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Sample records for cpmas nmr spectroscopy

  1. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  2. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Senesi, N.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  3. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  4. A structural study of pyrazole-1-carboxamides by X-ray crystallography and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Sobrados, Isabel; Jagerovic, Nadine; Elguero, José

    1999-03-01

    The crystal structures of the first two pyrazole N-substituted primary amides (3-methyl and 4-bromo) were determined. The amide groups from the R 22 (8) hydrogen-bond dimeric pattern in all cases, in accordance with the higher rate found for the formation of this pattern in monosubstituted benzamides (81%) compared with the whole group of primary amide structures (34%). These two compounds and four other N-CONH 2 pyrazoles were studied by solid state NMR (CPMAS technique).

  5. Crystal Structures and Vibrational and Solid-State (CPMAS) NMR Spectroscopy of Some Bis(triphenylphosphine)silver(I) Sulfate, Selenate and Phosphate Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowmaker, Graham A.; Hanna, John V.; Rickard, Clifton E.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2001-01-01

    The complexes [Ag2(PPh3)4EO4].2H2O(E=S, Se) (1,2), [Ag(PPh3)2HEO4].H2O (E=S, Se)(3,4) and [Ag9PPh3)2H2PO4].2EtOH (5) have been prepared and studied by X-ray crystallography and by infrared and solid-state 13C and 31 P cross-polarization, magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Solid-state 109Ag CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy of some diammine silver(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Harris, Robin K; Assadollahzadeh, Behnam; Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul; Amornsakchai, Pornsawan

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra were recorded for the compounds [Ag(NH3)2]2SO4, [Ag(NH3)2]2SeO4 and [Ag(NH3))]NO3, all of which contain the linear or nearly linear two-coordinate [Ag(NH3)2]+ ion. The 109Ag CP/MAS NMR spectra show centrebands and associated spinning sideband manifolds typical for systems with moderately large shielding anisotropy, and splittings due to indirect 1J(109Ag,14N) spin-spin coupling. Spinning sideband analysis was used to determine the 109Ag shielding anisotropy and asymmetry parameters Deltasigma and eta from these spectra, yielding anisotropies in the range 1500-1600 ppm and asymmetry parameters in the range 0-0.3. Spectra were also recorded for 15N and (for the selenate) 77Se. In all cases the number of resonances observed is as expected for the crystallographic asymmetric units. The crystal structure of the selenate is reported for the first time. One-bond (107, 109Ag,15N) coupling constants are found to have magnitudes in the range 60-65 Hz. Density functional calculations of the Ag shielding tensor for model systems yield results that are in good agreement with the experimentally determined shielding parameters, and suggest that in the solid compounds Deltasigma and eta are reduced and increased, respectively, from the values calculated for the free [Ag(NH3)2]+ ion (1920 ppm and 0, respectively), primarily as a result of cation-cation interactions, for which there is evidence from the presence of metal-over-metal stacks of [Ag(NH3)2]+ ions in the solid-state structures of these compounds. PMID:15307067

  7. CP-MAS 207Pb with 19F decoupling NMR spectroscopy: medium range investigation in fluoride materials.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y

    1999-11-01

    The isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb is used to perform structural investigations of crystalline fluoride compounds (PbF2, Pb2ZnF6, PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12 and Pb9Ga2F24) and transition metal fluoride glasses (TMFG) of the PZG family (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3). Using 207Pb Cross Polarisation Magic Angle Spinning (CP-MAS) NMR with 19F decoupling, it is shown that the isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb varies on a large scale (1000 ppm) and that the main changes of its value are not due to the nearest neighbour fluorines but may be related to the number of next nearest neighbour (nnn) Pb2+ ions. In this way, it is demonstrated that 207Pb chemical shift is an interesting probe to investigate medium range order in either crystalline or glassy fluoride systems. The 207Pb delta(iso) parameter has been linearly correlated to the number of nnn Pb2+ ions. PMID:10670899

  8. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  9. Characterization of the coal biosolubilization process using gel permeation chromatography and CPMAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Bean, R.M.; Franz, J.A.; Campbell, J.A.

    1990-05-01

    Leonardite, an oxidized lignite, and Illinois {number sign}6 coal were treated with Trametes versicolor and Penicillium sp., respectively, and separately with aqueous base to yield soluble and insoluble products. The products and starting materials were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), using both aqueous and organic eluents, and by high-field, high-speed-pinning (>10.0 kHz) {sup 13}C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The weight average molecular weights (M{sub w}) of the fungal-and base-solubilized products determined by GPC using acidic tetrahydrofuran (THF) eluent were found to be consistently lower than the M{sub w} determined using basic aqueous eluents. The M{sub w} of the leonardite product was measured to be 1800 and 6100 daltons using the THF and aqueous eluents, respectively. The aqueous eluent (phosphate buffered at pH 11.5) was found to be superior to the THF eluent in its solubilizing power, with 10% more material analyzed with the basic eluent. The solubility of the biotreated products in aqueous base was greater than either the starting coal or the chemically solubilized product. The Trametes-solubilized leonardite was found to contain a higher percentage of aliphatic carbon than the raw lignite; the Penicillium- solubilized Illinois {number sign}6 contained more aromatic carbon than before fungal treatment as determined by {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR. Pre-oxidation of Illinois {number sign}6 decreases the relative amount of aliphatic carbon. The high-field, high-speed-spinning CPMAS NMR technique was quantitatively evaluated using Argonne premium coals,International Humic Society Standards, and model compounds at various temperatures. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. The structural properties of the transmembrane segment of the integral membrane protein phospholamban utilizing (13)C CPMAS, (2)H, and REDOR solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karp, Ethan S; Tiburu, Elvis K; Abu-Baker, Shadi; Lorigan, Gary A

    2006-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the secondary structure of the transmembrane peptide phospholamban (TM-PLB), a sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) regulator. (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning spectra of (13)C carbonyl-labeled Leu39 of TM-PLB exhibited two peaks in a pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, each due to a different structural conformation of phospholamban as characterized by the corresponding (13)C chemical shift. The addition of a negatively charged phospholipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)) to the POPC bilayer stabilized TM-PLB to an alpha-helical conformation as monitored by an enhancement of the alpha-helical carbonyl (13)C resonance in the corresponding NMR spectrum. (13)C-(15)N REDOR solid-state NMR spectroscopic experiments revealed the distance between the (13)C carbonyl carbon of Leu39 and the (15)N amide nitrogen of Leu42 to be 4.2+/-0.2A indicating an alpha-helical conformation of TM-PLB with a slight deviation from an ideal 3.6 amino acid per turn helix. Finally, the quadrupolar splittings of three (2)H labeled leucines (Leu28, Leu39, and Leu51) incorporated in mechanically aligned DOPE/DOPC bilayers yielded an 11 degrees +/-5 degrees tilt of TM-PLB with respect to the bilayer normal. In addition to elucidating valuable TM-PLB secondary structure information, the solid-state NMR spectroscopic data indicates that the type of phospholipids and the water content play a crucial role in the secondary structure and folding of TM-PLB in a phospholipid bilayer. PMID:16839519

  11. Characterization of the wound-induced material in Citrus paradisi fruit peel by carbon-13 CP-MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Simona; Lai, Adolfo; Stange, Richard R; McCollum, T Greg; Schirra, Mario

    2003-05-01

    Grapefruit, Citrus paradisi, were injured, inoculated with Penicillium digitatum and incubated under conditions favourable for the accumulation of defence related material. Histochemical examination revealed that tissues adjacent to inoculated injuries contained phloroglucinol-HCl (PG-HCl) reactive material. Solvent washed cell wall preparations of intact and injured-inoculated peel were further purified using a mixture of cell wall degrading enzymes. Samples from injured inoculated tissue contained PG-HCl reactive globular material in addition to the fragments of xylem and cuticle found in controls. The principal chemical moieties of the material that accumulates in grapefruit injuries during wound-healing were studied by solid state 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR. A complete assignment of the NMR signals was made. From the analysis evidence was found that cellulose and hemicellulose are the biopolymers present in the intact peel samples, in addition, relevant quantities of cutin were found in the residues of enzyme digest. The NMR difference spectrum intact- wounded peels showed resonances which were attributed to all major functional groups of the aromatic-aliphatic suberin polyester of new material produced by the wounds. Information on the latter polyester was obtained by analyzing the T(1)rho (1H) relaxation. PMID:12711139

  12. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  13. Line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-02-01

    Cross polarization (CP) from 1H to quadrupolar nuclei with S = 3/2 has been carried out under magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions for powder samples of Na 2B 4O 7·10H 2O and H 3BO 3. The line shapes in the CP/MAS NMR spectra are different from those in the spectra measured with the single pulse sequence combined with 1H dipolar decoupling. Furthermore, the line shapes are found to be dependent on the measuring conditions such as the pulse amplitude for the quadrupolar nuclei. The spin-locking experiments demonstrate that line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra are largely dependent on the spin-locking efficiency.

  14. Cigarette butt decomposition and associated chemical changes assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Cesarano, Gaspare; Gaglione, Salvatore A; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette butts (CBs) are the most common type of litter on earth, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. Apart from being unsightly, CBs pose a serious threat to living organisms and ecosystem health when discarded in the environment because they are toxic to microbes, insects, fish and mammals. In spite of the CB toxic hazard, no studies have addressed the effects of environmental conditions on CB decomposition rate. In this study we investigate the interactive effects of substrate fertility and N transfer dynamics on CB decomposition rate and carbon quality changes. We carried out an experiment using smoked CBs and wood sticks, used as a slow decomposing standard organic substrate, incubated in both laboratory and field conditions for two years. CB carbon quality changes during decomposition was assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR. Our experiment confirmed the low degradation rate of CBs which, on average, lost only 37.8% of their initial mass after two years of decomposition. Although a net N transfer occurred from soil to CBs, contrary to our hypothesis, mass loss in the medium-term (two years) was unaffected by N availability in the surrounding substrate. The opposite held for wood sticks, in agreement with the model that N-rich substrates promote the decomposition of other N-poor natural organic materials with a high C/N ratio. As regards CB chemical quality, after two years of decomposition 13C NMR spectroscopy highlighted very small changes in C quality that are likely to reflect a limited microbial attack. PMID:25625643

  15. Cigarette Butt Decomposition and Associated Chemical Changes Assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Cesarano, Gaspare; Gaglione, Salvatore A.; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette butts (CBs) are the most common type of litter on earth, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. Apart from being unsightly, CBs pose a serious threat to living organisms and ecosystem health when discarded in the environment because they are toxic to microbes, insects, fish and mammals. In spite of the CB toxic hazard, no studies have addressed the effects of environmental conditions on CB decomposition rate. In this study we investigate the interactive effects of substrate fertility and N transfer dynamics on CB decomposition rate and carbon quality changes. We carried out an experiment using smoked CBs and wood sticks, used as a slow decomposing standard organic substrate, incubated in both laboratory and field conditions for two years. CB carbon quality changes during decomposition was assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR. Our experiment confirmed the low degradation rate of CBs which, on average, lost only 37.8% of their initial mass after two years of decomposition. Although a net N transfer occurred from soil to CBs, contrary to our hypothesis, mass loss in the medium-term (two years) was unaffected by N availability in the surrounding substrate. The opposite held for wood sticks, in agreement with the model that N-rich substrates promote the decomposition of other N-poor natural organic materials with a high C/N ratio. As regards CB chemical quality, after two years of decomposition 13C NMR spectroscopy highlighted very small changes in C quality that are likely to reflect a limited microbial attack. PMID:25625643

  16. Supramolecular self-organisation and conformational isomerism of a binuclear O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate gold(I) complex, [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2]: Synthesis, (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and thermal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rodina, Tatyana A; Korneeva, Eugenia V; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline one-dimensional polymeric catena-poly[bis(μ2-O,O'-dipropyldithiophosphato-S,S')digold(I)] (Au-Au) (1) was prepared and studied using (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. To elucidate the structural function of Dtph ligands in crystalline gold(I) O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters (δaniso and η) were calculated from spinning sideband manifolds in (31)P MAS NMR spectra. A novel structure of the gold(I) compound comprises two isomeric, non-centrosymmetric binuclear molecules of [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2] (isomers 'A' and 'B'), whose four Dtph groups display structural inequivalence. In each isomeric binuclear molecule of 1, a pair of μ2-bridging dipropyl Dtph ligands almost symmetrically links two neighbouring gold atoms, forming an extensive eight-membered metallocycle [Au2S4P2], while the intramolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bond additionally stabilises this central cyclic moiety. At the supramolecular level of complex 1, intermolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bonds yield almost linear infinite polymeric chains (⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯)n. The thermal behaviour of this compound was studied by the simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) technique (a combination of TG and DSC) under an argon atmosphere. PMID:26004097

  17. One- and two-dimensional exchange J-resolved CP-MAS NMR spectrum of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; McDowell, C. A.

    1986-02-01

    A combined technique of 1D and 2D exchange NMR and J-resolved CP-MAS NMR of dilute spins in solids and its application to study a spin exchange process of abundant spins in solids is described, and demonstrated for powdered adamantane. A high-resolution J-resolved NMR spectrum of a 13C nucleus obtained by applying homonuclear decoupling and magic angle sample spinning is employed to label the spin states of 1H spins bonded to the 13C nucleus. Perspective 2D exchange spectra are employed to map out connectivity between the proton spin states, and the rate constants for the 1H spin exchange involved are determined by 1D exchange NMR techniques. Discussions based on the total energy conservation enable us to conclude that the observed spin exchange processes are to be ascribed mainly to the flip-flop motion of 1H spins; the spin-lattice process is negligible. The rate constant for the flip-flop motion of the proton spins is determined to be (7±2)×103 s-1 at room temperature.

  18. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  19. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  20. The study of a monocotyledon abscission zone using microscopic, chemical, enzymatic and solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J; Davies, H A; Heyes, S J; Osborne, D J

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated distinguishing features in cells of the abscission zone of a monocotyledon fruit, the oil palm Elaeis guineensis. The cell walls of the abscission zone and the subtending mesocarp and pedicel have been analysed by light and transmission electron microscopy, by chemical methods and by solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results show that these abscission zone cells have specific characteristics which include high levels of unmethylated pectin in the walls and an inducible (x35) polygalacturonase enzyme expression. Together these findings help to explain the localised precision of cell separation events. PMID:11219806

  1. Hartmann-Hahn 2D-map to optimize the RAMP-CPMAS NMR experiment for pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuko; Martineau, Charlotte; Fink, Gerhard; Steuernagel, Stefan; Taulelle, Francis

    2012-02-01

    Cross polarization-magic angle spinning (CPMAS) is the most used experiment for solid-state NMR measurements in the pharmaceutical industry, with the well-known variant RAMP-CPMAS its dominant implementation. The experimental work presented in this contribution focuses on the entangled effects of the main parameters of such an experiment. The shape of the RAMP-CP pulse has been considered as well as the contact time duration, and a particular attention also has been devoted to the radio-frequency (RF) field inhomogeneity. (13)C CPMAS NMR spectra have been recorded with a systematic variation of (13)C and (1)H constant radiofrequency field pair values and represented as a Hartmann-Hahn matching two-dimensional map. Such a map yields a rational overview of the intricate optimal conditions necessary to achieve an efficient CP magnetization transfer. The map also highlights the effects of sweeping the RF by the RAMP-CP pulse on the number of Hartmann-Hahn matches crossed and how RF field inhomogeneity helps in increasing the CP efficiency by using a larger fraction of the sample. In the light of the results, strategies for optimal RAMP-CPMAS measurements are suggested, which lead to a much higher efficiency than constant amplitude CP experiment. PMID:22367881

  2. 13C CPMAS NMR studies and DFT calculations of triterpene xylosides isolated from Actaea racemosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Gliński, Jan A.; Wawer, Iwona

    2011-05-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of four triterpene glycosides: cimigenol xyloside ( 1), 26-deoxyactein ( 2), cimicifugoside H-1 ( 3) and 24-acethylhydroshengmanol xyloside ( 4) were recorded and analyzed to characterize their solid-state structure. Experimental data were supported by theoretical calculations of NMR shielding constants with the GIAO/6-31G**-su1 approach. A number of methods for the conformational search and a number of functionals for the DFT calculations were applied to ( 1). The best method was proven to be MMFF or MMFFAQ for the conformational search and the PBE1PBE functional for the DFT calculations. Extra calculations simulating C16 dbnd O⋯HOH hydrogen bond yield the isotropic shielding closer to the experimental solid-state value. For all the compounds CP kinetics parameters were calculated using either the I-S or the I-I*-S model. The analysis of CP kinetics data for methyl groups revealed differences in the T2 time constant for two methyl groups (C29 and C30) linked at C4.

  3. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  5. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds. PMID:25614975

  6. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  7. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  8. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  9. Study of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 near the phase transition temperature using 1H MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and 14N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependences of the chemical shifts and intensities of 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in tetramethylammonium tetrabromozincate, [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4, were investigated using single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the structural geometry near the phase transition temperature. Based on the analysis of the 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR and 14N NMR spectra, the two chemically inequivalent N(1) (CH3)4 and N(2) (CH3)4 ions were distinguished. Furthermore, the 14N NMR spectrum at the phase transition temperature indicated the existence of the ferroelastic characteristics of the N(CH3)4 ions.

  10. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  11. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm. PMID:19019638

  12. Advanced CPMAS-13C NMR techniques for molecular characterization of size-separated fractions from a soil humic acid.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    A humic acid extracted from a volcanic soil was subjected to preparative high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to reduce its molecular complexity and eleven different size fractions were obtained. Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning 13C NMR (CPMAS 13C NMR) analysis performed with variable contact-time (VCT) pulse sequences showed that the largest molecular-size fractions contained aromatic, alkyl, and carbohydrate-like components. The carbohydrate-like content and the alkyl chain length seemed to decrease with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon atoms was also observed with decreasing molecular size of the separated fractions. Mathematical treatment of the results from VCT experiments enabled cross polarization (T (CH)) and proton spin-lattice relaxation (T(1rho)(H)) times to be related to structural differences among the size fractions. The conformational distribution indicated that the eleven size fractions could be allocated to two main groups. The first group, with larger nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by molecular domains with slower local molecular motion. The second group of size fractions, with smaller nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by a larger number of molecular domains with faster local molecular motion. The T (CH) and (T(1rho)(H)) values suggested that either condensed or strongly associated aromatic systems were predominant in the size fractions with the largest apparent molecular dimensions. PMID:16896626

  13. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  14. Structures and thermal and hydrothermal stabilities of sulfonated poly(organosiloxanes) by /sup 29/Si and /sup 13/C CP/MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Ono, Y.; Nakata, S.; Asaoka, S.

    1987-03-12

    High-resolution /sup 29/Si and /sup 13/C cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopies have been applied to poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) and poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) in order to examine their thermal and hydrothermal stability. The effects of the treatments on the catalytic activity for the alcohol dehydration were also studied. Under nonsteaming conditions, both siloxanes have much higher thermal stability than Amberlyst-15. Thermal stability is in a decreasing order, poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) (573 K) > poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) (543 K) > Amberlyst-15 (468 K), while the thermal stability under steaming conditions is in the order of poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) (543 K) > poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) = Amberlyst-15 (468 K). The thermal degradation of the poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane) mainly occurs by the rupture of the C-Si bonds between the benzene ring and the siloxane chain. The steam greatly affects the thermal stability of poly((sulfophenyl)siloxane). Thus, under steaming conditions, thermal degradation occurred at much lower temperatures than under nonsteaming conditions. The thermal degradation of the poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane) mainly occurs at the C-C bond in the sulfopropyl groups. Steam does not affect the thermal stability of poly((sulfopropyl)siloxane).

  15. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and ¹H DQMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, (13)C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The ¹H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using ¹H-¹H distance constraints obtained from the ¹H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  16. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  17. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  18. Interaction between a recombinant prion protein and organo-mineral complexes as evidenced by CPMAS 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Scotti, R.; Gianfreda, L.; Conte, P.; Rao, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the main responsible for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The TSE etiological agent is a misfolded form of the normal cellular prion protein. The amyloidal aggregates accumulated in the brain of infected animals and mainly composed of PrPSc exhibit resistance to protease attack and many conventional inactivating procedures. The prion protein diseases cause an environmental issue because the environment and in particular the soil compartment can be contaminated and then become a potential reservoir and diffuser of TSEs infectivity as a consequence of (i) accidental dispersion from storage plants of meat and bone meal, (ii) incorporation of contaminated material in fertilizers, (iii) possible natural contamination of pasture soils by grazing herds, and (v) burial of carcasses. The environmental problem can be even more relevant because very low amounts of PrPSc are able to propagate the disease. Several studies evidenced that infectious prion protein remains active in soils for years. Contaminated soils result, thus, a possible critical route of TSE transmission in wild animals. Soil can also protect prion protein toward degradation processes due to the presence of humic substances and inorganic components such as clays. Mineral and organic colloids and the more common association between clay minerals and humic substances can contribute to the adsorption/entrapment of molecules and macromolecules. The polymerization of organic monomeric humic precursors occurring in soil in the presence of oxidative enzymes or manganese and iron oxides, is considered one of the most important processes contributing to the formation of humic substances. The process is very fast and produces a population of polymeric products of different molecular structures, sizes, shapes and complexity. Other molecules and possibly biomacromolecules such as proteins may be involved. The aim of the present work was to study by CPMAS 13C-NMR the interactions

  19. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  1. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  2. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  3. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  4. Solid state structure of new 5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Hejchman, Elżbieta; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2015-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2) were synthesized in a traditional way and microwave-assisted synthesis. Crystals of 2 in form of hydrochloride salt (3) were investigated using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In the crystal lattice of 3 there is only one type of strong hydrogen bond present involving protonated amino group and chloride anion. The whole structure is dominated by weak C-H…Cl-, C-H…O contacts. There is also visible aggregation of cations in stacks due to π-π interactions. The solid state structures of 1 and 2 derived from 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra were also proposed.

  5. Analysis of mercerization process based on the intensity change of deconvoluted resonances of (13)C CP/MAS NMR: Cellulose mercerized under cooling and non-cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kento; Nakano, Takato

    2015-08-01

    The area intensity change of C1, C4, and C6 in spectrum obtained by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and the mutual relationship between their changes were examined for cellulose samples treated with various concentrations of aqueous NaOH solutions under non-cooling and cooling conditions. The area intensity of C1-up and C6-down changed cooperatively with that of C4-down which corresponds to the crystallinity of samples: "-up" and "-down" are the up- and down- field component in a splitting peak of NMR spectrum, respectively. The intensity change of C1-up starts to decrease with decreasing in that of C4-down after that of C6-down is almost complete. These changes were more clearly observed for samples treated under cooling condition. It can be suggested that their characteristic change relates closely to the change in conformation of cellulose chains by induced decrystallization and the subsequent crystallization of cellulose II, and presumed that their changes at microscopic level relate to the macroscopic morphological changes such as contraction along the length of cellulose chains and recovery along the length. PMID:26042706

  6. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (free POM), light occluded particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (occluded POM<1.6) and dense occluded particulate organic matter 1.6 to 2.0 g cm-3 (occluded POM1.6-2.0)) of silty soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) < maize (13.0 g kg-1) < grassland (24.5 g kg-1) < spruce (40.5 g kg-1). The major part (86-91%) of the SOC was associated with the heavy mineral fraction at the grassland, maize and wheat site. In the A horizon of the spruce soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated

  7. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  8. A 4-mm Probe for C-13 CP/MAS NMR of Solids at 21.15 T

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Daugaard, P; Hald, E; Rice, D; Kupce, Eriks; Ellis, Paul D. )

    2002-05-31

    With the recent announcement of a persistent 21.15 Tesla (i.e., 900 MHz for 1H NMR) narrow-bore (54 mm bore) superconducting magnet by Oxford Instruments and the associated Unity INOVA-900 console by Varian Inc. we were challenged with the task of designing a double-resonance broadband solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probe in particular for evaluating the 13C-{1H} cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiment on this magnet and spectrometer system. In this communication we report the successful construction of an efficient X-1H/19F double resonance multinuclear MAS probe for this purpose along with our preliminary results on its performance at the 900 MHz spectrometer.

  9. Modification of olefin polymerization catalysts. III. A sup 13 C CP-MAS NMR study of adsorption of silyl ethers on MgCl sub 2 -supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pakkanen, T.T.; Vaehaesarja, E.; Pakkanen, T.A. ); Iiskola, E.; Sormunen, P. )

    1990-02-01

    A {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR and elemental analysis study of adsorption and interaction of silyl ethers, RSi(OMe){sub 3} (R = Et, Ph, OMe), as internal and external electron donors with MgCl{sub 2}-supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst has been carried out. A chemical activation of anhydrous MgCl{sub 2} with EtOH and AlEt{sub 3} produces a high-surface-area support stabilized by an organoaluminum compound, AlEt{sub 2}(OEt). In a treatment of the aluminum-modified MgCl{sub 2} support with silyl ether, the aluminum surface complex is retained and silyl ether is almost totally incorporated into the support. {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR data of the methoxy region indicate that a mobile liquid-like silyl ether species dominates, except in the case of Si(OMe){sub 4}, where a more strongly bound species is also present on the support. TiCl{sub 4} treatment removes the weakly adsorbed silyl ether species, leaving a species which is attributed to an aluminum-bound silyl ether surface complex. No evidence of titanium-bound silyl ether species was found in the solid state or in solution where TiCl{sub 4} undergoes with silyl ethers an exchange reaction forming a yellow solid identified as (TiCl{sub 2}(OMe){sub 2}){sub x}. Activation of the catalyst with AlEt{sub 3} at a high Al:Ti ratio produces a material with a low silyl ether coverage showing a weak methoxy signal in {sup 13}C CP-MAS. The linewidths of the observed signals in {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR are in the range 5-10 ppm at every stage of preparation of the catalyst, indicating heterogeneity of the coordination sites on the surface of chemically activated MgCl{sub 2}.

  10. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  11. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  12. Experimental (X-ray, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, IR, RS, INS, THz) and Solid-State DFT Study on (1:1) Co-Crystal of Bromanilic Acid and 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Łuczyńska, Katarzyna; Drużbicki, Kacper; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-06-01

    A combined structural, vibrational spectroscopy, and solid-state DFT study of the hydrogen-bonded complex of bromanilic acid with 2,6-dimethylpyrazine is reported. The crystallographic structure was determined by means of low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which reveals the molecular units in their native protonation states, forming one-dimensional infinite nets of moderate-strength O···H-N hydrogen bonds. The nature of the crystallographic forces, stabilizing the studied structure, has been drawn by employing the noncovalent interactions analysis. It was found that, in addition to the hydrogen bonding, the intermolecular forces are dominated by stacking interactions and C-H···O contacts. The thermal and calorimetric analysis was employed to probe stability of the crystal phase. The structural analysis was further supported by a computationally assisted (13)C CP/MAS NMR study, providing a complete assignment of the recorded resonances. The vibrational dynamics was explored by combining the optical (IR, Raman, TDs-THz) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy techniques with the state-of-the-art solid-state density functional theory (DFT) computations. Despite the quasi-harmonic approximation assumed throughout the study, an excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data was achieved over the entire spectral range, allowing for a deep and possibly thorough understanding of the vibrational characteristics of the system. Particularly, the significant influence of the long-range dipole coupling on the IR spectrum has been revealed. On the basis of a wealth of information gathered, the recent implementation of a dispersion-corrected linear-response scheme has been extensively examined. PMID:25961154

  13. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  14. Application of (13)C ramp CPMAS NMR with phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) for the quantitative estimation of carbon functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The composition of carbon (C) functional groups in natural organic matter (NOM), such as dissolved organic matter, soil organic matter, and humic substances, is frequently estimated using solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. A problem associated with quantitative analysis using general cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) spectra is the appearance of spinning side bands (SSBs) split from the original center peaks of sp (2) hybridized C species (i.e., aromatic and carbonyl C). Ramp CP/phase-adjusted side band suppressing (PASS) is a pulse sequence that integrates SSBs separately and quantitatively recovers them into their inherent center peaks. In the present study, the applicability of ramp CP/PASS to NOM analysis was compared with direct polarization (DPMAS), another quantitative method but one that requires a long operation time, and/or a ramp CP/total suppression side band (ramp CP/TOSS) technique, a popular but non-quantitative method for deleting SSBs. The test materials were six soil humic acid samples with various known degrees of aromaticity and two fulvic acids. There were no significant differences in the relative abundance of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, and aromatic C between the ramp CP/PASS and DPMAS methods, while the signal intensities corresponding to aromatic C in the ramp CP/TOSS spectra were consistently less than the values obtained in the ramp CP/PASS spectra. These results indicate that ramp CP/PASS can be used to accurately estimate the C composition of NOM samples. PMID:26522329

  15. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  16. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  17. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Aggregation of [Au(CN)4]- anions: examination by crystallography and 15N CP-MAS NMR and the structural factors influencing intermolecular Au···N interactions.

    PubMed

    Geisheimer, Andrew R; Wren, John E C; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Sakai, Ken; Kroeker, Scott; Leznoff, Daniel B

    2011-02-21

    To investigate the factors influencing the formation of intermolecular Au···NC interactions between [Au(CN)(4)](-) units, a series of [cation](n+)[Au(CN)(4)](n) double salts was synthesized, structurally characterized and probed by IR and (15)N{(1)H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Thus, [(n)Bu(4)N][Au(CN)(4)], [AsPh(4)][Au(CN)(4)], [N(PPh(3))(2)][Au(CN)(4)], [Co(1,10-phenanthroline)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), and [Mn(2,2';6',2''-terpyridine)(2)][Au(CN)(4)](2) show [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions that are well-separated from one another; no Au-Au or Au···NC interactions are present. trans-[Co(1,2-diaminoethane)(2)Cl(2)][Au(CN)(4)] forms a supramolecular structure, where trans-[Co(en)(2)Cl(2)](+) and [Au(CN)(4)](-) ions are found in separate layers connected by Au-CN···H-N hydrogen-bonding; weak Au···NC coordinate bonds complete octahedral Au(III) centers, and support a 2-D (4,4) network motif of [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units. A similar structure-type is formed by [Co(NH(3))(6)][Au(CN)(4)](3)·(H(2)O)(4). In [Ni(1,2-diaminoethane)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), intermolecular Au···NC interactions facilitate formation of 1-D chains of [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions in the supramolecular structure, which are separated from one another by [Ni(en)(3)](2+) cations. In [1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-H][Au(CN)(4)], the monoprotonated amine cation forms a hydrogen-bond to the [Au(CN)(4)](-) unit on one side, while coordinating to the axial sites of the gold(III) center through the unprotonated amine on the other, thereby generating a 2-D (4,4) net of cations and anions; an additional, uncoordinated [Au(CN)(4)](-)-unit lies in the central space of each grid. This body of structural data indicates that cations with hydrogen-bonding groups can induce intermolecular Au···NC interactions, while the cationic charge, shape, size, and aromaticity have little effect. While the ν(CN) values are poor indicators of the presence or absence of N-cyano bridging between [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units (partly because of the very low

  19. Silver-109 NMR spectroscopy of inorganic solids.

    PubMed

    Penner, Glenn H; Li, Wenli

    2004-09-01

    In this study the (109)Ag NMR spectra of the following solid inorganic silver-containing compounds were investigated: AgNO(3), AgNO(2), Ag(2)SO(4), Ag(2)SO(3), AgCO(3), Ag(3)PO(4), AgCl, AgBr, AgI, AgSO(3)CH(3), silver p-toluenesulfonate, NaAg(CN)(2), KAg(CN)(2), K(3)Ag(CN)(4), Me(4)NAgCl(2), silver diethylthiocarbamate, silver lactate, silver acetate, silver citrate, and bis[(N,N(1)-di-tert-butylformamidinato)silver(I)]. The magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra of all compounds were obtained. In some cases, when protons were available, the (1)H to (109)Ag cross-polarization (CP) technique was used to enhance the signal and shorten the experimental relaxation delay. It was possible to obtain slow MAS (or CP/MAS) or nonspinning spectra for 10 samples, allowing the determination of the principal components of the (109)Ag chemical shift (CS) tensors. The isotropic chemical shifts and the CS tensors are discussed in light of the available crystal structures. The need for an accepted standard for referencing (109)Ag chemical shifts and the use of AgSO(3)CH(3) as a CP setup sample are also discussed. PMID:15332810

  20. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  1. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  2. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  4. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  5. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  6. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  7. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  8. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  10. Examination of the structure in solid state of amino analogs of 4,4‧-[1,5-pentanediylbis(oxy)]bisbenzonitrile by means of X-ray diffraction, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Żabiński, Jerzy

    2008-05-01

    A single crystal of X-ray diffraction structures is presented for 4,4'-[1,5-(3-oxapentanediylbis(amino))]bisbenzonitrile 2 and 4,4'-[1,5-( N-methyl-3-azapentane-diylbis(oxy))]bisbenzonitrile 3. The molecular structures of these derivatives differ especially in conformations of the central linker: in 2 this linker adopts a trans/ gauche conformation, whereas in 3 - a fully extended conformation. The N atoms in various positions of the aliphatic linker change dramatically the molecular packing mode of both bisnitriles. But in both cases the nitrile groups take part in intermolecular hydrogen bonds: a type of N sbnd H···N in 2 and of C sbnd H···N in 3. Various conformations of both molecules were reflected in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra in solid state as single and double resonance patterns for 2 and 3, respectively. A preliminary anticancer assay against 60 cell lines of 3 reveals strong growth inhibition of leukemia, melanoma, and renal cancer cells.

  11. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  12. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled β’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the β subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE WOUND INDUCED MATERIAL IN CITRUS FRUIT PEEL BY CARBON-13 CP-MAS SOLID STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are conflicting views regarding the chemical composition of the induced, phloroglucinol-HCl (PG-HCl) reacting, material accumulating in injured citrus peel tissues. Grapefruit, Citrus paradisi, were injured, inoculated with Peicillium digitatum and incubated under contitions favorable to the a...

  14. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  15. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  16. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. PMID:26363582

  17. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  18. Multiplet-separated heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.; Sørensen, O. W.; Ernst, R. R.

    1983-02-01

    Techniques are described for the identification and separation of peaks of different multiplicity in heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The methods are applied to the two-dimensional 13C- 1H shift correlation spectrum of menthol.

  19. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  20. Fragment-Based Drug Discovery Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harner, Mary J.; Frank, Andreas O.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful tool for fragment-based drug discovery over the last two decades. While NMR has been traditionally used to elucidate the three-dimensional structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules and their interactions, it can also be a very valuable tool for the reliable identification of small molecules that bind to proteins and for hit-to-lead optimization. Here, we describe the use of NMR spectroscopy as a method for fragment-based drug discovery and how to most effectively utilize this approach for discovering novel therapeutics based on our experience. PMID:23686385

  1. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  2. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  3. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  4. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  5. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23011410

  6. Selective host-guest interaction between metal ions and metal-organic frameworks using dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-12-01

    The host-guest interaction between metal ions (Pt(2+) and Cu(2+) ) and a zirconium metal-organic framework (UiO-66-NH2 ) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced (15) N{(1) H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt(2+) coordinates with two NH2 groups from the MOF and two Cl(-) from the metal precursor, whereas Cu(2+) do not form chemical bonds with the NH2 groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt(2+) prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations. PMID:25297002

  7. Selective Host-Guest Interaction between Metal Ions and Metal-Organic Frameworks using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-08

    The host–guest interaction between metal ions (Pt2+ and Cu2+) and a zirconium metal–organic framework (UiO-66-NH2) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 15N{1H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt2+ coordinates with two NH2 groups from the MOF and two Cl- from the metal precursor, whereas Cu2+ do not form chemical bonds with the NH2 groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt2+ prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations.

  8. Selective Host-Guest Interaction between Metal Ions and Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D.; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-08

    The host–guest interaction between metal ions (Pt²⁺ and Cu²⁺) and a zirconium metal–organic framework (UiO-66-NH₂) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced ¹⁵N{¹H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt²⁺ coordinates with two NH₂ groups from the MOF and two Cl⁻ from the metal precursor, whereas Cu²⁺ do not form chemical bonds with the NH₂ groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt²⁺ prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations.

  9. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  10. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  11. Analysis of experimentally shocked minerals by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Boslough, M.B.

    1994-10-01

    The shock-loading of natural materials by an impact or explosion can result in the formation of modified and altered phases. In order to characterize the resulting material and to evaluate the extent of shock modification, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to examine several experimentally shocked minerals. In three related NMR studies, they have (1) examined shocked clinoptilolite, (2) performed a preliminary analysis of shocked quartz, and (3) reproduced shocked quartz results with detailed spectral deconvolutions, and extended it with NMR analysis of shocked feldspar powders.

  12. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  13. New Views of Functionally Dynamic Proteins by Solution NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kay, Lewis E

    2016-01-29

    In the past several decades solution NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins, providing detailed insights into biomolecular function. Herein, I provide a summary of two important areas of application, focusing on NMR studies of (i) supramolecular systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons and of (ii) sparsely populated and transiently formed protein states that are thermally accessible from populated ground-state conformers. The critical role of molecular dynamics in function is emphasized, highlighting the utility of the NMR technique in providing such often elusive information. PMID:26707200

  14. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  15. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  16. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  18. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  19. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  20. MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION OF NMR SPECTROSCOPY METABONOMIC DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with the EPA to evaluate and develop mathematical tools for analysis of the collected NMR spectroscopy data. Initially, we have focused on the use of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) also known as molecular factor analysis (MFA), a tech...

  1. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  2. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  3. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields. PMID:27417269

  4. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  5. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  6. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  7. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  8. 103Rh NMR spectroscopy and its application to rhodium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Jan Meine; Gaemers, Sander; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2004-09-01

    Rhodium is used for a number of large processes that rely on homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed reactions, for instance rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of alkenes, carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene derivatives (in crude oil). Many laboratory applications in organometallic chemistry and catalysis involve organorhodium chemistry and a wealth of rhodium coordination compounds is known. For these and other areas, 103Rh NMR spectroscopy appears to be a very useful analytical tool. In this review, most of the literature concerning 103Rh NMR spectroscopy published from 1989 up to and including 2003 has been covered. After an introduction to several experimental methods for the detection of the insensitive 103Rh nucleus, a discussion of factors affecting the transition metal chemical shift is given. Computational aspects and calculations of chemical shifts are also briefly addressed. Next, the application of 103Rh NMR in coordination and organometallic chemistry is elaborated in more detail by highlighting recent developments in measurement and interpretation of 103Rh NMR data, in relation to rhodium-assisted reactions and homogeneous catalysis. The dependence of the 103Rh chemical shift on the ligands at rhodium in the first coordination sphere, on the complex geometry, oxidation state, temperature, solvent and concentration is treated. Several classes of compounds and special cases such as chiral rhodium compounds are reviewed. Finally, a section on scalar coupling to rhodium is provided. PMID:15307053

  9. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  10. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  11. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    large spectral breadths. We have suggested the term ultra-wideline NMR (UWNMR) spectroscopy to describe this set of methodologies. This Account describes recent developments in pulse sequences and strategies for the efficient acquisition of UWNMR spectra. After an introduction to anisotropically broadened NMR patterns, we give a brief history of methods used to acquire UWNMR spectra. We then discuss new acquisition methodologies, including the acquisition of CPMG echo trains and the application of pulses capable of broadband excitation and refocusing. Finally, we present several applications of UWNMR methods that use these broadband pulses. PMID:23745683

  12. NMR spectroscopy to follow reaction progress in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Butler, Bradley J; Thomas, Donald S; Hook, James M; Harper, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand reaction outcomes in ionic liquids, it is crucial to be able to follow the progress of these reactions. This review highlights the advantages of NMR spectroscopy over other analytical techniques in following reaction progress in ionic liquids, particularly addressing the practical aspects of the methodology and highlighting the range of processes that can be readily followed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25287592

  13. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  14. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  15. Solid state NMR spectroscopy in the evaluation of the conformational changes of humic substances as affected by thermal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pasquale, C.; Berns, A. E.; Kucerik, J.; Conte, P.; Alonzo, G.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an ubiquitous, complex material which is produced by the degradation of plant tissues and animal bodies. It is the major indicator of soil quality since it is directly involved in the maintenance of soil fertility, prevention of erosion and desert encroachment and provision of suitable environment for biological activity. Organic matter is an important driving force in environmental global change as it acts as both a source and sink of atmospheric carbon. However, SOM is subjected to rapid changes due to environmental transformations such as massive deforestations, fires, intensive land uses, temperature increases and so on. In the present work, a characterization of humic substances was done in order to obtain information about the transformation occurring to SOM as affected by temperature increases. For the first time variable temperature cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) 13C NMR spectroscopy was applied in combination with thermal analyses (TG and DSC) on environmentally relevant soil organic matter. The results show that the conformational changes occurring in humic substances as temperature is raised can be associated to melting of alkyl components connected with sublimation of some organic compounds. The simultaneous application of solid phase micro extraction GC-MS also allowed the identification of the components which were released by sublimation processes.

  16. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  17. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  18. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  19. Simulation of selective pulse techniques for localized NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, Michael; Schleich, Thomas; Robin Bendall, M.

    The results of a computer simulation investigation delineating the limits of resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy of the depth- resolved suface-coil spectroscopy (DRESS), volume-selective excitation (VSE), and image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) methods for achieving spatially localized NMR spectroscopy are presented. A computer program, which numerically solves the Bloch equations for variable input parameters, is used to simulate the spatial localization afforded by each technique. Because the numerical solution of the Bloch equations describes the behavior of the bulk magnetization with great precision, the simulations provide an objective and realistic means of evaluating the performance of the individual localization schemes and reveal nuances and limitations not discussed in the original experimental papers. The results of this computer simulation study should encourage the optimization of localization methodology for use in specific applications.

  20. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  1. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future. PMID:26920831

  2. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR. PMID:26501900

  3. Maximum entropy signal processing in practical NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibisi, Sibusiso; Skilling, John; Brereton, Richard G.; Laue, Ernest D.; Staunton, James

    1984-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is intrinsically insensitive, a frequently serious limitation especially in biochemical applications where sample size is limited and compounds may be too insoluble or unstable for data to be accumulated over long periods. Fourier transform (FT) NMR was developed by Ernst1 to speed up the accumulation of useful data, dramatically improving the quality of spectra obtained in a given observing time by recording the free induction decay (FID) data directly in time, at the cost of requiring numerical processing. Ernst also proposed that more information could be obtained from the spectrum if the FID was multiplied by a suitable apodizing function before being Fourier transformed. For example (see ref. 2), an increase in sensitivity can result from the use of a matched filter1, whereas an increase in resolution can be achieved by the use of gaussian multiplication1,3, application of sine bells4-8 or convolution difference9. These methods are now used routinely in NMR data processing. The maximum entropy method (MEM)10 is theoretically capable of achieving simultaneous enhancement in both respects11, and this has been borne out in practice in other fields where it has been applied. However, this technique requires relatively heavy computation. We describe here the first practical application of MEM to NMR, and we analyse 13C and 1H NMR spectra of 2-vinyl pyridine. Compared with conventional spectra, MEM gives considerable suppression of noise, accompanied by significant resolution enhancement. Multiplets in the 1H spectra are resolved better leading to improved visual clarity.

  4. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  5. TOCCATA: a customized carbon total correlation spectroscopy NMR metabolomics database.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-11-01

    A customized metabolomics NMR database, TOCCATA, is introduced, which uses (13)C chemical shift information for the reliable identification of metabolites, their spin systems, and isomeric states. TOCCATA, whose information was derived from the BMRB and HMDB databases and the literature, currently contains 463 compounds and 801 spin systems, and it can be used through a publicly accessible web server. TOCCATA allows the identification of metabolites in the submillimolar concentration range from (13)C-(13)C total correlation spectroscopy experiments of complex mixtures, which is demonstrated for an Escherichia coli cell lysate, a carbohydrate mixture, and an amino acid mixture, all of which were uniformly (13)C-labeled. PMID:23016498

  6. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  7. Zwitterionic phosphorylated quinines as chiral solvating agents for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rudzińska-Szostak, Ewa; Górecki, Łukasz; Berlicki, Łukasz; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Mucha, Artur

    2015-10-01

    Because of their unique 3D arrangement, naturally occurring Cinchona alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives have found wide-ranging applications in chiral recognition. Recently, we determined the enantioselective properties of C-9-phosphate mixed triesters of quinine as versatile chiral solvating agents in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the current study, we introduce new zwitterionic members of this class of molecules containing a negatively charged phosphate moiety (i.e., ethyl, n-butyl and phenyl hydrogen quininyl phosphate). An efficient approach for synthesizing these compounds is elaborated, and full characterization, including conformational and autoaggregation phenomena studies, was performed. Therefore, their ability to induce NMR anisochrony of selected enantiomeric substrates (i.e., primarily N-DNB-protected amino acids and their methyl esters) was analyzed compared to uncharged diphenyl quininyl phosphate and its positively charged quaternary ammonium hydrochloride salt. In addition, (1) H and (13) C NMR experiments revealed their enantiodiscrimination potential toward novel analytes, such as secondary amines and nonprotected amino acids. PMID:26415853

  8. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  9. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  10. The Nature of Secondary Interactions at Electrophilic Metal Sites of Molecular and Silica-Supported Organolutetium Complexes from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Conley, Matthew P; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Sanders, Kevin; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; del Rosal, Iker; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W; Copéret, Christophe; Andersen, Richard A

    2016-03-23

    Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 reacts with [SiO2-700] to give [(≡SiO)Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]2] and CH2(SiMe3)2. [(≡SiO)Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]2] is characterized by solid-state NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy, which show that secondary Lu···C and Lu···O interactions, involving a γ-CH3 and a siloxane bridge, are present. From X-ray crystallographic analysis, the molecular analogues Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3-x[O-2,6-tBu-C6H3]x (x = 0-2) also have secondary Lu···C interactions. The (1)H NMR spectrum of Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 shows that the -SiMe3 groups are equivalent to -125 °C and inequivalent below that temperature, ΔG(⧧)(Tc = 148 K) = 7.1 kcal mol(-1). Both -SiMe3 groups in Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3 have (1)JCH = 117 ± 1 Hz at -140 °C. The solid-state (13)C CPMAS NMR spectrum at 20 °C shows three chemically inequivalent resonances in the area ratio of 4:1:1 (12:3:3); the J-resolved spectra for each resonance give (1)JCH = 117 ± 2 Hz. The (29)Si CPMAS NMR spectrum shows two chemically inequivalent resonances with different values of chemical shift anisotropy. Similar observations are obtained for Lu[CH(SiMe3)2]3-x[O-2,6-tBu-C6H3]x (x = 1 and 2). The spectroscopic data point to short Lu···Cγ contacts corresponding to 3c-2e Lu···Cγ-Siβ interactions, which are supported by DFT calculations. Calculated natural bond orbital (NBO) charges show that Cγ carries a negative charge, while Lu, Hγ, and Siβ carry positive charges; as the number of O-based ligands increases so does the positive charge at Lu, which in turns shortens the Lu···Cγ distance. The change in NBO charges and the resulting changes in the spectroscopic and crystallographic properties show how ligands and surface-support sites rearrange to accommodate these changes, consistent with Pauling's electroneutrality concept. PMID:26887899

  11. In vivo two-dimensional NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The poor resolution of in-vivo one- dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has limited its clinical potential. Currently, only the large singlet methyl resonances arising from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine are quantitated in a clinical setting. Other metabolites such as myo- inositol, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, and γ- amino butyric acid (GABA) are of clinical interest but quantitation is difficult due to the overlapping resonances and limited spectral resolution. To improve the spectral resolution and distinguish between overlapping resonances, a series of two- dimensional chemical shift correlation spectroscopy experiments were developed for a 1.5 Tesla clinical imaging magnet. Two-dimensional methods are attractive for in vivo spectroscopy due to their ability to unravel overlapping resonances with the second dimension, simplifying the interpretation and quantitation of low field NMR spectra. Two-dimensional experiments acquired with mix-mode line shape negate the advantages of the second dimension. For this reason, a new experiment, REVOLT, was developed to achieve absorptive mode line shape in both dimensions. Absorptive mode experiments were compared to mixed mode experiments with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and water suppression. Detailed theoretical and experimental calculations of the optimum spin lock and radio frequency power deposition were performed. Two-dimensional spectra were acquired from human bone marrow and human brain tissue. The human brain tissue spectra clearly reveal correlations among the coupled spins of NAA, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, GABA, aspartate and myo-inositol obtained from a single experiment of 23 minutes from a volume of 59 mL. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  12. Impact of structural differences in carcinopreventive agents indole-3-carbinol and 3,3'-diindolylmethane on biological activity. An X-ray, ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR, ¹³C CP/MAS NMR, and periodic hybrid DFT study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Szafrański, Marek; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Burchardt, Dorota V

    2015-09-18

    Three experimental techniques (1)H-(14)N NQDR, (13)C CP/MAS NMR and X-ray and Density Functional Theory (GGA/BLYP with PBC) and Hirshfeld surfaces were applied for the structure-activity oriented studies of two phyto-antioxidants and anticarcinogens: indole-3-carbinol, I3C, and 3,3'-diindolylmethane, DIM, (its bioactive metabolite). One set of (14)N NQR frequencies for DIM (2.310, 2.200 and 0.110 MHz at 295K) and I3C (2.315, 1.985 and 0.330 MHz at 160K) was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines recorded at RT revealed high symmetry (chemical and physical equivalence) of both methyl indazole rings of DIM. Carbonyl (13)C CSA tensor components were calculated from the (13)C CP/MAS solid state NMR spectrum of I3C recorded under fast and slow spinning. At room temperature the crystal structure of I3C is orthorhombic: space group Pca21, Z=4, a=5.78922(16), b=15.6434(7) and c=8.4405(2)Å. The I3C molecules are aggregated into ribbons stacked along [001]. The oxygen atomsare disorderedbetween the two sites of different occupancy factors. It implies that the crystal is built of about 70% trans and 30% gauche conformers, and apart from the weak OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (O⋯O=3.106Å) the formation of alternative O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.785Å) is possible within the 1D ribbons. The adjacent ribbons are further stabilised by O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.951Å). The analysis of spectra and intermolecular interactions pattern by experimental techniques was supported by solid (periodic) DFT calculations. The knowledge of the topology and competition of the interactions in crystalline state shed some light on the preferred conformations of CH2OH in I3C and steric hindrance of methyl indole rings in DIM. A comparison of the local environment in gas phase and solid permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given anticarcinogen to the protein or nucleic acid. PMID:26066413

  13. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  14. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  15. Protein Motions and Folding Investigated by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2002-03-01

    NMR spin relaxation spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for globally characterizing conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. Laboratory frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to overall rotational diffusion and internal motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, while rotating frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales. The former approach is illustrated by ^15N laboratory-frame relaxation experiments as a function of temperature for the helical subdomain HP36 of the F-actin-binding headpiece domain of chicken villin. The data are analyzed using the model-free formalism to characterize order parameters and effective correlation times for intramolecular motions of individual ^15N sites. The latter approach is illustrated by ^13C Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation measurements for the de novo designed α_2D protein and by ^15N rotating-frame relaxation measurements for the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus. These experiments are used to determine the folding and unfolding kinetic rate constants for the two proteins. The results for HP36, α_2D, and PSBD illustrate the capability of current NMR methods for characterizing dynamic processes on multiple time scales in proteins.

  16. Saturation in Deuteron Hadamard NMR Spectroscopy of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greferath, M.; Blumich, B.; Griffith, W. M.; Hoatson, G. L.

    Hadamard NMR was investigated for wide-line solid-state deuteron spectroscopy by numerical simulations and experiments on hexamethylbenzene. Similar signal-to-noise ratios were obtained at large filter bandwidths (500 kHz) by both the quadrupolar echo and the Hadamard methods, although the excitation power differs by up to four orders in magnitude. Increasing the excitation power leads to systematic, noise-like features in Hadamard spectra. In contrast to phase modulation, simulations indicate that for amplitude modulation of the pseudorandom excitation, the pulse sequence burns a saturation hole into the lineshape at the carrier frequency. Violation of the cyclicity requirement by introduction of a recycle delay between successive Hadamard scans results in a high-frequency noise contribution. Finite pulse widths are shown not to cause significant spectral distortions.

  17. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. PMID:25194346

  18. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring. PMID:14729025

  19. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions. PMID:26575437

  1. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  2. Phosphate ions in bone: identification of a calcium-organic phosphate complex by 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy at early stages of mineralization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Ackerman, J L; Strawich, E S; Rey, C; Kim, H-M; Glimcher, M J

    2003-05-01

    Previous 31P cross-polarization and differential cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS and DCP/MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy studies of native bone and of the isolated crystals of the calcified matrix synthesized by osteoblasts in cell culture identified and characterized the major PO(-3)(4) phosphate components of the mineral phase. The isotropic and anisotropic chemical shift parameters of the minor HPO(-2)(4) component in bone mineral and in mineral deposited in osteoblast cell cultures were found to differ significantly from those of brushite, octacalcium phosphate, and other synthetic calcium phosphates. However, because of in vivo and in vitro evidence that phosphoproteins may play a significant role in the nucleation of the solid mineral phase of calcium phosphate in bone and other vertebrate calcified tissues, the focus of the current solid-state 31P NMR experiments was to detect the possible presence of and characterize the phosphoryl groups of phosphoproteins in bone at the very earliest stages of bone mineralization, as well as the possible presence of calcium-phosphoprotein complexes. The present study demonstrates that by far the major phosphate components identified by solid-state 31P NMR in the very earliest stages of mineralization are protein phosphoryl groups which are not complexed with calcium. However, very small amounts of calcium-complexed protein phosphoryl groups as well as even smaller, trace amounts of apatite crystals were also present at the earliest phases of mineralization. These data support the hypothesis that phosphoproteins complexed with calcium play a significant role in the initiation of bone calcification. PMID:12724829

  3. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  4. Three-Dimensional Maximum-Quantum Correlation HMQC NMR Spectroscopy (3D MAXY-HMQC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Mao, Xi-An; Ye, Chaohui; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    1997-11-01

    The extension of two-dimensional maximum-quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D MAXY NMR), which can be used to simplify complex NMR spectra, to three dimensions (3D) is described. A new pulse sequence for 3D MAXY-HMQC is presented and exemplified using the steroid drug dexamethasone. The sensitivity and coherence transfer efficiency of the MAXY NMR approach has also been assessed in relation to other HMQC- and HSQC-based 3D methods.

  5. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  6. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  7. Functional group analysis in coal by sup 31 P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the labile-hydrogen functional group composition of coal and coal-derived materials by the nmr spectroscopy of their derivatives made with reagents containing the nmr-active nuclei {sup 31}P, {sup 119}Sn, or {sup 205}Tl. 7 refs.

  8. Mobility and Diffusion-Ordered Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin Freeman

    Mobility and diffusion-ordered two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have been developed for the analysis of mixtures. In the mobility -ordered experiments, the full range of positive and negative electrophoretic mobilities is displayed in one dimension and chemical shifts are displayed in the other. A concentric cylindrical tube electrophoresis chamber was designed to reduce the effective pathlength for current and to provide unidirectional flow for ions of interest. Techniques based upon the reverse precession method were also implemented to recover the signs of the mobilities and improved resolution in the mobility dimension was obtained by replacing Fourier transformation of truncated data sets with a linear prediction analysis. In the diffusion-ordered two-dimensional NMR experiments, the conventional chemical shift spectrum is resolved in one dimension and spectra of diffusion rates or molecular radii are resolved in the other. Diffusion dependent pulsed field gradient NMR data sets were inverted by means of the computer programs SPLMOD or DISCRETE, when discrete diffusion coefficients were present, and CONTIN when continuous distributions were present. Since the inversion is ill -conditioned, it was necessary to introduce additional information to limit the range of the solutions. In addition to prior knowledge of the decay kernels and non-negativity of amplitudes and damping constants, a set of rejection criteria was constructed for the discrete analysis case that took into account physical limits on diffusion coefficients, experimentally accessible values, and variations in effective decay kernels resulting from instrumental non-linearities. Examples of analyses of simulated data and experimental data for mixtures are presented as well as two-dimensional spectra generated by CONTIN for polydisperse polymer samples. Also, resolution in the diffusion dimension was increased by performing experiments on hydrophobic molecules in

  9. Analysis of organic matter at the soil-water interface by NMR spectroscopy: Implications for contaminant sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Simpson, A.

    2009-05-01

    Contaminant sorption to soil organic matter (OM) is the main fate of nonionic, hydrophobic organic contaminants in terrestrial environments and a number of studies have suggested that both soil OM structure and physical conformation (as regulated by the clay mineral phase) govern contaminant sorption processes. To investigate this further, a number of soil samples were characterized by both solid-state 13 C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CPMAS) NMR and 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR- MAS) NMR. HR-MAS NMR is an innovative NMR method that allows one to examine samples that are semi- solid using liquid state NMR methods (ie: observe 1H which is more sensitive than 13C). With HR-MAS NMR, only those structures that are in contact with the solvent are NMR visible thus one can probe different components within a mixture using different solvents. The 1H HR-MAS NMR spectrum of a grassland soil swollen in water (D2O) is dominated by signals from alkyl and O-alkyl structures but signals from aromatic protons are negligible (the peak at ~8.2ppm is attributed to formic acid). When the soil is swollen in DMSO-d6, a solvent which is more penetrating and capable of breaking hydrogen bonds, aromatic signals are visible suggesting that the aromatic structures are buried within the soil matrix and do not exist at the soil-water interface. The 13C solid-state NMR data confirms that aromatic carbon is present in substantial amounts (estimated at ~40% of the total 13C signal) therefore, the lack of 1H aromatic signals in the HR-MAS NMR spectrum indicates that aromatic structures are buried and that the soil-water interface is dominated by aliphatic chains, carbohydrates, and peptides. The NMR data indicates that the mineral component of soils governs the physical conformation of OM at the soil-water interface.

  10. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  11. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  13. Perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy for structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckel, Sina; Hiller, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses future perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy to study structures and functions of integral membrane proteins at atomic resolution, based on a review of recent progress in this area. Several selected examples of structure determinations, as well as functional studies of integral membrane proteins are highlighted. We expect NMR spectroscopy to make future key scientific contributions to understanding membrane protein function, in particular for large membrane protein systems with known three-dimensional structure. Such situations can benefit from the fact that functional NMR studies have substantially less limitations by molecular size than a full de novo structure determination. Therefore, the general potential for NMR spectroscopy to solve biologic key questions associated with integral membrane proteins is very promising.

  14. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  15. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  16. Applications of high resolution /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-10-01

    The advantages of tritium as an NMR nucleus are pointed out. Examples of its use are given, including labelled toluene, hydrogenation of ..beta..-methylstyrene, and maltose and its binding proteins. 7 refs., 2 figs. (DLC)

  17. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  18. Functional genomics by NMR spectroscopy. Phenylacetate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael; El-Said Mohamed, Magdy; Wanner, Barry L; Datsenko, Kirill A; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Bacher, Adelbert; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    Aerobic metabolism of phenylalanine in most bacteria proceeds via oxidation to phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the further metabolism of phenylacetate has not been elucidated, even in well studied bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The only committed step is the conversion of phenylacetate into phenylacetyl-CoA. The paa operon of E. coli encodes 14 polypeptides involved in the catabolism of phenylacetate. We have found that E. coli K12 mutants with a deletion of the paaF, paaG, paaH, paaJ or paaZ gene are unable to grow with phenylacetate as carbon source. Incubation of a paaG mutant with [U-13C8]phenylacetate yielded ring-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrophenylacetyl lactone as shown by NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of the paaF and paaH mutants with phenylacetate yielded delta3-dehydroadipate and 3-hydroxyadipate, respectively. The origin of the carbon atoms of these C6 compounds from the aromatic ring was shown using [ring-13C6]phenylacetate. The paaG and paaZ mutants also converted phenylacetate into ortho-hydroxyphenylacetate, which was previously identified as a dead end product of phenylacetate catabolism. These data, in conjunction with protein sequence data, suggest a novel catabolic pathway via CoA thioesters. According to this, phenylacetyl-CoA is attacked by a ring-oxygenase/reductase (PaaABCDE proteins), generating a hydroxylated and reduced derivative of phenylacetyl-CoA, which is not re-oxidized to a dihydroxylated aromatic intermediate, as in other known aromatic pathways. Rather, it is proposed that this nonaromatic intermediate CoA ester is further metabolized in a complex reaction sequence comprising enoyl-CoA isomerization/hydration, nonoxygenolytic ring opening, and dehydrogenation catalyzed by the PaaG and PaaZ proteins. The subsequent beta-oxidation-type degradation of the resulting CoA dicarboxylate via beta-ketoadipyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA appears to be catalyzed by the PaaJ, PaaF and PaaH proteins. PMID:12846838

  19. Determination of Dihydrobenzoacridinone Structures by NMR, IR, and UV Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, N. G.; Zhiharko, Yu. D.; Skakovsky, E. D.; Baranovsky, A. V.; Ogorodnikova, M. M.; Basalaeva, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    Condensation of 2-naphthylamine, aromatic aldehydes, and dimedone was found to produce 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a] acridin-11-one derivatives according to PMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Correlation spectroscopy showed that the carbonyl in the synthesized dihydrobenzoacridinone derivatives was located on C11.

  20. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Franks, W. Trent; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated ‘sampling problem’ and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins. PMID:21052779

  1. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  2. Quantitating Metabolites in Protein Precipitated Serum Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative NMR-based metabolite profiling is challenged by the deleterious effects of abundant proteins in the intact blood plasma/serum, which underscores the need for alternative approaches. Protein removal by ultrafiltration using low molecular weight cutoff filters thus represents an important step. However, protein precipitation, an alternative and simple approach for protein removal, lacks detailed quantitative assessment for use in NMR based metabolomics. In this study, we have comprehensively evaluated the performance of protein precipitation using methanol, acetonitrile, perchloric acid, and trichloroacetic acid and ultrafiltration approaches using 1D and 2D NMR, based on the identification and absolute quantitation of 44 human blood metabolites, including a few identified for the first time in the NMR spectra of human serum. We also investigated the use of a “smart isotope tag,” 15N-cholamine for further resolution enhancement, which resulted in the detection of a number of additional metabolites. 1H NMR of both protein precipitated and ultrafiltered serum detected all 44 metabolites with comparable reproducibility (average CV, 3.7% for precipitation; 3.6% for filtration). However, nearly half of the quantified metabolites in ultrafiltered serum exhibited 10–74% lower concentrations; specifically, tryptophan, benzoate, and 2-oxoisocaproate showed much lower concentrations compared to protein precipitated serum. These results indicate that protein precipitation using methanol offers a reliable approach for routine NMR-based metabolomics of human blood serum/plasma and should be considered as an alternative to ultrafiltration. Importantly, protein precipitation, which is commonly used by mass spectrometry (MS), promises avenues for direct comparison and correlation of metabolite data obtained from the two analytical platforms to exploit their combined strength in the metabolomics of blood. PMID:24796490

  3. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  4. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  5. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  6. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  7. Macromolecular NMR spectroscopy for the non-spectroscopist: beyond macromolecular solution structure determination.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Michael; Kwan, Ann H; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Mackay, Joel P; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-03-01

    A strength of NMR spectroscopy is its ability to monitor, on an atomic level, molecular changes and interactions. In this review, which is intended for non-spectroscopist, we describe major uses of NMR in protein science beyond solution structure determination. After first touching on how NMR can be used to quickly determine whether a mutation induces structural perturbations in a protein, we describe the unparalleled ability of NMR to monitor binding interactions over a wide range of affinities, molecular masses and solution conditions. We discuss the use of NMR to measure the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and over a wide range of timescales. Finally, we outline new and expanding areas such as macromolecular structure determination in multicomponent systems, as well as in the solid state and in vivo. PMID:21214861

  8. NMR spectroscopy and perfusion of mammalian cells using surface microprobes.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Pataky, Kristopher; Stettler, Matthieu; Wurm, Florian Maria; Brugger, Jürgen; Besse, Pierre-André; Popovic, Radivoje

    2007-03-01

    NMR spectra of mammalian cells are taken using surface microprobes that are based on microfabricated planar coils. The surface microprobe resembles a miniaturized Petri dish commonly used in biological research. The diameter of the planar coils is 1 mm. Chinese Hamster Ovaries are immobilized in a uniform layer on the microprobe surface or patterned by an ink-jet printer in the centre of the microcoil, where the rf-field of the planar microcoil is most uniform. The acquired NMR spectra show the prevalent metabolites found in mammalian cells. The volumes of the detected samples range from 25 nL to 1 nL (or 50,000 to 1800 cells). With an extended set-up that provides fluid inlets and outlets to the microprobe, the cells can be perfused within the NMR-magnet while constantly taking NMR spectra. Perfusion of the cells opens the way to increased cell viability for long acquisitions or to analysis of the cells' response to environmental change. PMID:17330170

  9. Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency diagnosed by proton NMR spectroscopy of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Udo F H; Tassini, Maria; Hayek, Joseph; de Vries, Maaike; Bilos, Appie; Vivi, Antonio; Valensin, Gianni; Buoni, Sabrina; Zannolli, Raffaella; Brussel, Wim; Kremer, Berry; Salomons, Gajja S; Veendrick-Meekes, Monique J B M; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A

    2009-06-01

    In patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency several parameters may point towards the diagnosis of GAMT deficiency. These include the low levels of creatine and creatinine in urine, the high concentration of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) in urine and the low levels of creatine and creatinine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this study, body fluids from 10 GAMT deficient patients were analysed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The urine 1D (1)H NMR spectra of all the patients showed a doublet resonance at 3.98 ppm (pH 2.50) derived from GAA present in high concentration. For this compound, a good recovery and good correlation was found between an LC-MS/MS method and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In CSF NMR spectra of these patients, the singlet resonances of creatine and creatinine (3.05 and 3.13 ppm, respectively) were absent (normally always present in (1)H NMR spectra of CSF). Due to overlap by other resonances, the doublet of GAA could not be observed. Our data demonstrate that (1)H NMR spectroscopy of urine and CSF can be used to diagnose patients with GAMT deficiency. PMID:19288536

  10. DSP-based on-line NMR spectroscopy using an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.; Bobis, J.P. |

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that uses an adaptive algorithm to carry out real-time NMR spectroscopy. The system employs a digital signal processor (DSP) chip to regulate the transmitted and received signal together with spectral analysis of the received signal to determine free induction decay (FID). To implement such a signal-processing routine for detection of the desired signal, an adaptive line enhancer filter that uses an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm is applied to the FID spectra. The results indicate that the adaptive filter can be a reliable technique for on-line spectroscopy study.

  11. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manu, V. S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π / 2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-13C, 15N NAVL peptide as well as U-13C, 15N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences.

  12. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manu, V S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π/2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-(13)C, (15)N NAVL peptide as well as U-(13)C, (15)N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences. PMID:26473327

  13. Computational Analysis of Solvent Effects in NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-12

    Solvent modeling became a standard part of first principles computations of molecular properties. However, a universal solvent approach is particularly difficult for the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding and spin-spin coupling constants that in part result from collective delocalized properties of the solute and the environment. In this work, bulk and specific solvent effects are discussed on experimental and theoretical model systems comprising solvated alanine zwitterion and chloroform molecules. Density functional theory computations performed on larger clusters indicate that standard dielectric continuum solvent models may not be sufficiently accurate. In some cases, more reasonable NMR parameters were obtained by approximation of the solvent with partial atomic charges. Combined cluster/continuum models yielded the most reasonable values of the spectroscopic parameters, provided that they are dynamically averaged. The roles of solvent polarizability, solvent shell structure, and bulk permeability were investigated. NMR shielding values caused by the macroscopic solvent magnetizability exhibited the slowest convergence with respect to the cluster size. For practical computations, however, inclusion of the first solvation sphere provided satisfactory corrections of the vacuum values. The simulations of chloroform chemical shifts and CH J-coupling constants were found to be very sensitive to the molecular dynamics model used to generate the cluster geometries. The results show that computationally efficient solvent modeling is possible and can reveal fine details of molecular structure, solvation, and dynamics. PMID:26614339

  14. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  15. Probing oxidative degradation in polymers using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Click, C.A.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of oxidative degradation remains an important goal in being able to predict the aging process in polymer materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has previously been utilized to investigate polymer degradation, including both proton ({sup 1}H) and carbon ({sup 13}C) studies. These previous NMR studies, as well as other spectroscopic investigations, are complicated by the almost overwhelming signal arising from the native undegraded polymer. This makes the identification and quantification of degradation species at small concentrations difficult. In this note we discuss recent investigation into the use of oxygen ({sup 17}O) NMR spectroscopy to probe the oxidative degradation process in polymers at a molecular level. Due to the low natural abundance (0.037%) and a nuclear spin of I=5/2 possessing an appreciable quadrupolar moment, the use of {sup 17}O NMR in polymer investigations has been limited. By utilizing synthetically enriched oxygen gas during the accelerated aging process, both the difficulties of low natural abundance and background interference signals are eliminated. For enriched samples {sup 17}O NMR spectra now provide a unique probe since all of the observed NMR resonances are the direct result of oxidative degradation.

  16. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  17. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  18. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  19. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  20. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  1. Citron and lemon under the lens of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Adele; Parenti, Francesca; Righi, Valeria; Schenetti, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) is an NMR technique that can be applied to semi-solid samples. Flavedo, albedo, pulp, seeds, and oil gland content of lemon and citron were studied through HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy, which was used directly on intact tissue specimens without any physicochemical manipulation. HR-MAS NMR proved to be a very suitable technique for detecting terpenes, sugars, organic acids, aminoacids and osmolites. It is valuable in observing changes in sugars, principal organic acids (mainly citric and malic) and ethanol contents of pulp specimens and this strongly point to its use to follow fruit ripening, or commercial assessment of fruit maturity. HR-MAS NMR was also used to derive the molar percentage of fatty acid components of lipids in seeds, which can change depending on the Citrus species and varieties. Finally, this technique was employed to elucidate the metabolic profile of mold flavedo. PMID:23871074

  2. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  3. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastian C.

    2006-03-15

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon registered seat, and Kalrez registered O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  4. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  5. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  6. NMR difference spectroscopy with a dual saddle-coil difference probe.

    PubMed

    Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P; Goldsbrough, Peter B; Santini, Robert E; Raftery, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    A new difference probe for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented. The difference probe uses two saddle-shaped coils to excite and detect two samples simultaneously. The samples are held in a specially modified 3-mm NMR tube with an Ultem plastic disk to separate the samples. The probe's resonant circuit contains two crossed diodes that passively switch the relative phase of each coil during the NMR experiment. The result is a difference spectrum from the two samples. The degree of cancellation of common signals was determined to be approximately 90%, and the application of the probe to relaxation-edited difference spectroscopy for identifying protein-ligand interactions was demonstrated using glutathione and glutathione S-transferase binding protein. PMID:15214412

  7. Chiral Recognition Studies of α-(Nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic Acids by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Anikó; Csóka, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Farkas, Viktor; Rábai, József; Szabó, Dénes

    2015-06-19

    Three chiral α-(nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic acids (R)-1, (RS)-2, (R)-3 were synthesized to examine their application as chiral solvating agents with amines. As a model compound, first (S)- and/or (RS)-α-phenylethylamine was used, and their diastereomeric salts were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR and ECD spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic studies were carried out at room temperature using the slightly polar CDCl3 and apolar C6D6 as solvents in 5 mM and 54 mM concentrations. The difference of the chemical shifts (Δδ) in the diastereomeric complexes is comparable with other, well-known chiral derivatizing and solvating agents (e.g., Mosher's acid, Pirkle's alcohol). Diastereomeric salts of racemic acids (RS)-1 and (RS)-2 with biologically active amines (1R,2S)-ephedrine and (S)-dapoxetine were also investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26024423

  8. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  9. Water Behavior in Bacterial Spores by Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dormant bacterial spores are able to survive long periods of time without nutrients, withstand harsh environmental conditions, and germinate into metabolically active bacteria when conditions are favorable. Numerous factors influence this hardiness, including the spore structure and the presence of compounds to protect DNA from damage. It is known that the water content of the spore core plays a role in resistance to degradation, but the exact state of water inside the core is a subject of discussion. Two main theories present themselves: either the water in the spore core is mostly immobile and the core and its components are in a glassy state, or the core is a gel with mobile water around components which themselves have limited mobility. Using deuterium solid-state NMR experiments, we examine the nature of the water in the spore core. Our data show the presence of unbound water, bound water, and deuterated biomolecules that also contain labile deuterons. Deuterium–hydrogen exchange experiments show that most of these deuterons are inaccessible by external water. We believe that these unreachable deuterons are in a chemical bonding state that prevents exchange. Variable-temperature NMR results suggest that the spore core is more rigid than would be expected for a gel-like state. However, our rigid core interpretation may only apply to dried spores whereas a gel core may exist in aqueous suspension. Nonetheless, the gel core, if present, is inaccessible to external water. PMID:24950158

  10. NMR Spectroscopy of Aqueous Extracts of Fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum- graecum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Matveichuk, S. V.; Karankevich, E. G.; Agabalaeva, E. D.; Reshetnikov, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The amino-acid and monosaccharide compositions of aqueous extracts of fenugreek herb were determined using PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The content of identified extract constituents was >70 mol%, of which the dominant amino acid was 4-hydroxyisoleucine (26.5 mol%); the major carbohydrate, glucose (10.1 mol%).

  11. Characterization of animal manure using advanced solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of chemical structure of animal manure is necessary for its effective utilization. However, characterization of animal manure is challenging since it is a complex mixture and partially soluble. Solid-state C-13 NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is regarded as the best tool to i...

  12. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  13. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  14. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  15. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  16. Characterization of various fast pyrolysis bio-oils by NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NMR spectroscopy, including 1H, 13 C and DEPT spectra were used to characterize fast pyrolysis oil from numerous energy crops and other agricultural feedstocks. The bio-oils studied were produced from swithchgrass, alfalfa stems, corn stover, guayule (whole plant and latex extracted bagasse) and ch...

  17. Introducing High School Students to NMR Spectroscopy through Percent Composition Determination Using Low-Field Spectrometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Pitzer, Joy M.; Frost, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mole to gram conversions, density, and percent composition are fundamental concepts in first year chemistry at the high school or undergraduate level; however, students often find it difficult to engage with these concepts. We present a simple laboratory experiment utilizing portable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to determine the…

  18. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  19. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  20. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  2. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (1H, 13C, and 31P) and two-dimensional (1H-13C and 1H-31P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the 1H-31P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  3. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (¹H, (13)C, and (31)P) and two-dimensional (¹H-(13)C and ¹H-(31)P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. ¹H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the ¹H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative ¹H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the ¹H-(31)P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  4. New methods and applications in solid-state NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Sneddon, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has long been established as offering unique atomic-scale and element-specific insight into the structure, disorder, and dynamics of materials. NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei (I > (1)/2) are often perceived as being challenging to acquire and to interpret because of the presence of anisotropic broadening arising from the interaction of the electric field gradient and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment, which broadens the spectral lines, often over several megahertz. Despite the vast amount of information contained in the spectral line shapes, the problems with sensitivity and resolution have, until very recently, limited the application of NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the quadrupolar interaction, describe some of the basic experimental approaches used for acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra, and discuss the information that these spectra can provide. We then describe some interesting recent examples to showcase some of the more exciting and challenging new applications of NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei in the fields of energy materials, microporous materials, Earth sciences, and biomaterials. Finally, we consider the possible directions that this highly informative technique may take in the future. PMID:25296129

  5. Solvation and crystal effects in bilirubin studied by NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Thierry; Matysik, Jörg; Mark, Franz

    2011-10-27

    The open-chain tetrapyrrole compound bilirubin was investigated in chloroform and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions by liquid-state NMR and as solid by (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to interpret the data, using the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional to optimize geometries and to compute NMR chemical shieldings by the gauge-including atomic orbital method. The dependence of geometries and chemical shieldings on the size of the basis sets was investigated for the reference molecules tetramethylsilane, NH(3), and H(2)O, and for bilirubin as a monomer and in clusters consisting of up to six molecules. In order to assess the intrinsic errors of the B3LYP approximation in calculating NMR shieldings, complete basis set estimates were obtained for the nuclear shielding values of the reference molecules. The experimental liquid-state NMR data of bilirubin are well reproduced by a monomeric bilirubin molecule using the 6-311+G(2d,p) basis set for geometry optimization and for calculating chemical shieldings. To simulate the bilirubin crystal, a hexameric model was required. It was constructed from geometry-optimized monomers using information from the X-ray structure of bilirubin to fix the monomeric entities in space and refined by partial optimization. Combining experimental (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N NMR correlation spectroscopy and density functional theory, almost complete sets of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments were obtained for both liquid and solid states. It is shown that monomeric bilirubin in chloroform solution is formed by 3-vinyl anti conformers, while bilirubin crystals are formed by 3-vinyl syn conformers. This conformational change leads to characteristic differences between the liquid- and solid-state NMR resonances. PMID:21846145

  6. High-resolution heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Huang, Yuqing; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful tool for determining the structures of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the structural analysis of proteins. In order to leverage the method’s potential for structural investigations, obtaining high-resolution NMR spectra is essential and this is generally accomplished by using very homogeneous magnetic fields. However, there are several situations where magnetic field distortions and thus line broadening is unavoidable, for example, the samples under investigation may be inherently heterogeneous, and the magnet’s homogeneity may be poor. This line broadening can hinder resonance assignment or even render it impossible. We put forth a new class of pulse sequences for obtaining high-resolution heteronuclear spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations based on distant dipolar field modulations. This strategy’s capabilities are demonstrated with the acquisition of high-resolution 2D gHSQC and gHMBC spectra. These sequences’ performances are evaluated on the basis of their sensitivities and acquisition efficiencies. Moreover, we show that by encoding and decoding NMR observables spatially, as is done in ultrafast NMR, an extra dimension containing J-coupling information can be obtained without increasing the time necessary to acquire a heteronuclear correlation spectrum. Since the new sequences relax magnetic field homogeneity constraints imposed upon high-resolution NMR, they may be applied in portable NMR sensors and studies of heterogeneous chemical and biological materials.

  7. Binding of Sulfonamide Antibiotics to CTABr Micelles Characterized Using (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Ashish K; Cashin, Patrick J; Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Exall, Kirsten; Buncel, Erwin; Brown, R Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Interactions of nine sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfadoxine, sulfathiazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfacetamide, sulfaguanidine, and sulfanilamide) with cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTABr) micelles were examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Seven of the nine provided a significant change in the (1)H NMR chemical shift such that the magnitude and direction (upfield vs downfield) of the chemical shift could be used to propose a locus and orientation of the sulfonamide within the micelle structure. The magnitude of the chemical shift was used to estimate the binding constant for seven sulfonamides with CTABr micelles, providing values and an overall pattern consistent with previous studies of these sulfonamides. PMID:27391918

  8. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  9. Broadband "Infinite-Speed" Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yan-Yan; Levin, E.M; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2009-06-02

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR of high-Z spin- 1/2 nuclei such as {sup 125}Te, {sup 207}Pb, {sup 119}Sn, {sup 113}Cd, and {sup 195}Pt is often hampered by large (>1000 ppm) chemical-shift anisotropies, which result in strong spinning sidebands that can obscure the centerbands of interest. In various tellurides with applications as thermoelectrics and as phase-change materials for data storage, even 22-kHz magic-angle spinning cannot resolve the center- and sidebands broadened by chemical-shift dispersion, which precludes peak identification or quantification. For sideband suppression over the necessary wide spectral range (up to 200 kHz), radio frequency pulse sequences with few, short pulses are required. We have identified Gan's two-dimensional magic-angle-turning (MAT) experiment with five 90{sup o} pulses as a promising broadband technique for obtaining spectra without sidebands. We have adapted it to broad spectra and fast magic-angle spinning by accounting for long pulses (comparable to the dwell time in t{sub 1}) and short rotation periods. Spectral distortions are small and residual sidebands negligible even for spectra with signals covering a range of 1.5 {gamma}B{sub 1}, due to a favorable disposition of the narrow ranges containing the signals of interest in the spectral plane. The method is demonstrated on various technologically interesting tellurides with spectra spanning up to 170 kHz, at 22 kHz MAS.

  10. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Deuterium NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically deuterated mammalian tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Curatolo, W.; Jungalwala, F.B.; Sears, B.; Tuck, L.; Neuringer, L.J.

    1985-07-30

    The choline-containing phospholipids of mammalian membranes have been biosynthetically deuterated by raising rats on a diet supplemented with (HOCH2CH2N(CD3)3) Cl or (HOCD2CH2N(CH3)3) Cl . Deuterium NMR spectra have been obtained from excised deuterated brain, sciatic nerve, heart, and lung, from isolated brain myelin and brain microsomes, and from aqueous dispersions of lipid extracts. Measurements of residual quadrupole splittings for excised deuterated neural tissues demonstrate that the orientational order of the choline head group is similar to that observed in model membranes. The spin-lattice relaxation time of the choline head group in deuterated neural tissue is indistinguishable from that observed in model membranes. These results support the proposal that the conformation and motional dynamics of the choline head groups of the bulk choline-containing lipids of neural tissue are similar to those in model membranes. Spectra of biosynthetically deuterated brain myelin and brain microsomes exhibit similar quadrupole splittings. Since these membranes have significantly different protein contents, these results indicate that no strong polar interactions exist between membrane proteins and the choline head groups of choline-containing membrane lipids. Spectra of intact deuterated heart and lung exhibit broad lines and a range of quadrupole splittings.

  12. High frequency volume coils for clinical NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J T; Hetherington, H P; Otu, J O; Pan, J W; Pohost, G M

    1994-08-01

    A tuned transmission line resonator has been developed in theory and in practical design for the clinical NMR volume coil application at 4.1 tesla. The distributed circuit transmission line resonator was designed for high frequency, large conductive volume applications where conventional lumped element coil designs perform less efficiently. The resonator design has made use of a resonant coaxial cavity, which could be variably tuned to the Larmor frequency of interest by tunable transmission line elements. Large head- and body-sized volumes, high efficiencies, and broad tuning ranges have been shown to be characteristic of the transmission line resonator to frequencies of 500 MHz. The B1 homogeneity of the resonator has been demonstrated to be a function of the electromagnetic properties of the load itself. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations for the fully time-dependent B1 field, coil homogeneity was predicted with finite-element models of anatomic structure, and inhomogeneities corrected for. A how-to exposition of coil design and construction has been included. Simple methods of quadrature driving and double tuning the transmission line resonator have also been presented. Human head images obtained with a tuned transmission line resonator at 175 MHz have clearly demonstrated uncompromised high field advantages of signal-to-noise and spatial resolution. PMID:7968443

  13. Fractional deuteration applied to biomolecular solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nand, Deepak; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can provide detailed insight into structural and dynamical aspects of complex biomolecules. With increasing molecular size, advanced approaches for spectral simplification and the detection of medium to long-range contacts become of critical relevance. We have analyzed the protonation pattern of a membrane-embedded ion channel that was obtained from bacterial expression using protonated precursors and D(2)O medium. We find an overall reduction of 50% in protein protonation. High levels of deuteration at H(α) and H(β) positions reduce spectral congestion in ((1)H,(13)C,(15)N) correlation experiments and generate a transfer profile in longitudinal mixing schemes that can be tuned to specific resonance frequencies. At the same time, residual protons are predominantly found at amino-acid side-chain positions enhancing the prospects for obtaining side-chain resonance assignments and for detecting medium to long-range contacts. Fractional deuteration thus provides a powerful means to aid the structural analysis of complex biomolecules by solid-state NMR. PMID:22105305

  14. Metabolomic differentiation of Cannabis sativa cultivars using 1H NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Hazekamp, Arno; Erkelens, Cornelis; Lefeber, Alfons W M; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-06-01

    The metabolomic analysis of 12 Cannabis sativa cultivars was carried out by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis techniques. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 1H NMR spectra showed a clear discrimination between those samples by principal component 1 (PC1) and principal component 3 (PC3) in cannabinoid fraction. The loading plot of PC value obtained from all 1)H NMR signals shows that Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) are important metabolites to differentiate the cultivars from each other. The discrimination of the cultivars could also be obtained from a water extract containing carbohydrates and amino acids. The level of sucrose, glucose, asparagine, and glutamic acid are found to be major discriminating metabolites of these cultivars. This method allows an efficient differentiation between cannabis cultivars without any prepurification steps. PMID:15217272

  15. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  16. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  17. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  18. Target-based whole-cell screening by ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junhe; Cao, Qing; McLeod, Sarah M; Ferguson, Keith; Gao, Ning; Breeze, Alexander L; Hu, Jun

    2015-04-13

    An NMR-based approach marries the two traditional screening technologies (phenotypic and target-based screening) to find compounds inhibiting a specific enzymatic reaction in bacterial cells. Building on a previous study in which it was demonstrated that hydrolytic decomposition of meropenem in living Escherichia coli cells carrying New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase subclass 1 (NDM-1) can be monitored in real time by NMR spectroscopy, we designed a cell-based NMR screening platform. A strong NDM-1 inhibitor was identified with cellular IC50 of 0.51 μM, which is over 300-fold more potent than captopril, a known NDM-1 inhibitor. This new screening approach has great potential to be applied to targets in other cell types, such as mammalian cells, and to targets that are only stable or functionally competent in the cellular environment. PMID:25693499

  19. 33S NMR spectroscopy 3. Substituent effects on 33S NMR parameters in 2-substituted ethanesulfonates.

    PubMed

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2006-08-01

    33S NMR parameters (chemical shifts and linewidths) in 2-substituted sodium ethanesulfonates, XCH2CH2SO3Na (X = H, CH3, OH, SH, NH2, Cl, Br, NH3+) depend upon the electronic properties of substituents. To explain experimental results and obtain additional information on the origin of the observed substituent effect (SE), sulfur isotropic absolute shielding constants have been calculated at DFT level of theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p)) by gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) method. Data have been interpreted with the aid of natural bond orbital (NBO) method and natural chemical shielding (NCS) analysis. It has been demonstrated that in the class of compounds considered the diamagnetic contribution to sulfur-shielding constant is constant and the observed upfield shift of 33S resonance induced by electron-withdrawing substituents (reverse chemical shift effect) can be related to variations of the paramagnetic contribution. Substituents with different electronic properties cause variations in the polarization of S-C and S-O bonds of the -C-SO3- moiety thus determining changes of the electron density at sulfur nucleus and consequently the expansion or contraction of 3p sulfur orbitals. Also oxygen lone-pairs and sulfur core 2p electrons can play an active role in determining the paramagnetic contribution to sulfur shielding. With regard to linewidth variations, they can be ascribed primarily to changes in the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant values. B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) method allows obtaining a good reproducibility of SE on the electric field gradient (EFG) at sulfur, although its values tend to be underestimated significantly. Moreover, 17O shielding constants have been calculated. PMID:16741982

  20. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  1. HRMAS-NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis meat characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ritota, Mena; Casciani, Lorena; Failla, Sebastiana; Valentini, Massimiliano

    2012-12-01

    ¹H-High resolution magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to gain the metabolic profile of longissimus dorsi and semitendinosus muscles of four different breeds: Chianina, Holstein Friesian, Maremmana and Buffalo. Principal component analysis, partial least squares projection to latent structure - discriminant analysis and orthogonal partial least squares projection to latent structure - discriminant analysis were used to build models capable of discriminating the muscle type according to the breed. Data analysis led to an excellent classification for Buffalo and Chianina, while for Holstein Friesian the separation was lower. In the case of Maremmana the use of intelligent bucketing was necessary due to some resonances shifting allowed improvement of the discrimination ability. Finally, by using the Variable Importance in Projection values the metabolites relevant for the classification were identified. PMID:22819725

  2. Investigating brain metabolism at high fields using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without 1H decoupling.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-02-01

    Most in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy studies in the brain have been performed using 1H decoupling during acquisition. Decoupling imposes significant constraints on the experimental setup (particularly for human studies at high magnetic field) in order to stay within safety limits for power deposition. We show here that incorporation of the 13C label from 13C-labeled glucose into brain amino acids can be monitored accurately using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without the application of 1H decoupling. Using LCModel quantification with prior knowledge of one-bond and multiple-bond J(CH) coupling constants, the uncertainty on metabolites concentrations was only 35% to 91% higher (depending on the carbon resonance of interest) in undecoupled spectra compared to decoupled spectra in the rat brain at 9.4 Tesla. Although less sensitive, 13C NMR without decoupling dramatically reduces experimental constraints on coil setup and pulse sequence design required to keep power deposition within safety guidelines. This opens the prospect of safely measuring 13C NMR spectra in humans at varied brain locations (not only the occipital lobe) and at very high magnetic fields above 4 Tesla. PMID:16345037

  3. Characterisation of oxygen permeation into a microfluidic device for cell culture by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-05-24

    A compact microfluidic device for perfusion culture of mammalian cells under in situ metabolomic observation by NMR spectroscopy is presented. The chip is made from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and uses a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane to allow gas exchange. It is integrated with a generic micro-NMR detector developed recently by our group [J. Magn. Reson., 2016, 262, 73-80]. While PMMA is an excellent material in the context of NMR, PDMS is known to produce strong background signals. To mitigate this, the device keeps the PDMS away from the detection area. The oxygen permeation into the device is quantified using a flow chemistry approach. A solution of glucose is mixed on the chip with a solution of glucose oxidase, before flowing through the gas exchanger. The resulting concentration of gluconate is measured by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a function of flow rate. An oxygen equilibration rate constant of 2.4 s(-1) is found for the device, which is easily sufficient to maintain normoxic conditions in a cell culture at low perfusion flow rates. PMID:27149932

  4. Differentiating and characterizing geminal silanols in silicas by (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-12-01

    Single and geminal hydroxyl species in silicas have been characterized using solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. Differentiating hydroxyl types is important in understanding their roles in chemical toxicity mechanisms for inhaled crystalline silicas responsible for silicosis. (1)H-(29)Si cross polarization NMR spectroscopy has been employed to obtain (29)Si NMR chemical shift data and signal accrual and relaxation characteristics. Spectral deconvolution is used to examine relative single and geminal hydroxyl resonance areas for a series of representative silicas and silica gels. Silicon-containing materials examined include 1878a quartz, and 1879a cristobalite from the National Institute for Science and Technology, kaolin, and several widely used respirable silicas and silica gels. Geminal hydroxyls were observed in every case, with relative resonance areas accounting for 21-65% of total hydroxyl signals. Factors affecting relative areas measured as a function of contact time, relaxation, and surface area are discussed. Subsequent (29)Si and (31)P NMR studies of a silica coated with various sodium hydrogen phosphates show preferential single silanol-phosphate interaction for basic phosphates, and oligomerization products for acidic phosphates. Geminal hydroxyl resonance areas displayed significant error (4-17%) for low surface area silicas, limiting this method to studies exhibiting major changes in chemical or spectroscopic properties. PMID:20825948

  5. Structural characterization of selenosubtilisin by sup 77 Se-NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    House, K.L.; Dunlap, R.B.; Odom, J.D.; Wu, Z.P.; Hilvert. D. Research Inst. of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA )

    1991-03-15

    Selenosubtilisin is an artificial enzyme containing an active site selenocysteine residue. In this environment the selenium atom is a valuable probe of structure-function relationships and also confers novel redox and hydrolytic properties to the original protease template. The authors have used {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy to characterize different oxidation states of {sup 77}Se isotopically enriched selenosubtilisin. The oxidized form of the enzyme exhibits a {sup 77}Se resonance at 1,189 ppm. This is in good agreement with the {sup 77}Se chemical shifts for model seleninic acids, confirming that the prosthetic group is in the seleninic acid oxidation state. On treatment of the oxidized enzyme with three equivalents of 3-carboxy-4-nitrobenzenethiol at pH 5.0, they observe the enzyme bound selenenyl sulfide at 388.5 ppm. This work demonstrates the utility of {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy for examining structure-function relationships of selenium containing proteins.

  6. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium-Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leskes, Michal; Moore, Amy J; Goward, Gillian R; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-27

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium-air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by (17)O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. (13)C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium-oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  7. Analysis and aging of unsaturated polyester resins in contemporary art installations by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Georgios; Knuutinen, Ulla; Laitinen, Kai; Spyros, Apostolos

    2010-12-01

    Two original art installations constructed from unsaturated polyester resins (UPR) and four different reference UPR products (before and after UVB aging) were analyzed by high-resolution 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Breaking strain studies were also conducted for the four UPR model products before and after different aging procedures (moisture, UVB exposure, melt/freeze). NMR analysis of the chemical composition of the UPR resin extracts showed they contain several low MW organic compounds and oligomers rich in polar -OH groups that play a significant role in the degradation behavior of the composite UPR materials. Statistical analysis of the NMR compositional data showed that styrene and benzaldehyde contents can be used to differentiate between fresh and aged UPR samples. The phthalate and propylene glycol unit speciation (esterified, primary or secondary -OH) of the extracts provided evidence that UPR resin C was used in the construction of the two art installations, and direct comparison of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra verified this compositional similarity. UPR resin C was shown by both NMR and breaking strain studies to be the reference UPR most susceptible to degradation by different aging procedures, a characteristic attributed to the lower styrene content of resin C. PMID:20922516

  8. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  9. Gyrotron FU CW VII for 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Kosuga, Kosuke; Agusu, La; Ogawa, Isamu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Smith, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2010-07-01

    Gyrotron FU CW VII, one of the FU CW Series Gyrotrons, has been designed, constructed and completed operational tests successfully in the Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU). The gyrotron operates at around 200 GHz for the fundamental cyclotron resonances and at around 400 GHz for the second harmonics. These radiation frequencies will be applied to 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Solid-state proton multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy with fast magic angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Helen; Titman, Jeremy J.; Gottwald, Johannes; Spiess, Hans W.

    1994-09-01

    The feasibility of multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy with high resolution for protons in solids is explored. A new multiple-quantum excitation sequence suitable for use with fast magic angle spinning is described, and its performance is compared to that of both static and slow-spinning multiple-quantum methods. Modified sequences with scale the rate of development of the multiple-quantum coherences are also demonstrated, and two-dimensional double-quantum spectra of adamantane and polycarbonate are presented.

  11. Single-shot diffusion trace (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R A; Braun, K P; Nicolay, K

    2001-05-01

    Ignoring diffusion anisotropy can severely hamper the quantitative determination of water and metabolite diffusion in complex tissues. The measurement of the trace of the diffusion tensor provides unambiguous and rotationally invariant ADC values, but usually requires three separate experiments. A single-shot technique developed earlier, originally designed for diffusion trace MR imaging (Mori and van Zijl, Magn Reson Med 1995;33:41-52), was improved and adapted for diffusion trace MR spectroscopy. A double spin-echo pulse sequence was incorporated with four pairs of bipolar gradients with specific predetermined relative signs in each of the three orthogonal directions. The combination of gradient directions leads to cancellation of all off-diagonal tensor elements while constructively adding the diagonal elements. Furthermore, the pulse scheme provides complete compensation for cross-terms between static magnetic field gradients and the applied diffusion gradients, while simultaneously avoiding cross-terms with localization gradients. The sequence was tested at 4.7 T in vivo on rat brain for MRI and on rat skeletal muscle and brain for MRS. It is shown that the average ADC as determined from the measurement of the ADCs in the three orthogonal directions is in close agreement with the ADC obtained along the trace of the diffusion tensor in a single acquisition, for both water and metabolite diffusion. The large differences in water and metabolite diffusion coefficients as measured in the individual orthogonal directions illustrate the need for diffusion trace measurements when accurate and rotationally invariant diffusion quantitation is required. The pulse scheme presented here may be applied for such purposes in MRS and MRI studies. PMID:11323799

  12. Methodology of 1H NMR Spectroscopy of the Human Brain at Very High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tkáč, I.; Gruetter, R.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrashort-echo-time stimulated echo-acquisition mode (STEAM) pulse sequence with interleaved outer volume suppression and VAPOR (variable power and optimized relaxation delays) water suppression was redesigned and optimized for human applications at 4 and 7 T, taking into account the specific requirements for spectroscopy at high magnetic fields and limitations of currently available hardware. In combination with automatic shimming, automated parameter adjustments and data processing, this method provided a user-friendly tool for routine 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the human brain at very high magnetic fields. Effects of first- and second-order shimming, single-scan averaging, frequency and phase corrections, and eddy currents were described. LCModel analysis of an in vivo 1H NMR spectrum measured from the human brain at 7 T allowed reliable quantification of more than fifteen metabolites noninvasively, illustrating the potential of high-field NMR spectroscopy. Examples of spectroscopic studies performed at 4 and 7 T demonstrated the high reproducibility of acquired spectra quality. PMID:20179773

  13. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  14. INVESTIGATION INTO HOW WOOD CELL WALLS INTERACT WITH SYNTHETIC ADHESIVES USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the continued growth of the wood adhesive industry and the need to create durable and environmentally friendly adhesive systems, it is still unclear whether covalent bonds contribute to wood adhesive bond strength. In order to investigate this question, solid-state NMR spectroscopy (NMR) has be...

  15. Identifying metabolites related to nitrogen mineralisation using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . T McDonald, Noeleen; Graham, Stewart; Watson, Catherine; Gordon, Alan; Lalor, Stan; Laughlin, Ronnie; Elliott, Chris; . P Wall, David

    2015-04-01

    Exploring new analysis techniques to enhance our knowledge of the various metabolites within our soil systems is imperative. Principally, this knowledge would allow us to link key metabolites with functional influences on critical nutrient processes, such as the nitrogen (N) mineralisation in soils. Currently there are few studies that utilize proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) to characterize multiple metabolites within a soil sample. The aim of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of 1H NMR for isolating multiple metabolites that are related to the mineralizable N (MN) capacity across a range of 35 Irish grassland soils. Soils were measured for MN using the standard seven day anaerobic incubation (AI-7). Additionally, soils were also analysed for a range of physio-chemical properties [e.g. total N, total C, mineral N, texture and soil organic matter (SOM)]. Proton NMR analysis was carried on these soils by extracting with 40% methanol:water, lyophilizing and reconstituting in deuterium oxide and recording the NMR spectra on a 400MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer. Once the NMR data were spectrally processed and analysed using multivariate statistical analysis, seven metabolites were identified as having significant relationships with MN (glucose, trimethylamine, glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, 4-aminohippuirc acid and citric acid). Following quantification, glucose was shown to explain the largest percentage variability in MN (72%). These outcomes suggest that sources of labile carbon are essential in regulating N mineralisation and the capacity of plant available N derived from SOM-N pools in these soils. Although, smaller in concentration, the amino acids; 4-aminohippuirc acid, glutamic acid and serine also significantly (P<0.05) explained 43%, 27% and 19% of the variability in MN, respectively. This novel study highlights the effectiveness of using 1H NMR as a practical approach to profile multiple metabolites in

  16. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  17. Stereochemistry of 16a-hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene established by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva de Miranda, Roqueline Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Salomão Bento Vasconcelos; de Fátima Silva, Grácia Divina; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto; Knupp, Vagner Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Friedelin (1), 3beta-friedelinol (2), 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3), 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4), 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5) and 16alpha,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6) were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl(3) solution, 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4) reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7). This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl(3) solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It is also the first time that all the (13)C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7. PMID:19214150

  18. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore » of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  19. NMR spectroscopy as a tool to close the gap on metabolite characterization under MIST.

    PubMed

    Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Reily, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    Withdrawals from the market due to unforeseen adverse events have triggered changes in the way therapeutics are discovered and developed. This has resulted in an emphasis on truly understanding the efficacy and toxicity profile of new chemical entities (NCE) and the contributions of their metabolites to on-target pharmacology and off-target receptor-mediated toxicology. Members of the pharmaceutical industry, scientific community and regulatory agencies have held dialogues with respect to metabolites in safety testing (MIST); and both the US FDA and International Conference on Harmonisation have issued guidances with respect to when and how to characterize metabolites for human safety testing. This review provides a brief overview of NMR spectroscopy as applied to the structure elucidation and quantification of drug metabolites within the drug discovery and development process. It covers advances in this technique, including cryogenic cooling of detection circuitry for enhanced sensitivity, hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, improved dynamic range through new solvent-suppression pulse sequences and quantitation. These applications add to the already diverse NMR toolkit and further anchor NMR as a technique that is directly applicable to meeting the requirements of MIST guidelines. PMID:21083239

  20. Survey and qualification of internal standards for quantification by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Torgny; Mathiasson, Marie; Bekiroglu, Somer; Hakkarainen, Birgit; Bowden, Tim; Arvidsson, Torbjörn

    2010-09-01

    In quantitative NMR (qNMR) selection of an appropriate internal standard proves to be crucial. In this study, 25 candidate compounds considered to be potent internal standards were investigated with respect to the ability of providing unique signal chemical shifts, purity, solubility, and ease of use. The (1)H chemical shift (delta) values, assignments, multiplicities and number of protons (for each signal), appropriateness (as to be used as internal standards) in four different deuterated solvents (D(2)O, DMSO-d(6), CD(3)OD, CDCl(3)) were studied. Taking into account the properties of these 25 internal standards, the most versatile eight compounds (2,4,6-triiodophenol, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene, 3,4,5-trichloropyridine, dimethyl terephthalate, 1,4-dinitrobenzene, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid) were qualified using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and NMR spectroscopy employing highly pure acetanilide as the reference standard. The data from these two methods were compared as well as utilized in the quality assessment of the compounds as internal standards. Finally, the selected internal standards were tested and evaluated in a real case of quantitative NMR analysis of a paracetamol pharmaceutical product. PMID:20207092

  1. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  2. pKa determination by ¹H NMR spectroscopy - an old methodology revisited.

    PubMed

    Bezençon, Jacqueline; Wittwer, Matthias B; Cutting, Brian; Smieško, Martin; Wagner, Bjoern; Kansy, Manfred; Ernst, Beat

    2014-05-01

    pKa values of acids and protonated bases have an essential impact on organic synthesis, medicinal chemistry, and material and food sciences. In drug discovery and development, they are of utmost importance for the prediction of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. To date, various methods for the determination of pKa values are available, including UV-spectroscopic, potentiometric, and capillary electrophoretic techniques. An additional option is provided by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The underlying principle is the alteration of chemical shifts of NMR-active nuclei (e.g., (13)C and (1)H) depending on the protonation state of adjacent acidic or basic sites. When these chemical shifts are plotted against the pH, the inflection point of the resulting sigmoidal curve defines the pKa value. Although pKa determinations by (1)H NMR spectroscopy are reported for numerous cases, the potential of this approach is not yet fully evaluated. We therefore revisited this method with a diverse set of test compounds covering a broad range of pKa values (pKa 0.9-13.8) and made a comparison with four commonly used approaches. The methodology revealed excellent correlations (R(2)=0.99 and 0.97) with electropotentiometric and UV spectroscopic methods. Moreover, the comparison with in silico results (Epik and Marvin) also showed high correlations (R(2)=0.92 and 0.94), further confirming the reliability and utility of this approach. PMID:24462329

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Control of Carbonated Cola Beverages Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D2O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as “fingerprints” and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  4. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kryczka, Tomasz; Wylęgała, Edward; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Midelfart, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years). The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye. PMID:25525621

  5. Qualitative and quantitative control of carbonated cola beverages using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maes, Pauline; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Reusch, Helmut; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2012-03-21

    ¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D₂O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as "fingerprints" and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  6. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  7. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  8. 51V solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of vanadium chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Pooransingh-Margolis, Neela; Renirie, Rokus; Hasan, Zulfiqar; Wever, Ron; Vega, Alexander J; Polenova, Tatyana

    2006-04-19

    We report 51V solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the 67.5-kDa vanadium chloroperoxidase, at 14.1 T. We demonstrate that, despite the low concentration of vanadium sites in the protein (one per molecule, 1 mumol of vanadium spins in the entire sample), the spinning sideband manifold spanning the central and the satellite transitions is readily detectable. The quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropy tensors have been determined by numerical simulations of the spinning sideband envelopes and the line shapes of the individual spinning sidebands corresponding to the central transition. The observed quadrupolar coupling constant C(Q) of 10.5 +/- 1.5 MHz and chemical shift anisotropy delta(sigma) of -520 +/- 13 ppm are sensitive reporters of the geometric and electronic structure of the vanadium center. Density functional theory calculations of the NMR spectroscopic observables for an extensive series of active site models indicate that the vanadate cofactor is most likely anionic with one axial hydroxo- group and an equatorial plane consisting of one hydroxo- and two oxo- groups. The work reported in this manuscript is the first example of 51V solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to probe the vanadium center in a protein directly. This approach yields the detailed coordination environment of the metal unavailable from other experimental measurements and is expected to be generally applicable for studies of diamagnetic vanadium sites in metalloproteins. PMID:16608356

  9. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR

  10. Ionothermal synthesis, crystal structure and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a new organically templated gallium oxalatophosphate: (H2TMPD)0.5[Ga3(C2O4)0.5(PO4)3] (TMPD=N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediamine).

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-Feng; Liu, Yi-Hui; Chang, Pai-Ching; Liao, Yi-Chen; Kao, Hsien-Ming; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2007-10-28

    A new organically templated gallium oxalatophosphate, (C7H20N2)0.5[Ga3(C2O4)0.5(PO4)3], has been synthesized by using a low-melting-point eutectic mixture of choline chloride and oxalic acid as a solvent and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. It is the first example of ionothermal synthesis of organically templated metal oxalatophosphate. The structure contains double 6-ring units of the composition Ga6(PO4)6 which are connected by oxalate ligands and P-O-Ga bonds to form a 3-D framework. The charge-compensating organic ammonium cations which are disordered over two positions are located at the intersections of two types of 8-ring channels. 1H MAS and 13C CPMAS NMR studies confirm the presence of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediammonium cation. The 71Ga and 31P MAS NMR spectra are also consistent with the crystal structure analysis results. PMID:17928909