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Sample records for cr ferritic steels

  1. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  2. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  3. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaochao; Ukai, Shigeharu; Leng, Bin; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-11-01

    The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above Ar3 of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite.

  4. A complex carbonitride of niobium and vanadium in 9% Cr ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuno, K.; Hamada, K.; Takeda, T. ); Uemori, R. ); Itoh, K. )

    1991-01-01

    It has been considered that small additions of Nb and V have striking effects on the creep strength of high Cr ferritic steels which are used for elevated temperature services such as boilers, steam generators etc. Although Nb and V are thought to form complex precipitates which may act as obstacles for the dislocation glide, the distribution and morphology of the precipitates have not been clarified yet. Several examples of simple precipitates of V in low alloy steels were only reported. In this paper, the morphology of the complex carbonitride of Nb and V in 9% Cr ferritic steels was investigated and the role of the carbonitride on the creep strength was discussed.

  5. Analysis of Creep Rupture Behavior of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels in the Presence of Notch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sunil; Laha, K.; Das, C. R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of notch on creep rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out on smooth and notched specimens of the steels in the stress ranging 90 to 300 MPa at 873 K (600 °C). Creep rupture lives of the steels increased in the presence of notch over those of smooth specimens, thus exhibiting notch strengthening. The strengthening was comparable for the 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo steels and appreciably more in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The strengthening effect was found to decrease with the decrease in applied stress and increase in rupture life for all the steels. The presence of notch decreased the creep rupture ductility of the steels significantly and the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel suffered more reduction than in the other two 9Cr-steels. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the notch was carried out to understand the notch strengthening and its variation in the steels. The variation in fracture appearance has also been corroborated based on finite element analysis. Reduction in von-Mises stress across the notch throat plane resulted in strengthening in the steels. Higher reduction in von-Mises stress in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel than that in 2.25Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo steels induced more strengthening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under multiaxial state of stress.

  6. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  7. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  8. Microstructure of a 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel before and after helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2014-12-01

    A 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel with the nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-2 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Helium ion was implanted into the 14Cr-ODS steel along with Eurofer 97 steel as reference at 400 °C to a fluence of 1 × 1017 He+/cm2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annual dark field (HAADF) scanning TEM (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to characterize the microstructure of 14Cr-ODS and Eurofer 97 steels before and after helium implantation. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates as well as large Cr-Ti rich oxides were observed in the 14Cr-ODS steel. The average size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates is 9 nm. After helium implantation, the helium bubbles formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel exhibit the smaller size and the lower volume fraction than that in Eurofer 97 steel, indicating high-density nano-scale precipitates can effectively suppress the coarsening of helium bubbles.

  9. Creep behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Isaac Samuel, E.

    2011-05-01

    Creep deformation and fracture behaviour of indigenously developed modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator (SG) tube application has been examined at 823, 848 and 873 K. Creep tests were performed on flat creep specimens machined from normalised and tempered SG tubes at stresses ranging from 125 to 275 MPa. The stress dependence of minimum creep rate obeyed Norton's power law. Similarly, the rupture life dependence on stress obeyed a power law. The fracture mode remained transgranular at all test conditions examined. The analysis of creep data indicated that the steel obey Monkman-Grant and modified Monkman-Grant relationships and display high creep damage tolerance factor. The tertiary creep was examined in terms of the variations of time to onset of tertiary creep with rupture life, and a recently proposed concept of time to reach Monkman-Grant ductility, and its relationship with rupture life that depends only on damage tolerance factor. SG tube steel exhibited creep-rupture strength comparable to those reported in literature and specified in the nuclear design code RCC-MR.

  10. Role of a complex carbonitride of niobium and vanadium in creep strength of 9% Cr ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuno, K.; Hamada, K.; Takeda, T. ); Uemori, R. ); Itoh, K. )

    1991-08-01

    Complex precipitates of Nb and V in ferritic steels have been considered to act as strong obstacles against dislocation glide. In the previous report, the authors investigated a complex precipitate of Nb and V in 9% Cr ferritic steel and showed that plate-like V-nitrides were formed adhering to spherical Nb (C,N) during tempering. These peculiar shaped precipitates are likely to trap dislocations during high temperature deformation such as creep. In this paper, the effect of the sizes of the complex carbonitrides on the creep strength of 9% Cr ferritic steels was investigated. The sizes of the carbonitrides were varied by changing the amount of N.

  11. Kinetics of isochronal austenization in modified high Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Zhang, Dantian; Yan, Zesheng

    2011-12-01

    Employment of high Cr ferritic steels as a main structural material is considered as a way to achieve economical competitiveness of main steam pipe and nuclear reactors in power plants. Differential dilatometry and microstructure observation were employed to investigate the isochronal austenitic transformation of the modified high Cr ferritic steel. The kinetics of the isochronal austenitic transformation were described by a phase-transformation model involving site saturation (pre-existing nuclei), diffusion-controlled growth, and incorporating an impingement correction. The experimental results and kinetic analysis indicate that an increase of the heating rate promotes the diffusion-controlled austenitic transformation. The dissolving degree of precipitates during the austenization process affects the activation energy for diffusion and the undissolved precipitates lead to an increase of the onset temperature of the subsequent martensite transformation upon cooling.

  12. Influence of Chemical Composition and Heat Treatment Condition on Impact Toughness of 15Cr Ferritic Creep Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Yoshiaki; Tohyama, Hideaki; Kushima, Hideaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Abe, Fujio

    Influences of chemical compositions, heat treatment and microstructure on impact toughness of 15Cr ferritic steel have been investigated. Charpy impact values of the furnace cooled steels were lower than 15J/cm2 at room temperature independent of chemical compositions. Drastic improvement in impact toughness has been attained by controlling the carbon and nitrogen contents, by the addition of nickel and by the increase in cooling rate after annealing. However, the effect of nickel on impact toughness strongly depends on carbon and nitrogen contents. Improvement in impact toughness of the 15Cr ferritic steel has not been explained by individual microstructural factors of grain size, distribution of precipitates, volume fraction of martensitic phase. It has been supposed that the increase in Charpy impact toughness of the 15Cr ferritic steel was attained by improvement in toughness of ferrite matrix itself.

  13. Type IV Cracking Susceptibility in Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Relative type-IV cracking susceptibility in 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb ferritic steel weld joint has been assessed. The type-IV cracking was manifested as preferential accumulation of creep deformation and cavitation in the relatively soft intercritical region of heat affected zone of the weld joint. The type-IV cracking susceptibility has been defined as the reduction in creep-rupture strength of weld joint compared to its base metal. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel exhibited more susceptibility to type-IV cracking at relatively lower temperatures; whereas, at higher temperatures, 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was more susceptible. The relative susceptibility to type-IV cracking in the weld joint of the Cr-Mo steels has been rationalized on the basis of creep-strengthening mechanisms operating in the steels and their venerability to change on intercritical heating during weld thermal cycle, subsequent postweld heat treatment, and creep exposure.

  14. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  15. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact properties of Cr-W-V ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered ferritic and martensitic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 393°C to ≈14 dpa on eight steels with 2.25%, 5%, 9%, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5% and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with ≈25% δ-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy (USE). The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393°C were compared with previous results at 365°C, all but a 5Cr and a 9Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  16. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  17. Dynamic strain aging behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo and reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels under low cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, K.; Shankar, Vani; Sandhya, R.; Prasad Reddy, G. V.; Mathew, M. D.

    2013-04-01

    Influence of temperature and strain rate on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic martensitic steel and 1.4W-0.06Ta reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel in normalized and tempered conditions was studied. Total strain controlled LCF tests between 300 and 873 K on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and RAFM steel and at various strain rates on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were performed at total strain amplitude of ±0.6%. Both the steels showed continuous cyclic softening at all temperatures. Whereas manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA) were observed in both the steels which decreased fatigue life at intermediate temperatures, at higher temperatures, oxidation played a crucial role in decreasing fatigue life.

  18. Wrought Cr--W--V bainitic/ferritic steel compositions

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Santella, Michael L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Jawad, Maan H.

    2006-07-11

    A high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy includes, generally, about 2.5% to about 4% chromium, about 1.5% to about 3.5% tungsten, about 0.1% to about 0.5% vanadium, and about 0.05% to 0.25% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy is heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled to produce an austenite transformation product.

  19. High heat flux testing of 12-14Cr ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Oksiuta, Z.; Linke, J.; Baluc, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal performance of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS reduced activation ferritic steels, which are considered as candidate first wall materials for the future fusion power reactors and were manufactured by mechanical alloying in hydrogen and hot isostatic pressing, was assessed by high heat flux (HHF) testing with the electron beam JUDITH facility at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Germany. An analysis of the microhardness and microstructure of the specimens was done before and after HHF tests. In general, both materials present a ferritic (α-Fe, bcc) microstructure with a wide range of grain sizes from 100 to 500 nm up to a few micrometers. The coarse grains are almost dislocation-free, while the smaller ones are surrounded by tangles of dislocations. Oxide and carbide impurities (about a few hundreds nm in size) and a high density of Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, with a mean size of about 5 nm, are also present. The microhardness, density and tensile strength of the 14Cr material are slightly larger than those of the 12Cr material. HHF tests revealed that there is no difference in thermal performance, level of degradation and erosion behaviour of 12Cr and 14Cr ODS steels. The onset of melting of the materials occurs for an energy density between 1 and 1.5 MJ/m 2. Below this value only some kind of thermal etching takes place. This is a significant improvement compared to stainless steel, for which severe plastic deformation at the material surface was observed.

  20. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  1. Sensitization of 21% Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel Weld Joints Fabricated With/Without Austenitic Steel Foil as Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Ma, Li; Han, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of sensitization heat treatment on the microstructure and electrochemical behavior of 21% Cr ferritic stainless steel weld joints with or without 309L austenite stainless steel as an interlayer were investigated. The joints were processed by pulsed gas tungsten arc welding. With the interlayer, grains in weld bead were refined, and almost fully ferrite. When the joints with the interlayer were maintained at 500 °C for 1 and 4 h, no microstructure changes occurred, whereas Widmanstatten austenite and needle-like austenite formed in the weld bead after sensitization at 815 °C for 1 h. In general, sensitization treatment worsens the corrosion resistance of welds, but the resistance of samples with the 4-h treatment at 500 °C recovered in part compared to those subjected to sensitization at 500 °C for 1 h. This could be due to Cr diffusion from the ferrite that heals the chromium-depletion zone along the grain boundary. However, an increase in temperature does not have the same effect. The corrosion morphology of samples in the weld bead is different from those in base metal after heat treatment at 500 °C for 1 h; in base metal, pitting corrosion occurs, whereas grain boundary corrosion occurs in the weld bead. Corrosion morphology is closely associated with precipitation and segregation along the grain boundary.

  2. Microstructure examination of Fe-14Cr ODS ferritic steels produced through different processing routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Hosemann, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Baluc, N.

    2014-08-01

    Various thermo-mechanical treatments were applied to refine and homogenise grain size and improve mechanical properties of hot-isostatically pressed (HIP) 14%Cr ODS ferritic steel. The grain size was reduced, improving mechanical properties, tensile strength and Charpy impact, however bimodal-like distribution was also observed. As a result, larger, frequently elongated grains with size above 1 μm and refined, equiaxed grains with a diameter ranging from 250 to 500 nm. Neutron diffraction measurements revealed that for HIP followed by hydrostatic extrusion material the strongest fiber texture was observed oriented parallel to the extrusion direction. In comparison with hot rolling and hot pressing methods, this material exhibited promising mechanical properties: the ultimate tensile strength of 1350 MPa, yield strength of 1280 MPa, total elongation of 21.7% and Charpy impact energy of 5.8 J. Inferior Charpy impact energy of ∼3.0 J was measured for HIP and hot rolled material, emphasising that parameters of this manufacturing process still have to be optimised. As an alternative manufacturing route, due to the uniform microstructure and simplicity of the process, hot pressing might be a promising method for production of smaller parts of ODS ferritic steels. Besides, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of all thermo-mechanically treated materials, in comparison with as-HIPped ODS steel, was improved by more than 50%, the transition temperature ranging from 50 to 70 °C (323 and 343 K) remains still unsatisfactory.

  3. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan; Ullah, Asad

    2013-08-15

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  4. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Hoelzer, David T; Busby, Jeremy T; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Klueh, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  5. Microstructural characterizations of 14Cr ODS ferritic steels subjected to hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, A.; Sornin, D.; Barcelo, F.; Bosonnet, S.; de Carlan, Y.; Logé, R.

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are very promising materials for nuclear applications. In this paper, the hot working behavior of ODS ferritic steels, consolidated by hot extrusion, is studied through torsion tests. Three ODS steels are produced acting on both the quantity of Ti and Y2O3 added to the matrix (wt% Fe-14Cr-1W), and the density and size of the nanoparticles. A temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rates from 5 ṡ 10-2 to 5 s-1 are considered. The microstructures of deformed samples are examined by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is observed that hot plastic strain leads to an early damage with nucleation and growth of cavities along grain boundaries. Except for the damage, very few microstructural and textural evolutions are noticed. The three tested ODS steels exhibit almost the same behavior under hot torsion straining, regardless of the precipitation state. Overall, the experimental results are interpreted through a mechanism of strain accommodation at grain boundaries, with low dislocation activity in the bulk of the grains.

  6. Microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12 14Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12-14 Cr ODS ferritic steels fabricated by mechanical alloying of pure Fe, Cr, W, Ti and Y 2O 3 powders in a Retsch ball mill in argon atmosphere, followed by hot isostatic pressing at 1100 °C under 200 MPa for 4 h and heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h. Weak Charpy impact properties were obtained in the case of both types of as-hipped materials. In the case of 14Cr materials, the weak Charpy properties appeared related to a bimodal grain size distribution and a heterogeneous dislocation density between the coarse and fine grains. No changes in microstructure were evidenced after heat treatment at 850 °C. Significant improvement in the transition temperature and upper shelf energy of 12Cr materials was obtained by heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h, which was attributed to the formation of smaller grains, homogenous in size and containing fewer dislocations, with respect to the as-hipped microstructure. This modified microstructure results in a good compromise between strength and Charpy impact properties.

  7. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1994-01-01

    A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

  8. Resistance spot weldability of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Yano, Yasuhide; Ito, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Resistance spot welding of 11Cr-0.4Mo-2W, V, Nb ferritic/martensitic steel sheets with different thicknesses was examined to develop a manufacturing technology for a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an inner duct structure. In the spot welding, welding current, electrode force, welding time and holding time were varied as welding parameters to investigate the appropriate welding conditions. Welding conditions under which spot weld joints did not have either crack or void defects in the nugget could be found when the electrode force was increased to 9.8 kN. It was also found that the electrode cap with a longer tip end length was effective for preventing weld defect formations. Strength of the spot welded joint was characterized from micro hardness and shear tension tests. In addition, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the spot welded joint was measured by Charpy impact tests with specimens that had notches in the welded zone.

  9. Non-instantaneous growth characteristics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Shao, Yi; Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Yongchang

    2016-08-01

    Microstructural observation and high-resolution dilatometry were employed to investigate kinetics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel upon different quenching/cooling rates. By incorporating the classical athermal nucleation and impingement correction, a non-instantaneous growth model for martensitic transformation has been developed. The developed model describes austenite/martensite interface mobility during martensite growth. The growth rate of martensite is found to be varied from 1 × 10-6 to 3 × 10-6 m/s. The low interface mobility suggests that it is not appropriate to presume the instantaneous growth behavior of martensite. Moreover, based on the proposed model, nucleation rate of martensite under different cooling rates is found to be nearly the same, while the growth rate of martensite is promoted by increasing the cooling rate.

  10. Tensile anisotropy and creep properties of a Fe-14CrWTi ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Rodrigo, Vargas Hideroa; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Rabeau, V.; Fournier, B.

    2012-07-01

    A Fe-14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is studied as a potential material for cladding tube application for the next generation of fast-breeder nuclear reactors. Tensile specimens machined out from a hot extruded round bar in three different orientations are used to evaluate the mechanical anisotropy of this steel for temperatures in the range 20-750 °C. Its anisotropy is discussed both in terms of mechanical strength and fracture mode. At high temperatures (HTs), above 500 °C, the longitudinal direction appears to be the most ductile and most resistant direction. Longitudinal creep tests between 650 °C and 900 °C were also carried out. They show this ODS steel has a high HT creep lifetime and a low creep failure strain. Intergranular cracks aligned along the loading axis were observed on fractured creep specimens. They reveal a particular weakness of prior particle boundaries and suggest to modify the elaboration process through mechanical alloying and hot extrusion.

  11. Modification in the Microstructure of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Martensitic Steel Exposed to Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, Cheruvathur; Paul, V. Thomas; Bharasi, N. Sivai; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mod. 9Cr-1Mo is used as the structural material in the steam generator circuit of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Microstructural modifications on the surface of this steel are investigated after exposing to flowing sodium at a temperature of 798 K (525 °C) for 16000 hours. Sodium exposure results in the carburization of the ferritic steel up to a depth of ~218 µm from the surface. Electron microprobe analysis revealed the existence of two separate zones with appreciable difference in microchemistry within the carburized layer. Differences in the type, morphology, volume fraction, and microchemistry of the carbides present in the two zones are investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Formation of separate zones within the carburized layer is understood as a combined effect of leaching, diffusion of the alloying elements, and thermal aging. Chromium concentration on the surface in the α-phase suggested possible degradation in the corrosion resistance of the steel. Further, concentration-dependent diffusivities for carbon are determined in the base material and carburized zones using Hall's and den Broeder's methods, respectively. These are given as inputs for simulating the concentration profiles for carbon using numerical computation technique based on finite difference method. Predicted thickness of the carburized zone agrees reasonably well with that of experiment.

  12. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  13. Effects of vanadium on polarization of 18% Cr ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Effects of alloying on the anodic polarization of a low interstitial, 18% chromium (Cr) ferritic stainless steel in sulfuric acid (H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) were examined. Vanadium (V) from 1 to 4% was added alone and with up to 1.5% nickel (Ni), silicon (Si), copper (Cu), and molybdenum (MO). The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) level varied from 84 to 168 ppm. The alloys were stabilized with titanium (Ti) or niobium (Nb). Increasing V had a variable effect on passivation in 1 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. The critical current density for passivation lowered. The breakdown potential also lowered. Stabilization with Ti prevented lowering of the breakdown potential. Ni addition to Cr-V-Ti alloys broadened the passive region of the alloys and lowered the minimum current density for passivation. Mo and Cu were beneficial, but Si had little effect on passivation. The alloys did not appear to undergo intergranular corrosion in the modified Strauss test.

  14. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure ( Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  15. Microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 12-Cr 1 MoVW ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Klueh, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the fusion materials development program in the United States, a 12 Cr-1 MoVW ferritic steel was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to a damage level of 36 dpa at 300, 400, 500, and 600/sup 0/C. During irradiation in HFIR, a transmutation reaction of nickel results in the production of helium, to a level of 99 at. ppM in the present experiment. The microstructures were evaluated after irradiation and the results are presented. Cavities were found at all temperatures. Small cavities (3 to 9 nm) were observed after irradiation at 300, 500 and 600/sup 0/C. At 500 and 600/sup 0/C, the cavities were found preferentially at dislocations, lath boundaries, and prior austenite grain boundaries. After irradiation at 400/sup 0/C, larger cavities (4 to 30 nm) were observed homogeneously distributed throughout the tempered martensite structure. The maximum swelling was 0.07% after irradiation at 400/sup 0/C. Comparision of the results with other studies in which helium was not present at such high levels indicated helium enhances the swelling of 12 Cr-1 MoVW.

  16. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-06-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure (Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  17. Effect of Niobium on the Ferrite Continuous-Cooling-Transformation (CCT) Curve of Ultrahigh-Thickness Cr-Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Na, Hyesung; Kim, Byunghoon; Kim, Dongjin; Kang, Chungyun

    2013-06-01

    Pressure vessels made for petrochemical and power plants using Cr-Mo steel must be thick (≥400 mm) and have high tensile strength (≥600 MPa). However, the tensile strength in the middle portion of the vessel is very low as a result of ferrite formation. Therefore, research was performed to study the ferrite transformation that occurs in the middle portion of high-thickness Cr-Mo steel when Nb is added to it. The ferrite-formation start time of the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) curve decreased with an increase in Nb content until the latter reached 0.05 pct. On cooling from the austenitizing temperature, some of the NbC present at the austenitizing temperature of 1203 K (930 °C) goes into austenite solution in the temperature range of 1173 K to 1073 K (900 °C to 800 °C). However, the ferrite curve shifted to the left for the alloy containing 0.075 pct Nb. It is postulated that the surplus NbC could act as ferrite nucleation sites despite the lower cooling rate. As a result, the hardenability improved in the order of the following Nb content: 0.05 pct, 0.025 pct, 0 pct, and 0.075 pct.

  18. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  19. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  20. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  1. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  2. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of heat-resistant 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 after thermomechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Astafurova, E. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (TMT) with the deformation in the austenitic region on the features of microstructure, phase transformations and mechanical properties of low-activation 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 is investigated. It is established, that directly after thermomechanical treatment (without tempering) the sizes and density of V(CN) particles are comparable with those after a traditional heat treatment (air quenching and tempering at 720°C, 3 h), where these particles are formed only during tempering. It causes the increasing of the yield strength of the steel up to ≈1450 MPa at room temperature and up to ≈430 MPa at the test temperature T = 650°C. The potential of microstructure modification by this treatment aimed at improving heat resistance of steel is discussed.

  4. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  5. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Béchade, J. L.; Tournié, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A.; Bonnaillie, P.

    2010-10-01

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  6. Development of A New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V)Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.J.; Jawad, M.H.

    2005-06-15

    The project, 'Development of a New Class of Fe-Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications', was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nooter Corporation. This project dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for the hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. The petroleum and chemical industries use reactor vessels that can approach the ship weights of approximately 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 in. These vessels are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo steels with chromium ranging from 1.25 to 12% and molybdenum from 1 to 2%. Steels in this composition have great advantages of high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, low cost, and properties obtainable by heat treatment. With all of the advantages of Fe-Cr-Mo steels, several issues are faced in design and fabrication of vessels and related components. These issues include the following: (1) low strength properties of current alloys require thicker sections; (2) increased thickness causes heat-treatment issues related to nonuniformity across the thickness and thus not achieving the optimum properties; (3) fracture toughness (ductile-to-brittle transition ) is a critical safety issue for these vessels, and it is affected in thick sections due to nonuniformity of microstructure; (4) PWHT needed after welding and makes fabrication more time-consuming with increased cost; and (5) PWHT needed after welding also limits any modifications of the large vessels in service. The goal of this project was to reduce the weight of large-pressure vessel components (ranging from 100 to 300 tons) by approximately 25% and reduce fabrication cost and improve in-service modification feasibility through development of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels with combination of nearly a 50% higher strength, a lower DBTT and a higher upper-shelf energy

  7. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  8. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  9. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  10. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  11. AFM and TEM study of cyclic slip localization in fatigued ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Man, J. . E-mail: man@ipm.cz; Petrenec, M.; Obrtlik, K.; Polak, J.

    2004-11-08

    Atomic force microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy were applied to the study of surface relief evolution at emerging persistent slip bands (PSBs) in individual grains of ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel cycled with constant plastic strain amplitude. Only the combination of both methods can reveal the true shape and fine details of extrusions and intrusions. Quantitative data on the changes of the surface topography of persistent slip markings and on the kinetics of extrusion growth during the fatigue life were obtained. Transmission electron microscopy of surface foils revealed PSBs with the typical, well-known ladder structure. Experimental data on cyclic slip localization in PSBs are compared with those in fcc metals and discussed in terms of vacancy models of surface relief evolution and fatigue crack initiation.

  12. Microstructure of welded and weld-simulated modified 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Prader, R.; Cerjak, H.; David, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Within the last 30 years significant advances in materials development have been made which have enhanced the operation temperature of thermal power plants led to an improvement in efficiency. Currently, a great deal of work relating to the modified 9% Cr-1/5 Mo steel (P 91) is in progress. This type of steel was originally considered to be an appropriate candidate for Fast Breeder Applications, and it was designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to the present, several modifications of 9% chromium steels have been developed in several labs all over the globe containing different portions of tungsten and molybdenum. This report focuses on the microstructural characterization of a heavy section multi pass weld done on a tube composed of P 91 steel. Weld simulations, using the Gleeble 1500 technology, were successfully applied to aid the microstructural study of the heat affected zone (HAZ). As revealed by the investigations, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) results in a softening of the heat affected zone in an area close to the uninfluenced base metal. According to the observed microstructure and Gleeble simulations, the peak temperature of the soft zone during welding falls within a temperature range between A{sub C1} (= 810 C) and slightly above A{sub C3} typically 900--930 C which was discovered for the first time in a previous investigation.

  13. Effect of sodium environment on the low cycle fatigue properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R.; Sandhya, R.; Ganesan, V.; Valsan, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The steam generator has been designed to operate for 30-40 years. It is important to accurately determine the life of the components in the actual environment in order to consider the extension of life beyond the design life. With this objective in view, a programme has been initiated at our laboratory to evaluate the effects of flowing sodium on the LCF behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. LCF tests conducted in flowing sodium environment at 823 K and 873 K exhibited cyclic softening behaviour both in air and sodium environments. The fatigue lives are significantly improved in sodium environment when compared to the data obtained in air environment under identical testing conditions. The lack of oxidation in sodium environment is considered to be responsible for the delayed crack initiation and consequent increase in fatigue life. Comparison of experimental lifetimes with RCC-MR design code predictions indicated that the design curve based on air tests is too conservative.

  14. Effect of specimen size and nickel content on the impact properties of 12 Cr-1 MoVW ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The ferritic steel 12 Cr-1 MoVW is a candidate material for use in the first wall of magnetic fusion reactors. One of the primary concerns of materials in this application is service-induced embrittlement from aging and irradiation. Unirradiated Charpy impact data have been developed on three typical heats of 12 Cr-1 MoVW steel and on heats that have been modified with nickel and chromium additions for subsequent simulation of helium effects of irradiation. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the upper-shelf energy were reduced by nickel additions. The addition of nickel while simultaneously maintaining a constant net chromium equivalent caused the transition temperature to increase. The use of a subsize specimen is mandated by the small volume and high gamma heating in high-flux research reactors used for very high-fluence irradiation experiments. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of the subsize specimen is important in predicting corresponding irradiation-induced transition temperature shifts and upper-shelf drops of full-size Charpy specimens. Data are reported from subsize Charpy impact specimens, and the full- and subsize specimens are compared. The effect of specimen size on the upper-shelf energy of this material can be reduced better by volume normalization than by area normalization.

  15. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of aging temperature on the microstructures and mechanical properties of ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Sun, Lan; Xiong, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Fan, Hong-yuan; Liu, Jian-yong

    2016-02-01

    The effect of aging on the mechanical properties and microstructures of a new ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB ferritic heat resistant steel was investigated in this work to satisfy the high steam parameters of the ultra-supercritical power plant. The results show that the main precipitates during aging are Fe(Cr, Mo)23C6, V(Nb)C, and (Fe2Mo) Laves in the steel. The amounts of the precipitated phases increase during aging, and correspondingly, the morphologies of phases are similar to be round. Fe(Cr, Mo)23C6 appears along boundaries and grows with increasing temperature. In addition, it is revealed that the martensitic laths are coarsened and eventually happen to be polygonization. The hardness and strength decrease gradually, whereas the plasticity of the steel increases. What's more, the hardness of this steel after creep is similar to that of other 9%-12%Cr ferritic steels. Thus, ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB can be used in the project.

  17. Blister formation on 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel exposed to hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Kopanets, I. E.; Karpov, S. A.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of pre-irradiation specimen deformation level on surface blister formation and sub-surface cracking of dual-phase 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel was studied using glow discharge hydrogen plasma with ion energy of 1 keV to fluences of 2 × 1025 H/m2. Protium was used for most studies, but deuterium was used for measuring the depth dependence of hydrogen diffusion. Formation of blisters was observed in the temperature range 230-340 K. It was found that pre-irradiation deformation caused changes in the threshold fluences of blister formation and also in blister size distribution. Subsurface cracks located on grain boundaries far beyond the implantation zone were formed concurrently with blisters, arising from hydrogen diffusion and trapping at defects. It was observed that cracks as long as 1 mm in length were formed in 95% deformed steel at depths up to 500 μm from surface.

  18. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  19. Development of low activation Ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, T.; Abe, F.; Araki, H.; Okada, M.

    1986-11-01

    Fe-(2-15)%Cr-(0-4)%W-0.1%C and Fe-9%Cr-(0-l)%V-0.1%C steels were prepared on the basis of reduced activation of ferritic steels. Tempering characteristics of these alloys were studied as a preliminary evaluation of mechanical properties. Alloys except for 12-15%Cr, 9%Cr-4%W, and 9%Cr-1%V showed a single phase of martensite. Carbides which precipitated in as-tempered steels are M 23C 6, M 6C, and W 2C for Cr-W steels and M 23C 6 and V 4C 3 for Cr-V steels. The toughness of the alloys was examined with Charpy impact test. The minimum DBTT (ductile-brittle transition temperature) was observed at around 0.25 at% of W or V concentration for 9%Cr steels. 9%Cr-V steels were superior to commercial 9%Cr-2%Mo steel in the point of toughness. The order of alloying element with a low DBTT was V > Mo > W.

  20. Simple bond-order-type interatomic potential for an intermixed Fe-Cr-C system of metallic and covalent bondings in heat-resistant ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tomohisa Nakamura, Kaoru; Yamada, Susumu; Ohnuma, Toshiharu

    2014-12-28

    It is known that M{sub 23}C{sub 6}(M = Cr/Fe) behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels affects the strength of the material at high temperature. The ability to garner direct information regarding the atomic motion using classical molecular dynamics simulations is useful for investigating the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels. For such classical molecular dynamics calculations, a suitable interatomic potential is needed. To satisfy this requirement, an empirical bond-order-type interatomic potential for Fe-Cr-C systems was developed because the three main elements to simulate the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels are Fe, Cr, and C. The angular-dependent term, which applies only in non-metallic systems, was determined based on the similarity between a Finnis-Sinclair-type embedded-atom-method interatomic potential and a Tersoff-type bond-order potential. The potential parameters were determined such that the material properties of Fe-Cr-C systems were reproduced. These properties include the energy and lattice constants of 89 crystal structures; the elastic constants of four realistic precipitates; the bulk moduli of B1, B2, and B3 crystals; the surface energies of B1 and B2 crystals; and the defect-formation energies and atomic configurations of 66 Fe-Cr-C complexes. Most of these material properties were found to be reproduced by our proposed empirical bond-order potentials. The formation energies and lattice constants of randomly mixed Fe-Cr alloys calculated using the interatomic potentials were comparable to those obtained through experiments and first-principles calculations. Furthermore, the energies and structures of interfaces between Cr carbide and α-Fe as predicted through first-principles calculations were well reproduced using these interatomic potentials.

  1. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  2. Formation Mechanism of Type IV Failure in High Cr Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Tsukamoto, S.; Shirane, T.; Abe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of type IV failure has been investigated by using a conventional 9Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel Gr.92. In order to clarify the main cause of type IV failure, different heat treatments were performed on the base metal in order to change the prior austenite grain (PAG) size and precipitate distribution after applying the heat-affected zone (HAZ) simulated thermal cycle at the peak temperature of around A c3 ( A c3 HAZ thermal cycle) and postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The microstructural evolution during the A c3 HAZ thermal cycle and PWHT was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that M23C6 carbides were scarcely precipitated at the newly formed fine PAG, block, and lath boundaries in A c3 HAZ-simulated Gr.92, because the carbide forming elements such as Cr and C were segregated at the former PAG and block boundaries of the base metal. On the other hand, if all the boundaries were covered by sufficient M23C6 carbides by homogenization of the alloying elements prior to applying the HAZ thermal cycle, the creep strength was much improved even if the fine PAG was formed. From these results, it is concluded that fine-grained microstructure cannot account for the occurrence of type IV failure, and it only has a small effect during long-term creep. The most important factor is the precipitate formation behavior at various boundaries. Without sufficient boundary strengthening by precipitates, the microstructure of A c3 HAZ undergoes severe changes even during PWHT and causes premature failure during creep.

  3. Creep strengthening by lath boundaries in 9Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Yamasaki, Shigeto; Miake, Masaki; Nakashima, Hideharu; Nishida, Minoru; Kusumoto, Junichi; Kanaya, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    The interactions between dislocations and lath boundaries in Grade 91 steel were observed by an in situ transmission electron microscopy tensile test at 973 K. Dislocations glided slowly and bowed out in a martensite lath interior. The ends of the dislocation were connected to the lath boundaries. In a tempered specimen, the pinning stress caused by the lath boundary was estimated to be >70 MPa with a lath width of 0.4 μm. In crept specimens, lath coarsening reduced the pinning effect.

  4. Anomalous surface segregation profiles in ferritic Fe-Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien

    2013-02-01

    The iron-chromium alloy and its derivatives are widely used for their remarkable resistance to corrosion, which only occurs in a narrow concentration range around 9 to 13 atomic percent chromium. Although known to be due to chromium enrichment of a few atoms thick layer at the surfaces, the understanding of its complex atomistic origin has been a remaining challenge. We report an investigation of the thermodynamics of such surfaces at the atomic scale by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We use a Hamiltonian which provides a parametrization of previous ab initio results and successfully describes the alloy's unusual thermodynamics. We report a strong enrichment in Cr of the surfaces for low bulk concentrations, with a narrow optimum around 12 atomic percent chromium, beyond which the surface composition decreases drastically. This behavior is explained by a synergy between (i) the complex phase separation in the bulk alloy, (ii) local phase transitions that tune the layers closest to the surface to an iron-rich state and inhibit the bulk phase separation in this region, and (iii) its compensation by a strong and nonlinear enrichment in Cr of the next few layers. Implications with respect to the design of prospective nanomaterials are briefly discussed.

  5. Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Miller, Brandon; Chichester, Heather J.M.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  6. Relationship between lath boundary structure and radiation induced segregation in a neutron irradiated 9 wt.% Cr model ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Miller, Brandon D.; Chichester, Heather J. M.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-02-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes which migrate to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs where low energy structures have suppressed RIS responses. This relationship between local GB structure and RIS has been demonstrated primarily in ion-irradiated specimens. A 9 wt.% Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of a neutron radiation environment on the RIS response at different GB structures. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  7. Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jawad, Mann; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2005-04-06

    The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. These reactor vessels can approach ship weights of about 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 inches. They are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo alloy steels, containing 1.25 to 12% chromium and 1 to 2% molybdenum. The goal of this project was to develop Fe-Cr-W(V) steels that can perform similar duties, in terms of strength at high temperatures, but will weigh less and thereby save energy.

  8. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  9. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  10. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Effect of impurity content on creep crack growth resistance in 1Cr1Mo0.25V ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattorini, F.; Franzoni, U.; Sturlese, S.

    1990-07-01

    The effect of impurity content on creep crack growth (CCG) rate and, more generally, on hot ductility of a typical lCrlMo0.25V ferritic steel was evaluated. Four heats intentionally doped with various amounts of impurities were characterized after heat treatments simulating the industrial thermal cycle taking place in a 1000-mm-diameter high-pressure rotor at two positions: near the outside surface and at the center in the cases of air cooling and oil quenching, respectively. Results indicate that the highest crack growth rates occur in the grade with a low P content (40 ppm) and Sn and Sb values (100 to 200 ppm) comparable with those characteristic of commercial steels. A marked reduction in brittleness is achieved only through a substantial reduction in the amount of Sn and Sb, even when medium-to-high P levels (100 ppm) are present. Creep resistance in terms of both time to rupture and minimum growth rate is not influenced by the impurity content, at least within the range of stresses investigated. Auger analyses on crept specimens demonstrate the presence of a selective segregation of impurity elements similar to that found in other ferritic steels: P is the only segregating element at non-cavitated grain boundaries, while cavitated areas contain Sn, Sb, and Cu in addition to P. The embrittlement at high Sn and Sb levels depends on two factors: at low P levels, cracks rapidly propagate under surface diffusivity control; at high P levels, excess P segregates at the grain boundaries, and crack propagation proceeds by an intergranular decohesion mechanism.

  12. Modelling of the effect of precipitates on work-hardening, ductility and impact behaviour of ferritic-martensitic Cr steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preininger, D.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of precipitates on work-hardening, tensile ductility and impact behaviour of carbon and high nitrogen martensitic 7-12Cr as well as particle strengthened ODS-(9-13)Cr steels have been analysed by models. A minimum of work-hardening and uniform strain generally appears around 600 °C at onset of dislocation recovery. Pronounced precipitation by increasing nitrogen and carbon content or additionally of fine Y 2O 3-particles distinctly increases work-hardening and uniform ductility. These, however, decrease with increasing strengthening but do not reach a visible level above 1500 MPa for ODS-steels at 20 °C. Minima of total elongation and fracture strain additionally appear in carbon and nitrogen martensitic steels around 300 °C where dynamic strain ageing occurs. Fracture strain and ductile upper shelf energy of Charpy tests in accordance with model predictions also decrease with increasing yield strength more strongly for ODS-steels due to their enhanced work-hardening and localized deformation. The strength-induced increase of ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of ODS-steels is comparable to that observed by irradiation defect strengthening.

  13. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on mechanical properties and structure of reduced-activation Cr-W-V steels of bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorynin, I. V.; Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.; Nesterova, E. V.; Klepikov, E. Yu

    2000-12-01

    Effects of molybdenum replacement by tungsten in steels of the bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes containing 2.5%, 8% and 11% Cr, respectively, were investigated. The phase composition and structure of the bainitic steels were varied by changing the cooling rates from the austenitization temperature (from values typical for normalization up to V=3.3 × 10-2°C/s) and then tempering. The steels were irradiated to a fluence of 4×1023 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 270°C and to fluences of 1.3×1023 and 1.2×1024 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 70°C. The 2.5Cr-1.4WV and 8Cr-1.5WV steels have shown lower values of the shifts in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) under irradiation in comparison with corresponding Cr-Mo steels. Radiation embrittlement at elevated irradiation temperature was lowest in bainitic 2.5Cr-1.4WV steel and martensitic-ferritic 11Cr-1.5WV steel. The positive effect of molybdenum replacement by tungsten at irradiation temperature ∼300°C is reversed at Tirr=70∘C.

  14. Effects of W and Co on the Microstructure and Creep Strength of the Precipitation Strengthened 15Cr Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Yoshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Abe, Fujio

    Effects of W and Co on microstructure of Co free 0.1C-15Cr-1Mo-3W-0.2V-0.05Nb-0.07N-0.003B (mass%) steel has been investigated, and a correlation between microstructure and creep strength property has been discussed. Time to rupture of 6W-3Co steel, in which W content was increased from 3 to 6mass% and 3mass%Co was added, was about 100 times longer than that of 3W-0Co base steel at 923K-100MPa and was almost the same as that of the conventional tempered martensitic creep resistant steel of NF616 steel. It has been found that the increase in W content and the addition of Co increases a number of coarse block type precipitates and promotes a precipitation of fine particles within grain, respectively. Furthermore, a large number of needle or disk-like fine particles aligned in a certain crystallographic orientation within grain has been observed in the creep ruptured steel containing high W and Co. It has been concluded that a remarkable increase in creep strength by the addition of W and Co is obtained by a combination of increase in an amount of coarse precipitates and a distribution of needle or disk-like fine particles within grain.

  15. A new equation for the Cr equivalent in 9 to 12 pct Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.H.; Yu, J.

    1998-06-01

    In advanced 9 to 12 pct Cr steels, the Cr equivalent is used as a measure to check the formation of {delta}-ferrite. In the present analysis, 29 alloys of varying composition were vacuum induction melted, and the amounts of {delta}-ferrite were measured in as-tempered conditions. Based on this and previous results on 9 to 12 pct Cr steels, a new equation for the Cr equivalent is proposed and correlated with the amount of {delta}-ferrite formation. Results indicate that the new Cr equivalent equation shows better correlation than previous equations and predicts the amount of {delta}-ferrite formed reasonably well.

  16. Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V)Ferritic STeels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jawad, M.

    2005-03-31

    The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. The petroleum and chemical industries use reactor vessels that can approach ship weights of approximately 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3-8 in. These vessels are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo steels with chromium ranging from 1.25 to 12% and molybdenum from 1 to 2%. Steels in this composition range have great advantages of high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, low cost, and good properties obtainable by heat treatment. With all of the advantages of Fe-Cr-Mo steels, several issues are faced in design and fabrication of vessels and related components. These issues include the following: 1. The low strengths of current alloys require thicker sections. 2. Increased thickness causes heat-treatment issues related to nonuniformity across the thickness and thus a failure to achieve optimum properties. 3. Fracture toughness (ductile-to-brittle transition) is a critical safety issue for these vessels, especially in thick sections because of the nonuniformity of the microstructure. 4. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) needed after welding makes fabrication more timeconsuming with increased cost. 5. PWHT needed after welding also limits any modifications of the large vessels in service. The goal of this project was to reduce the weight of large-pressure-vessel components (ranging from 100 to 300 tons) by approximately 25%, reduce fabrication cost, and improve in-service modification feasibility through development of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels with a combination of nearly a 50% higher strength, a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), a higher upper-shelf energy, ease of heat treating, and a strong potential for not requiring PWHT.

  17. Lattice strain and damage evolution of 9-12/%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel during in situ tensile test by x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Wu, X.; Mo, K.; Chen, X,; Almer, J. D.; Ilavsky, J.; Haeffner, D. R.; Stubbins, J. F.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction and small angle scattering measurements during tensile tests were performed on 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The lattice strains in both particle and matrix phases, along two principal directions, were directly measured. The load transfer between particle and matrix was calculated based on matrix/particle elastic mismatch, matrix plasticity and interface decohesion. In addition, the void or damage evolution during the test was measured using small angle X-ray scattering. By combining stress and void evolution during deformation, the critical interfacial strength for void nucleation was determined, and compared with pre-existing void nucleation criteria. These comparisons show that models overestimate the measured critical strength, and require a larger particle size than measured to match the X-ray observations.

  18. Influence of Alloy Content and Prior Microstructure on Evolution of Secondary Phases in Weldments of 9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2015-08-01

    9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels with 1 and 1.4 wt pct tungsten are materials of choice for the test blanket module in fusion reactors. The steels possess a tempered martensite microstructure with a decoration of inter- and intra-lath carbides, which undergoes extensive modification on application of heat. The change in substructure and precipitation behavior on welding and subsequent thermal exposure has been studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Changes i.e., formation of various phases, their volume fraction, size, and morphology in different regions of the weldment due to prolonged thermal exposure was influenced not only by the time and temperature of exposure but also the prior microstructure. Laves phase of type Fe2W was formed in the high tungsten steel, on aging the weldment at 823 K (550 °C). It formed in the fine-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) at much shorter durations than in the base metal. The accelerated kinetics has been understood in terms of enhanced precipitation of carbides at lath/grain boundaries during aging and the concomitant depletion of carbon and chromium and enrichment of tungsten in the vicinity of the carbides. Therefore, the fine-grained HAZ in the weldment was identified as a region susceptible for failure during service.

  19. Role of Boundary Strengthening on Prevention of Type IV Failure in High Cr Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Tsukamoto, Susumu; Sawada, Kota; Abe, Fujio

    2013-10-01

    Microstructure evolution of newly developed 9Cr-3W-3Co-V, Nb steel with boron addition (B steel) has been analyzed during HAZ thermal cycle at the peak temperature of around Ac3 (Ac3 HAZ) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) to elucidate the prevention mechanism of type IV failure by boron addition. It was found that enhancement of the boundary strengthening by precipitates is the main reason for prevention of type IV failure by boron addition. In B steel HAZ, original austenite is reconstituted through martensitic α to γ reverse transformation during the heating and original martensite is reconstituted through martensitic transformation during cooling of the Ac3 HAZ thermal cycle. This process allows M23C6 carbides to precipitate at the prior austenite grain (PAG) and block boundaries during PWHT even if the chemical segregation of carbide forming elements exists. The effect of boundary strengthening on the creep property has also been investigated. Microstructure evolution during creep was compared among Gr.92 with different Ac3 HAZ microstructures prepared by three kinds of heat treatments and B steel. The results revealed that both the boundary length and kernel average misorientation value decreased in all samples during creep. However, this process occurred very rapidly in Ac3 HAZ simulated Gr.92, whereas it was significantly retarded in the other samples with sufficient boundary strengthening by precipitates. This result confirms that the precipitates formed at PAG and block boundaries play the most important role to stabilize the microstructure of Ac3 HAZ simulated samples during creep and prolong the creep life.

  20. Effect of Laves Phase on High-Temperature Deformation and Microstructure Evolution in an 18Cr-2Mo-0.5Nb Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Yamoah, Nana Kwame Gyan; Reynolds, William T.; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Murayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Niobium-containing ferritic stainless steels are finding new applications in automotive exhaust components because of their oxidation resistance, thermal fatigue resistance, and high-temperature strength. The mechanical behavior of Nb-containing ferritic steels at service temperatures of 973 K (700 °C) and higher results from the convolution of dynamic microstructural changes including precipitation, precipitate coarsening, strain hardening, recovery, and recrystallization. The relative contributions of these competing processes have yet to be clarified. In this study, the high-temperature flow strength of an 18Cr-2Mo-0.5Nb ferritic stainless steel (SUS 444) was correlated with microstructure under different strain and initial precipitate distributions to clarify the relative role of the strengthening and softening processes. High-temperature tensile tests at 1023 K (750 °C) of un-aged (initial microstructure is precipitate-free) and pre-aged (initial microstructure contains precipitates) samples were carried out and transmission electron microscopy was used to assess dislocation distributions and precipitate morphology. The difference in the stress-strain curves between un-aged and pre-aged samples was drastic; the yield strength of the un-aged sample was twice that of the pre-aged sample, and the un-aged sample exhibits a noticeable yield drop. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a Laves phase nucleated and grew during the high-temperature tensile test in the un-aged sample and the majority of the precipitates in the pre-aged sample were the same Laves phase. Furthermore, a strain effect on precipitate growth was recognized in un-aged and pre-aged conditions by comparing grip (no strain) and gage (strained) sections of tensile samples. The dominant strengthening contribution in un-aged samples is initially the precipitate shearing mechanism and it changes to Orowan strengthening beyond the ultimate tensile strength, whereas the dominant contribution in

  1. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  2. Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9 Wt Pct Cr Steel Investigated by In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, P.; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, E. D.; Allen, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal cycles. Volume fractions of martensite, austenite, and delta ferrite were measured as a function of temperature at a 10 K/s heating rate to 1573 K (1300 °C) and subsequent cooling. At the peak temperature, the delta ferrite concentration rose to 19 pct, of which 17 pct transformed back to austenite on subsequent cooling.

  3. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  4. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  5. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  6. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Peter; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, Eliot D; Allen, S M

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt.% chromium steel under simulated weld thermal cycles. Volume fractions of martensite, austenite and delta ferrite were measured as a function of temperature at a 10 C s-1 heating rate to 1300 C and subsequent cooling to room temperature. At the peak temperature, the delta ferrite concentration rose to a level of 19%, of which 17% transformed back to austenite on subsequent cooling. The final microstructure after this single thermal cycle consisted of newly formed martensite with 4% of retained austenite and 2% of retained delta ferrite.

  7. UNDERSTANDING DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, M.J.

    2003-04-22

    Advanced ferritic/martensitic steels are being used extensively in fossil energy applications. New steels such as 2 1/4Cr-W-V (T23, T24), 3Cr-W-V, 9Cr-Mo-V (T91), 7Cr-W-V, 9Cr-W-V (T92 and T911), and 12Cr-W-V (T122, SAVE 12, and NF12) are examples of tubing being used in boilers and heat recovery steam generators (1). Other products for these new steels include piping, plates, and forgings. There is concern about the high-temperature performance of the advanced steels for several reasons. First, they exhibit a higher sensitivity to temperature than the 300 series stainless steels that they often replace. Second, they tend to be metallurgically unstable and undergo significant degradation at service temperatures in the creep range. Third, the experience base is limited in regard to duration. Fourth, they will be used for thick-section, high-pressure components that require high levels of integrity. To better understand the potential limitations of these steels, damage models are being developed that consider metallurgical factors as well as mechanical performance factors. Grade 91 steel was chosen as representative of these steels for evaluation of cumulative damage models since laboratory and service exposures of grade 91 exceed 100,000 hours.

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  9. Notch-Fatigue Properties of Advanced TRIP-Aided Bainitic Ferrite Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Junya; Sugimoto, Koh-ichi

    2012-11-01

    To develop a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided bainitic ferrite steel (TBF steel) with high hardenability for a common rail of the next generation diesel engine, 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-0.05 pct Nb TBF steels with different contents of Cr, Mo, and Ni were produced. The notch-fatigue strength of the TBF steels was investigated and was related to the microstructural and retained austenite characteristics. If Cr, Mo, and/or Ni were added to the base steel, then the steels achieved extremely higher notch-fatigue limits and lower notch sensitivity than base TBF steel and the conventional structural steels. This was mainly associated with (1) carbide-free and fine bainitic ferrite lath structure matrix without proeutectoid ferrite, (2) a large amount of fine metastable retained austenite, and (3) blocky martensite phase including retained austenite, which may suppress a fatigue crack initiation and propagation.

  10. The Development of Multi-axial Creep Damage Constitutive Equations for 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V Ferritic Steel at 590°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Barrans, Simon

    Within the framework of a phenomenological approach a set of multi-axial creep damage constitutive equations for 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V ferritic steel at 590°C is developed in which a new formulation is employed. The deficiency of the previous formulation and the need for improvement became apparent after a critical review of the development of creep damage constitutive equations for 316 stainless steel(1). The need for improvement was further underpinned by a call for modification of the constitutive equations(36). Recently, a specific formulation was proposed and validated(2)-(4). This paper reports the latest developments of the multi-axial creep constitutive equations for 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V ferritic steel at 590°C including: 1) the fundamental requirement; 2) formulation; 3) validation; and 4) conclusion. It systematically shows the suitability of this new set of constitutive equations and the incapability of the previous ones. Furthermore, it contributes knowledge to the methodology.

  11. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  12. Chromizing of 3Cr Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, Vilupanur; Harrison, Bradley; Koch, Jordan; Ly, Alexander; Schissler, Andrew; Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2011-01-01

    Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N) was chromized by the halide-activated pack cementation (HAPC) process. Key process parameters, i.e., coating temperatures and pack compositions, were investigated. Ammonium chloride-activated packs in the 700-1000 C range produced coatings nominally in the 1-8 {micro}m range, as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coatings applied in the 900-1000 C temperature range resulted in Cr-rich coatings. The predominant phase in the coating was identified as Cr23C6 by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the presence of chromium nitride, Cr2N, was observed in the coating. The power generation industry is faced with an ever-increasing demand for energy while simultaneously having to reduce carbon emissions. These goals can be facilitated by increasing plant efficiency through the use of higher operating temperatures and pressures. Traditional construction materials, e.g., the ferritic Grade 22 high strength low alloy steel, are limited to operations below {approx} 550 C. Therefore, new materials are required for future plants designed to operate up to 650 C and possibly higher. These new materials need to have improved tensile strength, ductility, toughness, corrosion resistance, and creep properties at elevated temperatures. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the oxidation and creep behavior of various coatings on Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N), a super-bainitic steel developed for superior creep properties. Thin, chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings were used to compensate for the reduced corrosion and oxidation resistance that resulted from the low chromium content of the alloy. However, the aluminized Grade 315 alloys performed less-than-favorably under conditions relevant to fossil boilers, leading to the conclusion that higher chromium contents are required for the formation of

  13. Screen-printed (La,Sr)CrO3 coatings on ferritic stainless steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells using nanopowders prepared by means of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylewski, Tomasz; Dabek, Jaroslaw; Przybylski, Kazimierz; Morgiel, Jerzy; Rekas, Mieczyslaw

    2012-06-01

    In order to protect the cathode from chromium poisoning and improve electrical resistance, a perovskite (La,Sr)CrO3 coating was deposited on the surface of a DIN 50049 ferritic stainless steel by means of the screen-printing method, using a paste composed of an ultra-fine powder prepared via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Investigations of the oxidation process of the coated steel in air and the Ar-H2-H2O gas mixture at 1073 K for times up to 820 h showed high compactness of the protective film, good adhesion to the metal substrate, as well as area specific resistance (ASR) at a level acceptable for metallic SOFC interconnect materials. The microstructure, nanostructure, phase composition of the thick film, and in particular the film/substrate interface, were examined via chemical analyses by means of SEM-EDS and TEM-SAD. It was shown that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating interacts with the steel during long-term thermal oxidation in the afore-mentioned conditions and intermediate, chromia-rich and/or spinel multilayer interfacial zones are formed. Cr-vaporization tests showed that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating may play the role of barriers that decrease the volatilization rate of chromia species.

  14. Abnormal ferrite in hyper-eutectoid steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chairuangsri, T.; Edmonds, D.V.

    2000-04-19

    The microstructural characteristics of ultra-high carbon hyper-eutectoid Fe-C and Fe-C-Cu experimental steels have been examined after isothermal transformation in a range just beneath the eutectoid temperature. Particular attention was paid to the formation of so-called abnormal ferrite, which refers to coarse ferrite grains which can form, in hyper-eutectoid compositions, on the pro-eutectoid cementite before the pearlite reaction occurs. Thus it is confirmed that the abnormal ferrite is not a result of pearlite coarsening, but of austenite decomposition before the conditions for coupled growth of pearlite are established. The abnormal ferrite formed on both allotriomorphic and Widmanstaetten forms of pro-eutectoid cementite, and significantly, it was observed that the pro-eutectoid cementite continued to grow, despite being enclosed by the abnormal ferrite. Under certain conditions this could lead to the eventual formation of substantially reduced amounts of pearlite. Thus, a model for carbon redistribution that allows the proeutectoid cementite to thicken concurrently with the abnormal ferrite is presented. The orientation relationships between the abnormal ferrite and pro-eutectoid cementite were also determined and found to be close to those which have been reported between pearlitic ferrite and pearlitic cementite.

  15. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  16. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S/sub 0/ per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625/sup 0/C. 31 figures.

  17. Creep Behavior and Degradation of Subgrain Structures Pinned by Nanoscale Precipitates in Strength-Enhanced 5 to 12 Pct Cr Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi Armaki, Hassan; Chen, Ruiping; Maruyama, Kouichi; Igarashi, Masaaki

    2011-10-01

    Creep behavior and degradation of subgrain structures and precipitates of Gr. 122 type xCr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-VNb ( x = 5, 7, 9, 10.5, and 12 pct) steels were evaluated during short-term and long-term static aging and creep with regard to the Cr content of steel. Creep rupture life increased from 5 to 12 pct Cr in the short-term creep region, whereas in the long-term creep region, it increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased with the addition of Cr from 9 to 12 pct. Behavior of creep rupture life was attributed to the size of elongated subgrains. In the short-term creep region, subgrain size decreased from 5 to 12 pct Cr, corresponding to the longer creep strength. However, in the long-term creep region after 104 hours, subgrain size increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased from 9 to 12 pct, corresponding to the behavior of creep rupture life. M23C6 and MX precipitates had the highest number fraction among all of the precipitates present in the studied steels. Cr concentration dependence of spacing of M23C6 and MX precipitates exhibited a V-like shape during short-term as well as long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C), and the minimum spacing of precipitates belonged to 9 pct Cr steel, corresponding to the lowest recovery speed of subgrain structures. In the short-term creep region, subgrain coarsening during creep was controlled by strain and proceeded slower with the addition of Cr, whereas in long-term creep region, subgrain coarsening was controlled by the stability of precipitates rather than due to the creep plastic deformation and took place faster from 9 to 12 pct and 9 to 5 pct Cr. However, M23C6 precipitates played a more important role than MX precipitates in the control of subgrain coarsening, and there was a closer correlation between spacing of M23C6 precipitates and subgrain size during static aging and long-term creep region.

  18. Irradiation creep of low-activation ferritic steels in FFTF/MOTA*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Asakura, K.; Yoshino, M.; Namba, C.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep behavior of low-activation steels, developed as structural materials for fusion reactors (JLF series steels), was investigated to obtain a fundamental understanding of these alloys under fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. (2.25-8)Cr(1-2)W bainitic steels and 12Cr-2W ferritic steels showed superior creep resistance to type-316 stainless steels under fast neutron irradiation up to 520°C. At temperatures below 460°C the creep strain increased with increasing Cr content up to 7 Cr, and further increments of Cr content up to 12% reduced the creep strain. At temperatures between 460 and 600°C, 7-8 Cr ferritic steels showed the largest creep strain. Swelling-enhanced creep, near the peak swelling temperature of 410°C, was also observed. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel JLF-1 presented excellent properties, suggesting it as a leading candidate alloy for structural components of fusion reactors.

  19. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  20. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Hanzelka, S.E.; Haltom, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidification and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds contaning a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very litte. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  1. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in Type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidfication and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds containing a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstatten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were also related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the Type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s (44.6 to 2912/sup 0/F/s) showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very little. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  2. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  3. Carbides in a High-Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Ji, Bo; Zhou, Xiao Ling; Zhu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The precipitate phases in an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 0.5 hour and tempered at 1053 K (780 °C) for 1.5 hours have been investigated. Except for dominant phases, Cr-rich M23C6 carbide and Nb-rich, Ta-Nb-rich, and V-rich MC carbides, needle-like precipitates with a typical size of 70 to 310 and 10 to 30 nm for the length of the long and short axis of the needles, respectively, were also observed on the extraction carbon replica of the steel. The typical metallic element composition of the needle-like precipitates is about 53-82Fe, 14-26Cr, 0.5-18Ta, 1-6W, and 2-5Co in atomic pct. Through energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron diffraction along with calculations regarding lattice parameter and interplanar spacing, the needle-like precipitates were identified as a Fe-rich M5C2 carbide, which is not known to have been reported previously in high-chromium steels. The M5C2 carbide has a base-centered monoclinic crystal structure with the approximate lattice parameters a/ b/ c = 1.142/0.5186/0.5383 nm and β = 104.68 deg. The formation of the Fe-rich M5C2 carbides in the steel has been discussed. The effect of chromium content in matrix and boron addition on the precipitate phases in ferritic/martensitic steels has also been discussed.

  4. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  5. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  6. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  7. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  8. Stress-relief cracking of a new ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, Jesse Gerald

    The mechanism of stress-relief cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) of low-alloy ferritic steels was studied through a tempering study, stress-relaxation testing, and detailed microstructural characterization. A new ferritic alloy steel, HCM2S, was used as the model system. Common 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel, which is susceptible to stress-relief cracking, was used for comparison to HCM2S. The CGHAZ was simulated using Gleeble techniques. A dense distribution of small tungsten-rich carbides within the prior austenite grains induced secondary hardening in the CGHAZ of HCM2S. The CGHAZ of 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel exhibited secondary hardening due to the intragranular precipitation of many Fe-rich M3C carbides. The hardness of HCM2S was more stable at longer times and high temperatures than 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel due to the intragranular precipitation of small W and V-rich carbides. The CGHAZs of HCM2S and 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel were susceptible to stress-relief cracking between 575 and 725°C. HCM2S exhibited C-curve behavior with respect to the time to failure as a function of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperature. No segregation of tramp elements to prior austenite grain boundaries was detected in HCM2S. Both intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation controlled the stress-relief cracking behavior. The amount of intergranular failure increased with test temperature due to the increasing amounts of Fe-rich M3C carbides at the prior austenite grain boundaries. These carbides acted as cavity nucleation sites. The cavities coalesced to form microcracks along prior austenite grain boundaries. Eventually, the remaining uncracked areas could not support the load and failed by ductile rupture. The balance of intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation resulted in the C-curve behavior. The nose of the C-curve occurred at 675°C. The intragranular regions were strong because of a dense distribution of W/Fe-rich carbides, but the prior austenite grain

  9. New ferritic steels increase the thermal efficiency of steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.H.; Bakker, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    The further development of ferritic high-temperature-resistant 9--11%Cr steels has paved the way for fossil-fired power stations to be operated at turbine steam inlet temperatures of up to around 600 C and high supercritical steam pressures with a distinct improvement in thermal efficiency, a significant contribution towards reducing the environmental impact of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions and to a more economical utilization of fossil fuels. Advances in the development of these steels are primarily attributable to joint research projects undertaken by the manufacturers and operators of power stations in Japan (EPDC), in the USA (EPRI) and in Europe (COST 501). The report gives details on the results achieved under EPRI Research Project RP 140 3-15/23 on the creep behavior of modified 9%CrMo cast steel used in the manufacture of steam turbines for coal-fired power plants. The modified 9%CrMo cast steel also offers great benefits as regards improving the useful life and thermal efficiency of existing power plants.

  10. Processing and microstructure characterisation of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 ferritic steels fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Huang, Yina; Ning, Huanpo; Williams, Ceri A.; London, Andrew J.; Dawson, Karl; Hong, Zuliang; Gorley, Michael J.; Grovenor, Chris R. M.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Roberts, Steve G.; Reece, Michael J.; Yan, Haixue; Grant, Patrick S.

    2015-09-01

    Ferritic steels strengthened with Ti-Y-O nanoclusters are leading candidates for fission and fusion reactor components. A Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti + 0.25Y2O3 (14YT) alloy was fabricated by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The densification of the 14YT alloys significantly improved with an increase in the sintering temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction revealed that 14YT SPS-sintered at 1150 °C under 50 MPa for 5 min had a high density (99.6%), a random grain orientation and a bimodal grain size distribution (<500 nm and 1-20 μm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns showed bcc ferrite, Y2Ti2O7, FeO, and chromium carbides, while transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed uniformly dispersed Y2Ti2O7 nanoclusters of <5 nm diameter and number density of 1.04 × 1023 m-3. Due to the very much shorter consolidation times and lower pressures used in SPS compared with the more usual hot isostatic pressing routes, SPS is shown to be a cost-effective technique for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy manufacturing with microstructural features consistent with the best-performing ODS alloys.

  11. Long-Term SOFC Stability with Coated Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Anderson, Michael D.; Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-01-25

    This study details long-term performance data for anode-supported thin-film YSZ-based SOFCs utilizing a ferritic stainless steel cathode current collector (Crofer22 APU) coated with a protective (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel to prevent Cr volatilization. Two standard cathode compositions, La(Sr)FeO3 and La(Sr)MnO3, were considered. The coating proved effective in blocking Cr migration, which resulted in long-term stability of the manganite cathode. In contrast the ferrite cathode indicated degradation that could not be attributed to Cr poisoning.

  12. Influence of microstructural changes due to tempering at 923 K and 1,023 K on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior in normalized 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, B.; Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis has been used to characterize the microstructural changes in normalized and tempered 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that tempering at 923 K shows a single peak behavior up to 20 h and tempering at 1,023 K shows a two peak behavior. This has been explained on the basis of the two stage process of irreversible domain wall movement during magnetization, associated with two major obstacles to domain wall movement: namely lath/grain boundaries and secondary phase precipitates. At lower fields, existing reverse domain walls at lath/grain boundaries overcome the resistance offered by the grain boundaries and move to a distance before they are pined by the precipitates. Then, at higher field, they overcome these precipitates. These two processes occur over a range of critical field strengths with some mean values. If these two mean values are close to each other, then a single peak in the rms voltage of the magnetic Barkhausen noise, with the associated changes in its shape, is observed. On the other hand, if the mean values of the critical fields for these two barriers are widely separated, then a two peak behavior is the clear possibility. The effect of the microstructural changes due to tempering for different durations at 923 K and 1,023 K in 2.25 Cr-1Mo ferritic steel on magnetic Barkhausen noise is explained based on these two stage processes. The influence of high dislocation density in bainitic structure, dissociation of bainite, and precipitation of different carbides such as Fe{sub 3}C, Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}Ce{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, etc., on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior has been analyzed in this study.

  13. Development of nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling followed by pressureless sintering

    SciTech Connect

    R, Shashanka Chaira, D.

    2015-01-15

    Nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are prepared by planetary milling of elemental Fe, Cr and Ni powder for 40 h and then consolidated by conventional pressureless sintering. The progress of milling and the continuous refinement of stainless steel powders have been confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels is calculated by Kissinger method using differential scanning calorimetry and is found to be 159.24 and 90.17 KJ/mol respectively. Both duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are consolidated at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C in argon atmosphere to study microstructure, density and hardness. Maximum sintered density of 90% and Vickers microhardness of 550 HV are achieved for duplex stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C for 1 h. Similarly, 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness are achieved for ferritic stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesized duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling • Calculated activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels • Studied the effect of sintering temperature on density, hardness and microstructure • Duplex stainless steel exhibits 90% sintered density and microhardness of 550 HV. • Ferritic stainless steel shows 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness.

  14. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  15. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  17. Calculation of the ferrite volume in some dual phase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Qixun, D.; Ruzeng, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The relation between the {gamma}/{gamma} + {alpha} boundary temperature, T{sub {alpha}}, and the equivalent values of [Cr] and [Ni], as well as the variation of the ferrite volume, V{sub f}, with the temperature in {alpha} + {gamma} dual-phase steels have been studied. With the aid of a computer, the regressive expressions derived from the experimental results are: T{sub {alpha}} (C) = T{sub 3} + 21.2 [Cr] {minus} 15.8 [Ni] + 223; V{sub f} (%) = 0.715 {l_brace}exp [0.015(T-T{sub {delta}})] {minus} exp[0.015(T{sub c}-T{sub {delta}})]{r_brace} + 1.85 exp [0.0083(T{sub {alpha}}-T{sub c})].

  18. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  19. Hydrogen-induced defects in austenite and ferrite of a duplex steel.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, A; Swiatnicki, W A; Jezierska, E

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the microstructure of two types of austeno-ferritic duplex stainless steel (Cr26-Ni6 model steel and Cr22-Ni5-Mo3 commercial steel), each of them after two thermo-mechanical treatments, was investigated. The aim of this study was to reveal microstructural changes appearing during the hydrogen charging and particularly to clarify the occurrence of phase transformations induced by hydrogen. The specific microstructural changes in the ferrite (alpha) and austenite (gamma) of both types of steel were observed. A strong increase of dislocation density was noticed in the alpha phase. In the case of model steel, longer hydrogen charging times led to significant ferrite grain refinement. In the commercial steel, the strips and twin plates appeared in the ferrite after hydrogenation. The appearance of stacking faults was revealed in the gamma phase. The martensite laths appeared in austenite after longer hydrogenation times. It seems that the microstructural changes gave rise to the formation of microcracks in the alpha and gamma phases as well as on the alpha/gamma interphase boundaries. PMID:17059551

  20. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  1. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel for Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel were explored. The samples for HAZs were prepared using a Gleeble simulator at different heat inputs. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and carbides through quenching and tempering treatment, whereas the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite, and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size, lath width of martensite, and δ-ferrite fraction in the HAZs increased with increase in the heat input. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and Charpy V-notch impact test. The Vickers hardness in the HAZs was higher than that in the base steel but did not change noticeably with increase in the heat input. The HAZs showed poor impact property due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared to the base steel. In addition, the impact property of the HAZs deteriorated more with the increase in the heat input. Post weld heat treatment contributed to improve the impact property of the HAZs through the formation of tempered martensite, but the impact property of the HAZs remained lower than that of base steel.

  2. Design of tough ferritic steels for cryogenic use

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes the design of ferritic steels and weldments that combine strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy must have a ductile-brittle transition temperature below the intended service temperature and a high fracture toughness in the ductile mode. Its systematic design uses the microstructure-property relations that govern the transition temperature and fracture toughness to identify a suitable microstructure, and then employs the microstructure-processing relations that govern its thermal response to manipulate the microstructure into the appropriate form. The procedure is illustrated by describing the heat treatments, microstructures and properties of a variety of laboratory and commercial alloys, including conventional ''9Ni'' steel, the low-Ni and Fe-Mn ferritic steels that have been developed as an alternative to 9Ni, the 12Ni steels that are promising for use at 4K, and the welding procedures and ferritic filler metals that are useful for ferritic cryogenic steels.

  3. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  4. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  5. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructural evolution in candidate low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira; Yoshino, Masahiko; Asakura, Kentaro

    1994-09-01

    Fe-(2.25-12)Cr-2W-V, Ta low activation ferritic steels (JLF series steels) were developed in the fusion materials development program of Japanese universities. Microstructural observations, including precipitation response, were performed after neutron irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA. The preirradiation microstructure was stable after irradiation at low temperature (< 683 K). Recovery of martensitic lath structure and coarsening of precipitates took place above 733 K. Precipitates observed after irradiation were the same as those in unirradiated materials in 7-9Cr steels, and no irradiation induced phase was identified. The irradiation induced shift in DBTT in the 9Cr-2W steel proved to be very small which is a reflection of stable precipitation response in these steels. A high density of fine α' precipitates was observed in the 12Cr steel which might be responsible for the large irradiation hardening found in the 12Cr steel. Void formation was observed in 7-9Cr steels irradiated at 683 K, but the amount of void swelling was very small.

  6. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  7. Microstructural Effects on Fracture Behavior of Ferritic and Martensitic Structural Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Omyma H.; Elshazly, Ezzat S.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of microstructure on fracture behavior of 1Cr-0.5Mo and 9Cr-1Mo structural steels was evaluated. 1Cr-0.5Mo steel is used in steam pipes and superheater tubes of power stations. Its microstructure is typically comprised of bainite in a pre-eutectoid ferrite matrix with an average grain size of 10 μm. 9Cr-1Mo steel was developed for applications in steam power stations and as a candidate structural material for first-wall and blanket components of future fusion reactors. Its microstructure consisted of a fully martensitic structure with a prior austenite grain size of 25 μm. The fracture properties were measured using instrumented impact testing at temperatures between -196 and 300 °C. The total impact fracture energy, the crack initiation and propagation energy, the dynamic yield strength, the brittleness temperature, and the cleavage fracture stress were measured. The bainitic-ferritic alloy steel exhibited much higher resistance to ductile fracture at high test temperatures, while its resistance to brittle fracture at low test temperatures was reduced compared to that of the fully martensitic alloy steel. The results were discussed in terms of the chemical composition and microstructure of the two steel types.

  8. Lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels via spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn; Allahar, Kerry N.; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.; Alsagabi, Sultan F.

    2016-03-01

    A lanthana-containing nanostructured ferritic steel (NFS) was processed via mechanical alloying (MA) of Fe-14Cr-1Ti-0.3Mo-0.5La2O3 (wt.%) and consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to study the consolidation behavior via SPS, sintering temperature and dwell time were correlated with microstructure, density, microhardness and shear yield strength of the sintered specimens. A bimodal grain size distribution including both micron-sized and nano-sized grains was observed in the microstructure of specimens sintered at 850, 950 and1050 °C for 45 min. Significant densification occurred at temperatures greater than 950 °C with a relative density higher than 98%. A variety of nanoparticles, some enriched in Fe and Cr oxides and copious nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm with faceted morphology and enriched in La and Ti oxides were observed. After SPS at 950 °C, the number density of Cr-Ti-La-O-enriched nanoclusters with an average radius of 1.5 nm was estimated to be 1.2 × 1024 m-3. The La + Ti:O ratio was close to 1 after SPS at 950 and 1050 °C; however, the number density of nanoclusters decreased at 1050 °C. With SPS above 950 °C, the density improved but the microhardness and shear yield strength decreased due to partial coarsening of the grains and nanoparticles.

  9. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  10. (Mn,Co)(3)O-4 Spinel Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Li, Xiaohong S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2007-11-01

    (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel with a nominal composition of Mn1.5Co1.5O4 demonstrates excellent electrical conductivity, satisfactory thermal and structural stability, as well as good thermal expansion match to ferritic stainless steel interconnects. A slurry-coating technique was developed for fabricating the spinel coatings onto the steel interconnects. Thermally grown layers of Mn1.5Co1.5O4 not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and stainless steel interconnect, but also acted as a mass barrier to inhibit scale growth on the stainless steel and to prevent Cr outward migration through the coating. The level of improvement in electrical performance and oxidation resistance (i.e. the scale growth rate) was dependent on the ferritic substrate composition. For E-brite and Crofer22 APU, with a relatively high Cr concentration (27wt% and 23%, respectively) and negligible Si, the reduction of contact ASR and scale growth on the ferritic substrates was significant. In comparison, limited improvement was achieved by application of the Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel coating on AISI430, which contains only 17% Cr and a higher amount of residual Si.

  11. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  12. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  13. Modeling the Ferrite-Austenite Transformation in the Heat-Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    The diffusion-controlled ferrite-austenite transformation in stainless steel welds was modeled. An implicit finite-difference analysis that considers multi-component diffusion was used. The model was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni system to investigate the ferrite- austenite transformation in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel weld metal. The transformation was followed as a function of time as the heat-affected zone was subjected to thermal cycles comparable to those experienced during gas-tungsten arc welding. The results showed that the transformation behavior and the final microstructural state are very sensitive to the maximum temperature that is experienced by the heat-affected zone. For high maximum exposure temperatures ({approximately} 1300{degree} C), the ferrite formation that occurs at the highest temperatures is not completely offset by the reverse ferrite dissolution at lower temperatures. As a result, for high temperature exposures there is a net increase in the amount of ferrite in the microstructure. It was also found that if compositional gradients are present in the initial ferrite and austenite phases, the extent of the transformation is impacted.

  14. Residual Ferrite and Relationship Between Composition and Microstructure in High-Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Ren, Yibin; Yao, Chunfa; Yang, Ke; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    A series of high-nitrogen stainless steels (HNS) containing δ-ferrite, which often retained in HNS, were studied to establish the relationship between composition and microstructure. Both ferrite and nitrogen depletions were found in the center regions of cast ingots, and the depletion of nitrogen in that area was found to be the main reason for the existence of δ-ferrite. Because of the existence of heterogeneity, the variation of microstructure with nitrogen content was detected. Hence, the critical contents of nitrogen (CCN) for the fully austenitic HNS were obtained. Then the effects of elements such as N, Cr, Mn, and Mo on austenite stability were investigated via thermodynamic calculations. The CCN of HNS alloys were also obtained by calculations. Comparing the CCN obtained from experiment and calculation, it was found that the forged microstructure of the HNS was close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. To elucidate the above relationship, by regression analysis using calculated thermodynamic data, nitrogen equivalent and a new constitution diagram were proposed. The constitution diagram accurately distinguishes the austenitic single-phase region and the austenite + ferrite dual-phase region. The nitrogen equivalent and the new constitution diagram can be used for alloying design and microstructural prediction in HNS. According to the nitrogen equivalent, the ferrite stabilizing ability of Mo is weaker than Cr, and with Mn content increases, Mn behaves as a weak austenite stabilizer first and then as a ferrite stabilizer.

  15. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  16. Microstructure and crack resistance of low carbon Cr-Ni and Cr-Ni-W steel after austempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdjieva, Tatyana B.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Russev, Stoyan N.; Staevski, Konstantin G.

    2013-09-01

    The microstructure of the low carbon Cr-Ni steel after slow cooling from austenization temperature represents a mix of granulated bainite with islands from carbon-rich martensite and carbon-poor austenite. After quick cooling throwing in salt bath from austenization temperature the microstructure is lath bainite. However, in the same treatment conditions, the microstructure of the low carbon Cr-Ni-W steel is different — clusters consist from lath ferrite and retained austenite, disposed in the frame of parent's austenite grains. The cooling velocity has no effect upon the structure making. The impact toughness of the steel with tungsten content is bigger than the steel without tungsten.

  17. Microstructural evolution of delta ferrite in SAVE12 steel under heat treatment and short-term creep

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengzhi; Eliniyaz, Zumrat; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yinzhong; Shan, Aidang

    2012-11-15

    This research focused on the formation and microstructural evolution of delta ferrite phase in SAVE12 steel. The formation of delta ferrite was due to the high content of ferrite forming alloy elements such as Cr, W, and Ta. This was interpreted through either JMatPro-4.1 computer program or Cr{sub eq} calculations. Delta ferrite was found in bamboo-like shape and contained large amount of MX phase. It was surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Annealing treatments were performed under temperatures from 1050 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C and various time periods to study its dissolution kinetics. The result showed that most of the delta ferrite can be dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Dissolution process of delta ferrite may largely depend on dissolution kinetic factors, rather than on thermodynamic factors. Precipitation behavior during short-term (1100 h) creep was investigated at temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C under a stress of 180 MPa. The results demonstrated that delta ferrite became preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep. Laves phase on the boundary around delta ferrite showed relatively slower growth and coarsening rate than that inside delta ferrite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite is systematically studied under heat treatment and short-term creep. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite contains large number of MX phase and is surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of delta ferrite is interpreted by theoretical and empirical methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the delta ferrite is dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite becomes preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep.

  18. ON QUANTIFICATION OF HELIUM EMBRITTLEMENT IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.

    2000-12-01

    Helium accumulation due to transmutation has long been considered a potential cause for embrittlement in ferritic/martensitic steels. Three Charpy impact databases involving nickel- and boron-doped alloys are quantified with respect to helium accumulation, and it is shown that all predict a very large effect of helium production on embrittlement. If these predictions are valid, use of Ferritic/Martensitic steels for Fusion first wall applications is highly unlikely. It is therefore necessary to reorient efforts regarding development of these steels for fusion applications to concentrate on the issue of helium embrittlement.

  19. Microstructural behavior of 8Cr-ODS martensitic steels during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, K.; Esaka, H.; Tamura, M.; Tanigawa, H.

    2011-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels show a high anisotropy in their creep behavior because of the δ-ferrite grain elongated in the hot-rolled direction and the characteristic formation of creep cavities. In this work, the relationship between the δ-ferrite grain and the growth of creep cavities in 8Cr-ODS steels was investigated. The samples of two ODS steels with different δ-ferrite volume fractions were machined parallel and perpendicular to the hot-rolled direction. Creep rupture tests and interrupted tests were performed at 700 °C and about 197 MPa. Cavities formed in the martensite along δ-ferrite grains during creep deformation. The area fraction of the cavities of all specimens increased in proportion to the cube root of test time. When the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was high and δ-ferrite grains elongated parallel to the load direction, δ-ferrite then obstructed the propagation of cracks. However, when the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was low and δ-ferrite grains elongated perpendicular to the load direction, δ-ferrite grains had little effect on crack propagation.

  20. Ferritic weldment of grain-refined ferritic steels for cryogenic use

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Syn, C.K.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The problem of welding grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti for 4K service was first approached in this laboratory by using high nickel filler metals such as are often specified for ferritic steel weldments at 77K. This approach led to an undesirable brittleness in the fusion zone and a low yield strength in the weld metal. A more promising approach was developed in joint research between the Japanese steel companies, who showed that quench-and-tempered 9Ni steel may be welded for 77K service with a matching ferritic filler if a multipass GTAW technique is employed. The present paper reports the initial resultsof similar studies on ferritic GTA weldments in grain-refined 9Ni steel. Information is included on the preparation of the 9Ni steel and the weld filler metal, on the welding procedure, the microstructure of both the weld metal and the heat affected zone, and on impact toughness and fracture toughness testing at 77/sup 0/K and 4.2/sup 0/K. The results show that it is possible to weld grain-refined 9Ni steel with ferritic weld filler metal so as to retain good toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this work may permit the utilization of retreated commercial grade 9Ni steel in structural applications within helium-cooled cryogenic devices where high strength and good toughness are required. (LCL)

  1. Austenite precipitation during tempering in 16Cr-2Ni martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Balan, K.P.; Reddy, A.V.; Sarma, D.S.

    1998-09-04

    The 16Cr-2Ni steel when quenched from austenitizing temperature of 1,323K results in the formation of a complex microstructure consisting of the inherited {delta}-ferrite, martensite and retained austenite with a few undissolved M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. There do not appear to be many reports on tempering behavior of 16Cr-2Ni steel through microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy. A comprehensive study is under progress to examine the structure-fracture-property relationship on 16Cr-2Ni steel and the microstructural changes that occur on tempering the steel are dealt with in this paper.

  2. Ferritic/martensitic steels - overview of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Odette, G. R.; van der Schaaf, B.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable research work has been conducted on the ferritic/martensitic steels since the last International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials in 1999. Since only a limited amount of that work can be reviewed in this paper, four areas will be emphasized: (1) the international collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to address potential problems with ferritic/martensitic steels and to prove their feasibility for fusion, (2) the major uncertainty that remains concerning the effect of transmutation helium on mechanical properties of the steels when irradiated in a fusion neutron environment, (3) development of new reduced-activation steels beyond the F82H and JLF-1 steels studied in the IEA collaboration, and (4) work directed at developing oxide dispersion-strengthened steels for operation above 650 °C.

  3. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  4. Effect of chromium, tungsten, tantalum, and boron on mechanical properties of 5-9Cr-WVTaB steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.; Sokolov, M. A.

    2002-08-01

    The Cr-W-V-Ta reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels use tungsten and tantalum as substitutes for molybdenum and niobium in the Cr-Mo-V-Nb steels that the reduced-activation steels replaced as candidate materials for fusion applications. Studies were made to determine the effect of W, Ta, and Cr composition on the tensile and Charpy properties of the Cr-W-V-Ta; steels with 5%, 7%, and 9% Cr with 2% or 3% W and 0%, 0.05%, or 0.10% Ta were examined. Boron has a long history of use in steels to improve properties, and the effect of boron was also examined. Regardless of the chromium concentration, the steels with 2% W and 0.05-0.1% Ta generally had a better combination of tensile and Charpy properties than steels with 3% W. Boron had a negative effect on properties for the 5% and 7% Cr steels, but had a positive effect on the 9% Cr steel. When the 5, 7, and 9Cr steels containing 2% W and 0.05% Ta were compared, the tensile and Charpy properties of the 5 and 9Cr steels were better than those of the 7Cr steel, and overall, the properties of the 5Cr steel were better than those of the 9Cr steel. Such information will be useful if the properties of the reduced-activation steels are to be optimized.

  5. New Economical 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zixing; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhao, Junliang; Jiang, Laizhu

    2012-02-01

    New economical duplex stainless steels (DSSs) containing 19Cr-6Mn- xNi-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N ( x = 0.5 to 2.0) were developed, and the microstructure, impact property, and corrosion resistance of the alloys were studied. The ferrite content increases with the solution treatment temperature, but decreases with an increase in nickel. The sigma phase is not found precipitating in the alloys treated with solution from 1023 K to 1523 K (750 °C to 1250 °C). The low-temperature impact energy of the experimental alloys increases first and then decreases rapidly with an increase in nickel, which is mainly due to the martensite transformation with an increase in austenite. The alloys have a better mechanical property and pitting corrosion resistance than AISI 304. Among the designed DSS alloys, 19Cr-6Mn-1.3Ni-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N is found to be an optimum alloy with proper phase proportion, a better combination of mechanical strength and elongation, and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with those of the other alloys.

  6. Mechanical property changes of low activation ferritic/martensitic steels after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Hamilton, M. L.; Narui, M.

    Mechanical property changes of Fe- XCr-2W-0.2V,Ta ( X: 2.25-12) low activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Japanese Low Activation Ferritic/martensitic (JLF) steels and F82H after neutron irradiation were investigated with emphasis on Charpy impact property, tensile property and irradiation creep properties. Dose dependence of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in JLF-1 (9Cr steel) irradiated at 646-700 K increased with irradiation up to 20 dpa and then decreased with further irradiation showing highest DBTT of 260 K at 20 dpa. F82H showed similar dose dependence in DBTT to JLF-1 with higher transition temperature than that of JLF-1 at the same displacement damage. Yield strength in JLF steels and F82H showed similar dose dependence to that of DBTT. Yield strength increased with irradiation up to 15-20 dpa and then decreased to saturate above about 40 dpa. Irradiation hardening in 7-9%Cr steels (JLF-1, JLF-3, F82H) were observed to be smaller than those in steels with 2.25%Cr (JLF-4) or 12%Cr (JLF-5). Dependences of creep strain on applied hoop stress and neutron fluence were measured to be 1.5 and 1, respectively. Temperature dependence of creep coefficient showed a maximum at about 700 K which was caused by irradiation induced void formation or irradiation enhanced creep deformation. Creep coefficient of F82H was larger than those of JLF steels above 750 K. This was considered to be caused by the differences in N and Ta concentration between F82H and JLF steels.

  7. Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered ferritic/martensitic steel P92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Huan; Shang, Zhongxia; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel P92 is a promising candidate for cladding and duct applications in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. The precipitate phases of the P92 steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 30 min and tempered at 1038 K (765 °C) for 1 h have been investigated using transmission electron microscopes. Four types of phases consisting of M23C6, MX, M2X and sigma-FeCr were identified in the steel. MX phases consist of Nb-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, Nb-rich MC carbide, V-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, V-rich MC carbide, V-rich MN nitride, and complex MC carbides with Nb-rich MC core and V-rich MC wings. M2X phases consist of Cr-rich M2(C,N) carbonitride, Cr-rich M2C carbide and M2N nitride. Sigma-FeCr has a simple tetragonal lattice and a typical chemical formula of Fe0.45Cr0.45W0.1. M23C6 and MX are the dominant phases, while the sigma-FeCr has the lowest content. The formation of sigma-FeCr and M2X phases in the steel is also discussed.

  8. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  9. Correlation of Fe/Cr phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo

    2014-12-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-15Cr ferritic model alloys were investigated by TEM examinations, micro-hardness measurements and tensile tests. The materials used in this work were Fe-15Cr, Fe-15Cr-C and Fe-15Cr-X alloys, where X refers to Si, Mn and Ni to simulate a pressure vessel steel. Specimens were isothermally aged at 475 °C up to 5000 h. Thermal aging causes a significant increase in the hardness and strength. An almost twice larger hardening is required for embrittlement of Fe-15Cr-X relative to Fe-15Cr. The age-hardening is mainly due to the formation of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates, while the addition of minor elements has a small effect on the saturation level of age-hardening. The correlation of phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr alloy was interpreted by dispersion strengthened models.

  10. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  11. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  12. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  13. Experimental and Thermokinetic Simulation Studies on the Formation of Deleterious Zones in Dissimilar Ferritic Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, R.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-05-01

    The methods to predict and prevent the formation of hard and soft zones in dissimilar weldments of 9Cr-1Mo and 2¼Cr-1Mo ferritic steels during high-temperature exposure are examined in this article. The computational studies have been carried out using multicomponent diffusion model incorporated in Dictra and validated by experimental methods using EPMA and TEM. Carbon concentration profiles across the interface of the weld joint between the two ferritic steels were simulated in the temperatures ranging from 823 K to 1023 K (from 550 °C to 750 °C) for various time durations using "diffusion in dispersed phase model" in Dictra. When precipitation and diffusion were incorporated into the calculations simultaneously, the agreement was better between the calculated and the experimentally measured values of carbon concentration profiles, type, and volume fractions of carbides in the hard zone and diffusion zone, width, and the activation energy. Calculation results of thermodynamic potentials of carbon in 2¼Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo steels suggested that the diffusion is driven by the activity gradient of carbon across the joint. The effectiveness of nickel-based diffusion barrier in suppressing the formation of hard and soft zones is demonstrated using calculations based on the cell model incorporated in Dictra.

  14. Dynamic recrystallization of ferrite in interstitial free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, N.; Matsubara, Y.; Saito, Y.

    1997-08-15

    The present study using IF steel confirmed that dynamic recrystallization can occur also in ferrite where it has been generally considered that recovery is an only restoration process during hot deformation. Although the occurrence of DRX has been clarified by microstructural observations and crystallographic determinations, stress-strain curves do not show obvious drop of stress which has been typically reported in the case of DRX of austenite. This result indicates that it is quite difficult to distinguish whether DRX occurs in ferrite only by stress-strain behavior. The noticeable feature of DRX of ferrite is inhomogeneity of recrystallization, i.e., some of the initial grains are hard to recrystallize. This is presumably due to orientation dependence of recrystallization, which is the essential feature of ferrite.

  15. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Hino; K, Yamaguchi; Y, Yamauchi; Y, Hirohata; K, Tsuzuki; Y, Kusama

    2005-04-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall, vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study, deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus. After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 keV D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention. Ferritic steel sample was

  16. Effect of Weld Intercooling Temperature on the Structure and Impact Strength of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; J.A. Simpson; H. Tian

    2006-06-01

    The effect of inadequate weld intercooling (cooling prior to post-weld heat treatment) on the structure and impact properties of 9Cr-1MoVNb (ASME Grade 91) and 12Cr-1Mo-WV (Type 422 stainless) steels was studied. A range of weld intercooling conditions were simulated by air cooling the two steels from the standard 1050°C normalization temperature to temperatures ranging from 250 to 450°C for Grade 91 and 100 to 300°C for Type 422, and then immediately tempering at 760°C for two hours. For Grade 91 steel, austenite retained at the intercooling temperature transformed to ferrite during tempering; final microstructures were mixtures of ferrite and tempered martensite. For Type 422 steel, austenite retained at the intercooling temperature was stable in the tempering condition and formed martensite upon cooling to room temperature; final microstructures were mixtures of tempered and untempered martensite. Hardness and impact properties of the two steels reflected the changes in microstructure with intercooling temperature.

  17. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  18. Cr(3+) substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles with high coercivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Xudong; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Chengwei; Silva, S Ravi P

    2016-06-17

    The low coercivity of spinel ferrites is a major barrier that significantly limits their use in high density magnetic recording applications. By controlling the substituting content of Cr(3+), in this article we describe how magnetic CoCr x Fe2-x O4 (0 < x < 1.2) nanoparticles with coercivity of up to 6.4 kOe were successfully obtained by the hydrothermal process. The high coercivity is attributed to the synergetic effects of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and the nanoscale size effect. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the spinel structure of the nanoparticles with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggesting regular tetragonal morphology. The TEM indicated an edge length ranging from 15 nm to 150 nm, which increases monotonically with increasing Cr content. Raman analyses supported the proposed model on the formation mechanism of the nanoparticles, i.e. heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. PMID:27159283

  19. Cr3+ substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles with high coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Xudong; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Chengwei; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-06-01

    The low coercivity of spinel ferrites is a major barrier that significantly limits their use in high density magnetic recording applications. By controlling the substituting content of Cr3+, in this article we describe how magnetic CoCr x Fe2‑x O4 (0 < x < 1.2) nanoparticles with coercivity of up to 6.4 kOe were successfully obtained by the hydrothermal process. The high coercivity is attributed to the synergetic effects of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and the nanoscale size effect. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the spinel structure of the nanoparticles with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggesting regular tetragonal morphology. The TEM indicated an edge length ranging from 15 nm to 150 nm, which increases monotonically with increasing Cr content. Raman analyses supported the proposed model on the formation mechanism of the nanoparticles, i.e. heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation.

  20. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  1. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  2. Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-10-01

    Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

  3. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  4. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  5. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  6. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  7. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe-Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2<111> and <100> loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2<111> and <100> loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2<111> loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally 'invisible' nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. PMID:23756468

  8. Response of ferritic steels to nonsteady loading at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    High-temperature operating experience is lacking in pressure vessel materials that have strength levels above 586 MPa. Because of their tendency toward strain softening, we have been concerned about their behavior under nonsteady loading. Testing was undertaken to explore the extent of softening produced by monotonic and cyclic strains. The specific materials included bainitic 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel containing vanadium, titanium, and boron, and a martensitic 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel. Tests included tensile, creep, variable stress creep, relaxation, strain cycling, stress cycling, and non-isothermal creep ratchetting experiments. We found that these steels had very low uniform elongation and exhibited small strains to the onset of tertiary creep compared to annealed 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. Repeated relaxation test data also indicated a limited capacity for strain hardening. Reversal strains produced softening. The degree of softening increased with increased initial strength level. We concluded that the high strength bainitic and martensitic steels should perform well when used under conditions where severe cyclic operation does not occur.

  9. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  10. Anomalous ultrasonic attenuation in ferritic steels at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Bevis; Lundin, Peter; Lindh-Ulmgren, Eva; Lévesque, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    An unexpected peak in attenuation has been observed at ∼800°C when heating low carbon steels in a laser-ultrasonic instrument. An explanation is given in terms of enhanced crystalline anisotropy with increasing temperature in the bcc ferrite range combined with subsequent transformation to austenite at still higher temperatures. An analysis based on theoretical models of attenuation in the Rayleigh regime is in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:27015796

  11. Deposition and Evaluation of Protective PVD Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Gannon, Paul; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Kopczyk, M.; Van Vorous, D.; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Visco, s.; jacobson, c.; Kurokawa, H.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2006-09-21

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are gaining attention to increase longterm stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used for deposition of two-segment coatings with Cr-Co-Al-O-N based sublayer and Mn-Co-O top layer. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steel and subsequently annealed in air for various time intervals. Surface oxidation was investigated using RBS, SEM and EDS analyses. Cr volatilization was evaluated using a transpiration apparatus and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Electrical conductivity (Area Specific Resistance) was studied as a function of time using the four-point technique with Ag electrodes. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and electrical conductivity of the coated and uncoated samples are reported. Transport mechanisms for various oxidizing species and coating diffusion barrier properties are discussed.

  12. The Role of Alloying Elements in Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Parish, Chad M

    2010-01-01

    The roles of the alloying elements in three nanostructured ferritic alloys (14YWT, MA957 and Eurofer 97) have been established through the characterisation of the microstructure by atom probe tomography and spectrum imaging in a transmission electron microscope. Cr, W, Mo, Ti and Y were found in the ferrite matrix and contributed to solid solution hardening. Ti, Y, C, O and N were found in high number densities of precipitates and nanoclusters both in the grain interior and on grain boundaries and thereby contributed to precipitation hardening. Cr, W and Mo were enriched at the intraparticle regions of the grain boundaries. The solute segregation and precipitation pinned the grain boundaries and contributed to the excellent creep properties of the alloys.

  13. Effect of composition on the transformation of {delta}-ferrite to {sigma} in type 316 stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, T.P.S.; Shankar, V.; Pujar, M.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    1995-05-15

    A study of the effect of Cr on {delta}-ferrite transformation kinetics has yielded a relationship between the kinetics parameter n{sub 2} and weld metal chromium content. The amount of {sigma}{sub 0.9} formed from {delta}-ferrite has been correlated with weld metal composition. A nomogram is proposed, to predict the amount of {sigma}{sub 0.9} formed after 90% ferrite transformation in a given weld metal, as a function of C, Cr and Mo contents. The nomogram can be employed to optimize the composition for reducing high temperature embrittlement resulting from {sigma} precipitation in type 316 stainless steel weld metals. The nomogram has been developed from data obtained at 650 C but has been shown to be valid in the temperature range 600--700 C.

  14. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  15. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  16. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel prepared by chemical reduction and mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. X.; Fang, Q. F.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 (14Cr-ODS) was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Pure Fe-1.5Y2O3 precursor was obtained by a sol-gel process and a reduction process at 650 °C for 3 h and pure 14Cr-ODS alloy powders were obtained from this precursor and the alloying metallic powders by mechanical alloying. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) reveal that Y-Ti-O complexes and V-Ti-O complexes with a main particle size of 8 nm are formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel matrix. After HIP sintering the weight and the relative density of the compacted ingots are about 0.8 kg and 99.7%. The uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength of the ODS steel obtained by HIP after annealing at 1100 °C for 5 h are about 13% and 840 MPa, respectively.

  17. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  18. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-10-25

    A ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. The steel has a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of the grains. The finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa, depending on the average size of the nanoscale precipitates. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, respectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The measured work-hardening behavior can be related to the observed dislocation accumulations resulting from the dispersive nano-scale precipitates.

  19. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1981-05-05

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the mo content.

  20. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  1. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  2. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  3. Development of ferritic weldments for grain-refined ferritic steels for 4. 2K service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    The weldability of grain-refined ferritic nickel steels designed for structural use in liquid helium was investigated. Plates of interstitial-free Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy and carbon-containing 9 Ni steel were welded with 14 Ni ferritic fillers using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with pure argon gas shielding. The ferritic weldments made have a strength closely matching those of the base plates without a significant loss in base metal toughness at temperatures as low as 4.2 K. The comparable toughness obtained in the welded region is attributed to three factors; the defect-free weldment, the chemical cleanliness of the GTAW weld deposit, and the in-process formation of an appropriate microstructure in the welded region. Special emphasis in this study was placed on changes in microstructures with respect to the characteristic of the weld thermal cycles and the effect of the resultant microstructures on low temperature toughness. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welded 9Ni steel, the retained (or precipitated) austenite is removed by the weld heat cycles but the sequential rapid heat cycles to successively lower peak temperatures associated with succeeding weld passes re-establish high toughness by sequentially refining the grain size and gettering carbon in the form of cementite precipitates. On the other hand, the high toughness in the HAZ of the 12Ni alloy and in the weld deposit is a direct consequence of repeated grain refinement through the overlapped austenitizing cycles and is not affected by the tempering cycles because of the carbon-free nature of these materials. 46 figures.

  4. Development of ferritic weldments for grain-refined ferritic steels for 4. 2K service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The weldability of grain-refined ferritic nickel steels designed for structural use in liquid helium was investigated. Plates of interstitial-free Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy and carbon-containing 9Ni steel were welded with 14Ni ferritic fillers using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with pure argon gas shielding. The ferritic weldments made have a strength closely matching those of the base plates without a significant loss in base metal toughness at temperatures as low as 4.2K. The comparable toughness obtained in the welded region is attributed to three factors; the defect-free weldment, the chemical cleanliness of the GTAW weld deposit, and the in-process formation of an appropriate microstructure in the welded region. Special emphasis in this study was placed on changes in microstructures with respect to the characteristic of the weld thermal cycles and the effect of the resultant microstructures on low temperature toughness. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welded 9Ni steel, the retained (or precipitated) austenite is removed by the weld heat cycles but the sequential rapid heat cycles to successively lower peak temperatures associated with succeeding weld passes re-establish high toughness by sequentially refining the grain size and gettering carbon in the form of cementite precipitates. On the other hand, the high toughness in the HAZ of the 12Ni alloy and in the weld deposit is a direct consequence of repeated grain refinement through the overlapped austenitizing cycles and is not affected by the tempering cycles because of the carbon-free nature of these materials.

  5. Effect of Hot Band Annealing on Forming Limit Diagrams of Ultra-Pure Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Jun; Bi, Hongyun; Li, Xin; Xu, Zhou

    2014-03-01

    In order to better understand the texture evolution, coincidence site lattice (CSL) and forming limit diagrams (FLDs) of ferritic stainless steels with and without hot band annealing, the texture evolution and CSL of ferritic stainless steels with 15% Cr content were studied by using x-ray diffraction and electron back-scattered diffraction technique. The strain hardening exponent n value, the strength coefficient K value, and Plastic strain ratio r value are the key parameters for the FLD. It was found out that the FLDo of plane strain condition and the stretchability were mainly influenced by their n value and K value, respectively. The higher n value and K value, better was the stretchability of investigated steels. The intensity of the γ-fiber dominated by {111} <112> was improved significantly in the cold rolled and annealed sheets because of a hot band annealing treatment and the sharp increase of Σ13b CSL boundaries. The increase of the formability is attributed to the significantly increase of the r value.

  6. Surface Treatments for Improved Performance of Spinel-coated AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Riel, Eric M.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect applications due to their low cost and resistance to oxidation at SOFC operating temperatures. However, steel candidates face several challenges; including long term oxidation under interconnect exposure conditions, which can lead to increased electrical resistance, surface instability, and poisoning of cathodes due to volatilization of Cr. To potentially extend interconnect lifetime and improve performance, a variety of surface treatments were performed on AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coupons prior to application of a protective spinel coating. The coated coupons were then subjected to oxidation testing at 800 and 850°C in air, and electrical testing at 800°C in air. While all of the surface-treatments resulted in improved surface stability (i.e., increased spallation resistance) compared to untreated AISI 441, the greatest degree of improvement (through 20,000 hours of testing at 800°C and 14,000 hours of testing at 850°C) was achieved by surface blasting.

  7. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  8. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  9. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  10. Safe Use Limits for Advanced Ferritic Steels in Ultra-Supercritical Power Boilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, RW

    2003-11-03

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Babcock & Wilcox Company to examine the databases for advanced ferritic steels and determine the safe limits for operation in supercritical steam power boilers. The materials of interest included the vanadium-modified 9-12% Cr steels with 1-2% Mo or W. The first task involved a review of pertinent information and the down-selection of a steel of special interest. The long-time database for 9Cr-1Mo-V steel was found to be most satisfactory for the examinations, and this steel was taken to be representative of the group. The second task involved the collection of aged and service exposed samples for metallurgical and mechanical testing. Here, aged samples to 75,000 hours, laboratory-tested samples to 83,000 hours, and service-exposed sample with up to 143,000 hours exposure were collected. The third task involved mechanical testing of exposed samples. Creep-rupture testing to long times was undertaken. Variable stress and temperature testing was included. Results were compared against the prediction of damage models. These models seemed to be adequate for life prediction. The fourth task involved the metallurgical examination of exposed specimens. Changes in microstructure were compared against published information on the evolution of microstructures in 9Cr-Mo-V steels and the results were found to be consistent with expectations. The fifth task involved a survey of steam and fireside corrosion. Data from the service-exposed tubing was examined, and a literature survey was undertaken as part of an activity in support of ultra-supercritical steam boiler technology. The corrosion study indicated some concerns about long-time fireside corrosion and suggested temperature limits were needed for corrosive coal ash conditions.

  11. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  12. Effect of ultrasonic impact peening on the corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Ming; Luo, Jing-Li; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic-Martensitic (F/M) steels are important candidate alloys to be used in the next generation (Generation-IV) SCWRs. In this work, two F/M steels with the same Cr content of around 12 wt.% and varied Si content from 0.6 wt.% to 2.2 wt.% were evaluated in supercritical water (SCW) at 500 °C and 25 MPa for up to 1000 h. The effect of ultrasonic shot peening on the oxidation behavior of these F/M steels have been investigated. The results showed that the oxidation was affected by the Si content as well as the surface modification. The F/M steel with low Si concentration exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the alloy with high Si content. Shot peening, which could modify the microstructure at the surface, showed significantly beneficial effect to improving the oxidation resistance. A thin, uniform oxide layer formed on the peened sample could be attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Cr induced by the surface modification.

  13. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  14. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  15. Effect of cooling parameters on the microstructure and properties of Mo-bearing and Cr-bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xiang-Dong; Li, Yu-Qian; Zhao, Yu-Tao; Zhang, Hai-Wang; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2011-10-01

    To develop low-cost low carbon bainitic steel, Mo-bearing and Cr-bearing steels were melted in a vacuum induction furnace and were researched by thermal simulation and hot rolling at the laboratory. As the cooling rate increases from 0.2 to 50°C/s, the transformation temperatures of two steels lie between 650 and 400°C, and the final microstructures of them change from quasi-polygonal ferrite and granular bainite to lath bainite. Compared with cooling in air or by interrupted cooling, Mo-bearing and Cr-bearing steel plates cooled by sprayed water boast higher strength and superior toughness, for large-size islands are responsible for the poor mechanical properties. Compared to Mo, Cr is effective to isolate the bainitic reaction in low carbon steel, and the bainitic microstructure can also be obtained in Cr-bearing steel cooled at a wide range of cooling rate.

  16. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  17. Development oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Uniaxial tension creep response is reported for an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Acceptable creep response is obtained at 900{degrees}C.

  18. A role of {delta}-ferrite in edge-crack formation during hot-rolling of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, F.; Brodtka, A.; Cho, J.Y.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zielinska-Lipiec, A.; Sunwoo, J.H.

    1997-10-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are substantially harder during hot-rolling than either ferritic or mild steels. The objective of this study is to verify the possible correlation between the edge-crack formation during hot-rolling and the presence of {delta} ferrite in austenitic stainless steel. Hot-rolled plates of austenitic stainless steels, examined at room temperatures, contain up to 9% of {delta} ferrite in austenitic matrix. The distribution of ferrite in steel plate is inhomogeneous: the highest ferrite content is located in the vicinity of the plate edge. Moreover, the content of {delta} ferrite changes irregularly across the plate thickness. The results obtained from analysis of several plates suggest a correlation between the maximum content of {delta} ferrite in steel microstructure and the length of the edge-crack formed during hot-rolling: the higher the volume fraction of ferrite, the longer the edge-crack.

  19. Weld metal hydrogen cracking behavior, toughness, and microstructure in 9% Cr 1% Mo steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A.M. Panton-Kent, R.; Gooch, T.G.

    1994-12-31

    The use of 9%Cr 1%Mo steels, within various industries is increasing. The modification of the standard composition by the addition of V, Nb, and N improves the high temperature strength and creep properties. Development of welding conditions is dominated by the avoidance of hydrogen cracking while ensuring adequate mechanical properties and minimizing subcritical HAZ softening. This study was designed to evaluate compositional effects on MMA and electron beam (EB) weld metal properties and compare the weld metal hydrogen cracking sensitivity of the modified and standard grades. In comparing the hydrogen cracking sensitivity of the 9% Cr 1%Mo steels, the effect of welding and PWHT conditions on {delta}-ferrite development and SCHAZ softening were studied. An EB weld was incorporated in this study and assessment made of the CTOD behavior and microstructural development. Standard and modified grades exhibited similar hydrogen cracking sensitivity. The {delta}-ferrite content depended on welding conditions and composition. The ferrite factor gave a better indication of final ferrite content than Cr-equivalent. Softening in the SCHAZ was minimized by decreasing arc energy and preheat. The study indicates that modified grades can be welded using the procedures for standard grades. Charpy toughness was unaffected by 0.02{emdash}0.09%Nb or the PWHT schedules employed. increased Nb reduced the fracture toughness following extended PWHT.

  20. Oxidation and electrical behavior of ferritic stainless steel interconnect with Fe-Co-Ni coating by electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Shujiang; Qi, Shaojun; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2012-10-01

    Fe-Co-Ni coating is deposited on ferritic stainless steel using a cost-effective technique of electroplating for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects application. The steel with Fe-Co-Ni coating has been evaluated in air at 800 °C corresponding to the cathode environment of SOFC. The results indicate that the steel with Fe-Co-Ni coating experiences an initially large mass gain, and then the mass gain increases slightly after the first-week rapid oxidation stage. After thermal exposure in air at 800 °C, the Fe-Co-Ni coating has been converted into (Fe,Co,Ni)3O4 spinel layer underneath which a Cr2O3 layer is developed from the steel substrate. The outer layer of (Fe,Co,Ni)3O4 spinel has not only suppressed Cr migration outward but also reduced the growth rate of the inner layer of Cr2O3. The steel with Fe-Co-Ni coating exhibits a stable surface oxide scale area specific resistance (ASR) which is much lower than that of the bare steel. (Fe,Co,Ni)3O4 spinel is a promising protective coating for SOFC steel interconnect.

  1. Insight into the microstructural characterization of ferritic steels using micromagnetic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Raj, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Kashyap, B.P.

    2000-04-01

    The influence of tempering-induced microstructural changes on the micromagnetic parameters such as magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE), coercive force (H{sub c}), residual induction (B{sub r}), and maximum induction (B{sub max}) has been studied in 0.2 pct carbon steel, 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, and 9Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that, after short tempering, the micromagnetic parameters show more or less linear correlation with hardness, which is attributed to the reduction in dislocation density, but long-term tempering produces nonlinear behavior. The variation in each of these parameters with tempering time has been explained based on the changes in the size and distribution of ferrite laths/grains and precipitates. It has been shown that the individual variation in the microstructural features such as size and distribution of laths/grains and precipitates during tempering can be clearly identified by the MBE parameters, which is not possible from the hysteresis loop parameters (H{sub c} and B{sub r}). It is also shown that the MBE parameters cannot only be used to identify different stages of tempering but also to quantify the average size of laths/grains and second-phase precipitates.

  2. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  3. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  4. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  5. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-04

    A high strength ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined matrix and grain boundary strengthening. The calculated amount of precipitation strengthening by the carbides was approximately 450 ~ 630 MPa, depending on the average size of nanoscale precipitates. This value is two or three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, espectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The effect of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and the relationship for resolved shear stress for single crystal under this condition has been presented using simulation data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results also show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size.

  6. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  8. Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of ODS steels of different Cr-contents during helium implantation under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Henry, J.; de Carlan, Y.; Sauvage, T.; Duval, F.; Barthe, M. F.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of two ferritic ODS steels with 12% and 14% Cr have been studied by homogeneously implantation with helium under uniaxial tensile stresses from 40 to 300 MPa. The maximum dose was about 1.2 dpa (5000 appm-He) with displacement damage rates of 1 × 10-5 dpa/s at a temperature of 300 °C. Irradiation creep compliances were measured to be 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12 and 14Cr ODS, respectively. Subsequently, microstructural evolution was studied in detail by TEM observations, showing dislocation loops and bubbles distributed homogenously in the matrix. Some bubbles were attached to ODS particles. Finally, the effects of Cr content on irradiation creep and microstructural changes are discussed, including earlier results of a 19Cr ODS and a PM2000 ferritic steel. Irradiation creep rates of both 12Cr and 14Cr-ODS ferritic steels a temperature of 300 °C show linear stress dependence up to 300 MPa at. Irradiation creep rate per dose rate and stress at a temperature of 300 °C amounts to 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12Cr- and 14Cr-ODS, respectively. Irradiation creep properties are remarkably insensitive to Cr content, grain size and dispersoid size. Dislocation loops and helium bubbles are distributed homogenously in the matrix. In the case of high density fine dispersoids, most bubbles are attached to ODS particles. This may suppress loop formation as well as growth of bubbles, thereby increasing the resistance of ODS ferritic steels against helium embrittlement.

  9. Oxidation behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels in stagnant liquid LBE saturated by oxygen at 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Quanqiang; Liu, Jian; Luan, He; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural materials in the Generation IV Nuclear Reactor, especially accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). The compatibility of F/M steels with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a critical issue for development of ADS using liquid LBE as the coolant. In this work, the corrosion tests of two F/M steels, including a novel 9-12 Cr modified F/M steel named SIMP steel and a commercial T91 steel, were conducted in the static oxygen-saturated liquid LBE at 600 °C up to 1000 h, the microstructure of the oxide scale formed on these two steels was analyzed, the relationship between the microstructure and the oxidation behavior was studied, and the reason why the SIMP steel showed better oxidation resistance compared to T91 steel was analyzed. The results of this study confirmed that the oxidation behavior of the F/M steels in liquid metals is influenced by their alloying elements and microstructures.

  10. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  11. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  12. Mechanical properties of irradiated 9Cr-2WVTa steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Rieth, M.

    1998-09-01

    An Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel has excellent strength and impact toughness before and after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the High Flux Reactor (HFR). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased only 32 C after 28 dpa at 365 C in FFTF, compared to a shift of {approx}60 C for a 9Cr-2WV steel--the same as the 9Cr-2WVTa steel but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile properties before and after irradiation. The 9Cr-2WVTa steel has a smaller prior-austenite grain size, but otherwise microstructures are similar before irradiation and show similar changes during irradiation. The irradiation behavior of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel differs from the 9Cr-2WV steel and other similar steels in two ways: (1) the shift in DBTT of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF does not saturate with fluence by {approx}28 dpa, whereas for the 9Cr-2WV steel and most similar steels, saturation occurs at <10 dpa, and (2) the shift in DBTT for 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF and HFR increased with irradiation temperature, whereas it decreased for the 9Cr-2WV steel, as it does for most similar steels. The improved properties of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel and the differences with other steels were attributed to tantalum in solution.

  13. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  14. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallez, Nicolas; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Delabrouille, Fredéric; Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent; Blat-Yrieix, Martine; Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe; Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels.

  15. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  16. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  17. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  18. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  19. Analysis of delta-ferrite data from production stainless steel pipe welds

    SciTech Connect

    Hebble, T.L.; Canonico, D.A.; Edmonds, D.P.; Goodwin, G.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    An American Society of Mechanical Engineers task group on stainless steel weld materials was organized to determine the need for ferrite measurements of production welds required by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.31 (Rev. 1). The task group studied paired ferrite measurements (i.e., calculated and measured ferrite numbers (FNs) for the material qualifications versus measured ferrite numbers for corresponding production welds (PWs)). Our purpose was to compare delta-ferrite content as measured in the filler metal weld qualification pad with that in the resultant PW. Welds made predominantly by three common processes (submerged arc, shielded metal arc, and gas tungsten arc) were included in the study. Weld metals investigated included types 308, 308L, 316, and 316L stainless steel. An initial evaluation of the paired ferrite measurements was made by the task group, and specific conclusions and recommendations were made. We describe the analysis of the data and the conclusions drawn. The data base consisted of a heterogeneous collection of 1449 paired ferrite measurements for several forms and combinations of types 304 and 316 stainless steel pipe qualification pad and production welds. Qualification pad values ranged from 5 to 15 FN, and corresponding values for the PWs ranged from 2.3 to 17.5 FN. Only two PW ferrite numbers were less than 3. For qualification weld ferrite numbers less than 14, the median PW ferrite number was in reasonable agreement. However, the results show a wide scatter. As a result of this analysis and the task group evaluation, we concluded that the requirements of Regulatory Guide 1.31 on the measurement of ferrite in PWs are not necessary and that a ferrite number of 5 in the qualification welds will, in most cases, result in PW ferrite contents greater than 3 FN.

  20. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  1. Long-term oxidation behavior of spinel-coated ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.

    2013-06-01

    Long-term tests (>8,000 hours) indicate that AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coated with a Mn-Co spinel protection layer is a promising candidate material system for IT-SOFC interconnect applications. While uncoated AISI 441 showed a substantial increase in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR), spinel-coated AISI 441 exhibited much lower ASR values (11-13 mOhm-cm2). Formation of an insulating silica sublayer beneath the native chromia-based scale was not observed, and the spinel coatings reduced the oxide scale growth rate and blocked outward diffusion of Cr from the alloy substrate. The structure of the scale formed under the spinel coatings during the long term tests differed from that typically observed on ferritic stainless steels after short term oxidation tests. While short term tests typically indicate a dual layer scale structure consisting of a chromia layer covered by a layer of Mn-Cr spinel, the scale grown during the long term tests consisted of a chromia matrix with discrete regions of Mn-Cr spinel distributed throughout the matrix. The presence of Ti in the chromia scale matrix and/or the presence of regions of Mn-Cr spinel within the scale may have increased the scale electrical conductivity, which would explain the fact that the observed ASR in the tests was lower than would be expected if the scale consisted of pure chromia.

  2. Cleavage-quasi cleavage in ferritic and martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Edsinger, K.V.; Lucas, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Confocal microscopy-fracture reconstruction and SEM were used to characterize the sequence-of-events leading to cleavage in a low alloy pressure vessel steel and two 8--12 Cr martensitic steels as a function of temperature. While differences between the steels were observed, they shared some common characteristics that differ from the conventional view of cleavage. Most notably cleavage does not occur as a single weakest link event; rather it is the consequence of a critical condition when a previously nucleated dispersion of microcracks suddenly coalesce to form a large, rapidly propagating macroscopic crack. It is argued that the critical event can be treated as a bridging instability. The stabilizing effect of the ductile ligaments separating the cleavage facets increases with increasing temperature. Indeed, even in the ductile tearing regime cleavage facets form a significant fraction of nuclei for larger microvoids.

  3. Effect of Nb on high-temperature properties for ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Ohmura, K.; Suzuki, T.; Funaki, S.; Hiroshige, I.

    1996-09-15

    In order to improve the efficiency of automobile engines and to reduce their weight, there is a move toward the use of conventional stainless steel sheets and pipes for exhaust manifolds to replace cast iron, the traditional material for this application. The exhaust manifold is used in an environment that includes engine vibrations as well as heating and cooling cycles caused by the travel pattern. Therefore, among high-temperature characteristics, thermal fatigue resistance is an important one that affects the life span of an exhaust manifold. Generally, austenitic steels have higher strength at high temperature than ferritic steels. However, type 304, a typical austenitic stainless steel, has less thermal fatigue resistance than type 430, a typical ferritic stainless steel. This is because austenitic steels have higher coefficient of thermal expansion than ferritic steels. Therefore, to obtain a material with excellent thermal fatigue resistance, it would conceivably be best to attempt to increase the high temperature strength of ferritic stainless steels. The present study centered on improvement of the high-temperature proof strength of ferritic stainless steels. The mechanism of high temperature strengthening by Nb addition, which was shown to be one of the most effective methods to improve proof strength at high temperature, was discussed.

  4. Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; More, Karren Leslie; Fayek, Mostafa; Walker, Larry R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-01-01

    A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

  5. Structures and properties of rapidly solidified 9Cr-lMo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megusar, J.; Lavernia, E.; Domalavage, P.; Harling, O. K.; Grant, N. J.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiation induced shifts of the DBTT and possible hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels are currently considered major problems for CTR applications. Rapid solidification and in particular liquid dynamic compaction (LDC) has been studied in developing 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate first wall material. Structural refinements such as reduction of segregation, fine grain size and fine size of second phase particles are retained in this process and this will have a favorable effect on fracture properties. LDC has also the potential of preparing first wall components directly from the melt and this would have an economic advantage over conventional ingot technology.

  6. Ferritic weldment of grain-refined ferritic steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Syn, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of the development of a weld filler metal and multipass GTA welding process for grain-refined 9Ni steel. The weld filler metal was cast in 4.5-kg ingots of the nominal composition Fe-14Ni-O.2Ti-0.003B, homogenized, hot-rolled, and then swaged into wire of 1.6-mm diameter. The chemical compositions of the base and filler metal are tabulated and the test welding procedure is described. Among the tests that were conducted on the welds are x-ray diffraction analysis for the residual austenite content; the Charpy impact test at 77 and 4.2 K for the fracture toughness; and scanning electron fractography for the weld metal, the HAZ, and the base metal of 9Ni Charpy specimens broken at 4.2 K. The procedure for grain refinement is defined; the retained austenite volume fraction is calculated using the method proposed by Miller. The results indicate that it is possible to weld grain-refined 9Ni steel with a ferritic weld filler metal and retain good toughness at cryogenic liquid helium temperatures.

  7. Effect of neutron irradiation at low temperature on the embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.

    1998-10-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation to fluence of 2.0 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) in temperature range 70-300°C on mechanical properties and structure of the experimental reduced-activation ferritic 0.1%C-(2.5-12)%Cr-(1-2)%W-(0.2-0.7)%V alloys were investigated. The steels were studied in different initial structural conditions obtained by changing the modes of heat treatments. Effect of neutron irradiation estimated by a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature (ΔDBTT) and reduction of upper shelf energy (ΔUSE) highly depends on both irradiation condition and steel chemical composition and structure. For the steel with optimum chemical composition (9Cr-1.5WV) after irradiation to 2 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E ⩾ 0.5 MeV) at 280°C the ΔDBTT does not exceed 25°C. The shift in DBTT increased from 35°C to 110°C for the 8Cr-1.5WV steel at a decrease in irradiation temperature from 300°C to 70°C. The CCT diagrams are presented for several reduced-activated steels.

  8. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  9. Studies on oxidation and deuterium permeation behavior of a low temperature α-Al2O3-forming Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Si-Xiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Tao; Hong, Suk-Ho; Zhou, Hai-Shan; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the capability of Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steels as tritium permeation barrier in fusion systems, the oxidation behavior together with the permeation behavior of a Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was investigated. Gas driven permeation experiments were performed. The permeability of the oxidized Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was obtained and a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 was used as a comparison. In order to characterize the oxide layer, SEM, XPS, TEM, HRTEM were used. Al2O3 was detected in the oxide film by XPS, and HRTEM showed that Al2O3 in the α phase was found. The formation of α-Al2O3 layer at a relatively low temperature may result from the formation of Cr2O3 nuclei.

  10. Microstructural Characteristics of Plasma Nitrided Layer on Hot-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel with a Small Amount of α-Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Liying; Niu, Xinjun; Cai, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The hot-rolled 304 stainless steel with γ-austenite and approximately 5 pct α-ferrite elongated along the rolling direction was plasma-nitrided at a low temperature of 693 K (420 °C). X-ray diffraction results revealed that the nitrided layer was mainly composed of the supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in austenite ( γ N). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the microstructure of the γ N phase exhibited "fracture factor contrast" reflective of the occurrence of fine pre-precipitations in γ N by the continuous precipitation. The occurrence of a diffuse scattering effect on the electron diffraction spots of γ N indicated that the pre-precipitation took place in γ N in the form of strongly bonded Cr-N clusters or pairs due to a strong attractive interaction of nitrogen with chromium. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observations indicated that the discontinuous precipitation initiated from the γ/ α interfaces and grew from the austenite boundaries into austenite grains to form a lamellar structure consisting of CrN and ferrite. The orientation relationship between CrN and ferrite corresponded to a Baker-Nutting relationship: (100)CrN//(100) α ; [011]CrN//[001] α . A zigzag boundary line following the banded structure of alternating γ-austenite and elongated α-ferrite was presented between the nitrided layer and the substrate to form a continuous varying layer thickness, which resulted from the difference in diffusivities of nitrogen in α-ferrite and γ-austenite, along the γ/ α interfaces and through the lattice. Microstructural features similar to the γ N were also revealed in the ferrite of the nitrided layer by TEM. It was not excluded that a supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite ( α N) formed in the nitrided layer.

  11. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  12. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  13. Ferritic-Martensitic steel Test Blanket Modules: Status and future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Aiello, G.; Aubert, P.; Boccaccini, L. V.; Daichendt, M.; De Dinechin, G.; Diegele, E.; Giancarli, L. M.; Lässer, R.; Neuberger, H.; Poitevin, Y.; Stephan, Y.; Rampal, G.; Rigal, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Helium-Cooled Lithium-Lead and the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed are the two breeding blankets concepts for the DEMO reactor which have been selected by EU to be tested in ITER in the framework of the Test Blanket Module projects. They both use a 9%CrWVTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steel, called EUROFER, as structural material and helium as coolant. This paper gives an overview of the status of the EUROFER qualification program and discusses the future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation.

  14. Field-dependent neutron depolarization study of the ferrite formation in medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Te Velthuis, S.G.E.; Van Dijk, N.H.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Sietsma, J.; Van Der Zwaag, S.

    2000-03-14

    Neutron depolarization experiments have been performed on the ferrite and pearlite phase transformations of the medium-carbon C60 and C35 steels. The interaction of the polarized neutron beam with the ferromagnetic ferrite grains gives information on the mean magnetization and the magnetic correlation length. From these parameters the ferrite fraction and the mean ferrite grain size are determined in situ as a function of time and temperature during the phase transformation. The applied magnetic field was varied periodically in order to record a full hysteresis curve of the magnetization, which gives essential information on the microstructure of the ferromagnetic ferrite grains. The field dependence of the mean particle size during the early stages of the pearlite formation is a strong indication of multi-domain behavior, which is absent in the austenite-ferrite transformation and at the end of the pearlite formation.

  15. Effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W. C.; Kim, C. H.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel were investigated by observing crack initiation, propagation, and fracture behaviors. Crack initiation occurred by decohesion between martensite and ferrite. However, cracks propagated along the ferrite-martensite interface in a high temperature quenched specimen, whereas in specimens quenched from lower temperature cracks propagated into the martensite particle. Tensile fracture behaviors were not strongly influenced by the cooling rate. At both cooling rates of 5.6 and 0.1 °C/sec, specimens quenched from high temperature fractured by partially brittle fracture mode, but fracture mode changed to ductile mode as the quenching temperature decreased. The effect of transformed ferrite on the fracture mode was not substantially different from that of retained ferrite. However, the crack initiation and propagation was influenced by the variation in martensite distribution caused by different growth behavior of transformed ferrite.

  16. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Suryanarayana, C.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Seven ODS steels, Fe(5-13.5)Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) were manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Only the composition Fe-13.5Cr3W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed no austenite formation at any temperature using differential thermal analysis and hence was selected as an experimental alloy for the present investigation. Milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing and hot swaging. Electron microscopy studies indicated high material homogeneity. The hardness of the as-swaged specimen was 65 R{sub c}. Annealing of the as-swaged material at 800, 900, 1000, 1100, and 1200{degrees}C showed a minor decrease in the hardness.

  17. Characterization of nanoscale NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic steel by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Zhenke; Miller, Michael K; Ghosh, Gautam; Liu, Chain T; Huang, Shenyan; Russell, Kaye F; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of NiAl-type ({beta}{prime}) precipitates in an aged ferritic steel (Fe-12.7Al-9Ni-10.2Cr-1.9Mo, at.%) is characterized by transmission and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). The alloy shows a duplex precipitation of {beta}{prime} particles: primary with an average diameter of 130 nm and secondary with an average diameter of 3 nm. Based on APT, the primary and secondary {beta}{prime} have compositions of Ni{sub 41.2}Al{sub 43.6}Fe{sub 12.7}Cr{sub 0.8}Mo{sub 1.4} and Ni{sub 26.3}Al{sub 41.6}Fe{sub 26.9}Cr{sub 3.3}Mo{sub 1.7}, respectively.

  18. Modelling of Nb influence on phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in low carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Parker, S. V.; Rose, A. J.; West, G. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new model has been developed to predict the phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in Nb-containing low carbon steels. The new model is based on some previous work and incorporates the effects of Nb on phase transformation behaviours, in order to make it applicable for Nb-containing steels. Dissolved Nb atoms segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries increase the critical energy for ferrite nucleation, and thus the ferrite nucleation rate is decreased. Dissolved Nb atoms also apply a solute drag effect to the moving transformation interface, and the ferrite grain growth rate is also decreased. The overall transformation kinetics is then calculated according to the classic Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory. The new model predictions are quite consistent with experimental results for various steels during isothermal transformations or continuous cooling.

  19. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  20. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  1. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  2. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  3. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  4. Microstructure and oxidation properties of 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel prepared by sol-gel and spark plasma sintering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y. P.; Wang, X. P.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, Q. X.; Zhang, T.; Fang, Q. F.; Hao, T.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The 16Cr-5Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. The phase characterization, microstructure and oxidation resistance of the 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel were investigated in comparison with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the Al free and Al added 16Cr-ODS steels exhibited typical ferritic characteristic structure. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) revealed that Y-Ti-O complexes with particle size of 10-30 nm were formed in the Al free matrix and Y-Al-O complexes with particle size of 20-100 nm were formed in the Al contained high-Cr ODS steel matrix. These complexes are homogeneously distributed in the matrices. The fabricated 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel exhibited superior oxidation resistance compared with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel and the commercial 304 stainless steel owing to the formation of continuous and dense Al2O3 film on the surface.

  5. Investigation of AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel and Development of Spinel Coatings for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2008-05-30

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare and spinel coated AISI 441 were studied in terms of metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The conventional melt metallurgy used for the bulk alloy fabrication leads to significant processing cost reduction and the alloy chemistry with the presence of minor alloying additions of Nb and Ti facilitate the strengthening by precipitation and formation of Laves phase both inside grains and along grain boundaries during exposure in the intermediate SOFC operating temperature range. The Laves phase formed along the grain boundaries also ties up Si and prevents the formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface during prolonged exposure. The substantial increase in ASR during long term oxidation due to oxide scale growth suggested the need for a conductive protection layer, which could also minimize Cr evaporation. In particular, Mn1.5Co1.5O4 based surface coatings on planar coupons drastically improved the electrical performance of the 441, yielding stable ASR values at 800ºC for over 5,000 hours. Ce-modified spinel coatings retained the advantages of the unmodified spinel coatings, and also appeared to alter the scale growth behavior beneath the coating, leading to a more adherent scale. The spinel protection layers appeared also to improve the surface stability of 441 against the anomalous oxidation that has been observed for ferritic stainless steels exposed to dual atmosphere conditions similar to SOFC interconnect environments. Hence, it is anticipated that, compared to unmodified spinel coatings, the Ce-modified coatings may lead to superior structural stability and electrical performance.

  6. Effect of tin addition on the microstructure and properties of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Han, Ji-peng; Jiang, Zhou-hua; He, Pan

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the effects of Sn on the inclusions as well as the mechanical properties and hot workability of ferritic stainless steel. Precipitation phases and inclusions in Sn-bearing ferritic stainless steel were observed, and the relationship between the workability and the microstructure of the steel was established. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis of the steel reveals that an almost pure Sn phase forms and MnS-Sn compound inclusions appear in the steel with a higher Sn content. Little Sn segregation was observed in grain boundaries and in the areas around sulfide inclusions; however, the presence of Sn does not adversely affect the workability of the steel containing 0.4wt% Sn. When the Sn content is 0.1wt%-0.4wt%, Sn improves the tensile strength and the plastic strain ratio and also improves the plasticity with increasing temperature. A mechanism of improving the workability of ferritic stainless steel induced by Sn addition was discussed: the presence of Sn lowers the defect concentration in the ultra-pure ferritic lattice and the good distribution of tin in the lattice overcomes the problem of hot brittleness that occurs in low-carbon steel as a result of Sn segregation.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of weld fusion zones in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.; Albert, Shaju K.

    2001-06-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel finds increasing application in power plant construction because of its excellent high-temperature properties. While it has been shown to be weldable and resistant to all types of cracking in the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ), the achievement of optimum weld metal properties has often caused concern. The design of appropriate welding consumables is important in this regard. In the present work, plates of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were welded with three different filler materials: standard 9Cr-1Mo steel, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and nickel-base alloy Inconel 182. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 730 and 760 °C for periods of 2 and 6 h. The joints were characterized in detail by metallography. Hardness, tensile properties, and Charpy toughness were evaluated. Among the three filler materials used, although Inconel 182 resulted in high weld metal toughness, the strength properties were too low. Between modified and standard 9Cr-1Mo, the former led to superior hardness and strength in all conditions. However, with modified 9Cr-1Mo, fusion zone toughness was low and an acceptable value could be obtained only after PWHT for 6 h at 760 °C. The relatively poor toughness was correlated to the occurrence of local regions of untransformed ferrite in the microstructure.

  8. Evaluation of Interface Boundaries in 9Cr-1Mo Steel After Thermal and Thermomechanical Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, T.; Dash, Manmath Kumar; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-04-01

    The grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and microstructure in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel subjected to different heat treatments and thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) have been evaluated using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Microstructures obtained through displacive transformation of high-temperature austenite yielded higher amounts of Σ1-29 coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries (from 29 to 38 pct) compared with the ferrite grains obtained by diffusional transformation (~16 pct) or by recrystallization process (~14 pct). Specifically, the low-angle (Σ1), Σ3, Σ11, and Σ25b boundaries were enhanced in the tempered martensite substructure, whereas the prior austenite grain boundaries were largely of random type. Misorientation between the product ferrite variants for ideal orientation relationships during austenite transformation was calculated and compared with CSL misorientation to find its proximity based on Brandon's criteria. The observed enhancements in Σ1, Σ3, and Σ11 could be interpreted based on Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) relation, but Nishiyama-Wassermann (N-W) relation was needed to understand Σ25b formation. The amounts of CSL boundaries in the tempered martensite structure were not significantly influenced by austenite grain size or the kinetics of martensitic transformation. In mixed microstructures of "polygonal ferrite + tempered martensite", the frequencies of CSL boundaries were found to systematically decrease with increasing amounts of diffusional/recrystallized ferrite.

  9. Microstructural characterization of the HAZ in AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Cleiton C. Farias, Jesualdo P.; Miranda, Helio C.; Guimaraes, Rodrigo F.; Menezes, John W.A.; Neto, Moises A.M.

    2008-05-15

    Ferritic stainless steel is used as a coating for equipment in the petroleum refining industry. Welding is the main manufacturing and maintenance process used. However, little information on the metallurgical alterations caused by welding of these steels is found in the literature, prompting this study. In this study the authors evaluated the HAZ microstructure of AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel welded plates, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that a weld thermal cycle caused microphase precipitation in the HAZ of the ferritic stainless steel. Also needle-like Laves phase precipitation occurred in the HAZ, near the partially-melted zone. Other secondary phases such as chi and sigma were observed, as well as nitride, carbide and carbonitride precipitates.

  10. Optical Band Gap Study Of Nanocrystalline NiCr0.8Fe1.2O4 Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arun S.; Dolia, S. N.; Dhawan, M. S.; Predeep, P.

    2008-04-01

    Optical energy band gap of nanocrystalline NiCr0.8Fe1.2O4 ferrite have been studied. The nanocrystalline NiCr0.8Fe1.2O4 ferrite have been synthesized using sol-gel technique. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the formation of spinel structure in single phase and the average particle size is 4 nm. The energy band gap measurements of nanocrystalline NiCr0.8Fe1.2O4 ferrite in pellet form have been carried out by absorption spectra using double beam spectrophotometer. A pellet of nanoparticle ferrite was made under a load of 10 tons. From the analysis of absorption spectra, nanocrystalline NiCr0.8Fe1.2O4 ferrite have been found to have energy band gap of 3.2 eV at room temperature.