superconducting quarter-wave resonator electron gun will be used as the injector of the Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) proof-of-principle experiment at BNL. Furthermore, this electron gun can be the testing cavity for various photocathodes. In this paper, we present the design of the cathode stalks and a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) designated to the future experiments. Two types of cathode stalks are discussed. Special shape of the stalk is applied in order to minimize the RF power loss. The location of cathode plane is also optimized to enable the extraction of low emittance beam. The coaxial waveguide structure FPC has the properties of tunable coupling factor and small interference to the electron beam output. The optimization of the coupling factor and the location of the FPC are discussed in detail. Based on the transmission line theory, we designed a half wavelength cathode stalk which significantly brings down the voltage drop between the cavity and the stalk from more than 5.6 kV to 0.1 kV. The transverse field distribution on cathode has been optimized by carefully choosing the position of cathode stalk inside the cavity. Moreover, in order to decrease the RF power loss, a variable diameter design of cathode stalk has been applied. Compared to the uniform shape of stalk, this design gives us much smaller power losses in important locations. Besides that, we also proposed a fundamental power coupler based on the designed beam parameters for the future proof-of-principle CEC experiment. This FPC should give a strong enough coupling which has the Q external range from 1.5e7 to 2.6e8.

  5. Powering embedded electronics for wind turbine monitoring using multi-source energy harvesting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, S. R.; Taylor, S. G.; Raby, E. Y.; Farinholt, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    With a global interest in the development of clean, renewable energy, wind energy has seen steady growth over the past several years. Advances in wind turbine technology bring larger, more complex turbines and wind farms. An important issue in the development of these complex systems is the ability to monitor the state of each turbine in an effort to improve the efficiency and power generation. Wireless sensor nodes can be used to interrogate the current state and health of wind turbine structures; however, a drawback of most current wireless sensor technology is their reliance on batteries for power. Energy harvesting solutions present the ability to create autonomous power sources for small, low-power electronics through the scavenging of ambient energy; however, most conventional energy harvesting systems employ a single mode of energy conversion, and thus are highly susceptible to variations in the ambient energy. In this work, a multi-source energy harvesting system is developed to power embedded electronics for wind turbine applications in which energy can be scavenged simultaneously from several ambient energy sources. Field testing is performed on a full-size, residential scale wind turbine where both vibration and solar energy harvesting systems are utilized to power wireless sensing systems. Two wireless sensors are investigated, including the wireless impedance device (WID) sensor node, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and an ultra-low power RF system-on-chip board that is the basis for an embedded wireless accelerometer node currently under development at LANL. Results indicate the ability of the multi-source harvester to successfully power both sensors.

  6. Seed electron production from O{sup -} ions under high-power microwave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, G. F.; Neuber, A. A.; Krompholz, H. G.; Krile, J. T.

    2008-03-15

    Surface and volume breakdown formation during pulsed high-power microwave (HPM) excitation can severely limit the power densities which can be transmitted into an atmospheric medium. Recent studies in this area have focused on developing models which accurately predict flashover formation at either dielectric/air interfaces or in the gas volume directly adjacent to these interfaces. These models are typically validated through comparison with experimentally gathered data. With respect to HPM surface flashover, experiments in the S-band at 5 MW power levels have reported on the contributing factors to flashover development including the effects of gas type, pressure, and relative humidity. A Monte Carlo-type electron motion simulation code, MC, has been developed to calculate the increasing electron density during flashover formation in this case. Results from the MC code have exhibited a quantitative agreement with experimental data over a wide range of atmospheric conditions. A critical parameter to flashover development is the stochastic process involving the appearance of initiatory or ''seed'' electrons, as seen by the reduction in flashover delay time by approximately 10-20% in the presence of external ultraviolet illumination. While the current version of the MC code seeds the flashover location with electron densities on the order of background ion densities produced by cosmic radiation, it fails to incorporate the field-assisted collisional detachment processes which are often assumed to be the primary origin of these electrons on the time scales of interest. Investigation of these processes and development of more accurate seeding in the MC code is a key step toward predicting HPM flashover over a wide range of parameters, particularly in the presence of highly electronegative gases such as SF{sub 6} or O{sub 2}, in which there is an absence of free electrons with zero applied field.

  7. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    SciTech Connect

    Romé, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Chen, S.

    2015-06-29

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  8. Ultra-low-power electronics and devices for a multisensing RFID tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampolli, Stefano; Elmi, Ivan; Cardinali, Gian Carlo; Scorzoni, Andrea; Cicioni, Michele; Marco, Santiago; Palacio, Francisco; Gómez-Cama, Jose M.; Sayhan, Ilker; Becker, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    A multisensing flexible Tag microlab (FTM) with RFID communication capabilities and integrated physical and chemical sensors for logistic datalogging applications is being developed. For this very specific scenario, several constraints must be considered: power consumption must be limited for long-term operation, reliable ISO compliant RFID communication must be implemented, and special encapsulation issues must be faced for reliable sensor integration. In this work, the developments on application specific electronic interfaces and on ultra-low-power MOX gas sensors in the framework of the GoodFood FP6 Integrated Project will be reported. The electronics for sensor control and readout as well as for RFID communication are based on an ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontroller from Texas Instruments together with a custom RFID front-end based on analog circuitry and a CPLD digital device, and are designed to guarantee a passive ISO15693 compliant RFID communication in a range up to 6 cm. A thin film battery for sensor operation is included, allowing data acquisition and storage when no reader field is present. This design allows the user to access both the traceability and sensor information even when the on-board battery is exhausted. The physical sensors for light, temperature and humidity are commercially available devices, while for chemical gas sensing innovative MOX sensors are developed, based on ultra-low-power micromachined hotplate arrays specifically designed for flexible Tag integration purposes. A single MOX sensor requires only 8.9 mW for continuous operation, while temperature modulation and discontinuous sensor operation modes are implemented to further reduce the overall power consumption. The development of the custom control and RFID electronics, together with innovative ultra-low-power MOX sensor arrays with flexible circuit encapsulation techniques will be reported in this work.

  9. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 MΩ and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 kΩ. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics. PMID:25687592

  10. A blended polymer electret-based micro-electronic power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wen-Ching; Lee, Bor-Shiun; Chen, Jia-Lun; Lin, Shun-Chi; Wu, Wen-Jong; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2008-03-01

    Recently, power harvesting technologies for low-power electronic devices have attracted much interest. In this paper, the design and fabrication methods of a micro-electrostatic power generator is presented. This power generator comprises a stator developed using an electret film for charge storage and a rotor covered by an interdigital electrode for electric power generation. The newly developed electret material is made from mixing two solutions. The first solution was made by blending polystyrene (PS) and cycloolefin copolymer (COC). The second solution was obtained by an additive process as polar molecule was added into COC. This unique two solution electret method can easily be integrated and adopted to the micro fabrication process. The charge storage capability of this new electret material was investigated and results showed that low concentration of polystyrene in the blended material will not only have more stable but also higher electrostatic charge than that of pure COC. In addition, the polar molecular additives also improve the electret properties of COC due to micro-cavities formation and the interactions between molecules and polymer. Our newly developed blended electret material has excellent mechanical properties and is easy to use when compared to using Teflon Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) and polypropylene (PP). A feasibility study of a micro electrostatic power generator based on our blended electret material was performed. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this new type of micro electrostatic power generator.

  11. Saturation-power enhancement of a free-electron laser amplifier through parameters adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yu-Pin; Xu, Y.-G.; Wang, S.-J.; Xu, J.-Y.; Liu, X.-X.; Zhang, S.-C.

    2015-06-01

    Saturation-power enhancement of a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier by using tapered wiggler amplitude is based on the postponement of the saturation length of the uniform wiggler. In this paper, we qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate that the saturation-power enhancement can be approached by means of the parameters adjustment, which is comparable to that by using a tapered wiggler. Compared to the method by tapering the wiggler amplitude, the method of parameters adjustment substantially shortens the saturation length, which is favorable to cutting down the manufacture and operation costs of the device.

  12. Radio synchrotron emission from secondary electrons in interaction-powered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2016-07-01

    Several supernovae (SNe) with an unusually dense circumstellar medium (CSM) have been recently observed at radio frequencies. Their radio emission is powered by relativistic electrons that can be either accelerated at the SN shock (primaries) or injected as a by-product (secondaries) of inelastic proton-proton collisions. We investigate the radio signatures from secondary electrons, by detailing a semi-analytical model to calculate the temporal evolution of the distributions of protons, primary and secondary electrons. With our formalism, we track the cooling history of all the particles that have been injected into the emission region up to a given time, and calculate the resulting radio spectra and light curves. For an SN shock propagating through the progenitor wind, we find that secondary electrons control the early radio signatures, but their contribution decays faster than that of primary electrons. This results in a flattening of the light curve at a given radio frequency that depends only upon the radial profiles of the CSM density and of the shock velocity, υ0. The relevant transition time at the peak frequency is {˜ } {190} d K_ep,-3^{-1} A_{w, 16}{/β _{0, -1.5}^2}, where Aw is the wind mass-loading parameter, β0 = υ0/c and Kep are the electron-to-proton ratio of accelerated particles. We explicitly show that late peak times at 5 GHz (i.e. tpk ≳ 300-1000 d) suggest a shock wave propagating in a dense wind (Aw ≳ 1016-1017 gr cm-1), where secondary electrons are likely to power the observed peak emission.

  13. Radio synchrotron emission from secondary electrons in interaction-powered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2016-04-01

    Several supernovae (SNe) with an unusually dense circumstellar medium (CSM) have been recently observed at radio frequencies. Their radio emission is powered by relativistic electrons that can be either accelerated at the SN shock (primaries) or injected as a by-product (secondaries) of inelastic proton-proton collisions. We investigate the radio signatures from secondary electrons, by detailing a semi-analytical model to calculate the temporal evolution of the distributions of protons, primary and secondary electrons. With our formalism, we track the cooling history of all the particles that have been injected into the emission region up to a given time, and calculate the resulting radio spectra and light curves. For a SN shock propagating through the progenitor wind, we find that secondary electrons control the early radio signatures, but their contribution decays faster than that of primary electrons. This results in a flattening of the light curve at a given radio frequency that depends only upon the radial profiles of the CSM density and of the shock velocity, υ0. The relevant transition time at the peak frequency is ˜ {190} d K_ep,-3^{-1} A_{w, 16}{/β _{0, -1.5}^2}, where Aw is the wind mass-loading parameter, β0 = υ0/c and Kep is the electron-to-proton ratio of accelerated particles. We explicitly show that late peak times at 5 GHz (i.e., tpk ≳ 300 - 1000 d) suggest a shock wave propagating in a dense wind (Aw ≳ 1016 - 1017 gr cm-1), where secondary electrons are likely to power the observed peak emission.

  14. Nonlinear relativistic single-electron Thomson scattering power spectrum for incoming laser of arbitrary intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Estrada, R. F.; Pastor, I.; Guasp, J.; Castejon, F.

    2012-06-15

    The classical nonlinear incoherent Thomson scattering power spectrum from a single relativistic electron with incoming laser radiation of any intensity, investigated numerically by the present authors in a previous publication, displayed both an approximate quadratic behavior in frequency and a redshift of the power spectrum for high intensity incoming radiation. The present work is devoted to justify, in a more general setup, those numerical findings. Those justifications are reinforced by extending suitably analytical approaches, as developed by other authors. Moreover, our analytical treatment exhibits differences between the Doppler-like frequencies for linear and circular polarization of the incoming radiation. Those differences depend nonlinearly on the laser intensity and on the electron initial velocity and do not appear to have been displayed by previous authors. Those Doppler-like frequencies and their differences are validated by new Monte Carlo computations beyond our previuos ones and reported here.

  15. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; Liu, H.; Merminga, L.; Neil, G. R.; Neuffer, D.; Shinn, M.; Sinclair, C.; Wiseman, M.; Brillson, L. J.; Henkel, D. P.; Helvajian, H.; Kelley, M. J.; Nair, Shanti

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  16. FY2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2014-02-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) technology area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  17. Measurements of the critical power for self-injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Döppner, T; Marsh, K A; Barty, C P J; Divol, L; Fonseca, R A; Glenzer, S H; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Martins, S F; Michel, P; Mori, W B; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Siders, C W; Silva, L O; Wang, T

    2009-11-20

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blowout regime producing 720 +/- 50 MeV quasimonoenergetic electrons with a divergence Deltatheta_{FWHM} of 2.85 +/- 0.15 mrad using a 10 J, 60 fs 0.8 microm laser. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3 x 10{18} cm{-3}), the energy gain increased from 75 to 720 MeV when the plasma length was increased from 3 to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection of electrons occurs when the laser power P exceeds 3 times the critical power P{cr} for relativistic self-focusing and saturates around 100 pC for P/P{cr} > 5. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:20366048

  18. Measurements of the Critical Power for Self-Injection of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Clayton, C. E.; Döppner, T.; Marsh, K. A.; Barty, C. P. J.; Divol, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Martins, S. F.; Michel, P.; Mori, W. B.; Palastro, J. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Siders, C. W.; Silva, L. O.; Wang, T.

    2009-11-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blowout regime producing 720±50MeV quasimonoenergetic electrons with a divergence ΔθFWHM of 2.85±0.15mrad using a 10 J, 60 fs 0.8μm laser. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3×1018cm-3), the energy gain increased from 75 to 720 MeV when the plasma length was increased from 3 to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection of electrons occurs when the laser power P exceeds 3 times the critical power Pcr for relativistic self-focusing and saturates around 100 pC for P/Pcr>5. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  19. The Rhodotron, a new high-energy, high-power, CW electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Y.; Abs, M.; Capdevila, J. M.; Defrise, D.; Genin, F.; NGuyen, A.

    1994-05-01

    Over the last years, a new kind of industrial electron accelerator has been conjointly developed by the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA) and IBA (Ion Beam Applications) in Belgium. This accelerator, called the Rhodotron, is a recirculating accelerator, operated in CW. It uses low frequencies (metric waves), that make possible the generation of continuous high-energy high-power beams. The construction of the first industrial model of the Rhodotron began in January 1992. It is a 10 MeV, 100 kW beam power unit, with an additional beam exit at 5 MeV. A target is also being developed in order to allow an efficient conversion of the electrons into X-rays. The different subsystems of this machine are now being assembled and tested. The first beam tests are scheduled for the autumn of 1993. A complete report presenting the state of development of this prototype is included in this paper.

  20. Evaluation of high temperature dielectric films for high voltage power electronic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suthar, J. L.; Laghari, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Three high temperature films, polyimide, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy and poly-P-xylene, were evaluated for possible use in high voltage power electronic applications, such as in high energy density capacitors, cables and microelectronic circuits. The dielectric properties, including permittivity and dielectric loss, were obtained in the frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kHz at temperatures up to 200 C. The dielectric strengths at 60 Hz were determined as a function of temperature to 250 C. Confocal laser microscopy was performed to diagnose for voids and microimperfections within the film structure. The results obtained indicate that all films evaluated are capable of maintaining their high voltage properties, with minimal degradation, at temperatures up to 200 C. However, above 200 C, they lose some of their electrical properties. These films may therefore become viable candidates for high voltage power electronic applications at high temperatures.

  1. Ultra-power shock wave driven by a laser-accelerated electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu

    2015-06-01

    This review is presented on modern research to achieve in a laboratory experiment the new level of shock-wave pressure of a few hundred or even thousands of Mbar when a substance is exposed to a stream of laser-accelerated fast electrons. The applications associated with the use of ultra-power shock waves as the ignition driver of inertial fusion targets as well as the tool in studying the equation of a state of a matter are discussed.

  2. Ambipolar Organic Tri-Gate Transistor for Low-Power Complementary Electronics.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Fabrizio; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C P; Roelofs, Christian W S; Janssen, René A J; Gelinck, Gerwin H; Kovács-Vajna, Zsolt M; Cantatore, Eugenio

    2016-01-13

    Ambipolar transistors typically suffer from large off-current inherently due to ambipolar conduction. Using a tri-gate transistor it is shown that it is possible to electrostatically switch ambipolar polymer transistors from ambipolar to unipolar mode. In unipolar mode, symmetric characteristics with an on/off current ratio of larger than 10(5) are obtained. This enables easy integration into low-power complementary logic and volatile electronic memories. PMID:26573767

  3. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Joel; Biedron, Sandra; Harris, John; Martinez, Jorge; Milton, Stephen; Benson, S.; Evtushenko, P.; Neil, G.; Zhang, S.

    2014-03-01

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system in an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance, one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance during operation, preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using electro-optical (EO) methods, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of an energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10 kW or more average FEL output power) beam. Such a diagnostic could be critical in efforts to diagnose and help mitigate deleterious beam effects for high output power FELs.

  4. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-08-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  5. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-03-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  6. Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab`s High Power Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, A. S.; Grippo, A. C.; Keesee, M. S.; Song, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility`s (Jefferson Lab`s) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS compatible tools, (2) to use VME and Industry Pack (IPs) interfaces for FEL specific devices such as controls and diagnostics for the drive laser, high power optics, photocathode gun and electron-beam diagnostics, (3) to migrate Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) technologies to VME when possible, and (4) to use CAMAC solutions for systems that duplicate CEBAF technologies such as RF linacs and DC magnets. This paper will describe the software developed for FEL specific devices and provide an overview of the FEL control system.

  7. Survey of electronics capability for SP-100 space reactor power system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manvi, Ram; Fujita, Tosh

    Because of reports indicating improvements in the radiation tolerance of some electronic parts, a survey was recently performed by SP-100 project personnel to determine the advisability of revising SP-100 SRPS (space reactor power systems) allowable neutron and gamma dose rates in order to reduce the size and mass of the radiation shield and thereby achieve system mass reductions. The survey results indicate that recent developments to increase the radiation tolerance of a limited set of electronics parts do not justify increasing the allowable SP-100 dose rates for electronic components. Specifically, the recent improvements on a limited set of parts do not justify increasing the current SP-100 allowable specifications of 5 x 10 exp 5 rads gamma dose and 1 x 10 exp 13 neutrons/sq cm fluence. However, if the improvements of 108 rads for gammas and 10 exp 15 neutrons/sq cm can be extended to a wide range of parts, significant mass savings would result.

  8. Survey of electronics capability for SP-100 space reactor power system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, Ram; Fujita, Tosh

    1991-01-01

    Because of reports indicating improvements in the radiation tolerance of some electronic parts, a survey was recently performed by SP-100 project personnel to determine the advisability of revising SP-100 SRPS (space reactor power systems) allowable neutron and gamma dose rates in order to reduce the size and mass of the radiation shield and thereby achieve system mass reductions. The survey results indicate that recent developments to increase the radiation tolerance of a limited set of electronics parts do not justify increasing the allowable SP-100 dose rates for electronic components. Specifically, the recent improvements on a limited set of parts do not justify increasing the current SP-100 allowable specifications of 5 x 10 exp 5 rads gamma dose and 1 x 10 exp 13 neutrons/sq cm fluence. However, if the improvements of 108 rads for gammas and 10 exp 15 neutrons/sq cm can be extended to a wide range of parts, significant mass savings would result.

  9. A high-efficiency power and data transmission system for biomedical implanted electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamici, Zoubir; Itti, Roland; Champier, Jacques

    1996-02-01

    In biomedical engineering, inductive transcutaneous links can be used for power and data transfer between external systems and implanted electronic devices. The development of a micro-telemeter having a significant implantation depth needs a high-efficiency magnetic transcutaneous link. This paper presents a new system, which uses a multi-frequency load network for transmitter coil based on the class E power amplifier. At the carrier frequency used, the resistive load is influenced by the coupling of the coils and by the variation of the implant equivalent resistance. Modulating this latter between two rails permits one to modulate the amplitude of the external transmitter current and then to transmit internal data without the use of the classical implanted emitter design. Furthermore, the fact that the modulation index depends on the coupling factor, allows one to find the external coil's correct position using a position feedback loop. A complete study of the concept of digital data transmission by impedance modulation associated with a class E power amplifier is presented. Internal data transmission using this system yields a decrease of the internal electronic circuitry bulk and constitutes a high-efficiency energizing device. A theoretical investigation shows that the efficiency of the power transfer varies between 44 and 75% within a wide range of implantation depths (20 - 40 mm).

  10. An Overview of Power Electronics Applications in Fuel Cell Systems: DC and AC Converters

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Masdar, M. S.; Mohamed, A.

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics and fuel cell technologies play an important role in the field of renewable energy. The demand for fuel cells will increase as fuel cells become the main power source for portable applications. In this application, a high-efficiency converter is an essential requirement and a key parameter of the overall system. This is because the size, cost, efficiency, and reliability of the overall system for portable applications primarily depend on the converter. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate converter topology is an important and fundamental aspect of designing a fuel cell system for portable applications as the converter alone plays a major role in determining the overall performance of the system. This paper presents a review of power electronics applications in fuel cell systems, which include various topology combinations of DC converters and AC inverters and which are primarily used in fuel cell systems for portable or stand-alone applications. This paper also reviews the switching techniques used in power conditioning for fuel cell systems. Finally, this paper addresses the current problem encountered with DC converters and AC inverter. PMID:25478581

  11. An overview of power electronics applications in fuel cell systems: DC and AC converters.

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Kamarudin, S K; Masdar, M S; Mohamed, A

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics and fuel cell technologies play an important role in the field of renewable energy. The demand for fuel cells will increase as fuel cells become the main power source for portable applications. In this application, a high-efficiency converter is an essential requirement and a key parameter of the overall system. This is because the size, cost, efficiency, and reliability of the overall system for portable applications primarily depend on the converter. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate converter topology is an important and fundamental aspect of designing a fuel cell system for portable applications as the converter alone plays a major role in determining the overall performance of the system. This paper presents a review of power electronics applications in fuel cell systems, which include various topology combinations of DC converters and AC inverters and which are primarily used in fuel cell systems for portable or stand-alone applications. This paper also reviews the switching techniques used in power conditioning for fuel cell systems. Finally, this paper addresses the current problem encountered with DC converters and AC inverter. PMID:25478581

  12. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  13. Analysis and design of a high power factor, single-stage electronic dimming ballast

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.F.; Yu, T.H.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and practical consideration of a single-stage electronic dimming ballast with unity power factor. The power stage of the ballast is derived from combining a buck-boost converter and a half-bridge series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter (SRPLI). With the plasma model of the lamp, the analysis of the ballast is carried out, from which the key equations used for dimming control are derived. Starting performance and dimming consideration are also addressed in the paper. In this dimming ballast, both pulsewidth modulation (PWM) and variable-frequency control strategies are employed. The discussed ballast with the controls can save a controller and a switch driver, reduce size and cost, and possibly increase system reliability over conventional two-stage systems in the applications with moderate power level. Simulated and experimental results of the ballast for an OSRAM T8 32-W lamp are used to verify the discussion.

  14. Electron-Beam Switches For A High Peak Power Sled-II Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay, L.

    2015-12-02

    Omega-P demonstrated triggered electron-beam switches on the L=2 m dual-delay-line X-band pulse compressor at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In those experiments, with input pulses of up to 9 MW from the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon, output pulses having peak powers of 140-165 MW and durations of 16-20 ns were produced, with record peak power gains M of 18-20. Switch designs are described based on the successful results that should be suitable for use with the existing SLAC SLED-II delay line system, to demonstrate C=9, M=7, and n>>78%, yielding 173ns compressed pulses with peak powers up to 350MW with input of a single 50-MW.

  15. Active local oscillator power stabilization for a hot electron bolometer heterodyne receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayton, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Kooi, J. W.; Ren, Y.; Zhang, W.; de Lange, G.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the application of a new technique for actively stabilizing the power of a far infrared gas laser as the local oscillator (LO) in a superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) heterodyne receiver system at 2.5 THz. The technique utilizes PID feedback control of the local oscillator intensity by means of a voice-coil based swing arm actuator placed in the beam path. The HEB itself is used as a direct detector to measure incident LO power whilst simultaneously continuing to function as heterodyne mixer. Results presented here demonstrate a factor of 50 improvement in the measured total power and spectroscopic Allan variance time. Allan times of 30 seconds and 25 seconds respectively are shown for large and small area HEB's with a measured effective noise fluctuation bandwidth of 12 MHz. The technique is versatile and can be applied to any LO source and at any LO frequency.

  16. Review of the State-of-the-Art in Power Electronics Suitable for 10-KW Military Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the technological opportunities of integrating power electronics-based inverters into a TEP system, primarily in the 10-kW size range. The proposed enhancement offers potential advantages in weight reduction, improved efficiency, better performance in a wider range of generator operating conditions, greater versatility and adaptability, and adequate reliability. In order to obtain strong assurance of the availability of inverters that meet required performance and reliability levels, a market survey was performed. The survey obtained positive responses from several manufacturers in the motor drive and distributed generation industries. This study also includes technology reviews and assessments relating to circuit topologies, reliability issues, vulnerability to pulses of electromagnetic energy, potential improvements in semiconductor materials, and potential performance improvement through cryogenics.

  17. Relativistic electron motion in cylindrical waveguide with strong guiding magnetic field and high power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing

    2015-06-15

    In O-type high power microwave (HPM) devices, the annular relativistic electron beam is constrained by a strong guiding magnetic field and propagates through an interaction region to generate HPM. Some papers believe that the E × B drift of electrons may lead to beam breakup. This paper simplifies the interaction region with a smooth cylindrical waveguide to research the radial motion of electrons under conditions of strong guiding magnetic field and TM{sub 01} mode HPM. The single-particle trajectory shows that the radial electron motion presents the characteristic of radial guiding-center drift carrying cyclotron motion. The radial guiding-center drift is spatially periodic and is dominated by the polarization drift, not the E × B drift. Furthermore, the self fields of the beam space charge can provide a radial force which may pull electrons outward to some extent but will not affect the radial polarization drift. Despite the radial drift, the strong guiding magnetic field limits the drift amplitude to a small value and prevents beam breakup from happening due to this cause.

  18. Secondary electron emissions and dust charging currents in the nonequilibrium dusty plasma with power-law distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Jingyu; Du Jiulin

    2012-06-15

    We study the secondary electron emissions induced by the impact of electrons on dust grains and the resulting dust charging processes in the nonequilibrium dusty plasma with power-law distributions. We derive new expressions of the secondary emitted electron flux and the dust charging currents that are generalized by the power-law q-distributions, where the nonlinear core functions are numerically studied for the nonextensive parameter q. Our numerical analyses show that the power-law q-distribution of the primary electrons has a significant effect on both the secondary emitted electron flux and the dust charging currents, and this effect depends strongly on the ratio of the electrostatic potential energy of the primary electrons at the dust grain's surface to the thermodynamic energy, implying that a competition in the dusty plasma between these two energies plays a crucial role in this novel effect.

  19. User's Guide: An Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup for the Profiling of the Power Density Distribution in Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Teruya, A T; Palmer, T A

    2002-06-01

    This handbook describes the assembly and operation of an enhanced Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) diagnostic device for measuring the power density distribution of high power electron beams used for welding. The most recent version of this diagnostic device, [1] Version 2.0, contains modifications to the hardware components of previous MFC designs.[2] These modifications allow for more complete capture of the electrons and better electrical grounding, thus improving the quality of the acquired data and enabling a more accurate computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction [3,4] of the power density distribution of the electron beam to be performed. [ 5-9

  20. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  1. Simulative research on the anode plasma dynamics in the high-power electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan; Liu, Lie; Ju, Jin-Chuan; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhao, Xue-Long; Zhou, Hong-Yu

    2015-07-15

    Anode plasma generated by electron beams could limit the electrical pulse-length, modify the impedance and stability of diode, and affect the generator to diode power coupling. In this paper, a particle-in-cell code is used to study the dynamics of anode plasma in the high-power electron beam diode. The effect of gas type, dynamic characteristic of ions on the diode operation with bipolar flow model are presented. With anode plasma appearing, the amplitude of diode current is increased due to charge neutralizations of electron flow. The lever of neutralization can be expressed using saturation factor. At same pressure of the anode gas layer, the saturation factor of CO{sub 2} is bigger than the H{sub 2}O vapor, namely, the generation rate of C{sup +} ions is larger than the H{sup +} ions at the same pressure. The transition time of ions in the anode-cathode gap could be used to estimate the time of diode current maximum.

  2. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.; Biedron, S.; Harris, J.; Martinez, J.; Milton, S. V.; Van Keuren, J.; Benson, Steve V.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Neil, George R.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-12-01

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

  3. Validity of power functionals for a homogeneous electron gas in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaja, A.; Eich, F. G.; Baldsiefen, T.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-03-01

    Physically valid and numerically efficient approximations for the exchange and correlation energy are critical for reduced-density-matrix-functional theory to become a widely used method in electronic structure calculations. Here we examine the physical limits of power functionals of the form f (n ,n') =(nn')α for the scaling function in the exchange-correlation energy. To this end we obtain numerically the minimizing momentum distributions for the three- and two-dimensional homogeneous electron gas, respectively. In particular, we examine the limiting values for the power α to yield physically sound solutions that satisfy the Lieb-Oxford lower bound for the exchange-correlation energy and exclude pinned states with the condition n (k )<1 for all wave vectors k . The results refine the constraints previously obtained from trial momentum distributions. We also compute the values for α that yield the exact correlation energy and its kinetic part for both the three- and two-dimensional electron gas. In both systems, narrow regimes of validity and accuracy are found at α ≳0.6 and at rs≳10 for the density parameter, corresponding to relatively low densities.

  4. Thermal dissipation media for high power electronic devices using a carbon nanotube-based composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thang Bui, Hung; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Trinh Pham, Van; Thanh Tam Ngo, Thi; Phan, Ngoc Minh

    2011-06-01

    Challenges in the thermal dissipation of an electronic package arise from the continuous increase in power density of higher-power devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known as the highest thermal conductivity material (2000 W mK‑1). This excellent thermal property suggests an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dispersion materials to solve the aforementioned problems. In this work, we present an effect of thermal dissipation of the CNTs in the high-brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED) and micro-processor. For the thermal dissipation of the HB-LED, a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) film on a Cu substrate was applied. Meanwhile, for the thermal dissipation of a micro-processor, the composite of commercial thermal paste/CNTs was used instead of the VA-CNTs. The experimental and simulation results have confirmed the advantages of the VA-CNT film and thermal paste/CNT composite as excellent thermal dissipation media for HB-LEDs, μ-processors and other high power electronic devices.

  5. Developing a stability assessment method for power electronics-based microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Peter M.

    Modern microgrids with microsources and energy storage are dependent on power electronics for control and regulation. Under certain circumstances power electronics can be destabilizing to the system due to an effect called negative incremental impedance. A careful review of the theory and literature on the subject is presented. This includes stability criteria for both AC and DC systems, as well as a discussion on the limitations posed by the analysis. A method to integrate stability assessment with higher-level microgrid architectural design is proposed. Crucial to this is impedance characterization of individual components, which was accomplished through simulation. DC and AC impedance measurement blocks were created in Matlab simulink to automate the process. A detailed switching-level model of a DC microgrid was implemented in simulink, including wind turbine microsource, battery storage, and three phase inverter. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) was included to maximize the efficiency of the turbine and was implemented through three rectifier alternatives and control schemes. The stability characteristics of each was compared in the final analysis. Impedance data was collected individually from the components and used to assess stability in the system as a whole. The results included the assessment of stability, margin, and unstable operating points to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  6. Power Dependence of the Electron Mobility Profile in a Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard H.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    The electron mobility profile is estimated in a 4.5 kW commercial Hall thruster as a function of discharge power. Internal measurements of plasma potential and electron temperature are made in the thruster channel with a high-speed translating probe. These measurements are presented for a range of throttling conditions from 150 - 400 V and 0.6 - 4.5 kW. The fluid-based solver, Hall2De, is used in conjunction with these internal plasma parameters to estimate the anomalous collision frequency profile at fixed voltage, 300 V, and three power levels. It is found that the anomalous collision frequency profile does not change significantly upstream of the location of the magnetic field peak but that the extent and magnitude of the anomalous collision frequency downstream of the magnetic peak does change with thruster power. These results are discussed in the context of developing phenomenological models for how the collision frequency profile depends on thruster operating conditions.

  7. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-26

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  8. Advanced electric vehicle controls and power conversion electronics for transit buses and light rail

    SciTech Connect

    Peticolas, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of development which has taken place in AC electric vehicle drive technology has focused on small vehicles (i.e. 3,000 lbs and less) with emphasis on high performance and rapid acceleration. Examples of this type of development are the GM Impact and the Ford Ecostar. These vehicles have been developed to demonstrate technology advances by Detroit, but the high performance capabilities of these vehicles have raised expectations that cannot be met with contemporary batteries, or perhaps, any batteries. Larger vehicles such as buses, trucks, and even light rail cars may in fact be better near term targets for electric conversion since many of these vehicles have lower performance demands, and operate on fixed routes with designated stops for several minutes, allowing ``opportunity`` charging for range extension. The basis of this paper is to propose a near term drive system for large vehicles that overcomes some of the problems of electric vehicles to date, while providing a platform which is adaptable to future improvements in technology. The advanced transit bus will not only require power electronics for the vehicle drive, but will require power electronics and electric actuators for a variety of nonpropulsion equipment such as air conditioning, wheel chair lifts, and power steering. 6 refs.

  9. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-01

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  10. Research Group Introduction : Power Electronics Laboratory, Dept. of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    伊東, 淳一

    Our research focuses on power conversion and its control especially matrix converter, multi-level converter, DC-DC converter. Furthermore AC motor drives, wireless power transfer system, high frequency power circuit and new device technology.

  11. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    2008-10-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    , subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to

  14. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, {alpha}, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, {Delta}{alpha}, less than 5%.

  15. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, α, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, Δα, less than 5%.

  16. Formation of Laminar Electron Flow for a High-Power Sub-THz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    This paper describes the design of a magnetron-injection gun for a 100 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. With an increase in power and frequency, performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is proposed for the evaluation of the laminarity, and applied to the design optimization of the electrodes. It is found that the laminarity depends not only on the conventional design parameter of the cathode slant angle, but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field inside the beam.

  17. Coulomb effect and threshold effect in electronic stopping power for slow protons

    SciTech Connect

    Semrad, D.

    1986-03-01

    We show how the electronic stopping power for slow protons is influenced by the deceleration and deflection of the projectile in the field of the target nucleus (Coulomb effect) and by the fact that in insulators a finite energy is also required for excitation of the outermost electrons (threshold effect). Estimates are derived from the Fermi-Teller description of the stopping process, from a modified local-density approximation, and from measured inner-shell ionization cross sections. It is found that the introduction of an energy threshold reduces at low energies the stopping cross section by a large factor and hence leads to an appreciable deviation from v/sub 1/ proportionality.

  18. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O'Brien, D.W.

    1995-01-17

    A tomographic technique is disclosed for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0[degree] to 360[degree] and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figures.

  19. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1995-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  20. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-11-21

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  1. Vacuum-free self-powered parallel electron lithography with sub-35-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuerui; Lal, Amit

    2010-06-01

    The critical dimension, throughput, and cost of nanolithography are central to developing commercially viable high-performance nanodevices. Available top-down lithography approaches to fabricate large-area nanostructures at low cost, such as controllable nanowire (NW) array fabrication for solar cells applications, are challenging due to the requirement of both high lithography resolution and high throughput. Here, a minimum 35 nm resolution is experimentally demonstrated by using a new mask fabrication technique in our demonstrated vacuum-free high-throughput self-powered parallel electron lithography (SPEL) system, which uses large-area planar radioactive beta-electron thin film emitters to parallel expose e-beam resist through a stencil mask. SPEL is the first-time demonstrated vacuum-free electron lithography, which overcomes the membrane mask distortion challenge that was shown to be the Achilles heel of previous attempts at electron projection lithography in vacuum. Monte Carlo simulations show that by using beryllium tritide thin film source in SPEL system, the exposure time can be reduced down to 2 min for each large-area (10000 cm(2) or more) parallel exposure, with resolution not larger than 20 nm. Moreover, experimental demonstration of large-area diameter-and-density controllable vertical NW arrays fabricated by SPEL shows its promising utility for an application requiring large-area nanostructure definition. PMID:20481509

  2. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  3. Japanese power electronics inverter technology and its impact on the American air conditioning industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushimaru, Kenji

    1990-08-01

    Since 1983, technological advances and market growth of inverter-driven variable-speed heat pumps in Japan have been dramatic. The high level of market penetration was promoted by a combination of political, economic, and trade policies in Japan. A unique environment was created in which the leading domestic industries, microprocessor manufacturing, compressors for air conditioning and refrigerators, and power electronic devices, were able to direct the development and market success of inverter-driven heat pumps. As a result, leading U.S. variable-speed heat pump manufacturers should expect a challenge from the Japanese producers of power devices and microprocessors. Because of the vertically-integrated production structure in Japan, in contrast to the out-sourcing culture of the United States, price competition at the component level (such as inverters, sensors, and controls) may impact the structure of the industry more severely than final product sales.

  4. Japanese power electronics inverter technology and its impact on the American air conditioning industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ushimaru, Kenji.

    1990-08-01

    Since 1983, technological advances and market growth of inverter- driven variable-speed heat pumps in Japan have been dramatic. The high level of market penetration was promoted by a combination of political, economic, and trade policies in Japan. A unique environment was created in which the leading domestic industries-- microprocessor manufacturing, compressors for air conditioning and refrigerators, and power electronic devices--were able to direct the development and market success of inverter-driven heat pumps. As a result, leading US variable-speed heat pump manufacturers should expect a challenge from the Japanese producers of power devices and microprocessors. Because of the vertically-integrated production structure in Japan, in contrast to the out-sourcing culture of the United States, price competition at the component level (such as inverters, sensors, and controls) may impact the structure of the industry more severely than final product sales. 54 refs., 47 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Onset of chaos in a single-phase power electronic inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Avrutin, Viktor; Mosekilde, Erik; Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Gardini, Laura

    2015-04-15

    Supported by experiments on a power electronic DC/AC converter, this paper considers an unusual transition from the domain of stable periodic dynamics (corresponding to the desired mode of operation) to chaotic dynamics. The behavior of the converter is studied by means of a 1D stroboscopic map derived from a non-autonomous ordinary differential equation with discontinuous right-hand side. By construction, this stroboscopic map has a high number of border points. It is shown that the onset of chaos occurs stepwise, via irregular cascades of different border collisions, some of which lead to bifurcations while others do not.

  6. Long life testing of spare Mariner Venus '67 hardware. [power conditioning electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S. W.

    1976-01-01

    The faultless performance of the Mariner Venus '67 Power Conditioning Electronics (PCE) throughout six years of continuous operation in a simulated space environment is reported. Weekly functional tests supplemented by daily monitoring verified that the PCE equipment can perform to its intended functions for at least six years without apparent performance degradation. Performance throughout the test period was very stable, there are no circuit or redundancy improvements to be considered. When the equipment was examined after the test was completed, there was no evidence of any physical damage nor any difficulty in disconnecting the wiring connectors.

  7. Onset of chaos in a single-phase power electronic inverter.

    PubMed

    Avrutin, Viktor; Mosekilde, Erik; Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T; Gardini, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Supported by experiments on a power electronic DC/AC converter, this paper considers an unusual transition from the domain of stable periodic dynamics (corresponding to the desired mode of operation) to chaotic dynamics. The behavior of the converter is studied by means of a 1D stroboscopic map derived from a non-autonomous ordinary differential equation with discontinuous right-hand side. By construction, this stroboscopic map has a high number of border points. It is shown that the onset of chaos occurs stepwise, via irregular cascades of different border collisions, some of which lead to bifurcations while others do not. PMID:25933662

  8. Onset of chaos in a single-phase power electronic inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, Viktor; Mosekilde, Erik; Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Gardini, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Supported by experiments on a power electronic DC/AC converter, this paper considers an unusual transition from the domain of stable periodic dynamics (corresponding to the desired mode of operation) to chaotic dynamics. The behavior of the converter is studied by means of a 1D stroboscopic map derived from a non-autonomous ordinary differential equation with discontinuous right-hand side. By construction, this stroboscopic map has a high number of border points. It is shown that the onset of chaos occurs stepwise, via irregular cascades of different border collisions, some of which lead to bifurcations while others do not.

  9. Fragments and Debris Generation Using a High Power Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassany, Bruno; Courchinoux, Roger; Bertron, Isabelle; Malaise, Frederic; Hebert, David

    2002-12-01

    The high power Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will be constructed at CEA/DAM/CESTA near Bordeaux, in the south west part of France. Among the problems encountered in the LMJ experimental chamber, there is the impact of the debris produced after a laser shot on the silica optical windows. The production of debris as well as the behavior of optical materials under their influence can be simulated and studied with a pulsed electron beam. We present in this paper the first experimental results obtained by this original technique.

  10. A high-power electron linear accelerator for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. B.; Loda, G.; Miller, R. C.; Smith, R.; Shimer, D.; Seidt, C.; MacArt, M.; Mohr, H.; Robison, G.; Creely, P.; Bautista, J.; Oliva, T.; Young, L. M.; DuBois, D.

    2003-12-01

    The design and testing of a new microwave linac system is described. For electron beam kinetic energies in the range of 5-10 MeV, the average beam power capability exceeds 100 kW. A 5-MeV structure, consisting of 6.5 accelerating cells and six coupling cells, has been constructed and tested using a new inductive store/IGCT-switched modulator. This linac system has operated at maximum parameters of 4.7 MeV and 115 kW. It is presently installed and validated for food irradiation usage at the 100 kW level.

  11. Magnetic quadrupole formation of elliptical sheet electron beams for high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Basten, M.A.; Booske, J.H.; Anderson, J. . Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.)

    1994-10-01

    Sheet electron beams are attractive for high-power microwave sources due to their ability to transport high current, at reduced current density, through thin clearance apertures and in close proximity to walls or RF structures. This paper reports on the theoretical investigation of magnetic quadrupole formation of elliptical sheet electron beams for use in high-power microwave devices. The beam envelope equations for an initially round beam passing through a physical non-symmetric quadrupole pair in the presence of space-charge, finite beam emittance, and under the effects of third-order field components and longitudinal velocity variations are presented. The presence of space-charge compensates for over-focusing in the thin beam-dimension and allows for the formation of highly elliptic sheet electron beams. As an example, the results of the study were applied to an existing Pierce gun source with a beam radius of 0.6 cm, beam energy of 10 keV and current density of 2.0 A/cm[sup 2]. The authors find that an elliptical beam with major radius r[sub a] = 3.61 cm, minor radius r[sub b] = 0.16 cm and ellipticity (r[sub a]/r[sub b]) of 22.5 can be produced with only modest quadrupole gradients of 64 G/cm and 18 G/cm. Quadrupole formation of elliptical sheet-beams may be particularly suited for experimental research applications since existing round-beam electron guns may be used and changes in beam ellipticity may be made without breaking the vacuum system.

  12. Performance analysis of electronic power transformer based on neuro-fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Hakan; Kececioglu, O Fatih; Yildiz, Ceyhun; Gani, Ahmet; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, electronic power transformer (EPT), which is also called solid state transformer, has attracted great interest and has been used in place of the conventional power transformers. These transformers have many important functions as high unity power factor, low harmonic distortion, constant DC bus voltage, regulated output voltage and compensation capability. In this study, proposed EPT structure contains a three-phase pulse width modulation rectifier that converts 800 Vrms AC to 2000 V DC bus at input stage, a dual active bridge converter that provides 400 V DC bus with 5:1 high frequency transformer at isolation stage and a three-phase two level inverter that is used to obtain AC output at output stage. In order to enhance dynamic performance of EPT structure, neuro fuzzy controllers which have durable and nonlinear nature are used in input and isolation stages instead of PI controllers. The main aim of EPT structure with the proposed controller is to improve the stability of power system and to provide faster response against disturbances. Moreover, a number of simulation results are carried out to verify EPT structure designed in MATLAB/Simulink environment and to analyze compensation ability for voltage harmonics, voltage flicker and voltage sag/swell conditions. PMID:27588243

  13. Development of a power electronics unit for the Space Station plasma contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Patterson, Michael J.; Saggio, Joseph, Jr.; Terdan, Fred; Mansell, Justin D.

    1994-02-01

    A hollow cathode plasma contactor has been baselined as a charge control device for the Space Station (SS) to prevent deleterious interactions of coated structural components with the ambient plasma. NASA LeRC Work Package 4 initiated the development of a plasma contactor system comprised of a Power Electronics Unit (PEU), an Expellant Management Unit (EMU), a command and data interface, and a Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU). A breadboard PEU was designed and fabricated. The breadboard PEU contains a cathode heater and discharge power supply, which were required to operate the PCU, a control and auxiliary power converter, an EMU interface, a command and telemetry interface, and a controller. The cathode heater and discharge supplies utilized a push-pull topology with a switching frequency of 20 kHz and pulse-width-modulated (PWM) control. A pulse ignition circuit derived from that used in arcjet power processors was incorporated in the discharge supply for discharge ignition. An 8088 based microcontroller was utilized in the breadboard model to provide a flexible platform for controller development with a simple command/data interface incorporating a direct connection to SS Mulitplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) analog and digital I/O cards. Incorporating this in the flight model would eliminate the hardware and software overhead associated with a 1553 serial interface. The PEU autonomously operated the plasma contactor based on command inputs and was successfully integrated with a prototype plasma contactor unit demonstrating reliable ignition of the discharge and steady-state operation.

  14. Development of a Power Electronics Unit for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Patterson, Michael J.; Saggio, Joseph, Jr.; Terdan, Fred; Mansell, Justin D.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode plasma contactor has been baselined as a charge control device for the Space Station (SS) to prevent deleterious interactions of coated structural components with the ambient plasma. NASA LeRC Work Package 4 initiated the development of a plasma contactor system comprised of a Power Electronics Unit (PEU), an Expellant Management Unit (EMU), a command and data interface, and a Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU). A breadboard PEU was designed and fabricated. The breadboard PEU contains a cathode heater and discharge power supply, which were required to operate the PCU, a control and auxiliary power converter, an EMU interface, a command and telemetry interface, and a controller. The cathode heater and discharge supplies utilized a push-pull topology with a switching frequency of 20 kHz and pulse-width-modulated (PWM) control. A pulse ignition circuit derived from that used in arcjet power processors was incorporated in the discharge supply for discharge ignition. An 8088 based microcontroller was utilized in the breadboard model to provide a flexible platform for controller development with a simple command/data interface incorporating a direct connection to SS Mulitplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) analog and digital I/O cards. Incorporating this in the flight model would eliminate the hardware and software overhead associated with a 1553 serial interface. The PEU autonomously operated the plasma contactor based on command inputs and was successfully integrated with a prototype plasma contactor unit demonstrating reliable ignition of the discharge and steady-state operation.

  15. Initial high-power testing of the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (electron cyclotron heating) system

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO/sub 2/ mode absorbers, two 90/sup 0/ miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE/sub 02/ mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE/sub 01/, 82.6% TE/sub 02/, 2.5% TE/sub 03/, and 1.9% TE/sub 04/. 4 refs.

  16. DOE FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies program advanced power electronic and electrical machines annual review report

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, Mitch

    2006-10-11

    This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006.

  17. Design and numerical simulation of a high power capacity relativistic backward wave oscillator with an electron collection cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoze; Ye, Hu; Zhang, Yuchuan; Song, Wei; Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Ligang; Tan, Weibing; Hu, Xianggang; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Shen, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Min

    2016-05-01

    A high power capacity relativistic backward wave oscillator with an electron collection cavity (ECC) placed at the downstream of the slow wave structure (SWS) is presented. The breakdown threshold is increased, and the density of seed electron is suppressed by preventing the secondary electron, plasma, and powder generated from the bombardment of spent electron beam on the surface of the collector drifting to the extractor and beam-wave interaction region. The maximum longitudinal electric field in the device is reduced through extension of the span between electron beam and slow wave structure and weakening the Cerenkov radiation. The conversion efficiency reaches up to 52% owing to enhanced transit time radiation taking place at the entrance of the ECC. The maximum longitudinal electric field is 1.1 MV/cm on the surface of SWSs when the output power is 7.3 GW and the power capacity improves significantly.

  18. Towards high power output of scaled-up benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) using multiple electron collectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingchuan; Williams, Isaiah; Li, Yan; Wang, Lei; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios; McCutcheon, Jeffrey; Li, Baikun

    2016-05-15

    This study aimed at achieving high power output of benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) with novel geometric anode setups (inverted tube granular activated charcoal (IT-GAC) and carbon cloth roll (CCR)) and multiple anodes/electron collectors. The lab-scale tests showed the power density of IT-GAC and CCR anodes achieved at 2.92 and 2.55 W m(-2), the highest value ever reported in BMFCs. The power density of BMFCs substantially increased with electron collector number (titanium rods) in anodes. The connection of multiple electron collectors with multiple cathodes had much higher total voltage/current output than that with single cathode. The possibility of maintaining high power density at scaled-up BMFCs was explored by arranging multiple anodes in sediment. The compact configuration of multiple CCR anodes contacting each other did not deteriorate the performance of individual anodes, showing the feasibility of maximizing anode numbers per sediment footprint and achieving high power output. Multiple IT-GAC and CCR anodes with multiple collectors effectively utilized sediment at both horizontal and vertical directions and enhanced electron collection efficiency. This study demonstrated that bacterial adhesion and electron collection should be optimized on small anodes in order to maintain high power density and achieve high power output in the scaled-up BMFCs. PMID:26745789

  19. A DSP based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems. Quarterly report 3.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-31

    This report is an update on the research project involving the implementation of a DSP based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems that was funded by the Department of Energy under the Inventions and Innovations program 1998. The objective of this research is to develop a utility interface (dc to ac converter) suitable to interconnect alternate/renewable energy sources to the utility system. The DSP based power electronics interface in comparison with existing methods will excel in terms of efficiency, reliability and cost. Moreover DSP-based control provides the flexibility to upgrade/modify control algorithms to meet specific system requirements. The proposed interface will be capable of maintaining stiffness of the ac voltages at the point of common coupling regardless of variation in the input dc bus voltage. This will be achieved without the addition of any extra components to the basic interface topology but by inherently controlling the inverter switching strategy in accordance to the input voltage variation.

  20. A direct current rectification scheme for microwave space power conversion using traveling wave electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of the Vision-21 conference held three years ago allowed the present author to reflect and speculate on the problem of converting electromagnetic energy to a direct current by essentially reversing the process used in traveling wave tubes that converts energy in the form of a direct current to electromagnetic energy. The idea was to use the electric field of the electromagnetic wave to produce electrons through the field emission process and accelerate these electrons by the same field to produce an electric current across a large potential difference. The acceleration process was that of cyclotron auto-resonance. Since that time, this rather speculative ideas has been developed into a method that shows great promise and for which a patent is pending and a prototype design will be demonstrated in a potential laser power beaming application. From the point of view of the author, a forum such as Vision-21 is becoming an essential component in the rather conservative climate in which our initiatives for space exploration are presently formed. Exchanges such as Vision-21 not only allows us to deviate from the 'by-the-book' approach and rediscover the ability and power in imagination, but provides for the discussion of ideas hitherto considered 'crazy' so that they may be given the change to transcend from the level of eccentricity to applicability.

  1. First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser Generating GW Power Radiation at 32-Nm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Ayvazian, V.; Baboi, N.; Bahr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bohnet, I.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; Brovko, O.I.; Carneiro, J.P.; Casalbuoni, S.; Castellano, M.; Castro, P.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Choroba, S.; Cianchi, A.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; Di Pirro, G.; Dohlus, M.; /Saclay /Wurzburg U. /BESSY, Berlin /CANDLE, Yerevan /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Fermilab /Hamburg U. /INFM, Padua /Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome2 /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Dubna, JINR /Orsay, LAL /Max Born Inst., Berlin /SLAC

    2006-09-15

    Many scientific disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry and biology to material sciences, geophysics and medical diagnostics need a powerful X-ray source with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. This would allow, for example, time-resolved observation of chemical reactions with atomic resolution. Such radiation of extreme intensity, and tunable over a wide range of wavelengths, can be accomplished using high-gain free-electron lasers (FEL). Here we present results of the first successful operation of an FEL at a wavelength of 32 nm, with ultra-short pulses (25 fs FWHM), a peak power at the Gigawatt level, and a high degree of transverse and longitudinal coherence. The experimental data are in full agreement with theory. This is the shortest wavelength achieved with an FEL to date and an important milestone towards a user facility designed for wavelengths down to 6 nm. With a peak brilliance exceeding the state-of-the-art of synchrotron radiation sources by seven orders of magnitude, this device opens a new field of experiments, and it paves the way towards sources with even shorter wavelengths, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, USA, and the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility in Hamburg, Germany.

  2. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  3. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.

    1997-06-01

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design.

  4. First operation of a free-electron laser generating GW power radiation at 32 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Baboi, N.; Bähr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bohnet, I.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; Brovko, O. I.; Carneiro, J. P.; Casalbuoni, S.; Castellano, M.; Castro, P.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Choroba, S.; Cianchi, A.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; di Pirro, G.; Dohlus, M.; Düsterer, S.; Edwards, H. T.; Faatz, B.; Fateev, A. A.; Feldhaus, J.; Flöttmann, K.; Frisch, J.; Fröhlich, L.; Garvey, T.; Gensch, U.; Golubeva, N.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Grigoryan, B.; Grimm, O.; Hahn, U.; Han, J. H.; Hartrott, M. V.; Honkavaara, K.; Hüning, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Jaeschke, E.; Jablonka, M.; Kammering, R.; Katalev, V.; Keitel, B.; Khodyachykh, S.; Kim, Y.; Kocharyan, V.; Körfer, M.; Kollewe, M.; Kostin, D.; Krämer, D.; Krassilnikov, M.; Kube, G.; Lilje, L.; Limberg, T.; Lipka, D.; Löhl, F.; Luong, M.; Magne, C.; Menzel, J.; Michelato, P.; Miltchev, V.; Minty, M.; Möller, W. D.; Monaco, L.; Müller, W.; Nagl, M.; Napoly, O.; Nicolosi, P.; Nölle, D.; Nuñez, T.; Oppelt, A.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Petersen, B.; Petrosyan, B.; Pflüger, J.; Piot, P.; Plönjes, E.; Poletto, L.; Proch, D.; Pugachov, D.; Rehlich, K.; Richter, D.; Riemann, S.; Ross, M.; Rossbach, J.; Sachwitz, M.; Saldin, E. L.; Sandner, W.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmitz, M.; Schmüser, P.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Schreiber, H.-J.; Schreiber, S.; Shabunov, A. V.; Sertore, D.; Setzer, S.; Simrock, S.; Sombrowski, E.; Staykov, L.; Steffen, B.; Stephan, F.; Stulle, F.; Sytchev, K. P.; Thom, H.; Tiedtke, K.; Tischer, M.; Treusch, R.; Trines, D.; Tsakov, I.; Vardanyan, A.; Wanzenberg, R.; Weiland, T.; Weise, H.; Wendt, M.; Will, I.; Winter, A.; Wittenburg, K.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zagorodnov, I.; Zambolin, P.; Zapfe, K.

    2006-02-01

    Many scientific disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry and biology to material sciences, geophysics and medical diagnostics need a powerful X-ray source with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range [1-4]. This would allow, for example, time-resolved observation of chemical reactions with atomic resolution. Such radiation of extreme intensity, and tunable over a wide range of wavelengths, can be accomplished using high-gain free-electron lasers (FEL) [5-10]. Here we present results of the first successful operation of an FEL at a wavelength of 32 nm, with ultra-short pulses (25 fs FWHM), a peak power at the Gigawatt level, and a high degree of transverse and longitudinal coherence. The experimental data are in full agreement with theory. This is the shortest wavelength achieved with an FEL to date and an important milestone towards a user facility designed for wavelengths down to 6 nm. With a peak brilliance exceeding the state-of-the-art of synchrotron radiation sources [4] by seven orders of magnitude, this device opens a new field of experiments, and it paves the way towards sources with even shorter wavelengths, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source [3] at Stanford, USA, and the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility [4] in Hamburg, Germany.

  5. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  6. Electrode architectures for efficient electronic and ionic transport pathways in high power lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Ankita Shah

    As the demand for clean energy sources increases, large investments have supported R&D programs aimed at developing high power lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles, military, grid storage and space applications. State of the art lithium ion technology cannot meet power demands for these applications due to high internal resistances in the cell. These resistances are mainly comprised of ionic and electronic resistance in the electrode and electrolyte. Recently, much attention has been focused on the use of nanoscale lithium ion active materials on the premise that these materials shorten the diffusion length of lithium ions and increase the surface area for electrochemical charge transfer. While, nanomaterials have allowed significant improvements in the power density of the cell, they are not a complete solution for commercial batteries. Due to their large surface area, they introduce new challenges such as a poor electrode packing densities, high electrolyte reactivity, and expensive synthesis procedures. Since greater than 70% of the cost of the electric vehicle is due to the cost of the battery, a cost-efficient battery design is most critical. To address the limitations of nanomaterials, efficient transport pathways must be engineered in the bulk electrode. As a part of nanomanufacturing research being conducted the Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing at Northeastern University, the first aim of the proposed work is to develop electrode architectures that enhance electronic and ionic transport pathways in large and small area lithium ion electrodes. These architectures will utilize the unique electronic and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes to create robust electrode scaffolding that improves electrochemical charge transfer. Using extensive physical and electrochemical characterization, the second aim is to investigate the effect of electrode parameters on electrochemical performance and evaluate the performance against standard commercial

  7. PESC '84 - Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 15th, Gaithersburg, MD, June 18-21, 1984, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on power electronics are presented. The general topics addressed include: converter circuits, converter systems, motor drives, power components, modelling and analysis techniques, and converter control. Some individual papers discuss: snubber configuration for both power transistors and GTO PWM inverters, high-voltage high-frequency class-E converter suitable for miniaturization, parallel running of GTO PWM inverters, series parallel connected composite amplifiers, spacecraft ac power system for auxiliary equipment. Also covered are: multimotor drive with a current source inverter, switching performance of a power MOSFET circuit, computer model of magnetic saturation and hysteresis for use on SPICE2, general approach to sampled data modelling for power electronic circuits, PWM control techniques for rectifier filter minimization, and measurement of loop gain with the digital modulator.

  8. High-Performance electronics at ultra-low power consumption for space applications: From superconductor to nanoscale semiconductor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Robert V.; Simmons, Jerry; Kupferman, Stuart; McWhorter, Paul; Dunlap, David; Kovanis, V.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of Sandia's work in ultralow power dissipation electronics for space flight applications, including superconductive electronics, new advances in quantum well structures, and ultra-high purity 3-5 materials, and recent advances in micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEMS) is presented. The superconductive electronics and micromechanical devices are well suited for application in micro-robotics, micro-rocket engines, and advanced sensors.

  9. Using Wireless Power Meters to Measure Energy Use of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA; Brown, Richard; Lanzisera, Steven; Cheung, Hoi Ying; Lai, Judy; Jiang, Xiaofan; Dawson-Haggerty, Stephen; Taneja, Jay; Ortiz, Jorge; Culler, David

    2011-05-24

    Miscellaneous and electronic devices consume about one-third of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. Despite the success of policies, such as Energy Star, that promote more efficient miscellaneous and electronic products, much remains to be done to address the energy use of these devices if we are to achieve our energy and carbon reduction goals. Developing efficiency strategies for these products depends on better data about their actual usage, but very few studies have collected field data on the long-term energy used by a large sample of devices due to the difficulty and expense of collecting device-level energy data. This paper describes the development of an improved method for collecting device-level energy and power data using small, relatively inexpensive wireless power meters. These meters form a mesh network based on Internet standard protocols and can form networks of hundreds of metering points in a single building. Because the meters are relatively inexpensive and do not require manual data downloading, they can be left in the field for months or years to collect long time-series energy use data. In addition to the metering technology, we also describe a field protocol used to collect comprehensive, robust data on the miscellaneous and electronic devices in a building. The paper presents sample results from several case study buildings, in which all the plug-in devices for several homes were metered, and a representative sample of several hundred plug-in devices in a commercial office building were metered for several months.

  10. Optimal testing input sets for reduced diagnosis time of nuclear power plant digital electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Seong, P.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the optimal testing input sets required for the fault diagnosis of the nuclear power plant digital electronic circuits. With the complicated systems such as very large scale integration (VLSI), nuclear power plant (NPP), and aircraft, testing is the major factor of the maintenance of the system. Particularly, diagnosis time grows quickly with the complexity of the component. In this research, for reduce diagnosis time the authors derived the optimal testing sets that are the minimal testing sets required for detecting the failure and for locating of the failed component. For reduced diagnosis time, the technique presented by Hayes fits best for the approach to testing sets generation among many conventional methods. However, this method has the following disadvantages: (a) it considers only the simple network (b) it concerns only whether the system is in failed state or not and does not provide the way to locate the failed component. Therefore the authors have derived the optimal testing input sets that resolve these problems by Hayes while preserving its advantages. When they applied the optimal testing sets to the automatic fault diagnosis system (AFDS) which incorporates the advanced fault diagnosis method of artificial intelligence technique, they found that the fault diagnosis using the optimal testing sets makes testing the digital electronic circuits much faster than that using exhaustive testing input sets; when they applied them to test the Universal (UV) Card which is a nuclear power plant digital input/output solid state protection system card, they reduced the testing time up to about 100 times.

  11. A Physically Transient Form of Silicon Electronics, With Integrated Sensors, Actuators and Power Supply

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Suk-Won; Tao, Hu; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Cheng, Huanyu; Song, Jun-Kyul; Rill, Elliott; Brenckle, Mark A.; Panilaitis, Bruce; Won, Sang Min; Kim, Yun-Soung; Yu, Ki Jun; Ameen, Abid; Li, Rui; Su, Yewang; Yang, Miaomiao; Kaplan, David L.; Zakin, Mitchell R.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Rogers, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable feature of modern silicon electronics is its ability to remain functionally and physically invariant, almost indefinitely for many practical purposes. Here, we introduce a silicon-based technology that offers the opposite behavior: it gradually vanishes over time, in a well-controlled, programmed manner. Devices that are ‘transient’ in this sense create application possibilities that cannot be addressed with conventional electronics, such as active implants that exist for medically useful timeframes, but then completely dissolve and disappear via resorption by the body. We report a comprehensive set of materials, manufacturing schemes, device components and theoretical design tools for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics of this type, together with four different classes of sensors and actuators in addressable arrays, two options for power supply and a wireless control strategy. A transient silicon device capable of delivering thermal therapy in an implantable mode and its demonstration in animal models illustrate a system-level example of this technology. PMID:23019646

  12. Single-state electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.F.; Yu, T.H.; Chiang, M.C.

    1998-05-01

    Analysis, design, and practical consideration of a single-stage electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor are presented in this paper. The proposed single-stage ballast is the combination of a boost converter and a half-bridge series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter. The boost semistage working in the discontinuous conduction mode functions as a power factor corrector and the inverter semistage operated above resonance are employed to ballast the lamp. Replacing the lamp with the plasma model, analysis of the ballast is fulfilled. The dimming feature is carried out by pulse-width modulation (PWM) and variable-frequency controls simultaneously. The proposed single-stage ballast is suitable for applications with moderate power level and low-line voltage while requiring a high-output voltage. It can save a controller, an active switch and its driver, reduce size, and possibly increase system reliability while requiring two additional diodes over a conventional two-stage system. A prototype was implemented to verify the theoretical discussion. The hardware measurements have shown that the desired performance can be achieved feasibly.

  13. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system. PMID:21721690

  14. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-15

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  15. Alternative lattice options for energy recovery in high-average-power high-efficiency free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    High-average-power free-electron lasers often rely on energy-recovering linacs. In a high-efficiency free electron laser, the main limitation to high average power stems from the fractional energy spread induced by the free-electron laser process. Managing beams with large fractional energy spread while simultaneously avoiding beam losses is extremely challenging and relies on intricate longitudinal phase space manipulations. In this paper we discuss a possible alternative technique that makes use of an emittance exchange between one of the transverse and the longitudinal phase spaces.

  16. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  17. Current status and scope of gallium nitride-based vertical transistors for high-power electronics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Srabanti; Swenson, Brian L.; Hoi Wong, Man; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2013-07-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is becoming the material of choice for power electronics to enable the roadmap of increasing power density by simultaneously enabling high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor. This is because the low switching losses of GaN enable high-frequency operation which reduces bulky passive components with negligible change in efficiency. Commercialization of GaN-on-Si materials for power electronics has led to the entry of GaN devices into the medium-power market since the performance-over-cost of even first-generation products looks very attractive compared to today's mature Si-based solutions. On the other hand, the high-power market still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high-power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high-power conversion needs. In this paper vertical GaN devices are discussed with emphasis on current aperture vertical electron transistors (CAVETs) which have shown promising performance. The fabrication-related challenges and the future possibilities enabled by the availability of good-quality, cost-competitive bulk GaN material are also evaluated for CAVETs. This work was done at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.

  18. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, A. F.; Mesa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 101 eV - 1010 eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  19. How Power Electronics Engineers Should Write and Present Technical Papers in English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper describes techniques that Japanese power electronics engineers can use to improve the quality of their technical papers written in English and the accompanying technical presentations. These techniques are based on the experience that the author has gained by participating in international conferences. Such techniques are important to discuss because the significant differences exist in writing and presentation styles between Japanese and American engineers. The author believes that such style differences are caused by differences between the Japanese and American cultures. The objective of this paper is to help Japanese engineers understand these cultural differences and improve their technical communication skills in English. The paper also includes some practical tips on writing and presentation techniques for improving the quality of their technical communications in English.

  20. Selected fault testing of electronic isolation devices used in nuclear power plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    Villaran, M.; Hillman, K.; Taylor, J.; Lara, J.; Wilhelm, W.

    1994-05-01

    Electronic isolation devices are used in nuclear power plants to provide electrical separation between safety and non-safety circuits and systems. Major fault testing in an earlier program indicated that some energy may pass through an isolation device when a fault at the maximum credible potential is applied in the transverse mode to its output terminals. During subsequent field qualification testing of isolators, concerns were raised that the worst case fault, that is, the maximum credible fault (MCF), may not occur with a fault at the maximum credible potential, but rather at some lower potential. The present test program investigates whether problems can arise when fault levels up to the MCF potential are applied to the output terminals of an isolator. The fault energy passed through an isolated device during a fault was measured to determine whether the levels are great enough to potentially damage or degrade performance of equipment on the input (Class 1E) side of the isolator.

  1. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications. PMID:26278347

  2. Thermal management of power sources for mobile electronic devices based on micro-SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, S.; Iguchi, F.; Shimizu, M.; Yugami, H.

    2014-11-01

    Small power sources based on micro-SOFC for mobile electronic devices required two conditions, i,e, thermally compatibility and thermally self-sustain, because of high operating temperature over 300 oC. Moreover, high energy efficiency was also required. It meant that this system should be designed considering thermal management. In this study, we developed micro-SOFC packages which have three functions, thermal insulation, thermal recovery, and self-heating. Heat conduction analysis based on finite element method, and thermochemical calculation revealed that vacuum thermal insulation was effective for size reduction and gas-liquid heat exchanger could reduce the temperature of outer surface. We fabricated the package with three functions for proof of concept and evaluated. As a result, it was suggested that developed package could satisfy both two requirements with high efficiency.

  3. Evolution of a finite pulse of radiation in a high-power free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Hafizi, B.; Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M. . Plasma Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The development of an optical pulse of finite axial extent is studied by means of an axisymmetric time-dependent particle simulation code for different rates of tapering of the wiggler field. The results provided in this paper illustrate a number of the physical phenomena underlying the free-electron laser mechanism. These include: suppression of the sideband instability; the role of gain focusing versus that of refractive guiding; efficiency enhancement; and pulse slippage. It is found that a significant reduction in the sideband modulation of the optical field can be achieved with a faster tapering of the wiggler parameters. Increasing the tapering rate also reduces refractive guiding, causing the optical wavefronts to become more convex, thus spreading the optical field into a larger cross section. The corresponding enhancement of the peak output power is associated with an increased lateral extent of the optical field rather than an increase in the field amplitude.

  4. Intense relativistic electron beam generation and prepulse effect in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Kumar, D. D. P.; Kumar, Senthil; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    Intense gigawatt relativistic electron beam has been generated in a high power cylindrical diode in the presence of prepulse. A bipolar prepulse voltage, recorded at the diode, varies both in amplitude and time duration with the Marx generator voltage. It was found that only at the accelerating gap {<=}1.65 cm there is some shot to shot variation in the diode voltage and current for the same Marx generator voltage. The anode and cathode plasma expansion velocities were calculated using the perveance data. The plasma expands at 5 cm/{mu}s for 1.85 cm radial anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gap. It was found that the effect of the prepulse is less pronounced in the cylindrical diode as compared to planar diode that allows one operation of the cylindrical diode with the gap {<=}1.85 cm.

  5. Toward low-power electronics: tunneling phenomena in transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Prakash, Abhijith; Salazar, Ramon; Appenzeller, Joerg

    2014-02-25

    In this article, we explore, experimentally, the impact of band-to-band tunneling on the electronic transport of double-gated WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) and Schottky barrier tunneling of holes in back-gated MoS2 FETs. We show that by scaling the flake thickness and the thickness of the gate oxide, the tunneling current can be increased by several orders of magnitude. We also perform numerical calculations based on Landauer formalism and WKB approximation to explain our experimental findings. Based on our simple model, we discuss the impact of band gap and effective mass on the band-to-band tunneling current and evaluate the performance limits for a set of dichalcogenides in the context of tunneling transistors for low-power applications. Our findings suggest that WTe2 is an excellent choice for tunneling field-effect transistors. PMID:24392853

  6. An alternative method using microwave power saturate in fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Byeongryong; Choi, Muhyun; Lee, Byungil; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2014-06-01

    An alternative method for fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry valid at low doses (0-3 Gy) is suggested in this paper. The method consisted of two steps. The first step involved dehydrating fingernail clippings to remove their water content by heating them at 70 °C for 72 h. As the water content in the fingernails decreased, the variability of the EPR signals improved. The second step involved measuring and fitting the EPR signals at successive microwave power levels. A newly derived value known as 'curvature', which was based on the conventional peak-to-peak amplitudes of the EPR signals, was applied for the dosimetry. This method could be used as an alternative method in cases of low-radiation exposure doses (<3 Gy) or where use of the conventional dosimetry method is not proper for a fingernail sample. PMID:24876339

  7. Research and development on high-power millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave electron tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourier, G.

    Several high-power generators operating in the frequency range above 20 GHz are examined. These are hot-cathode vacuum tubes of the gyrotron type, which operate at voltages under 200 kV and in a magnetic field under 40 kG. A gyrotron research and development program is described, with particular emphasis on its computer-aided design and the use of superconducting magnets. Devices operating in frequency ranges above 200-300 GHz are described, and the concept of using transverse interaction rather than longitudinal interaction is discussed. Although transverse interaction has less energetic efficiency, its uniform magnetic field, high value of deceleration, and the possibility of using a wave with low group velocity make it a viable option. Devices incorporating a small electron accelerator in the same vacuum envelope and operating at relatively low voltage at higher frequencies are presently being investigated.

  8. Virtual Power Electronics: Novel Software Tools for Design, Modeling and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, Janos; Nagy, István; Funato, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Dranga, Octavian; Nishida, Yasuyuki

    The current paper is dedicated to present browser-based multimedia-rich software tools and e-learning curriculum to support the design and modeling process of power electronics circuits and to explain sometimes rather sophisticated phenomena. Two projects will be discussed. The so-called Inetele project is financed by the Leonardo da Vinci program of the European Union (EU). It is a collaborative project between numerous EU universities and institutes to develop state-of-the art curriculum in Electrical Engineering. Another cooperative project with participation of Japanese, European and Australian institutes focuses especially on developing e-learning curriculum, interactive design and modeling tools, furthermore on development of a virtual laboratory. Snapshots from these two projects will be presented.

  9. Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and LowPower Products

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

    2006-08-01

    Most energy end uses such as space conditioning or waterheating are apparently well-defined in what is included, and haveterminology that derives from the professionals who work in the relevantfield. The topic of miscellaneous consumption lacks such clarity forhistorical and practical reasons. As this end use grows in size andinterest for the energy community, the confusion and ambiguity around thetopic is an increasing barrier to progress. This paper providesdefinitions for key terms and concepts with the intent that that futurework can be more correctly and consistently reported and interpreted. Inaddition, it provides a taxonomy of product types and categories, whichcovers both residential and commercial miscellaneous consumption. A keyelement is identification of "electronics" as a distinct energy end use.Finally, products are identified as to whether they commonly have alow-power mode, and product types that have such modes within thetraditional end uses are also listed.

  10. REX, a 5-MV pulsed-power source for driving high-brightness electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kauppila, T.J.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Electron-beam Experiment, or REX accelerator, is a pulsed-power source capable of driving a 100-ohm load at 5 MV, 50 kA, 45 ns (FWHM) with less than a 10-ns rise and 15-ns fall time. This paper describes the pulsed-power modifications, modelling, and extensive measurements on REX to allow it to drive high impedance (100s of ohms) diode loads with a shaped voltage pulse. A major component of REX is the 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick Lucite insulator with embedded grading rings that separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. A radially tailored, liquid-based resistor provides a stiff voltage source that is insensitive to small variations of the diode current and, in addition, optimizes the electric field stress across the vacuum side of the insulator. The high-current operation of REX employs both multichannel peaking and point-plane diverter switches. This mode reduces the prepulse to less than 2 kV and the postpulse to less than 5% of the energy delivered to the load. Pulse shaping for the present diode load is done through two L-C transmission line filters and a tapered, glycol-based line adjacent to the water PFL and output switch. This has allowed REX to drive a diode producing a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam with a normalized Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad corresponding to a beam brightness in excess of 4.4 {times} 10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2} {minus}rad{sup 2}. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Transient liquid phase bonding as a joining technique for high-temperature power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Nicholas Seth

    Fundamental aspects of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding in the Cu-Sn system have been studied, with the objective of assessing the utility of the bonding technique in joining high-temperature SiC devices to direct bond copper (DBC) substrates in power electronic packages. This technique can be implemented at relatively low temperatures (in comparison to the melting point of Cu), yet provide bonds that have composition and properties that are similar to those of Cu. The bonding parameters of time, temperature, and interlayer thickness were probed. Additionally, two methods for the introduction of the interlayer were used: one based on the use of foils and the other based on electron beam deposition. The resulting microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Microstructures consisting of the phases Cu6Sn5, Cu3Sn, Cu 41Sn11, and (Cu) were produced. The time required to form a bond with the targeted microstructure, notably that of (Cu), was found to be dominated by the consumption of intermediate phases, as dictated by diffusion, and thus scaled quadratically with initial interlayer thickness. Two types of bonding defects were obtained: one due to surface contamination and the other caused by the consumption of Sn through the formation of the Cu 6Sn5 intermetallic in the solid state during heating. The successful production of samples devoid of such defects was via electron beam deposition of the interlayer material, with sufficient thickness to ensure ample material for the formation of the transient liquid phase following solid state intermetallic formation. The mechanical properties of these bonds were measured and compared with those made with Sn foil. The toughness of the bonds in samples where the Sn interlayer was introduced by electron beam deposition was greater than that of samples that used an interlayer of Sn foil. The difference was attributed to the higher level of porosity and defects in

  12. Power balance in ELMO Bumpy Torus: bulk electrons and ions in a 37 kW discharge

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The power balance of the bulk electrons and ions in discharges with 37 kW of applied microwave power in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is examined in a zero-dimensional model using data on the intensity and linewidth of the molecular and atomic hydrogen emission. At least 60% of the applied power is ultimately dissipated by processes involving the neutral particles, including dissociation of molecules, ionization of and radiation from atoms, and heating of cold electrons produced during atomic ionization. The molecular influx rate and the density of atoms are used independently to determine the bulk electron particle confinement time, and an upper bound estimate is made of the diffusional power loss from the bulk plasma electrons. Parameters derived from the basic spectroscopic data presented in this paper include the neutral atom density 2 - 5x10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/, incident molecular flux 3 - 5x10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, bulk ion temperature approx. =3 eV, and particle confinement time <1.1 ms. The bulk electron energy confinement time is 0.7 ms or less in the standard operating regime. Published data on the nonthermal electron and ion populations in the plasma are used to evaluate approximately the overall energy flow in the discharge. 54 refs.

  13. Magnetic quadrupole formation of low-voltage sheet electron beams for high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Basten, M.A.; Booske, J.H.; Anderson, J.; Joe, J.; Scharer, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Sheet electron beams have the potential to make possible higher power sources of microwave radiation due to their ability to transport high currents, at reduced current densities, through a single narrow RF interaction circuit. Possible microwave device applications using sheet electron beams include sheet-beam klystrons, grating TWT`s, and planar FELs. One difficulty with the experimental investigation and implementation of sheet beams is the lack of a satisfactory source for large aspect-ratio beams. An attractive solution is the use of magnetic quadrupoles to transform an initially round beam from a conventional Pierce gun into a highly eccentric elliptical beam. Both 2-D envelope simulations and 3-D envelope and PIC code simulations indicate that this is a viable method of sheet beam formation, particularly for experimental investigations where flexibility and low-cost fabrication is desired. The authors are currently constructing a system to experimentally test this method. Features of the experiment include a low-cost commercially available Pierce gun, a four quadrupole sheet beam-forming system, and a highly elliptical output beam. Results of the 3-D PIC simulations of the beam and 3-D magnetostatic finite-element simulations of the quadrupole fringe fields will be discussed. Details of the experimental design and initial experimental measurements are presented.

  14. Exciting Alfven Waves using Modulated Electron Heating by High Power Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Experiments exploring the physics of ionospheric modification with intense perpendicular propagating waves (k-> ⊥B->0) on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA have been upgraded with the addition of a high power rapidly pulsed microwave source. The plasma is irradiated with ten pulses (250 kW X-band) near the upper-hybrid frequency. The pulses are modulated at a frequency of a fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci (ion cyclotron frequency). Based on a previous single-pulse experiment, the modulated electron heating may drive a large amplitude shear Alfvén wave (f electron Bernstein mode are investigated in plasmas with controllable parameters (ne =108 ~1012 cm-3 ,Te = 0 . 1 ~ 6 eV ,Ti <

  15. Production of high power microwaves for particle acceleration with an FEL bunched electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Marchese, G.; Padois, M.; Rullier, J. L.; Donohue, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Among the studies in the framework of high gradient linear electron-positron collider research, the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is a very promising concept, and two projects are in progress, the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN (W. Schnell, Report no. CERN SL/92-51 and CLIC note 184; K. Hübner, CERN/PS 92-43, CLIC note 176; S. Van der Meer, CERN/PS 89-50, CLIC note 97.) and the Relativistic Klystron-TBA project at LBNL (Technical Review Committee, International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report 1995, SLAC-R-95-471, 1995). In a TBA an extremely intense low-energy electron beam, called the drive beam, is bunched at the desired operating frequency, and upon passing through resonant cavities generates radio-frequency power for accelerating the main beam. Among the different approaches to the production of a suitable drive beam, the use of an FEL has been proposed and is under active study at CEA/CESTA.

  16. MOS-FET as a Current Sensor in Power Electronics Converters.

    PubMed

    Pajer, Rok; Milanoviĉ, Miro; Premzel, Branko; Rodiĉ, Miran

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a current sensing principle appropriate for use in power electronics' converters. This current measurement principle has been developed for metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOS-FET) and is based on U(DS) voltage measurement. In practice, shunt resistors and Hall effect sensors are usually used for these purposes, but the presented principle has many advantages. There is no need for additional circuit elements within high current paths, causing parasitic inductances and increased production complexity. The temperature dependence of MOS-FETs conductive resistance R(DS-ON) is considered in order to achieve the appropriate measurement accuracy. The "MOS-FET sensor" is also accompanied by a signal acquisition electronics circuit with an appropriate frequency bandwidth. The obtained analogue signal is therefore interposed to an A-D converter for further data acquisition. In order to achieve sufficient accuracy, a temperature compensation and appropriate approximation is used (R(DS-ON) = R(DS-ON)(θj)). The MOS-FET sensor is calibrated according to a reference sensor based on the Hall-effect principle. The program algorithm is executed on 32-bit ARM M4 MCU, STM32F407. PMID:26213938

  17. Stability assessment of a multi-port power electronic interface for hybrid micro-grid applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsi, Pourya

    Migration to an industrial society increases the demand for electrical energy. Meanwhile, social causes for preserving the environment and reducing pollutions seek cleaner forms of energy sources. Therefore, there has been a growth in distributed generation from renewable sources in the past decade. Existing regulations and power system coordination does not allow for massive integration of distributed generation throughout the grid. Moreover, the current infrastructures are not designed for interfacing distributed and deregulated generation. In order to remedy this problem, a hybrid micro-grid based on nano-grids is introduced. This system consists of a reliable micro-grid structure that provides a smooth transition from the current distribution networks to smart micro-grid systems. Multi-port power electronic interfaces are introduced to manage the local generation, storage, and consumption. Afterwards, a model for this micro-grid is derived. Using this model, the stability of the system under a variety of source and load induced disturbances is studied. Moreover, pole-zero study of the micro-grid is performed under various loading conditions. An experimental setup of this micro-grid is developed, and the validity of the model in emulating the dynamic behavior of the system is verified. This study provides a theory for a novel hybrid micro-grid as well as models for stability assessment of the proposed micro-grid.

  18. Electron Gun For a High-Power X-Band Magnicon Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V. P.; Nezhevenko, O. A.; True, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a 500 kV, 210 amp, advanced Pierce gun for a high power, 11.4 GHz, 60% efficient, second harmonic magnicon amplifier. This magnicon, being developed jointly by a collaboration of workers from Omega-P, NRL, and Litton, represents a prototype RF power source for future linear colliders. High magnicon efficiency requires use of a small diameter electron beam. From a 7.5 cm diameter low temperature dispenser cathode, the diameter of the focussed beam is 1.5 mm in a 0.65 T main field. In this case, beam area compression is 2500:1, and beam energy density is over 10 kJ/cm^2 per pulse. A unique feature of the gun is that the focus electrode is electrically isolated from the cathode. This not only help in achievement of the high beam intensity, it eliminates emission from the side of the cathode which is often the major ultimate origin of beam halo.

  19. 800-keV Electron Induction Injector with High Average Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, G. L.; Glazov, A. I.; Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Latypov, T. A.; Mamaev, S. L.; Puchkov, S. N.; Shcherbakov, A. M.; Tenyakov, I. E.; Terechkin, Y. M.; Vlasenko, S. I.

    1997-05-01

    Design parameters of the induction injector are 800 keV beam energy, 2...5 kA current, 80 ns pulse flat top and 100 Hz repetition rate. The average beam power of the series of pulses is 40 kW. The injector modules use metglass cores. The electron source mounted on the stem consists of a 80 mm diameter velvet cathode placed on a field forming electrode. The tapered insulator assembly separates the oil-filled induction modules from the vacuum diode. The magnetic field necessary for beam extraction is generated by two magntic cores. 150 kV, 40 kA, 100 ns, 100 Hz pulse generator has been designed in Radiotechnical institute. The generator is a two-stage magnetic power compressor with a thyratron switch. The voltage pulse is produced by the water-filled pulse forming line (PFL) with the impedance of 3.3 ohm. The calculated parameters of the injector, the design features of its modules and the experimental results of their testing are presented.

  20. Partial Shade Evaluation of Distributed Power Electronics for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Meydbrav, J.; Donovan, M.

    2012-06-01

    Site survey data for several residential installations are provided, showing the extent and frequency of shade throughout the year. This background information is used to design a representative shading test that is conducted on two side-by-side 8-kW photovoltaic (PV) installations. One system is equipped with a standard string inverter, while the other is equipped with microinverters on each solar panel. Partial shade is applied to both systems in a comprehensive range of shading conditions, simulating one of three shade extents. Under light shading conditions, the microinverter system produced the equivalent of 4% annual performance improvement, relative to the string inverter system. Under moderate shading conditions, the microinverter system outperformed the string inverter system by 8%, and under heavy shading the microinverter increased relative performance by 12%. In all three cases, the percentage of performance loss that is recovered by the use of distributed power electronics is 40%-50%. Additionally, it was found that certain shading conditions can lead to additional losses in string inverters due to peak-power tracking errors and voltage limitations.

  1. Structure of 100 W high-efficiency piezoelectric transformer for applications in power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kohei; Adachi, Kazunari; Shibamata, Yuki; Suzuki, Tsunehisa

    2016-08-01

    We propose a piezoelectric transformer comprising two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) and a stepped horn for its applications to high-power electronics. The transformer can realize a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio determined by the cross-sectional area ratio of the horn, both ends of which are connected to the BLTs, at a driving frequency in the vicinity of its mechanical resonance frequency. In experiments, we obtained the results predicted by finite-element analysis. The deviations of the measured resonance and driving frequencies from the numerically estimated values were 0.86 and 0.80%, respectively. At the driving frequency, the maximum efficiency was 99.2%, and a maximum output power of 100 W was obtained with an input voltage of 100 Vrms. Nevertheless, we observed unstable actions of the transformer, which can be attributed to the “jumping and dropping” phenomena, in high voltage operation. Numerical analysis suggests that the instability may be caused by the local electric field concentration in the piezoelectric elements, which occurs only when the transformer is driven by a low-output-impedance voltage source at its mechanical resonance frequency.

  2. Improving the power of genetic association tests with imperfect phenotype derived from electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Dai, Wei; Liao, Katherine P; Shaw, Stanley Y; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Gainer, Vivian S; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Churchill, Susanne; Szolovits, Peter; Murphy, Shawn; Kohane, Isaac; Plenge, Robert; Cai, Tianxi

    2014-11-01

    To reduce costs and improve clinical relevance of genetic studies, there has been increasing interest in performing such studies in hospital-based cohorts by linking phenotypes extracted from electronic medical records (EMRs) to genotypes assessed in routinely collected medical samples. A fundamental difficulty in implementing such studies is extracting accurate information about disease outcomes and important clinical covariates from large numbers of EMRs. Recently, numerous algorithms have been developed to infer phenotypes by combining information from multiple structured and unstructured variables extracted from EMRs. Although these algorithms are quite accurate, they typically do not provide perfect classification due to the difficulty in inferring meaning from the text. Some algorithms can produce for each patient a probability that the patient is a disease case. This probability can be thresholded to define case-control status, and this estimated case-control status has been used to replicate known genetic associations in EMR-based studies. However, using the estimated disease status in place of true disease status results in outcome misclassification, which can diminish test power and bias odds ratio estimates. We propose to instead directly model the algorithm-derived probability of being a case. We demonstrate how our approach improves test power and effect estimation in simulation studies, and we describe its performance in a study of rheumatoid arthritis. Our work provides an easily implemented solution to a major practical challenge that arises in the use of EMR data, which can facilitate the use of EMR infrastructure for more powerful, cost-effective, and diverse genetic studies. PMID:25062868

  3. Observation of ultrahigh-energy electrons by resonance absorption of high-power microwaves in a pulsed plasma.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, C; Fuji, T; Ito, H; Yugami, N; Nishida, Y

    2001-07-01

    The interaction of high power microwave with collisionless unmagnetized plasma is studied. Investigation on the generation of superthermal electrons near the critical layer, by the resonance absorption phenomenon, is extended to very high microwave power levels (eta=E(2)(0)/4 pi n(e)kT(e) approximately 0.3). Here E0, n(e), and T(e) are the vacuum electric field, electron density, and electron temperature, respectively. Successive generation of electron bunches having maximum energy of about 2 keV, due to nonlinear wave breaking, is observed. The electron energy epsilon scales as a function of the incident microwave power P, according to epsilon proportional to P0.5 up to 250 kW. The two-dimensional spatial distribution of high energy electrons reveals that they are generated near the critical layer. However, the lower energy component is again produced in the subcritical density region indicating the possibility of other electron heating mechanisms. PMID:11461406

  4. End-boundary sheath potential, Langmuir waves, electron and ion energy distribution in the low pressure DC powered Non-ambipolar Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-09-01

    The non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) is heated by electron beam extracted from the electron-source Ar plasma through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside NEP. NEP pressure is in the 1-3mTorr range of N2 and its accelerator voltage varied from VA = + 80 to VA = + 600V. The non-ambipolar beam-current injected into NEP is in the range of 10s Acm-2 and it heats NEP through beam-plasma instabilities. Its EED f has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy-continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies above the beam-energy. The remnant of the injected electron-beam power terminates at the NEP end-boundary floating-surface setting up sheath potentials from VS = 80 to VS = 580V in response to the applied values of VA. The floating-surface is bombarded by a space-charge neutral plasma-beam whose IED f is near mono-energetic. When the injected electron-beam power is adequately damped by NEP, its end-boundary floating-surface VS can be linearly controlled at almost 1:1 ratio by VA. NEP does not have an electron-free sheath; its ``sheath'' is a widen presheath that consists of a thermal presheath followed by an ``anisotropic'' presheath, leading up to the end-boundary floating-surface. Its ion-current of the plasma-beam is much higher than what a conventional thermal presheath can supply. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam power sufficiently, VS will collapse and becomes irresponsive to VA.

  5. Physics, fabrication and characterization of III-V multi-gate FETs for low power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thathachary, Arun V.

    With transistor technology close to its limits for power constrained scaling and the simultaneous emergence of mobile devices as the dominant driver for new scaling, a pathway to significant reduction in transistor operating voltage to 0.5V or lower is urgently sought. This however implies a fundamental paradigm shift away from mature Silicon technology. III-V compound semiconductors hold great promise in this regard due to their vastly superior electron transport properties making them prime candidates to replace Silicon in the n-channel transistor. Among the plethora of binary and ternary compounds available in the III-V space, InxGa1-xAs alloys have attracted significant interest due to their excellent electron mobility, ideally placed bandgap and mature growth technology. Simultaneously, electrostatic control mandates multigate transistor designs such as the FinFET at extremely scaled nodes. This dissertation describes the experimental realization of III-V FinFETs incorporating InXGa1-XAs heterostructure channels for high performance, low power logic applications. The chapters that follow present experimental demonstrations, simulations and analysis on the following aspects (a) motivation and key figures of merit driving material selection and design; (b) dielectric integration schemes for high-k metal-gate stack (HKMG) realization on InXGa 1-XAs, including surface clean and passivation techniques developed for high quality interfaces; (c) novel techniques for transport (mobility) characterization in nanoscale multi-gate FET architectures with experimental demonstration on In0.7Ga0.3As nanowires; (d) Indium composition and quantum confined channel design for InXGa 1-XAs FinFETs and (e) InAs heterostructure designs for high performance FinFETs. Each chapter also contains detailed benchmarking of results against state of the art demonstrations in Silicon and III-V material systems. The dissertation concludes by assessing the feasibility of InXGa 1-XAs Fin

  6. Electron-beam and high-speed optical diagnostics for the average power laser experiment (APLE) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; McVey, Brian D.; Greegor, Robert B.; Dowell, David H.

    1992-07-01

    The average power laser experiment (APLE) program is a collaboration between Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Company and Los Alamos National Laboratory to build a free-electron laser (FEL) operating at a wavelength of 10 μm and an average power of 100 kW. This program includes demonstration experiments at Boeing on the injector and at Los Alamos on a single accelerator master oscillator power amplifier (SAMOPA). In response to simulations of the expected electron beam properties, diagnostic plans have been developed for the low duty factor and the 25% duty factor operations of APLE. Preliminary evaluations of diagnostics based on information conversion to visible or near-infrared light (optical-transition radiation, Cherenkov radiation, synchrotron radiation, and spontaneous-emission radiation) or electrical signals (striplines, toroids, flying wires, etc.) are addressed.

  7. Free electron laser with small period wiggler and sheet electron beam: A study of the feasibility of operation at 300 GHz with 1 MW CW output power

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Finn, J.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Radack, D.; Rodgers, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of a small period wiggler (/ell//sub ..omega../ < 1 cm) together with a sheet electron beam has been proposed as a low cost source of power for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetic fusion plasmas. Other potential applications include space-based radar systems. We have experimentally demonstrated stable propagation of a sheet beam (18 A. 1 mm /times/ 20 mm) through a ten-period wiggler electromagnet with peak field of 1.2 kG. Calculation of microwave wall heating and pressurized water cooling have also been carried out, and indicate the feasibility of operating a near-millimeter, sheet beam FEL with an output power of 1 MW CW (corresponding to power density into the walls of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/). Based on these encouraging results, a proof-of-principle experiment is being assembled, and is aimed at demonstrating FEL operating at 120 GHz with 300 kW output power in 1 ..mu..s pulses: electron energy would be 410 keV. Preliminary design of a 300 GHz 1 MW FEL with an untapered wiggler is also presented. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Grid Interconnection and Performance Testing Procedures for Vehicle-To-Grid (V2G) Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Hoke, A.; Martin, G.; Markel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Bidirectional power electronics can add vehicle-to-grid (V2G) capability in a plug-in vehicle, which then allows the vehicle to operate as a distributed resource (DR). The uniqueness of the battery-based V2G power electronics requires a test procedure that will not only maintain IEEE interconnection standards, but can also evaluate the electrical performance of the vehicle working as a DR. The objective of this paper is to discuss a recently published NREL technical report that provides interim test procedures for V2G vehicles for their integration into the electrical distribution systems and for their performance in terms of continuous output power, efficiency, and losses. Additionally, some other test procedures are discussed that are applicable to a V2G vehicle that desires to provide power reserve functions. A few sample test results are provided based on testing of prototype V2G vehicles at NREL.

  9. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applicationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Médard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-01

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm2 (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 μA extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 π mm mrad at 15 kV (1σ) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon beams

  10. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-15

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2} (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 {mu}A extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 {pi} mm mrad at 15 kV (1{sigma}) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon

  11. High-Power Electron Landau-Heating Experiments in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range in a Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, M.; Lloyd, B.; Takase, Y.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Gandy, R.; Granetz, R.; Griffin, D.; Gwinn, D.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pachtman, A.; Pappas, D.; Parker, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Terry, J.; Texter, S.; Watterson, R.; Wolfe, S.

    1984-09-01

    The effectiveness of plasma heating by electron Landau interaction in the lower hybrid range of frequencies in tokamak plasmas is demonstrated. Upon injection of 850 kW of rf power at a density of n―e~=1.4×1014 cm-3, an electron temperature increase of 1.0 keV and an ion temperature increase of 0.8 keV was achieved. These results are compared with transport and ray-tracing code predictions.

  12. The dependence of F-region electron heating on HF radio pump power: Measurements at EISCAT Tromsø

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.; Kosch, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of ionospheric electron temperature enhanced by the action of a powerful high-frequency radio wave on the F-region at the EISCAT facility near Tromsø, Norway are analyzed to obtain the electron heat source due to the radio wave as a function of transmitter power. The absorption of the wave in the D-region is accounted for and is found to have a significant influence on the F-region heating, especially due to variations in the D-region electron density during the experiment. It is found that the efficiency of F-region heating expressed in terms of the electron heating rate as a function of radio wave power flux is higher at higher transmitter powers. This behavior seems to be consistent with the development of geomagnetic field-aligned plasma density irregularities which are associated with the conversion of the radio wave to electrostatic upper-hybrid waves. At the highest power fluxes, the efficiency appears to be close to 100%.

  13. Plasma and cyclotron frequency effects on output power of the plasma wave-pumped free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolghadr, S. H.; Jafari, S.; Raghavi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress has been made employing plasmas in the free-electron lasers (FELs) interaction region. In this regard, we study the output power and saturation length of the plasma whistler wave-pumped FEL in a magnetized plasma channel. The small wavelength of the whistler wave (in sub-μm range) in plasma allows obtaining higher radiation frequency than conventional wiggler FELs. This configuration has a higher tunability by adjusting the plasma density relative to the conventional ones. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is employed which governs on the self-consistent evolution of an electromagnetic wave. The electron bunching process of the whistler-pumped FEL has been investigated numerically. The result reveals that for a long wiggler length, the bunching factor can appreciably change as the electron beam propagates through the wiggler. The effects of plasma frequency (or plasma density) and cyclotron frequency on the output power and saturation length have been studied. Simulation results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency, the power increases and the saturation length decreases. In addition, when density of background plasma is higher than the electron beam density (i.e., for a dense plasma channel), the plasma effects are more pronounced and the FEL-power is significantly high. It is also found that with increasing the strength of the external magnetic field frequency, the power decreases and the saturation length increases, noticeably.

  14. High-power free-electron maser with frequency multiplication operating in a shortwave part of the millimeter wave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Perelstein, E. A.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedykh, S. N.

    2012-08-01

    The possibility of using frequency multiplication in order to obtain high-power short-wavelength radiation from a free-electron maser (FEM) with a Bragg resonator has been studied. Preliminary experiments with an LIU-3000 (JINR) linear induction accelerator demonstrate the operation of a frequency-multiplying FEM at megawatt power in the 6- and 4-mm wave bands on the second and third harmonic, respectively.

  15. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module 20: Solid State Power Supplies; 20T: Electron Tube Power Supplies. Study Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This set of individualized learning modules on power supplies is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Two modules are included in the…

  16. Statistical properties of radiation power levels from a high-gain free-electron laser at and beyond saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, William M.; Esarey, Eric

    2002-09-24

    We investigate the statistical properties (e.g., shot-to-shot power fluctuations) of the radiation from a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the nonlinear regime. We consider the case of an FEL amplifier reaching saturation whose shot-to-shot fluctuations in input radiation power follow a gamma distribution. We analyze the corresponding output power fluctuations at and beyond first saturation, including beam energy spread effects, and find that there are well-characterized values of undulator length for which the fluctuation level reaches a minimum.

  17. AlGaN Channel High Electron Mobility Transistors: Device Performance and Power-Switching Figure of Merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ajay; Dasgupta, Sansaptak; Rajan, Siddharth; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, AlGaN channels for high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been evaluated based on a power device figure of merit. AlGaN-channel HEMTs grown on SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) were fabricated. Maximum saturation current of 0.55 A/mm was obtained at VGS=1 V. Current-gain cutoff ( ft) and power-gain cutoff ( fmax) frequencies obtained from small signal measurements were ft=13.2 GHz and fmax=41 GHz. Pulsed current-voltage (I-V) measurements at 200 ns showed no dispersion in I-V curves. Large signal continuous wave (CW) measurement yielded an output power density of 4.5 W/mm with power added efficiency (PAE) of 59% at 4 GHz. This work demonstrates the potential of AlGaN channel HEMTs for high voltage switching and microwave power applications.

  18. Power of expression in the electronic patient record: structured data or narrative text?

    PubMed

    Lovis, C; Baud, R H; Planche, P

    2000-09-01

    This paper presents the authors' experience with the development and use of a document-centered electronic patient record (EPR) in a large teaching hospital. The development of the document-centered EPR began with the formulation of a set of critical hypotheses to facilitate both the continuation of the best medical practice and the implementation and use of the EPR. An alternate and more conventional approach - the data-centered EPR - is compared with the document-centered EPR. Various benefits and pitfalls are discussed. Finally, the choice was to offer both solutions in a tightly linked system. The need for an EPR which combines the document and data centered approaches is a reflection of the more general discussion of what the medical record will be in the future. All too often, the need for structured data conflicts with the need for free texts and the power of expression. It is not easy to evaluate the consequences of this initial decision. However, changing the foundations of the EPR after its implementation is difficult and expensive. Therefore, the selection of the correct orientation in a given hospital requires a broad-based discussion. PMID:10978913

  19. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  20. Power sources for portable electronics and hybrid cars: lithium batteries and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Scrosati, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The activities in progress in our laboratory for the development of batteries and fuel cells for portable electronics and hybrid car applications are reviewed and discussed. In the case of lithium batteries, the research has been mainly focused on the characterization of new electrode and electrolyte materials. Results related to disordered carbon anodes and improved, solvent-free, as well as gel-type, polymer electrolytes are particularly stressed. It is shown that the use of proper gel electrolytes, in combination with suitable electrode couples, allows the development of new types of safe, reliable, and low-cost lithium ion batteries which appear to be very promising power sources for hybrid vehicles. Some of the technologies proven to be successful in the lithium battery area are readapted for use in fuel cells. In particular, this approach has been followed for the preparation of low-cost and stable protonic membranes to be proposed as an alternative to the expensive, perfluorosulfonic membranes presently used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PMID:16211622

  1. Recent Progress on Flexible Triboelectric Nanogenerators for SelfPowered Electronics.

    PubMed

    Hinchet, Ronan; Seung, Wanchul; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2015-07-20

    Recently, smart systems have met with large success. At the origin of the internet of things, they are a key driving force for the development of wireless, sustainable, and independent autonomous smart systems. In this context, autonomy is critical, and despite all the progress that has been made in low-power electronics and batteries, energy harvesters are becoming increasingly important. Thus, harvesting mechanical energy is essential, as it is widespread and abundant in our daily life environment. Among harvesters, flexible triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) exhibit good performance, and they are easy to integrate, which makes them perfect candidates for many applications and, therefore, crucial to develop. In this review paper, we first introduce the fundamentals of TENGs, including their four basic operation modes. Then, we discuss the different improvement parameters. We review some progress made in terms of performance and integration that have been possible through the understanding of each operation mode and the development of innovative structures. Finally, we present the latest trends, structures, and materials in view of future improvements and applications. PMID:26149974

  2. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  3. Simulation of a high-average power free-electron laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Freund; M. Shinn; S.V. Benson

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we compare the 10 kW-Upgrade experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA, with numerical simulations using the medusa code. medusa is a three-dimensional FEL simulation code that is capable of treating both amplifiers and oscillators in both the steady-state and time-dependent regimes. medusa employs a Gaussian modal expansion, and treats oscillators by decomposing the modal representation at the exit of the wiggler into the vacuum Gaussian modes of the resonator and then analytically determining the propagation of these vacuum resonator modes through the resonator back to the entrance of the wiggler in synchronism with the next electron bunch. The bunch length in the experiment is of the order of 380–420 fsec FWHM. The experiment operates at a wavelength of about 1.6 microns and the wiggler is 30 periods in length; hence, the slippage time is about 160 fsec. Because of this, slippage is important, and must be included in the simulation. The observed single pass gain is 65%–75% and, given the experimental uncertainties, this is in good agreement with the simulation. Multipass simulations including the cavity detuning yield an output power of 12.4 kW, which is also in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. MOS-FET as a Current Sensor in Power Electronics Converters

    PubMed Central

    Pajer, Rok; Milanovič, Miro; Premzel, Branko; Rodič, Miran

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a current sensing principle appropriate for use in power electronics’ converters. This current measurement principle has been developed for metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOS-FET) and is based on UDS voltage measurement. In practice, shunt resistors and Hall effect sensors are usually used for these purposes, but the presented principle has many advantages. There is no need for additional circuit elements within high current paths, causing parasitic inductances and increased production complexity. The temperature dependence of MOS-FETs conductive resistance RDS−ON is considered in order to achieve the appropriate measurement accuracy. The “MOS-FET sensor” is also accompanied by a signal acquisition electronics circuit with an appropriate frequency bandwidth. The obtained analogue signal is therefore interposed to an A-D converter for further data acquisition. In order to achieve sufficient accuracy, a temperature compensation and appropriate approximation is used (RDS−ON=RDS−ON(ϑj)). The MOS-FET sensor is calibrated according to a reference sensor based on the Hall-effect principle. The program algorithm is executed on 32-bit ARM M4 MCU, STM32F407. PMID:26213938

  5. High-Temperature SiC Power Module with Integrated SiC Gate Drivers for Future High-Density Power Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Mr. Bret; Cole, Mr. Zach; Passmore, Mr. Brandon; Martin, Daniel; Mcnutt, Tyler; Lostetter, Dr. Alex; Ericson, Milton Nance; Frank, Steven Shane; Britton Jr, Charles L; Marlino, Laura D; Mantooth, Alan; Francis, Dr. Matt; Lamichhane, Ranjan; Shepherd, Dr. Paul; Glover, Dr. Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the testing results of an all-silicon carbide (SiC) intelligent power module (IPM) for use in future high-density power electronics applications. The IPM has high-temperature capability and contains both SiC power devices and SiC gate driver integrated circuits (ICs). The high-temperature capability of the SiC gate driver ICs allows for them to be packaged into the power module and be located physically close to the power devices. This provides a distinct advantage by reducing the gate driver loop inductance, which promotes high frequency operation, while also reducing the overall volume of the system through higher levels of integration. The power module was tested in a bridgeless-boost converter to showcase the performance of the module in a system level application. The converter was initially operated with a switching frequency of 200 kHz with a peak output power of approximately 5 kW. The efficiency of the converter was then evaluated experimentally and optimized by increasing the overdrive voltage on the SiC gate driver ICs. Overall a peak efficiency of 97.7% was measured at 3.0 kW output. The converter s switching frequency was then increased to 500 kHz to prove the high frequency capability of the power module was then pushed to its limits and operated at a switching frequency of 500 kHz. With no further optimization of components, the converter was able to operate under these conditions and showed a peak efficiency of 95.0% at an output power of 2.1 kW.

  6. A comparative study on the mechatronic and electronic self-powered synchronized switch interfaces for piezoelectric energy harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haili; Ge, Cong; Liang, Junrui; Wang, Ya

    2016-04-01

    By scavenging the vibration energy from the ambience, the piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) technology provides one of the most promising solutions towards the everlasting power supplies for distributed wireless sensors. Given the capacitive characteristics of the piezoelectric devices, synchronized switch interface circuits, such as the synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI), have been developed towards the harvested power enhancement. The self-powered sensing and control issue is essential for implementing these circuit innovations in practical applications. This paper provides a comparative study on the recently proposed mechatronic self-powered SSHI (MSP-SSHI) and the existing electronic self-powered SSHI (ESP-SSHI). The MSP-SSHI uses a single-pole double-throw switch to simultaneously perform the sensing and switching functions in the SSHI interface. It can reduce the switching threshold and energy losses caused in the semiconductors of the electronic solution, and no need to care about the high-voltage breakdown problems in the ESP-SSHI. On the other hand, the distance between the pole and throws will introduce certain switching phase difference under the larger range of excitation. A piecewise linear model of the MSP-SSHI is built to analyze the switching phase difference. It was found that the damping ratio and stiffness in the mechanical switch can significantly influence the switching phase difference. Simulations show that well-designed damping ratio and stiffness can help the MSP-SSHI maintain smaller switching phase difference, and therefore improve the output power.

  7. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas.

  8. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W-Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Antipov, S; Jing, C; Power, J G; Conde, M; Wisniewski, E; Liu, W; Qiu, J; Ha, G; Dolgashev, V; Tang, C; Gai, W

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method. PMID:26894715

  9. Interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train with a W-band accelerating structure: High power and high gradient

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; et al

    2016-02-05

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to themore » interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. As a result, measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.« less

  10. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W -Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.

  11. Stark broadening measurement of the electron density in an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet with double-power electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Muyang; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Dezhen; Zhang Jialiang; Wei Guodong

    2010-03-15

    Characteristics of a double-power electrode dielectric barrier discharge of an argon plasma jet generated at the atmospheric pressure are investigated in this paper. Time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the plasma parameters, of which the excitation electron temperature is determined by the Boltzmann's plot method whereas the gas temperature is estimated using a fiber thermometer. Furthermore, the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer H{sub {beta}} line is applied to measure the electron density, and the simultaneous presence of comparable Doppler, van der Waals, and instrumental broadenings is discussed. Besides, properties of the jet discharge are also studied by electrical diagnosis. It has been found that the electron densities in this argon plasma jet are on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, and the excitation temperature, gas temperature, and electron density increase with the applied voltage. On the other hand, these parameters are inversely proportional to the argon gas flow rate.

  12. The e-SCRUB Machine: an 800-kV, 500-kW average power pulsed electron beam generator for flue-gas scrubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, James R.; Briggs, Ray; Crewson, Walter F.; Johnson, R. D.; Ratafia-Brown, J. A.; Richardson, W. K.; Rienstra, W. W.; Ballard, Perry G.; Cukr, Jeffrey; Cassel, R. L.; Schlitt, Leland; Genuario, R. D.; Morgan, R. D.; Tripoli, G. A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) to remove SOx and NOx from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. It also describes the e-SCRUB program, a program currently underway to commercialize this process with an integrated pulsed electron beam. The electron beam, together with injected water and ammonia, causes chemical reactions which convert the SOx and NOx into commercial grade agricultural fertilizer, a usable byproduct. The e-SCRUB facility is a test bed to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of a repetitive, reliable pulsed electron beam generator operating at average power levels of up to 1 MW. This facility contains the electron beam generator and all the auxiliary and support systems required by the machine, including a computer driven central experiment control system, a 100,000 SCFM flowing dry nitrogen load which simulates the characteristics of a power plant flue, and a 2 MVA dedicated electrical service to power the machine. The e-SCRUB electron beam machine is designed to produce an 800 kV pulsed electron beam with a repetition rate of 667 pps. The energy per pulse deposited into the flue gas is approximately 750 J. The pulsed power system converts the utility power input to a 667 pps, 800 kV pulse train which powers the electron gun. The functional units of the pulsed power system will be discussed in the paper, along with some preliminary experimental results.

  13. PESC '91 - Annual IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 22nd, MIT, Cambridge, MA, June 24-27, 1991, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    The present conference discusses a novel microtransformer for use in microswitching converters, a high torque/low-speed switched-reluctance machine, parameter and state estimation in power electronics, a general circuit topology for a multilevel inverter, dc/dc-conversion via saturable induction commutation, a self-oscillating and synchronously rectified dc/dc converter, an HF quasi-square-wave converter, a new family of isolated zero-voltage switched converters, the dual-flow pulse-trimming concept, solid-state reactive power modulation, the harmonic interaction of power systems with static switching, power MOSFETs for reverse conduction, repetitive switching using thyristors, voltage-mode resonant converters, thermal optimization in power electronics, a MOS gate drive with resonant transitions, a real-time estimation of induction-motor rotor time constant, short circuit impedance and leakage in transformer windings, the miniaturization of isolated gate drive circuitry, and one-cycle control of switching converters. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  14. Verification of electron doping in single-layer graphene due to H{sub 2} exposure with thermoelectric power

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung Ju; Kang, Hojin; Soler-Delgado, David; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Yung Woo E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr; Park, Min; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Byung Hoon E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr; Kubatkin, Sergey

    2015-04-06

    We report the electron doping of single-layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) by means of dissociative hydrogen adsorption. The transfer characteristic showed n-type doping behavior similar to that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. Furthermore, we studied the thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD-grown SLG before and after exposure to high-pressure H{sub 2} molecules. From the TEP results, which indicate the intrinsic electrical properties, we observed that the CVD-grown SLG is n-type doped without degradation of the quality after hydrogen adsorption. Finally, the electron doping was also verified by Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Verification of electron doping in single-layer graphene due to H2 exposure with thermoelectric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Ju; Park, Min; Kang, Hojin; Lee, Minwoo; Soler-Delgado, David; Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Kyung Ho; Kubatkin, Sergey; Jeong, Dae Hong; Park, Yung Woo; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2015-04-01

    We report the electron doping of single-layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) by means of dissociative hydrogen adsorption. The transfer characteristic showed n-type doping behavior similar to that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. Furthermore, we studied the thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD-grown SLG before and after exposure to high-pressure H2 molecules. From the TEP results, which indicate the intrinsic electrical properties, we observed that the CVD-grown SLG is n-type doped without degradation of the quality after hydrogen adsorption. Finally, the electron doping was also verified by Raman spectroscopy.

  16. High-current pulsed electron accelerator “Gamma-1” with output power up to 1.5 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, N. V.; Gordeev, V. S.; Punin, V. T.; Grishin, A. V.; Myskov, G. A.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Mikhailov, E. S.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Kozachek, A. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Strabykin, K. V.; Glushkov, S. L.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Mayornikova, V. L.; Mayorov, R. A.; Moiseevskikh, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A multi-module multi-terawatt electrophysical facility “Gamma” is being developed at RFNCVNIIEF, Sarov, Russia. The facility will be used for conducting experiments in different fields of radiation physics. The first module of the facility - a high-current electron accelerator “Gamma-1” has been created. The output electric parameters of the module are as follows: electron energy ≤2.0 MeV, diode current 0.75 MA, maximal electric power 1.5 TW. Description of accelerator design and principles of its operation are presented. Results of experiments as well as further prospects on building a full-scale facility are given.

  17. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Evaluation of Composite Surface Irradiated by Different Powers of Er:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Ardavan; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Pordel, Edris; Azarbayejani, Zahra; Heidari, Soolmaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the composite surface treated by different powers of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser in comparison with bur preparation via scanning electron microscope. Methods: Fourteen composite resin blocks with 15× 10 × 10 mm dimensions were used in this study. The samples were divided to seven groups as follow: Group 1 (power: 1 W, Energy: 50 mJ); Group 2 (power: 2 W, Energy: 100 mJ); Group 3 (power: 3W, Energy: 150 mJ); Group 4 (power: 4 W, Energy: 200 mJ); Group 5 (power: 5W, Energy: 250 mJ); Group 6 (power: 6 W, Energy: 300 mJ); Group 7: Diamond bur. Then, the samples were prepared for SEM examination. Results: The surface treated by Er:YAG laser showed irregular and micro porous surface. Conclusion: It seems that composite surface treatment by Er:YAG laser can be an alternative method for composite repair if suitable parameters are used. PMID:25987973

  18. Generating power from cellulose in an alkaline fuel cell enhanced by methyl viologen as an electron-transfer catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Miaoqing; Liu, Xianhua; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed a single-compartment direct cellulose alkaline fuel cell by using nickel foam as the anode and methyl viologen as an electron transfer catalyst. The maximum power density of the fuel cell at optimal conditions is 450 mW m-2. High-performance liquid chromatography detected short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids in the oxidation products. Using common reed and red algae as fuels, the fuel cell achieved maximum power densities of 295 mW m-2 and 154 mW m-2, respectively.

  19. Grid pulser for an electron gun with a thermionic cathode for the high-power operation of a terahertz free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemine, Shoji; Kawase, Keigo; Sugimoto, Naoya; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Furukawa, Kazuya; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Fujimoto, Masaki; Ohsumi, Hiroki; Yaguchi, Masaki; Funakoshi, Sousuke; Tsutsumi, Ryouta; Kubo, Kumiko; Tokuchi, Akira; Isoyama, Goro

    2015-02-01

    A grid pulser for a thermionic-cathode electron gun for an L-band electron linac with an RF frequency of 1.3 GHz was developed in an effort to increase the power of a terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) based on the linac. The grid pulser can generate a train of electron pulses with a 5-ns duration at intervals of 36.9 ns or at a repetition frequency of 27 MHz, which is the 48th sub-harmonic of the RF frequency, and with a peak current of up to 2.4 A or higher, which is four times higher than the current that can be obtained with the conventional grid pulser. In combination with the sub-harmonic buncher (SHB) system, whose fundamental frequency is 108 MHz (the 12th sub-harmonic of the RF frequency), an electron beam that comprises electron bunches separated by 36.9-ns intervals for a period of 8 μs can be successfully accelerated using the linac to an energy of 15 MeV under the condition that the average beam current or, correspondingly, the beam loading in the acceleration tube of the linac is the same as that obtained using the conventional grid pulser. The time-resolved energy spectrum indicates that the energy is constant over the latter 6 μs and that the energy spread is 1.2% (FWHM); this performance satisfies the requirements for the FEL. The bunch charge measured at the end of the FEL beamline is 4 nC, which is four times higher than that obtained using the conventional grid pulser.

  20. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer; John W.; Palmer, Todd A.

    2011-03-08

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  1. The IBA Rhodotron: an industrial high-voltage high-powered electron beam accelerator for polymers radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lancker, Marc; Herer, Arnold; Cleland, Marshall R.; Jongen, Yves; Abs, Michel

    1999-05-01

    The Rhodotron is a high-voltage, high-power electron beam accelerator based on a design concept first proposed in 1989 by J. Pottier of the French Atomic Agency, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). In December 1991, the Belgian particle accelerator manufacturer, Ion Beam Applications s.a. (IBA) entered into an exclusive agreement with the CEA to develop and industrialize the Rhodotron. Electron beams have long been used as the preferential method to cross-link a variety of polymers, either in their bulk state or in their final form. Used extensively in the wire and cable industry to toughen insulating jackets, electron beam-treated plastics can demonstrate improved tensile and impact strength, greater abrasion resistance, increased temperature resistance and dramatically improved fire retardation. Electron beams are used to selectively cross-link or degrade a wide range of polymers in resin pellets form. Electron beams are also used for rapid curing of advanced composites, for cross-linking of floor-heating and sanitary pipes and for cross-linking of formed plastic parts. Other applications include: in-house and contract medical device sterilization, food irradiation in both electron and X-ray modes, pulp processing, electron beam doping of semi-conductors, gemstone coloration and general irradiation research. IBA currently markets three models of the Rhodotron, all capable of 10 MeV and alternate beam energies from 3 MeV upwards. The Rhodotron models TT100, TT200 and TT300 are typically specified with guaranteed beam powers of 35, 80 and 150 kW, respectively. Founded in 1986, IBA, a spin-off of the Cyclotron Research Center at the University of Louvain (UCL) in Belgium, is a pioneer in accelerator design for industrial-scale production.

  2. Unique mechanization to fault isolate failures of an electron tube Radio Frequency (RF) amplifier and its high voltage power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. G.

    1986-03-01

    An electronics circuit for improving the fault isolation of failures between an electron tube radio frequency (RF) amplifier and its high voltage power supply is disclosed. High voltage power supplies control their output voltage by comparing a feedback voltage against a reference. This comparison is used to develop an error voltage which, in turn, drives a pulsewidth modulator that corrects the feedback voltage to the reference. The output of a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) is used as the reference voltage. The DAC is driven by a counter which would count to the correct reference voltage represented by a specific count. The final count is determined by a comparator which compares the counter output to the desired final counter and stops the counter when it is reached.

  3. Power electronic interface circuits for batteries and ultracapacitors in electric vehicles and battery storage systems

    DOEpatents

    King, Robert Dean; DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for load leveling of a battery in an electrical power system includes a power regulator coupled to transfer power between a load and a DC link, a battery coupled to the DC link through a first DC-to-DC converter and an auxiliary passive energy storage device coupled to the DC link through a second DC-to-DC converter. The battery is coupled to the passive energy storage device through a unidirectional conducting device whereby the battery can supply power to the DC link through each of the first and second converters when battery voltage exceeds voltage on the passive storage device. When the load comprises a motor capable of operating in a regenerative mode, the converters are adapted for transferring power to the battery and passive storage device. In this form, resistance can be coupled in circuit with the second DC-to-DC converter to dissipate excess regenerative power.

  4. Power electronic interface circuits for batteries and ultracapacitors in electric vehicles and battery storage systems

    DOEpatents

    King, R.D.; DeDoncker, R.W.A.A.

    1998-01-20

    A method and apparatus for load leveling of a battery in an electrical power system includes a power regulator coupled to transfer power between a load and a DC link, a battery coupled to the DC link through a first DC-to-DC converter and an auxiliary passive energy storage device coupled to the DC link through a second DC-to-DC converter. The battery is coupled to the passive energy storage device through a unidirectional conducting device whereby the battery can supply power to the DC link through each of the first and second converters when battery voltage exceeds voltage on the passive storage device. When the load comprises a motor capable of operating in a regenerative mode, the converters are adapted for transferring power to the battery and passive storage device. In this form, resistance can be coupled in circuit with the second DC-to-DC converter to dissipate excess regenerative power. 8 figs.

  5. A brief review of models of DC-DC power electronic converters for analysis of their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewniak, Piotr; Grzesik, Bogusław

    2014-10-01

    A brief review of models of DC-DC power electronic converters (PECs) is presented in this paper. It contains the most popular, continuous-time and discrete-time models used for PEC simulation, design, stability analysis and other applications. Both large-signal and small-signal models are considered. Special attention is paid to models that are used in practice for the analysis of the global and local stability of PECs.

  6. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE observations of energetic electrons scattered by cyclotron resonance with waves from powerful VLF transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.; Imhof, William L.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the wave-particle mechanisms responsible for the loss of electrons from the radiation belts, energetic electron data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was studied. Powerful ground-based VLF transmitters resonantly scatter electrons from the inner radiation belt onto trajectories from which they precipitate into the atmosphere as they drift eastward. 563 instances in which the satellite traversed a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered into quasi-trapped trajectories were identified. From the longitude distribution, it was concluded that waves from the VLF transmitter NWC at 114 deg E are the origin of 257 of the events, and waves from UMSat 44 deg E related to 45 more. In another 177 cases the electrons had drifted from the longitude of these transmitters to a location in the western hemisphere. The previously reported seasonal variation in the frequency of occurrence of cyclotron resonance interaction is confirmed with the continuous coverage provided by GRO. The frequency of occurrence of the cyclotron resonance interactions is largest before sunrise, which we attribute to the diurnal variations in the transmission VLF waves through the ionosphere. For the first time, unique very narrow sheets of electrons occurring in the aftermath of a large geomagnetic storm are reported.

  7. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  8. Powering microbes with electricity: direct electron transfer from electrodes to microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, DR

    2010-09-16

    P>The discovery of electrotrophs, microorganisms that can directly accept electrons from electrodes for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors, has spurred the investigation of a wide range of potential applications. To date, only a handful of pure cultures have been shown to be capable of electrotrophy, but this process has also been inferred in many studies with undefined consortia. Potential electron acceptors include: carbon dioxide, nitrate, metals, chlorinated compounds, organic acids, protons and oxygen. Direct electron transfer from electrodes to cells has many advantages over indirect electrical stimulation of microbial metabolism via electron shuttles or hydrogen production. Supplying electrons with electrodes for the bioremediation of chlorinated compounds, nitrate or toxic metals may be preferable to adding organic electron donors or hydrogen to the subsurface or bioreactors. The most transformative application of electrotrophy may be microbial electrosynthesis in which carbon dioxide and water are converted to multi-carbon organic compounds that are released extracellularly. Coupling photovoltaic technology with microbial electrosynthesis represents a novel photosynthesis strategy that avoids many of the drawbacks of biomass-based strategies for the production of transportation fuels and other organic chemicals. The mechanisms for direct electron transfer from electrodes to microorganisms warrant further investigation in order to optimize envisioned applications.

  9. Improvement of the intrinsic time resolving power of the Cologne iron-free orange type electron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Materna, Th.; Pascovici, G.; Christen, S.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Petkov, P.; Zell, K. O.

    2010-11-15

    Conversion electron spectroscopy represents an important tool for nuclear structure analysis of medium and heavy nuclei. Two iron-free magnetic electron spectrometers of the orange type have been installed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne. The very large transmission of 15% and the very good energy resolution of 1% makes the iron-free orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. By means of fast timing techniques, lifetimes of nuclear excited states can be measured with an accuracy better than 20 ps. For the first time, the energy dependent centroid position of prompt events yielding the time-walk characteristics (the prompt curve) of the orange spectrometer fast timing setup has been measured using prompt secondary {delta}-electrons generated in a pulsed beam experiment. The prompt curve calibrated as a function of energy allows precise lifetime determination down to a few tens of picoseconds by the use of the centroid shift method.

  10. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  11. Relativistic high-current electron-beam stopping-power characterization in solids and plasmas: collisional versus resistive effects.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, B; Santos, J J; Debayle, A; Hulin, S; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Vaisseau, X; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Honrubia, J J; Nicolaï, Ph; Beg, F N; Benocci, R; Chawla, S; Coury, M; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; d'Humières, E; Jarrot, L C; McKenna, P; Rhee, Y J; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Yahia, V

    2012-12-21

    We present experimental and numerical results on intense-laser-pulse-produced fast electron beams transport through aluminum samples, either solid or compressed and heated by laser-induced planar shock propagation. Thanks to absolute K(α) yield measurements and its very good agreement with results from numerical simulations, we quantify the collisional and resistive fast electron stopping powers: for electron current densities of ≈ 8 × 10(10) A/cm(2) they reach 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. For higher current densities up to 10(12)A/cm(2), numerical simulations show resistive and collisional energy losses at comparable levels. Analytical estimations predict the resistive stopping power will be kept on the level of 1 keV/μm for electron current densities of 10(14)A/cm(2), representative of the full-scale conditions in the fast ignition of inertially confined fusion targets. PMID:23368474

  12. Technical options for high average power free electron milimeter-wave and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the potential space power beaming applications require the generation of directed energy beams with respectable amounts of average power (MWs). A tutorial summary is provided here on recent advances in the laboratory aimed at producing direct conversion of electrical energy to electromagnetic radiation over a wide spectral regime from microwaves to the ultraviolet.

  13. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  14. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques. [using low cost heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The integration of low-cost commercial heat pipes in the design of a NASA candidate standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output resulted in a 44% weight reduction. Part temperatures were also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A complete 350- watt modular power converter was built and tested to evaluate thermal performance of the redesigned supply.

  15. High-power free-electron maser operated in a two-mode frequency-multiplying regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. Yu.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Perelstein, E. A.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedykh, S. N.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency multiplication effects in high-power free-electron masers (FEM) with Bragg cavities were studied to provide the advance of the oscillators into short-wavelength bands. Theoretical analysis of frequency-multiplying FEMs was carried out within the framework of the averaged coupled-wave approach. Proof-of-principle experiments were performed based on a moderately relativistic induction linac LIU-3000 (JINR). As a result, an FEM multiplier operated with a megawatt power level in the 6-mm and 4-mm wavelength bands at the second and third harmonics, respectively, was realized. The possibility of using two-mode bichromatic FEMs for powering a double-frequency accelerating structure was discussed.

  16. Microwave heating power distribution in electron-cyclotron resonance processing plasmas, experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, S.R.; Eddy, C. Jr.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Slinker, S.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are currently investigating the mechanisms of microwave power absorption in an ECR plasma. The microwave electric field is detected with an antenna at the end of a shielded co-ax cable, connected to a bolometer for power measurements. Initial measurements have been 1-D along the axis of the plasma chamber. Later, 3-D profiles will be made of the microwave heating power distribution. A comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical microwave absorption are presented. A ray tracing analysis of the propagating right hand wave are given, including both collisional and collisionless absorption. Mode conversion effects are studied to explain why most of the power is absorbed at the entry window, especially the L wave power.

  17. About compensation the electronic beam dynamic stratification influence in super-power relativistic Cherenkov oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayev, Alexander A.; Rak, Alexey O.; Sinitsyn, Anatoly K.

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of the exact nonlinear theory relativistic TWT and BWO on irregular hollow waveguides with cathode filters-modulators with the account as propagating, and beyond cut-off waves, with the account of losses in walls of a waveguide and inhomogeneity directing an electronic beam magnetostatic fields finds out influence of dynamic stratification influence on efficiency of the generator. Possibility of almost fill compensation the electronic beam dynamic stratification influence on efficiency by optimization of an electronic beam arrangement in inhomogeneous high frequency and magnetic fields and characteristics of the irregular corrugated waveguide is shown. (author)

  18. Simulation of Some of the Power Electronics Case Studies in Matlab Simpowsystem Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alasooly, Hedaya; Redha, Mohammed

    2010-06-01

    Matlab SimPowerSystems is a modern design tool that allows scientists and engineers to rapidly and easily build models that simulate power systems. Not only can you draw the circuit topology rapidly, but your analysis of the circuit can include its interactions with mechanical, thermal, control, and other disciplines. The paper covers some case studies that provide detailed, realistic examples of how to use SimPowerSystems in power system analysis. The following types of studies is coverted on the paper: 1. Thyristor-Based Static Var Compensator: Study the steady-state and dynamic performance of a static var compensator (SVC) on a transmission system. 2. Transient Stability of a Power System with SVC and PSS: Study of the application of static var compensator (SVC) and power system stabilizers (PSS) to improve transient stability and power oscillation damping of the system. 3. GTO-Based STATCOM: Study the steady-state and dynamic performance of a static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) on a transmission system. 4. Control of load flow using UPFC: Study the steady-state and dynamic performance of a unified power flow controller (UPFC). 5. Chopper-Fed DC Motor Drive: Study of a DC motor drive with armature voltage controlled by a GTO thyristor chopper. 6. VSC-Based HVDC Link: Modeling of a forced-commutated Voltage-Sourced Converter high-voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) transmission link. 7. Three-Phase Network with Electrical Machines: Simulation of a three-phase power system containing electrical machines and other three-phase models. 8. Variable-Frequency Induction Motor Drive: Study of a PWM inverter-driven variable-frequency AC induction motor in variable-voltage, variable-speed operation.

  19. Radiation-hard power electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameel, J.; Amidei, D.; Baccaro, S.; Citterio, M.; Cova, P.; Delmonte, N.; Sekhon Edgar, K.; Edgar, R.; Fiore, S.; Lanza, A.; Latorre, S.; Lazzaroni, M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The New Small Wheel (NSW) is an upgrade for the ATLAS detector to provide enhanced triggering and reconstruction of muons in the forward region. The large LV power demands of the NSW necessitate a point-of-load architecture with on-detector power conversion. The radiation load and magnetic field of this environment, while significant, are nevertheless still in the range where commercial-off-the-shelf power devices may suffice. We present studies on the radiation-hardness and magnetic-field tolerance of several candidate buck converters and linear regulators. Device survival and performance are characterized when exposed to gamma radiation, neutrons, protons and magnetic fields.

  20. A multi-port power electronics interface for battery powered electric vehicles: Application of inductively coupled wireless power transfer and hybrid energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Matthew Kelly

    Climate change, pollution, and geopolitical conflicts arising from the extreme wealth concentrations caused by fossil fuel deposits are just a few of the side-effects of the way that we fuel our society. A new method to power our civilization is becoming more and more necessary. Research for new, more sustainable fuel sources is already underway due to research in wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro power. However this focus is mainly on stationary applications. A large portion of fossil fuel usage comes from transportation. Unfortunately, the transition to cleaner transportation fuels is being stunted by the inability to store adequate amounts of energy in electro-chemical batteries. The idea of charging while driving has been proposed by many researchers, however several challenges still exist. In this work some of these challenges are addressed. Specifically, the ability to route power from multiple sources/loads is investigated. Special attention is paid to adjusting the time constant of particular converters, namely the battery and ultra-capacitor converters to reduce the high frequency and high magnitude current components applied to the battery terminals. This is done by developing a closed loop model of the entire multi-port converter, including the state of charge of the ultra-capacitors. The development of closed loop models and two experimental testbeds for use as stationary vehicle charging platforms with their unique set of sources/loads are presented along-side an on-board charger to demonstrate the similarities and differences between stationary charging and mobile charging. Experimental results from each are given showing that it is not only possible, but feasible to utilize Inductively Coupled Wireless Power Transfer (ICWPT) to charge a battery powered electric vehicle while driving and still protect the life-span of the batteries under the new, harsher conditions generated by the ICWPT system.

  1. Trigger probe for determining the orientation of the power distribution of an electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2007-07-17

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining the orientation of electron beams being profiled. To accurately time the location of an electron beam, the probe is designed to accept electrons from only a narrowly defined area. The signal produced from the probe is then used as a timing or triggering fiducial for an operably coupled data acquisition system. Such an arrangement eliminates changes in slit geometry, an additional signal feedthrough in the wall of a welding chamber and a second timing or triggering channel on a data acquisition system. As a result, the present invention improves the accuracy of the resulting data by minimizing the adverse effects of current slit triggering methods so as to accurately reconstruct electron or ion beams.

  2. Influence of emitter ring manufacturing tolerances on electron beam quality of high power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Illy, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of manufacturing imperfections and possible misalignments of the emitter ring in the gyrotron cathode structure on the electron beam quality has been performed. It has been shown that a possible radial displacement of the emitter ring of the order of few tens of microns can cause dramatic effects on the beam quality and therefore the gyrotron operation. Two different design approaches are proposed in order to achieve an electron beam which is less sensitive to manufacturing imperfections.

  3. Theory of magnetically insulated electron flows in coaxial pulsed power transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawconnell, Robert I.; Neri, Jesse

    1990-03-01

    The Cartesian magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) theory of Mendel et al. [Appl. Phys. 50, 3830 (1979); Phys. Fluids 26, 3628 (1983)] is extended to cylindrical coordinates. A set of equations that describe arbitrary electron flows in cylindrical coordinates is presented. These equations are used to derive a general theory for laminar magnetically insulated electron flows. The laminar theory allows one to specify the potentials, fields, and densities across a coaxial line undergoing explosive electron emission at the cathode. The theory is different from others available in cylindrical coordinates in that the canonical momentum and total energy for each electron may be nonzero across the electron sheath. A nonzero canonical momentum and total energy for the electrons in the sheath allows the model to produce one-dimensional flows that resemble flows from lines with impedance mismatches and perturbing structures. The laminar theory is used to derive two new self-consistent cylindrical flow solutions: (1) for a constant density profile and (2) for a quadratic density profile of the form ρ=ρc[(r2m-r2)/(r2m-r2c)]. This profile is of interest in that it is similar to profiles observed in a long MITL simulation [Appl. Phys. 50, 4996 (1979)]. The theoretical flows are compared to numerical results obtained with two-dimensional (2-D) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes.

  4. Restoring phase coherence in a one-dimensional superconductor using power-law electron hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobos, Alejandro M.; Tezuka, Masaki; García-García, Antonio M.

    2013-10-01

    In a one-dimensional (1D) superconductor, zero-temperature quantum fluctuations destroy phase coherence. Here we put forward a mechanism which can restore phase coherence: power-law hopping. We study a 1D attractive-U Hubbard model with power-law hopping using Abelian bosonization and density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) techniques. The parameter that controls the hopping decay acts as the effective, noninteger spatial dimensionality deff. For real-valued hopping amplitudes we identify analytically a range of parameters for which power-law hopping suppresses fluctuations and restores superconducting long-range order for any deff>1, at zero temperature. A detailed DMRG analysis fully supports these findings. These results are also of direct relevance to quantum magnetism as our model can be mapped onto an S=1/2 XXZ spin chain with power-law decaying couplings, which can be studied experimentally with cold-ion-trap techniques.

  5. Advances in Lithium-Sulfur Rechargeable Batteries Powering the Electronic Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skotheim, Terje; Akridge, Jim; Hyland, Bob

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the Moltech Corporation's history and structure, power systems development, product attributes, Li-S adapted products, cell construction, specific energy comparisons, and product requirements necessary for use in spacecraft applications.

  6. Development of Power Electronics for a 0.2kW-Class Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Patterson, Michael J.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1997-01-01

    Applications that might benefit from low power ion propulsion systems include Earth-orbit magnetospheric mapping satellite constellations, low Earth-orbit satellites, geosynchronous Earth-orbit satellite north-south stationkeeping, and asteroid orbiters. These spacecraft are likely to have masses on the order of 50 to 500 kg with up to 0.5 kW of electrical power available. A power processing unit for a 0.2 kW-class ion thruster is currently under development for these applications. The first step in this effort is the development and testing of a 0.24 kW beam power supply. The design incorporates a 20 kHz full bridge topology with multiple secondaries connected in series to obtain outputs of up to 1200 V(sub DC). A current-mode control pulse width modulation circuit built using discrete components was selected for this application. An input voltage of 28 +/- 4 V(sub DC) was assumed, since the small spacecraft for which this system is targeted are anticipated to have unregulated low voltage busses. Efficiencies in excess of 91 percent were obtained at maximum output power. The total mass of the breadboard was less than 1.0 kg and the component mass was 0.53 kg. It is anticipated that a complete flight power processor could weigh about 2.0 kg.

  7. Electronic stopping power data of heavy ions in polymeric foils in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, A.; Ammi, H.; Hedibel, M.; Guesmia, A.; Mammeri, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    A continuous energy loss measurements of 63Cu, 28Si, 27Al, 24Mg, 19F, 16O and 12C ions over an energy range of (0.06-0.65) MeV/nucleon through thin polymeric foils (Mylar, Polypropylene and Formvar) were carried out by time of flight spectrometry. The deduced experimental stopping data have been used in order to assess our proposed semi empirical formula. The proposed approach based on the Firsov and Lindhard-Scharff stopping power models is provided for well describing-the electronic stopping power of heavy ions (3 ⩽ Z < 100) in various solids targets at low energy range. The ζe factor, which was approximated to be ∼Z11/6 , involved in Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) formula has been suitably modified in the light of the available experimental stopping power data. The calculated stopping power values after incorporating, effective charge Z1∗ of moving heavy ions with low velocities (v ⩽v0Z12/3) and modified ζe in LSS formula, have been found to be in close agreement with measured values in various solids targets. A reason of energy loss measurements is to obtain data that help to assess our understanding of the stopping power theories. For this, the obtained results are compared with, LSS calculations, MSTAR and SRIM-2013 predictions code.

  8. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    A low-cost, low-mass, electrically efficient, modular cathode/electron gun assembly has been developed by FDE Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon, under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This new assembly offers significant improvements in the design and manufacture of microwave and millimeter wave traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) used for radar and communications. It incorporates a novel, low-heater-power, reduced size and mass, high-performance barium dispenser type thermionic cathode and provides for easy integration of the cathode into a large variety of conventional TWT circuits. Among the applications are TWT's for Earth-orbiting communication satellites and for deep space communications, where future missions will require smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (a hybrid microwave/millimeter wave amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid-state driver, a small TWT, and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package), where electrical efficiency and thermal loading are critical factors and lower cost is needed for successful commercialization. The design and fabrication are based on practices used in producing cathode ray tubes (CRT's), which is one of the most competitive and efficient manufacturing operations in the world today. The approach used in the design and manufacture of thermionic cathodes and electron guns for CRT's has been optimized for fully automated production, standardization of parts, and minimization of costs. It is applicable to the production of similar components for microwave tubes, with the additional benefits of low mass and significantly lower cathode heater power (less than half that of dispenser cathodes presently used in TWT s). Modular cathode/electron gun assembly. The modular

  9. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  10. Performance and Economic Analysis of Distributed Power Electronics in Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.; Gonzalez, S.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed electronics like micro-inverters and DC-DC converters can help recover mismatch and shading losses in photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under partially shaded conditions, the use of distributed electronics can recover between 15-40% of annual performance loss or more, depending on the system configuration and type of device used. Additional value-added features may also increase the benefit of using per-panel distributed electronics, including increased safety, reduced system design constraints and added monitoring and diagnostics. The economics of these devices will also become more favorable as production volume increases, and integration within the solar panel?s junction box reduces part count and installation time. Some potential liabilities of per-panel devices include increased PV system cost, additional points of failure, and an insertion loss that may or may not offset performance gains under particular mismatch conditions.

  11. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  12. Current driven due to localized electron power deposition in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.; Sauter, O.; Smirnov, A.P.

    1999-05-01

    Due to spatial localization of electron cyclotron wave injection in DIII-D, electrons heated in an off-axis region must toroidally transit the tokamak 25--50 times before re-entering the heating region. This distance is of the order of the mean free path. The effect of such RF localization is simulated with a time-dependent Fokker-Planck code which is 2D-in-velocity, 1D-in-space-along-B, and periodic in space. An effective parallel electric field arises to maintain continuity of the driven current. Somewhat surprisingly, the localized current drive efficiency remains equal to that for a uniform medium.

  13. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1996-12-31

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building.

  14. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  15. Circuit for Communication over DC Power Line Using High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, Michael J. (Inventor); Prokop, Norman F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A high temperature communications circuit includes a power conductor for concurrently conducting electrical energy for powering circuit components and transmitting a modulated data signal, and a demodulator for demodulating the data signal and generating a serial bit stream based on the data signal. The demodulator includes an absolute value amplifier for conditionally inverting or conditionally passing a signal applied to the absolute value amplifier. The absolute value amplifier utilizes no diodes to control the conditional inversion or passing of the signal applied to the absolute value amplifier.

  16. FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M

    2005-11-22

    component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and

  17. FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as 'FreedomCAR' (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether

  18. Transient stability enhancement of wind farms using power electronics and facts controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Hossein Ali

    Nowadays, it is well-understood that the burning of fossil fuels in electric power station has a significant influence on the global climate due to greenhouse gases. In many countries, the use of cost-effective and reliable low-carbon electricity energy sources is becoming an important energy policy. Among different kinds of clean energy resources- such as solar power, hydro-power, ocean wave power and so on, wind power is the fastest-growing form of renewable energy at the present time. Moreover, adjustable speed generator wind turbines (ASGWT) has key advantages over the fixed-speed generator wind turbines (FSGWT) in terms of less mechanical stress, improved power quality, high system efficiency, and reduced acoustic noise. One important class of ASGWT is the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), which has gained a significant attention of the electric power industry due to their advantages over the other class of ASGWT, i.e. fully rated converter-based wind turbines. Because of increased integration of DFIG-based wind farms into electric power grids, it is necessary to transmit the generated power from wind farms to the existing grids via transmission networks without congestion. Series capacitive compensation of DFIG-based wind farm is an economical way to increase the power transfer capability of the transmission line connecting wind farm to the grid. For example, a study performed by ABB reveals that increasing the power transfer capability of an existing transmission line from 1300 MW to 2000 MW using series compensation is 90% less than the cost of building a new transmission line. However, a factor hindering the extensive use of series capacitive compensation is the potential risk of sub- synchronous resonance (SSR). The SSR is a condition where the wind farm exchanges energy with the electric network, to which it is connected, at one or more natural frequencies of the electric or mechanical part of the combined system, comprising the wind farm and the

  19. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. (6)Li and (7)Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  20. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565