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Sample records for crada pc91-002 final

  1. Flow Visualization Studies in the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System CRADA PC91-002, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Borovetz, H.S.; Shaffer, F.; Schaub, R.; Lund, L.; Woodard, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of experiments to visualize and measure flow fields in the Novacor left ventricular assist system (LVAS). The experiments utilize a multiple exposure, optical imaging technique called fluorescent image tracking velocimetry (FITV) to hack the motion of small, neutrally-buoyant particles in a flowing fluid.

  2. Geophysical tomography imaging system. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.J.; Won, I.J.

    1998-05-20

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and Geophex, Ltd., was established to investigate high-resolution, shallow acoustic imaging of the subsurface. The primary objectives of the CRADA were accomplished, including the evaluation of a new tomographic imaging algorithm and the testing and comparison of two different acoustic sources, the hammer/plate source and an electromagnetic vibratory source. The imaging system was composed essentially of a linear array of geophones, a digital seismograph, and imaging software installed on a personal computer. Imaging was most successful using the hammer source, which was found to be less susceptible to ground roll (surface wave) interference. It is conjectured that the vibratory source will perform better for deeper targets for which ground roll is less troublesome. Potential applications of shallow acoustic imaging are numerous, including the detection and characterization of buried solid waste, unexploded ordnance, and clandestine man-made underground structures associated with treaty verification (e.g., tunnels, underground storage facilities, hidden bunkers).

  3. Machining and inspection of structural ceramic components. CRADA final report for CRADA number Y-1292-0078

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, R.W.; Albright, S.; Ritland, M.

    1996-09-30

    This document is the final report of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Coors Ceramics Company (Coors). The purpose of this CRADA was to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting ceramic components. Specific CRADA objectives were accomplished through the completion of six projects at four separate Coors facilities. The projects included the development of an analytical model to simulate the mechanics of a powder rolling process, development and testing of a microwave-based system for measuring the density of conveyed ceramic material, and the development and testing of four machine vision inspection systems. This CRADA benefited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with advanced heat engines, enhanced critical manufacturing skills within the DOE complex for fabricating precision, high quality workpieces from difficult-to-machine materials, and enabled U.S. industry to maintain a position of leadership in the structural ceramics field.

  4. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L; Miller, J; Parzych, W

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  5. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

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    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  6. HIP densification project. Final CRADA report

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    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Finkelstein, W.

    1997-08-29

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

  7. Final report for the Tera Computer TTI CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, G.S.; Pavlakos, C.; Silva, C.

    1997-01-01

    Tera Computer and Sandia National Laboratories have completed a CRADA, which examined the Tera Multi-Threaded Architecture (MTA) for use with large codes of importance to industry and DOE. The MTA is an innovative architecture that uses parallelism to mask latency between memories and processors. The physical implementation is a parallel computer with high cross-section bandwidth and GaAs processors designed by Tera, which support many small computation threads and fast, lightweight context switches between them. When any thread blocks while waiting for memory accesses to complete, another thread immediately begins execution so that high CPU utilization is maintained. The Tera MTA parallel computer has a single, global address space, which is appealing when porting existing applications to a parallel computer. This ease of porting is further enabled by compiler technology that helps break computations into parallel threads. DOE and Sandia National Laboratories were interested in working with Tera to further develop this computing concept. While Tera Computer would continue the hardware development and compiler research, Sandia National Laboratories would work with Tera to ensure that their compilers worked well with important Sandia codes, most particularly CTH, a shock physics code used for weapon safety computations. In addition to that important code, Sandia National Laboratories would complete research on a robotic path planning code, SANDROS, which is important in manufacturing applications, and would evaluate the MTA performance on this code. Finally, Sandia would work directly with Tera to develop 3D visualization codes, which would be appropriate for use with the MTA. Each of these tasks has been completed to the extent possible, given that Tera has just completed the MTA hardware. All of the CRADA work had to be done on simulators.

  8. Cimstation/IM enhanced data verification, CRADA final report for CRADA number Y-1292-0162

    SciTech Connect

    Biddix, M.D.; Turner, J.

    1994-05-16

    This report discusses a CRADA code used to enhance the Cimstation in ramifaction of inspection part programs as they are being develop. This report briefly discussed the following topics and contains a code listing in the back: algorithm explanation; Cimstation CAD models; importing inspection point data; need for a new algorithm; details of the algorithms; formulas/mathematics used for the algorithm; algorithm software design diagram; and software function descriptions.

  9. [A variable frequency microwave furnace]. CRADA final report for CRADA Number ORNL91-0055

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.

    1994-12-08

    The goals of this CRADA were to: (1) development and demonstrate a highly frequency-agile microwave furnace; (2) explore applications of the furnace for materials processing; and (3) develop control systems and packaging that are robust, user-friendly, and suitable for sale as a turnkey system. Microwave Laboratories, Inc. (MLI) designed, built, and successfully brought to market a benchtop Variable Frequency Microwave Furnace (VFMF). The concept has demonstrated advantages in polymer curing, waste remediation, and diamond (CVD). Through experimentation and modeling, the VFMF approach has gained credibility within the technical community.

  10. CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, Joel W

    2011-02-14

    TCF funding of a CRADA between LBNL and RSLE leveraged RSLE's original $1M investment in LBNL research and led to development of a solar cell fabrication process that will bring the high efficiency, high voltage hybrid tandem solar cell closer to commercialization. RSLE has already built a pilot line at its Phoenix, Arizona site.

  11. Surface Inspection Machine Infrared (SIMIR). Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Neu, J.T.; Beecroft, M.

    1997-02-28

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was a one year effort to make the surface inspection machine based on diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (Surface Inspection Machine-Infrared, SIMIR), being developed by Surface Optics Corporation, perform to its highest potential as a practical, portable surface inspection machine. The design function of the SIMIR is to inspect metal surfaces for cleanliness (stains). The system is also capable of evaluating graphite-resin systems for cure and heat damage, and for measuring the effects of moisture exposure on lithium hydride, corrosion on uranium metal, and the constituents of and contamination on wood, paper, and fabrics. Over the period of the CRADA, extensive experience with the use of the SIMIR for surface cleanliness measurements have been achieved through collaborations with NASA and the Army. The SIMIR was made available to the AMTEX CRADA for Finish on Yarn where it made a very significant contribution. The SIMIR was the foundation of a Forest Products CRADA that was developed over the time interval of this CRADA. Surface Optics Corporation and the SIMIR have been introduced to the chemical spectroscopy on-line analysis market and have made staffing additions and arrangements for international marketing of the SIMIR as an on-line surface inspection device. LMES has been introduced to a wide range of aerospace applications, the research and fabrication skills of Surface Optics Corporation, has gained extensive experience in the areas of surface cleanliness from collaborations with NASA and the Army, and an extensive introduction to the textile and forest products industries. The SIMIR, marketed as the SOC-400, has filled an important new technology need in the DOE-DP Enhanced Surveillance Program with instruments delivered to or on order by LMES, LANL, LLNL, and Pantex, where extensive collaborations are underway to implement and improve this technology.

  12. Final Report on CRADA ORNL05-0703

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, D. K.

    2010-04-27

    The work of this CRADA has been focused on the development of Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS)-based high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductor technology that is in the pre-commercial development stage. Metal-Oxide Technologies, Inc. (MetOx) is a Houston-based small business that is developing and manufacturing second-generation (2G) HTS wire using an all-Metallo-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) process, including the buffer layers and HTS coating. Advances toward commercialization were enabled by coordinated interactions that facilitated the synthesis, characterization, and iterative optimization of prototype 2G wire segments.

  13. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-06-12

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation.

  14. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  15. Advanced austenitic alloys for fossil power systems. CRADA final report

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    Swindeman, R.W.; Cole, N.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Henry, J.F.

    1998-08-01

    In 1993, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ABB Combustion Engineering t examine advanced alloys for fossil power systems. Specifically, the use of advanced austenitic stainless steels for superheater/reheater construction in supercritical boilers was examined. The strength of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels was reviewed and compared to the strength and ductility of advanced austenitic stainless steels. The advanced stainless steels were found to retain their strength to very long times at temperatures where cold-worked standard grades of austenitic stainless steels became weak. Further, the steels exhibited better long-time stability than the stabilized 300 series stainless steels in either the annealed or cold worked conditions. Type 304H mill-annealed tubing was provided to ORNL for testing of base metal and butt welds. The tubing was found to fall within range of expected strength for 304H stainless steel. The composite 304/308 stainless steel was found to be stronger than typical for the weldment. Boiler tubing was removed from a commercial boiler for replacement by newer steels, but restraints imposed by the boiler owners did not permit the installation of the advanced steels, so a standard 32 stainless steel was used as a replacement. The T91 removed from the boiler was characterized.

  16. Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T.

    2012-08-27

    Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The

  17. CRADA Final Report: ErbB2 Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, Ruth

    2002-08-27

    The aim of the study was to design novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of carcinomas which overexpress the erbB-2 oncogene product and/or the activator (HRG). erbB-2 is a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, that overexpression of which in invasive breast, prostate, ovarian and lung carcinomas correlates with poor prognosis and poor overall survival. In breast carcinomas, erbB-2 is overexpressed in 25%-30% of the invasive phenotype and in 70% of ductal carcinomas in situ. On the other hand, the erbB-2 activator, heregulin (HRG) is expressed in about 30% of invasive breast carcinomas and it is highly expressed in other carcinoIl1as including, ovarian, lung, and prostate. Interestingly, only 6% of invasive breast carcinomas co-express both HRG and erbB-2. It is known today that tumors that overexpress erbB-2 are a leading cause of death, making erbB-2 and its activator HRG critical targets for therapy. Targeting both the receptors and the activator would be beneficial for a significant number of cancer patients. At the final stages of the project we had obtained significant improvements over the peptide quality but not significant improvements were made towards the generation of humanized monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramics. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1292-0088

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J.D.; Kalish, Y.

    1996-12-06

    This CRADA supports the objective of demonstrating feasibility and minimizing manufacturing costs associated with the use of ceramic components in a heavy duty diesel engine manufactured by Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC). Studies were conducted to evaluate existing, known data for ceramic material, and to identify additional data needed to better characterize a valve of ceramic composition. Tests were conducted to provide important information required for redesign of existing metal valves and other engine head components. A vendor was selected by DDC to produce the valve shapes for testing and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) provided design modeling/analysis support. The effort also included the development of a bench-test apparatus to simulate the environment of a valve in operation that provided material data and confirmation of analytical results.

  19. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-10-02991 "Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Precursors and Conversion Technologies"

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Rober; Paulauskas, Felix; Naskar, Amit; Kaufman, Michael; Yarborough, Ken; Derstine, Chris

    2013-10-01

    The overall objective of the collaborative research performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Dow Chemical Company under this Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA NFE-10-02991) was to develop and establish pathways to commercialize new carbon fiber precursor and conversion technology. This technology is to produce alternative polymer fiber precursor formulations as well as scaled energy-efficient advanced conversion technology to enable continuous mode conversion to obtain carbonized fibers that are technically and economically viable in industrial markets such as transportation, wind energy, infrastructure and oil drilling applications. There have been efforts in the past to produce a low cost carbon fiber. These attempts have to be interpreted against the backdrop of the market needs at the time, which were strictly military aircraft and high-end aerospace components. In fact, manufacturing costs have been reduced from those days to current practice, where both process optimization and volume production have enabled carbon fiber to become available at prices below $20/lb. However, the requirements of the lucrative aerospace market limits further price reductions from current practice. This approach is different because specific industrial applications are targeted, most specifically wind turbine blade and light vehicle transportation, where aircraft grade carbon fiber is not required. As a result, researchers are free to adjust both manufacturing process and precursor chemistry to meet the relaxed physical specifications at a lower cost. This report documents the approach and findings of this cooperative research in alternative precursors and advanced conversion for production of cost-effective carbon fiber for energy missions. Due to export control, proprietary restrictions, and CRADA protected data considerations, specific design details and processing parameters are not included in this report.

  20. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Pihl, Josh A; West, Brian H; Toops, Todd J; Adelman, Brad; Derybowski, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments

  1. Frito-Lay North America/NREL CRADA: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-176

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.

    2013-06-01

    Frito Lay North America (FLNA) requires technical assistance for the evaluation and implementation of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in production facilities and distribution centers across North America. Services provided by NREL do not compete with those available in the private sector, but rather provide FLNA with expertise to create opportunities for the private sector renewable/efficiency industries and to inform FLNA decision making regarding cost-effective projects. Services include: identifying the most cost-effective project locations based on renewable energy resource data, utility data, incentives and other parameters affecting projects; assistance with feasibility studies; procurement specifications; design reviews; and other services to support FNLA in improving resource efficiency at facilities. This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) establishes the terms and conditions under which FLNA may access capabilities unique to the laboratory and required by FLNA. Each subsequent task issued under this umbrella agreement would include a scope-of-work, budget, schedule, and provisions for intellectual property specific to that task.

  2. Improved catalyst materials and emission control systems. CRADA final report for CRADA Number ORNL 92-0115

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; Domingo, N.; Storey, J.M.; LaBarge, W.; Beckmeyer, R.F.; Theis, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    The overall goal of this CRADA was the improvement of performance and/or development of alternate systems for conventional fuel, flex-fuel, and alternate fuel vehicles in order to meet stringent future emission standards. The objectives had three major thrusts: (1) the characterization of the structural and chemical evolution of the precious metals and washcoat during aging under bench flow reactor, engine dynamometer, and vehicle conditions; (2) the correlation of measured catalyst performance and degradation over time with details of microstructural changes under bench flow reactor and engine dynamometer conditions; and (3) the simulation and testing of an in-cylinder catalyst system to determine the effect on emissions of a single-cylinder engine. Catalyst formulations for both gasoline and natural gas applications were studied. The emission testing and structural characterization were performed on alternate formulations and processing variables in order to evaluate the relative conversion efficiency, lifetime, and stability. The aging parameters were correlated with the evolving structure and properties of the tested catalytic converters. A major portion of the second thrust area was the construction and validation of both the bench flow reactor and engine dynamometer test facility and the identification of deactivation/regeneration mechanisms associated with alternative fuels relative to those for conventional fuel. A number of microstructural changes were identified that could contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst during aging. The stability of several catalyst formulations and alternate processing procedures relative to these microstructural changes and changes in conversion efficiency and lifetime were studied.

  3. CRADA Final Report for CRADA No. ORNL99-0544, Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.

    2005-10-17

    Electron beam (EB) curing is a technology that promises, in certain applications, to deliver lower cost and higher performance polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures compared to conventional thermal curing processes. PMCs enhance performance by making products lighter, stronger, more durable, and less energy demanding. They are essential in weight- and performance-dominated applications. Affordable PMCs can enhance US economic prosperity and national security. US industry expects rapid implementation of electron beam cured composites in aircraft and aerospace applications as satisfactory properties are demonstrated, and implementation in lower performance applications will likely follow thereafter. In fact, at this time and partly because of discoveries made in this project, field demonstrations are underway that may result in the first fielded applications of electron beam cured composites. Serious obstacles preventing the widespread use of electron beam cured PMCs in many applications are their relatively poor interfacial properties and resin toughness. The composite shear strength and resin toughness of electron beam cured carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites were about 25% and 50% lower, respectively, than those of thermally cured composites of similar formulations. The essential purpose of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of electron beam cured, carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites, with a specific focus on composite shear properties for high performance aerospace applications. Many partners, sponsors, and subcontractors participated in this project. There were four government sponsors from three federal agencies, with the US Department of Energy (DOE) being the principal sponsor. The project was executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), NASA and Department of Defense (DOD) participants, eleven private CRADA partners, and two subcontractors. A list of key project contacts is provided in Appendix A. In order to properly

  4. An evaluation of optical tool inspection and compensation technologies. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1291-0052

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    Babelay, E.F.; Centola, J.; Zorger, W.; Serafin, W.

    1994-05-15

    A Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) was established April 1992 between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and United Technologies Corporation, Pratt and Whitney Division to evaluate the existing applicability of the Energy Systems optical tool inspection and compensation system (OTICS) for use at Pratt and Whitney`s East Hartford Plant. The OTICS was developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and optically measures the shape of a single point cutting tool. The tool shape inspection provides process information relating to tool wear and if desired the tool shape geometry can be used to generate a new numerical control machining program that is compensated for the tool forms errors. The tool wear measurement capability of OTICS was successfully evaluated in the Phase-1 testing. The testing verified that OTICS can easily detect tool wear and the {+-} 0.0001 inch resolution obtained was sufficient for the larger cutter inserts used by Pratt and Whitney (P and W). During the tool wear experiments at P and W, a second potential use identified for OTICS was the accurate on-machine dimensional verification of special ground contour forming tools. The OTICS tool path compensation experiment demonstrated the varied technologies that are integrated in the tool path compensation process. The OTICS system was successful at inspecting the 0.125 in. radius tool and compensating the tool path for tool form errors. The need for automated interfaces between the OTICS computer and controller along with the part program requirements and the overall compensation methodology were highlighted in the demonstration.

  5. Inverted Metamorphic Cell Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-156

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA targeted technology transfer of the inverted metamorphic multi-junction (IMM) solar cell innovation from NREL to Emcore Photovoltaics. The technology transfer was successfully completed. Additionally, NREL provided materials characterization of solar cell structures produced at Emcore.

  6. Optical Probe for Semiconductor: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-206

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2011-02-01

    This CRADA involves development of a new semiconductor characterization tool, Optical Probe, which can be commercialized by GT Solar. GT Solar will participate in the design and testing of this instrument that will be developed under an IPP project.

  7. Centralized Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment - CRADA Final Report For CRADA Number NFE-11-03562

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, R. K.; Peters, Scott

    2014-05-28

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  8. Reduced dust emission industrial vacuum system. Final report/project accomplishments summary, CRADA Number KCP941001

    SciTech Connect

    Yerganian, S.; Wilson, S.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify the design of a Billy Goat Industries VQ series industrial litter vacuum cleaner currently in production to allow it to be effective in a dusty environment. Other desired results were that the new design be easily and economically manufacturable, safe and easy for the operator to use and maintain, and easily adaptable to the rest of the Billy Goat Industries product line. To meet these objectives, the project plan was divided into four main phases. The first phase consisted of design overview and concept development. The second phase consisted of developing a detailed design based on the lessons learned from the prototype built in the first phase. The third phase consisted of refinement of the detailed design based on testing and marketing review. The fourth phase consisted of final reporting on the activities of the CRADA. The project has been terminated due to technical difficulties and a lack of confidence that practical, marketable solutions to these problems could be found.

  9. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    SciTech Connect

    Curro, J.G.; Schweizer, K.S.; Honeycutt, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  10. Integrated Biorefinery Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-390

    SciTech Connect

    Chapeaux, A.; Schell, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Amyris-NREL CRADA is a sub-project of Amyris?s DOE-funded pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR). The primary product of the Amyris IBR is Amyris Renewable Diesel. Secondary products will include lubricants, polymers and other petro-chemical substitutes. Amyris and its project partners will execute on a rapid project to integrate and leverage their collective expertise to enable the conversion of high-impact biomass feedstocks to these advanced, infrastructure-compatible products. The scope of the Amyris-NREL CRADA includes the laboratory development and pilot scale-up of bagasse pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification conditions by NREL for subsequent conversion of lignocellulosic sugar streams to Amyris Diesel and chemical products by Amyris. The CRADA scope also includes a techno-economic analysis of the overall production process of Amyris products from high-impact biomass feedstocks.

  11. Development of lifetime test procedure for powder evacuated panel insulation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K E; Graves, R S; Childs, K W

    1996-03-01

    This CRADA is between Appliance Research Consortium (ARC) of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and the Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. A Powder Evacuated Panel (PEP) is a "super" thermal insulation, having a thermal resistivity (R) substantially above that of existing insulation without the environmental problems of some insulations such as Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blown foam.

  12. Supply of purified Th228 for Ra224 generators. Final CRADA Report .

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-02

    CRADA was terminated when it was determined that the Russians could not perform the terms of the subcontract. It became apparent that the Russians would not be a reliable source of Th228, as a precursor in the decay chain which leads to Ra224. Their government policies will prohibit the export of Th228 in quantities needed for commercial cancer therapy.

  13. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Final CRADA Report ORNL-00-0609, Real-Time Control of Diesel Combustion Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert M

    2010-07-01

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) and ORNL established this CRADA to improve heavy-duty engine efficiency with reduced emissions at relatively extreme operating regimes such has high EGR, low-load, and cold-start, with an emphasis on the application of advanced control strategies. The approach used in this collaborative effort was to include the application of novel analysis and modeling techniques developed from the application of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory. More specifically, analytical techniques derived from these theories were to used to detect, characterize, and control the combustion instabilities that are responsible for poor combustion performance and corresponding high emissions. The foundation of this CRADA was established based on ORNL expertise on the fundamentals of advanced combustion operation and experience with nonlinear dynamics and controls in combustion systems. The initial plan was all data generation would be performed at DDC with an agreed upon experimental plan formed by both organizations. While numerous experiments were performed at DDC and the data was exchanged with ORNL researchers, the team decided to transfer an engine to ORNL to allow more flexibility and data generation opportunities. A prototype DDC Series 60 with a common rail fuel system was selected and installed at ORNL. DDC and ORNL maintained a strong collaboration throughout much of this project. Direct funding from DOE ended in 2004 and DDC continued to fund at a reduced amount through 2007. This CRADA has not been funded in more recent years but has been maintained active in anticipation of restored funding. This CRADA has led to additional collaborations between DDC and ORNL. The objectives are to: (1) Explore and establish boundaries of high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) modes on a DDC heavy-duty diesel engine; (2) Improve fundamental understanding of combustion instabilities for use in the development of predictive controls and diagnostics; and (3) Develop

  15. Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot`s performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B&R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding.

  16. Machine tool evaluation (development of environmentally conscious machining fluids and systems). CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Sigman, M.E.; Yang, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The overall purpose of this CRADA is to select or develop as required a group of cutting fluids, for use with metals and/or ceramic materials, which are more environmentally benign and which will reduce or eliminate the environmental problems associated with management and disposal of these cutting fluids. This CRADA was initially funded by DOE/DP, and was expanded to include DOE/ER funding with an added focus on environmental issues related to synthetic cutting fluids. The specific objective of this DOE-ER funded project (one of ten technical tasks within the CRADA) is to determine and demonstrate chemical methods of degrading and/or improving the disposability of synthetic cutting fluids. Photochemical advanced oxidation processes were developed and demonstrated to successfully remove all carbon from new and used cutting fluids, and from surrogate solutions containing up to 15,000 ppm of total organic carbon in the initial solutions. Chemical and energy costs for the process were evaluated. Commercial providers of advanced oxidation process technologies were consulted concerning scale-up, and associated costs in industrial systems were estimated to be well represented by the laboratory bench-scale measured values. Engineering aspects and alternative oxidation methodologies were explored through consultation with an internationally recognized chemical engineer, and it was concluded that no clear alternatives were available for treating aqueous fluids with extremely high initial carbon content (i.e., 15,000 popm total organic carbon).

  17. Rhenium labeled peptides and antibodies for cancer therapy. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.; Rhodes, B. A.

    1996-08-12

    This CRADA involved development of optimal methods for attachment of rhenium radioisotopes to antibodies and peptides which can be used for cancer treatment. Rhenium-186 and the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generators were provided from ORNL to RhoMed for peptide labeling studies. The rhenium-186 and carrier-free rhenium-188 were then used to optimize the labeling of various small peptides....A system has been developed at ORNL which provides the rhenium-188 radioisotope, which has excellent therapeutic properties for cancer treatment.

  18. Prevention of iron-sulfide deposition in petroleum processing. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R. D.; Panchal, C. B.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-25

    The purpose of this CRADA extension which effectively ended in 2003 was to quantify the effect of iron-sulfide formation on the fouling propensity of crude oil. The specific objectives are focused on fouling of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU-1) at the Shell Refinery in Mobile, Alabama. The technical approach consists of analyzing the plant data, chemical analysis of crude oil to detect key precursors, performing refinery tests using the Argonne Field Fouling Unit, and verifying the effectiveness of a physical device of tube insert and enhanced tubes to change threshold conditions and thereby reducing fouling.

  19. DEDALOS NREL: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-237

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.

    2013-06-01

    Currently High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) terrestrial modules are based on the combination of optic elements that concentrate the sunlight into much smaller GaAs space cells to produce electricity. GaAs cell technology has been well developed for space applications during the last two decades, but the use of GaAs cells under concentrated sunlight in terrestrial applications leaves unanswered questions about performance, durability and reliability. The work to be performed under this CRADA will set the basis for the design of high-performance, durable and reliable HCPV terrestrial modules that will bring down electricity production costs in the next five years.

  20. Efficiency Improvement of Nitride-Based Solid State Light Emitting Materials -- CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke

    2010-05-13

    The development of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} N/GaN thin film growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy has opened a new route towards energy efficient solid-state lighting. Blue and green LED's became available that can be used to match the whole color spectrum of visible light with the potential to match the eye response curve. Moreover, the efficiency of such devices largely exceeds that of incandescent light sources (tungsten filaments) and even competes favorably with lighting by fluorescent lamps. It is, however, also seen in Figure 1 that it is essential to improve on the luminous performance of green LED's in order to mimic the eye response curve. This lack of sufficiently efficient green LED's relates to particularities of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N materials system. This ternary alloy system is polar and large strain is generated during a lattice mismatched thin film growth because of the significantly different lattice parameters between GaN and InN and common substrates such as sapphire. Moreover, it is challenging to incorporate indium into GaN at typical growth temperatures because a miscibility gap exists that can be modified by strain effects. As a result a large parameter space needs exploration to optimize the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to date it is unclear what the detailed physical processes are that affect device efficiencies. In particular, an inhomogeneous distribution indium in GaN modifies the device performance in an unpredictable manner. As a result technology is pushed forward on a trial and error basis in particular in Asian countries such as Japan and Korea, which dominate the market and it is desirable to strengthen the competitiveness of the US industry. This CRADA was initiated to help Lumileds Lighting/USA boosting the performance of their green LED's. The tasks address the distribution of the indium atoms in the active area of their blue and green LED's and its relation to internal and external quantum efficiencies. Procedures to

  1. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  2. Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Maley

    2004-03-31

    Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because

  3. Multiphase Flow Modeling - Validation and Application CRADA MC94-019, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhava Syamlal; Philip A. Nicoletti

    1995-08-31

    For the development and validation of multiphase flow modeling capability, a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) is in effect between Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) and Fluent Inc. To validate the Fluent multiphase model, several simulations were conducted at METC and the results were compared with the results of MFIX, a multiphase flow code developed at METC, and with experimental data. The results of these validation studies will be presented. In addition, the application of multiphase flow modeling will be illustrated by presenting the results of simulations of a filter back- flushing and a fluidized bed coal gasifier. These simulations were conducted only with MFIX, since certain features needed in these simulations will be available only in the next release of Fluent.

  4. Manufacture of die casting dies by hot isostatic pressing. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Luk, K.; Brucher, H.G.

    1998-09-01

    The reason for this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Doehler-Jarvis was to investigate the manufacture die-casting dies with internal water-cooling lines by hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing) of H13 tool steel powder. The use of HIPing will allow the near-net-shape manufacture of dies and the strategic placement of water-cooling lines during manufacture. The production of near-net-shape dies by HIPing involves the generation of HIPing diagrams, the design of the can that can be used for HIPing a die with complex details, strategic placement of water-cooling lines in the die, computer modeling to predict movement of the water lines during HIPing, and the development of strategies for placing water lines in the appropriate locations. The results presented include a literature review, particle analysis and characterization of H13 tool steel powder, and modeling of the HIPing process.

  5. CRADA ORNL 91-0046B final report: Assessment of IBM advanced computing architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with IBM to assess their advanced computer architectures. Over the course of this project three different architectures were evaluated. The POWER/4 RIOS1 based shared memory multiprocessor, the POWER/2 RIOS2 based high performance workstation, and the J30 PowerPC based shared memory multiprocessor. In addition to this hardware several software packages where beta tested for IBM including: ESSO scientific computing library, nv video-conferencing package, Ultimedia multimedia display environment, FORTRAN 90 and C++ compilers, and the AIX 4.1 operating system. Both IBM and ORNL benefited from the research performed in this project and even though access to the POWER/4 computer was delayed several months, all milestones were met.

  6. Gelcasting of CRYSTAR{reg_sign} silicon carbide ceramics. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Willkens, C.A.

    1998-12-31

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to assess the applicability the gelcasting process for forming ceramic green bodies using Saint-Gobain/Norton Industrial Ceramics Corporation`s proprietary CRYSTAR{reg_sign} silicon carbide powder. A gelcasting process, specifically tailored to Saint-Gobain/Norton`s powder composition, was developed and used successfully to form green bodies for property evaluation. This preliminary evaluation showed that the gelcast material had characteristics and properties comparable to Norton`s baseline material. Wafer carrier molds were received from Norton for gelcasting a complex-shaped configuration with CRYSTAR{reg_sign} silicon carbide. Gelcasting experiments showed that Norton`s standard plaster of paris molds were incompatible with the gelcasting process. Mold surface treatments and the use of alternative castable mold materials were investigated, however, a successful process was not identified. The highest quality parts were cast in either glass or aluminum molds.

  7. Recycling end-of-life vehicles of the future. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Daniels, E.; Energy Systems

    2010-01-14

    Argonne National Laboratory (the Contractor) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the following Participants: Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC (VRP, which consists of General Motors [GM], Ford, and Chrysler), and the American Chemistry Council - Plastics Division (ACC-PD). The purpose of this CRADA is to provide for the effective recycling of automotive materials. The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use of advanced lightweighting materials or systems in future vehicles. The issues, technical requirements, and cost and institutional considerations in achieving that goal are complex and will require a concerted, focused, and systematic analysis, together with a technology development program. The scope and tasks of this program are derived from 'A Roadmap for Recycling End-of-Life Vehicles of the Future,' prepared in May 2001 for the DOE Office of Energy, Efficiency, and Renewable Energy (EERE)-Vehicle Technologies Program. The objective of this research program is to enable the maximum recycling of automotive materials and obsolete vehicles through the development and commercialization of technologies for the separation and recovery of materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use of

  8. Evaluation of Durable Metallic Supports for Catalytic Combustors, CRADA Final Report ORNL 00-0570

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B. A.; Wright, I. G.; Lara-Curzio, E.; McCarty, J.; Barnes, J.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Catalytica Energy Systems Incorporated (CESI) to determine the properties of current metallic catalyst supports and examine new candidate alloys for this application. A team was established at ORNL to examine oxidation-limited lifetime of these thin-walled metallic components using standard lifetime models and to measure the mechanical properties of the foils (40-200:m in thickness) which can differ substantially from bulk properties. Oxidation experiments were conducted on foil specimens at 700/-1100/C in laboratory air and in air with 10 vol.% water vapor to better simulate the combustor environment. At the higher test temperatures, time to oxidation-induced (i.e. breakaway oxidation) failure was determined in 1h cycles in order to verify predictions from a standard reservoir-type oxidation lifetime model. Selected specimens were run for >10,000h in 100 or 500h cycles at lower test temperatures in order to determine the oxidation kinetics for the model. The creep properties of selected foils were measured for 4,000-8,000h at operation-relevant stresses and temperatures. None of the new candidate alloys significantly out-performed currently used alloys in laboratory testing, particularly in oxidation lifetime testing. Therefore, engine testing was not performed on any of the new candidate alloys. Both the oxidation- and creep-resistance of FeCrAl alloys was greater than expected and the results of the CRADA allowed CESI to extend life or increase operating temperatures for these lower cost substrate alloys in the next generation of catalyst modules.

  9. Science and Technology Development for Renewable Energy Applications: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-03-00122

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.

    2010-07-01

    This CRADA PTS is a vital element of a larger GE effort to design and build higher-power next-generation wind turbine generators with a cost of energy production competitive or less than conventional fuel-based generation.

  10. Development of YBCO Superconductor for Electric Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-150

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2013-03-01

    The proposed project will be collaborative in exploration of high temperature superconductor oxide films between SuperPower, Inc. and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This CRADA will attempt to develop YBCO based high temperature oxide technology.

  11. Telemedicine. Final report/project accomplishments summary CRADA number 95-KCP-1014

    SciTech Connect

    VanDeusen, A.L.

    1997-04-01

    This project was initiated to fill existing voids in the telemedicine equipment market. Currently, when a medical facility adds telemedicine capability to their video conference system, they must purchase expensive and bulky encoders and decoders in order to send information over the available data channel. Even with this expensive equipment, only one data type (stethoscope or ECG) can be sent at a time. In addition, since existing encoders and decoders are not designed specifically for telemedicine, special cables must be built to connect with this equipment. This project resulted in the design and construction of an encoder/decoder system that resolved these issues. The unit (referred to as the Telecoder) is designed specifically for the telemedicine market. The Telecoder is compact, handles two types of data (stethoscope and ECG) simultaneously, integrates with existing medical equipment, and is less expensive. In addition to the Telecoder module, a prototype was built that adds all the necessary logic and interfaces necessary to integrate the basic encoder design into additional Cardionics products. Although a complete integration into other Cardionics products was not in the scope of this CRADA, all the basic design work has been done to allow Cardionics to complete the work.

  12. Micro-toughened titanium-based intermetallics for high-temperature service. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Liu, C.T.; Blue, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) report deals with the composition development, processing parameter development, microstructural evaluation, and mechanical properties development of the {beta} TiAl alloys. Two series of alloy compositions were identified. The first series consisted of four alloys, and the second series consisted of three alloys. The powders were packed in titanium cans, evacuated, and sealed. The titanium cans were hot extruded at 1150, 1250, and 1400{degrees}C to an area reduction ratio of 16:1. The extruded bars were heat treated between 800 and 1320{degrees}C, and their microstructure characterized in the extended and heat-treated condition by optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural features such as colony size, width of colony boundary {beta} layer, interlamellar spacing, {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 2} spacing, {beta}lamellar width, and {alpha}{sub 2}-{beta} layer ratio were quantified. Tensile bars were prepared from the extruded bars by electrodischarge machining followed by grinding. Tensile tests were conducted from room temperature to 1000{degrees}C. Three-point-bend tests were used to measure the fracture toughness at both room temperature and 800{degrees}C. The effect of long-term annealing at 800 and 1000{degrees}C on one of the alloys was measured at room temperature. Tensile properties of the alloys of this study were compared with the data reported in literature.

  13. Advanced compact laser scanning system enhancements for gear and thread measurements. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    McKeethan, W.M.; Maxey, L.C.; Bernacki, B.E.; Castore, G.

    1997-04-04

    The measurement, or metrology, of physical objects is a fundamental requirement for industrial progress. Dimensional measurement capability lies at the heart of ones ability to produce objects within the required technical specifications. Dimensional metrology systems are presently dominated by touch-probe technologies, which are mature and reliable. Due to the intricate geometries required in certain fields of manufacturing, these contract probes cannot be physically brought in proximity to the measurement surface, or lack sufficient lateral resolution to satisfactorily determine the surface profile, which can occur in the measurement of gears, splines and thread. Optical probes are viable candidates to supplement the contact probes, since light can be focused to less than one micron (40 microinches), no contact occurs that can mar highly finished surfaces, and no probes must be replaced due to wear. However, optical probes typically excel only on one type of surface: mirror-like or diffuse, and the optical stylus itself is oftentimes not as compact as its contact probe counterpart. Apeiron, Inc. has pioneered the use of optical non-contact sensors to measure machined parts, especially threads, gears and splines. The Oak Ridge Metrology Center at Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are world-class experts in dimensional metrology. The goal of this CRADA is to tap the expertise in Oak Ridge to evaluate Apeiron`s platform, and to suggest new or novel methods of optical surface sensing, if appropriate.

  14. Position and Orientation Tracking System three-dimensional graphical user interface. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.

    1997-09-30

    Under the Department of Energy`s Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) program, a major effort is under way to develop technology for remediating the waste in underground storage tanks that contain radioactive and hazardous waste. A large part of the program`s effort has gone towards development of remotely operable robotics equipment, including the Houdini Vehicle and the Position and Orientation Tracking System (POTS). Since planned operation of this equipment is to be completely remote, a significant effort is needed to ensure that operators have sufficient system information to operate the equipment efficiently and safely. ORNL developed POTS and RedZone Robotics, Inc. developed Houdini which can be operated together to provide both position and orientation descriptions of the Houdini vehicle, relative to a world reference frame, while operating inside an underground storage tank. The Houdini vehicle has been outfitted with an optical detection system that houses infrared detectors. The infrared detectors are part of the POTS tracking system. The sensors provide a set of timing pulses to the POTS control computer whenever a laser beam from one of the four POTS laser scanners strikes a detector. Using the pointing angle information from each POTS laser scanners, the POTS control computer is able to compute the pose of the Houdini vehicle at a rate of approximately 25 Hz. This information, along with the orientation of the Houdini`s Schilling Titan II robot arm, is used to present the pose information to the operator in a 3-D graphical user interface using software that has been developed by this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The graphical display presents the data to the operator in a format that is readily understood. The equipment operators are able to use the information in real-time to enhance the operator`s ability to safely and efficiently control the remotely-operated vehicle.

  15. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-03-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

  16. Drying and reconstitution of subbituminous coal - CRADA 90-004. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.W.; Nowak, M.A.; Killmeyer, R.P. |

    1991-10-30

    AMAX Coal Company (AMAX) has built a 200 tph, demonstration scale fluidized-bed drying process at their Belle Ayr Mine in Wyoming to dry the subbituminous coal of Wyodak seam from an average moisture content of 25-30 wt% to about 10 wt%. Currently, the dryer generates too many fines for proper transportation and handling. Though the raw coal is about 2-inch top size, about 80 wt% of the dryer product ends up finer than 28 mesh, and about 10 wt% of the dried coal is collected in the dryer bag house (minus 200 mesh). Paul Woessner, Director of Research and Development of AMAX, met with personnel from PETC Coal Preparation Division and expressed an interest in an investigation of the feasibility of applying the PETC`s humic acid binder to reconstitute the bag house fines from the dryer. This was an area in which PETC had been doing some research and had some expertise. As a result, AMAX and the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA, see appendix A) in June 1990 to produce, from fine subbituminous coal, economic low moisture reconstituted solid fuel forms that have suitable storage, handling, transportation, and combustion properties. PETC`s task in this agreement was to conduct broad, baseline studies in three areas: (1) to develop a humic acid binder from AMAX subbituminous coal using the PETC-developed Humic Acid Binder Process, (2) to reconstitute AMAX`s dried subbituminous coal fines from the bag house and the fluidized bed dryer product with humic acid binder, and (3) to produce low moisture, water-resistant pellets from raw subbituminous coal by the PETC-developed Lignipel Process. AMAX, on the other hand, agreed to produce 1-2 tons of reconstituted solid fuel for handleability and combustion tests and partially funded PETC`s efforts.

  17. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  18. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Rice, C. Keith; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Ally, Moonis Raza; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  19. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. Ink Jet Printing for Silicon Photovoltaics: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-00139

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D. S.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to combine the strengths of NREL and Evergreen Solar in the area of ink jet printing to develop a new manufacturing technology necessary to produce Si solar cells based on ribbon technology comparable to or exceeding current technologies.

  1. Metallization for Self Aligned Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-295

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this CRADA NREL will modify/develop metallization inks that are compatible with 1366 Technologies technology. Various methods of deposition will be used to apply the inks to the textured silicon substrates. The goal of the project is to minimize the contact resistance while maximizing the cell efficiency.

  2. High Performance Photovoltaic Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-169

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will provide certified measurements of the conversion efficiency at high concentration for several multijunction solar cells that were fabricated by Cyrium Technologies. In an earlier phase of the CRADA, Cyrium provided epitaxially-grown material and NREL processed the samples into devices and measured the performance.

  3. Electrical Characterization of Printed Nanocrystalline Silicon Films, Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00241

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.

    2011-05-01

    This CRADA helped Innovalight characterize and quantify their ink-based selective emitter technology. Controlled localized doping of selective emitter structures via Innovalight Silicon Ink technology was demonstrated. Both secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning capacitance microscopy revealed; abrupt lateral dopant profiles at ink-printed boundaries. Uniform doping of iso- and pyramidal surfaces was also verified using scanning electron microscopy dopant contrast imaging.

  4. Mobile Ocean Test Berth Support: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-413

    SciTech Connect

    LiVecchi, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC), headquartered at the Oregon State University, is establishing the capabilities to test prototype wave energy conversion devices in the ocean. This CRADA will leverage the technical expertise and resources at NREL in the wind industry and in ocean engineering to support and enhance the development of the NNMREC Mobile Ocean Test Berth (MOTB). This CRADA will provide direct support to NNMREC by providing design evaluation and review of the MOTB, developing effective protocols for testing of the MOTB and wave energy conversion devices in the ocean, assisting in the specification of appropriate instrumentation and data acquisition packages, and providing guidance on obtaining and maintaining A2LA (American Association for Laboratory Accreditation) accreditation.

  5. 10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.

    2011-05-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

  6. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  7. Cooperation on Lidar for Improved Wind Turbine Performance. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-521

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Paul

    2015-05-12

    Research into the use of lidar for improved wind turbine performance is an area of considerable interest. Lidars have been proposed to analyze and improve wind turbine pitch control performance, yaw alignment and control performance, as well as to improve power curve assessments. In this CRADA, NREL, NRG Systems, Inc. (“NRG”) and Avent Lidar Technology SAS (“Avent”) will collaborate on testing these concepts.

  8. Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, J.

    2013-08-01

    The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

  9. Boulder Wind Power Advanced Gearless Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00463

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Boulder Wind Power (BWP) Advanced Gearless Drivetrain Project explored the application of BWP's innovative, axial-gap, air-core, permanent-magnet direct-drive generator in offshore wind turbines. The objective of this CRADA is to assess the benefits that result from reduced towerhead mass of BWP's technology when used in 6 MW offshore turbines installed on a monopile or a floating spar foundation.

  10. Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

    1998-09-16

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

  11. Inverter Load Rejection Over-Voltage Testing: SolarCity CRADA Task 1a Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.; Hoke, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Chebahtah, J.; Wang, T.; Zimmerly, B.

    2015-02-01

    Various interconnection challenges exist when connecting distributed PV into the electrical distribution grid in terms of safety, reliability, and stability of electric power systems. One of the urgent areas for additional research - as identified by inverter manufacturers, installers, and utilities - is the potential for transient over-voltage from PV inverters. In one stage of a cooperative tests were repeated a total of seven times. The maximum over-voltage measured in any test did not exceed 200% of nominal, and typical over-voltage levels were significantly lower. The total voltage duration and the maximum continuous time above each threshold are presented here, as well as the time to disconnect for each test. Finally, we present a brief investigation into the effect of DC input voltage as well as a series of no-load tests. This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient over-voltages created by several commercial PV inverters during load-rejection conditions. For this work, a test plan that is currently under development by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Through a cooperative research and development agreement, NREL is working with SolarCity to address two specific types of transient overvoltage: load rejection overvoltage (LRO) and ground fault overvoltage (GFO). Additional partners in this effort include the Hawaiian Electric Companies, Northern Plains Power Technologies, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  12. Dynamometer Testing of a NW2200 Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-394

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, R.

    2012-04-01

    Northern Power Systems specializes in direct drive wind turbine designs. CRADA CRD-10-394 involved testing the NW2200 wind turbine power train. Power train testing is important because it allows validation of the generator design and some control algorithms prior to installation on a tower, where this data would be more difficult and time consuming to collect. In an effort to keep the commercial product schedule on time, Northern Power requested testing support from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for this testing. The test program was performed using NREL's 2.5 MW dynamometer test bed at the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, CO.

  13. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the General Motors Company (CRADA No. PNNL/271): “Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology”

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Kim, Chang H.; Oh, Se H.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.

    2011-12-13

    Diesel engines can offer substantially higher fuel efficiency, good driving performance characteristics, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emission compared to stoichiometric gasoline engines. Despite the increasing public demand for higher fuel economy and reduced dependency on imported oil, however, meeting the stringent emission standards with affordable methods has been a major challenge for the wide application of these fuel-efficient engines in the US market. The selective catalytic reduction of NOx by urea (urea-SCR) is one of the most promising technologies for NOx emission control for diesel engine exhausts. To ensure successful NOx emission control in the urea-SCR technology, both a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a urea-SCR catalyst with high activity and durability are critical for the emission control system. Because the use of this technology for light-duty diesel vehicle applications is new, the relative lack of experience makes it especially challenging to satisfy the durability requirements. Of particular concern is being able to realistically simulate actual field aging of the catalyst systems under laboratory conditions, which is necessary both as a rapid assessment tool for verifying improved performance and certifiability of new catalyst formulations. In addition, it is imperative to develop a good understanding of deactivation mechanisms to help develop improved catalyst materials. In this CRADA program, General Motors Company and PNNL have investigated fresh, laboratory- and vehicle-aged DOC and SCR catalysts. The studies have led to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of catalysts used in the urea-SCR technology, and have improved the correlation between laboratory and vehicle aging for reduced development time and cost. This Final Report briefly highlights many of the technical accomplishments and documents the productivity of the program in terms of peer-reviewed scientific publications

  14. The use of predictive lithostratigraphy to significantly improve the ability to forecast reservoir and source rocks? Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R. D.; Moore, T. L.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-29

    The purpose of this CRADA, which ended in 2003, was to make reservoir and source rock distribution significantly more predictable by quantifying the fundamental controls on stratigraphic heterogeneity. To do this, the relationships among insolation, climate, sediment supply, glacioeustasy, and reservoir and source rock occurrence were investigated in detail. Work current at the inception of the CRADA had uncovered previously unrecognized associations among these processes and properties that produce a phenomenon that, when properly analyzed, will make lithostratigraphic variability (including texture, porosity, and permeability) substantially more understandable. Computer climate simulations of selected time periods, compared with the global distribution of paleoclimatic indicators, documented spatial and temporal climate changes as a function of insolation and provided quantitative changes in runoff, lake level, and glacioeustasy. The effect of elevation and climate on sediment yield was assessed numerically by analyzing digital terrain and climate data. The phase relationships of climate, yield, and glacioeustatic cycles from the Gulf of Mexico and/or other sedimentary basins were assessed by using lacunarity, a statistical technique.

  15. Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-11-422

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this CRADA work is to support Eaton Innovation Center (Eaton) efforts to develop advanced load identification, management technologies, and solutions to reduce building energy consumption by providing fine granular visibility of energy usage information and safety protection of miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) in commercial and residential buildings. MELs load identification and prediction technology will be employed in a novel 'Smart eOutlet*' to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and design tools and building power management systems. The work scoped in this CRADA involves the following activities: development and validation of business value proposition for the proposed technologies through voice of customer investigation, market analysis, and third-party objective assessment; development and validation of energy saving impact as well as assessment of environmental and economic benefits; 'smart eOutlet' concept design, prototyping, and validation; field validation of the developed technologies in real building environments. (*Another name denoted as 'Smart Power Strip (SPS)' will be used as an alternative of the name 'Smart eOutlet' for a clearer definition of the product market position in future work.)

  16. [TDA`s hot gas desulfurization sorbent]. TDA Inc./FETC CRADA No. 97-F003, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.A.

    1997-11-14

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between TDA Incorporated and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The objective of this CRADA was to evaluate the performance of TDA`s hot gas desulfurization (HGD) sorbent for use in fossil fuel gasification processes. This particular sorbent, TNT-MB was developed for use in moving-bed HGD reactors in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. Two separate tests were conducted; a 10-cycle test, and a low-temperature scoping test. All 10 cycles absorbed H{sub 2}S for the prescribed 125 minutes without breakthrough. The H{sub 2}S concentration remained below 50 ppmv throughout the 125 minute test period. The sorbent showed an increase in attrition resistance from 1.8% (fresh) to 0.87% (reactor inlet) and 0.64% (reactor outlet) after 10 cycles. The results of an additional attrition test are also contained in this report.

  17. SWAY/NREL Collaboration on Offshore Wind System Testing and Analysis: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-459

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Amy

    2015-02-01

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and SWAY. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA agreement, NREL and SWAY will collaborate on the SWAY 1/5th-scale floating wind turbine demonstration project in Norway. NREL and SWAY will work together to obtain measurement data from the demonstration system to perform model validation.

  18. Organic Based Nanocomposite Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-145

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2013-01-01

    This CRADA will focus on the development of organic-based solar cells. Key interfacial issues in these cells will be investigated. In this rapidly emerging technology, it is increasingly clear that cell architecture will need to be at the nanoscale and the interfacial issues between organic elements (small molecule and polymer), transparent conducting oxides, and contact metallizations are critical. Thus this work will focus on the development of high surface area and nanostructured nanocarpets of inorganic oxides, the development of appropriate surface binding/acceptor molecules for the inorganic/organic interface, and the development of next-generation organic materials. Work will be performed in all three areas jointly at NREL and Konarka (with their partner in the third area of the University of Delaware). Results should be more rapid progress toward cheap large-area photovoltaic cells.

  19. AIST-NREL Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Demonstration. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-402

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-05-11

    The purpose of the project is to demonstrate and quantitatively compare performance of CPV systems installed in Japan and in the United States. The deployment conditions (e.g. spectrum and temperature) are site dependent and the optimal design of the system may vary with location. The CPV systems will use multi-junction concentrator cells for the conversion of sunlight into electricity. The optimal design of the cell may depend on the location at which a CPV system is installed. Thus, the systems in Japan and in the U.S. will all use a combination of concentrator cells obtained from three different vendors. This CRADA pertains only to the equipment that will be installed in the U.S. This effort is a collaborative project between AIST and NREL.

  20. Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

    2013-04-01

    Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  1. Acciona Solar Technology Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-384

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Under this agreement, NREL will work with Acciona to conduct joint testing, evaluation, and data collection related to Acciona's solar technologies and systems. This work includes, but is not limited to, testing and evaluation of solar component and system technologies, data collection and monitoring, performance evaluation, reliability testing, and analysis. This work will be conducted at Acciona's Nevada Solar One (NSO) power plant and NREL test facilities. Specific projects will be developed on a task order basis. Each task order will identify the name of the project and deliverables to be produced under the task order. Each task order will delineate an estimated completion date based on a project's schedule. Any reports developed under this CRADA must be reviewed by both NREL and Acciona and approved by each organization prior to publication of results or documents.

  2. WindFloat Feasibility Study Support. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-419

    SciTech Connect

    Sirnivas, Senu

    2015-05-07

    This shared resource CRADA defines research collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Principle Power, Inc. and its subsidiaries (“Principle Power”). Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA agreement, NREL and Principle Power will collaborate on the DEMOWFLOAT project, a full-scale 2-MW demonstration project of a novel floating support structure for large offshore wind turbines, called WindFloat. The purpose of the project is to demonstrate the longterm field performance of the WindFloat design, thus enabling the future commercialized deployment of floating deepwater offshore wind power plants. NREL is the leading U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory for the development and advancement of renewable energy and has a strong interest in offshore wind and the development of deepwater offshore wind systems. NREL will provide expertise and resources to the DEMOWFLOAT project in assessing the environmental impacts, independent technical performance validation, and engineering analysis. Principle Power is a Seattle, Washington-based renewable energy company that owns all the intellectual property associated with the WindFloat. In return for NREL’s support of the DEMOWFLOAT project, Principle Power will provide NREL with valuable test data from the project that will be used to validate the numerical tools developed by NREL for analyzing offshore wind turbines. In addition, NREL will gain experience and knowledge in offshore wind designs and testing methods through this collaboration. 2 This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. NREL and Principle Power will work together to advance floating offshore wind technology, and demonstrate its viability for supplying the world with a new clean energy source.

  3. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening, Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-07-01081

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip; Bush, John; Bowerman, Biays; Cespedes, Ernesto; White, Timothy

    2004-12-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009.

  4. New N-Type Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-177

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2014-08-01

    This CRADA will develop improved thin film organic solar cells using a new n-type semiconducting polymer. High efficiency photovoltaics (PVs) based on inorganic semiconductors have good efficiencies (up to 30%) but are extremely expensive to manufacture. Organic PV technology has the potential to overcome this problem through the use of high-throughput production methods like reel-to-reel printing on flexible substrates. Unfortunately, today's best organic PVs have only a few percent efficiency, a number that is insufficient for virtually all commercial applications. The limited choice of stable n-type (acceptor) organic semiconductor materials is one of the key factors that prevent the further improvement of organic PVs. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) previously developed a new class of electron-deficient (n-type) conjugated polymers for use in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). During this project TDA in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will incorporate these electron-deficient polymers into organic photovoltaics and investigate their performance. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing new materials and polymers to improve the performance of organic solar cells. Materials being developed at TDA include spin coated transparent conductors, charge injection layers, fullerene derivatives, electron-deficient polymers, and three-phase (fullerene/polythiophene/dye) active layer inks.

  5. FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, F.

    2013-04-01

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

  6. CRADA Final Report: Properties of Vacuum Deposited Thin Films of Lithium Phosphorous Oxynitride (Lipon) with an Expanded Composition Range

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.

    2003-12-29

    Thin films of an amorphous, solid-state, lithium electrolyte, referred to as ''Lipon'', were first synthesized and characterized at ORNL in 1991. This material is typically prepared by magnetron sputtering in a nitrogen plasma, which allows nitrogen atoms to substitute for part of the oxygen ions of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lipon is the key component in the successful fabrication of ORNL's rechargeable thin film microbatteries. Cymbet and several other US Companies have licensed this technology for commercialization. Optimizing the properties of the Lipon material, particularly the lithium ion conductivity, is extremely important, yet only a limited range of compositions had been explored prior to this program. The goal of this CRADA was to develop new methods to prepare Lipon over an extended composition range and to determine if the film properties might be significantly improved beyond those previously reported by incorporating a larger N component into the film. Cymbet and ORNL investigated different deposition processes for the Lipon thin films. Cymbet's advanced deposition process not only achieved a higher deposition rate, but also permitted independent control the O and N flux to the surface of the growing film. ORNL experimented with several modified sputtering techniques and found that by using sectored sputter targets, composed of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}N ceramic disks, thin Lipon films could be produced over an expanded composition range. The resulting Lipon films were characterized by electrical impedance, infrared spectroscopy, and several complementary analytical techniques to determine the composition. When additional N plus Li are incorporated into the Lipon film, the lithium conductivity was generally degraded. However, the addition of N accompanied by a slight loss of Li gave an increase in the conductivity. Although the improvement in the conductivity was only very modest and was a disappointing conclusion of this study, forcing a higher N

  7. Dubose CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    Schuttler, G.L.

    2000-01-25

    impossible to seal. To accomplish this, Mr. Dubose proposed to build a functional single-disc cylinder head to try different seal designs. Texas Tech had a Kawasaki single cylinder engine that was suitable for this use, and it was decided that a rotary valve cylinder head would be fabricated to fit this engine. To this end, Texas Tech provided assistance in creating the cylinder head design, assisted by Honeywell FM and T. Several design iterations were created, and both wax and stereolithography models were created at FM and T to assist the design process. The wax and stereolithography models were used for conceptual visualization of the designs, fit-up checks of the various components with the actual engine, and even flow testing of the intake and exhaust ports. When the design was finalized, two prototype cylinder head assemblies were machined, from aluminum and steel supplied by Texas Tech and Mr. Dubose, in the FM and T Model Shop. The engine was then to be assembled and tested at Texas Tech. At the time that this project was closed, the engine had not yet been completely assembled and tested.

  8. NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

  9. Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

  10. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  11. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  12. Commercialization Plan Support for Development of Low Cost Vacuum Insulating Glazing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-449

    SciTech Connect

    Dameron, Arrelaine

    2015-07-09

    During the duration of this CRADA, V-Glass and NREL will partner in testing, analysis, performance forecasting, costing, and evaluation of V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ process technology for creating a low cost hermetic seal for conventional and vacuum glazing. Upon successful evaluation of hermeticity, V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ will be evaluated for its potential use in highly insulating window glazing.

  13. Development of Abrasion-Resistant Coating for Solar Reflective Films. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-247

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this CRADA is to develop an abrasion-resistant coating, suitable for use on polymeric-based reflective films (e.g., the ReflecTech reflective film), that allows for improved scratch resistance and enables the use of aggressive cleaning techniques (e.g., direct contact methods like brushing) without damaging the specular reflectance properties of the reflective film.

  14. Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2013-10-01

    Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

  15. Development and Demonstration of Energy Savings Perform Contracting Methodologies for Hydroelectric Facilities: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-309

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    This CRADA explores the opportunities and challenges of funding federal hydro dam refurbishment projects through ESPCs. It assesses legal authorities for rehabilitating dams through ESPCs; roles and responsibilities of each party including the dam owner, Power Marketing Administration (PMA), ESCO, and preference customers; potential contract structure and flow of money; measurement and verification processes; risk and responsibility allocation; and financial viability of projects.

  16. Preliminary Structural Design Conceptualization for Composite Rotor for Verdant Power Water Current: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-296

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2011-02-01

    The primary thrust of the CRADA will be to develop a new rotor design that will allow higher current flows (>4m/s), greater swept area (6-11m), and in the process, will maximize performance and energy capture.

  17. Low-Defect Heteroepitaxy on Porous Si Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-534

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    2014-12-01

    In this collaboration, NREL will grow Ge, SiGe, and III-V layers on porous Si (pSi) substrates prepared either by Crystal Solar or at NREL. The intent is to grow low-defect epitaxial III-V alloys using the porous Si layer to prevent defect formation. Finally, we aim to fabricate solar cells from the III-V layers to prove the electronic quality.

  18. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperation with the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M). This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between METC and 3M was to evaluate exposure of 3M SICONEX{trademark} fiber-reinforced ceramic and NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabric materials to a gasifying environment at high temperatures (1000--1100{degree}F) and high pressure (300 psia). Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) provided two 60 mm I.D. {times} 0.5 m SICONEX{trademark} spools and one each of the NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabrics for exposure to coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the materials in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the CRADA are found in CRADA 94-024. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 94-024. Four gasifier runs were conducted over a five month period to accumulate 483 hours of operation. During this time, 2 LayCer{trademark} 70/3 filters were used for filtering the coal gas while the SICONEX{trademark} and NEXTEL{trademark} were exposed along side of the filters. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer{trademark} 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

  19. Inks for Ink Jet Printed Contacts for High Performance Silicon Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-06-199

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.

    2013-01-01

    The work under the proposed CRADA will be a joint effort by BP Solar and NREL to develop new types of high performance inks for high quality contacts to silicon solar cells. NREL will develop inks that have electronic properties that will allow the formation of high quality ohmic contacts to n- and p-type crystalline silicon, and BP Solar will evaluate these contacts in test contact structures.

  20. METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperatation with Shell Synthetic Fuels, Incorporated to obtain data relevent to the design and operation of dry particulate solids filters, and Nahcolite as a chloride removal sorbent. Shell Synthetic Fuels Incorporated provided 60 mm O.D. {times} 40 mm I.D. {times} O.5 m long silicon carbide, LayCer{trademark} 70/3 candle filters for use in filtering coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the filters in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) are found in CRADA 93-011. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 93-011. Seven gasifier runs were conducted over an eighteen month period to accumulate 868 hours of operation. During this time, 3 filters were used 2 at a time to give individual candle usage of 254 hours, 525 hours, and 868 hours, respectively. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

  1. In-service testing of Ni{sub 3}Al coupons and trays in carburizing furnaces at Delphi Saginaw. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Santella, M.L.; Viswanathan, S.; Swindeman, R.W.; Chatterjee, M.

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) report deals with the development of nickel aluminide alloy for improved longer life heat-resistant fixture assemblies for batch and continuous pusher carburizing furnaces. The nickel aluminide development was compared in both coupon and component testing with the currently used Fe-Ni-Cr heat-resisting alloy known as HU. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) casting process development, (2) characterization and possible modification of the alloy composition to optimize its manufacturing ability and performance under typical furnace operating conditions, and (3) testing and evaluation of specimens and prototype fixtures. In support of the CRADA objectives, coupons of nickel aluminide and the HU alloy were installed in both batch and pusher furnaces. The coupons were taken from two silicon levels and contained welds made with two different filler compositions (IC-221LA and IC-221W). Both nickel-aluminide and HU coupons were removed from the batch and pusher carburizing furnace at time intervals ranging from one month to one year. The exposed coupons were cut and mounted for metallographic, hardness, and microprobe analysis. The results of the microstructural analysis have been transmitted to General Motors Corporation, Saginaw Division (Delphi Saginaw) through reports that were presented at periodic CRADA review meetings. Based on coupon testing and verification of the coupon results with the testing of trays, Delphi Saginaw moved forward with the use of six additional trays in a batch furnace and two assemblies in a pusher furnace. Fifty percent of the trays and fixtures are in the as-cast condition and the remaining trays and fixtures are in the preoxidized condition. The successful operating experience of two assemblies in the pusher furnace for nearly a year formed the basis for a production run of 63 more assemblies. The production run required melting of 94 heats weighing 500 lb. each. Twenty

  2. NREL/University of Delaware Offshore Wind R&D Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-393

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, Walt

    2015-11-12

    Specifically, the work under this CRADA includes, but is not limited to, the development of test procedures for an offshore test site in Delaware waters; testing of installed offshore wind turbines; performance monitoring of those turbines; and a program of research and development on offshore wind turbine blades, components, coatings, foundations, installation and construction of bottom-fixed structures, environmental impacts, policies, and more generally on means to enhance the reliability, facilitate permitting, and reduce costs for offshore wind turbines. This work will be conducted both at NREL's National Wind Technology Center and participant facilities, as well as the established offshore wind test sites.

  3. CENER/NREL Collaboration in Testing Facility and Code Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-207

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P.

    2014-11-01

    Under the funds-in CRADA agreement, NREL and CENER will collaborate in the areas of blade and drivetrain testing facility development and code development. The project shall include NREL assisting in the review and instruction necessary to assist in commissioning the new CENER blade test and drivetrain test facilities. In addition, training will be provided by allowing CENER testing staff to observe testing and operating procedures at the NREL blade test and drivetrain test facilities. CENER and NREL will exchange blade and drivetrain facility and equipment design and performance information. The project shall also include exchanging expertise in code development and data to validate numerous computational codes.

  4. Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated PV Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-239

    SciTech Connect

    Stradins, P.

    2011-10-01

    In this CRADA, NREL's Silicon group members performed the following research activities: (1) investigation of the role of hydrogen in growth of a mixed-phase nc-Si:H/a-Si:H material; (2) role of hydrogen in light-induced degradation of a-Si:H and development of Staebler-Wronski effect resistive a-Si:H; and (3) performing characterizations of UniSolar's a-Si:H and nc-Si materials, with goal to help optimizing large-area uniformity and quality of the UniSolar's nanocrystalline Si:H.

  5. Equipment Only - Solar Resources Measurements at the University of Texas at Austin, TX: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-222

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty and staff at the University of Texas at Austin collected solar resource measurements at their campus using equipment on loan from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The equipment was used to train students on the operation and maintenance of solar radiometers and was returned to NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory upon completion of the CRADA. The resulting data augment the solar resource climatology information required for solar resource characterizations in the U.S. The cooperative agreement was also consistent with NREL's goal of developing an educated workforce to advance renewable energy technologies.

  6. NaREC Offshore and Drivetrain Test Facility Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-140

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the National Renewable Energy Centre (NaREC) in the United Kingdom (UK) have a mutual interest in collaborating in the development of full-scale offshore wind energy and drivetrain testing facilities. NREL and NaREC will work together to share resources and experiences in the development of future wind energy test facilities. This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) includes sharing of test protocols, infrastructure cost data, test plans, pro forma contracting instruments, and safe operating strategies. Furthermore, NREL and NaREC will exchange staff for training and development purposes.

  7. Improving Translation Models for Predicting the Energy Yield of Photovoltaic Power Systems. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-526

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Keith

    2015-08-04

    The project under this CRADA will analyze field data of various flat-plate and concentrator module technologies and cell measurements at the laboratory level. The field data will consist of current versus voltage data collected over many years on a latitude tilt test bed for Si, CdTe, amorphous silicon, and CIGS technologies. The concentrator data will be for mirror- and lens-based module designs using multijunction cells. The laboratory data will come from new measurements of cell performance with systematic variation of irradiance, temperature and spectral composition. These measurements will be labor-intensive and the aim will be to cover the widest possible parameter space for as many different PV samples as possible. The data analysis will require software tools to be developed. These tools will be customized for use with the specific NREL datasets and will be unsuitable for commercial release. The tools will be used to evaluate different translation equations against NREL outdoor datasets.

  8. Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

  9. Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

  10. Development of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Using Inkjet Printed Silicon and Other Inkjet Processes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-260

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2012-04-01

    The cost of silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV) can be greatly lowered by developing thin-film crystalline Si solar cells on glass or an equally lower cost substrate. Typically, Si film is deposited by thermal evaporation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering. NREL and Silexos have worked under a CRADA to develop technology to make very low cost solar cells using liquid organic precursors. Typically, cyclopentasilane (CPS) is deposited on a glass substrate and then converted into an a-Si film by UV polymerization followed by low-temperature optical process that crystallizes the amorphous layer. This technique promises to be a very low cost approach for making a Si film.

  11. Development of ZnTe:Cu Contacts for CdTe Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-320

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, R.

    2012-04-01

    The main focus of the work at NREL was on the development of Cu-doped ZnTe contacts to CdTe solar cells in the substrate configuration. The work performed under the CRADA utilized the substrate device structure used at NREL previously. All fabrication was performed at NREL. We worked on the development of Cu-doped ZnTe as well as variety of other contacts such as Sb-doped ZnTe, CuxTe, and MoSe2. We were able to optimize the contacts to improve device parameters. The improvement was obtained primarily through increasing the open-circuit voltage, to values as high as 760 mV, leading to device efficiencies of 7%.

  12. Laboratory Testing of the Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer Rotational Filter Systems, NETL-Innovatech, Inc., CRADA 98-F026, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-22

    A patented dynamic mechanical filter developed by InnovaTech was previously shown to remove fine particulate matter from industrial process gas streams at ambient temperatures and pressures. An all-metal, high-temperature version of this novel media-less filter was fabricated under this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE/NETL-Morgantown for hot gas testing of the device. The technology is entirely different in both concept and design from conventional vortex separators, cyclones, or porous media filters. This new filtration concept is capable of separating heavy loading of fine particles without blinding, fouling or bridging, and would require minimal operational costs over its anticipated multi-year service life. The all-metal filter design eliminates thermal stress cracking and premature failure prevalent in conventional porous ceramic filters. In contrast, conventional porous media filters (i.e., ceramic cross-flow or candles) easily foul, require periodic cleaning (typically backpulsing), frequent replacement and subsequent disposal.

  13. CRADA Final Report: Application of Dual-Mode Invertor Control to Commercially Available Radial-Gap Permanent Magnet Motors - Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.; McKeever, J.W.; Downing, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.D; Bremmer, R.; Shoemaker, J.M.; Seksarian, A.K.; Poore, B.; Lutz, J.

    2006-05-01

    John Deere and Company (Deere), their partner, UQM Technologies, Inc. (UQM), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) recently completed work on the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) Number ORNL 04-0691 outlined in this report. CRADA 04-0691 addresses two topical issues of interest to Deere: (1) Improved characterization of hydrogen storage and heat-transfer management; and (2) Potential benefits from advanced electric motor traction-drive technologies. This report presents the findings of the collaborative examination of potential operational and cost benefits from using ORNL/PEEMRC dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) to drive permanent magnet (PM) motors in applications of interest to Deere. DMIC was initially developed and patented by ORNL to enable PM motors to be driven to speeds far above base speed where the back-electromotive force (emf) equals the source voltage where it is increasingly difficult to inject current into the motor. DMIC is a modification of conventional phase advance (CPA). DMIC's dual-speed modes are below base speed, where traditional pulse-width modulation (PWM) achieves maximum torque per ampere (amp), and above base speed, where six-step operation achieves maximum power per amp. The modification that enables DMIC adds two anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three motor phases, which consequently adds the cost of six thyristors. Two features evaluated in this collaboration with potential to justify the additional thyristor cost were a possible reduction in motor cost and savings during operation because of higher efficiency, both permitted because of lower current. The collaborative analysis showed that the reduction of motor cost and base cost of the inverter was small, while the cost of adding six thyristors was greater than anticipated. Modeling the DMIC control displayed inverter efficiency gains due to reduced current, especially under

  14. Development of New Absorber Materials to Achieve Organic Photovoltaic Commercial Modules with 15% Efficiency and 20 Years Lifetime: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-498

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2014-08-01

    Under this CRADA the parties will develop intermediates or materials that can be employed as the active layer in dye sensitized solar cells printed polymer systems, or small molecule organic photovoltaics.

  15. Equipment Loan for Concentrated PV Cavity Converter (PVCC) Research: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-285

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, Judy

    2015-07-28

    Interest in High Concentration Photovoltaics (HCPV) for terrestrial applications has significantly grown in recent years. A major driver behind this growth trend is the availability of high efficiency multi-junction (MJ) cells that promise reliable operation under high concentrations (500 to 1000 suns). The primary impact of HCPV on the solar electricity cost is the dramatic reduction in cell cost. For terrestrial HCPV systems, operating at concentrations ≥ 500 suns, the expensive MJ cells are marginally affordable. Most recently, triple-junction test cells have achieved a conversion efficiency of over 40% under concentrated sunlight. Photovoltaic Cavity Converter (PVCC) is a multi-bandgap, high concentration PV device developed by United Innovations, Inc., under subcontract to NREL. The lateral- (2- dimensional) structure of PVCC, as opposed to vertical multi-junction (MJ) structure, helps to circumvent most of the developmental challenges MJ technology has yet to overcome. This CRADA will allow the continued development of this technology by United Innovations. This project was funded by the California Energy Commission and is the second phase of a twopart demonstration program. The key advantage of the design was the use of a PVCC as the receiver. PVCCs efficiently process highly concentrated solar radiation into electricity by recycling photons that are reflected from the surface of the cells. Conventional flat, twodimensional receivers cannot recycle photons and the reflected photons are lost to the conversion process.

  16. METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/Shell CRADA 93-011. Online particulate monitoring began in August 1993 and ended in October 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in six MGCR runs (No. 5 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.07 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, (Modular Gas Cleanup Rig), from the FBG, pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit.

  17. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/3M CRADA 94024. Online particulate monitoring began in June 1994 and ended in October, 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in four MGCR runs (No. 7 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.0 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, Modular Gas Cleanup Rig, from the FBG, pressurized Fluidized-Bed Gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit. The alkali monitor unit was not used during runs No. 7 through No. 10.

  18. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Ford Motor Company (CRADA No. PNNL/265): “Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials”

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

    2013-02-14

    the engine exhaust. For these reasons, automakers and engine manufacturers have difficulty improving their catalytic converters for meeting the stringent HC emission standards. In this collaborative program, scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Ford Motor Company have investigated laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We have also studied materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we have examined the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measured the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model. Since this CRADA has now been completed, in this final report we will provide brief summaries of most of the work carried out on this CRADA over the last several years.

  19. CRADA Final Report: Application of Dual-Mode Inverter Control to Commercially Available Radial-Gap Mermanent Magnet Motors - Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, John W; Lawler, Jack; Downing, Mark; Stahlhut, Ronnie D; Bremmer, R.; Shoemaker, J. M.; Seksarian, A. K.; Poore, B.; Lutz, Jon F

    2006-05-01

    John Deere and Company (Deere), their partner, UQM Technologies, Inc. (UQM), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) recently completed work on the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) Number ORNL 04-0691 outlined in this report. CRADA 04-0691 addresses two topical issues of interest to Deere: (1) Improved characterization of hydrogen storage and heat-transfer management; and (2) Potential benefits from advanced electric motor traction-drive technologies. This report presents the findings of the collaborative examination of potential operational and cost benefits from using ORNL/PEEMRC dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) to drive permanent magnet (PM) motors in applications of interest to Deere. DMIC was initially developed and patented by ORNL to enable PM motors to be driven to speeds far above base speed where the back-electromotive force (emf) equals the source voltage where it is increasingly difficult to inject current into the motor. DMIC is a modification of conventional phase advance (CPA). DMIC's dual-speed modes are below base speed, where traditional pulse-width modulation (PWM) achieves maximum torque per ampere (amp), and above base speed, where six-step operation achieves maximum power per amp. The modification that enables DMIC adds two anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three motor phases, which consequently adds the cost of six thyristors. Two features evaluated in this collaboration with potential to justify the additional thyristor cost were a possible reduction in motor cost and savings during operation because of higher efficiency, both permitted because of lower current. The collaborative analysis showed that the reduction of motor cost and base cost of the inverter was small, while the cost of adding six thyristors was greater than anticipated. Modeling the DMIC control displayed inverter efficiency gains due to reduced current, especially under

  20. Final report for CRADA No. Y1293-0163 with the Tennessee Technology Foundation on behalf of the State of Tennessee. April 1993--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    During the time from April 1993 through April 1994, the State of Tennessee and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., were engaged in a jointly supported economic development effort. This project was accomplished through collaboration with the Tennessee Technology Foundation (TTF) and supported a consultant to the Tennessee Commission of Economic and Community Development. This document will serve as the final report of that effort and will summarize the activities during the effective period of the subject agreement.

  1. Evaluation of Novel Semiconductor Materials Potentially Useful in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00172

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J.

    2010-07-01

    Evaluation of novel semiconductor materials potentially useful in solar cells. NREL will fabricate, test and analyze solar cells from EpiWorks' wafers produced in 2-3 separate growth campaigns. NREL will also characterize material from 2-3 separate EpiWorks material development campaigns. Finally, NREL will visit EpiWorks and help establish any necessary process, such as spectral CV measurements and III-V on Si metalization processes and help validate solar cell designs and performance.

  2. Alzeta porous radiant burner. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    An Alzeta Pyrocore porous radiant burner was tested for the first time at elevated pressures and mass flows. Mapping of the burner`s stability limits (flashback, blowoff, and lean extinction limits) in an outward fired configuration and hot wall environment was carried out at pressures up to 18 atm, firing rates up to 180 kW, and excess air rates up to 100%. A central composite experimental design for parametric testing within the stability limits produced statistically sound correlations of dimensionless burner temperature and NO{sub x} emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, dimensionless firing rate, and reciprocal Reynolds number. The NO{sub x} emissions were below 4 ppmvd at 15% O{sub 2} for all conditions tested, and the CO and unburned hydrocarbon levels were simultaneously low. As a direct result of this cooperative research effort between METC and Alzeta, Solar Turbines has already expressed a strong interest in this novel technology.

  3. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Abramowicz, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  4. Final report on the Vitro CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    ORNL and Vitro investigated the application of advanced Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies to site characterization and environmental remediation work. The six tasks were to do feasibility studies for integrating GIS tools with DBMS, graphics, and other packages to aid in environmental analyses, develop environmental and geographic data standards and guidelines including data structures/quality assurance practices/metadata, investigate environmental and remediation predictive modeling and their integration with GIS, study remote sensing techniques including Global Positioning Systems techniques, and investigate display enhancement techniques including 2D/3D visualization coupled with GIS data bases.

  5. Advanced aircraft ignition CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Conventional commercial and military turbo-jet aircraft engines use capacitive discharge ignition systems to initiate fuel combustion. The fuel-rich conditions required to ensure engine re-ignition during flight yield less than optimal engine performance, which in turn reduces fuel economy and generates considerable pollution in the exhaust. Los Alamos investigated two approaches to advanced ignition: laser based and microwave based. The laser based approach is fuel ignition via laser-spark breakdown and via photo-dissociation of fuel hydrocarbons and oxygen. The microwave approach involves modeling, and if necessary redesigning, a combustor shape to form a low-Q microwave cavity, which will ensure microwave breakdown of the air/fuel mixture just ahead of the nozzle with or without a catalyst coating. This approach will also conduct radio-frequency (RF) heating of ceramic elements that have large loss tangents. Replacing conventional systems with either of these two new systems should yield combustion in leaner jet fuel/air mixtures. As a result, the aircraft would operate with (1) considerable less exhaust pollution, (2) lower engine maintenance, and (3) significantly higher fuel economy.

  6. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several drawbacks, particularly in the extraction phase. One general disadvantage of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide must be produced at large centralized plants where it is concentrated to 70% by distillation and transported to the users plant sites where it is diluted before use. Advanced membranes have the potential to enable more efficient, economic, and safe manufacture of hydrogen peroxide. Advanced membrane technology would allow filtration-based separation to replace the difficult liquid-liquid extraction based separation step of the hydrogen peroxide process. This would make it possible for hydrogen peroxide to be produced on-site in mini-plants at 30% concentration and used at the same plant location without distillation and transportation. As a result, production could become more cost-effective, safe and energy efficient.

  7. Electrochemical oxygen pumps. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J. D. Noble, J.

    2009-10-01

    All tasks of the Work Plan of ISTC Project 2277p have been completed, thus: (1) techniques of chemical synthesis were developed for more than ten recipes of electrolyte based on cerium oxide doped with 20 mole% of gadolinium (CeGd)O{sub 2}, doped by more than 10 oxide systems including 6 recipes in addition to the Work Plan; (2) electric conductivity and mechanical strength of CeGd specimens with additions of oxide systems were performed, two candidate materials for the electrolyte of electrochemical oxygen pump (pure CeGd and CeGd doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal) were chosen; (3) extended studies of mechanical strength of candidate material specimens were performed at room temperature and at 400, 600, 800 C; (4) fixtures for determination of mechanical strength of tubes by external pressure above 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C were developed and fabricated; and (5) technology of slip casting of tubes from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} and of (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal, withstanding external pressure of minimum 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C was developed, a batch of tubes was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (6) technology of making nanopowder from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} was developed based on chemical synthesis and laser ablation techniques, a batch of nanopowder with the weight 1 kg was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (7) a business plan for establishing a company for making powders of materials for electrochemical oxygen pump was developed; and (8) major results obtained within the Project were reported at international conferences and published in the Russian journal Electrochemistry. In accordance with the Work Plan a business trip of the following project participants was scheduled for April 22-29, 2006, to Tonawanda, NY, USA: Manager Victor Borisov; Leader of technology development Gennady Studenikin; Leader of business planning Elena Zadorozhnaya; Leader of production Vasily Lepalovsky; and Translator Vladimir Litvinov. During this trip project participants were to discuss with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and representative of Praxair Inc. J. Chen the results of project activities (prospects of transition metal-doped material application in oxygen pumps), as well as the prospects of cooperation with Praxair at the meeting with the company management in the following fields: (1) Deposition of thin films of oxide materials of complex composition on support by magnetron and ion sputtering, research of coatings properties; (2) Development of block-type structure technology (made of porous and dense ceramics) for oxygen pump. The block-type structure is promising because when the size of electrolyte block is 2 x 2 inches and assembly height is 10 inches (5 blocks connected together) the area of active surface is ca. 290 square inches (in case of 8 slots), that roughly corresponds to one tube with diameter 1 inch and height 100 inches. So performance of the system made of such blocks may be by a factor of two or three higher than that of tube-based system. However one month before the visit, J. Chen notified us of internal changes at Praxair and the cancellation of the visit to Tonawanda, NY. During consultations with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and Senior Project Manager A. Taylor a decision was made to extend the project term by 2 quarters to prepare proposals for follow-on activities during this extension (development of block-type structures made of dense and porous oxide ceramics for electrochemical oxygen pumps) using the funds that were not used for the trip to the US.

  8. Robust Technique for Measuring and Simulating Silicon Wafer Quality Characteristics that Enable the Prediction of Solar Cell Electrical Performance of MEMC Silicon Wafer. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-438

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2015-12-01

    NREL and MEMC Electronic Materials are interested in developing a robust technique for monitoring material quality of mc-Si and mono-Si wafers -- a technique that can provide relevant data to accurately predict the performance of solar cells fabricated on them. Previous work, performed under two TSAs between NREL and MEMC, has established that dislocation clusters are the dominant performance-limiting factor in MEMC mc-Si solar cells. The work under this CRADA will go further in verifying these results on a larger data set, evaluate possibilities of faster method(s) for mapping dislocations in wafers/ingots, understanding dislocation generation during ingot casting, and helping MEMC to have an internal capability for basic characterization that will provide feedback needed for more accurate crystallization simulations. NREL has already developed dislocation mapping technique and developed a basic electronic model (called Network Model) that uses spatial distribution of dislocations to predict the cell performance. In this CRADA work, we will use these techniques to: (i) establish dislocation, grain size, and grain orientation distributions of the entire ingots (through appropriate DOE) and compare these with theoretical models developed by MEMC, (ii) determine concentrations of some relevant impurities in selected wafers, (iii) evaluate potential of using photoluminescence for dislocation mapping and identification of recombination centers, (iv) evaluate use of diode array analysis as a detailed characterization tool, and (v) establish dislocation mapping as a wafer-quality monitoring tool for commercial mc-Si production.

  9. Development of Novel RTP-like Processing for Solar Cell Fabrication using UV-Rich Light Sources: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-11-442

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2013-01-01

    NREL and Mattson Technology are interested in developing new processing techniques for fabrication of solar cells using UV-rich optical processing. UV light has a very high absorption coefficient in most semiconductors, allowing the semiconductor surface to be heated locally and, in some cases, without a significant increase in the substrate temperature. NREL has several projects related to cell processing that currently use an optical furnace (having a spectrum rich in visible and infrared light). Mattson Technology has developed a UV rich light source that can be used in either pulse or continuous modes. The objective of this CRADA is to explore applications in solar cell processing where absorption characteristics of UV light can lead to lower cell cost and/or higher efficiencies.

  10. CRADA opportunities in pressurized combustion research

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.J.; Norton, T.S.; Casleton, K.H.

    1995-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center recently began operation of a Low Emissions Combustor Test and Research (LECTR) Facility. This facility was built to support the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems (ATS) by providing test facilities and engineering support to METC customers through the ATS University-Industry Consortium and through CRADA participation with industrial partners.

  11. Final Report for CRADA Agreement , AL-C-2006-01 with Microsens Biotechnologies: Detection of the Abnormal Prion Protein in Blood by Improving the Extraction of this Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Mary Jo

    2009-03-31

    Several conditions were examined to optimize the extraction protocol using Seprion beads for the abnormal prion protein. Different combinations of water, hexafluro-2-propanol and formic acid were used. The results of these extraction protocols showed that the magnetic beads coated with Seprion reagents were subject to degradation, themselves, when the extraction conditions that would solubilize the abnormal prion protein were used. These compounds caused interference in the immunoassay for the abnormal prion protein and rendered these protocols incompatible with the assay systems. In an attempt to overcome this problem, another approach was then used. The coated beads were used as an integral part of the assay platform. After washing away denaturing agents, the beads with the 'captured' abnormal prion were incubated directly in the immunoassay, followed by analysis by the capillary electrophoresis. When a capillary electrophoresis electro-kinetic separation was attempted, the beads disturbed the analysis making it impossible to interpret. A pressure separation method was then developed for capillary electrophoresis analysis. When 20 samples, 5 of which were positive were analyzed, the assay identified 4 of the 5 positives and had no false positives. When a larger number of samples were analyzed the results were not as good - there were false positives and false negatives. It was then observed that the amount of beads that were loaded was dependent upon how long the beads were allowed to settle before loading them into the capillary. This resulted in unacceptable variations in the results and explained that when large numbers of samples were evaluated the results were not consistent. Because the technical difficulties with using the Seprion beads could not be overcome at this time, another approach is underway that is outside of the scope of this CRADA. No further agreements have been developed. Because the results were not favorable, no manuscripts were written nor

  12. CRADAs: They're Not Just for NCI Anymore | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey Thomas, Contributing Writers, and Bruce Crise, Guest Writer Advancing scientific discovery is increasingly dependent on diverse and innovative partnerships, and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is an essential tool for establishing partnerships. CRADAs allow a federal laboratory to enter into collaborative research and development (R&D) projects with outside parties (commercial or nonprofit).

  13. CRADA Final Report CRADA No. LB05-001820"Ion Beam Drift Compression Technology for NDCX"

    SciTech Connect

    First point Scientific, Inc.; E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Waldron, William L.

    2009-10-05

    Summary of the specific research and project accomplishments: Through this collaboration, LBNL and FPSI determined the specific energy manipulations that apply to the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) ion beam and developed the preliminary design of a Fast Induction Energy Corrector (FIEC). This effort was successfully completed, firmly establishing the technical feasibility of the proposed approach for regulating the longitudinal energy distribution of the NDCX ion beam. This is a critical step in achieving the NDCX goal of axial compression of the beam by a factor of 100 during neutralized drift.

  14. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-08-01671 Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P. J.; Wilson, M.

    2014-11-28

    Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oC and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.

  15. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  16. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-12-12

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ~16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities. Another potential benefit would be for the medical industry that uses hydrofluoric acid to electropolish niobium-alloy materials. The FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will eliminate the environmental hazards posed by the use of hydrofluoric acid employed by chemical polishing and conventional electropolishing. Further, improved performance benefits may be possible. The overall objective of the Phase I program was to demonstrate that FARADAYIC Electropolishing of niobium cavities in electrolytes free of hydrofluoric acid can meet the RF superconducting performance criteria of those cavities. The FARADAYIC Electropolishing Process developed in the Phase I program was used to polish 50 mm Nb disks to a surface roughness (RA) of < 1 nm over a small area through process and post-processing optimization. An excellent level of surface cleanliness was achieved. While the desired 2K RF performance has not yet been achieved, Faraday believes that surface oxide state can be controlled through manipulation of the process parameters, to meet the 2K RF standard. Faraday is establishing apparatus and facilities infrastructure for single-cell SRF cavity electropolishing, through a synergistic effort with the Fermi National Accelerator Facility (Fermilab) to scale-up electropolishing of superconducting RF cavities. Faraday proposes to commercialize the subject technology via an IP based strategic relationship with a partner with established market channels within two primary commercialization avenues: 1) the superconducting particle accelerator community, 2) the medical device and implant market. Faraday will initially maintain Low Rate Initial Production capabilities for an application, but latterly seek a strategic partner who is solely dedicated to high rate production.

  17. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C. J.; Howell, Dave; Norris, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  18. Novel CO{sub 2} capture. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this work was to use electrochemically driven pH control to develop a second generation, enzyme-based contained liquid membrane (CLM) permeator to extract CO{sub 2} from a variety of coal-based flue gas streams more efficiently than does the CLM current design, while achieving performance coincident with DOE targets of less than 45% Cost of electricity (COE) in 2007 and less than 20% COE in 2012. Central to this goal the CLM would be alkaline (>pH 8) at the feed gas side and acid (

  19. Advanced membrane separation technology for biosolvents. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Argonne and Vertec Biosolvents investigated the stability and perfonnance for a number of membrane systems to drive the 'direct process' for pervaporation-assisted esterification to produce lactate esters. As outlined in Figure 1, the target is to produce ammonium lactate by fennentation. After purification and concentration, ammonium lactate is reacted with ethanol to produce the ester. Esterification is a reversible reaction so to drive the reaction forward, the produced ammonia and water must be rapidly separated from the product. The project focused on selecting pervaporation membranes with (1) acid functionality to facilitate ammonia separation and (2) temperature stability to be able to perform that reaction at as high a temperature as possible (Figure 2). Several classes of commercial membrane materials and functionalized membrane materials were surveyed. The most promising materials were evaluated for scale-up to a pre-commercial application. Over 4 million metric tons per year of solvents are consumed in the U.S. for a wide variety of applications. Worldwide the usage exceeds 10 million metric tons per year. Many of these, such as the chlorinated solvents, are environmentally unfriendly; others, such as the ethylene glycol ethers and N Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP), are toxic or teratogenic, and many other petroleum-derived solvents are coming under increasing regulatory restrictions. High performance, environmentally friendly solvents derived from renewable biological resources have the potential to replace many of the chlorinated and petrochemical derived solvents. Some of these solvents, such as ethyl lactate; d-limonene, soy methyl esters, and blends ofthese, can give excellent price/perfonnance in addition to the environmental and regulatory compliance benefits. Advancement of membrane technologies, particularly those based on pervaporation and electrodialysis, will lead to very efficient, non-waste producing, and economical manufacturing technologies for production of ethyl lactate and other esters.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease gene discovery. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-09

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the human gene(s) responsible for the disorder known as IBD. The work was planned in two phases. The desired products resulting from Phase 1 were BAC clone(s) containing the genetic marker(s) identified by gene/Networks, Inc. as potentially linked to IBD, plasmid subclones of those BAC(s), and new genetic markers developed from these plasmid subclones. The newly developed markers would be genotyped by gene/Networks, Inc. to ascertain evidence for linkage or non-linkage of IBD to this region. If non-linkage was indicated, the project would move to investigation of other candidate chromosomal regions. Where linkage was indicated, the project would move to Phase 2, in which a physical map of the candidate region(s) would be developed. The products of this phase would be contig(s) of BAC clones in the region exhibiting linkage to IBD, as well as plasmic subclones of the BACs and further genetic marker development. There would also be continued genotyping with new polymorphic markers during this phase. It was anticipated that clones identified and developed during these two phases would provide the physical resources for eventual disease gene discovery.

  1. Intermetallic blades for fabric cutting. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S.; Shih, H.R.; Off, J.W.A.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the evaluation of nickel- and iron-aluminide blades for cutting fabric as opposed to conventional steel blades. The aluminides were selected as blade material because of their extremely high work-hardening rate and the possibility of forming aluminum oxide on the surface to further enhance the wear resistance. Unlike steel blades, they do not require heat treating to become strong. A testing facility using an Eastman cutter was designed and built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing of blades. Denim fabric supplied by Levi Strauss was used. For lack of sufficient fabric, heavy paper was also used. Extensive testing revealed that there were several issues in getting the true comparison between various blades. The most important issue was the consistent sharpening of the blade edge. With all of the effort and precautions, identical edges could not be put on the blades of all the different materials. The second issue was the limited availability of fabric to evaluate the end-of-life limit for the blade edges. Two nickel- and three iron-aluminide compositions were evaluated. Under test conditions, the iron-aluminide alloy (PM-60), based on FeAl, was found to outperform other aluminides and the steel blade. Based on the data presented in this report, the authors recommend that additional testing be carried out on both the steel and aluminide blades to determine the number of times each blade can be sharpened prior to its replacement. However, the recommended testing needs to be conducted on blades for which the identical cutting edges and sharpening are incorporated. They further recommend that if the iron-aluminide blade is truly superior, a cost analysis be performed to determine its commercial feasibility. The best aluminide blades should be tested by commercial textile companies.

  2. Low emission advanced power cycle. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-07-13

    Today's gas turbines are based on the Brayton Cycle in which heat is added to the working fluid at constant pressure. An alternate approach, the Humphrey cycle, provides a higher theoretical thermal efficiency by adding heat at constant, or near constant volume. A few practical examples of such engines appeared in the mid 1900's, but they were largely superseded by the Brayton engine. Although the conventional gas turbine has been developed to a high level of efficiency and reliability, significant improvements in performance are becoming increasingly costly to obtain. Efficiencies of compressors, turbines and combustors are approaching theoretical limits. Cooling and materials technologies continue to improve but higher cycle temperatures may be limited by NOx emissions. While heat exchangers, intercoolers and other features improve cycle efficiency they add significantly to the cost, weight and volume of the basic engine and for flight applications may always be impractical. For these reasons there has been renewed interest in recent years in the constant volume Humphrey cycle focusing mainly on pulsing systems in which heat is added by a rapid series of detonations. Variations on this basic scheme are being evaluated for aircraft propulsions systems. General Electric has established a joint program with several Russian organizations to explore devices based on pressure rise combustion cycle and to make fundamental measurements of detonation properties of mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels and air.

  3. Ground penetrating radar mini-CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, R.; Stump, G.; Weil, G.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the feasibility of using ground penetrating radar (GPR) to assess the ease of excavability prior to and during trenching operations. The project partners were EnTech Engineering Inc., Vermeer Manufacturing Co., and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technology (FM&T)/Kansas City Plant (KCP). Commercial GPRs were field tested as well as a system developed at AlliedSignal FM&T. The AlliedSignal GPR was centered around a HP8753 Network Analyzer instrument. Commercial GPR antennas were connected to the analyzer and data was collected under control of software written for a notebook PC. Images of sub-surface features were generated for varied system parameters including: frequency, bandwidth, FFT windowing, gain, antenna orientation, and surface roughness conditions. Depths to 10 feet were of primary interest in this project. Although further development is required, this project has demonstrated that GPR can be used to identify transitions between different sub-surface conditions, as in going from one rock type to another. Additionally, the average relative dielectric constant of the material can be estimated which can be used to help identify the material. This information can be used to characterize an excavation site for use in budgeting a job. A real-time GPR would provide the operator with sub-surface images that could help with setting the optimum feed and speed rates of the trenching machine.

  4. Modeling of GE Appliances: Final Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-01-31

    This report is the final in a series of three reports funded by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) in collaboration with GE Appliances’ through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to describe the potential of GE Appliances’ DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid.

  5. A national laboratory/private industry cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA)

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, D.A.; MacEachin, J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the history and process of establishing a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories and Magnavox Electronic Systems Company for the design, development, and testing of a 360-degree scanning, imaging, intrusion detection sensor. The subject of the CRADA is the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). It is intended for exterior use at ranges from 50 to 1,500 meters and uses a combination of three sensing technologies (infrared, visible, and radar) and a new data processing method to provide low false-alarm intrusion detection and tracking combined with immediate visual assessment. The establishment of this CRADA represents a new paradigm in the cooperation between the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Laboratories and Private Industry. Although a formal document has now been executed, a CRADA is, nonetheless, primarily an agreement to work with each other to achieve goals that might otherwise be unattainable.

  6. Jupiter Oxygen Corporation/Albany Research Center Crada Progress Report, September

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Paul C.; Schoenfield, Mark

    2004-09-13

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has developed a new Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) process for fossil-fueled boilers. Pursuant to a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, ARC currently is studying the IPR process as applied to the oxygen fuel technology developed by Jupiter. As discussed further below, these two new technologies are complementary. This interim report summarizes the study results to date and outlines the potential activities under the next phase of the CRADA with Jupiter.

  7. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  8. 77 FR 48165 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of Homeland Security for the Efficacy Testing of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) and Chlorine Dioxide (ClO 2 )...

  9. CRADA 2009S001: Investigation of the Supercondcuting RF Properties of Large Grain Ingot Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Terry; Hollister, Jerry L.; Kolka, Ahren; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-12-18

    This CRADA intended to explore the properties of large grain ingot niobium by fabricating four single cell TESLA shaped accelerating cavities. Once the cavities were fabricated, SRF performance would be measured. Niowave received four discs of large grain ingot niobium from JLAB in February 2009. Niowave cut samples from each disc and tested the RRR. After the RRR was measured with disappointing results, the project lost interest. A no cost extension was signed in July 2009 to allow progress until June 2010, but ultimately no further work was accomplished by either party. No firm conclusions were drawn, as further investigations were not made. Large grain ingot niobium has shown real potential for high accelerating gradient superconducting cavities. However, this particular CRADA did not gather enough data to reach any conclusions in this regard.

  10. Agreement Execution Process Study: CRADAs and NF-WFO Agreements and the Speed of Business

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, Bruce J.; Cejka, Cheryl L.; Macklin, Richard; Miksovic, Ann

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a study on the execution of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and Non-Federal Work for Others (NF-WFO) agreements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory complex. The study provides quantitiative estimates of times required to negotiate and execute these agreements across the DOE complex. It identifies factors impacting on cycle times and describes best practicies used at various laboratories and site offices that reduce cycle times.

  11. Ozone/UV treatment to enhance biodegradation of surfactants in industrial wastewater. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, J.E.; Sullivan, P.F.; Lovejoy, M.A.; Collier, J.; Adams, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    The new owners of a surfactant manufacturing plant wanted to triple production but were limited by the plant`s wastewater treatment capacity. Mass balance calculations indicated that little aerobic biodegradation was occurring in the plant`s wastewater treatment system. Literature reviews and laboratory tests confirmed that as much as 60% of the plant`s products might resist aerobic biodegradation. Overall chemical losses, both solid and aqueous, were estimated at 3.8% of theoretical. Organic loadings to the wastewater treatment system were 170 kg/d of which 50 kg/d reached the biological treatment system. Pollution prevention measures have allowed a > 20% increase in production levels with a > 30% decrease in effluent volume and no increase in discharge of chemical oxygen demand (COD). A new dissolved air flotation (DAF) system removes 70% of the organic loading. Sludge volumes are lower by an order of magnitude than with the clarifier/drum-filter process it replaced.

  12. Westinghouse multi-annular swirl burner CRADA 95-029. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The FLUENT computational fluid dynamic code has been used to aid design of the Westinghouse Multi-Annular Swirl Burner (MASB). After successful comparison of FLUENT predictions to test data, design studies using FLUENT have indicated that backwall holes are unnecessary in the MASB design. FLUENT was then used to study the adaptation of the MASB design to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Preliminary steady-state and transient simulations of the propane-fueled start-up process indicate that flame structure is dependent on the choice turbulence closure and the resultant variation in swirl levels and recirculation zones. Due to the effect of duct geometry on swirl dissipation, a more accurate representation of the transition duct connecting the MASB to the turbine will be needed to better describe the flame structure.

  13. CRADA Final Report: Optimized Catalysts for the Cracking of Heavier Petroleum Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2003-01-02

    Catalysts lower the activation energy required for chemical reactions to proceed and are widely used in petroleum refining and chemical manufacturing. The useful lifetime and, thus, the value of an industrial catalyst are limited by a process known as deactivation in which the efficiency of the catalyst declines over time. Understanding this deactivation process is essential for developing new catalysts with longer useful lifetimes. In this project a new surface science tool, ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy, was used to identify chemical species on the surfaces of catalysts in-situ under actual reaction conditions. In collaboration with Catalytica this tool was applied to study deactivation in a series of important industrial catalysts. In the specific case of "reforming" catalysts are used to dehydrogenate and cyclize n-hexane and n-heptane to form benzene and toluene for the production of high octane gasoline, the buildup and polymerization of carbonaceous reaction byproducts on the surface of the catalyst was studied in-situ by this new method. The information on catalyst reaction and deactivation mechanisms has been found to be useful to the industrial partner in improving their catalysts. These improvements could have a major impact on the efficiency of petroleum refining and gasoline production. In addition, the new surface science tools developed by this project will have general applicability to the study of catalysis and to the field of surface science in general.

  14. Equipment Loan: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-250

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.

    2013-08-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  15. Pulsed DC deposition of near-frictionless carbon. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.; Energy Systems

    2005-06-30

    Near-Frictionless Carbon (NFC) coatings, CemeCon, Inc. arranged for the loan of a Pinnacle Plus pulsed DC power supply with ancillary support equipment and appropriate sputter targets for the deposition of CemeCon's graded Cr-based bond coat. A process engineer from CemeCon AG also came to Argonne to install and operate the new power supply, and work with ANL scientists on process development. By any measure, these results are extremely encouraging. It has now been established that NFC coatings can be deposited in the CemeCon CC800/9sx unit using pulsed DC to generate the plasma, and further that the DLC3000 bond coat technology can be used with PACVD coatings. In terms of process variables, it should be possible to increase the deposition rate by increasing either or both the deposition pressure and/or the pulsed bias voltage without adversely affecting the coating quality. Other structural characterization may be performed on the coatings, including fluctuation microscopy, ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  16. CRADA SC94-1259 final report: Dielectric mirror masks for laser processing of microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods were examined for the fabrication of dielectric mirror masks. In the first method, a commercial laser mirror was patterned with photoresist and the dielectric film etched with ammonium bifluoride. The ammonium bifluoride etch showed strong kinetic anisotropy with the fastest etch rate in the vertical direction. However, horizontal etching still resulted in significant undercutting of the photomask. In the second method, a photoresist coated laser mirror was etched with an argon plasma. The argon plasma caused significant damage to the photoresist and underlying dielectric layer without adequate removal of the dielectric film in the open areas of the mask. Neither of the two methods examined were able to produce usable dielectric masks. During the course of this project, it was discovered that a foreign company, Balzers AG of Liechtenstein, had recently developed successful fabrication procedures for dielectric mirror masks. A mask purchased from Balzers for testing showed distinguishable pattern features down to 2 {mu}m in size. This mask was used in ablative projection etching experiments to form microstructures in Mylar polymer films. A thin film resistor pattern with 7.0 {mu}m wide lines was etched 5.4 {mu}m deep into a Mylar substrate. The etch pattern showed uniform linewidths but exhibited some thinning of the lines in areas where U-turns occurred. The ablative projection etching technique shows promise as a method for the rapid fabrication of contact masks in microstructuring applications.

  17. Project Liberty: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00245

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E. J.

    2010-08-01

    NREL hosted two teams of POET Project Liberty analysts for week-long biomass compositional analysis (wet chemical analysis) classes (one in 2008, one in 2009). NREL also performed biomass compositional on over 70 samples of corn stover feedstock and pretreated corn stover provided by POET.

  18. Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, E N; Borole, A P

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this Cooperative research and Development Agreement project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( O W ) and Baker Performance Chemicals (BPC), Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, UNOCAL and Texaco is to investigate the biological desukrization of crude oil. Biological removal of organic s&%r fiom crude oil offers an attractive alternative to conventional thermochemical treatment due to the mild operating conditions afforded by the biocatalyst. In order for biodesulfbrization to realize commercial success, reactors must be designed which allow for sufficient liquid / liquid and gas / liquid mass transfer while simultaneously reducing operating costs. To this end we have been developing advanced bioreactors for biodesufirization and have been studying their performance using both actual crude oil as well as more easily characterized model systems.

  19. Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371

    SciTech Connect

    French, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

  20. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A.; Wierman, C.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  1. Evaluation of Hydrogen Sensors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-547

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, William

    2015-10-01

    In preparation for the projected 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, KPA has been contracted by Toyota Motors to develop a hydrogen safety system for vehicle repair facilities. Repair facility safety designs will include hydrogen sensors. KPA will identify critical sensor specifications for vehicle repair facilities. In collaboration with NREL, KPA will select and purchase commercial hydrogen sensors that meet or nearly meet requirements for deployment in vehicle repair facility. A two-phase field deployment plan to verify sensor performance has been developed.

  2. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  3. Racing Radiators Utilizing ORNL’s Graphite Foam. CRADA Final Report, ORNL-98-0551

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, James

    1998-10-10

    The recent development of light-weight foams has led to novel light-weight, high strength carbon based materials and structures. These materials exhibit very high specific strengths and low thermal conductivities. Likewise, the novel development of very high thermal conductivity graphite foam will lead to novel ''out-of-the-box'' solutions for thermal management problems. With a thermal conductivity equivalent to aluminum 6061 and 1/5th the weight, this material is an enabling technology for thermal management problems ranging from heat sinks to radiators and satellite panels to aircraft heat exchangers. In addition, the open porosity will lead to novel designs that ncorporate porous media heat exchangers and phase change materials. For example, by utilizing the foam as a heat exchanger, heat transfer coefficients over two orders of magnitude greater than current metallic designs have been measured. To further demonstrate this phenomenon, a heat exchanger (radiator) for a passenger automobile has been developed that is significantly smaller in size, and testing has demonstrated feasibility to improve the automobiles aerodynamic efficiency and reduce weight.

  4. University of Arkansas Pine Bluff. Final report/project accomplishments summary, CRADA Number 95-KCPP-004

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to help develop and transfer technologies to improve the production of the catfish segment of American aquaculture. This project was organized to leverage two DOE programs, DOE Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) funds and Defense Program Technology Transfer Initiative. The emphasis was to be directed toward utilizing engineering and manufacturing capabilities to develop solutions to the industry problems through the technology transfer program. The project scope included the following: (1) review the technical needs of the aquaculture industry in the state of Arkansas; (2) match the technical capabilities of FM and T with the needs of the industry; (3) form joint projects between FM and T and UAPB. Four areas of immediate interest were identified: (1) dissolved oxygen sensor system improvements; (2) alternatives to seining; (3) fish inventory and sizing; (4) improved off-flavor detection. In the first project a technical literature search was conducted by UAPB with consultation from FM and T. It was determined that commercial dissolved oxygen sensor equipment is available that could be used to upgrade the monitoring for aquaculture use. Initial results of the Alternatives to Seining project concluded that either acoustic or electric field technology can be used to herd the fish as the traditional seine does. The balance of the project was canceled when project funding at UAPB was canceled.

  5. University of Pittsburgh and FETC CRADA PC96-004, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    DoE/FETc-99/lo90 Cellular deposition is a dynamic phenomenon that may involve both adhesion and detachment, as in thrombosis and thromboembolism. Current techniques for assessing the blood compatibility of opaque biomaterials are limited to endpoint analysis of cellular deposition. To investigate temporal changes in deposition multiple trials with varying duration are generally required.

  6. Monolithic circuits for barium fluoride detectors used in nuclear physics experiments. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, R.L.; Blankenship, J.L.; Beene, J.R.; Todd, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    Custom monolithic electronic circuits have been developed recently for large detector applications in high energy physics where subsystems require tens of thousands of channels of signal processing and data acquisition. In the design and construction of these enormous detectors, it has been found that monolithic circuits offer significant advantages over discrete implementations through increased performance, flexible packaging, lower power and reduced cost per channel. Much of the integrated circuit design for the high energy physics community is directly applicable to intermediate energy heavy-ion and electron physics. This STTR project conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sought to develop a new integrated circuit chip set for barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) detector arrays based upon existing CMOS monolithic circuit designs created for the high energy physics experiments. The work under the STTR Phase 1 demonstrated through the design, simulation, and testing of several prototype chips the feasibility of using custom CMOS integrated circuits for processing signals from BaF{sub 2} detectors. Function blocks including charge-sensitive amplifiers, comparators, one shots, time-to-amplitude converters, analog memory circuits and buffer amplifiers were implemented during Phase 1 effort. Experimental results from bench testing and laboratory testing with sources were documented.

  7. West Virginia Diesel Study, CRADA MC96-034, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gautam

    1998-08-05

    The global objective of the recently completed Phase 1 of the West Virginia Diesel Study, at West Virginia University, was to evaluate mass emission rates of exhaust emissions from diesel powered equipment specified by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission. The experimental data generated in this study has been utilized by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission to promulgate initial rules, requirements and standards governing the operation of diesel equipment in underground coal mines.

  8. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. |

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  9. A Study of the Electromedics Autotransfusion System, CRADA PC93-010, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin Shaffer; Mehrdad Shahnam

    1995-03-31

    This report describes the work at PETC to evaluate flow dynamics in the Electromedics autotransfusion system. First, a literature survey was conducted for flow studies in centrifuge systems. Although no flow studies were identified for Latham-type bowls, pertinent literature for general centrifugal separation was found and reviewed. Sample measurements were taken with a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). The data indicates that LDV is a useful tool in flow analysis. Velocity, turbulence intensity, and bowl vibration are all accurately measured with LDV. For optical imaging of particle separation it is necessary to use fluorescent doped particles and color separation. This allows each type of particle to be observed in a mixture. A market survey was completed and sources for fluorescent dyed particles of three different emission wavelengths and corresponding optical bandpass filters were identified.

  10. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

  11. Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01

    The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

  12. Winnebago Resource Study. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-329

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Robichaud, R.

    2015-03-01

    Since 2005 the NREL Native American Tall Tower Loan program has assisted Native American tribes to assess their wind resource by lending tall (30m - 50m) anemometer. This program has allowed tribes a lower risk way to gather financeable wind data for potential utility scale wind energy projects. These projects offer Tribes a significant economic development opportunity.

  13. Phase 1 STTR flywheel motor/alternator for hybrid electric vehicles. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, J.W.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; Kessinger, R.L. Jr.; Robinson, S.T.; Seymour, K.P.; Dockstadter, K.D.

    1997-12-31

    Visual Computing Systems (VCS) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have teamed, through a Phase 1 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE), to develop an advanced, low-cost motor/alternator drive system suitable for Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) applications. During Phase 1, system performance and design requirements were established, design concepts were generated, and preliminary motor/alternator designs were developed and analyzed. ORNL provided mechanical design and finite element collaboration and Lynx Motion Technology, a spin-off from VCS to commercialize their technology, constructed a proof-of-concept axial-gap permanent magnet motor/alternator that employed their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) with a survivable design speed potential of 10,000 rpm. The VCS motor/alternator was successfully tested in ORNL`s Motor Test Tank using an ORNL inverter and ORNL control electronics. It was first operated as an unloaded motor to 6,000 rpm and driven as an unloaded generator to 6,000 rpm. Output from the generator was then connected to a resistance bank, which caused the loaded generator to decelerate to 3,860 rpm where data was collected. After about 4-1/2 minutes, the test was terminated because of an impact noise. Subsequent inspection and operation at low speeds did not reveal the source of the noise. Electrical performance of the motor was excellent, encouraging continued development of this technology. Phase 2 efforts will focus on further design development and optimization, manufacturing development and prototype construction, testing, and evaluation.

  14. Heart pathology determination from electrocardiogram signals by application of deterministic chaos mathematics. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M.; Stickney, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    It is well known that the electrical signals generated by the heart exhibit nonlinear, chaotic dynamics. A number of heart pathologies alter heartbeat dynamics and/or the electrical properties of the heart, which, in turn, alter electrocardiogram signals. Electrocardiogram techniques in common use for diagnosing pathologies have limited sensitivity and specificity. This leads to a relatively high misdiagnosis rate for ventricular fibrillation. It is also known that the linear analysis tools utilized (such as fast Fourier transforms and linear statistics) are limited in their ability to find subtle changes or characteristic signatures in nonlinear chaotic electrocardiogram signals. In contrast, the authors` research indicates that chaotic time-series analysis tools that they have developed allow quantification of the nonlinear nature of dynamic systems in the form of nonlinear statistics, and also enable characteristic signatures to be identified. The goal of this project is to modify these tools to increase and enhance the medically useful information obtained from electrocardiogram signals through the application of chaotic time series analysis tools. In the one year of the project, the tools have been extended to enhance the capabilities for detecting ventricular fibrillation. Chaotic time-series analysis provides a means to increase sensitivity in detecting general heart dynamics. Oak Ridge National Laboratory specialists have worked with Physio-Control and their medical collaborators to extend the capabilities of state-of-the-art electrocardiogram systems and interpretation of results.

  15. Radiometer Evaluation - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-00382

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-10-01

    This project will place instrumentation at the NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in cooperation with Yankee Environmental Systems (Participant). One or more Participant instruments will be deployed for the purpose of evaluation under controlled conditions. The scope of the project will be a year-long comparison of the instruments vs. other NREL baseline instruments with awell-characterized history.

  16. CRADA Final Report: Genetic Testing for Evaluation of Heart Disease Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Ronald M.

    2002-01-21

    We have examined relationships of common genotypes in candidate genes to variations in plasma lipids, lipoproteins, lipoprotein subfractions, and other parameters related to cardiovascular disease risk in two study cohorts. The first cohort consisted of 395 healthy individuals studied on their usual diets, and again after consumption of high fat (40-46%) and low fat (20-24%) diets. The second cohort consisted of 369 subjects selected for leanness (body mass index < 25 kg/m{sup 2}). For both cohorts, 30 genotypes in 14 genes were examined by PCR using reagents from Roche Molecular Systems. In the diet study cohort, significant associations with various lipoprotein measurements were observed for variants in 9 genes related to lipoprotein metabolism. Some of these associations were significant for the high fat or low fat diet only, andlor for diet-induced lipoprotein changes. In addition some associations were significant in the cohort oflean subjects only. Collectively these preliminary analyses suggest that analysis of these genotypes, together with others that will be added on the basis of new gene discovery, can be of value in delineating gene-diet interactions of importance for cardiovascular disease risk.

  17. Solar Trough Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00289

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, A.

    2011-05-01

    New HCEs were installed on the hot sides of the thermal loops at SEGS VIII and IX from mid-2007 to mid-2008. Due to significant increases in plant performance, an interest in a further increase performance by installing new HCEs on the cold portions of the loop developed. Although it was assumed that the plant performance would increase, the exact amount was unknown. The objective of this project was to estimate the performance improvements with new HCEs installed on the cold sides of the loop, with performance being evaluated as potential increases in electrical power production (megawatt-hours). A comparison of performance prior to and post installation of new HCEs on the hot sides of the loops was done. For completeness, an estimate of performance losses - such as the optical efficiency, mirror reflectivity, and optical accuracy - was also included in this analysis. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) HCE Survey System was used to determine if the HCEs were hot or cold.

  18. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P; Baker, C

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  19. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials.

  20. Optimization of electron-cyclotron-resonance charge-breeder ions : Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.; Physics; Far-Tech, Inc.

    2009-10-09

    Measurements of 1+ beam properties and associated performance of ECR Charge Breeder source determined by total efficiency measurement and charge state distributions from the ECR Charge Breeder. These results were communicated to Far-Tech personnel who used them to benchmark the newly developed programs that model ion capture and charge breeding in the ECR Charge Breeder Source. Providing the basic data described above and in the discussion below to Far-Tech allowed them to improve and refine their calculational tools for ECR ion sources. These new tools will be offered for sale to industry and will also provide important guidance to other research labs developing Charge Breeding ion sources for radioactive beam physics research.

  1. Noncomposite Counterelectrode Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-203

    SciTech Connect

    Engtrakul, C.

    2014-06-01

    New counter electrode materials under development at NREL have the potential to positively impact electrochromic window technology. The current generation of nanocomposite materials is designed to provide rapid transport of lithium ions to nanoparticles of anodic coloring materials. They may improve the coloration efficiency of the entire films stack while also improving the speed and depth of coloration. We expect an added benefit of greater film durability. To date, encouraging results have been obtained in the laboratory. Performance and durability tests will be carried out to characterize any improvements obtained as a result of the new counter electrode materials. In addition to process improvement, the project also has the secondary goal of improving the basic understanding of the electrochromic process in Sage?s counter electrode.

  2. Nondestructive testing of ceramic engine components. Final progress report for completed CRADAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Happoldt, G.P.

    1993-07-15

    This report describes a method for the nondestructive testing of ZrO{sub 2} plasma-sprayed layers with intentional disbonds. A theoretical analysis was conducted to determine the surface-temperature difference for each disbond using a given input heat pulse.

  3. CRADA Final Report: Identification of New Therapies with Potential for Treatment of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-10-21

    This project represents a collaboration between two research groups at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the research facility at the Chiron corporation, in which each group supplied unique and essential contributions. Mina Bissell, at LBNL, provided the resources and expertise of her research group in a physiologically relevant culture system with particular utility for investigating the development of breast cancer. Chiron Corporation, of Emeryville, California, generated high-quality cDNA microarrays, hybridized cDNA prepared from cultures and cell lines developed in the Bissell laboratory, and performed preliminary analysis of the resultant dataset. Saira Mian, at LBNL, used sophisticated statistical and Bayesian techniques for analysis of the enormously complex dataset to reveal key genes involved in signaling pathways responsible for development of breast cancer. These results have indicated separate and distinct groups of genes associated only with the nonmalignant cells, with the malignant cells, and the reverted cells. Currently, the project team is involved in data verification, to be followed by testing selected genes for utility as potential tumor suppressors. However, the results already obtained were so striking that a disclosure has been filed on 367 of the selected genes for potential use in therapy.

  4. Letter to Eduard Smetanin, dated March 2, 2007: Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-02

    The IPP/DOE program office has finished its evaluation of the alpha-emitting isotope work with Kurchatov Institute and IPPE, and they have made an important decision about the future of this work. IPP/DOE has directed us to re-program the work and add more funds, so the emphasis will be on production of Th228. By making this re-direction of the isotope work, IPPE will see several important benefits: (a) the payments will be made faster to IPPE by using the ISTC Agreement; (b) a larger amount of money will be paid to IPPE; and (c) a profitable future business opportunity for IPPE is more probable.

  5. Ceramicrete stabilization of radioactive-salt-containing liquid waste and sludge water. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-04

    It was found that the Ceramicrete Specimens incorporated the Streams 1 and 2 sludges with the adjusted loading about 41.6 and 31.6%, respectively, have a high solidity. The visible cracks in the matrix materials and around the anionite AV-17 granules included could not obtain. The granules mentioned above fixed by Ceramicrete matrix very strongly. Consequently, we can conclude that irradiation of Ceramecrete matrix, goes from the high radioactive elements, not result the structural degradation. Based on the chemical analysis of specimens No.462 and No.461 used it was shown that these matrix included the formation elements (P, K, Mg, O), but in the different samples their correlations are different. These ratios of the content of elements included are about {+-} 10%. This information shows a great homogeneity of matrix prepared. In the list of the elements founded, expect the matrix formation elements, we detected also Ca and Si (from the wollastonite - the necessary for Ceramicrete compound); Na, Al, S, O, Cl, Fe, Ni also have been detected in the Specimen No.642 from the waste forms: NaCl, Al(OH){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fe(OH){sub 3}, nickel ferrocyanide and Ni(NO{sub 3})2. The unintelligible results also were found from analysis of an AV-17 granules, in which we obtain the great amount of K. The X-ray radiographs of the Ceramicrete specimens with loading 41.4 % of Stream 1 and 31.6% of Stream 2, respectively showed that the realization of the advance technology, created at GEOHKI, leads to formation of excellent ceramic matrix with high amount of radioactive streams up to 40% and more. Really, during the interaction with start compounds MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with the present of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and Wollastonite this process run with high speed under the controlled regimes. That fact that the Ceramicrete matrix with 30-40% of Streams 1 and 2 have a crystalline form, not amorphous matter, allows to permit that these matrix should be very stable, reliable for incorporation of a radionuclides.

  6. Buried Anode Device Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-451

    SciTech Connect

    Tenent, R.

    2015-03-01

    The possibility of a reflecting electrochromic device is very attractive, and the 'Buried Anode' architecture developed at NREL could yield such a device. The subject of this cooperative agreement will be the development and refinement of a Buried Anode device process. This development will require the active involvement of NREL and US e-Chromic personnel, and will require the use of NREL equipment as much as possible. When this effort is concluded, US e-Chromic will have enough information to construct a pilot production line, where further development can continue.

  7. Fusion welding of advanced borated stainless steels. Final report: CRADA No. CR1042

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    This work addressed two major areas concerning joining of advanced borated stainless steels. These areas included the development of a understanding of the physical metallurgy of borated stainless steels and the development of welding processes and post-weld heat treatments for these alloys. Differential thermal analysis experiments were conducted on ten heats of borated stainless steel to determine the transformation temperatures and melting behavior of the alloys. On-heating solidus temperatures were measured for all of the alloys and were used to define the temperatures associated with the fusion line during welding. Isothermal heat treatments designed to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature exposures on the toughness of the borated grades were conducted. These tests were used to determine if significant changes in the microstructure or mechanical properties of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ) occur. Specifically, the tests addressed the solid-state region of the HAZ. The test matrix included a variety of alloy compositions and thermal exposures at temperatures near the on-heating solidus (as determined by the DTA experiments). Welding experiments designed to assess the mechanical properties and microstructure of gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welds were conducted.

  8. Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M. Gorelov, A. M.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian metallurgical industry) and supplied to the partner for tests in a stack of fuel cells. A feasibility study on the cost of the Russian material for a BSP is to be done on Tasks 1, 2 in case the annual order makes up 400,000 sheets. The goal of Task 3 of the project is to research on possible implementation of cermet compositions on the basis of LiAlO{sub 2}, TiN, B{sub 4}C, ceramics with Ni and Ni-Mo binders. BaCeO{sub 3} conductive ceramics with metal binders of Ni, Ni-Cr etc. were also planned to be studied. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of samples is to be made and passed to FCE for tests. The goal of Task 4 of the Project is development of a new alloy or alloys with a ceramic coating that will have upgraded corrosion stability in operation within a SOFC. A new alloy was to be worked out by the way of modification of compositions of industrial alloys. Ceramic coatings are to be applied onto ferrite steel produced serially by iron and steel industry of Russia as sheet iron.

  9. Design of 3x3 focusing array for heavy ion driver. Final report on CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2005-03-30

    This memo presents a design of a 3 x 3 quadrupole array for HIF. It contains 3 D magnetic field computations of the array build with racetrack coils with and without different shields. It is shown that it is possible to have a low error magnetic field in the cells and shield the stray fields to acceptable levels. The array design seems to be a practical solution to any size array for future multi-beam heavy ion fusion drivers.

  10. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Ludtka, G.M.; Bjerke, M.A.; Gray, W.H.

    1997-12-01

    The overall scope of this endeavor was to develop an integrated computer system, running on a network of heterogeneous computers, that would allow the rapid development of tool designs, and then use process models to determine whether the initial tooling would have characteristics which produce the prototype parts. The major thrust of this program for ORNL was the definition of the requirements for the development of the integrated die design system with the functional purpose to link part design, tool design, and component fabrication through a seamless software environment. The principal product would be a system control program that would coordinate the various application programs and implement the data transfer so that any networked workstation would be useable. The overall system control architecture was to be required to easily facilitate any changes, upgrades, or replacements of the model from either the manufacturing end or the design criteria standpoint. The initial design of such a program is described in the section labeled ``Control Program Design``. A critical aspect of this research was the design of the system flow chart showing the exact system components and the data to be transferred. All of the major system components would have been configured to ensure data file compatibility and transferability across the Internet. The intent was to use commercially available packages to model the various manufacturing processes for creating the die and die inserts in addition to modeling the processes for which these parts were to be used. In order to meet all of these requirements, investigative research was conducted to determine the system flow features and software components within the various organizations contributing to this project. This research is summarized.

  11. Production of Ra225 precursor for Ac225/Bi213 generators. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-02

    Russian subcontractors shipped two small deliveries of Ra225 to PNNL for evaluation. The activity was close to the requisite amount in the subcontract. The first labeled properly; the second did not. This showed that the Russians could supply Ra225 to the US; however they proved unable to meet future demands for larger amounts of activity. The US DOE attempts to get Ra225 from Russian should be terminated; the Russians, under Rosatom, are not interested in this business.

  12. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, S.; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-30

    provided validation data sets and the WBE software tool to validate the KGS implementation. OAE diagnostician automatically detects and diagnoses problems with outdoor air ventilation and economizer operation for air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings using data available from building automation systems (BASs). As part of this CRADA, PNNL developed implementation documentation and provided technical support to KGS to implement the tool into their software suite. PNNL also provided validation data sets and the OAE software tool to validate the KGS implementation. Finally, as part of this CRADA project, PNNL developed new processes to automate parts of the re-tuning process and transfer those process to KGS for integration into their software product. The transfer of DOE-funded technologies will transform the commercial buildings sector by making buildings more energy efficient and also reducing the carbon footprint from the buildings. As part of the CRADA with PNNL, KGS implemented the whole building energy diagnostician, a portion of outdoor air economizer diagnostician and a number of measures that automate the identification of re-tuning measures.

  13. Gelcasting of aluminum titanate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Stephan, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to assess the applicability of the gelcasting process for forming automotive exhaust port liner green bodies using Golden Technologies` proprietary aluminum titanate powder composition. A gelcasting process, specifically tailored to Golden Technologies` powder, was developed and used successfully to form green bodies for property evaluation. Using appropriate milling and firing conditions, it was found that the gelcast material had properties which compared favorably with Golden Technologies` baseline material. Tubular gelcast samples simulating exhaust port liners were prepared and shipped to Golden Technologies for final process evaluation.

  14. Solar Resource Measurements in El Paso, Texas (Equipment CRADA Only): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-273

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A.

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  15. Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

  16. CRADA opportunities with METC`s gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, E.N.; Rockey, J.M.; Tucker, M.S.

    1995-06-01

    Opportunities exist for Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to support commercialization of IGCC power systems. METC operates an integrated gasifier and hot gas cleanup facility for the development of gasification and hot gas cleanup technologies. The objective of our program is to gather performance data on gasifier operation, particulate removal, desulfurization and regeneration technologies. Additionally, slip streams are provided for developing various technologies such as; alkali monitoring, particulate measuring, chloride removal, and contaminate recovery processes. METC`s 10-inch diameter air blown Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG) provides 300 lb/hr of coal gas at 1100{degrees}F and 425 psig. The particulate laden gas is transported to METC`s Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR). The gas pressure is reduced to 285 psig before being fed into a candle filter vessel. The candle filter vessel houses four candle filters and multiple test coupons. The particulate free gas is then desulfurized in a sorbent reactor. Starting in 1996 the MGCR system will be able to regenerate the sorbent in the same vessel.

  17. FTTA AGREEMENT BETWEEN CH2M HILL, INC. AND THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY-ATHENS (NERL) CRADA FILE #0168-99

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Water Act mandates that water quality standards must be met everywhere except in limited permitted areas surrounding wastewater discharges. Mixing zone models, such as Visual Plumes, the modeling platform being developed under this CRADA, are used to establish permit li...

  18. Microalgal Production of Jet Fuel: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-208

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, E. E.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2012-06-01

    Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that can use CO2 and sunlight to generate the complex biomolecules necessary for their survival. These biomolecules include energy-rich lipid compounds that can be converted using existing refinery equipment into valuable bio-derived fuels, including jet fuel for military and commercial use. Through a dedicated and thorough collaborative research, development and deployment program, the team of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Chevron will identify a suitable algae strain that will surpass the per-acre biomass productivity of terrestrial plant crops.

  19. Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-03-00129

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R. B.

    2010-07-01

    Midwest Research Institute (MRI) and AVL Powertrain Engineering, Inc. (AVL) have executed a Software and Trademark License Agreement (Software License) by which AVL is granted the exclusive right to use, modify and improve and to commercialize by reproducing, distributing and granting sublicenses in, certain computer software known as ADVISOR 2003.

  20. Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-291

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

  1. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-08

    The objective of this project was to determine why diamond-based films are unusually efficient electron emitters (field emission cathodes) at room temperature. Efficient cathodes based on diamond are being developed by SI Diamond Technology (SIDT) as components for bright, sunlight-readable, flat panel displays. When the project started, it was known that only a small fraction (<1%) of the cathode area is active in electron emission and that the emission sites themselves are sub-micron in size. The critical challenge of this project was to develop new microcharacterization methods capable of examining known emission sites. The research team used a combination of cathode emission imaging (developed at SIDT), micro-Raman spectroscopy (LBNL), and electron microscopy and spectroscopy (National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBNL) to examine the properties of known emission sites. The most significant accomplishment of the project was the development at LBNL of a very high resolution scanning probe that, for the first time, measured simultaneously the topography and electrical characteristics of single emission sites. The increased understanding of the emission mechanism helped SIDT to develop a new cathode material,''nano-diamond,'' which they have incorporated into their Field Emission Picture Element (FEPix) product. SIDT is developing large-format flat panel displays based on these picture elements that will be brighter and more efficient than existing outdoor displays such as Jumbotrons. The energy saving that will be realized if field emission displays are introduced commercially is in line with the energy conservation mission of DOE. The unique characterization tools developed in this project (particularly the new scanning microscopy method) are being used in ongoing BES-funded basic research.

  2. CRADA with the Belhaven group and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-081): Automated soil moisture measuring systems. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) develop an improved, full- scale, inexpensive, soil moisture sensor, using innovative porous ceramic materials as the moisture wicking component and (2) demonstrate the performance of the sensor in the laboratory and in field to determine its reliability and accuracy. The opportunity for this project arose as a result of an inquiry from Belhaven to whom the soil moisture sensor developed at PNNL by John Cary was licensed. The existing Cary sensor needed research and development effort in order to create the type of soil moisture sensor envisioned by the Belhaven for use in an integrated soil moisture systems in the field. PNNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this Collaborative project.

  3. Assessment of U.S. Energy Wave Resources: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-328

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, G.

    2012-06-01

    In terms of extractable wave energy resource for our preliminary assessment, the EPRI/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) assumed that 15% of the available resource could be extracted based on societal constraints of a 30% coverage of the coastline with a 50% efficient wave energy absorbing device. EPRI recognizes that much work needs to be done to better define the extractable resource and we have outlined a comprehensive approach to doing this in our proposed scope of work, along with specific steps for refining our estimate of the available wave energy resources.

  4. Economic and Performance Analysis of Gear Box Failures. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-236

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, USA is forming a collaborative within the wind energy industry to address reliability issues on wind turbines. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), leading the collaborative effort, will allow gearbox manufacturers, bearing manufacturers, wind turbine owner/operators, and wind turbine manufacturers to team up for joint projects that address specific issues regarding design and reliability of wind turbine gearboxes. The primary means of investigation will be through full scale testing and analysis of actual gearboxes, both in the field and in the NREL 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility. These teams would contribute resources into a campaign that is intended to serve the mutual interests of a majority of the wind and gearbox industry stakeholders in addition to the specific project team objectives. that address specific issues regarding design and reliability of wind turbine gearboxes. The primary means of investigation will be through full scale testing and analysis of actual gearboxes, both in the field and in the NREL 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility. These teams would contribute resources into a campaign that is intended to serve the mutual interests of a majority of the wind and gearbox industry stakeholders in addition to the specific project team objectives.

  5. Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-376

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Barry

    2015-07-09

    The objective of this project is to use field verification to improve DOE’s ability to model and understand the impacts of, as well as develop solutions for, high penetration PV deployments in electrical utility distribution systems. The Participant will work with NREL to assess the existing distribution system at SCE facilities and assess adding additional PV systems into the electric power system.

  6. Biomass Resource Demand Characterization Study: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-436

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.

    2015-02-01

    Competing demands for U.S. biomass resources and resulting impacts on regional feedstock availability could have a significant impact on the ability of the biofuels industry to transition to lower cost feedstocks, such as wood, agricultural residues, and energy crops, as well as on the ability of U.S. electric utilities and consumers to meet Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) and transition to lower carbon-footprint sources of electricity. Promulgation of regulations that place a cost on CO2 emissions from fossil fuels will also impact this situation as biomass to power applications become increasingly cost competitive. This increased competition for biomass feedstocks could create technical and economic risks for the Government, industry, and investors, and has the potential to impede commercialization of bio-energy in the U.S. at a meaningful scale.

  7. Renewable Energy Institute International (REII): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-387

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.

    2014-11-01

    NREL will provide the Renewable Energy Institute with detailed on-site biomass gasifier syngas monitoring, using the NREL transportable Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer. This information will be used to optimize the parameters of the gasifier operation, insuring the quality of the syngas made in the Red Lion Bioenergy gasifier and its compatibility with catalytic conversion to fuels.

  8. Technical Support for China's Village Electrification Program: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00235

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, D.

    2010-07-01

    This work has two main goals: First, it provides for the analysis of data collected from systems developed in the previous phase of China's rural power program, the Township Electrification Program Second, it will comprise joint IEE-NREL work in support of the upcoming phase, 'Electrification of Unelectrified Areas'.

  9. Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Technology Transfer and Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-461

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Keyser, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the last 15 years, NREL has been utilizing its unique expertise and capabilities to work with industry partners on battery thermal testing and electric and hybrid vehicle simulation and testing. Further information and publications about NREL's work and unique capabilities in battery testing and modeling can be found at NREL's Energy Storage website: http://www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/energystorage/. Particularly, NREL has developed and fabricated a large volume isothermal battery calorimeter that has been made available for licensing and potential commercialization (http://techportal.eere.energy.gov/technology.do/techID=394). In summer of 2011, NREL developed and fabricated a smaller version of the large volume isothermal battery calorimeter, called hereafter 'cell-scale LVBC.' NETZSCH Instruments North America, LLC is a leading company in thermal analysis, calorimetry, and determination of thermo-physical properties of materials (www.netzsch-thermal-analysis.com). NETZSCH is interested in evaluation and eventual commercialization of the NREL large volume isothermal battery calorimeter.

  10. Solar Technology Validation Project - RES Americas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-11

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  11. Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-01-406

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-07-01

    The pressure within a lithium-ion cell changes due to various chemical reactions. When a battery undergoes an unintended short circuit, the pressure changes are drastic - and often lead to uncontrolled failure of the cells. As part of work for others with Oceanit Laboratories Inc. for the NAVY STTR, NREL built Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations that can identify potential weak spots in the battery during such events, as well as propose designs to control violent failure of batteries.

  12. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Patricia S.; Jones, Donald W.; Reuscher, Timothy; Schmoyer, Richard S.; Truett, Lorena F.

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  13. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  14. Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.

    2012-07-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

  15. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  16. Testing and Evaluation of Photoelectrochemical Membranes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-313

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, T.

    2012-09-01

    This research work will be undertaken in close coordination with Synkera Technologies and in concurrence with the overall objectives of the Synkera DOE SBIR Phase II project. The subcontract is conditional on Synkera receiving the DOE Phase II SBIR award.

  17. Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-407

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2012-01-01

    Creare was awarded a Phase 1 STTR contract from the US Office of Naval Research, with a seven month period of performance from 6/28/2010 to 1/28/2011. The objectives of the STTR were to determine the feasibility of developing a software package for estimating reliability of battery packs, and develop a user interface to allow the designer to assess the overall impact on battery packs and host platforms for cell-level faults. NREL served as sub-tier partner to Creare, providing battery modeling and battery thermal safety expertise.

  18. SunEdison Photovoltaic Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-302

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.

    2012-09-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with SunEdison to monitor and analyze the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems as they relate to grid integration. Initially this project will examine the performance of PV systems with respect to evaluating the benefits and impacts on the electric power grid.

  19. Solar Technology Validation Project - Amonix, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-13

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  20. Cooperative Research between NREL and Solar Junction Corp: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-306

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.

    2015-03-01

    NREL and Solar Junction Corp. will perform cooperative research on materials and devices that are alternatives to standard approaches with the goal of improving solar cell efficiency while lowering cost. The general purpose of this work is to model the performance of a multi-junction concentrator cell of Solar Junction, Inc. design under normal concentrator operating conditions.

  1. Solar Resource Measurements at FPL Energy - Equipment Only. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-283

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike

    2015-05-07

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; Provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  2. Concentrating Solar Power Hybrid System Study: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-506

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this PTS is to collaboratively leverage the collective resources at General Electric Global Research (GEGRC) and National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in the areas of concentrating solar power hybrid systems to advance state-of-the-art concentrating solar and conventional power generation system integration.

  3. Improved Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurement Performance: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-294

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development for making the RSR a more accurate and fully characterized instrument for solar power technology development and commercial solar power project site assessment. Cooperative R&D is proposed in three areas: instrument calibration, instrument field configuration and operation, and measurement extrapolation and interpolation using satellite images. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  4. Biomass in Multifunction Crop Plants: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-163

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, S. R.

    2011-10-01

    An array of cellulase, hemicellulase, and accessory enzymes were tested for their ability to increase the conversion levels and rates of biomass to sugar after being subjected to thermochemical pretreatment. The genes were cloned by Oklahoma State University and expressed, purified, and tested at NREL. Several enzymes were noted to be effective in increasing conversion levels, however expression levels were typically very low. The overall plan was to express these enzymes in corn as a possible mechanism towards decreased recalcitrance. One enzyme, cel5A endoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, was transformed into both tobacco and corn. The transgenic corn stover and tobacco were examined for their susceptibility to thermochemical pretreatment followed by enzymatic digestion.

  5. Evaluation of Rocket Research Company's Plasma Torch for NOx Reduction Studies CRADA PC93-001, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) formerly known as The Fuel Evaluation Facility was used from March 29 to April 17, 1993 for the sole purpose of evaluating the Rocket Research (RR) plasma torch and testing its effectiveness in reducing NO{sub x} emissions from coal flames. Two spare facility convective sections were modified to accept the torch and to allow for effective mixing in the convective section chambers. The torch was placed into the fourth convective section and a 1-inch fused silica bluff body was placed immediately upstream of the torch to further enhance the mixing at the torch injection location. The gases anticipated for use during testing included ammonia (NH{sub 3}) , hydrogen (H{sub 2}) , carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Ammonia and hydrogen were planned as the gases which would be introduced through the torch directly while CO and CH{sub 4} would be used only in the torch secondary injection ring. The intent was to minimize any potential fouling problems with the carbon containing gases. Actual test conditions did not allow evaluation of the CO or the CH{sub 4} due to continued intermittent operation of the Rocket Research plasma torch. The torch had not been previously tested under conditions similar to the high temperature condition of the CERF and consequently it was found that the torch would not operate effectively under the test conditions. The torch using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as primary and secondary gases has evaluated for short periods of time.

  6. Film Si Solar Cells with Nano Si: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00356

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01

    Nevada Nanotechnology Center and Si group at NREL will work together to develop a-Si based solar cells with nano-Si technique. We will explore the existing a-Si based film solar cell technology at NREL and nano scale Si technology at Nevada Nanotechnology Center. By exchanging information, we will come; up with some new cell structures using nano-Si. We expect the new a-Si based cells will have optical enhancement or better electronic or optical properties of absorber layer to improve solar cell performance.

  7. CdTe Feedstock Development and Validation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00280

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate different CdTe feedstock formulations (feedstock provided by Redlen) to determine if they would significantly improve CdTe performance with ancillary benefits associated with whether changes in feedstock would affect CdTe cell processing and possibly reliability of cells. Feedstock also included attempts to intentionally dope the CdTe with pre-selected elements.

  8. Environmental Enhancement Through Corn Stover Utilization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-00174

    SciTech Connect

    Czernik, S.

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a rapid bio-oil analysis protocol based on the application of mass spectrometry, infra-red spectrometry, and multivariate statistical analysis. This protocol was successfully applied to characterize bio-oil samples from the Iowa State University (ISU) fast pyrolysis unit and to relate those characteristics to the feedstock and the process conditions.

  9. JouleLabs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00301

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, D.

    2010-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Joule Labs Inc. (Joule Labs) will collaborate on creating a software platform for the development and distribution of renewable energy and energy efficiency analysis tools.

  10. Liquid-Liquid Separation Process: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-362

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.

    2014-06-01

    The 3M Company, in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and others, will develop the concept of the membrane solvent-extraction (MSE) technology for water removal and verify the technology at a pilot scale for bio-ethanol production to increase energy and water savings.

  11. Connectivity Enhanced Energy Management and Control for EREVs: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-457

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.

    2014-08-01

    The projected trend in personal mobility is the use of range extended electric vehicles (EREVs) and plug in hybrids (PHEVs). Although batteries with high power density and compact high power electric machines provide appreciable 'all electric' range, there still exists the need for an onboard range extender. The use of connectivity information such as route, elevation/curvature, traffic etc. enables substantial real world improvement in system efficiency and fuel economy of EREVs and plug-in hybrids through efficient use of stored electrical energy.

  12. Electric Vehicle Grid Interaction Exploration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-431

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.

    2013-09-01

    Under this agreement NREL plans to collect, analyze, and share with Xcel Energy data regarding the driving and charging performance of plug-in electric vehicles. NREL will research activities critical to energy storage, electric propulsion, and the emerging issues surrounding the integration of vehicles into the current and future grid. It will provide NREL with access to one of the firstall-electric vehicles available in the market as part of NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (ATVF).

  13. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  14. Solar Technology Validation Project - Solargen (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-06

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  15. Solar Technology Validation Project - USS Data, LLC: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-04

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  16. Solar Technology Validation Project - Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-298-3

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  17. Evaluation of Ion Damage in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00234

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.

    2013-01-01

    Equipment will be used by Greenville College to enhance a previously established collaboration in the area of radiation hardness of solar cells, using Greenville's unique Ion Accelerator. Equipment will be located at the E. College Avenue site.

  18. Solar Technology Validation Project - Loyola Marymount University: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-03

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-13

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  20. Solar Resource Measurements in Sacramento, California: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-205

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensingvalidation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  1. Mobile Building Energy Audit and Modeling Tools: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-00441

    SciTech Connect

    Brackney, L.

    2013-04-01

    Broadly accessible, low cost, accurate, and easy-to-use energy auditing tools remain out of reach for managers of the aging U.S. building population (over 80% of U.S. commercial buildings are more than 10 years old*). concept3D and NREL's commercial buildings group will work to translate and extend NREL's existing spreadsheet-based energy auditing tool for a browser-friendly and mobile-computing platform. NREL will also work with concept3D to further develop a prototype geometry capture and materials inference tool operable on a smart phone/pad platform. These tools will be developed to interoperate with NREL's Building Component Library and OpenStudio energy modeling platforms, and will be marketed by concept3D to commercial developers, academic institutions and governmental agencies. concept3D is NREL's lead developer and subcontractor of the Building Component Library.

  2. Commercialization of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-300

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies is to produce electricity at 15 cents/kilowatt-hour (kWh) with six hours of thermal storage in 2015 (intermediate power) and close to 10 cents/kWh with 12-17 hours of thermal storage in 2020 (baseload power). Cost reductions of up to 50% to the solar concentrator are targeted through technology advances. The overall solar-to-electric efficiency of parabolic-trough solar power plants can be improved and the cost of solar electricity can be reduced by improving the properties of the selective coating on the receiver and increasing the solar-field operating temperature to >450 degrees C. New, more-efficient selective coatings will be needed that have both high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance at elevated temperatures. Conduction and convection losses from the hot absorber surface are usually negligible for parabolic trough receivers. The objective is to develop new, more-efficient selective coatings with both high solar absorptance (..alpha.. > 0.95) and low thermal emittance (..epsilon.. < 0.08 @ 450 degrees C) that are thermally stable above 450 degrees C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

  3. GridAgents DER Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-265

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.

    2012-04-01

    The project objectives are to perform research, development, and pilot-scale testing of advanced, next-generation distribution operational strategies using ConEdison's 3G: Distribution System of the Future and associated infrastructure for the real-world Test Bed (demonstration network) combined with the Infotility GridAgents: Secure Agent Framework for Energy as the software platform for advanced operational strategies development. The objective is to accelerate high-payoff technologies that, because of their risk, are unlikely to be developed in a timely manner without a partnership between industry and the Federal government. NREL will be responsible for the evaluation of equipment design and control methods for DER integration and testing of prototype DER technologies and control equipment at the NREL test facility.

  4. An environmentally conscious approach to clothes maintenance. Final report/project accomplishments summary CRADA Number KCP-94-1006

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.

    1997-03-01

    The introduction of the automatic home washer and dryer in the 1950s, coupled with the introduction of wash and wear fabrics in the 1960s, drastically decreased the demand for the commercial laundry and dry cleaning industry. Further, dry cleaners now must contend with higher operational costs due to chemicals such as perchloroethylene being deemed environmentally unsound. The Kansas City Plant, managed by AlliedSignal FM and T, has been successful in drastically reducing the use of chlorinated and fluorinated solvents in the manufacture of weapon components. That expertise was coupled with Garment Care`s knowledge of commercial cleaning processes and materials in this project to develop a new system to clean and process clothing and linens at low cost.

  5. Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00192

    SciTech Connect

    Czernik, S.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this project is for Chevron and NREL to collaborate in determining the effect of bio-oil composition variability on autothermal reforming performance including bio-oil volatilization, homogeneous oxidative cracking, and catalytic reforming.

  6. Solar Resources Measurements in Houston, TX -- Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-204

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.

    2012-09-01

    Loaning Texas Southern University equipment in order to perform site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance is important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: (1) establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; (2) provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; (3) support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; (4) provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (http://www.nrel.gov/midc) Or the Renewable Resource Data Center - RReDC (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  7. Advanced quadrupole ion trap instrumentation for low level vehicle emissions measurements. CRADA final report for number ORNL93-0238

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Goeringer, D.E.; Dearth, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amenable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of sensitivity, specificity, speed, and flexibility with respect to the technical requirements of the top 15 analyzer.

  8. MBMS Monitoring of ClearFuels/Rentech PDU: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-386

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.

    2014-06-01

    NREL will provide detailed on-site biomass gasifier syngas monitoring, using the NREL transportable Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer. This information will be used to optimize the parameters of the gasifier operation, insuring the quality of the syngas made in the Rentech gasifier and its compatibility with catalytic conversion to fuels.

  9. Britz-Heidbrink Inc. Mini-CRADA, Powder Coating of Animal Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.

    2000-01-04

    The goal of this CRADA was to combine the powder coating material and application techniques and laboratory testing capabilities of FM and T with the manufacturing, real-world testing, and practical knowledge available to BHI in a limited study to determine if coated stainless steel would provide the durability needed to justify additional work in this area. The coating materials chosen had to have low reflectivity and be easily sanitized, non-toxic, pleasant in appearance, and durable for the lifetime of the stainless steel product. The materials also had to be capable of withstanding the daily abuse of animal contact, impact with walls or other hard surfaces, and exposure to a variety of lighting and climatic conditions. FM and T and BHI worked together to investigate coating materials that under normal conditions would be exposed, at least weekly, to 180 F to 260 F washing and sanitization procedures that include strong detergents and phosphoric acid. After a proper cleaning method for the bare panels was established, six different powder coatings were selected and tested. The coatings were selected for their known resistance to harsh chemicals. Sample panels of each coating passed 1000 hours of continuous salt fog exposure and 24-hour constant submersion in heated disinfectant solutions. Actual cage panels were then coated and installed in a high-pressure spray washer at a medical research facility for accelerated real-world testing. In the high-pressure spray washer, the panels received the equivalent of one year's exposure to harsh chemicals in one week. In addition to the exposure to the harsh sanitizing chemicals, the test panels never had a chance to get completely dry. In actual use, the panels would have been cleaned once a week and would have been essentially dry the rest of the time. Constant soak in wet conditions is one of the most difficult tests of paint durability. The accelerated aging indicated that five of the six coatings tested are able to

  10. CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO{sub 2}-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, W. A.; Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Steimke, J. L.; Zahn, Steffen

    2014-02-24

    Over the past several years, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has led a team of collaborators under the Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear hydrogen production program to develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process. HyS is a 2-step water-splitting process consisting of high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to generate SO{sub 2}, followed by the electrolysis of aqueous SO{sub 2} to generate hydrogen and sulfuric acid. The latter is fed back into the high temperature reactor. SRNL designed and built an SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) and a test facility. Over 40 SDE’s were tested using different catalysts, membranes and other components. SRNL demonstrated that an SDE could be operated continuously for approximately 200 hours under certain conditions without buildup of sulfur at the SDE’s cathode, thus solving a key technical problem with SDE technology. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) is a major supplier of hydrogen production systems, and they have proprietary technology that could benefit from the SDE developed by SRNS, or some improved version thereof. However, to demonstrate that SRNL’s SDE is a truly viable approach to the electrolyzer design, continuous operation for far greater periods of time than 200 hours must be demonstrated, and the electrolyzer must be scaled up to greater hydrogen production capacities. SRNL and Air Products entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the objective of demonstrating the effectiveness of the SDE for hydrogen and sulfuric acid production and to demonstrate long-term continuous operation so as to dramatically increase the confidence in the SDE design for commercial operation. SRNL prepared a detailed technical report documenting previous SDE development, including the current SDE design and operating conditions that led to the 200-hour sulfurfree testing. SRNL refurbished its single cell SDE test facility and qualified the equipment for continuous operation. A new membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm{sup 2} active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the “as tested” design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization.

  11. CRADA NFE-08-01456 Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys in Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Unocic, Kinga A; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Kumar, Deepak; Lipschutz, Mark D.

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for use of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels as a material of construction for industrial gas turbine recuperator components. ORNL manufactured lab scale foil of three different AFA alloy compositions and delivered them to Solar for creep properties evaluation. One AFA composition was selected for a commercial trial foil batch. Both lab scale and the commercial trial scale foils were evaluated for oxidation and creep behavior. The AFA foil exhibited a promising combination of properties and is of interest for future scale up activities for turbine recuperators. Some issues were identified in the processing parameters used for the first trial commercial batch. This understanding will be used to guide process optimization of future AFA foil material production.

  12. CRADA with International Polyol Chemicals, Inc. (IPCI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-053): Process Optimization for Polyols Production from Glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this CRADA is to provide sufficient process development to allow a decision for commercialization of the International Polyol Chemicals, Inc. (IPCI) process for production of polyols from glucose. This cooperative research allowed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to focus its aqueous processing systems expertise on the IPCI process to facilitate process optimization. The project was part of the Department of Energy's (DOE/EE-OIT) Alternative Feedstocks Program (AFP). The project was a demonstration of the cooperative effort between the AFP and the Department of Agriculture's Alternative Agriculture Research Center, which was also funding IPCI research.

  13. Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, J.W.

    2001-08-06

    Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

  14. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-01

    The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of automated fault de4tection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction, and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: 1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, 2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and 3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations.

  15. Heat transfer enhanced microwave process for stabilization of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1995-03-31

    The objectve of this CRADA is to combine a polymer process for encapsulation of liquid radioactive waste slurry developed by Monolith Technology, Inc. (MTI), with an in-drum microwave process for drying radioactive wastes developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), for the purpose of achieving a fast, cost-effectve commercial process for solidification of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Tests performed so far show a four-fold increase in process throughput due to the direct microwave heating of the polymer/slurry mixture, compared to conventional edge-heating of the mixer. We measured a steady-state throughput of 33 ml/min for 1.4 kW of absorbed microwave power. The final waste form is a solid monolith with no free liquids and no free particulates.

  16. A Summary of Experiments in Converting Copper Oxide Process Regenerator Off-Gases to Elemental Sulfur, CRADA 97-F006, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brian C. Cianciolo; Richard J. Oehlberg; Sidney G. Nelson

    1999-01-22

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) of Twinsburg, Ohio has developed a new technology for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gas streams directly to elemental sulfur. Key to the technology is a special catalyst that promotes the reaction of SO{sub 2} with reformed natural gas. The technology evolved from earlier flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) work that Sorbtech engineers performed in the late 1980's. In 1995, with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) support, Sorbtech designed and constructed a larger, skid-mounted pilot-test unit suitable for demonstrating the new technology in field tests. This Report summarizes months of preparation work and eight days of testing that were performed at FETC'S facilities during late September and early October, 1997. On the basis of the results of this phase of the project, the following conclusions were made: (1) The chemistry of the new technology was well proven and demonstrated at FETC. The overall S0{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur yields were typically in the range of 93 to 98 percent. (The project goal was 95 percent, so the goal was exceeded). (2) Sulfur selectivity values, indicating the tendency of S0{sub 2} to be converted to elemental sulfur in preference to H{sub 2}S or COS, were typically in the range of 98 to 100 percent. (3) Bright yellow sulfur of high quality was produced at FETC. (4) The FETC regenerator exhaust gas presented no processing difficulties. Swings in the level of methane in the exhaust gas were handled with relative ease. (5) With the exception of the water condenser, all system components performed well. (6) Condensing of the sulfur after its production was a serious problem at FETC. Solid sulfur deposits built up in the process-gas lines at several locations in the system. Clogging of the lines necessitated terminating runs typically after 2 to 4 hours of operation. Clogging problems were most severe in the water condenser. Many planned parametric tests were not run because of the sulfur plugging problems. (7) Several suggestions were made by BP Oil Company for solving the sulfur pl ugging problems. Among the suggestions were to never allow the temperature of the process gas to fall below 118{degree}C, to increase the temperature of the sulfur condenser to 148{degree}C, and to eliminate the water condenser from the system entirely.

  17. Simulation and Field Evaluation Support for ESTCP Dynamic Windows: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-492

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmetti, R.

    2015-02-01

    We will leverage new building performance and daylighting simulation tools to characterize the performance of a new electrochromic (EC) glazing as well as perform a field evaluation of the same product installed in a DoD facility. The in situ data will be used to validate and calibrate the simulation model, which will then be used to extrapolate the performance of the product across all US climate zones. The property as part of this agreement will be installed at MCAS Miramar, California.

  18. Development of Inorganic Precursors for Manufacturing of Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-308

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.; Ginley, D.

    2013-06-01

    Both NREL and Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials are interested in the development of solution phase metal and semiconductive precursors for the manufacturing of photovoltaic devices. In particular, we intend to develop material sets for atmospheric deposition processes. The cooperation between these two parties will enable high value materials and processing solutions for the manufacturing of low cost, roll-to-roll photovoltaics.

  19. Carbon Nanosheets and Nanostructured Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-321

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon nanosheet thin films were employed as nanostructured electrodes in organic solar cells. Due to the nanostructured texture of the carbon nanosheet electrodes, there was an increase in performance over standard ITO electrodes with very thick active layers. ZnO deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used as a hole blocking layer to provide for carrier selectivity of the carbon nanosheets.

  20. Solar Resources Measurements in Elizabeth City, North Carolina - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-217

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (www.nrel.gov/midc). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  1. Solar Resource Measurements in Canyon, Texas - Equipment Only Loan: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-233

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A.

    2014-07-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high-quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; and provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  2. Solar Resource Measurements in Humboldt State University, Arcata, California: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-262

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (www.nrel.gov/midc) or the Renewable Resource Data Center - RReDC (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  3. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103 CRADA FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F. F.

    1998-06-01

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at ORNL and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-l 88 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL.

  4. Wind Farm Monitoring at Storm Lake I Wind Power Project -- Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-369

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, Vahan

    2015-07-09

    Long-term, high-resolution wind turbine and wind power plant output data are important to assess the impact of wind power on grid operations and to derive meaningful statistics for better understanding of the variability of wind power. These data are used for many research and analysis activities consistent with the Wind Program mission.

  5. Evaluating Ultracapacitors for the Saturn Vue Mild Hybrid Platform: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00276

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    Recent analysis conducted by NREL for the USABC and the Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team indicated that HEVs utilizing smaller energy windows from the on-board storage system can achieve much of the fuel economy benefit realized by larger energy window HEVs. The simulations showed that nearly all hybridization fuel savings are realized with energy windows of 150 Wh or less. Dynamometer testing of a variety of production HEVs (both mild and full hybrid) has confirmed battery window use less than 200 Wh on standard drive cycles. These findings suggest a cost-saving opportunity from using either smaller batteries or ultracapacitors (which have lower projected long-term costs and superior cold-temperature performance) in order to still achieve a sizeable hybridization benefit.

  6. Low Cost High Efficiency InP-Based Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-344

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells on 2-inch InP substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 4-inch InP substrates. NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells, including a metamorphic layer, on 2-inch GaAs substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 6-inch GaAs substrates. NREL will perform characterization measurements of the solar cells, including I-V and quantum efficiency measurements at AM1.5 1-sun.

  7. Improved Tools for Wind Resource Assessment with Remote Sensing Sodar Device: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-09-363

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.

    2015-02-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with the Participant to characterize wind resource assessment measurement systems needed for the design, construction, and integration of wind energy conversion systems to produce electricity for utility grid applications. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of hardware and software systems needed to advance wind energy resource assessment technology at speed and scale for use by electric utilities and wind power system integrators.

  8. Xylo-Oligosaccharide Process Development, Composition, and Techno-Economic Analysis. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-483

    SciTech Connect

    Shekiro, Joe; Elander, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this cooperative work agreement between General Mills Inc. (GMI) and NREL is to determine the feasibility of producing a valuable food ingredient (xylo-oligosaccharides or XOS), a highly soluble fiber material, from agricultural waste streams, at an advantaged cost level relative to similar existing ingredients. The scope of the project includes pilot-scale process development (Task 1), compositional analysis (Task 2), and techno-economic analysis (Task 3).

  9. Thermal Analysis and Test Program to Evaluate Passenger Compartment Thermal Load Reduction and Improve: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00231

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.

    2011-05-01

    This activity supported a GM and NREL collaborative exploration of strategies to minimize and alleviate the temperature rise in the passenger compartment of an automobile during prolonged exposure to solar radiation in hot climates. It developed and exercised math-based models to simulate the air flow and thermal environment in the passenger compartment in order to compare the effectiveness of the strategies. This activity also assessed the strategies using vehicle tests.

  10. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  11. Performance of MicroLink Cells Developed Under Navy STTR: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-426

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.

    2013-06-01

    Evaluate MicroLink cells as a function of temperature and spectral irradiance following the teams' standard procedures. These measurements will include the standard procedures for evaluating multijunction cells including quantum efficiency measurements and current versus voltage measurements.

  12. Investigations into Performance and Lifetime Enhancements of OPV Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-263

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate Plextronics new additives and derivatives in lithium-ion Battery Applications, Plextronics will provide to NREL, a starting point, including materials and initial data for proof of concept. The central focus of this project is to acertain the nature of the efficacy of the Plextronics additives through physical and electrical characterization, including evaluations of new derivatives, system evaluations on batteries made with Plexcore and to study long term cycling performance differences. The initial focus is to establish Plexcore mode of action to support the commercialization of the first commercial evaluations of Plexcore in Sept. 2013.

  13. Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

  14. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Lignin with Heterogeneous Catalysts: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-513

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-08-04

    We will synthesize and screen solid catalysts for the depolymerization of lignin to monomeric and oligomeric oxygenated species, which could be fractionated and integrated into refinery intermediate streams for selective upgrading, or catalytically upgraded to fuels and chemicals. This work will primarily focus on the synthesis and application of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for depolymerization of lignin model compounds and softwood lignin. LDHs have been shown in our group to offer good supports and catalysts to promote base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin model compounds and in preliminary experiments for the depolymerization of lignin from an Organosolv process. We will also include additional catalyst supports such as silica, alumina, and carbon as identified in ongoing and past efforts at NREL. This work will consist of two tasks. Overall, this work will be synergistic with ongoing efforts at NREL, funded by the DOE Biomass Program, on the development of catalysts for lignin depolymerization in the context of biochemical and thermochemical conversion of corn stover and other biomass feedstocks to advanced fuels and chemicals.

  15. Infrastructure, Components and System Level Testing and Analysis of Electric Vehicles: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-353

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.

    2013-05-01

    Battery technology is critical for the development of innovative electric vehicle networks, which can enhance transportation sustainability and reduce dependence on petroleum. This cooperative research proposed by Better Place and NREL will focus on predicting the life-cycle economics of batteries, characterizing battery technologies under various operating and usage conditions, and designing optimal usage profiles for battery recharging and use.

  16. Solar Resource Measurements in Cocoa, Florida (FSEC) - Equipment Loaned to NREL: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-318

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Afshin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific measurements of global and diffuse solar irradiance components, passively separated by alternate shading and unshading of a pyranometer mounted under a shading band with alternating opaque and open panels (for a site other than NREL) are needed to verify the underlying theory and mathematical techniques for developing direct, global and diffuse renewable resource data from such a system. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. NREL will provide the supporting equipment (Shadow Bank Stand) for the specially designed shading band. FSEC will provide the calibrated pyranometer and perform data acquisition of the radiometer signal. Data acquired under this agreement will be shared with the NREL Principle Investigator for the purposes of validating techniques for estimating direct radiation from global and diffuse components measured with the ZEBRA system.

  17. Test of a 250 kVA Battery-Inverter System Micro-Grid: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-460

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William; Martin, Greg; Lundstrom, Blake

    2013-12-01

    Portland General Electric (PGE) is installing a 5-megawatt (MW) lithium-ion-based battery-inverter system (BIS) in Salem, Oregon, as part of the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project. NREL will assist PGE in testing a 250-kilovolt-ampere (kVA) portion of the BIS in order to verify correct operation and minimize risk to subsequent demonstrations. In this project NREL will providetechnical support for the 250-kVA test and will work with PGE to write a test plan and evaluate the system in the lab before deployment in the field.

  18. Exploration of Novel Reaction Pathway for Formation of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-03-121

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.

    2014-11-01

    The investigation will explore a potentially low-cost method of forming CIGS for use in solar cells. Investigators from HelioVolt will work in NREL laboratories to modify and apply our tools in fabrication of the CIGS layer. Investigators from NREL will assist in preparing substrates and in compleing solar cells composed of these CIGS layers to evaluate the effectiveness of the HelioVolt processes.

  19. CRADA with Teledyne Electronic Technologies and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-096): The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system. Final letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the ``Exposure-to- Risk`` monitoring system in an actual occupational environment. The system is a unique combination of existing hardware with proprietary software to create an integrated means of assessing occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds. One component of this system utilizes a portable mass spectrometer developed by Teledyne Electronic Technologies. Integration of the system was accomplished under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. Commercialization of the system will take place following demonstration in an actual occupational environment, and will include, in part, Teledyne Electronic Technologies. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system will benefit DOE by overcoming present-day limitations in worker health protection monitoring. There are numerous sites within the` DOE complex where many different hazardous chemicals are used on a routine basis. These chemicals range from paint stripers and cleaning solvents to chemical warfare agents, each having its own degree of potential adverse health risk to a worker. Thus, a real concern for DOE is to ensure that a worker is properly monitored to assess any adverse health risk from exposure to potentially hazardous chemicals. With current industrial hygiene technologies, this is an arduous task. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system integrates a patented breath-inlet device connecting a subject`s exhaled breath directly with a field-portable mass spectrometer with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to estimate the target tissue dose following a chemical exposure. Estimation of the adverse health risk prediction follows from the exposure/dose calculation based on currently accepted methodologies. This new system can determine, in the field, the possible adverse health risks on a daily basis to an individual worker.

  20. Material and Device Analysis for Efficiency Improvement in Epitaxial Crystalline Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-433

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2014-01-01

    Crystal Solar has a novel approach for producing low-cost, monocrystalline silicon wafers that are capable of yielding high-efficiency solar cells. The approach involves epitaxial growth of the substrate and a proprietary lift-off technology. Crystal Solar will send selected wafers and cells to NREL for characterization and analyses. NREL will apply a variety of techniques to help identify mechanism(s) that limit the cell efficiency and suggest suitable approaches for mitigation.

  1. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  2. Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2013-11-01

    This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

  3. Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, E.

    2014-09-01

    LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

  4. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  5. Wind Energy R&D Collaboration between NIRE and NREL: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-437

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P.

    2015-01-01

    This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of joint technology development and certification efforts in the wind power sector; providing access to commercial wind farm and federal facilities to enhance R&D; identification of workforce development best practices. This work will be done at Contractor and Participant facilities.

  6. Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Biodiesel: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-10-408

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, P. C.

    2014-06-01

    OPX Biotechnologies, Inc. (OPX), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Johnson Matthey will develop and optimize a novel, engineered microorganism that directly produces biodiesel from renewable hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed process will fix CO2 utilizing H2 to generate an infrastructure-compatible, energy-dense fuel at costs of less than $2.50 per gallon, with water being produced as the primary byproduct. NREL will perform metabolic engineering on the bacterium Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) and a techno-economic analysis to guide future scale-up work. H2 and CO2 uptakes rates will be genetically increased, production of free fatty acids will be enhanced and their degradation pathway blocked in order to meet the ultimate program goals.

  7. Development of Novel Nanocrystal-based Solar Cell to Exploit Multiple Exciton Generation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00227

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the project was to develop new design and fabrication techniques for NC solar cells with the goal of demonstrating enhanced photocurrent and efficiency by exploiting multiple exciton generation and to investigate multiple exciton generation and charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor NC films used in NC-based solar cells.

  8. New Approaches for Passivation of Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-351

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2012-09-01

    New approaches of passivating crystalline, multicrystalline, and amorphous silicon will be explored. These will include the use of aqueous solution of KCN and a proprietary composition formulated by Mallinckrodt Baker, Inc. The surface passivation will be compared with that provided by an iodine-ethanol solution, and bulk passivation will be compared with that of H-passivation obtained by silicon nitride, in a fire-through process.

  9. Application of Vacancy Injection Gettering to Improve Efficiency of Solar Cells Produced by Millinet Solar: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-417

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will apply vacancy injection gettering (VIG) to Millinet solar cells and evaluate the performance improvement produced by this process step. The VIG will be done in conjunction with the formation of a back, Al-alloyed, contact. Millinet Solar will provide NREL with cells having AR coating on the front side and screen-printed Al on the backside, which will be processed in the NREL's optical furnace to perform simultaneous VIG and back contact alloying with deep BSF. These cells will be sent back to Millinet solar for a screen-printed front/side contact mask, followed by a second firing at NREL. Detailed analyses will be performed to determine improvements due to BSF and VIG.

  10. Exploration of Novel Materials for Development of Next Generation OPV Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-398

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2012-09-01

    Organic-based solar cells offer the potential for low cost, scalable conversion of solar energy. This project will try to utilize the extensive organic synthetic capabilities of ConocoPhillips to produce novel acceptor and donor materials as well potentially as interface modifiers to produce improved OPV devices with greater efficiency and stability. The synthetic effort will be based on the knowledge base and modeling being done at NREL to identify new candidate materials.

  11. Development of Commercial Technology for Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells on Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-209

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2013-03-01

    NREL has conducted basic research relating to high efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and the method of making solar cells. Two patents have been issued to NREL in the above field. In addition, specific process and metrology tools have been developed by NREL. Applied Optical Sciences Corp. (AOS) has expertise in the manufacture of solar cells and has developed its own unique concentrator technology. AOS wants to complement its solar cell expertise and its concentrator technology by manufacturing flat panel thin film silicon solar cell panels. AOS wants to take NREL's research to the next level, using it to develop commercially viable flat pane, thin film silicon solar cell panels. Such a development in equipment, process, and metrology will likely produce the lowest cost solar cell technology for both commercial and residential use. NREL's fundamental research capability and AOS's technology and industrial background are complementary to achieve this product development.

  12. Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.

    2013-02-01

    Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

  13. Development of CdS/CdTe Tin Film Devices for St. Gobain Coated Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-317

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T.

    2012-04-01

    Research performed at NREL to produce CdS/CdTe devices on St. Gobain coated-glass material to establish a baseline CdS/CdTe device process and determine baseline device performance parameters on St. Gobain material. Performance of these baseline devices compared to similar devices produced by applying the established baseline CdS/CdTe process on alternative St. Gobain coated-glass materials.

  14. Spectroscopic Studies of Photosynthetic Systems and Their Application in Photovoltaic Devices - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-175

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spectral hole-burning (SHB) and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) will be used to study the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes of several photosynthetic protein complexes at low temperatures. The combination of SHB on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that will address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae. A better understanding of the EET and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are crystallized.

  15. Biodiesel Emissions Testing with a Modern Diesel Engine - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-399

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the emissions and performance impact of biodiesel in a modern diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter. This testing is in support of the Non-Petroleum Based Fuels (NPBF) 2010 Annual Operating Plan (AOP).

  16. Measurement of Time-Averaged Particle-Wall Collision Properties Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry, CRADA PC93-006, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Massah, H.; Sinclair, J.; Shahnam, M.

    1995-04-30

    This paper describes an experimental facility to measure time-averaged properties of particle-wall collisions. A particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) system measures particle rebound angles and velocities and impact angles and velocities for specific particles. From these measured properties, values of normal and tangential coefficient of restitution are derived. The PTV system rapidly measures thousands of particle-wall collisions enabling determination of time-averaged properties. In this initial work we use 191 {micro}m glass particles colliding with a glass plate at a fixed angle of 17.5{degree} and a velocity of 17.07 m/s. Observations are also made of aspherical particles colliding with gross sliding. In the future, this experimental system will be used with particles and wall materials of industrial significance.

  17. Application of Robust Design and Advanced Computer Aided Engineering Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-143

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.

    2013-06-01

    Oshkosh Corporation (OSK) is taking an aggressive approach to implementing advanced technologies, including hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) technology, throughout their commercial and military product lines. These technologies have important implications for OSK's commercial and military customers, including fleet fuel efficiency, quiet operational modes, additional on-board electric capabilities, and lower thermal signature operation. However, technical challenges exist with selecting the optimal HEV components and design to work within the performance and packaging constraints of specific vehicle applications. SK desires to use unique expertise developed at the Department of Energy?s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), including HEV modeling and simulation. These tools will be used to overcome technical hurdles to implementing advanced heavy vehicle technology that meet performance requirements while improving fuel efficiency.

  18. Electric Drive Dynamic Thermal System Model for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-360

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.

    2013-10-01

    Electric drive systems, which include electric machines and power electronics, are a key enabling technology for advanced vehicle propulsion systems that reduce the dependence of the U.S. transportation sector on petroleum. However, to penetrate the market, these electric drive technologies must enable vehicle solutions that are economically viable. The push to make critical electric drivesystems smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective brings respective challenges associated with heat removal and system efficiency. In addition, the wide application of electric drive systems to alternative propulsion technologies ranging from integrated starter generators, to hybrid electric vehicles, to full electric vehicles presents challenges in terms of sizing critical components andthermal management systems over a range of in-use operating conditions. This effort focused on developing a modular modeling methodology to enable multi-scale and multi-physics simulation capabilities leading to generic electric drive system models applicable to alternative vehicle propulsion configurations. The primary benefit for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the abilityto define operating losses with the respective impact on component sizing, temperature, and thermal management at the component, subsystem, and system level. However, the flexible nature of the model also allows other uses related to evaluating the impacts of alternative component designs or control schemes depending on the interests of other parties.

  19. Solar Technology Validation Project - Tri-State G&T: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-12

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  20. Solar Technology Validation Project - Utah State Energy Program (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-09

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  1. Solar Technology Validation Project - Hualapai Valley Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-02

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-07-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  2. Solar Technology Validation Project - Southwest Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-08

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  3. Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-254

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Equipment will be used by Jackson State University for solar radiation data monitoring. This is a continuing effort of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Solar Measurement Network; Provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) (www.nrel.gov/midc) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC ) (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests.

  4. Investigations of the in Planta Expression of Active Cellobiohydrolase I: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-219

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, M.

    2011-02-01

    It was the purpose of this project to determine if cellulases produced in transgenic plants could effectively be utilized in the production of ethanol and other feedstock chemicals from lignocellulosic substrates.

  5. Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, R.

    2011-02-01

    SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

  6. Examination of Na-Doped Mo Sputtering for CIGS Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-375

    SciTech Connect

    Repins, I.

    2012-01-01

    This work has investigated the use of Na doped Mo (MONA) sputtering targets for use in preparing CIGS devices. The Mo:Na material is doped to about 3% Na by weight, implying that a 40 nm layer on top of the standard Mo contact contains sufficient Na to dope a 2.5 ..mu..m CIGS film. The ability to control Na doping independent of both CIGS processing conditions and adhesion is an important gain for industry and research. Manufacturers gain a route to increased manufacturability and performance, while NREL researchers gain a tightened performance distribution of devices and increased process flexibility. Our immediate partner in this work, the Climax Molybdenum Technology Center, gains validation of their product.

  7. Optimization of Solar Cell Design for Use with GreenVolts CPV System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00281

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, S.

    2011-05-01

    GreenVolts, a Bay area start-up, was developing a CPV system that was based on a unique reflective optical design. They were interested in adapting the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell structure designed at NREL for use in their system. The purpose of this project was to optimize the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell for operation in the GreenVolts optical system.

  8. Thermal Characterization and Analysis of A123 Systems Battery Cells, Modules and Packs: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-243

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.

    2012-03-01

    In support of the A123 Systems battery development program with USABC/DOE, NREL provided technical support in thermal characterization, analysis and management of batteries. NREL's effort was part of Energy Storage Project funded by DOE Vehicle Technologies Program. The purpose of this work was for NREL to perform thermal characterization and analysis of A123 Systems cells and modules with the aim for Al23 Systems to improve the thermal performance of their battery cells, modules and packs.

  9. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate potentialities in terms of technology, raw materials and material and technical basis to set up a production of effective anti-corrosion preparations of new generation in Russia. During the four years of the project 228 compounds and formulations were synthesized and studied in respect to their corrosion inhibiting activity. A series of compounds which were according to the Bubble tests more efficient (by a factor of 10-100) than the reference inhibitor SXT-1102, some possessing the similar activity or slightly better activity than new inhibitor ??-1154? (company ONDEO/Nalco). Two synthetic routes for the synthesis of mercaptopyrimidines as perspective corrosion inhibitors were developed. Mercaptopyrimidine derivatives can be obtained in one or two steps from cheap and easily available precursors. The cost for their synthesis is not high and can be further reduced after the optimization of the production processes. A new approach for lignin utilization was proposed. Water-soluble derivative of lignin can by transformed to corrosion protective layer by its electropolymerization on a steel surface. Varying lignosulfonates from different sources, as well as conditions of electrooxidation we proved, that drop in current at high anodic potentials is due to electropolymerization of lignin derivative at steel electrode surface. The electropolymerization potential can be sufficiently decreased by an increase in ionic strength of the growing solution. The lignosulfonate electropolymerization led to the considerable corrosion protection effect of carbon steel. More than three times decrease of corrosion rate on steel surface was observed after lignosulfonate electropolymerization, exceeding protective effect of standard commercially available corrosion inhibitor. Solikamsky lignin could be a promising candidate as a base for the development of the future green corrosion inhibitor. A protective effect of isothiazolones in compositions with other biocides and inhibitors was investigated. Additionally to high biocidal properties, combination of kathon 893 and copper sulfate may also produce a strong anticorrosion effect depending on concentrations of the biocides. Based on its joint biocidal and anticorrosion properties, this combination can be recommended for protection of pipelines against carbon dioxide-induced corrosion. By means of linear polarization resistance test, corrosion properties of biocides of different classes were studied. Isothiazolones can be recommended for treating oil-processing waters in Tatarstan to curb carbon dioxide - induced corrosion. A laboratory research on evaluation of the efficiency of biocides, inhibitors and penetrants by biological and physical-and-chemical methods has been carried out. It was shown that action of corrosion inhibitors and biocides strongly depends on character of their interaction with mineral substances available in waters on oil-exploration sites. It was found that one of approaches to designing environmentally safe ('green') antimicrobial formulations may be the use of synergetic combinations, which allow one to significantly decrease concentrations of biocides. It was shown that the efficacy of biocides and inhibitors depends on physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Anticorrosion and antimicrobial effects of biocides and inhibitors depended in much on the type of medium and aeration regimen. Effects of different biocides, corrosion inhibitors. penetrants and their combinations on the biofilm were investigated. It has been shown that minimal inhibiting concentrations of the reagents for the biofilm are much higher than those for aquatic microorganisms. Results obtained from the research in stationary conditions have been confirmed with data from experiments carried out in hydrodynamic conditions. New approaches to the investigation of biocorrosive processes on the basis of bioluminescent method of intracellular ATP determination have been developed. Approaches and methods developed on the basis of bioluminescent method could significantly simplify the analysis of biocorrosion processes and allow to conduct the analysis directly under the field conditions in situ. An express method to assess biogenic sulfate reduction in soil and water samples has been elaborated. The method intends for field application and allows one to no-problem assess action of such harmful and corrosion provoking microorganisms, as sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  10. CRADA Final Report for NFE-08-01826: Development and application of processing and processcontrol for nano-composite materials for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, C.; Armstrong, B.; Maxey, C.; Sabau, A.; Wang, H.; Hagans, P.; and Babinec, S.

    2012-12-15

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and A123 Systems, Inc. collaborated on this project to develop a better understanding, quality control procedures, and safety testing for A123 System’s nanocomposite separator (NCS) technology which is a cell based patented technology and separator. NCS demonstrated excellent performance. x3450 prismatic cells were shown to survive >8000 cycles (1C/2C rate) at room temperature with greater than 80% capacity retention with only NCS present as an alternative to conventional polyolefin. However, for a successful commercialization, the coating conditions required to provide consistent and reliable product had not been optimized and QC techniques for being able to remove defective material before incorporation into a cell had not been developed. The work outlined in this report addresses these latter two points. First, experiments were conducted to understand temperature profiles during the different drying stages of the NCS coating when applied to both anode and cathode. One of the more interesting discoveries of this study was the observation of the large temperature decrease experienced by the wet coating between the end of the infrared (IR) drying stage and the beginning of the exposure to the convection drying oven. This is not a desirable situation as the temperature gradient could have a deleterious effect on coating quality. Based on this and other experimental data a radiative transfer model was developed for IR heating that also included a mass transfer module for drying. This will prove invaluable for battery coating optimization especially where IR drying is being employed. A stress model was also developed that predicts that under certain drying conditions tensile stresses are formed in the coating which could lead to cracking that is sometimes observed after drying is complete. Prediction of under what conditions these stresses form is vital to improving coating quality. In addition to understanding the drying process other parameters such as slurry quality and equipment optimization were examined. Removal of particles and gels by filtering, control of viscosity by %solids and mixing adjustments, removal of trapped gas in the slurry and modification of coater speed and slot die gap were all found to be important for producing uniform and flaw-free coatings. Second, an in-line Hi-Pot testing method has been developed specifically for NCS that will enable detection of coating flaws that could lead to soft or hard electrical shorts within the cell. In this way flawed material can be rejected before incorporation into the cell thus greatly reducing the amount of scrap that is generated. Improved battery safety is an extremely important benefit of NCS. Evaluation of battery safety is usually accomplished by conducting a variety of tests including nail penetration, hot box, over charge, etc. For these tests entire batteries must be built but the resultant temperature and voltage responses reveal little about the breakdown mechanism. In this report is described a pinch test which is used to evaluate NCS quality at various stages including coated anode and cathode as well as assembled cell. Coupled with post-microscopic examination of the damaged ‘pinch point’ test data can assist in the coating optimization from an improved end-use standpoint. As a result of this work two invention disclosures, one for optimizing drying methodology and the other for an in-line system for flaw detection, have been filed. In addition, 2 papers are being written for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

  11. Optical Materials, Adhesive and Encapsulant, III-V, and Optical Characterization Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-216

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2012-11-01

    SolFocus is currently developing solar technology for utility scale application using Winston collector based concentrating photovoltaics (CPV). Part of that technology development includes small mirror dishes and front surface reflectors, and bonding the separate parts to the assembly. Mirror panels must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. The reflective surfaces must demonstrate long term durability and maintain high reflectivity. Some bonded surfaces must maintain adhesion and transparency under high concentrations and high temperatures. Others will experience moderate temperatures and do not require transparency. NREL researchers have developed methods and tools that address these related areas.

  12. CRADA Final Report: Materials Development For Pulp and Paper Mills, Task 9 Proof of Commercial Concept: Commodity Carbon Fibers From Weyerhaeuser Lignin Based Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, Felix L; Naskar, Amit K; Ozcan, Soydan; Keiser, James R; Gorog, John Peter

    2010-09-01

    Tasks were assigned to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers for the development of lignin-based carbon fiber from a specific precursor that was produced by the Participant (Weyerhaeuser Corporation). These tasks included characterization of precursor polymers and fibers; and the development of conversion parameters for the fibers. ORNL researchers provided recommendations for in-house characterization of the precursor at the participant's laboratory. During the early stage of the precursor fiber production trials of various spools of fibers with varied compositions were produced. Some of those samples were sent to ORNL (by the Participant) for the development of conversion protocol. The trial tow samples were oxidized at ORNL's precursor evaluation system (PES), a bench-scale facility consisting of an oven, filament winder, tension controller, and a let off creel. The PES is a modular tool useful for the development of precursor conversion protocol. It can handle a single filament to a large single tow (50k filaments). It can also offer precise tensioning for few-filament tows. In the PES, after oxidation, fibers are typically carbonized first at low temperature, {le} 600 C, and subsequently at a higher temperature, {le} 1200 C with controlled residence time. ORNL has recently installed a new carbonization furnace with 1700 C limit and a furnace with 2500 C capacity is under installation. A protocol for the oxidation and carbonization of the trial precursor fibers was developed. Oxidized fiber with a density of 1.46 g/cc (oxidation time: 90 min) shows qualitative flame retardancy via simple flame test (fibers do not catch fire or shrink when exposed to flame). Oxidized and carbonized filaments of the Weyerhaeuser precursor fibers show moderate mechanical properties and 47-51 % carbon yield (based on oxidized fiber mass) after carbonization between 1000-1400 C. The properties of fibers from nonoptimized composition and processing parameters indicate the potential of low-cost, low-end carbon fibers based on renewable resource materials. Further work is necessary to produce high quality precursor and the corresponding carbonized filaments of superior properties.

  13. Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-06-01

    The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

  14. Evaluation of Solar Grade Silicon Produced by the Institute of Physics and Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-211

    SciTech Connect

    Page, M.

    2013-02-01

    NREL and Solar Power Industries will cooperate to evaluate technology for producing solar grade silicon from industrial waste of the phosphorus industry, as developed by the Institute of Physics and Technology (IPT), Kazakhstan. Evaluation will have a technical component to assess the material quality and a business component to assess the economics of the IPT process. The total amount of silicon produced by IPT is expected to be quite limited (50 kg), so evaluations will need to be done on relatively small quantities (≈ 5 kg/sample).

  15. Final report for the ORNL/3M CRADA No. ORNL91-0061 for the period January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.L.; Besmann, T.M.; Lowden, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Composites using Nextel{trademark} fibers of varying composition were prepared to investigate the effectiveness of each Nextel{trademark} fiber as a reinforcement for the given matrix. A carbon interface coating was used for the baseline materials, however, alternate interlayers with improved oxidation resistance were also explored. Room-temperature flexure strengths of as-fabricated composites and specimens heated in air at 1273 K were measured and compared to results for other SiC-matrix composites.

  16. Joint Development of Coated Conductor and Low Cost Thin Film Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-007-213

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2011-02-01

    UES plans on developing CIGS thin films by using Metal Organic Deposition (MOD) technique as it is a low-cost, non-vacuum method for scale-up to large area PV modules. NREL will support UES, Inc. through expert processing, characterization and device fabrication. NREL scientists will also help develop a processing phase diagram which includes composition, film thickness, annealing temperature and ambient conditions. Routine measurements of devices and materials will be done under NREL's core support project.

  17. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  18. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  19. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  20. CRADA No. NFE-10-02715 Assessment of AFA Stainless Steels for Tube Products in Chemical Processing and Energy Production Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Epler, Mario; Magee, John H

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (Carpenter) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to assess material properties of several potential AFA family grades and explore the feasibility of producing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels in tubular form needed for many power generation and chemical process applications. Carpenter's Research Laboratory successfully vacuum melted 30 lb heats of seven candidate AFA alloy compositions representing a wide range of alloy content and intended application temperatures. These compositions were evaluated by ORNL and Carpenter R&D for microstructure, tensile properties, creep properties, and oxidation resistance. In parallel, additional work was directed toward an initial tube manufacture demonstration of a baseline AFA alloy. Carpenter successfully manufactured a 10,000 lb production heat and delivered appropriate billets to a partner for extrusion evaluation. Tube product was successfully manufactured from the baseline AFA alloy, indicating good potential for commercially produced AFA tubular form material.

  1. CRADA with Beckman Instruments and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-013): Development and commercialization of the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA) using characterization of aridisols

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and commercialize a technology conceived by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and manufactured by Beckman Instruments, Inc. (Beckman), and to apply this technology to the characterization of and soils. The technology is the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The UFA provides a highly efficient method of direct, rapid measurement of hydraulic conductivity and other flow properties according to Darcy-Buckingham principles because the operator controls both the fluid driving force, using an ultracentrifuge, and the flow into the sample while it is spinning, with a rotating seal assembly. The concept of using centrifugation to significantly decrease the time needed, from years or months to days, for study of subsurface transport, particularly under unsaturated conditions, was conceived by James Conca, Ph.D., and Judith Wright, Ph.D., in 1986. The prototype UFA was developed in 1988 because there was a need to rapidly and accurately determine transport parameters in soils, sediments, and rocks for the Grout Waste Disposal Program. Transport parameters are critical to modeling outcomes for site-specific solutions to environmental remediation and waste disposal problems.

  2. Final Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    This final chapter provides observations about institutional research in community colleges derived from the preceding chapters and the issue editors' own experiences. Taken as a whole, the chapters in this issue, as well as the editors' experiences, suggest several observations about institutional research in community colleges. These include the…

  3. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  5. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  7. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, B. W.

    2002-08-02

    Final report for program on the study of structure and properties of epitaxial oxide films. The defect structure of epitaxial oxide thin films was investigated. Both binary and complex oxides were studied. Epitaxial oxides were synthesized by organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD). This technique has been found to be highly versatile for the synthesis of a wide range of epitaxial oxide including dielectrics, ferroelectrics and high T{sub c} superconductors. Systems investigated include the binary oxides ZnO and TiO{sub 2} and ferroelectric oxides BaTiO{sub 3}, BaSrTiO{sub 3} and KNbO{sub 3}. Techniques used to evaluate the defect structure included deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), photocapacitance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High purity, stoichiometric oxide films were deposited and their defect structure evaluated. Epitaxial ZnO was deposited at temperatures as low as 250 C. PL indicated only near band edge ultraviolet emission showing that both extrinsic and intrinsic point defects could be significantly lowered in OMCVD derived thin films compared to that of the bulk. This presumably was a result of low deposition temperatures and high purity starting materials. Ferroelectric oxides epitaxial thin films of BaTiO{sub 3} and the solid solution BaSrTiO{sub 3} were synthesized and the defect structure determined. Photocapacitance spectroscopy was developed to quantify electrically active defects in the oxides. Defects with concentrations as low as 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} were observed and their properties determined. A new model was developed for the electronic transport properties of intrinsic and extrinsic BaTiO{sub 3}. A transport model was proposed whereby conduction in La doped films occurs via hopping in localized states within a pseudogap formed between a lower Hubbard band and the conduction band edge. The influence of the size effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in the thin films was investigated. The

  8. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  9. Oil shale technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

  10. Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanella, M L

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

  11. Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, R.D.

    2000-03-30

    The goal of the project was to develop a wireless communications system, including communications, command, and control software, to remotely monitor the environmental state of a process or facility. Proof of performance would be tested and evaluated with a prototype demonstration in a functioning facility. AR Designs' participation provided access to software resources and products that enable network communications for real-time embedded systems to access remote workstation services such as Graphical User Interface (GUI), file I/O, Events, Video, Audio, etc. in a standardized manner. This industrial partner further provided knowledge and links with applications and current industry practices. FM and T's responsibility was primarily in hardware development in areas such as advanced sensors, wireless radios, communication interfaces, and monitoring and analysis of sensor data. This role included a capability to design, fabricate, and test prototypes and to provide a demonstration environment to test a proposed remote sensing system. A summary of technical accomplishments is given.

  12. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  13. Verb-Final Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogihara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a typological study of verb-final languages, the purpose of which is to examine various grammatical phenomena in verb-final languages to discover whether there are correlations between the final position of the verb and other aspects of grammar. It examines how finality of the verb interacts with argument coding in simple…

  14. Testing of high speed network components (RNET Project), with IBM and Bellsouth (91-0069), and testing of high speed network components (campus LAN project) with IBM (92-0124). Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, W.R.; Chen, M.S.; Brackett, P.

    1997-06-20

    The Gigabit network project was established to demonstrate ATM technology in a realistic metropolitan environment running realistic applications, which would stretch its capacity. Despite considerable obstacles, both technical and logistical, the Gigabit Network project succeeded in establishing a network infrastructure that has served the Oak Ridge complex well during the last two years, and will continue to serve it in the future. The project did not, however, succeed in demonstrating the showcase applications on an ATM network. Development and delivery of a working ATM switch ultimately became the pacing item in the project, and after a number of delays, the project was terminated without placing a switch in service.

  15. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantage Jet Fuel: Catalytic Conversion of Corn Stover to Energy Dense, Low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-462

    SciTech Connect

    Elander, Rick

    2015-08-04

    NREL will provide scientific and engineering support to Virent Energy Systems in three technical areas: Process Development/Biomass Deconstruction; Catalyst Fundamentals; and Technoeconomic Analysis. The overarching objective of this project is to develop the first fully integrated process that can convert a lignocellulosic feedstock (e.g., corn stover) efficiently and cost effectively to a mix of hydrocarbons ideally suited for blending into jet fuel. The proposed project will investigate the integration of Virent Energy System’s novel aqueous phase reforming (APR) catalytic conversion technology (BioForming®) with deconstruction technologies being investigated by NREL at the 1-500L scale. Corn stover was chosen as a representative large volume, sustainable feedstock.

  16. CRADA final report: Technical assessment of roll-to-roll operation of lamination process, thermal treatment, and alternative carbon fiber precursors for low-cost, high-efficiency manufacturing of flow battery stacks and other energy devices

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Madden, Thomas; Wood, III, David L; Muth, Thomas R.; Warrington, Curtis; Ozcan, Soydan; Manson, Hunter; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Smith, Mark A.; Lu, Yuan; Loretz, Jeremy

    2015-09-23

    Among the various stationary-storage technologies under development, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer the greatest potential to deliver inexpensive, scalable, and efficient grid-scale electrical-energy storage. Unlike traditional sealed batteries, in a flow battery power and energy are decoupled. Cell area and cell count in the stack determine the device power, and the chemical storage volume determines the total energy. Grid-scale energy-storage applications require megawatt-scale devices, which require the assembly of hundreds of large-area, bipolar cells per power plant. The cell-stack is the single system component with the largest impact on capital cost (due to the large number of highly engineered components) and operating costs (determined by overall round-trip efficiency).

  17. Advanced bioreactor concepts for gaseous substrates: Conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels and removal of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from coal combustion gases. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, E.N.; Selvaraj, P.T.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the proposed research program was the development and demonstration of a new generation of gaseous substrate-based bioreactors for the production of liquid fuels from coal synthesis gas and the removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} species from coal combustion flue gas. This study addressed the further investigation of optimal bacterial strains, growth media and kinetics for the biocatalytic conversion of coal synthesis gas to liquid fuel such as ethanol and the reduction of gaseous flue gas constituents. The primary emphasis was on the development of advanced bioreactor systems coupled with innovative biocatalytic systems that will provide increased productivity under controlled conditions. It was hoped that this would result in bioprocessing options that have both technical and economic feasibility, thus, ensuring early industrial use. Predictive mathematical models were formulated to accommodate hydrodynamics, mass transport, and conversion kinetics, and provide the data base for design and scale-up. The program was separated into four tasks: (1) Optimization of Biocatalytic Kinetics; (2) Development of Well-mixed and Columnar Reactors; (3) Development of Predictive Mathematical Models; and (4) Industrial Demonstration. Research activities addressing both synthesis gas conversion and flue gas removal were conducted in parallel by BRI and ORNL respectively.

  18. Micro-fluidic (Lab-on the- Chip) PCR Array Cartridge for Biological Screening in a Hand Held Device: FInal Report for CRADA no 264. PNNL-T2-258-RU with CombiMatrix Corp

    SciTech Connect

    Rainina, Evguenia I.

    2010-10-31

    The worldwide emergence of both new and old diseases resulting from human expansion and also human and materials mobility has and will continue to place stress on both medical and clinical diagnostics. The classical approach to bioagents detection involves the use of differential metabolic assays to determine species type in the case of most bacteria, or the use of cell culture and electron microscopy to diagnose viruses and some bacteria that are intracellular parasites. The long-term goal in bioagent detection is to develop a hand-held instrument featuring disposable cartridges which contain all the necessary reagents, reaction chambers, waste chambers, and micro-fluidics to extract, concentrate, amplify, and analyze nucleic acids. This GIPP project began development of a sensory platform using nucleic-acid based probes. Although research was not completed, initial findings indicated that an advanced sensing device could theoretically be built on a DNA/RNA-based technology platform.

  19. Technical Support to SBIR Phase II Project: Improved Conversion of Cellulose Waste to Ethanol Using a Dual Bioreactor System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-310

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.

    2013-04-01

    Over-dependence on fossil fuel has spurred research on alternative energy. Inedible plant materials such as grass and corn stover represent abundant renewable natural resources that can be transformed into biofuel. Problems in enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars include the use of incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and adsorption and loss of enzymes necessitating their use in large quantities. Technova Corporation will develop a defined consortium of natural microorganisms that will efficiently break down biomass to energy-rich soluble sugars, and convert them to cleaner-burning ethanol fuel. The project will also develop a novel biocatalytic hybrid reactor system dedicated to this bioprocess, which embodies recent advances in nanotechnology. NREL will participate to develop a continuous fermentation process.

  20. Streamlining and Refining FEDS Loads Models - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dirks, James A.

    2013-02-05

    The Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) software is a powerful buildings energy analysis tool developed by Battelle at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with support from numerous organizations including several within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). FEDS is used extensively throughout the federal sector to examine building energy efficiency potential and recommend energy saving retrofit projects. The focus of this CRADA was to update the foundation of the FEDS loads models, to improve the core functionality and calculation methods and position the building efficiency analysis software for continued growth. The broader intent was to increase FEDS utility and user satisfaction via improving modeling accuracy, facilitating development and making possible a wide range of new and desired capability enhancements. This report provides an summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  1. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions. PMID:26934755

  2. NARSTO Texas Final Report

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-06

    Final Report for the Texas PM2.5 Sampling and Analysis Study (March 11, ... Tropp,et al, 1998     NOTE: The Final Report is separated into the following PDF files: Section 1: ... Mass and Chemical Composition (PDF) Section 5: Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations and Section 6 Bibliography (PDF) ...

  3. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (<100,000 km) of Mimas and Enceladus remain as well as some of our best flybys of the tiny ring moons. Cassini will also continue to study seasonal and temporal changes in the system as northern summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet

  4. Ceramic component manufacturing process development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.

    1996-09-30

    Ceramic materials are well suited for applications where temperature, wear, and corrosion resistance are necessary. The toughness and wear resistance properties that make ceramics desirable, also make fabrication of parts difficult. The objective of this CRADA was to increase the grinding efficiency on Ceradyne Incorporated silicon nitride. This was to be accomplished through optimization of grinding wheel life and increasing silicon nitride material removal rates. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between grinding parameters, wheel wear, and material removal rates. Due to excessive, unexplained variation in the experimental results, a consistent relationship between the selected grinding parameters and wheel wear could not be established. Maximum material removal rates were limited by spindle and table drive power. Additional experiments were conducted to evaluate high speed grinding. When compared to conventional grinding speeds, the material removal rates using high speed grinding (13,000 SFM) increased by a factor of five to ten with no degradation of fracture strength.

  5. Cassini's Grand Finale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington, Scott G.; Spilker, Linda J.

    2016-07-01

    After more than a decade exploring Saturn and its moons, the Cassini mission is in its closing act. Cassini's last year is an encore performance stuffed with science, including a final plunge into Saturn's atmosphere.

  6. Endeavour's Final Voyage

    NASA Video Gallery

    After nearly two decades of achievements in space, Endeavour makes one last reach for the stars on its 25th and final mission, STS-134. This webcast examines the mission to come and explores the st...

  7. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  8. Expedition 34 Final Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Expedition 34 crew members conduct final training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center before their Dec. 19 launch to the International Space Station. Flight Engineers Chris Hadfield, Roman...

  9. Aurora final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Dross; Amedeo, Conti

    2013-12-06

    Final Technical report detailing the work done by Nuvera and its partners to fulfill the goals of the program "Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks" (a.k.a. AURORA)

  10. 10 CFR 950.37 - Final agreement or final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final agreement or final decision. 950.37 Section 950.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution Process § 950.37 Final agreement or final decision. (a) If the parties reach a Final Agreement on a...

  11. Project Adobe. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Curen, Sallie A.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of Project Adobe, the New Mexico Parent Training and Information Center, which provides information, support, education and training to families with school-aged children with disabilities in their local communities. Achievements include: (1) completion and printing of a booklet on the…

  12. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  13. Space Station Final Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An artist's conception of what the final configuration of the International Space Station (ISS) will look like when it is fully built and deployed. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Chris

    2014-11-13

    The project, Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

  15. Perception of Final Lengthening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jan; Beckman, Mary

    A series of phonetic production and perception experiments were designed to describe the phonological or phonetic domains of two effects in spoken English: final lengthening, generally interpreted as a mark for the edge of some linguistically-defined unit of speech production, and stress-timed shortening, generally interpreted as evidence for…

  16. Rosetta: The Final Furlong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2014-09-01

    By the time of the meeting, the Rosetta spacecraft will have formally arrived at its target comet, and final landing site selection will be in progress. One of the instruments that will be sent down to the surface of the comet is Ptolemy (a GC-MS).

  17. Final Prep on SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Alvin Pittman Sr., lead electronics technician with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Janine Cuevas, a mechanical technician with PWR, perform final preparations on the space shuttle main engine tested Oct. 25, 2005, at NASA's Stennis Space Center. It was the first main engine test since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29.

  18. GENIE final state interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  19. Caregivers program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts, with changes, the interim final rule concerning VA's Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers. VA administers this program to provide certain medical, travel, training, and financial benefits to caregivers of certain veterans and servicemembers who were seriously injured during service on or after September 11, 2001. Also addressed in this rulemaking is the Program of General Caregiver Support Services that provides support services to caregivers of veterans from all eras who are enrolled in the VA health care system. Specifically, changes in this final rule include a requirement that Veterans be notified in writing should a Family Caregiver request revocation (to no longer be a Family Caregiver), an extension of the application timeframe from 30 days to 45 days for a Family Caregiver, and a change in the stipend calculation to ensure that Primary Family Caregivers do not experience unexpected decreases in stipend amounts from year to year. PMID:25581943

  20. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2005-10-27

    In this final technical report, a summary of work is provided. Work toward an improved representation of frontal clouds in global climate models occurred. This involved analysis of cloud variability in ARM observations and the careful contrast of single column model solutions with ARM data. In addition, high resolution simulations of frontal clouds were employed to diagnosis processes that are important for the development of frontal clouds.

  2. Geolocation Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Magnoli, D E

    2003-06-02

    This paper is the final report for LL998 In Situ Sensing Subtask 7 (Geo-location) undertaken for NNSA NA-22 enabling technologies R&D for Counterproliferation Detection. A few state-of-the-art resolution parameters are presented for accelerometers, indoor and outdoor GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) systems, and INSs (Inertial Navigation Systems). New technologies are described, including one which has demonstrated the ability to track within a building to a resolution of under a foot.

  3. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans. PMID:22950145

  4. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-03-29

    This final technical report describes results and findings from a research project to examine the role of microbial phosphohydrolase enzymes in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of the radionuclide uranium through the production of insoluble uranium phosphate minerals. The research project investigated the microbial mechanisms and the physical and chemical processes promoting uranium biomineralization and sequestration in oxygenated subsurface soils. Uranium biomineralization under aerobic conditions can provide a secondary biobarrier strategy to immobilize radionuclides should the metal precipitates formed by microbial dissimilatory mechanisms remobilize due to a change in redox state.

  5. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Josef Michl

    2011-10-31

    In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

  6. Final Meeting of NACA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Final meeting of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, August 21, 1958. After the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik I satellite in October 1957, the United States realized that it needed a space program to keep up with the technological advancements made by the Soviets. On July 29, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed Public Law 85-568 and established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). T. Keith Glennan was sworn in as the first Administrator of NASA on August 19, 1958, and by October 1, the official effective date of the new agency, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) was absorbed by NASA. Left to right: T. Keith Glennan, NASA Administrator; Mr. Preston R. Bassett, member of the NACA Committee on Aerodynamics; Mr. Charles J. McCarthy, Chairman of the Board, Chance Vought Aircraft, Inc.

  7. FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

    2006-08-28

    The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

  8. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Tanis

    2005-11-25

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below.

  10. AIPM Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  11. Final cook temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Matthews, Michael; Glasco, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Fully cooked, ready-to-eat products represent one of the fastest growing markets in the meat and poultry industries. Modern meat cooking facilities typically cook chicken strips and nuggets at rates of 6000 lbs per hour, and it is a critical food safety issue to ensure the products on these lines are indeed fully cooked. Common practice now employs oven technicians to constantly measure final cook temperature with insertion-type thermocouple probes. Prior research has demonstrated that thermal imagery of chicken breasts and other products can be used to predict core temperature of products leaving an oven. In practice, implementation of a system to monitor core temperature can be difficult for several reasons. First, a wide variety of products are typically produced on the same production line and the system must adapt to all products. Second, the products can be often hard to find because they often leave the process in random order and may be touching or even overlapping. Another issue is finite measurement time which is typically only a few seconds. Finally, the system is subjected to a rigorous sanitation cycle and must hold up under wash down conditions. To address these problems, a calibrated 320x240 micro-bolometer camera was used to monitor the temperature of formed, breaded poultry products on a fully cooked production line for a period of one year. The study addressed the installation and operation of the system as well as the development of algorithms used to identify the product on a cluttered conveyor belt. It also compared the oven tech insertion probe measurements to the non-contact monitoring system performance.

  12. Microwave processing of materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Garard, R.S.

    1997-11-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Lambda Technologies, Inc. (Lambda) of Raleigh, N.C., was initiated in May 1995. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Corp. (LMER) has replaced LMES]. The completion data for the Agreement was December 31, 1996. The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace (VFMF); and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The VFMF, whose initial conception and design was funded by the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies.

  13. Development of a modular integrated control architecture for flexible manipulators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Battiston, G.

    1994-12-08

    In April 1994, ORNL and SPAR completed the joint development of a manipulator controls architecture for flexible structure controls under a CRADA between the two organizations. The CRADA project entailed design and development of a new architecture based upon the Modular Integrated Control Architecture (MICA) previously developed by ORNL. The new architecture, dubbed MICA-II, uses an object-oriented coding philosophy to provide a highly modular and expandable architecture for robotic manipulator control. This architecture can be readily ported to control of many different manipulator systems. The controller also provides a user friendly graphical operator interface and display of many forms of data including system diagnostics. The capabilities of MICA-II were demonstrated during oscillation damping experiments using the Flexible Beam Experimental Test Bed at Hanford.

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean; Tom Schechinger; Stuart Birrell; Jill Euken

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  15. Enhanced control & sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1997-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot`s performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B&R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding.

  16. Final technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel J. Candes

    2007-11-06

    In the last two dcades or so, many multiscale algorthms have been proposed to enable large scale computations which were thought as nearly intractable. For example, the fast multipole algorithm and other similar ideas have allowed to considerably speed up fundamental computations in electromagnetism, and many other fields. The thesis underlying this proposal is that traditional multiscale methods have been well-developed and it is clear that we now need new ideas in areas where traditional spatial multiscaling is ill-suited. In this context, the proposal argues that clever phase-space computations is bound to plan a crucial role in advancing algorithms and high-performance scientific computing. Our research past accomplishments have shown the existence of ideas beyond the traditional scale-space viewpoint such as new multiscale geometric representations of phase-space. We have shown that these clever representations lead to enhanced sparsity. We have shown that enhanced sparsity has significant important implications both for analysis, and for numerical applications, where sparsity allows for faster algorithms. We have implemented these ideas and built computational tools to be used as new building blocks of a new generation of wave propagation solvers. Finally, we have deployed these ideas into novel algorithms. In this last year, we assembled all these techniques and made significant progress in solving a variety of computational problems, which we then applied in selected areas of considerable scientific interest.

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK B202 Final Technical Report. The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  18. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Mayda

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Fridman

    2005-06-01

    This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

  20. Final Report to DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail Gultepe

    2012-05-15

    This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Pigarov

    2012-06-05

    This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

  2. MIST final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gloudemans, J.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock Wilcox-designed plants. MIST was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to addresss the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST program is reported in eleven volumes; Volumes 2 through 8 pertain to groups of Phase 3 tests by type, Volume 9 presents inter-group comparisons. Volume 10 provides comparisons between the RELAP5 MOD2 calculations and MIST observations, and Volume 11 (with addendum) presents the later, Phase 4 tests. This is Volume 1 of the MIST final report, a summary of the entire MIST program. Major topics include: test advisory grop (TAG) issues; facility scaling and design; test matrix; observations; comparisons of RELAP5 calculations to MIST observations; and MIST versus the TAG issues. 11 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Enhanced superconductors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.B.

    1992-05-01

    One of the major challenges facing high temperature superconductors is the making of non-brittle materials. Based on the successful discovery of high temperature perovskite superconductors, a new class of superconducting materials is hypothesized. The proposed class will be mechanically tough and may have high critical temperatures. The proposed material will be inexpensive to manufacture and easily formed into wires and bands. The project's research goal was to detect a superconducting transition in a specific material within this proposed new class. Substantial progress was made toward this objective. In Phase I a major milestone, the bulk conversion of a precursor material, was successfully accomplished. The second model precursor polymer, Polychlorofluoroethylene (PCFE), was synthesized for this study. This allowed the possibility of making low defect polyfluoroacetylene. This synthesis route yielded poly(fluoroacetylene) with a significantly lower defect density when compared to HF-eliminated fluoropolymer films. The final phase of this work was directed to synthesis of poly(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-para-phenylene vinylene) (PTFPPV). While making significant progress in synthesizing conducting polymers with polar or polarizable groups, this study did not reach its ultimate goal of producing a model compound with all of the necessary chemical properties to test the exciton model of superconductivity.

  4. Tiger LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  5. Electrocatalytic hydrocracking. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1992-06-01

    This report describes an electrocatalytic method for the chemical addition of hydrogen to a model hydrocarbon compound. In the method, hydrogen formed by water electrolysis at the counter electrode of an electrochemical cell is delivered via conduction through a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. The working electrode of the cell is, at the same time, a hydrocracking catalyst and therefore promotes the reaction of the hydrogen with the hydrocarbon. This process would have clear and distinct advantages over conventional hydroprocessing technologies in that the hydrogen concentration at the catalyst surface could be controlled and maintained by the applied electromotive force. This control would allow operation of the electrocatalytic reactor at ambient pressures instead of the extremely high hydrogen partial pressures required of conventional reactors. In addition, the direct delivery of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should inhibit coke formation and thus prolong the life of the catalyst. Finally, hydrogen utilization efficiencies should be greatly improved since the hydrogen is delivered directly to the reaction site thereby eliminating hydrogen solubility loss in the effluent stream. This report details the demonstration of (a) the ability of a solid electrolyte to perform as a catalyst, (b) the conduction of hydrogen through a solid electrolyte and (c) the simultaneous exploitation of these two properties. Hence, the essential concept of electrocatalytic hydrocracking has been demonstrated. An objective of future work in this area should be to determine whether the hydrocracking or hydrogenation reactions are actually enhanced during the electrocatalytic process when compared to the conventional catalytic process.

  6. MTX final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  7. Enthalpy studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, P.M.; Stein, F.P.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the evaluation and enhancement of the enthalpy model developed for the SRC-I process (as well as the other coal-liquefaction processes). A preliminary version of the model was used in the Post-Baseline review of the SRC-I process design (Duffy et al., 1983), and the final version will be employed by APCI in the ASPEN PLUS Model of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant (APCI, 1984). ICRC, recognizing the need for thermophysical data on coal liquids and coal-fluid model compounds, embarked upon a 2-year experimental program. Specifically, the overall program objectives were to obtain vapor/liquid equilibrium (VLE) and enthalpy data to develop correlations and verify the designs of several important pieces of process equipment in the SRC-I demonstration plant. The enthalpy model uses a modification of the Peng-Robinson (1976) equation of state proposed by Mathias ad Copeman (1983). It was developed mainly from publicly available data on coal fluids and related model compounds (Mathias and Monks, 1982). The generalized (predictive) model has provided good agreement with experimental data on coal fluids. Surprisingly, the agreement with the data on model-compound mixtures is not as good. The practical conclusion is that, within the frame work of the present model, it is better to lump various types of components within the same pseudocomponent. The enthalpy model has achieved the main objective of an improved model for the design of several key heat exchangers in the SRC-I process. Further, the work has identified deficiencies in existing models, which suggest the focus of future research. 24 references.

  8. World Cup Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  9. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final order. 22.31 Section 22.31... PERMITS Final Order § 22.31 Final order. (a) Effect of final order. A final order constitutes the final Agency action in a proceeding. The final order shall not in any case affect the right of the Agency...

  10. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  11. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  12. ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the

  13. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, Alain J

    2009-12-31

    Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint Michael's College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint Michael's College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2009-09-08

    emissions are only observed in whistler spheromaks and FRCs but not in mirrors or asymmetric configurations lacking magnetic null lines. The collisionless electron energization in a toroidal null line usually produces non-Maxwellian distributions. Off the null axis electrons gain more perpendicular than parallel energy. Distributions with T{sub {perpendicular}} > T{sub {parallel}} lead to whistler instabilities which have been observed. A whistler spheromak is a source of high-frequency whistler emissions. These are usually small amplitude whistlers propagating in a complicated background magnetic field. The waves are emitted from a moving source. High frequency whistlers propagate faster than the spheromak, thus partly move ahead of it and partly in the reverse direction. In test wave experiments wave growth opposite to the direction of the hot electron flow has been observed, confirming that Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance instabilities account for the emission process. Propagating whistler mirrors produce no significant instabilities except when they interact with other fields which exhibit null lines. For example, a whistler mirror has been launched against a stationary FRC, resulting in strong FRC heating and whistler instabilities. In the whistler mirror configuration the antenna near-zone field produces a toroidal null line outside the coil which can also become a source for whistler emissions. Finally, nonlinear EMHD research has been extended to initially unmagnetized plasmas where a new nonlinear skin depth has been discovered. When a small-amplitude oscillating magnetic field is applied to a plasma the field penetration is governed by the skin depth, collisional or collisionless depending on frequency, collision frequency and plasma frequency. However, when the magnetic field increases the electrons become magnetized and the field penetration occurs in the whistler mode if the cyclotron frequency exceeds the oscillating frequency. This phenomenon has been

  15. 10 CFR 950.37 - Final agreement or final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... settlement of the contract matter in dispute, made by the sponsor and the Program Administrator. (b) The parties agree that no appeal shall be taken or further review sought, and that the Final Agreement...

  16. Final focus system for TLC

    SciTech Connect

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal US function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Direct-energy-regenerated particulate trap technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Janney, M.A.; Yonushonis, T.M.; McDonald, A.C.; Wiczynski, P.D.; Haberkamp, W.C.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this CRADA between Lockheed Martin and Cummins Engine Company was to develop fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) composite materials for use as diesel engine particulate traps. Chemical vapor deposition techniques were used to partially densify and rigidize a thin fibrous substrate and produce the porous SiC- based filter. Microwave energy was used to directly couple to the deposited SiC to uniformly heat the filter and oxidize the collected carbon particulates. For commercial usage particulate traps must: (1) filter carbon particulates from a high temperature diesel exhaust at an acceptably low backpressure, (2) survive thousands of thermal transients due to regeneration or cleaning of the filter by oxidizing the collected carbon, (3) be durable and reliable over the expected life of the filter (300,000 miles or 10,000 hours), and (4) provide a low overall operating cost which is competitive with other filtering techniques. The development efforts performed as part of this CRADA have resulted in a very promising new technology for Cummins Engine Company. Ceramic fiber based filter papers were developed at Fleetguard, Inc., (a Cummins Subsidiary) and used to produce the spiral wound, corrugated filter cartridges. Optimized SiC coatings were developed at Lockheed Martin which couple with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Prototype particulate filter cartridges fabricated at Fleetguard and rigidized at Lockheed Martin performed well in single cylinder engine tests at Cummins. These prototype filters obtained filtering efficiencies greater than 80% at acceptably low backpressures and could be successfully headed and regenerated using a conventional in-home microwave oven.

  18. Deaths: Final Data for 2014.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Kenneth D; Murphy, Sherry L; Xu, Jiaquan; Tejada-Vera, Betzaida

    2016-06-01

    Objectives-This report presents final 2014 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. PMID:27378572

  19. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Cancer.gov

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  20. Final Vowel-Consonant-e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Lou E.

    The utility value of the final vowel-consonant-e phonic generalization was examined using 2,715 common English words. When the vowel was defined as a single-vowel, the consonant as a single-consonant, and the final e as a single-e the generalization was found to be highly useful, contrary to other recent findings. Using the total sample of 2,715…

  1. Final State Interactions in GENIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytman, S. A.; Meyer, A. S.

    2011-11-01

    Final state interactions (FSI) are an important part of all neutrino event generators because modern detectors are made of nuclei to maximize count rate. The incident neutrino will interact with one (or two) nucleons but the final state can be quite different because the hadrons will have further interactions in the residual nucleus. This has historically been one of the major differences between event generators. GENIE will now have 2 FSI codes which allow interesting comparisons for the first time.

  2. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Fourth Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-12-02

    This quarterly report summarizes the status of the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The final CRADA documents processed by PNNL’s Legal Services were submitted to all the parties for signatures.

  3. Follow-On Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: MFIX to FLUENT Technology Transfer and Validation Studies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhava Syamlal; Guenther, Chris; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Shi, Shaoping

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes the effort by NETL and Fluent on the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement No. 00-F039 signed in May 2000. The objective of the CRADA was to transfer technology from NETL's MFIX code into the commercial software FLUENT so as to increase the computational speed, accuracy, and utility of FLUENT. During the period of this CRADA MFIX was used to develop granular flow theories and used for simulating gas-solids chemical reactors. The FLUENT and MFIX predictions were compared with each other and with experimental data generated at NETL. The granular kinetic theory in FLUENT was improved as a result of this work, and a gas-solids reaction (ozone decomposition) was used as a test case for the gas-solids chemical reaction capability in FLUENT. Also, under a separate project, work has begun to transfer the coal combustion and gasification model in MFIX to FLUENT.

  4. 20 CFR 636.11 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final action. 636.11 Section 636.11 Employees... HEARINGS § 636.11 Final action. The final decision of the Secretary pursuant to section 166(b) of the Act... Officer's final determination where there has been no such hearing, constitutes final agency action...

  5. MPO B593110 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksby, C

    2011-07-25

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) shall provide one (1) Mechanical Engineer to support the Linear Collider Subsystem Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS). The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will include engineering, design, and drawing support for the Vacuum Seal Test. NSTec will also provide a final report of the setup and input to LLNL's project management on project status. The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will also include engineering, design, and drawing support to the conceptual design for manufacturing of the Flux Concentrator Magnet. NSTec will also contribute to LLNS's final report on the Flux Concentrator Magnet. The deliverables are drawings, sketches, engineering documents, and final reports delivered to the LLNS Technical Representative.

  6. Insulated siding project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Research and development on the nibbed vinyl insulative siding product has been completed. The product has been tested and evaluated in response to the issues raised by the first and second stage reviewers in the OERI invention review process. The production run machine design has been completed, prototyped and evaluated and the agreement for full-scale production. Final evaluation and testing of the machine's flawless part production was integral to the manufacture and preparation of samples for purposes of final tests in the Ball State CERES laboratories.

  7. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  8. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  9. A New Comprehensive Final Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu P.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions

  10. Charlotte Circle Outreach. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Mary Lynne; Rose, Terry L.; Prendergast, Donna

    This final report details the activities of the Charlotte Circle Outreach, a program designed to provide technical assistance and training to early intervention programs offering services to infants and young children with substantial disabilities, ages birth through two years. This mission was accomplished through cooperative planning with…

  11. TRICARE reimbursement revisions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    This final rule provides several necessary revisions to the regulation in order for TRICARE to be consistent with Medicare. These revisions affect: Hospice periods of care; reimbursement of physician assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and diagnosis-related group values, removing references to specific numeric diagnosis-related group values and replacing them with their narrative description. PMID:22737760

  12. TRICARE; diabetic education. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    The Department of Defense is publishing this final rule to clarify TRICARE coverage for diabetic education. This rule introduces new definitions and addresses revisions or omissions in policy or procedure inadvertently missed in previous regulatory changes pertaining to diabetic education. PMID:20695037

  13. TRICARE Young Adult. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-05-29

    This final rule implements Section 702 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult (TYA) program to provide an extended TRICARE Program coverage opportunity to most unmarried children under the age of 26 of uniformed services sponsors. The TYA program is a premium-based program. PMID:23724426

  14. LSCA Final Reports: Second Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Collin, Ed.

    This document includes final summary reports from recent federally funded Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) demonstration projects in California. While some projects reported at length and others provided the bare facts, reports are excerpted but published as received, without editing beyond a uniform first page. The Summary Report Form…

  15. Data breaches. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-22

    This document establishes regulations to address data breaches regarding sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The regulations implement certain provisions of Title IX of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006, which require promulgation of these regulations as an interim final rule. PMID:17674483

  16. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  17. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  18. Deaths: Final Data for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. deaths and death rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…

  19. The Trine Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Jon R.; And Others

    The final report describes the Trine Project which addressed three needs in the education of handicapped children: the need for an alternate writing system, the need for communication, and the need for access to general purpose computers used in the schools. The project had three major objectives: (1) to design a low-cost portable writing and…

  20. 77 FR 71714 - Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ..., 2005 (70 FR 7414) that amended certain provisions of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, that... that NHTSA published on August 6, 2012 (77 FR 46677). There were no comments in response to the notice.... In the final rule published on February 14, 2005 (70 FR 7414), 49 CFR 567.4(g)(5) was amended...

  1. Physicians Training Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    This final report describes the accomplishments and activities of a project which developed, implemented, and evaluated training activities for medical students, pediatric residents, and practicing physicians to enhance their understanding of and involvement with early intervention and the special education system in Connecticut. The training…

  2. Stable Black Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lawrence E.; And Others

    This document is the final report of a study conducted to determine what factors contribute to strong Black family life and how these strong families solve problems, in order to add to the knowledge base on stable families so as to enhance practical intervention with families in need, and to identify models of self-help strategies used by stable…

  3. Multihandicapped Blind. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lloyd

    The final report of the Garden Grove unified school district project for 1969 through 1972 (funded through Title III) involving six multiply handicapped, legally blind children, 7- to 10-years-old, who were previously excluded from special education (SE) classes is presented. Described as the main procedural objective is development of a…

  4. Environmental Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joan; Batty, Sara O.

    This final report deals with the efforts of the Environmental Action Coalition of New York City to change its network of recycling centers from collection points to educational centers for learning about solid waste and related environmental problems. This change was accomplished by first increasing the efficiency and the stability of the centers…

  5. LSCA Final Reports: Third Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Collin, Ed.

    This document includes final summary reports from 16 recent federally funded Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) projects in California. This volume covers generally the period 1984-85, and reports are presented in six subject areas: programs for children, information and referral projects, institutional services, literacy, local history,…

  6. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  7. Development work on a new package design for the next generation microelectronics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.; DeMarco, V.

    1996-11-01

    AlliedSignal and Micro-Mode Products joined under a DOE CRADA to develop a new package for next-generation electronics devices. Requirements included low cost of manufacture, ability to satisfy thermal expansion requirements, ability to satisfy thermal dissipation requirements, acceptable digital and microwave performance, and hermeticity. Four processes were tested; vacuum deposition of paralene, epoxy powder coating, transfer molding, and manual encapsulation. Transfer molding and manual potting improved the hermeticity but produced microcracking and reduced heat transfer ability following encapsulation. Additional study on manufacturing and encapsulating of the package is needed.

  8. Staff exchange with Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute (SIRTI), final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in U.S. industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms.

  9. 78 FR 44592 - Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Statement, Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan and Wilderness Study (Final EIS/GMP/WS) for Fort... at Fort Pulaski National Monument Headquarters, Cockspur Island, US Highway 80 East,...

  10. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  11. 40 CFR 750.9 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final rule. 750.9 Section 750.9... Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act § 750.9 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. Final versions of...

  12. 40 CFR 750.9 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final rule. 750.9 Section 750.9... Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act § 750.9 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. Final versions of...

  13. 40 CFR 750.9 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final rule. 750.9 Section 750.9... Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act § 750.9 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. Final versions of...

  14. 40 CFR 750.9 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final rule. 750.9 Section 750.9... Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act § 750.9 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. Final versions of...

  15. 40 CFR 750.9 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final rule. 750.9 Section 750.9... Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act § 750.9 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. Final versions of...

  16. 40 CFR 66.81 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 66.81 Section 66.81... COLLECTION OF NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTIES BY EPA Final Action § 66.81 Final action. (a) A final Agency action... State action pursuant to part 67. (b) The actions listed in paragraph (a) of this section...

  17. 75 FR 29915 - Direct Final Rulemaking Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476) or you may visit http://dms.dot.gov . FOR... Transportation published a final rule adopting direct final rule procedures (69 FR 4455) and the Federal Railroad Administration published a final rule adopting direct final rule ] procedures on March 7, 2007 (72 FR...

  18. 21 CFR 1316.67 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final order. 1316.67 Section 1316.67 Food and... PROCEDURES Administrative Hearings § 1316.67 Final order. As soon as practicable after the presiding officer... Federal Register his final order in the proceeding, which shall set forth the final rule and the...

  19. 14 CFR 17.41 - Final orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final orders. 17.41 Section 17.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACT DISPUTES Finality and Review § 17.41 Final orders. All final FAA...

  20. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Holmes

    2005-12-31

    This document is the final report on the work completed on DE-FG02-95ER25238 since the start of the second renewal period: Jan 1, 2001. It supplements the annual reports submitted in 2001 and 2002. In the renewal proposal I envisaged work in three main areas: Analytical and topological tools for studying flows and maps Low dimensional models of fluid flow Models of animal locomotion and I describe the progess made on each project.

  1. Measurement techniques development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N.D.

    1993-08-01

    This final report covers work done through the period of performance 16 January 1991 to 16 January 1993. The work has been in support of the drive symmetry and hydrodynamic implosion experiments which Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Group P-4 is designing and fielding at the NOVA laser facility at LLNL. The work done involves experimental support in obtaining data, analysis of the data, and experimental design.

  2. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  3. Final inspection of photomask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Fredi; Sauerbrei, Hartmut; Aschke, Lutz; Knapp, Konrad

    2001-04-01

    In order to increase the quality in manufacturing of future photon mask generations Schott Lithotec is brought in a brand new, much increased automatic laser inspection system into a new manufacturing line of photo mask blanks. It is in a position to detect additionally to the standard defect types further defect types like dim- and bright-chrome defects. The resolution of the system is less than 100 nm. With a quickly inspecting time per blank of less than three minutes and for the first time in the world used automatic SMIF-pod-handling this is a tool for the 100 percent final inspection in the manufacturing of photo mask blanks.

  4. Hydroprocessing SRC. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bronfenbrenner, J.C.; Garg, D.; Harris, C.F.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-09-01

    Catalyst activity and aging rate were studied in ICRC's process development unit (PDU) and at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility under SRC-I Demonstration Plant hydroprocessing conditions. Similar studies using both high- and low-conversion modes were conducted by The Lummus Company. The studies determined variations in SRC conversion, hydrocarbon gas production, hydrogen consumption, and heteroatom removal. Samples of spent catalyst were analyzed to ascertain the reasons for catalyst deactivation. Finally, the ICRC PDU hydroprocessing results were compared with those generated at Lummus and Wilsonville pilot plants.

  5. Final amplifier design and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.A.; Hanson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met.

  6. Final amplifier design and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.A.; Hanson, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met.

  7. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  8. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  10. Isolation, Preliminary Characterization and Preliminary Assessment of Scale-Up Potential of Photosynthetic Microalgae for the Production of Both Biofuels and Bio-Active Molecules in the U.S. and Canada: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-372

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkos, P.

    2012-09-01

    Combustion flue gases are a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere, a factor that has been linked to the possible global climate change. It is, therefore, critical to begin thinking seriously about ways to reduce this influx into the atmosphere. Using carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion as a feedstock for the growth, photosynthetic microorganisms can provide a large sink for carbon assimilation as well as a feedstock for the production of significant levels of biofuels. Combining microalgal farming with fossil fuel energy production has great potential to diminish carbon dioxide releases into the atmosphere, as well as contribute to the production of biofuels (e.g., biodiesel, renewable diesel and gasoline and jet fuel) as well as valuable co-products such as animal feeds and green chemicals. CO2 capture may be a regulatory requirement in future new coal or natural gas power plants and will almost certainly become an opportunity for commerce, the results of such studies may provide industries in the US and Canada with both regulatory relief and business opportunities as well as the ability to meet environmental and regulatory requirements, and to produce large volumes of fuels and co-products.

  11. Space tug applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a `space tug`. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems.

  12. (Wind electric systems). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sencenbaugh, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    This report details the results of a demonstration project, the design and testing of a low power, high reliability wind electric system for remote, stand-alone locations. The study consisted of two basic areas. An engineering redesign of a sucessful preproduction prototype to determine best material usage in castings and manufacturing time, in addition to evaluating performance vs cost tradeoffs in design. The second stage of the program covered actual field testing of the redesigned machine in remote areas. After field testing, the machine was to undertake a final redesign to correct any weak areas found during the field evaluation period. Three machines of this design were tested throughout various regions of the United States. These units were located in Nederland, Colorado, Whidbey Island, Washington and Fort Cronkite, San Francisco, CA. The results obtained from prolonged testing were both varied and valuable. A detailed structural analysis was done during the preliminary redesign and final design stages of this program. This report is organized in chronological order.

  13. The Final Stages of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D.

    2014-04-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars end their lives as white dwarf stars. These stars and their environs have a deep personal significance for humanity: this is the expected fate of our own sun. Once a star becomes a white dwarf, its remaining evolution is best described as an exponential cooling. In the final throws of post-main sequence mass-loss the former stellar core becomes a white dwarf, emerging phoenix-like from amongst the ashes. Some planets may survive and others may form as a sort of second generation from the cast-off material. Life may survive or may be reborn on any planets that remain; life may also arise on newly formed planets. The prospects will depend in a significant way on the timescales of the central white dwarf star's cooling evolution and how its radiation shapes the environment. We will discuss white dwarf evolutionary timescales with an eye towards the potential habitability of planets, both new and old. We will consider the uncertainties in these timescales from both an empirical and a theoretical perspective. We will critique the existing evidence for planets and summarize what we have learned so far through direct imaging and stellar pulsations. We will close with the very bright prospects for the future of planets and life in the final stages.

  14. 78 FR 47048 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Notice of availability of Final EIS. SUMMARY:...

  15. 78 FR 14318 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... (SFHA) boundaries or zone designations, or regulatory floodways on the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may...

  16. 78 FR 21143 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  17. 78 FR 52954 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  18. 78 FR 52953 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  19. 78 FR 5820 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  20. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  1. 78 FR 45938 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  2. 78 FR 45937 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  3. 78 FR 9406 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  4. 78 FR 43905 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  5. 78 FR 14316 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  6. 78 FR 43904 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  7. 78 FR 20337 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  8. 78 FR 20338 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  9. 78 FR 14577 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  10. 78 FR 14576 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  11. 78 FR 36216 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  12. 78 FR 36219 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  13. 78 FR 29762 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  14. 78 FR 36220 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  15. 78 FR 32678 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  16. 78 FR 32679 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  17. 78 FR 64521 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  18. 78 FR 29761 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  19. 78 FR 43904 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  20. 78 FR 29763 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  1. Final RQ adjustments rule issued

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    On June 12, 1995, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its long awaited final rule adjusting certain reportable quantities (RQs) for hazardous substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The rule: revises the table of hazardous substances to add 47 individual Clean Air Act (CAA) hazardous air pollutants (HAPs); adjustments their statutory one-pound RQs; adds five other CAA HAPs that are categories of substances and assigns no RQ to the categories; and adjusts RQs for 11 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed hazardous wastes. EPA made conforming changes to the Clean Water Act table of hazardous substances and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) table of extremely hazardous substances. The rule became effective July 12, 1995.

  2. Strategic Asia 2002 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ellings; Aaron Friedberg; Michael Wills

    2002-09-01

    The Strategic Asia Program made considerable progress over the course of 2002--the program's first year with support from the Department of Energy--and completed all its tasks on schedule and within budget. Following a planning meeting in Washington in February 2002, a team of leading specialists wrote a series of original assessments regarding the impact of September 11 on the strategic environment in Asia, examining how perceptions and strategies of countries in the region changed following the terrorist attacks. The final products, Strategic Asia 2002-03: Asian Aftershocks and its accompanying executive summary, were published in September 2002. The program's research findings (some of which are summarized) were presented to policymakers in Washington and elsewhere throughout the year, and almost 2,000 copies of the book had been distributed by mid-2003.

  3. Final project report, staff exchange with Finnigan Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the exchange between Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Finnigan Corporation is a transfer of expertise and technology for the design and operation of efficient and sensitive atmospheric pressure/vacuum electrospray ionization (ESI) sources. The development of such ion sources will permit wider application of mass spectrometry instrumentation in applied studies in a variety of disciplines including clinical, forensic, biochemical, biotechnical, and environmental studies where sensitivity is a paramount concern. Two meetings were held between representatives of Finnigan Corporation (led by Dr. Ian Jardine, Director for Marketing, Finnigan Corporation) and PNL staff members. During these meetings, Finnigan and PNL staff surveyed the existing technology for atmosphere/vacuum interface of mass spectrometry to ESI. The representatives from Finnigan viewed demonstrations of recent developments that increased efficiency and sensitivity for ESI mass spectrometry. During these meetings, knowledge and expertise were shared in the development of instrumentation, methods, and applications of ESI mass spectrometry with particular emphasis on current and planned Finnigan instrumentation. With the objective of more effective and competitive products for Finnigan Corporation, concepts for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were directed toward the development and commercialization of advanced high efficiency and sensitivity ESI technology. A detailed proposal and work plan for the cooperative project was developed and is included in this report.

  4. Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-03-01

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

  5. 16 CFR 1.12 - Final notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final notice. 1.12 Section 1.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.12 Final notice. A final notice...

  6. 40 CFR 750.21 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final rule. 750.21 Section 750.21... Manufacturing Exemptions § 750.21 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. The Agency shall also publish at that time: (1) A list...

  7. 40 CFR 750.41 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final rule. 750.41 Section 750.41... Processing and Distribution in Commerce Exemptions § 750.41 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, EPA will issue a final rule. EPA will also publish at that...

  8. 40 CFR 750.41 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final rule. 750.41 Section 750.41... Processing and Distribution in Commerce Exemptions § 750.41 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, EPA will issue a final rule. EPA will also publish at that...

  9. 40 CFR 750.21 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final rule. 750.21 Section 750.21... Manufacturing Exemptions § 750.21 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. The Agency shall also publish at that time: (1) A list...

  10. 40 CFR 750.41 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final rule. 750.41 Section 750.41... Processing and Distribution in Commerce Exemptions § 750.41 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, EPA will issue a final rule. EPA will also publish at that...

  11. 40 CFR 750.21 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final rule. 750.21 Section 750.21... Manufacturing Exemptions § 750.21 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. The Agency shall also publish at that time: (1) A list...

  12. 40 CFR 750.21 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final rule. 750.21 Section 750.21... Manufacturing Exemptions § 750.21 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. The Agency shall also publish at that time: (1) A list...

  13. 40 CFR 750.21 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final rule. 750.21 Section 750.21... Manufacturing Exemptions § 750.21 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, the Agency shall issue a final rule. The Agency shall also publish at that time: (1) A list...

  14. 40 CFR 750.41 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final rule. 750.41 Section 750.41... Processing and Distribution in Commerce Exemptions § 750.41 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, EPA will issue a final rule. EPA will also publish at that...

  15. 40 CFR 750.41 - Final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final rule. 750.41 Section 750.41... Processing and Distribution in Commerce Exemptions § 750.41 Final rule. (a) As soon as feasible after the deadline for submittal of reply comments, EPA will issue a final rule. EPA will also publish at that...

  16. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  17. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  18. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final order. 22.31 Section 22.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES AND THE REVOCATION/TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Final Order § 22.31 Final order. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final order. 22.31 Section 22.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES AND THE REVOCATION/TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Final Order § 22.31 Final order. (a)...

  20. 10 CFR 820.32 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final order. 820.32 Section 820.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.32 Final order. (a) Effect of Initial Decision. The Initial Decision shall be deemed filed as a Final Order thirty days...