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Sample records for cranial nerve symptoms

  1. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ... You Know... Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement, causing double vision. Symptoms Symptoms depend on which ...

  2. Paroxysmal staccato tinnitus: a carbamazepine responsive hyperactivity dysfunction symptom of the eighth cranial nerve.

    PubMed

    Brantberg, Krister

    2010-04-01

    Hyperactive disorders related to neurovascular compression have been described for several cranial nerves of which trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm are the best known. The present report on four patients, in conjunction with previous reports, suggests that paroxysmal staccato tinnitus might be considered an auditory hyperactivity disorder of the eighth cranial nerve. The present patients reported attacks, usually lasting 10-20 s, of loud monaural tinnitus with a staccato character (eg, clattering or sounding like a machine gun). The attacks occurred very frequently, sometimes every minute. The attacks were spontaneous but they were also provoked by certain head positions or by exposure to loud sounds. Most of the patients did not reveal any significant eighth cranial nerve sensory loss and thus it is probably not advisable to rely on any specific test result for this diagnosis. Instead, it is suggested that a diagnosis of paroxysmal staccato tinnitus can be based on the history as the symptoms are both stereotypic and very specific. Furthermore, low doses of carbamazepine, although not effective for the general population of tinnitus patients, relieved the symptoms. PMID:19778910

  3. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nerves—the cranial nerves—lead directly from the brain to various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. Some of the cranial nerves are ... cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, pass through ... to parts of the head, neck, and trunk. The nerves are named and numbered, ...

  4. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  5. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  6. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement by Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  7. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  8. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  9. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  10. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  11. Cranial Nerves any nerve that emanates from the skull Motor = efferent

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Cranial Nerves ­ any nerve that emanates from the skull Motor = efferent somatomotor ­ to skeletal, vision, gustation, hearing, equilibrium Cranial nerves - functions nI ­ olfactory, SS nII ­ optic, SS n to tongue Cranial nerves ­ pathways from anterior cranial fossa nI ­ olfactory from anterior cranial fossa

  12. Cranial nerve manifestations in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blake, Kim D; Hartshorne, Timothy S; Lawand, Christopher; Dailor, A Nichole; Thelin, James W

    2008-03-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) anomalies have been regarded as a major criterion for a clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome for some time. However, there have been relatively few studies of the extent of this involvement. A detailed questionnaire (in French or English) was distributed to all physicians who participated in the 2001-2004 Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program (CPSP), and who identified themselves as caring for an individual with CHARGE syndrome. Clinical data were collected from multiple sources for each individual, including evidence of CN dysfunction. Evidence for CN anomalies recorded by the clinical presentations and evidence from specialized testing, were: weak chewing and/or sucking (CN V), facial palsy (CN VII), sensorineural hearing loss (CN VIII), balance vestibular problems (CN VIII), and swallowing problems (CN IX/X). Data were analyzed as to the frequency of the CN anomalies and compared to the literature. At the time of this study, there were 99 individuals identified with CHARGE syndrome across Canada. The CHARGE syndrome diagnosis was confirmed by geneticists across the country. Gene testing was not available at the time of this study. Of these 92% exhibited symptoms of at least one CN anomaly, and 72% reported involvement of more than one. Isolated CN involvement was rare. Ascertainment was highest for CN IX/X, and lowest for VIII vestibular. The frequency of CN involvement was generally higher than that reported in the literature. PMID:18241060

  13. A Case of Transient, Isolated Cranial Nerve VI Palsy due to Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Otitis externa affects both children and adults. It is often treated with topical antibiotics, with good clinical outcomes. When a patient fails to respond to the treatment, otitis externa can progress to malignant otitis externa. The common symptoms of skull bone osteomyelitis include ear ache, facial pain, and cranial nerve palsies. However, an isolated cranial nerve is rare. Herein, we report a case of 54-year-old female who presented with left cranial nerve VI palsy due to skull base osteomyelitis which responded to antibiotic therapy. PMID:25045551

  14. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. PMID:24323823

  16. [Effects of Endovascular Treatment on Cranial Nerve Palsy due to Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koh, Masaki; Kuwayama, Naoya; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of endovascular treatment on cranial nerve palsy due to unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular coiling was performed in 203 patients with intracranial aneurysms between April 2002 and March 2012 in our hospital. Of these patients, 8(3.9%)presented with cranial nerve palsy due to unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Cranial nerve palsy involved the oculomotor nerve in 8 patients and the optic nerve in 2 patients. Two patients had both optic nerve and oculomotor nerve dysfunction. Patients with incomplete oculomotor nerve palsy at admission were more likely to have full recovery after coiling. Optic nerve dysfunction did not improve after coiling. Incomplete oculomotor nerve palsy, early treatment(?15 days), and small aneurysms(?10 mm)were likely to be associated with complete recovery after coiling. This study indicates that endovascular coiling may resolve cranial nerve palsy due to unruptured intracranial aneurysms in patients who have incomplete oculomotor nerve palsy due to small aneurysms and are treated as early as possible after symptom onset. PMID:26435368

  17. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  18. Cranial nerve assessment: a concise guide to clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Omprakash; Rizk, Elias; Rodriguez, Julian; Lee, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Examination of the cranial nerves is an integral and important part of a complete neurological examination. Historically, these skills were crucial for diagnosing specific lesions. With the development of modern imaging modalities, the significance of clinical examination techniques has perhaps been undermined. The authors present an overview of each cranial nerve with a concise summary of examination techniques. PMID:24307604

  19. The Six Syndromes of the Sixth Cranial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Azarmina, Mohsen; Azarmina, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The sixth cranial nerve runs a long course from the brainstem to the lateral rectus muscle. Based on the location of an abnormality, other neurologic structures may be involved with the pathology related to this nerve. Sixth nerve palsy is frequently due to a benign process with full recovery within weeks, yet caution is warranted as it may portend a serious neurologic process. Hence, early diagnosis is often critical for some conditions that present with sixth nerve palsy. This article outlines a simple clinical approach to sixth nerve palsy based on its anatomy. PMID:23943691

  20. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Sixth cranial nerve palsy due to arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, Venkatachalam; Reshma, Khajamohideen B

    2014-01-01

    Sixth cranial nerve palsy is an extremely rare complication of an arachnoid cyst. A 4-year-old boy who presented with left abducens palsy and a subdural hygroma complicating arachnoid cyst is discussed. Comprehensive review of the world literature revealed only 12 additional cases. PMID:25347081

  2. Brain Mass and Cranial Nerve Size in Shrews and Moles

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between body size, brain size, and fibers in selected cranial nerves in shrews and moles. Species include tiny masked shrews (S. cinereus) weighing only a few grams and much larger mole species weighing up to 90 grams. It also includes closely related species with very different sensory specializations – such as the star-nosed mole and the common, eastern mole. We found that moles and shrews have tiny optic nerves with fiber counts not correlated with body or brain size. Auditory nerves were similarly small but increased in fiber number with increasing brain and body size. Trigeminal nerve number was by far the largest and also increased with increasing brain and body size. The star-nosed mole was an outlier, with more than twice the number of trigeminal nerve fibers than any other species. Despite this hypertrophied cranial nerve, star-nosed mole brains were not larger than predicted from body size, suggesting that magnification of their somatosensory systems does not result in greater overall CNS size. PMID:25174995

  3. Brain mass and cranial nerve size in shrews and moles.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Duncan B; Sarko, Diana K; Catania, Kenneth C

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between body size, brain size, and fibers in selected cranial nerves in shrews and moles. Species include tiny masked shrews (S. cinereus) weighing only a few grams and much larger mole species weighing up to 90 grams. It also includes closely related species with very different sensory specializations - such as the star-nosed mole and the common, eastern mole. We found that moles and shrews have tiny optic nerves with fiber counts not correlated with body or brain size. Auditory nerves were similarly small but increased in fiber number with increasing brain and body size. Trigeminal nerve number was by far the largest and also increased with increasing brain and body size. The star-nosed mole was an outlier, with more than twice the number of trigeminal nerve fibers than any other species. Despite this hypertrophied cranial nerve, star-nosed mole brains were not larger than predicted from body size, suggesting that magnification of their somatosensory systems does not result in greater overall CNS size. PMID:25174995

  4. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1Wig/ Wig mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  5. Cranial Nerve Palsies: Sarcoidosis to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Fawad; Bannout, Firas; Russell, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Cranial palsies are a very rare feature of SLE. Similarly, peripheral sensory-motor axonal neuropathy is very uncommon in SLE. The combination of the two as the presenting symptoms of SLE is a diagnostic challenge particularly in an elderly male patient with a known diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This case serves to highlight the diagnostic considerations in such a patient. The lack of response to standard therapy and the presence of subtle clues like anemia, proteinuria, and mild serositis should prompt the physician to look for alternate diagnoses. The potential association of SLE and sarcoidosis is also discussed. SLE can be present in elderly male patients with cranial and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:23401835

  6. [A case of zoster sine herpete with involvement of the unilateral IX, X and XI cranial and upper cervical nerves].

    PubMed

    Funakawa, I; Terao, A; Koga, M

    1999-09-01

    We describe a case of unilateral IX, X and XI cranial and upper cervical nerve palsies involving zoster sine herpete (ZSH). A 63-year-old man experienced nausea, loss of appetite and general fatigue. On 4 days of illness, dysphagia, dysarthria and difficulty in elevation of his right arm appeared. Neurological examination showed the right curtain sign, a nasal voice and a decreased right gag reflex. He could hardly elevate his right arm laterally. Needle electromyography revealed positive sharp waves in his right trapezius muscle. Although no skin lesion was detected, anti-varicella-zoster virus antibodies were positive in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Acyclovir and a steroid were ineffective for these symptoms. Although case reports of unilateral IX, X and XI cranial nerve palsies with ZSH is very rare, ZSH should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of multiple cranial nerve palsies. PMID:10614162

  7. Ophthalmoplegic migraine with isolated third cranial nerve palsy in a known case of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Aakash; Khardenavis, Supriya; Deshpande, Anirudda

    2013-01-01

    Among the various forms of migraine headaches, ophthalmoplegic migraine is an uncommon and rare form, the incidence of which is approximately 0.7 per million. It presents predominantly with headache and ophthalmoplegia. One of more cranial nerves can be affected, however the third cranial nerve is most often affected. As a result, symptoms wise, mydriasis and ptosis are commonly seen. Patients generally recover completely within a few days or weeks, however residual deficits are known to occur in a minority of patients. One of the common generalised epilepsy syndromes is the juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), its prevalence being roughly up to 10% of all patients with epilepsy. It usually begins in the second decade of life. Generalised tonic–clonic seizures myoclonic jerks absences constitute the main seizure types in JME. Studies indicate a definite association of epilepsy with migraine headaches and a significant number of migraneurs are found to be epileptic. Conversely, patients with epilepsy are two times more likely to have migraine, as compared to their first degree relatives without migraine. We report a known case of a female patient of JME having a history of classical migraine with aura presenting to us with headache and ophthalmoplegia. She was extensively evaluated to rule out other causes of isolated third cranial nerve palsy, with all the investigations being negative for any obvious cause. She was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the acute attack and was subsequently put on antimigraine medication, propranolol during her hospital stay, with which her ptosis recovered completely after 2?weeks. The patient was later started on tablet divalproex sodium, which the patient continues to take on a long-term basis, especially because of its efficacy as an antimigraine prophylaxis agent and a potent drug against JME. PMID:24296772

  8. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Spataro, Rossella; La Bella, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes. PMID:25960744

  9. [Unusual manifestation of zoster sine herpete as unilateral caudal cranial nerve syndrome].

    PubMed

    Terborg, C; Förster, G; Sliwka, U

    2001-12-01

    Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies are a rare complication following varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation, especially if typical herpetic eruptions are lacking. We report a case of a 45-year-old, immunocompetent male with unilateral involvement of the cranial nerves VIII, IX, X, and XI without skin lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies revealed mononuclear pleocytosis with intrathecal antibody synthesis against VZV, while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) did not detect VZV or HSV (herpes simplex virus). The patient almost completely recovered after aciclovir administration. VZV reactivation without rash (zoster sine herpete) may lead to multiple cranial nerve palsies. PCR is a useful tool to detect VZV-DNA in CSF, but negative results do not exclude a reactivation. In case of multiple cranial nerve palsies of unknown etiology with mononuclear pleocytosis in CSF tumors of the skull base, meningitis tuberculosis, and meningeosis have to be excluded, and antiviral therapy should be discussed. PMID:11789442

  10. US Food and Drug Administration /Conformit Europe- approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Meek, M F; Coert, J H

    2008-04-01

    Several absorbable nerve conduits are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Conformit Europe (CE) for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves . Surgeons are often not aware of the different(bio) materials of these conduits when performing nerve repair. An overview of these FDA- and CE-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical use is presented . PubMed, MEDLINE, and the companies selling the conduits were consulted . The available FDA and CE absorbable nerve conduits for peripheral and cranial nerve repair are 2 collagen- and 2 synthetic- polyester based conduits. The available clinical data, the price, the length, and the composition of the tube show significant differences. Based on the available data in this paper at this moment, we favor the PGA (Neurotube) nerve conduit for repair of peripheral and cranial nerve defects because of its advantages in length, price, and availability of clinical data. However, no prospective studies comparing the available nerve conduits have been published. PMID:18437784

  11. Persistent hiccups and vomiting with multiple cranial nerve palsy in a case of zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Natsumi; Nakachi, Ryo; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man came to our hospital complaining of hiccups and vomiting lasting for five days. A neurological examination showed dysfunction of cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, IX and X on the left side. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster virus-DNA was positive. The patient responded well to treatment with intravenous acyclovir and steroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of zoster sine herpete presenting with persistent hiccups and vomiting. It is important to keep in mind that herpes zoster can present with symptoms that closely resemble those of intractable hiccups and nausea of neuromyelitis optica. Early detection of the virus is critical for making appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:25318806

  12. The 12, 24, or is it 26 cranial nerves?

    PubMed Central

    Welsby, P

    2004-01-01

    Many of our perceptions are gained through interpretative organs that we assume to be providing objective accounts. Notably, however, neither vision nor hearing provide an objective account of reality. This paper challenges the "conventional wisdoms" held regarding the optic, auditory, and hypoglossal nerves, and the nerves of eye movement. PMID:15466996

  13. Altered sensorium and multiple cranial nerve palsies in a recently diagnosed diabetic.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shaifali; Chaubal, C C; Jindal, Sushil; Aher, Atul; Biswas, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    We report a recent diabetic who presented with hyperglycemic, hyperosmolar, non ketotic state with coma and multiple cranial nerve palsies due to an associated previously undetected sinus infection. This is a classic case revisited purely for its educational value in terms of clinical photographs, tissue biopsy and imaging findings. These findings reiterate the devastating neurological consequences of fungal sinusitis in diabetic patients. PMID:25205894

  14. It's All in the Mime: Actions Speak Louder than Words When Teaching the Cranial Nerves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The…

  15. Issues in the Optimal Selection of a Cranial Nerve Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Goldsmith, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) is a safe technique that is of clear clinical value in the preservation of cranial nerves in skull base surgery and is rapidly becoming the standard of care. Available nerve monitoring systems vary widely in capabilities and costs. A well-informed surgeon may best decide on monitoring needs based on surgical case selection, experience, operating room space, availability of monitoring personnel, and cost. Key system characteristics that should be reviewed in the decision-making process include the monitoring technique (electromyography, pressure transducer, direct nerve monitoring, brainstem auditory evoked potential) and the stimulus technique (stimulating parameters, probe selection). In the past, IONM has been primarily employed in posterior fossa and temporal bone surgery, but the value of IONM is being recognized in more skull base and head and neck surgeries. Suggested IONM strategies for specific surgeries are presented. PMID:17170916

  16. Cranial nerve fasciculation and Schwann cell migration are impaired after loss of Npn-1.

    PubMed

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Huber, Andrea B

    2011-11-15

    Interaction of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) with its repulsive ligand Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is crucial for guidance decisions, fasciculation, timing of growth and axon-axon interactions of sensory and motor projections in the embryonic limb. At cranial levels, Npn-1 is expressed in motor neurons and sensory ganglia and loss of Sema3A-Npn-1 signaling leads to defasciculation of the superficial projections to the head and neck. The molecular mechanisms that govern the initial fasciculation and growth of the purely motor projections of the hypoglossal and abducens nerves in general, and the role of Npn-1 during these events in particular are, however, not well understood. We show here that selective removal of Npn-1 from somatic motor neurons impairs initial fasciculation and assembly of hypoglossal rootlets and leads to reduced numbers of abducens and hypoglossal fibers. Ablation of Npn-1 specifically from cranial neural crest and placodally derived sensory tissues recapitulates the distal defasciculation of mixed sensory-motor nerves of trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagal projections, which was observed in Npn-1(-/-) and Npn-1(Sema-) mutants. Surprisingly, the assembly and fasciculation of the purely motor hypoglossal nerve are also impaired and the number of Schwann cells migrating along the defasciculated axonal projections is reduced. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of cranial neural crest and embryonic placodes, where loss of Schwann cell precursors leads to aberrant growth patterns of the hypoglossal nerve. Interestingly, rostral turning of hypoglossal axons is not perturbed in any of the investigated genotypes. Thus, initial hypoglossal nerve assembly and fasciculation, but not later guidance decisions depend on Npn-1 expression and axon-Schwann cell interactions. PMID:21925156

  17. US Food and Drug Administration/Conformit Europe-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Meek, M F; Coert, J H

    2008-01-01

    Several absorbable nerve conduits are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Conformit Europe (CE) for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves. Surgeons are often not aware of the different (bio)materials of these conduits when performing nerve repair. An overview of these FDA- and CE-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical use is presented. PubMed, MEDLINE, and the companies selling the conduits were consulted. The available FDA and CE absorbable nerve conduits for peripheral and cranial nerve repair are 2 collagen- and 2 synthetic-polyester-based conduits. The available clinical data, the price, the length, and the composition of the tube show significant differences. Based on the available data in this paper at this moment, we favor the PGA (Neurotube) nerve conduit for repair of peripheral and cranial nerve defects because of its advantages in length, price, and availability of clinical data. However, no prospective studies comparing the available nerve conduits have been published. PMID:18281807

  18. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  19. Chronic granulomatous meningitis with multiple cranial nerve lesions hydrocephalus, stroke, sinus thrombosis, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Kladosek, A; Nagelmeier, I E; Becherer, A; Matula, C; Stradal, K H; Wolf, K; Czech, T; Stanek, G

    2000-11-01

    Most frequently, chronic granulomatous meningitis (CGM) is caused by infectious agents. However, in some cases the cause of CGM remains undetermined. It is unclear whether antimicrobial agents, including antituberculous drugs, are helpful in such cases. We describe a 61-year-old man who had multiple cranial nerve lesions, epilepsy, sinus thrombosis, stroke, and hydrocephalus attributable to CGM. Repeated extensive search for a causative agent in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the meninges remained negative. Only a single culture of the sputum revealed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which prompted antituberculous therapy with isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. After 6 months of therapy, neurologic abnormalities were slightly improved. We conclude that antimicrobial/ antituberculous agents have only a minor short-term effect in long-lasting CGM of undetermined cause. PMID:11095565

  20. Relationships between clinical symptom severity scales and nerve conduction measures in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    You, H; Simmons, Z; Freivalds, A; Kothari, M J; Naidu, S H

    1999-04-01

    This study examined the severity of symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in relation to nerve conduction measures of the median nerve. Clinical symptom severity and nerve conduction studies were evaluated for 64 hands with CTS in 45 patients. We found the following: (1) significant relationships identified among the clinical scales resulted in a dichotomous symptom classification scheme into primary and secondary symptoms, with the former being more specific for those symptoms usually seen in association with nerve injury; (2) there were significant relationships between symptom severity and nerve conduction abnormality; (3) the primary symptom scale correlated more strongly with the electrodiagnostic measures of nerve injury than did the secondary symptom scale. Based on these findings, we believe that these clinical scales have biological significance and reflect median nerve injury. This would support their potential utility for evaluating the outcome of CTS treatment and developing a model for exposure-severity relationship. PMID:10204785

  1. Dermal Sinus Tract of the Thoracic Spine Presenting with Intramedullary Abscess and Cranial Nerve Deficits.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Georgios; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P; Flaris, Nikolaos; Iliadis, Charalampos; Tsonidis, Christos

    2015-11-01

    Congenital dermal sinus tract of the spine is an unusual developmental defect which represents a failure of the surface ectoderm and dermal elements to separate from the neuroectoderm. A 15-month-old female presented with high fever, severe right hemiparesis, difficulty breathing and cranial nerve deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed a congenital dermal sinus tract at the Th6 level, an intramedullary collection extending up to the brainstem and a probable intramedullary cystic lesion. The child was operated acutely with ligation of the sinus tract, drainage of the abscess and partial removal of the intramedullary lesion. Due to abscess recurrence, she was reoperated with complete excision of the dermal sinus tract, abscess redrainage and subtotal excision of the dermoid cyst (retaining a part of its capsule). Pus culture isolated Corynebacterium species and Peptococcus species and histology of the lesion showed a dermoid cyst. Postoperatively, after an initial neurologic deterioration, she progressively improved. An MRI scan at 15 months neither showed recurrence of the collection nor regrowth of the lesion. Spinal dermal sinus tracts that remain unnoticed or untreated can result in serious complications and should be operated as soon as possible to prevent undesirable sequelae. PMID:26458220

  2. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) arising from the 3rd cranial nerve in infants: a clinical-radiological entity?

    PubMed

    Oh, Christopher C; Orr, Brent A; Bernardi, Bruno; Garré, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Andrea; Figà-Talamanca, Lorenzo; Robinson, Giles W; Patay, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is a rare embryonal tumor of the central nervous system with preponderance in very young children, the majority of whom are younger than 3 years of age at diagnosis. Historically, outcomes of this aggressive disease, even with extensive multimodal therapy, have been dismal. Recent improvements have come from therapies directed exclusively towards ATRT, but misdiagnosis or delays in the correct diagnosis lead to significantly worse survival rates. ATRTs most commonly occur supratentorially but have been described in virtually all central nervous system locations, including the cerebellopontine angle cistern, meninges, and spinal canal, and extradural locations. ATRTs originating from cranial nerves are rare. Here, we describe three cases of solitary ATRT arising from the 3rd cranial nerve (CN III) or close to its origin in the midbrain, all of which presented in patients within 6 months of birth, with isolated unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and strikingly similar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. These MRI features include IV contrast enhancement, relative T2 hyposignal, and restricted water diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient images, findings which are consistent with angiogenesis and high cellularity, and hence, suggestive of malignancy. We conclude that ATRT should be placed high on the differential diagnosis list when encountering a young infant presenting with isolated, unilateral 3rd nerve palsy and a small, solitary tumor arising from CN III that demonstrates malignant conventional and diffusion-weighted imaging features on MRI. PMID:26148473

  3. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, ... eye pain) Increased or decreased pressure in the skull Infections (such as meningitis or sinusitis ) Multiple sclerosis ...

  4. It's all in the mime: Actions speak louder than words when teaching the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-11-12

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The research design involved exposure of the same group of students to didactic followed by miming lecturing of CNs. The effectiveness of each lecturing strategy was measured via pre- and post-testing. Student perceptions of these strategies were measured by a survey. As an example of miming, gestures for CN VII included funny faces for muscles of facial expression, kangaroo vocalization for taste, spitting action for saliva production, and crying for lacrimal gland production. Accounting for extra duration of the miming lecture, it was shown that pre- to post-test improvement was higher for the miming presentation than for the didactic (0.47?±?0.03 marks/minute versus 0.33?±?0.03, n?=?39, P?

  5. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 34.444, p < 0.001). Fifty-nine cases experienced CNP in more than one cranial nerve. Twenty-two of 27 cases (68.8%) of intragroup CNP and 11 of 32 cases (40.7%) of intergroup CNP occurred synchronously ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  6. Anti-GQ1b-negative Miller-Fisher syndrome with lower cranial nerve involvement from parasinusoidal aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Niedermayr, Anton; Weigl, Peter G; Voigtländer, Till

    2006-03-01

    Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) typically presents with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Atypical MFS additionally includes bulbar impairment, affection of the limbs, or abortive presentations. Mostly, MFS follows an infection with Campylobacter jejunii. Aspergilloma has not been reported to trigger MFS. In a 48-year-old male tiredness, tinnitus, otalgia, parietal hyperaesthesia, coughing, plugged nose, hypoacusis, globus sensation, epipharyngeal pain, dysarthria, hypogeusia, arthralgia, lid cloni, facial hypaesthesia and tooth ache consecutively developed. There were occasional lid cloni, left-sided facial hypaesthesia, reduced gag reflex, divesting soft palate, and absent tendon reflexes. CSF investigations revealed normal cell-count but increased protein. Antibodies against GM1 and GQ1b were negative. Atypical MFS was diagnosed. Otolaryngological examinations revealed chronic sinusitis maxillaris from an aspergilloma. After immunoglobulins and resectioning of the aspergilloma, neurological abnormalities disappeared within 19d. MFS may manifest as unilateral lower cranial nerve lesions without affection of the upper cranial nerves or ataxia. Atypical MFS may be triggered by parasinusoidal aspergilloma. PMID:16081159

  7. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema; Polacek, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  8. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T. . E-mail: cgmhnog@yahoo.com

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those evaluated with CT or Tm, with a 15-30% improvement in local tumor control and survival. Patients with extensive CN palsy had worse survival than those with only lower CN or upper CN involvement (5-year DSS 20.4% vs. 43.2% and 40.4%, respectively; p < 0.001). Patients who recovered from CN palsy had better survival than those who did not (47% vs. 26%, p < 0.001). Brachytherapy was associated with poorer local control, whereas a total external dose of more than 70 Gy improved local tumor control and marginally improved DSS. Subgroup analysis in CT and MRI patients group, either DSS or OS was significantly associated with imaging modality, N stage, or location of or remission of CN palsy. Conclusion: The use of MRI was associated with improved tumor control and survival of patients with NPC causing CN palsy. Patients recovering from CN palsy had better survival. A higher radiation dose delivered by external beam may achieve better tumor control than brachytherapy.

  9. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  10. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. Methods: To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Results: Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Conclusion: Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients. PMID:26674155

  11. Midbrain neurocysticercosis presenting as isolated pupil sparing third cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Navdeep; Sharma, Pawan; Shukla, R; Singh, Dilip; Vidhate, Mukund; Naphade, Pravin U

    2012-01-15

    Brainstem alone is involved very infrequently in patients with neurocysticercosis; usually, it occurs in association with disseminated form of the disease. Isolated involvement of the third nerve is commonly due to vascular causes. We are reporting a case due to cysticercus lesion presenting as isolated third-nerve involvement with sparing of the pupil. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was established by the presence of characteristic granulomatous lesions in the midbrain along with positive ELISA for cysticercal antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded well to corticosteroids with almost complete recovery. A follow-up MRI scan showed a significant decrease in the size of the lesion. PMID:21906754

  12. Image findings of cranial nerve pathology on [18F]-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT): a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Osama A; Muzaffar, Razi; Shetty, Vilaas; Osman, Medhat M

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to increase awareness about the utility of (18)F -FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) pathology. We discuss the clinical implication of detecting perineural tumor spread, emphasize the primary and secondary (18)F -FDG-PET/CT findings of CN pathology, and illustrate the individual (18)F -FDG-PET/CT CN anatomy and pathology of 11 of the 12 CNs. PMID:26634826

  13. Incidence, Impact, and Predictors of Cranial Nerve Palsy and Haematoma Following Carotid Endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study

    PubMed Central

    Doig, D.; Turner, E.L.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; de Borst, G.J.; Brown, M.M.; Richards, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cranial nerve palsy (CNP) and neck haematoma are complications of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The effects of patient factors and surgical technique were analysed on the risk, and impact on disability, of CNP or haematoma in the surgical arm of the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS), a randomized controlled clinical trial of stenting versus CEA in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Materials and methods A per-protocol analysis of early outcome in patients receiving CEA in ICSS is reported. Haematoma was defined by the surgeon. CNP was confirmed by an independent neurologist. Factors associated with the risk of CNP and haematoma were investigated in a binomial regression analysis. Results Of the patients undergoing CEA, 45/821 (5.5%) developed CNP, one of which was disabling (modified Rankin score = 3 at 1 month). Twenty-eight (3.4%) developed severe haematoma. Twelve patients with haematoma also had CNP, a significant association (p < .01). Independent risk factors modifying the risk of CNP were cardiac failure (risk ratio [RR] 2.66, 95% CI 1.11 to 6.40), female sex (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.02 to 3.20), the degree of contralateral carotid stenosis, and time from randomization to treatment >14 days (RR 3.33, 95% CI 1.05 to 10.57). The risk of haematoma was increased in women, by the prescription of anticoagulant drugs pre-procedure and in patients with atrial fibrillation, and was decreased in patients in whom a shunt was used and in those with a higher baseline cholesterol level. Conclusions CNP remains relatively common after CEA, but is rarely disabling. Women should be warned about an increased risk. Attention to haemostasis might reduce the incidence of CNP. ICSS is a registered clinical trial: ISRCTN 25337470. PMID:25344019

  14. Symptoms and disability after major peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Ring, David

    2013-08-01

    Laceration and irrecoverable stretch, crush, or avulsion of a major peripheral nerve in the upper extremity causes substantial impairment in an adult patient. Hand care professionals who treat these patients encounter a wide range of coping strategies leading to varied courses of recovery and strikingly different final outcomes. There is evidence that the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of recovery (not to mention the circumstantial aspects such as worker compensation and litigation) are as important as the physical aspects. Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder these aspects of recovery might improve the quality and effectiveness of our care. PMID:23895722

  15. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  16. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Local tumors or swelling can press on and ... show: Enlarged (dilated) pupil of the affected eye Eye movement abnormalities Eyes that are not aligned Your health ...

  17. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Screening Guidelines Home Remedies for Simple Eye Problems Medical Marijuana for Glaucoma Pregnancy Preventing Eye Injuries Smokers Sports ... Occasionally MCNP can occur in younger people with migraine. This condition almost always resolves on its own ...

  18. Chiropractic management of a patient with ulnar nerve compression symptoms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Illes, Jennifer D.; Johnson, Theodore L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management of a patient with arm and hand numbness and who was suspected to have ulnar nerve compression. Clinical Features A 41-year-old woman presented with hand weakness and numbness along the medial aspect of her right forearm and the 3 most medial fingers. The onset of symptoms presented suddenly, 3 weeks prior, when she woke up in the morning and assumed she had “slept wrong.” The patient’s posture showed protracted shoulders and moderate forward head carriage. Orthopedic assessment revealed symptomatic right elevated arm stress test, grip strength asymmetry, and a Tinel sign at the right cubital tunnel. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated using chiropractic care, which consisted of manipulative therapy, myofascial therapy, and elastic therapeutic taping. Active home care included performing postural exercises and education about workstation ergonomics. She demonstrated immediate subjective improvement of her numbness and weakness after the first treatment. Over a series of 11 treatments, her symptoms resolved completely; and she was able to perform work tasks without dysfunction. Conclusion Chiropractic treatment consisting of manipulation, soft tissue mobilizations, exercise, and education of workstation ergonomics appeared to reduce the symptoms of ulnar nerve compression symptoms for this patient. PMID:24294148

  19. Tapia's syndrome in the intensive care unit: a rare cause of combined cranial nerve palsy following intubation.

    PubMed

    Coninckx, M; Cardoen, S; Hemelsoet, D

    2015-12-01

    Tapia's syndrome is characterized by unilateral paralysis of the tongue and vocal cord, and is caused by a concurrent lesion of both the recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerves. The proposed mechanism in most patients is compression or stretching of these nerves on their extracranial course due to airway manipulation under general anaesthesia. As Tapia's syndrome is a rare and possibly devastating condition, recognition of the presence of concurrent paralyses is an important step in diagnosis and treatment. We report two cases of Tapia's syndrome as a complication of intubation in the intensive care unit. PMID:26088745

  20. ["Left hemicranium, the cranial nerves" by Tramond: An anatomical model in wax from the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière's Museum in Paris: description and tri-dimensional photographic reconstruction (TDPR)].

    PubMed

    Paravey, S; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    An anatomical model in wax made by Tramond (middle of the 19th century) represented the cranial nerves of a left hemicranium. The aim of the study was to verify its anatomical veracity, to realize a tri-dimensional visualization by computer, and finally to numerize and to diffuse it to the general public in the purpose of culture on the internet. The model belonged to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum (Paris Descartes university). It represented the cranial nerves especially the facial and the trigeminal nerves and their branches. To perform the photographic rotation every 5° along 360°, we used a special device made of two identical superimposed marble disks linked by a ball bearing. A digital camera and the Quick Time Virtual Reality software were used. Seventy-two pictures were shot. This wax was realized with a great morphological accuracy from a true cranium as a support for the cranial nerves. The work of numerization and its free diffusion on the Internet permitted to deliver to everybody the images of this sample of the collection of the Orfila Museum, the pieces of which were evacuated on December 2009 after its closure. PMID:21493118

  1. Successful treatment with acyclovir and a corticosteroid for lower cranial polyneuropathy in zoster sine herpete: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Nakahara Ph D, Toshiki; Nakajima, Sho; Nakazato, Tomoko; Mikasa, Michitaka; Furukawa Ph D, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-23

    A 62-year-old woman developed meningitis as well as acute paralysis of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves on the right side and also had dysfunction of the left hypoglossal nerve. Although there was no evidence of a typical cutaneous or mucosal herpetic lesion, PCR detection of varicella zoster virus (VZV)-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the clinical diagnosis of polyneuritis cranialis due to VZV infection and zoster sine herpete. After starting intravenous acyclovir and methylprednisolone, her hypoglossal nerve palsy disappeared within a day and all other symptoms and signs dramatically improved. A rapid improvement observed in our patient suggests that the right cranial polyneuropathy could be caused by inflammation associated with epineurial edema (where the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves pass through the right jugular foramen), whereas the exact mechanism of the twelfth cranial nerve involvement on the contralateral side is unknown. Our clinical findings indicate that acute lower cranial polyneuropathy in patients with zoster sine herpete should be treated immediately with combined administration of acyclovir and an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. PMID:26511031

  2. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip

    PubMed Central

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H.; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. METHODS The authors recorded subjects’ eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. RESULTS In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2 patients with known CN III palsy had significantly decreased ratios of 0.19 and 0.06, respectively. Three patients with surgically treatable pathological conditions impacting CN VI, such as infratentorial mass effect or hydrocephalus, had significantly increased ratios (1.84, 1.44, and 1.34, respectively) relative to normal controls, and 6 patients with supratentorial mass effect had significantly decreased ratios (0.27, 0.53, 0.62, 0.45, 0.49, and 0.41, respectively). These alterations in eye tracking all reverted to normal ranges after surgical treatment of underlying pathological conditions in these 9 neurosurgical cases. CONCLUSIONS This proof of concept series of cases suggests that the use of eye tracking to detect CN palsy while the patient watches television or its equivalent represents a new capacity for this technology. It may provide a new tool for the assessment of multiple CNS functions that can potentially be useful in the assessment of awake patients with elevated intracranial pressure from hydrocephalus or trauma. PMID:25495739

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. Methods We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. Results The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. Conclusions FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT. PMID:23270432

  4. Tumors of the cranial base: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, L.N.; Schramm, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of this book highlights the differences and similarities in the pathology and biology of the various types of neoplasms of the cranial base. The second section covers improvements in radiological diagnosis with the advent of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and a better knowledge of radiological anatomy. It also examines the significance and proper evaluation of minor symptoms to enable earlier diagnosis, as well as the advances in interventional radiology that have produced the balloon occlusion text and tumor embolization. Section three is on advanced neuroanesthetic techniques and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Section four describes specialized treatment modalities including microsurgical resection with the laser, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Section five reviews the latest techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base following resection, as well as the preservation and reconstruction of cranial nerves and cerebral blood vessels exposed during the surgery. The final three sections examine the lesions and surgical techniques specific to the different anatomical regions, i.e, the anterior, middle and posterior cranial base.

  5. Use of the holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for cranial nerve decompression: an in vivo study using the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Qadir, R; Kennedy, D

    1993-06-01

    A study was designed to evaluate the utility and safety of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for precise bony decompression of neural canals. In vivo rabbit studies were performed to measure temperature changes and nerve degeneration which occurred when the facial canal was decompressed with the laser as compared to the diamond burr. Marked temperature elevations were noted with the laser (n = 4), but not with the burr (n = 4). Seven of nine nerves decompressed with the laser revealed moderate to severe degeneration, whereas two control nerves decompressed with the drill demonstrated only minimal degeneration. It is concluded that this laser should not be used for nerve decompression unless better control of temperature elevation can be achieved. PMID:8502097

  6. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders-affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate-are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  7. A study of Guillain–Barré syndrome with reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita; Banakar, Basavaraj F.; Pujar, Guruprasad S.; Khichar, Shubhakaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Focused studies on cranial neuropathy in Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and its prognostic implication are not done previously. Aim: To study the clinical profile of GBS patients with special reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication. Materials and Methods: The study included 61 patients with GB syndrome, fulfilling Asbury Cornblath's criteria for GB syndrome. A pre-designed semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data regarding demographic profile and clinical profile. All patients underwent detailed neurological examination, investigations including nerve conduction studies and CSF examination and treated according to the severity of the illness. Patients were followed up for 6 months. During analysis two groups were made depending on cranial nerve involvement, and compared with respect to various parameters. Results: Out of 61 patients 38 (62.3%) patients had cranial nerve palsies, in that 25 had multiple cranial nerve palsies, and 13 had single isolated nerve palsy. A majority of 30 (49.2%) had bulbar palsy, 28 (46%) had facial nerve palsy, and all had bilateral involvement except 3 patients who had unilateral palsy. Hypoglossal nerve involvement was seen in six (10%) patients and four (6.5%) patients had ophthalmoplegia. Only one had bilateral vestibulocochlear nerve palsy. On comparing various clinico-electrophysiological parameters among patients of GB syndrome with and without cranial nerve involvement, the presence of respiratory paralysis, IVIg and ventilatory support requirement had significant association with cranial nerve involvement in GBS. Conclusion: Our study found a correlation between cranial nerve palsies and severity of the illness. Cranial nerve innervated muscles recover earlier as compared to distal limb muscles. No association was found between outcome at 6 months and cranial nerve involvement. PMID:25540538

  8. Cellular/Molecular Terminal Nerve-Derived Neuropeptide Y Modulates

    E-print Network

    Eisthen, Heather L.

    , a cranial nerve that extends underneath the lamina propria surrounding the olfactory epithelium, displays is the most anterior vertebrate cranial nerve, extending between the nasal cavity and basal forebrain (Fig. 1Cellular/Molecular Terminal Nerve-Derived Neuropeptide Y Modulates Physiological Responses

  9. [A case of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus developing myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with hypertrophic pachymeningitis manifesting as multiple cranial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuko; Oku, Kayo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohsone, Yasuo; Handa, Michiko; Okano, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old man with a 35-year history of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM), complicated with myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis presenting alveolar hemorrhage and pachymeningitis. The patient was first diagnosed as having DM at age of 28 years old and deteriorated secretion of insulin and the typical clinical course led us to the diagnosis of SPIDDM. When he was 58 years old, he suffered from fever, headache, and alveolar hemorrhage. He was diagnosed as having MPO-ANCA associated vasculitis based on a high titer of MPO-ANCA and histological findings of lung biopsy. Treatment with steroid pulse therapy, followed by oral prednisolone and oral cyclophosohamide, resulted in clinical improvement. Five years later, he complained of double vision. A gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the brain showed normal. Two months later, he developed right cranial nerve V~XII palsy. A second MRI study revealed thickening of the right temporal region and cerebellar dura mater, leading us to the diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. He responded well to oral prednisolone (50 mg/day) and intravenous cyclophosohamide (500 mg). This is the first case report of SPIDDM complicated with MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis, manifesting as alveolar hemorrhage and hypertrophic pachymeningitis. PMID:22214812

  10. Isolated abducens nerve palsy due to pituitary apoplexy after mild head trauma.

    PubMed

    Kayayurt, Kamil; Gündogdu, Ömer Lütfi; Yava?i, Özcan; Metin, Yavuz; Ugras, Erhan

    2015-10-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a relatively rare condition. Cranial nerve palsies may develop due to compression of the surrounding structures by the rapidly expanding tumor. While the most commonly affected nerve is the oculomotor nerve, abducens nerve palsy may also occur less commonly. A 68-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of severe headache, nausea, vomiting, and diplopia after head trauma due to falling. His magnetic resonance imaging evaluation demonstrated a large pituitary adenoma and bleeding into the tumor, which was acutely expanding and leading to compression of the abducens nerve laterally. Isolated abducens palsy due to posttraumatic pituitary apoplexy is a rare clinical condition, and as the symptoms and signs are nonspecific, it can commonly remain clinically undiagnosed. In this article, our aim was to draw attention to a clinical condition in which unfavorable complications may develop if the diagnosis is overlooked. PMID:26314216

  11. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the hand muscles (in severe cases) Weakness of hand flexing Tests may be needed, depending on your history, symptoms, ... MRI of the neck Nerve ultrasound Nerve conduction tests Recording of the electrical activity in muscles ( EMG ) X-rays

  12. Fluid structure interaction analysis reveals facial nerve palsy caused by vertebral-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kambayashi, Yukinao; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Shinohara, Sho; Fujiwara, Hidemoto; Nakazato, Shinji; Watanabe, Masato; Dahmani, Chiheb; Yamamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko; Murayama, Yuichi

    2015-11-01

    Cranial nerve palsy caused by aneurysmal compression has not been fully evaluated. The main causes of symptoms are considered to be direct mechanical compression and aneurysm pulsations. Recent studies indicate that nerve dysfunction is mainly induced by pulsation rather than by direct compression, and successful cases of endovascular surgery have been reported. We describe a patient with an unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (VA-PICA) aneurysm compressing the facial nerve at the root exit zone (REZ). The patient presented with peripheral facial nerve palsy but not hemifacial spasm and was successfully treated by coil embolization. To investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral facial nerve palsy, fluid structure interaction (FSI) analysis can approximate displacement and the magnitude of aneurysmal wall motion due to hemodynamic forces. In our case, maximum mesh displacement was observed at the aneurysmal wall attached to the facial nerve inside the pons rather than the REZ, which explains the clinical manifestation of facial nerve palsy in the absence of hemifacial spasm. This preliminary report demonstrates the utility of FSI analysis for investigating cranial nerve neuropathy. PMID:26453756

  13. Late Radiation-Associated Dysphagia (Late-RAD) with Lower Cranial Neuropathy after Oropharyngeal Radiotherapy: A Preliminary Dosimetric Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Lewin, Jan S.; Baron, Charles A.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Rosenthal, David I.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Schwartz, David S.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Hutcheson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Late radiation-associated dysphagia (late-RAD) is a rare delayed toxicity, commonly associated with lower cranial neuropathies, in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) survivors. Prevention of late-RAD is paramount because the functional impairment can be profound, progressive, and refractory to standard therapies. The objective of this analysis was to identify candidate dosimetric predictors of late-RAD and associated lower cranial neuropathies after radiotherapy (RT) or chemo-RT (CRT) for OPC. Methods An unmatched retrospective case-control analysis was conducted. OPC patients treated with definitive RT or CRT (1999–2006) were included. Late-RAD was defined by new or progressive pharyngeal dysphagia per modified barium swallow (MBS) studies after recovery from acute toxicity with an interval of adequate function. As a secondary endpoint, predictors of late lower cranial neuropathies associated with late-RAD cases were examined. Controls were followed prospectively on an institutional trial a minimum of 4 years without symptoms of late-RAD. Dysphagia-aspiration related structures (DARS) and regions of interest containing cranial nerve paths (RCCNPs) were retrospectively contoured. Dose volume histograms were calculated. Non-parametric bivariate associations were analyzed with Bonferroni correction and multiple logistic regression models were fit. Results Thirty-eight patients were included (12 late-RAD cases, 26 controls). Median latency to late-RAD was 5.8 years (range: 4.5–11.3 years). Lower cranial neuropathies were present in 10 of 12 late-RAD cases (IX=4, X=6, XII=8), 7 of whom had multiple nerve palsies. IMRT was delivered in all controls and 25% of cases (p<0.001); the remainder received 3D-CRT. Smoking history, tumor subsite, fractionation schedule, neck dissection, and concurrent chemotherapy did not significantly differ between cases and controls (p>0.05). T-stage was significantly higher in late-RAD cases (p=0.002); N-stage was higher in controls (p=0.109). Mean superior pharyngeal constrictor (SPC) dose was higher in cases relative to controls (median: 70.5 vs 61.6 Gy). Adjusting for T-stage or total RT dose, mean SPC dose significantly predicted late-RAD (p=0.036) and related cranial neuropathies (p=0.019). RCCNPs did not significantly predict late-RAD or cranial neuropathies. Conclusions SPC dose may predict for late-RAD and related lower cranial neuropathies. These data, and those of previous studies that have associated SPC dose with classical dysphagia endpoints, suggest impetus to constrain dose to the SPCs when possible. PMID:24906528

  14. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation rescue surgery after multiple multilevel procedures for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Madeleine; Strohl, Kingman; Palomo, J Martin; Ponsky, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) is a new procedure offered for the treatment of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that has been shown to decrease the severity and symptoms of OSA in select patients. We report on a case of a patient with persistent symptoms and findings of OSA despite a history of multiple multilevel procedures, including an uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) with revision, a genioglossus advancement, and a maxillomandibular advancement. The patient then underwent HNS with significant improvement of his symptoms and severity. The success of this patient's HNS surgery demonstrates that we need to examine where HNS fits into the approach to surgery for OSA. There could be benefit to considering cranial nerve stimulation earlier than conventional approaches for select patients. PMID:26700261

  15. Changes in Levels of Nerve Growth Factor in Nasal Secretions after Capsaicin Inhalation in Patients with Airway Symptoms from Scents and Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Millqvist, Eva; Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa; Ståhl, Arne; Bende, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Patients complaining of upper and lower airway symptoms caused by scents and chemicals have previously been shown to have increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, but the precise mechanisms behind this reaction are unknown. Hypothesizing that a neurochemical alteration related to sensory hyperreactivity (SHR) of the airway mucosa occurs, we measured levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in nasal lavage fluid (NAL) before and after capsaicin inhalation provocations and related the capsaicin cough sensitivity to the NGF levels. Thirteen patients with SHR and 14 control subjects were provoked with capsaicin inhalation at three different doses. We measured NGF in NAL before and after provocation and recorded cough and capsaicin-induced symptoms. All subjects demonstrated a dose-dependent cough response to capsaicin inhalation, with a more pronounced effect in patients than in controls. Basal levels of NGF were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control subjects (p < 0.01). After capsaicin provocation, the patients showed a significant increase in NGF (p < 0.01), which was related to capsaicin cough sensitivity. The findings demonstrate that, in patients with airway symptoms induced by scents and chemicals, SHR is real and measurable, demonstrating a pathophysiology in the airways of these patients compared to healthy subjects. PMID:16002371

  16. Isolated partial, transient hypoglossal nerve injury following acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, A.M.; Hilmi, O.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury following ipsilateral acupuncture for migraines in a 53-year-old lady. The palsy was partial, with no associated dysarthria, and transient. Further examination and imaging was negative. Cranial nerve injuries secondary to acupuncture are not reported in the literature, but are a theoretical risk given the location of the cranial nerves in the neck. Anatomical knowledge is essential in those administering the treatment, and those reviewing patients with possible complications. PMID:24876519

  17. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  18. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  19. Embryonic origin of gustatory cranial sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Barlow, Linda A

    2007-10-15

    Cranial nerves VII, IX and X provide both gustatory (taste) and non-gustatory (touch, pain, temperature) innervation to the oral cavity of vertebrates. Gustatory neurons innervate taste buds and project centrally to the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), whereas neurons providing general epithelial innervation to the oropharynx project to non-gustatory hindbrain regions, i.e., spinal trigeminal nucleus. In addition to this dichotomy in function, cranial ganglia VII, IX and X have dual embryonic origins, comprising sensory neurons derived from both cranial neural crest and epibranchial placodes. We used a fate mapping approach to test the hypothesis that epibranchial placodes give rise to gustatory neurons, whereas the neural crest generates non-gustatory cells. Placodal ectoderm or neural crest was grafted from Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressing salamander embryos into unlabeled hosts, allowing us to discern the postembryonic central and peripheral projections of each embryonic neuronal population. Neurites that innervate taste buds are exclusively placodal in origin, and their central processes project to the NTS, consistent with a gustatory fate. In contrast, neural crest-derived neurons do not innervate taste buds; instead, neurites of these sensory neurons terminate as free nerve endings within the oral epithelium. Further, the majority of centrally directed fibers of neural crest neurons terminate outside the NTS, in regions that receive general epithelial afferents. Our data provide empirical evidence that embryonic origin dictates mature neuron function within cranial sensory ganglia: specifically, gustatory neurons derive from epibranchial placodes, whereas neural crest-derived neurons provide general epithelial innervation to the oral cavity. PMID:17826760

  20. Abstract It was hypothesised that P2X3 receptors, pre-dominantly labelling spinal and cranial sensory gangli-

    E-print Network

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Abstract It was hypothesised that P2X3 receptors, pre- dominantly labelling spinal and cranial that extrinsic sen- sory nerves expressing P2X3 are involved in a purinergic mechanosensory transduction pathway

  1. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations.

  2. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  3. Intra-cranial manifestations of the neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Herron, J; Darrah, R; Quaghebeur, G

    2000-02-01

    The neurocutaneous syndromes or phakomatoses are a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders primarily involving structures derived from the embryological neuroectoderm. All of the syndromes involve the central nervous system (CNS). Peripheral nerves, skin and other organ systems may also be involved. Twenty to 30 disorders are now classified as neurocutaneous syndromes. This article reviews the intra-cranial imaging features of some of the commonest. PMID:10657153

  4. Diagnosis of NF2

    MedlinePLUS

    ... symptoms of NF2. Although tumors on the eighth cranial nerve are most common, persons with NF2 can develop ... depend on their location. Those that arise on cranial nerves (like the eighth cranial nerve tumors) affect the ...

  5. Approved Module Information for OP3BVP, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Binocular Vision & Paediatrics Module Code: OP3BVP

    E-print Network

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    abnormalities 3rd, 4th and 6th cranial nerve pathways: cranial nerves that innervate the extraocular muscles, major cranial features which are near the pathways, signs and symptoms of nerve palsies Neurogenic

  6. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  7. A newly designed nerve monitor for microneurosurgery: bipolar constant current nerve stimulator and movement detector with a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, M; Mutsuga, N; Suzuki, Y; Sugita, K

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a newly designed nerve monitor which is useful for numerous microneurosurgical procedures. Standard bipolar forceps are used to apply constant current stimulation. Muscle contraction evoked by the stimulation is detected by a small disc-shaped pressure sensor taped to the overlying skin. The responses are monitored both quantitatively on a liquid crystal display and qualitatively through an on-off auditory signal. Surgery can proceed without interruption. This apparatus can safely and reliably monitor the facial nerve, nerves involved in eye movements, lower cranial nerves and spinal nerves. This portable system weights only 1.8 kg and can easily be used by a neurosurgeon. PMID:8122545

  8. Transitional Nerve: A New and Original Classification of a Peripheral Nerve Supported by the Nature of the Accessory Nerve (CN XI)

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Brion; McNeil, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Classically, the accessory nerve is described as having a cranial and a spinal root. Textbooks are inconsistent with regard to the modality of the spinal root of the accessory nerve. Some authors report the spinal root as general somatic efferent (GSE), while others list a special visceral efferent (SVE) modality. We investigated the comparative, anatomical, embryological, and molecular literature to determine which modality of the accessory nerve was accurate and why a discrepancy exists. We traced the origin of the incongruity to the writings of early comparative anatomists who believed the accessory nerve was either branchial or somatic depending on the origin of its target musculature. Both theories were supported entirely by empirical observations of anatomical and embryological dissections. We find ample evidence including very recent molecular experiments to show the cranial and spinal root are separate entities. Furthermore, we determined the modality of the spinal root is neither GSE or SVE, but a unique peripheral nerve with a distinct modality. We propose a new classification of the accessory nerve as a transitional nerve, which demonstrates characteristics of both spinal and cranial nerves. PMID:21318044

  9. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases: a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Chun-ying; Zou, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections; patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.0001, RR: 1.35, 95%CI: 1.30–1.40). The average nerve conduction velocity in the nerve growth factor group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, MD: 4.59 m/s, 95%CI: 4.12–5.06). The incidence of pain or scleroma at the injection site in the nerve growth factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, RR: 6.30, 95%CI: 3.53–11.27), but such adverse effects were mild. CONCLUSION: Nerve growth factor can significantly improve nerve function in patients with nervous system disease and is safe and effective. PMID:26109961

  10. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length. PMID:19330282

  11. Detailed Anatomy of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Mazaheri, Yazdan; Biglari, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The detailed morphology and topography of the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) with its surrounding structures were studied in 10 sides of five heads of adult one-humped camel to determine its general arrangement as well as its differences and similarities to other animals. The following detailed descriptions were obtained: (1) the bilateral CCG was constantly present caudal to cranial base at the rostroventral border of the occipital condyle over the caudolateral part of nasopharynx; (2) the CCG was always in close relations medially with the longus capitis muscle, rostrolaterally with the internal carotid artery, and caudally with the vagus nerve; and (3) the branches of the CCG were the internal carotid and external carotid nerves, jugular nerve, cervical interganglionic branch, laryngopharyngeal branch, carotid sinus branch and communicating branches to the vagus, and first spinal nerves. In conclusion, there was no variation regarding topography of dromedary CCG among the specimens, in spite of typical variations in number, and mainly in origin of nerve branches ramifying from the CCG. In comparative anatomy aspect, the close constant relations, and presence of major nerves (internal/external carotid and jugular nerves) of dromedary CCG exhibited a typical reported animal's pattern. However, the shape, structures lateral to the CCG, the origin and course pattern of external carotid and jugular nerves, the number of the major nerves branches, the communicating branches of the CCG to the spinal and cranial nerves, and the separation of most rostral parts of vagosympathetic trunk of dromedary were different from those of most reported animals. PMID:25950508

  12. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction Osteogenesis: Evolution of Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Juling; Harshbarger, Raymond J.; Kelley, Patrick; George, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the brain in the first few years of life drives the expansion of the cranial vault. This expansion occurs primarily at the cranial sutures; premature fusion of these results in growth restriction perpendicular to the axis of the suture. The result of this is physical deformation of the cranial and facial skeleton, as well as the distortion of the underling brain and its physiology. These patients can present with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, neurodevelopmental delay, as well as the morphological features of craniosynostosis. Acquired conditions such as the slit ventricle syndrome may also result in cephalocranial disproportion with these clinical features. Traditional vault remodeling surgery is able to correct the physical abnormalities as well as correcting cephalocranial disproportion. Its limitations include the degree of scalp expansion achievable as well as resulting defects in the bone. The use of distraction osteogenesis of the cranial vault permits a controlled expansion in a predetermined vector in a gradual manner. When used in the calvarium, this combines the benefits of tissue expansion on the scalp, as well as stimulating the production of new bone, reducing the defects resulting from expansion. In this review, the authors describe some of the surgical considerations important to the use of this technique. This includes the relevant anatomy and technical aspects illustrated with the use of clinical cases. Finally, they present a summary of their experience and discuss the complications associated with cranial vault distraction osteogenesis. PMID:25383052

  13. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil ?brahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  14. Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Elbow (Cubital Tunnel Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stretching can irritate the nerve, keeping your elbow bent for long periods or repeatedly bending your elbow ... For example, many people sleep with their elbows bent. This can aggravate symptoms of ulnar nerve compression ...

  15. Myotonia-like symptoms in a patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Nakanishi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Atsuta, Naoki; Yamada, Shinichiro; Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Hashizume, Atsushi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with a 4-year history of worsening muscle stiffness and weakness in his right hand. He showed elevated serum creatine kinase levels at the onset of muscle stiffness that was characterized by delayed muscle relaxation after voluntary contraction. This symptom often occurred during cold exposure, and was partially attenuated by sodium channel blockade. Electrodiagnostic findings in repetitive nerve stimulation, short-exercise, and cooling tests were normal. Electromyography showed chronic denervation potentials in his cranial, cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral myotomes without myotonic discharge. He exhibited facial and tongue fasciculations, hypernasality, gynecomastia, neurogenic changes in muscle biopsy, and increased serum testosterone levels. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) was diagnosed on the basis of the CAG trinucleotide expansion in the gene coding androgen receptor. A myotonia-like symptom without myotonic discharge may present as an early neurological sign of SBMA, which possibly reflects a sodium channel dysfunction in skeletal muscles. PMID:26363965

  16. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  17. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  18. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus).

    PubMed

    Runcie, Rosa M; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R; Frank, Lawrence R; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2009-02-01

    Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic-mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1+/-7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (+/-s.e.m.) of 2.1+/-0.3 degrees C and a maximum of 6.3 degrees C above myotomal muscle temperature (T(m)), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with T(m) and temperature elevation was greater at lower T(m). The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  19. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus)

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Rosa M.; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Dickson, Kathryn A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic–mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1±7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (±s.e.m.) of 2.1±0.3°C and a maximum of 6.3°C above myotomal muscle temperature (Tm), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with Tm and temperature elevation was greater at lower Tm. The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  20. Nerve agents: implications for anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Hrobak, Paula Kay

    2008-04-01

    Anesthesia providers may be called to treat injuries from chemical weapons or spills, for which prompt treatment is vital. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of nerve agents and the resultant pathophysiology and to be able to quickly recognize the signs and symptoms of nerve agent exposure. This review article addresses the different types of nerve agents that are currently being manufactured as well as the symptomatic and definitive treatment of the patient who presents with acute nerve agent toxicity. This article also reviews the physiology of the neuromuscular junction and the autonomic nervous system receptors that nerve agent toxicity affects. PMID:18478812

  1. Isolated Ocular Motor Nerve Palsies.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nathan H; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    An isolated ocular motor nerve palsy is defined as dysfunction of a single ocular motor nerve (oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens) with no associated or localizing neurologic signs or symptoms. When occurring in patients aged 50 or older, the most common cause is microvascular ischemia, but serious etiologies such as aneurysm, malignancy, and giant cell arteritis should always be considered. In this article, the authors review the clinical approach, anatomy, and differential diagnosis of each isolated ocular motor nerve palsy and discuss the clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and treatment of microvascular ischemia. PMID:26444399

  2. Neurobrucellosis developing unilateral oculomotor nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    I??kay, Sedat; Y?lmaz, Kutluhan; Ölmez, Akgün

    2012-11-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that is common around the world. Its clinical course demonstrates great diversity as it can affect all organs and systems. However, the central nervous system is rarely affected in the pediatric population. Neurobrucellosis is most frequently observed with meningitis and has numerous complications, including meningocephalitis, myelitis, cranial nerve paralyses, radiculopathy, and neuropathy. Neurobrucellosis affects the second, third, sixth, seventh, and eighth cranial nerves. Involvement of the oculomotor nerves is a very rare complication in neurobrucellosis although several adult cases have been reported. In this article, we present the case of a 9-year-old girl who developed unilateral nerve paralysis as a secondary complication of neurobrucellosis and recovered without sequel after treatment. This case is notable because it is a very rare, the first within the pediatric population. Our article emphasizes that neurobrucellosis should be considered among the distinguishing diagnoses in every case that is admitted for nerve paralysis in regions where Brucella infection is endemic. PMID:22244219

  3. [Giant mucocele of the paranasal sinuses with extension to the contralateral posterior cranial fossa and reversible retrocochlear deafness].

    PubMed

    Rudert, H; Harder, T; Werner, J A; Lippert, B M

    1993-05-01

    Report on a huge mucocele of the right maxillary sinus extending into the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses, and protruding into the contralateral left posterior cranial fossa. The patient, a 45-year old male, had no history of paranasal sinus energy, nasal or paranasal symptoms. He went to his physician because of a slowly developing deafness in his left ear and because of episodes of loss of consciousness when blowing his nose. A reversible episode of vertigo and reversible paresis of the left abducent nerve 17 years previously, were later assumed to have been the first symptoms of endocranial extension of the mucocele. The diagnosis of a mucocele was made by MRI. MRI in T2 weighted spin-echo sequences is the best imaging technique for diagnosing a mucocele. The mucocele was treated primarily with endonasal surgery of the paranasal sinuses, using telescopes and an operating microscope. After opening the right maxillary sinus via the middle meatus liquid contents of the mucocele poured into the nasal cavity. The sack of the mucocele was removed partially. Three months later the patient was reoperated with a combined transfacial and endonasal approach, because of progression from partial hearing loss to total deafness. Postoperatively hearing improved nearly completely and compression of the pons and the posterior fossa had disappeared on MRI. It is concluded that in mucoceles no longer the extirpation of the sack, but endonasal marsupialization, using the operating microscope and telescopes, is the therapy of choice. PMID:8323630

  4. A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with invasive Aspergillus mastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Hato, Naohito; Okada, Yoko; Sato, Eriko; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) associated with invasive Aspergillus mastoiditis. A 63-year-old man with diabetes mellitus underwent mastoidectomy because of chronic discharge from his left ear. The mastoidectomy was unsuccessful in resolving purulent otorrhea; moreover, 7 months later, the patient developed left abducens nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed HCP at the left middle cranial fossa. Although the pathogen could not be identified, an Aspergillus infection was considered based on elevated serum ?-d-glucan and a positive Aspergillus antigen test result. Voriconazole treatment resolved diplopia and left otorrhea and dramatically improved HCP. PMID:26003880

  5. Current Concepts in Restoring Acquired Cranial Defects.

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, K V; Singla, N K; Gowda, Mahesh E; Kumar, Dinesh; Legha, V S

    2014-12-01

    Restoring acquired cranial defects has been in vogue for long, and the reconstructive techniques continue to evolve. Over the decades various techniques and materials are employed in rehabilitating cranial defects. Advances in bioengineering, custom templates and Rapid prototyping technology has given greater impetus in restoring larger cranial defects. With the variety of options available it will be very crucial in deciding the best possible technique and material to rehabilitate patients with cranial defects. PMID:26199486

  6. P-ANCA cranial pachymeningitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, D; Maillot, F; Hommet, C; Arsène, S; Cottier, J P; Lamisse, F; Guillevin, L

    2005-04-01

    Pachymeningitis is an inflammatory process that thickens the dura mater. This disease has various etiologies including infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune diseases. We present the case of a patient who developed cranial pachymeningitis with a clinical and biological picture suggestive of a neurological form of vasculitis. A 51-year-old woman developed rhinitis, otitis media, headaches, and deterioration of her condition after a course of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. After a booster dose of the vaccine, she developed unilateral visual loss and impairment of multiple cranial nerves. Blood analysis showed inflammation and presence of antimyeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed pachymeningitis. A complete remission was obtained with immunosuppressive therapy. The initial clinical presentation and subsequent remission under immunosuppressive therapy were suggestive of a vasculitis with nervous system involvement. Though vasculitis was not proven histologically in this patient, we believe that MPO-ANCA-related autoimmunity provoked the patient's disease as already reported in similar cases. As pachymeningitis is a fibrosing process, early recognition and treatment of an autoimmune etiology, even in the absence of previous pulmonary or renal involvement, is required to prevent definitive neurological impairment. PMID:15578248

  7. Optic Nerve Drusen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Drusen En Español Read in Chinese What are optic nerve drusen? Optic nerve drusen are abnormal globular ...

  8. [Sensory sensitization, part II: Pathophysiology in dysfunctional disorders. Understanding the inner life of the nerve pathways may explain hitherto unexplainable symptoms].

    PubMed

    Levander, Hans

    2003-04-30

    This article is based on a vast clinical experience from patients presenting with widespread pain syndromes as well as dysfunctional symptoms from inner organs. A literature survey has been performed. Allodynia and hyperalgesia that partly explain the fibromyalgia and local myalgia syndromes seem to arise from a pathophysiological process of nociceptive sensitisation. It is proposed that the concept of "sensory sensitisation dysfunctional disorders" be applied to conditions like bronchial hyperreactivity, Da Costas syndrome, Dercum's disease (Adipositas dolorosa), dry eyes and mouth syndrome, fibromyalgia, gastralgia, globus hystericus, interstitial cystitis, chronic prostatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, photo- and phonosensitivity, rhinitis, tension headache, tinnitus, vestibulitis syndrome. These dysfunctional disorders cannot be satisfactorily explained by presently known pathophysiological models like ongoing inflammatory process, tissue degeneration, fibrosis, blood vessel diseases, tumours, immune reactions, toxic or deficiency conditions, metabolic disturbances. Neurogenic mechanisms also seem to play an important role in the pathophysiology of arthritic conditions, and might be worthwhile to include in forthcoming discussions concerning the aetiology of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:12789809

  9. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens. PMID:25323096

  10. Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... characterized by slow-growing tumors on the eighth cranial nerves. The tumors cause pressure damage to neighboring nerves. ... except on the vestibular branch of the 8th cranial nerve. The dominant symptom is pain, which develops as ...

  11. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  12. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... damage to the long portion of the nerve cell) Conduction block (the impulse is blocked somewhere along the nerve pathway) Demyelination (damage and loss of the fatty insulation surrounding the nerve cell) The nerve damage or destruction may be due ...

  14. Medial Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fibromatosis Medial and lateral plantar nerve entrapment is compression of nerve branches at the inner heel (the ... nerve or surgery to free the nerve from compression may help relieve pain. Foot Problems Overview of ...

  15. Microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Rhoton, Albert L

    2015-10-01

    The trochlear nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest intracranial course, but also the thinnest. It is the only nerve that arises from the dorsal surface of the brainstem and decussates in the superior medullary velum. After leaving the dorsal surface of the brainstem, it courses anterolaterally around the lateral surface of the brainstem and then passes anteriorly just beneath the free edge of the tentorium. It passes forward to enter the cavernous sinus, traverses the superior orbital fissure and terminates in the superior oblique muscle in the orbit. Because of its small diameter and its long course, the trochlear nerve can easily be injured during surgical procedures. Therefore, precise knowledge of its surgical anatomy and its neurovascular relationships is essential for approaching and removing complex lesions of the orbit and the middle and posterior fossae safely. This review describes the microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve and is illustrated with pictures involving the nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures. Clin. Anat. 28:857-864, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26223856

  16. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  17. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident, an operation is indicated from our experience. PMID:12874724

  18. [Postoperative facial and vestibular nerve palsy: experimental study of its pathophysiological mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Sekiya, T; Okabe, S; Hatayama, T; Iwabuchi, T; Takiguchi, M

    1990-02-01

    The 7th and 8th cranial nerves were shifted in the cerebellopontine (CP) angle of dogs by cerebellar retractions that were similar to those performed in humans with monitoring of auditory evoked brainstem responses (ABR). Postoperatively, the vestibular, facial nerves, and brainstem were histologically examined. Caudal-to-rostral shifts of the nerves could induce vestibular and/or facial nerve damages. The most vulnerable portion of the vestibular nerve was located between the vestibular ganglions and the area vestibularis-the most lateral end of the internal auditory canal. This indicated that due to traction force derived from surgical interventions, the nerves and vessels were avulsed at the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The vestibular nerve may be potentially injured more easily and frequently than the cochlear and facial nerves in retromastoid craniectomies with lateral decubitus position in humans. Direct injuries of the facial nerves in the CP angles were not observed in this study. It was elucidated that the facial nerve was usually injured in the facial canal proximal to the geniculate ganglion due to traction force derived from manipulations in the CP angle. It is likely that as facial nerve edema progresses postoperatively, the facial nerve is gradually compressed within the narrow labyrinthine portion of the facial canal. This may be the cause of delayed postoperative facial nerve palsy. The importance to recognize how not only cochlear but also vestibular and facial nerve are injured by the usual manipulations in the CP angle is stressed. PMID:2357413

  19. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  20. Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy due to an inflammatory process within the sella and parasellar regions.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Hwang, Michelle S; Strickland, Ben A; Khishfe, Basem

    2016-01-01

    Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy raises concern about a serious intracranial condition. Abducens nerve palsy is a common isolated palsy due to its susceptibility to injury along its long course. Non-traumatic isolated abducens nerve palsy is often caused by a mass that indirectly stretches and compresses the nerve. Pathological processes directly causing bilateral isolated involvement of the abducens nerve are rare. We describe a 24-year-old man who presented with isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy. Radiological imaging and laboratory tests were consistent with an aggressive bacterial infectious process located in the sellar region with parasellar extension. If promptly addressed, sixth cranial nerve palsy appears to be reversible with aggressive medical therapy and endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:26482458

  1. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  2. Trigeminal neuralgia involving supraorbital and infraorbital nerves

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shaila M.; Kambalimath, Deepashri H.

    2010-01-01

    Supraorbital neuralgia is a rare disorder accounting for 4% of incidence with hallmark of localized pain in or above the eyebrow, clinically characterized by the following triad: (1) forehead pain in the area supplied by the supraorbital nerve, (2) tenderness on either the supraorbital notch and (3) absolute, but transitory relief of symptoms upon supraorbital nerve blockade. The pain presents with a chronic or intermittent pattern. The persistence of protracted unilateral forehead/occular pain, tenderness over the nerve and repeated blockade effect strongly suggest the diagnosis. Surgical treatment can be used when the medical treatment fails or in patients who do not tolerate the pharmacological treatment. PMID:22442595

  3. [Hypoglossal nerve in its intralingual trajectory: anatomy and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Sequert, C; Lestang, P; Baglin, A C; Wagner, I; Ferron, J M; Chabolle, F

    1999-09-01

    There is little literature on the intralingual trajectory of the hypoglosal nerve. We performed an anatomical dissection on 6 cadavers and completed our study with histological examinations. The 12th cranial nerve enters the lower part of the tongue laterally, reaching the anterior border of the hypoglossal muscle where it follows the ascending lingual artery medially to terminate anteriorly to the lingual V. Its terminal branches spread out horizontally in each half of the tongue. There is a paramedial branch, found in all cases, which projects downwardly, posteriorly and medially at the basilingual portion of the genioglossal muscle. These anatomic findings indicate that basiglossectomy removing the entire base of the tongue can be performed without functional sequelae. A certain degree of somatotopy is also found with specific fibers reaching the protractor and retractor muscles. This nerve distribution supports attempts at selective electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve with the aim of dilating the upper airways in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:10519010

  4. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Sangeeta P; Wanjari, Panjab V; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia. PMID:24552945

  5. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  6. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Felice, KJ. Focal neuropathies of the femoral, obturator, lateral femoral cutaneous and other nerves of the thigh and pelvis. In: Bromberg MB, Smith ...

  7. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Esther; vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M.; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lehnherr, André; Rieder, Philip; Keller, Philip J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Gesemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In this study we have analyzed the function of the MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2A (MDGA2A) protein in zebrafish cranial motoneuron development. MDGA2A is prominently expressed in distinct clusters of cranial motoneurons, especially in the ones of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Analyses of MDGA2A knockdown embryos by light sheet and confocal microscopy revealed impaired migration and aberrant axonal outgrowth of these neurons; suggesting that adhesive interactions mediated by MDGA2A are required for the proper arrangement and outgrowth of cranial motoneuron subtypes. PMID:25572423

  8. Follow-up evaluation with ultrasonography of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Yue; Yue, Linxian; Chiu, Jack; He, Fanding; Wu, Xiaojing; Zang, Bin; Lu, Bin; Yao, Xiaoke; Jiang, Zirui

    2014-01-01

    Published data on earthquake-associated peripheral nerve injury is very limited. Ultrasonography has been proven to be efficient in the clinic to diagnose peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound in the evaluation of persistent peripheral nerve injuries 1 year after the Wenchuan earthquake. Thirty-four patients with persistent clinical symptoms and neurologic signs of impaired nerve function were evaluated with sonography prior to surgical repair. Among 34 patients, ultrasonography showed that 48 peripheral nerves were entrapped, and 11 peripheral nerves were disrupted. There was one case of misdiagnosis on ultrasonography. The concordance rate of ultrasonographic findings with those of surgical findings was 98%. A total of 48 involved nerves underwent neurolysis and the symptoms resolved. Only five nerves had scar tissue entrapment. Preoperative and postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic results were concordant, which verified that ultrasonography is useful for preoperative diagnosis and postoperative evaluation of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:25206859

  9. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  10. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, M.; Johnny, J. Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations. PMID:26015748

  11. 6 Tips for Calming Your Public Speaking Nerves Stay hydrated

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    6 Tips for Calming Your Public Speaking Nerves Stay hydrated o Drink plenty of water beforehand PRACTICE! Adapted from "6 Tips to Calm Your Nerves Before Speaking" by The Public Speaker. http and keep a bottle of water with you while you're speaking. A dry mouth is a symptom of anxiety so

  12. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; GOUDARZI, Razieh Moazam; MOHAMMADZADEH, Mahdi; MIRZADEH, Azadeh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies. The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0.067 mg/kg/day) and dactinomycin (0.045 mg/kg/day) after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis. Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID) and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID) was started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared. The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later. PMID:24665331

  13. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils. PMID:18402165

  14. A Case of Hemifacial Spasm Caused by an Artery Passing Through the Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeonseon

    2015-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by unilateral facial nerve dysfunction. The usual cause involves vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve, but compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve is very unusual. A 20-year-old man presented with left facial spasm that had persisted for 4 years. Compression of the left facial nerve root exit zone by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) was revealed on magnetic resonance angiography. During microvascular decompression surgery, penetration of the distal portion of the facial nerve root exit zone by the AICA was observed. At the penetrating site, the artery was found to have compressed the facial nerve and to be immobilized. The penetrated seventh cranial nerve was longitudinally split about 2 mm. The compressing artery was moved away from the penetrating site and the decompression was secured by inserting Teflon at the operative site. Although the facial spasm disappeared in the immediate postoperative period, the patient continued to show moderate facial weakness. At postoperative 12 months, the facial weakness had improved to a mild degree. Prior to performing microvascular decompression of HFS, surgeons should be aware of a possibility for rare complex anatomy, such as compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve, which cannot be observed by modern imaging techniques. PMID:25810866

  15. Adult Peripheral Nerve Disorders—Nerve Entrapment, Repair, Transfer and Brachial Plexus Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ida K.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives After reviewing this article the reader should be able to: 1. Describe the pathophysiologic bases for nerve injury and how it applies to patient evaluation and management. 2. Realize the wide variety of injury patterns and associated patient complaint and physical findings associated with peripheral nerve pathology. 3. Evaluate and recommend further tests to aid in defining the diagnosis. 4. Specify treatment options and potential risks and benefits. Summary Peripheral nerve disorders comprise a gamut of problems ranging from entrapment neuropathy, to direct open traumatic injury and closed brachial plexus injury. The pathophysiology of injury defines the patient symptoms, exam findings and treatment options and is critical to accurate diagnosis and treatment. Goals of treatment include management of often associated pain and improvement of sensory and motor function. Understanding peripheral nerve anatomy is critical to adopting novel nerve transfer procedures, which may provide superior options for a variety of injury patterns. PMID:21532404

  16. Concurrent cranial mediastinal Blastomyces granuloma and carcinoma with cranial vena caval syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, Natashia A; Viviano, Katrina R

    2015-11-01

    This report describes an unusual progression of blastomycosis in a dog with concurrent mediastinal carcinoma. The dog was evaluated for respiratory distress. Diagnostic results revealed chylothorax and a cranial vena caval thrombus. Histopathology of the cranial mediastinal mass diagnosed mediastinal carcinoma and fungal granuloma. Intercurrent disease may complicate the clinical presentation and clinical course of blastomycosis. PMID:26538674

  17. Rare communication between the musculocutaneous and median nerves in the forearm: its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Fu; Won, Hyung-Sun; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Seung-Min; Kim, In-Beom

    2014-10-01

    Morphologic classifications of communication between musculocutaneous and median nerves are not based on the distribution and the function of the communicating branch. The authors report a rare case of such a communication with passage of the median nerve through the pronator teres muscle and discuss its clinical significance. The musculocutaneous nerve was divided into a lateral branch that continued to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve and a medial branch that joined the median nerve in the forearm. The authors separated the nerve bundles and noted that the communicating branch derived from the sixth to seventh cervical nerves and supplied nerve fibers to the pronator teres muscle and the proper palmar digital nerve of the thumb. In addition, the median nerve penetrated the humeral head of the pronator teres muscle. Isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy with such a communication may cause unexpected symptoms such as sensory deficit in the palm and muscular weakness of the forearm and the thumb. PMID:25122101

  18. Prolonged Bilateral Reactive Miosis as a Symptom of Severe Insulin Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Gradwohl-Matis, Ilse; Pann, Jakob; Schmittinger, Christian A.; Brunauer, Andreas; Dankl, Daniel; Dünser, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 64 Final Diagnosis: Insulin self poisoning Symptoms: Coma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Supportive care Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Miosis occurs following exposure to toxins that decrease the sympathomimetic tone, increase the cholinergic tone, or exert sedative-hypnotic effects, but has not been reported in insulin poisoning. Case Report: A 64-year- old woman without co-morbidities was found unconscious next to an empty insulin pen. Her Glasgow Coma Scale was 3 with absent reflexes, bilateral reactive miosis, and injection marks across the abdominal wall. The patient was endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, and transferred to this hospital. At admission, the blood glucose level was 34 mg/dL. Glasgow Coma Scale remained at 3, with persistent bilateral reactive miosis. The toxicology screening was negative for ethanol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, amphetamines, cannabinoids, salicylates, acetaminophen, and cocaine. Cranial computed tomography with angiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show any structural brain lesions. Intravenous glucose was continued at 6–14 g/h for 3 days. On repeated neurological examinations, the patient remained deeply comatose, with partial loss of cranial nerve function. Bilateral reactive miosis persisted for 4 days. From day 5 on, the patient awoke progressively. At discharge, the patient was fully alert and orientated, without a focal neurological deficit. Conclusions: Prolonged bilateral reactive miosis can be a clinical symptom accompanying metabolic encephalopathy in severe insulin poisoning. Functional impairment of the pons due to relative hypoperfusion during hypoglycemia may serve as a reasonable pathophysiologic explanation for this phenomenon. PMID:25556593

  19. Ulnar Nerve Compression after Silastic Ulnar Head Replacement

    PubMed Central

    El-Gammal, Tarek A.; Blair, William F.

    1991-01-01

    A patient with silastic radiocarpal and ulnar head replacement arthroplasty presented six years after the operation with symptoms of ulnar neuropathy. Bone resorption of the distal ulna resulted in volar subluxation of the ulnar head implant which compressed the ulnar nerve at its entrance into Guyon's canal. Removal of the implant and decompression of the nerve resulted in recovery of ulnar nerve funcions. Compression neuropathy of the ulnar nerve should be considered a potential complication of the use of silastic ulnar head replacements. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  20. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing. PMID:26336812

  1. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  2. Spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy with hourglass-like fascicular constriction within the main trunk of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Nagano, A; Shibata, K; Tokimura, H; Yamamoto, S; Tajiri, Y

    1996-03-01

    Interfascicular neurolysis was performed in nine patients with spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy. In eight of these patients, an hourglass-like constriction in the fascicles forming the anterior interosseous nerve was found within the main trunk of the median nerve at 2-7.5 cm above the medial epicondyle. The clinical signs and symptoms of these eight patients were similar to those that have been described to isolated neuritis. While the etiology remains unknown, when spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy is suspected to be caused by isolated neuritis, interfascicular neurolysis should be performed to confirm the lesion and to discover whether fascicular constriction is present. PMID:8683060

  3. Application and histology-driven refinement of active contour models to functional region and nerve delineation: towards a digital brainstem atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nirmal; Sultana, Sharmin; Rashid, Tanweer; Krusienski, Dean; Audette, Michel A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the digital formatting of a printed atlas of the brainstem and the delineation of cranial nerves from this digital atlas. It also describes on-going work on the 3D resampling and refinement of the 2D functional regions and nerve contours. In MRI-based anatomical modeling for neurosurgery planning and simulation, the complexity of the functional anatomy entails a digital atlas approach, rather than less descriptive voxel or surface-based approaches. However, there is an insufficiency of descriptive digital atlases, in particular of the brainstem. Our approach proceeds from a series of numbered, contour-based sketches coinciding with slices of the brainstem featuring both closed and open contours. The closed contours coincide with functionally relevant regions, whereby our objective is to fill in each corresponding label, which is analogous to painting numbered regions in a paint-by-numbers kit. Any open contour typically coincides with a cranial nerve. This 2D phase is needed in order to produce densely labeled regions that can be stacked to produce 3D regions, as well as identifying the embedded paths and outer attachment points of cranial nerves. Cranial nerves are modeled using an explicit contour based technique called 1-Simplex. The relevance of cranial nerves modeling of this project is two-fold: i) this atlas will fill a void left by the brain segmentation communities, as no suitable digital atlas of the brainstem exists, and ii) this atlas is necessary to make explicit the attachment points of major nerves (except I and II) having a cranial origin. Keywords: digital atlas, contour models, surface models

  4. Are routine cranial ultrasounds necessary in premature infants greater than 30 weeks gestation?

    PubMed

    Harris, N Ja'Neice; Palacio, Diana; Ginzel, Andrew; Richardson, C Joan; Swischuk, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the recommendation of the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society that screening cranial ultrasonography be performed routinely on all infants of less than 30 weeks gestation at 7 to 14 days of age and again between 36 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age, and, by using this practice parameter, to determine the number of babies with a clinically significant abnormal screening cranial ultrasound (US) who would otherwise have been missed. A retrospective study of 486 infants of 30 to 33 weeks gestation born January 1, 1999 to June 30, 2004 was done. All had screening cranial ultrasounds. Grade III and/or grade IV intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurred in 4 (0.8%) infants of 30 to 31 weeks gestation. Infants with significant IVH had either risk factors for brain injury or symptoms that would eventually warrant US during their hospitalization. Seven (1.4%) infants had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). All infants with a final diagnosis of PVL had pre- and/or perinatal risk factors associated with PVL. There was a significant trend toward fewer abnormal cranial ultrasounds from 30 to 33 weeks gestation (p=0.04). Our study supports the recommendation by the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society that screening US can be limited but suggests that the gestational age cut off should be 30 weeks or less. PMID:17094042

  5. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend by ... may use one of these optic nerve computer imaging techniques as part of your glaucoma examination. By ...

  6. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  7. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. PMID:25937552

  8. Central topography of cranial motor nuclei controlled by differential cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Astick, Marc; Tubby, Kristina; Mubarak, Waleed M; Guthrie, Sarah; Price, Stephen R

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal nuclei are prominent, evolutionarily conserved features of vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) organization. Nuclei are clusters of soma of functionally related neurons and are located in highly stereotyped positions. Establishment of this CNS topography is critical to neural circuit assembly. However, little is known of either the cellular or molecular mechanisms that drive nucleus formation during development, a process termed nucleogenesis. Brainstem motor neurons, which contribute axons to distinct cranial nerves and whose functions are essential to vertebrate survival, are organized exclusively as nuclei. Cranial motor nuclei are composed of two main classes, termed branchiomotor/visceromotor and somatomotor. Each of these classes innervates evolutionarily distinct structures, for example, the branchial arches and eyes, respectively. Additionally, each class is generated by distinct progenitor cell populations and is defined by differential transcription factor expression; for example, Hb9 distinguishes somatomotor from branchiomotor neurons. We characterized the time course of cranial motornucleogenesis, finding that despite differences in cellular origin, segregation of branchiomotor and somatomotor nuclei occurs actively, passing through a phase of each being intermingled. We also found that differential expression of cadherin cell adhesion family members uniquely defines each motor nucleus. We show that cadherin expression is critical to nucleogenesis as its perturbation degrades nucleus topography predictably. PMID:25308074

  9. Central Topography of Cranial Motor Nuclei Controlled by Differential Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Astick, Marc; Tubby, Kristina; Mubarak, Waleed M.; Guthrie, Sarah; Price, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neuronal nuclei are prominent, evolutionarily conserved features of vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) organization [1]. Nuclei are clusters of soma of functionally related neurons and are located in highly stereotyped positions. Establishment of this CNS topography is critical to neural circuit assembly. However, little is known of either the cellular or molecular mechanisms that drive nucleus formation during development, a process termed nucleogenesis [2–5]. Brainstem motor neurons, which contribute axons to distinct cranial nerves and whose functions are essential to vertebrate survival, are organized exclusively as nuclei. Cranial motor nuclei are composed of two main classes, termed branchiomotor/visceromotor and somatomotor [6]. Each of these classes innervates evolutionarily distinct structures, for example, the branchial arches and eyes, respectively. Additionally, each class is generated by distinct progenitor cell populations and is defined by differential transcription factor expression [7, 8]; for example, Hb9 distinguishes somatomotor from branchiomotor neurons. We characterized the time course of cranial motornucleogenesis, finding that despite differences in cellular origin, segregation of branchiomotor and somatomotor nuclei occurs actively, passing through a phase of each being intermingled. We also found that differential expression of cadherin cell adhesion family members uniquely defines each motor nucleus. We show that cadherin expression is critical to nucleogenesis as its perturbation degrades nucleus topography predictably. PMID:25308074

  10. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  20. The Physics of Nerves

    E-print Network

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The accepted model for nerve pulse propagation in biological membranes seems insufficient. It is restricted to dissipative electrical phenomena and considers nerve pulses exclusively as a microscopic phenomenon. A simple thermodynamic model that is based on the macroscopic properties of membranes allows explaining more features of nerve pulse propagation including the phenomenon of anesthesia that has so far remained unexplained.

  1. Infra-orbital nerve schwannoma: Report and review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilesh

    2015-01-01

    Extra-cranial schwannomas although common in head and neck region are very rarely seen originating from the infra-orbital nerve. We report a case of schwannoma arising from infra-orbital nerve in a 40-year-old male patient. The case presented as an isolated, asymptomatic, slow growing sub-cutaneous nodular swelling over left side of mid-face. On ultrasonography, a localized lesion within the sub-cutaneous tissue of cheek was observed, without involvement of orbital, maxillary sinus or underlying bone. Aspiration biopsy of the lesion showed spindle shaped cells predominantly arranged in Antoni A pattern around verocay bodies, with less organized Antoni B tissue in few places. Diagnosis of schwannoma, probably arising from terminal branch of infra-orbital nerve was established. The tumor was approached through skin incision. At the time of exploration, the lesion was found to emanate from the nerve trunk of peripheral branch of infra-orbital nerve, which was dissected and preserved. We correlate our experience with previously reported cases of infra-orbital nerve schwannoma. PMID:25810682

  2. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  3. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3 to 18 months of age, with moderate to severe nonsynostotic positional plagiocephaly,...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3 to 18 months of age, with moderate to severe nonsynostotic positional plagiocephaly,...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3 to 18 months of age, with moderate to severe nonsynostotic positional plagiocephaly,...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3 to 18 months of age, with moderate to severe nonsynostotic positional plagiocephaly,...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3 to 18 months of age, with moderate to severe nonsynostotic positional plagiocephaly,...

  8. Cranial Anatomy and Baboon CLIFFORD JOLLY*

    E-print Network

    Delson, Eric

    COMMENTARY Cranial Anatomy and Baboon Diversity CLIFFORD JOLLY* Department of Anthropology, New. The baboons are a particularly interesting example of mammalian evolution in tropical Africa. They have been, the study of baboons has the added interest that the place, time-frame, and ecological setting

  9. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  10. Relationship of cranial robusticity to cranial form, geography and climate in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Freidline, Sarah E; Wang, Steven L; Hanson, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Variation in cranial robusticity among modern human populations is widely acknowledged but not well-understood. While the use of "robust" cranial traits in hominin systematics and phylogeny suggests that these characters are strongly heritable, this hypothesis has not been tested. Alternatively, cranial robusticity may be a response to differences in diet/mastication or it may be an adaptation to cold, harsh environments. This study quantifies the distribution of cranial robusticity in 14 geographically widespread human populations, and correlates this variation with climatic variables, neutral genetic distances, cranial size, and cranial shape. With the exception of the occipital torus region, all traits were positively correlated with each other, suggesting that they should not be treated as individual characters. While males are more robust than females within each of the populations, among the independent variables (cranial shape, size, climate, and neutral genetic distances), only shape is significantly correlated with inter-population differences in robusticity. Two-block partial least-squares analysis was used to explore the relationship between cranial shape (captured by three-dimensional landmark data) and robusticity across individuals. Weak support was found for the hypothesis that robusticity was related to mastication as the shape associated with greater robusticity was similar to that described for groups that ate harder-to-process diets. Specifically, crania with more prognathic faces, expanded glabellar and occipital regions, and (slightly) longer skulls were more robust than those with rounder vaults and more orthognathic faces. However, groups with more mechanically demanding diets (hunter-gatherers) were not always more robust than groups practicing some form of agriculture. PMID:19554616

  11. Conjugate Gaze Palsies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  12. Recognizing Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Donate Recognizing Symptoms An attack of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can happen at any time. It ... factors. Get the Symptom Diary Attack of the Irritable Bowel From " The Art of IBS " © IFFGD Pain or ...

  13. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-?s-long pulses of 2.12 ?m radiation delivered via a 600-?m-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  14. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  15. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  16. Transient Delayed Facial Nerve Palsy After Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tzermpos, Fotios H.; Cocos, Alina; Kleftogiannis, Matthaios; Zarakas, Marissa; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy, as a complication of an inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, is a rarely reported incident. Based on the time elapsed, from the moment of the injection to the onset of the symptoms, the paralysis could be either immediate or delayed. The purpose of this article is to report a case of delayed facial palsy as a result of inferior alveolar nerve block, which occurred 24 hours after the anesthetic administration and subsided in about 8 weeks. The pathogenesis, treatment, and results of an 8-week follow-up for a 20-year-old patient referred to a private maxillofacial clinic are presented and discussed. The patient's previous medical history was unremarkable. On clinical examination the patient exhibited generalized weakness of the left side of her face with a flat and expressionless appearance, and she was unable to close her left eye. One day before the onset of the symptoms, the patient had visited her dentist for a routine restorative procedure on the lower left first molar and an inferior alveolar block anesthesia was administered. The patient's medical history, clinical appearance, and complete examinations led to the diagnosis of delayed facial nerve palsy. Although neurologic occurrences are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures, such as inferior alveolar block anesthesia, could initiate facial nerve palsy. Attention should be paid during the administration of the anesthetic solution. PMID:22428971

  17. Median nerve schwannoma: A case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Padasali, Praveen S; Shankaregowda, V S; Kshirsagar, Shriram D

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a median nerve schwannoma, a rare type of a benign tumor of Schwann cells that presents as a palpable and painful mass on the flexor aspect of the forearm. Schwannomas of the median nerve make up 0.1-0.3% of all hand tumors. Symptoms are caused by an entrapment syndrome resulting from the growing tumor. Pain is the most common complaint of schwannomas. Imaging studies include computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. It is difficult to differentiate schwanommas from neurofibromas solely on the basis of a radiological investigation. Tumors of the median nerve are diagnostically challenging and median nerve schwannomas are rare. Diagnostic pearls are described to facilitate a more accurate and timely diagnosis. These characteristics include mobility, Tinel's sign, S-100 histological staining, and Antoni patterns. With a correct diagnosis, the tumor can be extirpated with preservation of nerve function and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:26396609

  18. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  19. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  20. Erector Spinal Muscular Schwannoma of the Dorsal Ramus Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Chang Hyun; Moon, Jae Gon; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of intramuscular schwannoma originating from the dorsal ramus nerve in a 62-year-old woman. The mass grew slowly, with pain developing upon touch five years prior. No neurological deficit was detected. The mass was observed in the erector spinae muscles in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical excision was performed. The mass was well encapsulated with clear margin. The lesion appeared to originate from the cranial side. We completely removed the mass including the origin. Histopathology confirmed a schwannoma diagnosis. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a dorsal ramus-nerve schwannoma within the erector spinae muscles. PMID:26512285

  1. Cavernous portion of the trochlear nerve with special reference to its site of entrance.

    PubMed Central

    Bisaria, K K

    1988-01-01

    In a study of 80 cavernous sinuses in 40 cadavers, the trochlear nerve entered the cavernous sinus in 87.5% of cases before the crossing, in 7.5% at the crossing and in 5.0% after the crossing of the free and the attached margins of the tentorium cerebelli. In 77.5% of specimens the trochlear nerve showed a marked bend with flattening at the site of its entrance into the cavernous sinus. The nerve ran between the superficial and deep layers of dura, partly between them, in the thickness of the deeper layer, or deep to the deep layer but adherent to it. These findings do not conform with the description of its course by other workers in the past. In 72.5% of specimens the size of the trochlear nerve was larger during its course in the cavernous sinuses but in 20.0% of specimens such an increase in thickness was noted even in the posterior cranial fossa. Only in one specimen was the trochlear nerve adherent to the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. Cases showing the trochlear nerve entering the cavernous sinus after the crossing of the two margins of tentorium cerebelli and the splitting and branching of the trochlear nerve in the cavernous sinus have not hitherto been reported. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3248970

  2. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov Facing AIDS ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  3. Cranial mediastinal liposarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kondo, H; Wickins, S C; Conway, J A; Mallicote, M F; Sanchez, L C; Agnew, D W; Farina, L L; Abbott, J R

    2012-11-01

    A 23-year-old Anglo-Arabian mare was presented with tachypnea, dyspnea, and pitting edema of the ventral thoracic subcutis. On necropsy, a tan to red, friable, irregularly shaped mass (23 × 20 × 18 cm) occupied the cranial mediastinum. Histologically, the mass was classified as a liposarcoma and was composed of short interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped to irregularly rounded cells with discrete, variably sized, clear cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were stained with oil red O in frozen sections of formalin-fixed tissue. PMID:22287648

  4. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 ?M QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  5. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  6. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  7. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  8. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  9. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  10. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed Central

    Rayfield, Emily J.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  11. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  12. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  13. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre-otic paraxial mesoderm in amphibians, to determine developmental causes underlying the complicated changes in cranial muscle development and architecture within amphibians, and in particular how the novel mouth apparatus in frog tadpoles evolved. This will also form a foundation for further research into the molecular mechanisms that regulate rostral head morphogenesis. Our empirical studies are discussed within a theoretical framework concerned with the evolutionary origin and developmental basis of novel anatomical structures in general. We argue that a common developmental origin is not a fool-proof guide to homology, and that a view that sees only structures without homologs as novel is too restricted, because novelties must be produced by changes in the same framework of developmental processes. At the level of developmental processes and mechanisms, novel structures are therefore likely to have homologs, and we need to develop a hierarchical concept of novelty that takes this into account. PMID:22780231

  14. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  15. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  16. Symptom Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Studies DVBIC Publications Concussion Literature Information Papers Study Manuals DVBIC Locations Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical ... event like combat, terrorist attacks, natural disasters, or car crashes. Thinking / Cognitive Symptoms After a brain injury ...

  17. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  18. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  19. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  1. [Optic nerve disc drusen].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O; C?lug?ru, D; C?lug?ru, M; Emese, Kaucsar

    2006-01-01

    Optic nerve head drusen represents a frequent condition, with unknown pathogenesis, mostly asymptomatic. Here, we present a patient with visual impairment, who has reacted well to anti-inflammatory and vasodilator treatment. PMID:16927754

  2. Modified intramuscular transposition of the ulnar nerve.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2006-11-01

    The ulnar nerve passes posterior to the medial epicondyle and experiences longitudinal strain when subjected to elbow flexion. Furthermore, Osborne's ligament and the arcade of fibers between the 2 heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris (Osborne's fascia) compress the nerve during elbow flexion with narrowing of the cubital tunnel passageway. Some patients experience the added element of nerve subluxation over the posterior edge of the epicondyle. When changes to daytime ergonomic behavior and sleep posture prove insufficient to relieve a patient's symptoms, surgical treatment is warranted. A range of procedures exists from simple decompression, to medial epicondylectomy, to anterior transposition. Transposition has been the most widely used method of treatment with the final position of the nerve lying subcutaneous, intramuscular, or submuscular. Each of the transposition methods has proponents with a variety of arguments made in favor of specific aspects of the surgery. This article presents a form of anterior transposition that seeks to draw the best elements from previously reported techniques with the goal of optimizing results. PMID:17095387

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility for elective anterior cruciate ligament repair. He had no background history of any significant medical problems. He opted for general anesthesia over a regional technique. He was induced with fentanyl and propofol and a size 4 laryngeal mask airway was inserted without any problems. His head was in a neutral position during the surgery. After surgery in the recovery room, he complained of numbness in his lower lip. He also developed extensive scabbing of the lower lip on the second day after surgery. The numbness and scabbing started improving after a week, with complete recovery after two weeks. Conclusion We report the first case of vascular occlusion and injury to the inferior alveolar nerve, causing scabbing and numbness of the lower lip, resulting from laryngeal mask airway use. This is an original case report mostly of interest for anesthetists who use the laryngeal mask airway in day-to-day practice. Excessive inflation of the laryngeal mask airway cuff could have led to this complication. Despite the low incidence of cranial nerve injury associated with the use of the laryngeal mask airway, vigilant adherence to evidence-based medicine techniques and recommendations from the manufacturer's instructions can prevent such complications. PMID:21447166

  4. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nelke, Kamil H; ?uczak, Klaudiusz; Pawlak, Wojciech; ?ysenko, Lidia; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The facial nerve (VII) is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed. PMID:26400886

  5. Serial anthropometry predicts peripheral nerve dysfunction in a community cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Herman, William H.; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for glucose intolerance, but the independent role of obesity in the development of peripheral neuropathy is unclear. This study assessed the impact of body size trajectories on prevalent nerve dysfunction in community-dwelling women with and without glucose intolerance. Methods Annual (1996–2008) anthropometric measures of weight, height, waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI, weight[kg]/height[m2]) were assessed in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation – Michigan site. Glucose intolerance was defined annually based on current use of diabetes medications, self-reported diabetes diagnosis, and, when available, fasting glucose. Peripheral nerve dysfunction in 2008 was defined as abnormal monofilament testing or ?4 symptoms or signs. Linear mixed models were used to determine trajectories of anthropometry by subsequently-identified nerve dysfunction status. Results Mean BMI was 32.4 kg/m2 at baseline and 27.8% of women had nerve dysfunction in 2008. BMI, weight, and waist circumference increased over time. Women who would have nerve dysfunction were significantly larger than women without dysfunction, independent of glucose intolerance. At mean baseline age of 46, BMI, weight, and waist circumference differed significantly (p-value<0.01) by subsequent nerve dysfunction status, independent of glucose intolerance and hypertension. These body size differences were maintained but not exacerbated over time. Conclusions Peripheral nerve dysfunction is prevalent among community-dwelling women. Twelve years before the nerve assessment, anthropometry differed between women who would and would not have nerve dysfunction, differences that were maintained over time. Obesity deserves attention as an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for peripheral nerve dysfunction. PMID:23161607

  6. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2?±?43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7?±?1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures. PMID:26413963

  7. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  8. Emergency Physician Attitudes, Preferences, and Risk Tolerance for Stroke as a Potential Cause of Dizziness Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kene, Mamata V.; Ballard, Dustin W.; Vinson, David R.; Rauchwerger, Adina S.; Iskin, Hilary R.; Kim, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated emergency physicians’ (EP) current perceptions, practice, and attitudes towards evaluating stroke as a cause of dizziness among emergency department patients. Methods We administered a survey to all EPs in a large integrated healthcare delivery system. The survey included clinical vignettes, perceived utility of historical and exam elements, attitudes about the value of and requisite post-test probability of a clinical prediction rule for dizziness. We calculated descriptive statistics and post-test probabilities for such a clinical prediction rule. Results The response rate was 68% (366/535). Respondents’ median practice tenure was eight years (37% female, 92% emergency medicine board certified). Symptom quality and typical vascular risk factors increased suspicion for stroke as a cause of dizziness. Most respondents reported obtaining head computed tomography (CT) (74%). Nearly all respondents used and felt confident using cranial nerve and limb strength testing. A substantial minority of EPs used the Epley maneuver (49%) and HINTS (head-thrust test, gaze-evoked nystagmus, and skew deviation) testing (30%); however, few EPs reported confidence in these tests’ bedside application (35% and 16%, respectively). Respondents favorably viewed applying a properly validated clinical prediction rule for assessment of immediate and 30-day stroke risk, but indicated it would have to reduce stroke risk to <0.5% to be clinically useful. Conclusion EPs report relying on symptom quality, vascular risk factors, simple physical exam elements, and head CT to diagnose stroke as the cause of dizziness, but would find a validated clinical prediction rule for dizziness helpful. A clinical prediction rule would have to achieve a 0.5% post-test stroke probability for acceptability. PMID:26587108

  9. Syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve: winged scapula?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jefferson Braga; Gerhardt, Samanta; Pacheco, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from early intervention surgery in patients with the syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve and consequent winged scapula. Methods Six patients with a syndrome of nerve trapping without specific nerve strain limitations were followed up. Results The patients achieved improvement of their symptoms 6–20 months after the procedure. The motor symptoms completely disappeared, without any persistent pain. The medial deformity of the winged scapula improved in all cases, without any residual esthetic disorders. Conclusion The approach of early surgical release seems to be a better predictor for recovery from non-traumatic paralysis of the anterior serratus muscle. PMID:26535205

  10. A Comparison of Cranial and Artificially Aroused Impulses Under the Influence of Nerve Blocks

    E-print Network

    Gruber, Charles M.

    1912-06-01

    /2 to 1 hour. Curve s i m i l a r to P l a t e I I Curve 4 b e f f e r e n t . I I . 8. Galvanometer. I t may be quest ioned whether part of a l l of the impulses /fesurn? of a. Jarje Senes of Experiments With Strye/t rr/rr/jed Fro^V- P/ecfr Current ,7... b l y they may not be s t rong enough to cause a c on t r a c t i on . To ascer ta in i f tha t were true ga lvanomet- r i c reading© were taken. I t was found that when a b lock was ob ­ ta ined no d e f l e c t i o n o f the galvanometer occurred...

  11. Development of a Computer-Assisted Cranial Nerve Simulation from the Visible Human Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Jeffrey C.; Fung, Kevin; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in technology and personal computing have allowed for the development of novel teaching modalities such as online web-based modules. These modules are currently being incorporated into medical curricula and, in some paradigms, have been shown to be superior to classroom instruction. We believe that these modules have the potential of…

  12. EMBRYOLOGICAL ORIGIN FOR AUTISM: DEVELOPMENTAL ANOMALIES OF THE CRANIAL NERVE MOTOR NUCLEI. (R824758)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. Presentation of Bilateral Peripheral Seventh Cranial Nerve Palsy in an HIV Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lisa M.; Kirmani, Batool

    2012-01-01

    Neurological manifestations in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus can significantly increase overall morbidity and mortality. These complications are neither limited to a specific location in the nervous system nor a focal time period in the disease's progression. A literature review yielded several cases of peripheral facial palsy associated with HIV seropositivity, but few cases have been reported where the patient had bilateral peripheral facial palsy. In this paper, we present a patient with bilateral peripheral facial palsy and aseptic meningitis in the context of newly diagnosed HIV. PMID:22934208

  14. Benign occipital unicameral bone cyst causing lower cranial nerve palsies complicated by iophendylate arachnoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, W. G.; Kalbag, R. M.; Ramani, P. S.; Tomlinson, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A 20 year old girl presented with a history of neck and occipital pain for six weeks, which was found to be due to a unicameral bone cyst of the left occipital condylar region. The differential diagnosis of bone cysts in the skull is discussed. Six months after the operation, the patient again presented with backache due to adhesive arachnoiditis. The latter was believed to have arisen as a result of a combination of spinal infective meningitis and intrathecal ethyl iodophenyl undecylate (iophendylate, Myodil, Pantopaque). The nature of meningeal reactions to iophendylate and the part played by intrathecal corticosteroids in relieving the arachnoiditis in the present case are discussed. Images

  15. Chinese Medicine in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Experimental Research on Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Yuanlin; Liang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of chronic diabetes mellitus. Pathological characteristics of DPN include axonal atrophy, nerve demyelination, and delayed regeneration of peripheral sensory nerve fibers. The goal of treatment in DPN is not only to ameliorate neurological symptoms but also to slow or reverse the underlying neurodegenerative process. Schwann cells and neurotrophic factors play important roles in the repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves. The present paper reviews current studies and evidence regarding the neurological effects of traditional Chinese medicine, with an emphasis on recent developments in the area of nerve repair and regeneration in DPN. PMID:22927874

  16. Botulinum Toxin Physiology in Focal Hand and Cranial Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders. PMID:23202323

  17. Terminal nerve and vision.

    PubMed

    Behrens, U; Wagner, H-J

    2004-09-01

    The vertebrate retina receives efferent input from different parts of the central nervous system. Efferent fibers are thought to influence retinal information processing but their functional role is not well understood. One of the best-described retinopetal fiber systems in teleost retinae belongs to the terminal nerve complex. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide (FMRFamide)-containing fibers from the ganglion of the terminal nerve form a dense fiber plexus in the retina at the border of the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layer. Peptide-containing fibers surround and contact perikarya of dopaminergic interplexiform cells in teleost retina. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exogenously supplied GnRH mediates dopaminergic effects on the membrane potential and on the morphology of dendritic tips (spinules) of cone horizontal cells. These effects can be specifically blocked by GnRH-antagonists, indicating that the release of dopamine and dopamine-dependent effects on light adaptation of retinal neurons are affected by the terminal nerve complex. Recent data have shown that olfactory information has an impact on retinal physiology, but its precise role is not clear. The efferent fiber of the terminal nerve complex is one of the first retinopetal fiber systems for which the sources of the fibers, their cellular targets, and several physiological, morphological, and behavioral effects are known. The terminal nerve complex is therefore a model system for the analysis of local information processing which is influenced by a distinct fiber projection. PMID:15570588

  18. Typewriter tinnitus: a carbamazepine-responsive syndrome related to auditory nerve vascular compression.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Six subjects with similar unilateral tinnitus that was fully suppressed by carbamazepine have been identified. Their ages at the time of the sudden onset of their tinnitus ranged from 39 to 87 years (mean 67). The 3 men had right ear tinnitus. Two of the 3 women had left ear tinnitus. All 6 described a staccato quality of their intermittent tinnitus ('like a typewriter in the background, pop corn, Morse code'). Five of the 6 subjects had no other hearing or vestibular complaints; their audiograms were symmetric and consistent with their ages. Vascular compression of the auditory nerve ipsilateral to the tinnitus was detected in 4 of the 5 subjects imaged. The similarities between typewriter tinnitus and other cranial nerve syndromes associated with vascular compression (trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia) suggest that surgical decompression of the auditory nerve can relieve medication-refractive cases of typewriter tinnitus. PMID:16514262

  19. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... . A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies electrical current to a patient's head to treat insomnia, depression, or anxiety. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date a PMA or notice of completion...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... . A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies electrical current to a patient's head to treat insomnia, depression, or anxiety. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date a PMA or notice of completion...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Identification . A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies electrical current to a patient's head to treat insomnia, depression, or anxiety. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date a PMA or notice...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies electrical current to a patient's head to treat insomnia, depression, or anxiety. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date a PMA or notice...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Identification . A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies electrical current to a patient's head to treat insomnia, depression, or anxiety. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date a PMA or notice...

  14. Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba 

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Keely Britt

    2014-07-25

    The present study involves the developmental simulation of the adult cranial morphology of the newly discovered species, Australopithecus sediba. Au. sediba has been the focus of considerable discussion and debate in ...

  15. Ecological correlates to cranial morphology in Leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Emma; Bumacod, Nicholas; Wedel, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian order Lagomorpha has been the subject of many morphometric studies aimed at understanding the relationship between form and function as it relates to locomotion, primarily in postcranial morphology. The leporid cranial skeleton, however, may also reveal information about their ecology, particularly locomotion and vision. Here we investigate the relationship between cranial shape and the degree of facial tilt with locomotion (cursoriality, saltation, and burrowing) within crown leporids. Our results suggest that facial tilt is more pronounced in cursors and saltators compared to generalists, and that increasing facial tilt may be driven by a need for expanded visual fields. Our phylogenetically informed analyses indicate that burrowing behavior, facial tilt, and locomotor behavior do not predict cranial shape. However, we find that variables such as bullae size, size of the splenius capitus fossa, and overall rostral dimensions are important components for understanding the cranial variation in leporids. PMID:25802812

  16. A Stable Cranial Neural Crest Cell Line from Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Mamoru; Arias, Athena C.; Liu, Liqiong; Chen, Yi-Bu; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2012-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells give rise to ectomesenchymal derivatives such as cranial bones, cartilage, smooth muscle, dentin, as well as melanocytes, corneal endothelial cells, and neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system. Previous studies have suggested that although multipotent stem-like cells may exist during the course of cranial neural crest development, they are transient, undergoing lineage restriction early in embryonic development. We have developed culture conditions that allow cranial neural crest cells to be grown as multipotent stem-like cells. With these methods, we obtained 2 independent cell lines, O9-1 and i10-1, which were derived from mass cultures of Wnt1-Cre; R26R-GFP-expressing cells. These cell lines can be propagated and passaged indefinitely, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. Whole-genome expression profiling of O9-1 cells revealed that this line stably expresses stem cell markers (CD44, Sca-1, and Bmi1) and neural crest markers (AP-2?, Twist1, Sox9, Myc, Ets1, Dlx1, Dlx2, Crabp1, Epha2, and Itgb1). O9-1 cells are capable of contributing to cranial mesenchymal (osteoblast and smooth muscle) neural crest fates when injected into E13.5 mouse cranial tissue explants and chicken embryos. These results suggest that O9-1 cells represent multipotent mesenchymal cranial neural crest cells. The O9-1 cell line should serve as a useful tool for investigating the molecular properties of differentiating cranial neural crest cells. PMID:22889333

  17. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5?MPa? m and 53?±?4.9?MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1?±?1.8?MPa? m and 68?±?18?MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68?±?5.7?MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82?±?26?MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests. PMID:25023222

  18. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  19. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  20. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in many women may be precipitated by simple psychological events such as leaving home, while severely stressful events produce a higher incidence. Unless a physiological factor such as malnutrition is operating, menses usually recur spontaneously within a few months. Amenorrhea is a constant feature of anorexia nervosa and may precede related attitudes toward eating and body weight. This syndrome is best regarded as a chronic and often severe neurotic disorder requiring combined physiological and psychological treatment, although some evidence exists to indicate an endocrine disorder. Extensive basic research is needed on the complex relationship between the neuroendocrine system and emotion. PMID:4735136

  1. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  2. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ?=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  3. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  4. Segmental thoracic lipomatosis of nerve with nerve territory overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN), or fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of fibrofatty enlargement of the peripheral nerves. It is associated with bony and soft tissue overgrowth in approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases. It most commonly affects the median nerve at the carpal tunnel or digital nerves in the hands and feet. The authors describe a patient with previously diagnosed hemihypertrophy of the trunk who had a history of large thoracic lipomas resected during infancy, a thoracic hump due to adipose proliferation within the thoracic paraspinal musculature, and scoliotic deformity. She had fatty infiltration in the thoracic spinal nerves on MRI, identical to findings pathognomonic of LN at better-known sites. Enlargement of the transverse processes at those levels and thickened ribs were also found. This case appears to be directly analogous to other instances of LN with overgrowth, except that this case involved axial nerves rather than the typical appendicular nerves. PMID:24506247

  5. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  6. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment. PMID:25878687

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Musculocutaneous Nerve Block in Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Chen; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Chiou, Hong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is a common and challenging complication of herpes zoster infection, particularly in older people. In recent decades, first-line treatments, including oral or topical medication, have become well established. However, few studies have reported the efficacy of interventional procedures for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Here, the authors present a case of intractable postherpetic neuralgia treated with musculocutaneous peripheral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. Symptoms remained controlled at 1 mo follow-up. Ultrasound can be readily applied to improve the accuracy and efficiency of peripheral nerve block as it is currently widely used to evaluate the musculoskeletal system in clinical settings. PMID:26390394

  8. Mechanisms underlying the neuronal-based symptoms of allergy.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Taylor-Clark, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Persons with allergies present with symptoms that often are the result of alterations in the nervous system. Neuronally based symptoms depend on the organ in which the allergic reaction occurs but can include red itchy eyes, sneezing, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, coughing, bronchoconstriction, airway mucus secretion, dysphagia, altered gastrointestinal motility, and itchy swollen skin. These symptoms occur because mediators released during an allergic reaction can interact with sensory nerves, change processing in the central nervous system, and alter transmission in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric autonomic nerves. In addition, evidence supports the idea that in some subjects this neuromodulation is, for reasons poorly understood, upregulated such that the same degree of nerve stimulus causes a larger effect than seen in healthy subjects. There are distinctions in the mechanisms and nerve types involved in allergen-induced neuromodulation among different organ systems, but general principles have emerged. The products of activated mast cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident cells can overtly stimulate nerve endings, cause long-lasting changes in neuronal excitability, increase synaptic efficacy, and also change gene expression in nerves, resulting in phenotypically altered neurons. A better understanding of these processes might lead to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting the suffering of those with allergies. PMID:24433703

  9. [Management of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa accompanied by subdural effusions].

    PubMed

    Abderrahmen, K; Saadaoui, K; Bouhoula, A; Boubaker, A; Jemel, H

    2012-10-01

    Subdural effusions are uncommon but known complications of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa. They mainly occur after minor head traumas in young patients. Here, we report eight cases of arachnoid cyst of the middle cranial fossa associated with subdural hematoma in five cases and hygroma in three cases. Major symptoms are signs of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan and MRI showed the cyst and the subdural effusion. An excellent therapeutic result was achieved with evacuation of the subdural fluid via burr holes in the five cases of subdural hematoma while in the two cases of hygroma a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary. In the last case, a temporal craniotomy was performed with evacuation of the hygroma and fenestration of the cyst. We suggest treating only the complicating event in the case of a subdural hematoma via burr holes evacuation. Whereas, in the case of hygroma we think that craniotomy with fenestration of the cyst or the use of a subdural shunt are more often needed. PMID:22749080

  10. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms.

  11. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Angel; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; James, Aaron W.

    2013-01-01

    During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The HH family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Desert Hedgehog (DHH), of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH). Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of IHH deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development. PMID:23565096

  12. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ? 515?kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15?sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and ?-amyloid precursor protein (?-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction. PMID:21639724

  13. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  14. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  15. Superficial radial nerve–lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve anatomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Davidovich, Eduardo R; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study focuses on an anatomic variation in which the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN) innervates the radial border of the dorsum of the hand and thumb in addition to, or replacing, the superficial radial nerve (RSN). Here, we propose a technique of nerve conduction that identifies this variation. Methods We studied nerve conduction in 200 upper limbs of two series of 50 volunteers. We sought evidence of the aforementioned variation on the dorsum of the hand and in the thumb. Results We found eight occurrences of this variation on the dorsum of the hand and 11 variants on the thumb within the two respective series of 100 upper limbs studied. Discussion The RSN–LACN anatomic variation can be studied using nerve conduction. The knowledge of this variation is particularly important for the evaluation of proximal radial nerve injury. PMID:24653956

  16. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  17. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ET. CALL NOW Home » About Multiple Myeloma » Symptoms Multiple Myeloma Symptoms Multiple myeloma symptoms may vary by patient, ... to be managed or prevented. The most common multiple myeloma symptoms may include: • Bone pain or bone fractures • ...

  18. Endoscopic Robotic Decompression of the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose Carlos; de Souza Montero, Edna Frasson

    2014-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment can be treated by a number of surgical techniques when necessary. Endoscopic techniques have recently been developed to access the ulnar nerve by use of a minimally invasive approach. However, these techniques have been considered difficult and, many times, dangerous procedures, reserved for experienced elbow arthroscopic surgeons only. We have developed a new endoscopic approach using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) that may be easier and safer. Standardization of the technique was previously developed in cadaveric models to achieve the required safety, reliability, and organization for this procedure, and the technique was then used in a live patient. In this patient the nerve entrapment symptoms remitted after the surgical procedure. The robotic surgical procedure presented a cosmetic advantage, as well as possibly reduced scar formation. This is the first note on this surgical procedure; the procedure needs to be tested and even evolved until a state-of-the-art standard is reached. PMID:25126508

  19. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy ... provider if you develop any symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. ... al. Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy: report of the American Academy of Neurology, the ...

  20. Middle fossa arachnoid cysts and inner ear symptoms: Are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Proimos, E; Chimona, TS; Memtsas, Z; Papadakis, CE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Arachnoid cysts most frequently occur in the middle cranial fossa and when they are symptomatic, patients present with central nervous symptoms. Nevertheless, a large proportion of arachnoid cysts are incidentally diagnosed during neuroimaging in cases with nonspecific symptoms. Report of cases: The cases of two males with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts with nonspecific inner ear symptoms were retrospectively reviewed. The first patient presented with mild headache, nausea, vertigo, unsteadiness, and tinnitus on the left ear while the second patient’s main complaint was left sided tinnitus. Both patients (initially managed for peripheral disorders) underwent a thorough clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Because of the patients’ persistent clinical symptoms, and indications of CNS disorder in the first case, neuroimaging by brain MRI was performed revealing a middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst in both patients. Conclusion: Occasionally, patients with arachnoid cysts may present with mild, atypical or intermittent and irrelevant symptoms which can mislead diagnosis. Otorhinolaryngologists should be aware of the fact that atypical, recurrent or intermittent symptoms may masquerade a CNS disorder. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (2):168-171. PMID:25336883

  1. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  2. [The inflammatory reflex: the role of the vagus nerve in regulation of immune functions].

    PubMed

    Mravec, B

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies published in past years have shown an important role of the vagus nerve in regulating immune functions. Afferent pathways of this cranial nerve transmit signals related to tissue damage and immune reactions to the brain stem. After central processing of these signals, activated efferent vagal pathways modulate inflammatory reactions through inhibiting the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Therefore, pathways localized in the vagus nerve constitute the afferent and efferent arms of the so-called "inflammatory reflex" that participates in negative feedback regulation of inflammation in peripheral tissues. Activation of efferent pathways of the vagus nerve significantly reduces tissue damage in several models of diseases in experimental animals. Clinical studies also indicate the importance of the vagus nerve in regulating inflammatory reactions in humans. It is suggested that alteration of the inflammatory reflex underlies the etiopathogenesis of diseases characterized by exaggerated production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Therefore, research into the inflammatory reflex may create the basis for developing new approaches in the treatment of diseases with inflammatory components. PMID:22263327

  3. Occipital Nerve Blocks for Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Trevor A; Orr, Serena; Bodell, Lisa; Lockyer, Lisette; Rajapakse, Thilinie; Barlow, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Posttraumatic headache is one of the most common and disabling symptoms after traumatic brain injury. However, evidence for treating posttraumatic headache is sparse, especially in the pediatric literature. This retrospective chart review evaluated the use of occipital nerve blocks in adolescents treated for posttraumatic headache following mild traumatic brain injury, presenting to the Complex Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury clinic. Fifteen patients (mean age 15.47; range: 13-17) received occipital nerve block for posttraumatic headache. Follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at 5.57 (standard deviation = 3.52) months postinjury. The headache burden was high, with all except one having headaches 15 or more days per month (median 30, range 10-30). Sixty-four percent reported long-term response to the occipital nerve blocks, with associated improved quality of life and decreased postconcussion symptom scores (P < .05). One patient reported transient allopecia. Occipital nerve blocks are well tolerated and can be helpful in posttraumatic headache. PMID:25406154

  4. Using the nerve stimulator for peripheral or plexus nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Urmey, W F

    2006-06-01

    Conventional methodology for nerve location utilizes anatomical landmarks followed by invasive exploration with a needle to a suitable endpoint. An appropriate endpoint can be either anatomical in nature (e.g. transaterial technique) or functional (paresthesia or motor response to electrical stimulation). Ability to electrically stimulate a peripheral nerve or plexus depends upon many variables, including; 1) conductive area at the electrode, 2) electrical impedance, 3) electrode-to-nerve distance, 4) current flow (amperage), and 5) pulse duration. Electrode conductive area follows the equation R = rhoL/A, where R = electrical resistance, p = tissue resistivity, L = electrode-to-nerve distance, and A = electrode conductive area. Therefore resistance varies to the inverse of the electrode's conductive area. Tissue electrical impedance varies as a function of the tissue composition. In general, tissues with higher lipid content have higher impedances. Modern electrical nerve stimulators are designed to keep current constant, in spite of varying impedance. The electrode-to-nerve distance has the most influence on the ability to elicit a motor response to electrical stimulation. This is governed by Coulomb's law: E = K(Q/r2) where E = required stimulating charge, K= constant, Q = minimal required stimulating current, and r = electrode-to-nerve distance. Therefore, ability to stimulate the nerve at low amperage (e.g. < 0.5 mA), indicates an extremely close position to the nerve. Similarly, increasing current flow (amperage) increases the ability to stimulate the nerve at a distance. Increasing pulse duration increases the flow of electrons during a current pulse at any given amperage. Therefore, reducing pulse duration to very short times (e.g. 0.1 or 0.05 ms) diminishes current dispersion, requiring the needle tip to be extremely close to the nerve to elicit a motor response. The above parameters can be varied optimally to enhance successful nerve location and subsequent blockade. Unlike imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, electrical nerve stimulation depends upon nerve conduction. Similarly, percutaneous electrode guidance (PEG) makes use of the above variables to allow prelocation of the nerve by transcutaneous stimulation. PMID:16682917

  5. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  6. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  7. [Positioning Injuries to Peripheral Nerves during Laparoscopic Colon and Rectum Surgery].

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, D B; Wolken, H; Ellebrecht, C T; Bruch, H-P; Kleemann, M

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic colon and rectum operations expose peripheral nerves to risk due to extreme patient positions needed to achieve gravity displacement during the surgical procedures. The general incidence of position-caused nerve injuries in surgery is not well known and is estimated to be about 0.5?% in the literature. There are no current data concerning laparoscopic operations. This study assesses the incidence and outcome of surgery-associated neurological symptoms after laparoscopic colon and rectum surgical procedures. We analysed the number of position-caused nerve injuries and their outcome from 1992-2010 in a prospectively managed data base. Risk factors like age, BMI, procedure duration and abduction of the upper extremities were analysed. There were 19 (0.7?%) position-caused nerve injuries among 2698 laparoscopic operations on the colon and rectum. The incidence of surgery-associated neurological symptoms was 1.08?% after laparoscopic rectum and 0.54?% after laparoscopic colon surgical procedures. Both operation time (267 vs. 185 minutes) and BMI (27.93 vs. 25.79?kg/m(2)) were revealed as risk factors for position-caused nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities reduced the incidence of positioning nerve injuries from 0.23?% to 0.1?%. Postoperative neurological symptoms were in most cases reversible (89.47?%). The incidence of postoperative nerve injuries since 2007 is low after laparoscopic rectum and colon operations and is mostly completely reversible. Both procedure duration and BMI are probable risk factors for surgery-associated nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities provides an opportunity to reduce position-caused nerve injuries. PMID:23824613

  8. The superior laryngeal nerve injury of a famous soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci.

    PubMed

    Marchese-Ragona, R; Restivo, D A; Mylonakis, I; Ottaviano, G; Martini, A; Sataloff, R T; Staffieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) has been attributed much less clinical significance than the recurrent laryngeal nerve. It has sometimes been described as the 'neglected' nerve in thyroid surgery, although injury to this nerve can cause significant disability. The external branch of the SLN is the only motor supply to the cricothyroid muscle, which increases the tension of the ipsilateral vocal fold during highfrequency phonation, particularly in women and voice professionals. Damage to this nerve can manifest as ipsilateral cricothyroid muscle paralysis, and clinical symptoms may include a hoarse, breathy voice, frequent throat clearing, vocal fatigue or diminished vocal frequency range, especially when rising pitch. SLN paralysis can be a significant issue for those whose careers depend largely on a full range of voice. The famous opera soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci, suffered SLN injury during thyroid surgery with distressing consequences. PMID:23620644

  9. Suprascapular nerve block for the treatment of frozen shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Korhan; Ozcekic, Ali Nadir; Sarar, Serhan; Cift, Hakan; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Unay, Koray

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to compare the effects of suprascapular nerve block in patients with frozen shoulder and diabetes mellitus unresponsive to intraarticular steroid injections. Settings and Design: Ten patients without improvement of sign and symptoms after intraarticular injections were made a suprascapular nerve block. Methods: Pain levels and active range of movement of patients were recorded at initial attendance and after 1, 4, and 12 weeks. All patients’ simple pain scores, total pain scores, and range of motion of their shoulders were improved significantly after suprascapular nerve block. Statistical Analysis: In this study, the statistical analyses were performed by using the SPSS 8.0 program (SPSS Software, SPSS Inc., USA). To compare pre- and post-injection results of simple pain score, total pain score, shoulder abduction and external rotation, Wilcoxon test was used. Results: Patient's simple pain scores, total pain scores also abduction, external rotation and internal rotation angles were improved significantly after suprascapular nerve block. Conclusion: Effective results after suprascapular nerve blockage was obtained for the treatment of refractory frozen shoulder cases. PMID:22412778

  10. Peripheral nerve tumours: 30-year experience in the surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Gutkowska, Olga; Mazurek, Piotr; Koszewicz, Magdalena; Zió?kowski, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral nerve tumours are relatively rare type of soft tissue tumours. The aim of this work is to present our experience with surgical treatment of this type of lesions. Clinical material consists of 94 patients (56 females, 38 males), in whom 101 tumours deriving from peripheral nervous system were removed. The patients underwent surgical treatment between 1983 and 2012. Tumours occurred mainly in the upper extremity (72 tumours), less often in the lower extremity (25 tumours). Lesions developed in major peripheral nerves (51 tumours) and small nerve branches (50 tumours). The most common symptoms reported before surgery included presence of tumour mass (100 %), positive Hoffmann-Tinel sign (95.6 %) and paraesthesia (93.4 %). Less often sensory deficit (89.1 %) and pain (71.7 %) were observed. Motor deficit was the least common manifestation (41.3 %). Benign tumours prevailed in presented material (94 tumours). In 7 cases, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) was identified. As a result of surgical treatment in the group of tumours deriving from major peripheral nerves, in 87.8 % of the patients, pain relief was achieved; in 84 %, Hoffmann-Tinel sign was negative; and in 79 %, paraesthesia resolved. Sensory function improvement was observed in 51.2 % of the patients while motor function improved in 26.3 % of the patients. None of the patients experienced tumour relapse. In the group of tumours deriving from small nerve branches, 47 patients had no signs of tumour recurrence. One female patient diagnosed with MPNST suffered a relapse. Obtaining satisfactory results of peripheral nerve tumour treatment requires both careful differential diagnosis and well thought-out strategy at every stage of therapeutic management. PMID:25727458

  11. Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Human Cervical and Thoracic Vagus Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Atsuko; Green, Hunter R.; Lee, Thomas D.; Hong, LongSheng; Tan, Jian; Vinters, Harry V.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNS) has been used for chronic heart failure (CHF), and is believed to improve imbalance of autonomic control by increasing parasympathetic activity. Although it is known that there is neural communication between the VN and the cervical sympathetic trunk, there are few data regarding the quantity and/or distribution of the sympathetic components within the VN. Objective To examine the sympathetic component within human VN and correlate these with the presence of cardiac and neurologic diseases. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on 31 human cervical and thoracic VNs (total 104 VNs) from autopsies and we reviewed the patients’ records. We correlated the quantity of sympathetic nerve fibers within the VNs with cardiovascular and neurologic disease states. Results All 104 VNs contain TH positive (sympathetic) nerve fibers; the mean TH positive areas were 5.47% in right cervical, 3.97% in left cervical, 5.11% in right thoracic, and 4.20% in left thoracic VN. The distribution of TH positive nerve fibers varied from case to case: central, peripheral, or scattered throughout nerve bundles. No statistically significant differences in nerve morphology were seen between diseases in which VNS is considered effective (depression and CHF), and other cardiovascular diseases, or neurodegenerative disease. Conclusion Human VNs contain sympathetic nerve fibers. The sympathetic component within the VN could play a role in physiologic effects reported with VNS. The recognition of sympathetic nerve fibers in the VNs may lead to better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of VNS. PMID:24768897

  12. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  13. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used...

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anD human services national institutes of health Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Nerve Changes “My fingers and toes ... I always wore shoes.” About nerve changes Some chemotherapy can cause nerve problems. You may have a ...

  15. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evolution of Cranial Shape in Caecilians (Amphibia

    E-print Network

    Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Evolution of Cranial Shape in Caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) Emma Sherratt of morphological variation in the skull of caecilian amphibians, a major clade of verte- brates. Because caecilians cor- respond to the main caecilian clades, and each cluster is separated by unoccupied morphospace

  16. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  17. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  18. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  19. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  20. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  1. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  2. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  3. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  4. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  5. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders §...

  6. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  7. Cranial trauma and the assessment of posttraumatic survival time.

    PubMed

    Steyn, M; De Boer, H H; Van der Merwe, A E

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of trauma on skeletal remains can be very difficult, especially when it comes to the estimation of posttraumatic survival time in partially healed lesions. The ability to reliably estimate the time an individual has survived after sustaining an injury is especially important in cases of child abuse and torture, but can also aid in determining the association between an injury and eventual death. Here a case from South Africa is reported, where the skeletal remains of an unknown individual were found with cranial and scapular fractures. These fractures all presented with macroscopic features indicative of healing. Using recently published data on the timing of fractures by De Boer et al., the two sets of cranial trauma and the scapular fracture were assessed by means of radiology, histology and microCT scanning. This was primarily done in order to obtain more information on the events surrounding the death of this individual, but also to assess the usability of the published methods on cranial fractures. It was found that the initial trauma was most likely sustained at least two weeks before death, whilst a neurosurgical procedure was performed at least one week before death. It seems that cranial fractures, especially if stable, may show some different healing features than postcranial fractures. The individual has since been identified, but unfortunately as is often the case in South Africa, limited information is available and the medical records could not be found. PMID:25217847

  8. Vertebrate cranial placodes as evolutionary innovations--the ancestor's tale.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary innovations often arise by tinkering with preexisting components building new regulatory networks by the rewiring of old parts. The cranial placodes of vertebrates, ectodermal thickenings that give rise to many of the cranial sense organs (ear, nose, lateral line) and ganglia, originated as such novel structures, when vertebrate ancestors elaborated their head in support of a more active and exploratory life style. This review addresses the question of how cranial placodes evolved by tinkering with ectodermal patterning mechanisms and sensory and neurosecretory cell types that have their own evolutionary history. With phylogenetic relationships among the major branches of metazoans now relatively well established, a comparative approach is used to infer, which structures evolved in which lineages and allows us to trace the origin of placodes and their components back from ancestor to ancestor. Some of the core networks of ectodermal patterning and sensory and neurosecretory differentiation were already established in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians and were greatly elaborated in the bilaterian ancestor (with BMP- and Wnt-dependent patterning of dorsoventral and anteroposterior ectoderm and multiple neurosecretory and sensory cell types). Rostral and caudal protoplacodal domains, giving rise to some neurosecretory and sensory cells, were then established in the ectoderm of the chordate and tunicate-vertebrate ancestor, respectively. However, proper cranial placodes as clusters of proliferating progenitors producing high-density arrays of neurosecretory and sensory cells only evolved and diversified in the ancestors of vertebrates. PMID:25662263

  9. Cranial Drilling Tool with Retracting Drill Bit Upon Skull Penetration

    E-print Network

    Cranial Drilling Tool with Retracting Drill Bit Upon Skull Penetration Paul Loschak1 , Kechao Xiao1, Harvard University, Boston, MA 3 Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 1 Background Penetrating the skull as a injury [1]. The risk of pressure induced damage can be reduced by penetrating the skull with a small

  10. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S; Jantz, Richard L

    2002-11-12

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  11. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Corey S.; Jantz, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  12. Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia after intrathecal chemotherapy and cranial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, F.E.; Nissenblatt, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    A 26-year-old man developed transient bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia after cranial irradiation and intrathecal administration of methotrexate for lymphoma. Resolution of the ophthalmoplegia and the decrease in abnormally high levels of cerebrospinal fluid myelin basic protein after discontinuation of intrathecal medication suggested demyelination from chemotherapy and irradiation.

  13. ORIGINAL PAPERS Cranial Morphology of a Pantolestid Eutherian Mammal

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Doug M.

    ORIGINAL PAPERS Cranial Morphology of a Pantolestid Eutherian Mammal from the Eocene Bridger is a eutherian subfamily of mammals whose members are known from the middle early Paleocene through at least and extant mammals. Semicircular canal morphology is used to test locomotor hypotheses. YPM 13525 lacks

  14. Morphometric analysis of the cranial base in Asians.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Po; Liu, Pao-Hsin; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Pan, Chin-Yun; Chou, Szu-Ting

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that developmental heterogeneity in cranial base morphology increases the prevalence of Class III malocclusion and mandibular prognathism in Asians. Thin-plate spline (TPS) graphical analysis of lateral cephalometric radiographs of the cranial base and the upper midface configuration were compared between a European-American group (24 females and 31 males) and four Asian ethnic groups (100 Chinese, 100 Japanese, 100 Korean and 100 Taiwanese; 50 females and 50 males per group) of young adults with clinically acceptable occlusion and facial profiles. Procrustes analysis was performed to identify statistically significant differences in each configuration of landmarks (P < 0.001). The TPS graphical analysis revealed that the greatest differences of Asians were the horizontal compression and vertical expansion in the anterior portion of the cranial base and upper midface region. The most posterior cranial base region also showed horizontal compression between the basion and Bolton point, with forward displacement of the articulare. Facial flatness and anterior displacement of the temporomandibular joint, resulting from a relative retrusion of the nasomaxillary complex and a relative forward position of the mandible were also noted. These features that tend to cause a prognathic mandible and/or retruded midface indicate a morphologic predisposition of Asian populations for Class III malocclusion. PMID:23377841

  15. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  16. Cysticercosis in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Cheepsattayakorn, R; Tantachamroon, T

    1994-10-01

    Two cases of neurocysticercosis from Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital were reported with autopsy and surgical findings. The autopsy case was a 14-year-old girl who had a single cyst at the cisterna ambiens of the pineal region, causing hydrocephalus and severe brain edema accompanied with increased intracranial pressure and psychiatric problems but no definite localizing signs. The surgical case was a 35-year-old man with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, localizing signs of ataxia of the left lower extremity and hearing loss in the right ear. Computed brain tomography showed a posterior fossa cyst with obstructive hydrocephalus. The cyst and the tissues from CP angle region were removed and sent to the Department of Pathology. Histopathologic appearance of both cases showed cysticercosis. PMID:7745377

  17. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001). Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with the South American taxon Gasparinisaura, but never both at the same time. The new morphological observations presented herein, combined with re-examination of the holotype of Parksosaurus, suggest that Parksosaurus shares a closer relationship with Thescelosaurus than with Gasparinisaura, and that many of the features previously cited to support a relationship with the latter taxon are either also present in Thescelosaurus, are artifacts of preservation, or are the result of incomplete preparation and inaccurate interpretation of specimens. Additionally, the overall morphology of the skull and lower jaws of both Thescelosaurus and Parksosaurus also closely resemble the Asian taxa Changchunsaurus and Haya, though the interrelationships of these taxa have yet to be tested in a phylogenetic analysis that includes these new morphological data for T. neglectus. PMID:25405076

  18. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  19. Myological variability in a decoupled skeletal system: batoid cranial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N; Grubbs, R Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial musculature of an abbreviated phylogenetic representation of batoid fishes, including skates, guitarfishes and with a particular focus on stingrays. We identified homologous muscle groups across these taxa and describe changes in gross morphology across developmental and functional muscle groups, with the goal of exploring how decoupling of the jaws from the skull has effected muscular arrangement. In particular, we focus on the cranial anatomy of durophagous and nondurophagous batoids, as the former display marked differences in morphology compared to the latter. Durophagous stingrays are characterized by hypertrophied jaw adductors, reliance on pennate versus fusiform muscle fiber architecture, tendinous rather than aponeurotic muscle insertions, and an overall reduction in mandibular kinesis. Nondurophagous stingrays have muscles that rely on aponeurotic insertions onto the skeletal structure, and display musculoskeletal specialization for jaw protrusion and independent lower jaw kinesis, relative to durophagous stingrays. We find that among extant chondrichthyans, considerable variation exists in the hyoid and mandibular muscles, slightly less so in hypaxial muscles, whereas branchial muscles are overwhelmingly conserved. As chondrichthyans occupy a position sister to all other living gnathostomes, our understanding of the structure and function of early vertebrate feeding systems rests heavily on understanding chondrichthyan cranial anatomy. Our findings highlight the incredible variation in muscular complexity across chondrichthyans in general and batoids in particular. PMID:24652648

  20. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. PMID:21328563

  1. Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Statistics More Resources Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

  2. Cannabis use in HIV for pain and other medical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Woolridge, Emily; Barton, Simon; Samuel, Jonathon; Osorio, Jess; Dougherty, Andrew; Holdcroft, Anita

    2005-04-01

    Despite the major benefits of antiretroviral therapy on survival during HIV infection, there is an increasing need to manage symptoms and side effects during long-term drug therapy. Cannabis has been reported anecdotally as being beneficial for a number of common symptoms and complications in HIV infections, for example, poor appetite and neuropathy. This study aimed to investigate symptom management with cannabis. Following Ethics Committee approval, HIV-positive individuals attending a large clinic were recruited into an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire study. Up to one-third (27%, 143/523) reported using cannabis for treating symptoms. Patients reported improved appetite (97%), muscle pain (94%), nausea (93%), anxiety (93%), nerve pain (90%), depression (86%), and paresthesia (85%). Many cannabis users (47%) reported associated memory deterioration. Symptom control using cannabis is widespread in HIV outpatients. A large number of patients reported that cannabis improved symptom control. PMID:15857739

  3. Cranial Treatment and Spinal Manipulation for a Patient With Low Back Pain: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Wayne; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present chiropractic management of a patient with chronic low back pain by focusing on the craniomandibular system. Clinical Features A 37-year-old man consulted a chiropractor for pain in the lumbosacral area with radiation down the anterolateral side of the upper left leg. The symptoms started after a fall the previous year. Examination showed a post-traumatic chronic L4-L5 facet dysfunction and left sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. Chiropractic spinal manipulation to the lumbar spine and pelvis gave only temporary relief from the pain. Intervention and Outcome A year later a bone scintigraphy was conducted, in which a lesion was found over the right sphenoid area. Cranial treatment of this area was added to the chiropractic treatment plan. After this treatment, the patient reported that he was pain free and could return to normal activities of daily living. Conclusion The clinical progress of this case suggests that for some patients, adding craniosacral therapy may be helpful in patients with low back symptoms. PMID:26644786

  4. ?-Synuclein in cutaneous autonomic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Lafo, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a cutaneous biomarker for Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Twenty patients with PD and 14 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent examinations, autonomic testing, and skin biopsies at the distal leg, distal thigh, and proximal thigh. ?-Synuclein deposition and the density of intraepidermal, sudomotor, and pilomotor nerve fibers were measured. ?-Synuclein deposition was normalized to nerve fiber density (the ?-synuclein ratio). Results were compared with examination scores and autonomic function testing. Results: Patients with PD had a distal sensory and autonomic neuropathy characterized by loss of intraepidermal and pilomotor fibers (p < 0.05 vs controls, all sites) and morphologic changes to sudomotor nerve fibers. Patients with PD had greater ?-synuclein deposition and higher ?-synuclein ratios compared with controls within pilomotor nerves and sudomotor nerves (p < 0.01, all sites) but not sensory nerves. Higher ?-synuclein ratios correlated with Hoehn and Yahr scores (r = 0.58–0.71, p < 0.01), with sympathetic adrenergic function (r = ?0.40 to ?0.66, p < 0.01), and with parasympathetic function (r = ?0.66 to ?0.77, p > 0.01). Conclusions: We conclude that ?-synuclein deposition is increased in cutaneous sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic fibers but not sensory fibers of patients with PD. Higher ?-synuclein deposition is associated with greater autonomic dysfunction and more advanced PD. These data suggest that measures of ?-synuclein deposition in cutaneous autonomic nerves may be a useful biomarker in patients with PD. PMID:24089386

  5. Slower nerve conduction velocity in individuals with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Docherty, C

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify nerve conduction velocity differences in individuals with functional ankle instability compared to a "healthy" population. 38 participants ages 18-30 were recruited from a large university with approximately 43,000 students. 19 subjects (9 men and 10 women; age=21.0±1.4 years; height=172.0±9.3?cm; mass=74.4±1 2.4?kg) with symptoms of functional ankle instability were in the functional ankle instability group. 19 subjects (10 men, 9 women; age=22.0±2.6 years; height=169.8±9.1?cm; mass=69.0±14.8?kg) with "healthy" ankles were in the control group. Nerve conduction velocity was conducted using one trial at 2 different sites: posterior to the fibular head (fibular), and 10?cm superior/posterior of the first site (popliteal). Nerve conduction velocity (m/sec) was assessed using a SierraWave II system (Cadwell Laboratories; Kennewick, WA). A MANCOVA was performed on the two dependent variables (fibular and popliteal). Covariates included surface temperature of the leg, body mass index, and age. The independent variable was group (functional ankle instability and control). The effect of group was significantly related to nerve conduction velocity at the fibular site (F(1, 27)?=16.49, p=0.01) and popliteal site (F(1, 27)=4.51, p=0.01), with responses significantly faster for individuals in the control group than the functional ankle instability group. These results indicate that patients with functional ankle instability might have damage to the peroneal nerve which results in slower peroneal nerve conduction velocity. PMID:24577859

  6. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981?±?83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251?±?32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p?nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs. PMID:22700359

  7. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Monteiro, Tatiana Alves; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schmidt; de Brito, Rubens

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI) in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives:?To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report:?A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2?dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion:?Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients. PMID:25992034

  8. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    ICHINOHE, Tom; KANNO, Nobuo; HARADA, Yasuji; YOGO, Takuya; TAGAWA, Masahiro; SOETA, Satoshi; AMASAKI, Hajime; HARA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  9. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Ichinohe, Tom; Kanno, Nobuo; Harada, Yasuji; Yogo, Takuya; Tagawa, Masahiro; Soeta, Satoshi; Amasaki, Hajime; Hara, Yasushi

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  10. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  11. A free-vibration analysis for the human cranial system.

    PubMed

    Misra, J C; Chakravarty, S

    1982-01-01

    The problem of free-vibration of the cranial vault is studied in the paper by taking into account the dissipative material behaviour of both the skull and the brain. Two mathematical models are considered for this purpose. In one model, the layered structure (inner table, diploë and outer table) of the skull is considered, the outer surface of the skull being assumed to be traction-free while the second model assumes the homogeneity of the skull but takes into account the mechanical influence of the scalp. Results of numerical computation show that the dissipative material behaviour of the skull as well as the brain and also the mechanical influence of the scalp have a significant effect on the frequency spectrum of the freely vibrating cranial system. PMID:7174696

  12. Endoscopic transnasal approach to anterior and middle cranial base lesions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sien Hui; Brand, Yves; Prepageran, Narayanan; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience in managing pathologies involving the anterior and middle cranial base using an endoscopic transnasal approach, highlighting the surgical technique, indications, and complications. The different types of endoscopic approaches used include the transtuberculum/transplanum, transcribiform, transsellar, and cavernous sinus approaches. The common indications include repair of cerebrospinal fluid leaks (both spontaneous and post traumatic) and excision of pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, esthesioneuroblastomas, and other malignancies of the anterior cranial base. Careful reconstruction is performed with the multilayer technique utilizing fat, fascia lata, and fibrin sealant. The endoscopic transnasal approach, coupled with the present-day sophisticated neuronavigation systems, allows access to lesions in the midline extending from the cribriform plate to the craniovertebral junction. However, preoperative planning and careful selection of cases with evaluation of each case on an individual basis with regard to the lateral extension of the lesion are imperative. PMID:26448224

  13. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  14. Optogenetic control of nerve growth

    E-print Network

    Park, Seongjun

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical ...

  15. Neuromas and gaps of sensory nerves of the hand: management using vein conduits.

    PubMed

    Malizos, K N; Dailiana, Z H; Anastasiou, E A; Sarmas, I; Soucacos, P N

    1997-07-01

    This study analyzed the efficacy of an interposed vein conduit graft in eliminating symptoms of painful neuroma of sensory nerves of the hand and preventing recurrence after excising the pathologic tissue and bridging the concomitant gap with the distal nerve segment. Twenty-three patients underwent reconstruction of 25 palmar sensory nerve gaps ranging from 12 mm to 28 mm, as well as 2 dorsal gaps of 32 mm and 35 mm, respectively. Eighteen patients had symptomatic painful neuromas. Subjective and objective evaluation criteria were employed for assessment and were compared with data obtained from primary direct suturing in 25 digital nerves of 21 patients. Electrophysiologic measurements, including sensory nerve action potential and conduction velocity, were similar, with both groups having values significantly lower than normal control values. Two-point discrimination measurements were slightly inferior for the vein conduit-reconstructed nerves compared with results attained after direct suturing. However, neuroma symptoms were eliminated, and in combination with the return of adequate sensibility, all but 1 patient resumed full hand function. PMID:9247655

  16. Diagnostic value of history and physical examination in patients suspected of lumbosacral nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    Vroomen, P; de Krom, M C T F M; Wilmink, J; Kester, A; Knottnerus, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patient characteristics, symptoms, and examination findings in the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral nerve root compression causing sciatica. Methods: The study involved 274 patients with pain radiating into the leg. All had a standardised clinical assessment and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The associations between patient characteristics, clinical findings, and lumbosacral nerve root compression on MR imaging were analysed. Results: Nerve root compression was associated with three patient characteristics, three symptoms, and four physical examination findings (paresis, absence of tendon reflexes, a positive straight leg raising test, and increased finger-floor distance). Multivariate analysis, analysing the independent diagnostic value of the tests, showed that nerve root compression was predicted by two patient characteristics, four symptoms, and two signs (increased finger-floor distance and paresis). The straight leg raise test was not predictive. The area under the curve of the receiver-operating characteristic was 0.80 for the history items. It increased to 0.83 when the physical examination items were added. Conclusions: Various clinical findings were found to be associated with nerve root compression on MR imaging. While this set of findings agrees well with those commonly used in daily practice, the tests tended to have lower sensitivity and specificity than previously reported. Stepwise multivariate analysis showed that most of the diagnostic information revealed by physical examination findings had already been revealed by the history items. PMID:11971050

  17. Targeting Peripheral Afferent Nerve Terminals for Cough and Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic unproductive coughing and dyspnea are symptoms that severely diminish the quality of life in a substantial proportion of the population. There are presently few if any drugs that effectively treat these symptoms. Rational drug targets for cough and dyspnea have emerged over the recent years based on developments in our understanding of the innervation of the respiratory tract. These drug targets can be subcategorized into those that target the vagal afferent nerve endings, and those that target neural activity within the CNS. This review focuses on targets presumed to be in the peripheral terminals of afferent nerves within the airways. Conceptually, the activity of peripheral afferent nerves involved with unwanted urge-to-cough or dyspnea sensations can be inhibited by limiting the intensity of the stimulus, inhibiting the amplitude of the stimulus-induced generator potential, or inhibiting the transduction between the generator potential and action potential discharge and conduction. These mechanisms reveal many therapeutic strategies for anti-tussive and anti-dyspnea drug development with peripheral sites of action. PMID:21705272

  18. Hiccups as a myocardial ischemia symptom.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Waldemar; Szabowski, S?awomir; Stepie?, Marta; Krzywkowska, Katarzyna; Krzywkowski, Artur; Marciniak, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    A hiccup is involuntary, paroxysmal inspiratory movements of the chest wall associated with diaphragm and accessory respiratory muscle contractions, with the synchronized closure of glottis. The mechanism underlying this common primitive reflex plays an important role in protecting airways against esophageal aspiration. The hiccup reflex mechanism is based on the afferent pathway (vagus and phrenic nerve and sympathetic fibers innervating chest organs, the abdomen, the ear, the nose and the throat stimulation, and the stimulation of hiccup center in the central nervous system, mainly reflecting psychogenic or metabolic disorders) and the efferent pathway (phrenic nerves). An incidental hiccup is a common problem, usually resolves spontaneously and does not present a clinical issue. The clinical issue arises in the case of pathologic persistent hiccups or symptomatic secondary hiccups which may lead to significant fatigue, insomnia or depression. Generally, pathologic hiccups are associated with considerable discomfort concerning both the "stigmatized" person and his or her personal surroundings in which it evokes different emotions, from amusement through impatience to uneasiness and the suggestion of a medical visit as an expression of concern for a given person. The most common causes of pathologic symptomatic hiccups are nervous system diseases, either the central nervous system (proliferative, angiogenic, inflammatory disorders), or the peripheral nervous system: the irritation of the phrenic nerve (proliferative disorders, goitre) and the vagus nerve (otolaryngologic diseases, meningitis, esophageal, stomach and duodenal diseases, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enteritis). The vagus nerve irritation with subsequent hiccups may be caused by chest disorders (injury, surgery) and heart diseases (myocardial infarction). In the present paper we describe the case of a 62-year-old male with recurrent hiccups associated with exertion as a secondary symptom of myocardial ischemia. PMID:18476462

  19. Virtual assessment of perimortem and postmortem blunt force cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Farrell, Dara; Michailidis, Konstantinos; Karantanas, Apostolos; Roberts, Neil; Kranioti, Elena F

    2013-06-10

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential use of reconstructed three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D MDCT) imagery to distinguish between perimortem cranial trauma and postmortem cranial damage. A total of 45 crania were initially examined for the purpose of this study. The postmortem group consists of 14 crania from a Medieval Scottish population while the perimortem group consists of 31 CT scans of perimortem trauma cases from the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete. Six crania belonging to the perimortem group could not be assessed for the purposes of this study. Each of the remaining 39 crania was examined under the following criteria: preponderant texture, preponderant outline, edge morphology, fracture angle, fracture relationship to path of least resistance, evidence of plastic response and the presence of hinging. As edge morphology could not be determined for any of the crania this criterion was not considered for statistical computations. Statistical analysis demonstrated the five of the six criteria (preponderant texture, preponderant outline, fracture relationship to least resistance path, plastic response and the presence of hinging) subjected to statistical analysis bore statistical significance in distinguishing between perimortem trauma and postmortem damage when using 3D CT images. This study, therefore, demonstrated that the timing of cranial fractures can be determined using 3D CT images and thus can complement and add to existing methods for trauma assessment in both forensic and archaeological settings. PMID:23601150

  20. Craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas: historical overview.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Loumiotis, Ioannis; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    The surgical treatment of meningiomas located at the base of the anterior cranial fossa is often challenging, and the evolution of the surgical strategy to resect these tumors parallels the development of craniotomy, and neurosurgery in general, over the past century. Early successful operations to treat these tumors were pioneered by prominent figures such as Sir William Macewen and Francesco Durante. Following these early reports, Harvey Cushing made significant contributions, allowing a better understanding and treatment of meningiomas in general, but particularly those involving the anterior cranial base. Initially, large-sized unilateral or bilateral craniotomies were necessary to approach these deep-seated lesions. Technical advances such as the introduction of electrosurgery, the operating microscope, and refined microsurgical instruments allowed neurosurgeons to perform less invasive surgical procedures with better results. Today, a wide variety of surgical strategies, including endoscopic surgery and radiosurgery, are used to treat these tumors. In this review, the authors trace the evolution of craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas. PMID:24684326

  1. Phylogeny, Diet, and Cranial Integration in Australodelphian Marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anjali

    2007-01-01

    Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials. PMID:17912372

  2. Heterochrony and developmental modularity of cranial osteogenesis in lipotyphlan mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Here we provide the most comprehensive study to date on the cranial ossification sequence in Lipotyphla, the group which includes shrews, moles and hedgehogs. This unique group, which encapsulates diverse ecological modes, such as terrestrial, subterranean, and aquatic lifestyles, is used to examine the evolutionary lability of cranial osteogenesis and to investigate the modularity of development. Results An acceleration of developmental timing of the vomeronasal complex has occurred in the common ancestor of moles. However, ossification of the nasal bone has shifted late in the more terrestrial shrew mole. Among the lipotyphlans, sequence heterochrony shows no significant association with modules derived from developmental origins (that is, neural crest cells vs. mesoderm derived parts) or with those derived from ossification modes (that is, dermal vs. endochondral ossification). Conclusions The drastic acceleration of vomeronasal development in moles is most likely coupled with the increased importance of the rostrum for digging and its use as a specialized tactile surface, both fossorial adaptations. The late development of the nasal in shrew moles, a condition also displayed by hedgehogs and shrews, is suggested to be the result of an ecological reversal to terrestrial lifestyle and reduced functional importance of the rostrum. As an overall pattern in lipotyphlans, our results reject the hypothesis that ossification sequence heterochrony occurs in modular fashion when considering the developmental patterns of the skull. We suggest that shifts in the cranial ossification sequence are not evolutionarily constrained by developmental origins or mode of ossification. PMID:22040374

  3. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  4. From nerve net to nerve ring, nerve cord and brain - evolution of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-17

    The puzzle of how complex nervous systems emerged remains unsolved. Comparative studies of neurodevelopment in cnidarians and bilaterians suggest that this process began with distinct integration centres that evolved on opposite ends of an initial nerve net. The 'apical nervous system' controlled general body physiology, and the 'blastoporal nervous system' coordinated feeding movements and locomotion. We propose that expansion, integration and fusion of these centres gave rise to the bilaterian nerve cord and brain. PMID:26675821

  5. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p?

  6. Dermatological and immunological conditions due to nerve lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Domenico; Lupoli, Amalia; Caccavale, Stefano; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Summary Some syndromes are of interest to both neurologists and dermatologists, because cutaneous involvement may harbinger symptoms of a neurological disease. The aim of this review is to clarify this aspect. The skin, because of its relationships with the peripheral sensory nervous system, autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, constitutes a neuroimmunoendocrine organ. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides released from sensory nerves. Neuropeptides play a precise role in cutaneous physiology and pathophysiology, and in certain skin diseases. A complex dysregulation of neuropeptides is a feature of some diseases of both dermatological and neurological interest (e.g. cutaneous and nerve lesions following herpes zoster infection, cutaneous manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome, trigeminal trophic syndrome). Dermatologists need to know when a patient should be referred to a neurologist and should consider this option in those presenting with syndromes of unclear etiology. PMID:24125557

  7. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  8. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  9. Entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal affecting the infrapatellar branch – a report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Porr, Jason; Chrobak, Karen; Muir, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present 2 cases of entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal affecting the infrapatellar branch, and to provide insight into the utilization of nerve tension testing for the diagnosis of nerve entrapments in a clinical setting. Rationale: Saphenous nerve entrapments are a very rare condition within today’s body of literature, and the diagnosis remains controversial. Clinical Features: Two cases of chronic knee pain that were unresponsive to previous treatment. The patients were diagnosed with an entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal affecting the infrapatellar branch using nerve tension techniques along with a full clinical examination. Intervention and Outcome: Manual therapy and rehabilitation programs were initiated including soft tissue therapy, nerve gliding techniques and gait retraining which resulted in 90% improvement in one case and complete resolution of symptoms in the second. Conclusion: Nerve tension testing may prove to be an aid in the diagnosis of saphenous nerve entrapments within a clinical setting in order to decrease time to diagnosis and proper treatment. PMID:24302782

  10. Thoracic origin of a sympathetic supply to the upper limb: the ‘nerve of Kuntz’ revisited

    PubMed Central

    RAMSAROOP, L.; PARTAB, P.; SINGH, B.; SATYAPAL, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the origin of the sympathetic innervation of the upper limb is important in surgical sympathectomy procedures. An inconstant intrathoracic ramus which joined the 2nd intercostal nerve to the ventral ramus of the 1st thoracic nerve, proximal to the point where the latter gave a large branch to the brachial plexus, has become known as the ‘nerve of Kuntz’ (Kuntz, 1927). Subsequently a variety of sympathetic interneuronal connections down to the 5th intercostal space were reported and also described as the nerve of Kuntz. The aim of this study was to determine: (1) the incidence, location and course of the nerve of Kuntz; (2) the relationship of the nerve of Kuntz to the 2nd thoracic ganglion; (3) the variations of the nerve of Kuntz in the absence of a stellate ganglion; (4) to compare the original intrathoracic ramus with sympathetic variations at other intercostal levels; and (5) to devise an appropriate anatomical classification of the nerves of Kuntz. Bilateral microdissection of the sympathetic chain and somatic nerves of the upper 5 intercostal spaces was undertaken in 32 fetuses (gestational age, 18 wk to full term) and 18 adult cadavers. The total sample size comprised 99 sides. Sympathetic contributions to the first thoracic nerve were found in 60 of 99 sides (left 32, right 28). Of these, 46 were confined to the 1st intercostal space only. The nerve of Kuntz (the original intrathoracic ramus) of the 1st intercostal space had a demonstrable sympathetic connection in 34 cases, and an absence of macroscopic sympathetic connections in 12. In the remaining intercostal spaces, intrathoracic rami uniting intercostal nerves were not observed. Additional sympathetic contributions (exclusive of rami communicantes) were noted between ganglia, interganglionic segments and intercostal nerves as additional rami communicantes. The eponym nerve of Kuntz should be restricted to descriptions of the intrathoracic ramus of the 1st intercostal space. Any of these variant sympathetic pathways may be responsible for the recurrence of symptoms after sympathectomy surgery. PMID:11787821

  11. The impact of cranial irradiation on the growth of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.J.; Foster, M.B.; D'Ercole, A.J.; McMillan, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Heights, height velocities, weights, and weight velocities were measured serially in 21 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had survived three to five years in continuous complete remission. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment regimens that varied according to whether cranial irradiation was used. Patients receiving cranial irradiation had lower height velocities during therapy than normal subjects and patients not receiving cranial irradiation. Twenty-two other children with ALL, who were irradiated but not randomized, exhibited similar alterations in growth. These results indicate that cranial irradiation, and not leukemia or antileukemia chemotherapy, causes reduced growth.

  12. Finite element analysis of the cranial base in subjects with Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, G D; McNamara, J A; Lozanoff, S

    1997-05-01

    The association between cranial base morphology and Class III malocclusion is poorly understood. This study analyses local shape- and size differences in cranial base configurations of Class I and Class III subjects, employing finite element (FEM) analysis. Seventy-three prepubertal European-American children with Class III malocclusion were compared to their counterparts with a normal, Class I molar occlusion. Lateral cephalographs were traced, checked and subdivided into age- and sex-matched groups. Thirteen points on the cranial base were identified and digitized, providing a geometrical cranial base representation. Average cranial geometries were scaled to an equivalent size and a FEM analysis, capable of depicting and quantifying local shape- and size-change, employed to highlight regionalized, morphological differences. While the anterior cranial base was more homogeneous for shape-change, significant, localized anisotropy in the posterior regions of the cranial base and around sella turcica was evident. For size-change, areas of negative allometry were located posteriorly, but dilations in the mid- and anterior cranial base also were apparent. It is concluded that morphological alterations within the petro-occipital complex accompanied by changes in the sphenoidal and ethmoidal regions induce deviation from a normal cranial base configuration to one associated with deficient orthocephalization and an appearance of Class III malocclusion. PMID:9218107

  13. Evaluation of the nerve-injured patient.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B

    2003-04-01

    The evaluation of patients with nerve injury or nerve compression requires an accurate history and subjective report to determine the tests that are the most useful in providing the essential information. Motor and sensory evaluation is necessary inglobal mixed-nerve injuries, but in cases of nerve compression, tests of provocation give more accurate information for detecting the site of nerve compression. There is no gold standard test in the evaluation of patients with nerve injury or compression; therefore, a battery of valid and reliable sensory and motor tests provides the most complete information to formulate a treatment plan. PMID:12737348

  14. A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis presenting with scleritis in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Joo, Young-Bin; Kim, Jeana; Min, Jun-Ki

    2010-06-01

    Hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) is an uncommon disorder that causes a localized or diffuse thickening of the dura mater and has been reported to be infrequently associated with systemic autoimmune disorders such as Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, Sjögren syndrome, and temporal arteritis. Here, we report a case of HCP initially presented with scleritis and headache in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). HCP was initially suspected on brain magnetic resonance imaging and defined pathologically on meningial biopsy. Immunologic studies showed the presence of anti-RNP antibody. After high dose corticosteroid therapy, the patient's symptoms and radiologic abnormalities of brain were improved. Our case suggested that HCP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of headache in a patient with UCTD presenting with scleritis. PMID:20514324

  15. Bedbugs: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments A - D Bedbugs Signs, symptoms Bedbugs: Signs and symptoms Bedbug bites : The bites often ... hiding place. Serious and life-threatening reactions to bedbug bites Although less common, it is possible to ...

  16. Acne: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments A - D Acne Signs, symptoms Acne: Signs and symptoms Blackheads and whiteheads Blackheads and ... sandpaper. View as one page View as slideshow Acne signs Many people think that acne is just ...

  17. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  18. Shingles: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments Q - T Shingles Signs, symptoms Shingles: Signs and symptoms Shingles tends to cause more ... painful before the shingles appeared. Learn more about shingles: Shingles Shingles: Who gets, causes Shingles: Diagnosis, treatment, ...

  19. Nerve injuries about the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; McAdams, Timothy R

    2010-10-01

    The ulnar, radial, median, medial antebrachial cutaneous, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are subject to traction and compression in athletes who place forceful, repetitive stresses across their elbow joint. Throwing athletes are at greatest risk, and cubital tunnel syndrome (involving the ulnar nerve) is clearly the most common neuropathy about the elbow. The anatomy and innervation pattern of the nerve involved determines the characteristic of the neuropathy syndrome. The most important parts of the work-up are the history and physical examination as electrodiagnostic testing and imaging are often not reliable. In general, active rest is the first line of treatment. Tailoring the surgery and rehabilitation protocol according to the functional requirements of that athlete's sport(s) can help optimize the operative outcomes for recalcitrant cases. PMID:20883903

  20. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  1. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  2. Morphology and variation in porpoise (Cetacea: Phocoenidae) cranial endocasts.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Rachel A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of endocranial anatomy in cetaceans is important from the perspective of echolocation ability, intelligence, social structure, and alternate pathways for circulation to the brain. Apart from the importance of studying brain shape and asymmetries as they relate to aspects of behavior and intelligence, cranial endocasts can show a close correspondence to the hydrostatic shape of the brain in life, and canals and grooves can preserve features of the circulatory system. Multiple samples are rarely available for studies of individual variation, especially in fossils, thus a first step in quantifying variation and making comparisons with fossils is made possible with CT scans of osteological specimens. This study presents a series of high-resolution X-ray CT-derived cranial endocasts of six extant species of Phocoenidae, a clade including some of the smallest and one of the rarest cetaceans. Degree of gyrification varies interspecifically and intraspecifically, possibly resulting from variation in preservation of the ossified meninges. Computed tomographic data show that visually assessed asymmetry in the cranial endocasts is not correlated with volumetric measurements, but nonetheless may reflect torsion in the skull's shape such that the right cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres extend rostrally and laterally more than the left. Vasculature and canals are similar to other described cetacean species, but the hypophyseal casts are unusual. Similarities between brain shape and volume measurements in the different species can be attributed to paedomorphism and concomitant variation in ecological preferences. This may explain similarities Neophocaena phocaenoides and Phocoena sinus share with the juvenile Phocoena phocoena specimen studied. PMID:23613315

  3. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Wollner, N.; Fuks, Z.

    1987-03-01

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Neuromodulation of the suprascapular nerve.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder joint is an enarthrodial or ball-and-socket joint. A complex network of anatomic structures endows the human shoulder with tremendous mobility, greater than any other joint in the body. Many pathologies can been found in those patients with chronic shoulder pain. The painful limitation of shoulder motion affects hand and arm motion as well; therefore, it significantly influences work performance and everyday activities as well as the quality of life. Therefore, the treatment of patients with chronic shoulder pain has major social and health economic implications. In this article we present a patient with a complex history of shoulder pathology including 7 surgeries that left the patient with chronic debilitating shoulder pain. She was suffering from chronic pain and limited mobility of the shoulder joint due to adhesive shoulder capsulitis. She was treated with a multimodality approach with the goals of increasing shoulder range of motion and decreasing her pain. This did not provide significant improvement. The suprascapular nerve supplies motor and sensory innervation to the shoulder, and can be easily accessible in the supraspinatus fossa. A suprascapular nerve block dramatically decreased her pain. This clinical observation along with confirmatory nerve block play an important role during the decision-making process for a trial period of electrical neuromodulation. She was followed for 3 months after the permanent implantation of a suprascapular nerve stimulator. Her pain and shoulder range of motion in all planes improved dramatically. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the suprascapular nerve, in addition to multimodality pain management, is one approach to the difficult task of treating adhesive capsulitis with accompanying pain and the inability to move the shoulder. We conducted a literature review on PubMed and found no case describing a similar patient to our knowledge. PMID:25415792

  5. Ulnar nerve entrapment neuropathy at the elbow: relationship between the electrophysiological findings and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Halac, Gulistan; Topaloglu, Pinar; Demir, Saliha; C?kr?kc?oglu, Mehmet Ali; Karadeli, Hasan Huseyin; Ozcan, Muhammet Emin; Asil, Talip

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Ulnar nerve neuropathies are the second most commonly seen entrapment neuropathies of the upper extremities after carpal tunnel syndrome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate pain among ulnar neuropathy patients by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and determine if it correlated with the severity of electrophysiologicalfindings. [Subjects and Methods] We studied 34 patients with clinical and electrophysiological ulnar nerve neuropathies at the elbow. After diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, all patients underwent the Turkish version of the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. [Results] The ulnar entrapment neuropathy at the elbow was classified as class-2, class-3, class-4, and class-5 (Padua Distal Ulnar Neuropathy classification) for 15, 14, 4, and 1 patient, respectively. No patient included in class-1 was detected. According to Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale, 24 patients scored under 12 points. The number of patients who achieved more than 12 points was 10. Groups were compared by using the ?2 test, and no difference was detected. There was no correlation between the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and electromyographic findings. [Conclusion] We found that the severity of electrophysiologic findings of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow did not differ between neuropathic and non-neuropathic groups as assessed by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. PMID:26311956

  6. Sensory neural conduction of median nerve from digits and palm stimulation in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Giannini, F; Passero, S; Paradiso, C; Battistini, N; Cioni, R

    1994-10-01

    The median sensory nerve conduction between ring finger and wrist is a suitable parameter for early detection of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), although shorter segments of median nerve have also been proposed for the same goal. In order to assess the relative diagnostic value of the sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the third palmar branch versus the SNCV of the second palmar branch, generally performed until now, we studied 62 patients with typical signs and symptoms of CTS. The following parameters were evaluated by surface recording: orthodromic SNCVs in digit-wrist segments for median (index = M2, third = M3 and ring = M4 fingers), ulnar (fourth = U4 finger) and radial (thumb = R1) nerves; SNCVs in palm-wrist segments by surface bipolar stimulation at each metacarpo-phalangeal interspace (second = P2 and third = P3 for the median nerve and fourth = P4 for the ulnar nerve); and distal motor latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. No responses at the wrist were recorded in 22.6% of patients after digital stimulation of M4, whereas the SNCV of P3, the palmar nerve branch arising from digital nerves of the medial side of M3 and the lateral side of M4, was measurable in 93.5% of patients. As significantly expressed (P < 0.001) by the increased ratio of the mean values of P2 and P3 in CTS patients, the SNCV of P3 decreased more frequently and to a greater extent than the SNCV of P2. PMID:7525240

  7. Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma with Simultaneous Cranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hwan-Su; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is reported at a rare level of incidence, and is frequently associated with underlying coagulopathy or those receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet agents; some cases accompany concomitant intracranial hemorrhage. The spontaneous development of spinal subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a neurological emergency; therefore, early diagnosis, the discontinuation of anticoagulant, and urgent surgical decompression are required to enable neurological recovery. In this report, we present a simultaneous spinal subdural hematoma and cranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, which mimicked an aneurysmal origin in a female patient who had been taking warfarin due to aortic valve replacement surgery. PMID:26113966

  8. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  9. Facial and Cochlear Nerve Complications following Microsurgical Resection of Vestibular Schwannomas in a Series of 221 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Xu, Bai-nan; Hou, Yuan-zheng; Sun, Guo-chen; Jiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite improvements in microsurgical technique and the use of intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, the potential for facial and cochlear nerve injury remains a possibility in the resection of vestibular schwannomas (VS). We reviewed a series of 221 cases of VS resected via a retrosigmoid approach at our institution from October 2008 to April 2014 and determined the incidence of postoperative facial and cochlear deficits. Material/Methods A total of 221 patients – 105 (47.5%) male and 116 (52.5%) female – with a mean age of 46.1 years (range 29–73 years), with VS ?3 cm (n=183, 82.8%) and <3 cm (n=38, 17.2%) underwent surgical resection via a retrosigmoid approach and were evaluated for postoperative facial and cochlear nerve deficits. Results Near-total resection (>95% removal) was achieved in 199 cases (90%) and subtotal resection (>90% removal) in 22 cases (10%). At 6 month follow-up, House-Brackmann grades I–III were observed in 183 cases (82.8%), grade IV in 16 cases (7.2%), and grade V in 22 cases (10%). Of the 10 patients that had preoperative functional hearing, 3 (33%) retained hearing postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 6 patients (2.7%), lower cranial nerve palsies in 9 patients (4.1%), and intracranial hematomas 3 cases (1.4%). Conclusions The observed incidence of persistent postoperative nerve deficits is very low. Meticulous microsurgical dissection of and around the facial and cochlear nerves with the aid of intraoperative electrophysiological nerve monitoring in the retrosigmoid approach allows for near-total resection of medium and large VS with the possibility of preservation of facial and cochlear nerve function. PMID:26056168

  10. [A case of Moebius syndrome--electrophysiological studies of facial nerve and brainstem].

    PubMed

    Noro, H; Wakai, S; Ishikawa, Y; Okabe, M; Minami, R

    1991-11-01

    A five-year old boy was the product of a 40 week pregnancy by vertex presentation complicated only by threatened abortion at approximately 8 weeks gestation. Apgar score was 5 after one minute. At birth he was noted to have a generalized hypotonia associated with facial diplegia, small mandible, weak suck and swallow reflexes. Admission examination revealed small mandible, mask-like facial expression and mild mental retardation. Cranial nerve examination showed bilateral blepharoptosis and facial nerve palsies. Pupil reflexes were normal, but corneal reflexes were impaired bilaterally. Diplopia due to the left abducens nerve palsy was suggested. There was no atrophy of the tongue. Motor tone, strength, and deep tendon reflexes were normal. A normal 46 XY karyotype was present. The other clinical and laboratory findings were normal. MRI of the brain was unremarkable. The characteristics of electrophysiological studies were summarized as follows: 1) Auditory brainstem evoked responses demonstrated waveforms IV-V were abnormal because their amplitudes were less than 30% of wave I bilaterally. 2) Somatosensory evoked potentials documented by central conduction times from cervical region to sensory cortex were prolonged on both sides. 3) Facial nerve conduction velocity was calculated by evoked EMGs of the mentalis muscle electrically stimulated at two distal points over the marginal mandibular branch. MCV of the left side was reduced (34.2 m/sec). 4) The amplitude of the facial muscle potentials evoked by facial nerve stimulation was reduced on both sides. 5) Blink reflex responses documented by the latency difference of R1 responses between the two sides were prolonged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1813186

  11. Oculomotor nerve injury induces nuerogenesis in the oculomotor and Edinger-Westphal nucleus of adult dog.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningxi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Zhen; Meng, Youqiang; Feng, Baohui; Wang, Xuhui; Yang, Min; Wan, Liang; Ning, Bo; Li, Shiting

    2013-11-01

    Technical developments have extensively promoted experimental and clinical studies on cranial nerve regeneration, but intracranial nerve recovery is still an unexplored research area compared to peripheral nerve repair. In this study, we researched whether neurogenesis occurs in adult oculomotor (OMN) and Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWN) or not after oculomotor nerve injury. To assess cell proliferation in response to unilateral oculomotor nerve crush (ONC) in adult beagle dog, repetitive 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) intravenous injections were performed during 3 or 7 days before the dogs were euthanized 2 h after the last injection on days 3, 7, 14, and 28 post-ONC. The proliferating cell types were investigated with three cell phenotypic markers and confocal microscopy on serial sections throughout the whole extent of OMN and EWN. BrdU-positive nuclei were detected in bilateral OMNs and EWNs from 3 to 28 days after ONC with the peak value at 3 days. Confocal analysis revealed that partial BrdU-positive cells colocalized with nestin or ?III-tubulin or GFAP, and the number of every kind of double-labeled cell maintained an increased tendency from 3 to 28 days post-ONC. Neither single-labeled BrdU-positive nuclei nor double-labeled cells were detected in the subependymal layer of cerebral aqueduct (SELCA) of all unilateral ONC dogs; also, they were not observed in the OMNs, EWNs, and SELCA of intact and sham-operated dog. These findings demonstrate that ONC can trigger continual mitotic activity, proliferation of NSCs, neurogenesis, and astrogliogenesis in the OMN and EWN of adult dogs. PMID:23832509

  12. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  17. [Ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block].

    PubMed

    Ota, Junichi; Hara, Kaoru

    2008-05-01

    Theoretically, sciatic nerve block can be used alone or in combination with lumbar plexus block or femoral nerve block for anesthesia and/or analgesia of lower limb surgery. However, clinical use of sciatic nerve block was limited by technical difficulties in performing the block since techniques used relies only on surface anatomical landmarks. Recent advances in ultrasound technology allow direct visualization of nerves and other surrounding structures and have increased the interest in performing many kinds of peripheral nerve blocks including sciatic nerve block. Preliminary data suggest that ultrasound-guided technique can help perform the sciatic nerve block more reliably and safely. In this article we describe the anatomy of the sciatic nerve, sonographic features, and technique of three major approaches including subgluteal, anterior, and popliteal approaches. The use of this technique for postoperative analgesia is also discussed. PMID:18516885

  18. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  20. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  1. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  2. Epineurial repair of an iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis after total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy in a dog with concurrent cranio-mandibular osteopathy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Ignacio; Espadas, Irene; Hammond, Gawain; Pratschke, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old male entire West Highland white terrier was referred to the Small Animal Hospital at the University of Glasgow for bilateral, chronic, medically unresponsive otitis media and externa. A history of cranio-mandibular osteopathy was also reported. Bilateral total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy was performed with the aid of a pneumatic burr. Extensive bone proliferation was present bilaterally originating from the caudal mandibular ramus and tympanic bulla which incorporated the horizontal canal on each side. The right facial nerve was identified leaving the stylomastoid foramen and running in a cranial direction through a 1.5 cm diameter cuff of bone surrounding the horizontal canal and external acoustic meatus. Despite careful dissection, a facial nerve neurotmesis ensued which required microsurgical epineurial repair. Neurologic examination performed 12 h post-operatively revealed abnormalities consistent with right facial nerve paralysis. At 3 months, the facial nerve function was found to have improved significantly and was assessed to be normal four months after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this clinical communication described the first reported clinical case where unilateral facial nerve paralysis resulting from iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis was successfully treated by microsurgical epineurial repair. PMID:25686402

  3. Cranial Size and IQ in Asian Americans from Birth to Age Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, J. Philippe

    1997-01-01

    Data from the Collaborative Perinatal Project analyzed for a subsample of 100 Asian Americans showed a higher IQ for the Asian American sample at age 7, and larger cranial capacity at birth, 4 months, 1 year, and 7 years as compared to Whites and Blacks. Socioeconomic status related to cranial capacity and IQ scores, but not stature or weight.…

  4. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base

    PubMed Central

    Kimbel, William H.; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee–human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  5. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tekkök, ?smail Hakk?

    2015-01-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM. PMID:26361537

  6. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base.

    PubMed

    Kimbel, William H; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D

    2014-01-21

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee-human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  7. Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II. PMID:19844632

  8. Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2009-09-01

    A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II. PMID:19844632

  9. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  10. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits) in repairing nerve defects in children

    PubMed Central

    Sénès, Filippo Maria; Catena, Nunzio; Sénès, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct neurorrhaphy, nerve grafting interposition and neurotization are the options for nerve repair in children, whereas few reports about using nerve conduits (tubulization) are referred to pediatrics in the literature. The authors present their experience about nerve repairing by means of nerve tubes during the developmental age when the harvesting of nerve grafts and also vein grafts of adequate caliber for bridging nerve defects is difficult. A critical review of their case series offers indications for using nerve conduits in pediatrics. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients were treated using the nerve tubulization; nine patients were affected by obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) while six were suffering from peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs). Results: In patients suffering from OBPP, we observed 1 good, 3 fair and 5 bad results. In the PNI group, we observed 4 patients who had good results while only 2 had a bad outcome. No fair results were observed. Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as a first choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction. PMID:26538763

  11. Nerve conduction studies in adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, V; Moser, H W; Cornblath, D R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is an X linked metabolic disorder presenting with progressive spastic paraparesis in the third to fifth decade of life. Although peripheral neuropathy is also present in most patients, prominent pyramidal signs may make its clinical recognition difficult. The objective was to characterise the peripheral neuropathy in patients with AMN by nerve conduction studies. METHODS--Nerve conduction studies were performed in 99 men known to have AMN and in 38 heterozygous women, all of whom had neurological disabilities. RESULTS--Of the 13 variables obtained, at least one was abnormal in 82% of patients. The abnormalities were more common in men than in women (87% v 67%); in legs than in arms (77% v 38%); in motor than in sensory conduction (80% v 39%); and in latency (distal and F wave) and velocity compared with amplitude (80% v 29%). Twenty six patients had at least one nerve variable value in the demyelinating range. Four variables (sural velocity, peroneal amplitude, peroneal velocity, and peroneal F wave) were correlated with the expanded disability status scale; five variables (peroneal velocity, tibial H reflex, median distal latency, median conduction velocity, and median F wave latency) were correlated with serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs); and two variables (sural amplitude and peroneal distal latency) were more likely to be abnormal in patients with normal adrenal function than in patients with Addison's disease. CONCLUSIONS--Nerve conduction studies in patients with AMN are often abnormal and suggest a mixture of axonal loss and multifocal demyelination. Their correlation with disability status and serum VLCFAs suggests that measures from nerve conduction studies may be useful in evaluating future treatments. Images PMID:8708687

  12. Primary intracardiac malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Arava, Sudheer; Bagmar, Saphalta; Jain, Parul; Kumaran, Muthu; Kumar, Sanjeev; Ray, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors constituting approximately 75% of all the cardiac tumors. Rest 25% are malignant and sarcomas being the commonest. Among the sarcomas primary cardiac malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are extremely rare. They usually arise in relation to the branches of vagus or phrenic nerves, 5-42% being associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. Clinical signs and symptoms depend on the location and extent of involvement. Complete resection is the treatment of choice but local recurrence is common. PMID:26549085

  13. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in humans: an effective therapy?

    PubMed

    Spuck, Sebastian; Nowak, Georg; Renneberg, Axel; Tronnier, Volker; Sperner, Jürgen

    2008-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an additive treatment option for refractory epilepsy. The electrode is placed on the cervical trunk of the left vagus nerve. In patients who are not suitable for left-sided vagus nerve stimulation (L-VNS) right-sided vagus nerve stimulation (R-VNS) may be as effective. In animal models epilepsy is sufficiently suppressed by R-VNS. In a 16 years old boy suffering from medically refractory psychomotoric seizures with secondary generalisation, L-VNS reduced the frequency of generalized seizures. A deep wound infection required the removal of the system eight weeks later. Cicatrisation did not allow preparation of the left vagus nerve, therefore we implanted R-VNS with sufficient seizure suppression. However, compared to L-VNS, the effect occurred months later and cardiac symptoms were induced by stimulation of the right vagus nerve. R-VNS seems to be an effective and alternative therapy in selected patients responding to L-VNS where a left-sided reimplantation is not possible. Placement and adjustment of the device should be performed under ECG control. Further studies are necessary to compare the efficacy of L-VNS and R-VNS. PMID:18801642

  14. The nerve gap. Theory and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1986-11-01

    In peripheral nerve surgery, the term "gap" means the distance between the two stumps of a transected peripheral nerve without further specification. The factors that contribute to the formation of a gap are analyzed in this paper. It becomes clear that the gap formed by a true nerve defect has a different meaning than a gap formed by elastic retraction. The final length of a particular nerve gap in an extremity is decisively influenced by the joint position. Therefore, the question arises regarding how a nerve adapts to the length difference during limb motion, which can be estimated for the median nerve during flexion and extension of the elbow joint with approximately 10 cm in an adult patient. Three mechanisms play an important role: true elongation of the length of the nerve in the relaxed state against elastic forces; movement of the nerve trunk in the longitudinal direction; and increase and decrease of the tissue relaxation at the level of the nerve trunk (relaxed course) and the nerve fibers (change in the undulated course). The efficiency of this mechanism partially depends on the ability of the nerve to move against the surrounding tissue. This ability is provided by the loose connective tissue around the nerve (adventitia, conjunctiva nervorum, perineurium). Only if this movement is possible, traction forces to elongate the nerve are distributed over the whole length of the nerve and are kept minimal for each particular segment. Adhesions of the nerve trunk at the site of repair prevent an equal distribution of forces and cause an unfavorable rise of traction forces at certain segments, according to the anatomic site. True elongation of the nerve, therefore, has only a limited application in overcoming a gap. Alternatives are rerouting, limb-shortening, and nerve-grafting. Today, the most reliable technique is the use of autologous cutaneous nerve segments as free nerve grafts. Advantages and disadvantages of "vascularized" nerve grafts are discussed. The use of neuromatous neurotization to overcome a gap is still in an experimental state. PMID:3539948

  15. Nodal gap substance in diabetic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, K. N.; Weerasuriya, A.

    1974-01-01

    Anoxia and KC1 have been used to inactivate peripheral nerves by depolarization conduction block. Investigation of the inactivation patterns in isolated sciatic nerves of healthy and alloxan-diabetic rats suggests that the paranodal gap substance of healthy nerve behaves as an effective periaxonal diffusion barrier. In diabetic nerve the permeability of this barrier is significantly increased. A marked reduction in the K' binding capacity of the nodal gap substance has been demonstrated in myelinated nerves of human diabetics and alloxan diabetic rats. Images PMID:4276085

  16. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  17. Amniotic membrane covering for facial nerve repair?

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Murat; Tuncel, Arzu; Sheidaei, Shahrouz; ?enol, Mehmet Güney; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Deveci, Ildem; Karaman, Nihan

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic membranes have been widely used in ophthalmology and skin injury repair because of their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we measured therapeutic efficacy and determined if amniotic membranes could be used for facial nerve repair. The facial nerves of eight rats were dissected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Amniotic membranes were covered on the anastomosis sites in four rats. Electromyography results showed that, at the end of the 3rd and 8th weeks after amniotic membrane covering, the latency values of the facial nerves covered by amniotic membranes were significantly shortened and the amplitude values were significantly increased. Compared with simple facial nerve anastomosis, after histopathological examination, facial nerve anastomosed with amniotic membrane showed better continuity, milder inflammatory reactions, and more satisfactory nerve conduction. These findings suggest that amniotic membrane covering has great potential in facial nerve repair. PMID:25206390

  18. Facial nerve surgery in the 19th and early 20th centuries: The evolution from crossover anastomosis to direct nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Shah, S B; Jackler, R K

    1998-03-01

    The historical aspects of facial nerve (FN) anatomy and of Bell's palsy have long been favorite topics of otologic historians. Little attention has been paid, however, to the evolution of FN surgery, a subject with a remarkably rich and engaging history. In the early 13th century, Roland, an Italian surgeon, used a red hot iron to coapt severed nerve endings. In the 17th century, Ferrara, another Italian, sutured injured nerves with tortoise tendon dipped in hot red wine. It was not until the late 19th century that peripheral nerve suture became a subject of serious scientific study. Although it is ironic, the course of events suggests that the evolution of FN repair was greatly stimulated by the development of the modern mastoid operation. Whereas the simple mastoid operation practiced by Wilde (1853) and others carried little risk of FN injury, more adventuresome procedures such as radical mastoidectomy (Kessel, 1885) carried a much greater risk. The abundance of iatrogenic palsies during this era undoubtedly did much to motivate surgeons to seek a better means of restoring facial animation. Most surgeons would be surprised to learn that crossover anastomoses predated direct nerve repair by nearly half a century. In 1879, the German surgeon Drobnik performed the first facial-spinal accessory anastomosis. Over the next two decades, numerous articles were written (most notably by Sir Charles Balance and Harvey Cushing) on crossovers between the FN and cranial nerves IX, X, XI, and XII. Although a few tentative attempts at reapproximating severed FNs took place in the first two decades of this century, it was not until 1925 that an actual suture repair of an intratemporal injury was undertaken. This feat was first accomplished by the famous hand surgeon Sterling Bunnell and shortly thereafter by the otolaryngologist Robert Martin. The evolution of FN surgery in the days predating the operating microscope is a rich tapestry of colorful personalities and clashing egos, which saw promising advances relegated to obscurity and some previously obscure techniques become progressively more promising. PMID:9520063

  19. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the weighted strategy isocentric positioning correction provided the reduction of fiducial registration errors, featuring up to 61.7% decrease in median values (versus 46.8% for the unweighted strategy) of initial displacements. The weighted strategy proved high performance in minimizing the effects of fiducial localization errors, showing a great potential in improving patient setup. The clinical data analysis revealed that the application of a robust reconstruction algorithm may provide high-quality results in patient setup verification, by properly managing external fiducials localization errors.

  20. [The nerve agent sarin: history, clinical manifestations, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Nobuo

    2014-05-01

    Organic phosphate pesticides were used worldwide after World War II and experiences on poisoning and treatment have been accumulated. An organic phosphate "nerve agent" Sarin was used in two terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990s. Sarin effects on humans were well documented in these two incidents. Sarin gas inhalation caused instantaneous death by respiratory arrest in several victims in Matsumoto. Severely injured victims presenting with coma and generalized convulsion were resuscitated and recovered rapidly without sequelae. Miosis and blurred-dark vision, ocular pain, copious secretions from respiratory and gastrointestinal tract (muscarinic effects), and headache were common in severely to slightly affected victims. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity decreased in parallel with the severity of signs and symptoms in victims. Oximes, atropine sulphate, diazepam, and ample intravenous infusion were effective treatments. Follow-up examinations on victims were conducted up to 10 years in Matsumoto, and 5 years in Tokyo. No neurological sequelae or abnormalities were observed after 1 year, except for a few EEG abnormalities or delay in sensory nerve conduction velocity. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was observed in several of the victims in the 5-year follow up, irrespective of the severity of poisoning at Matsumoto. Psychological symptoms continue in victims of both incidents. PMID:24807372

  1. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gül, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  2. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gül, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  3. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ‘cross-bridging’ to promote nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ‘protect’ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26692833

  4. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  5. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  6. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID:25076936

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of amyloid proteins in sural nerves and clinical associations in amyloid neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K.; Kyle, R. A.; Dyck, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    To test whether immunohistochemical characterization of proteins in amyloid deposits in biopsied sural nerves gives reliable and useful diagnostic information using commercially available reagents, biopsy specimens of sural nerves from 38 patients with amyloid neuropathy were studied. Transthyretin (TTR) was detected in the amyloid deposits of 11 nerves, lambda light chains (LC) in 8 nerves, kappa LC in 7 nerves, and both lambda and kappa LC in 3 nerves. In 9 nerves, the amyloid deposits were too small to allow adequate immunohistochemical characterization of amyloid proteins in serial sections. Evidence that immunohistochemical characterization was correct came from: 1) evaluation of kin, 2) search for monoclonal proteins in the plasma, and 3) sequencing of the gene abnormalities in TTR+ cases. In 9 of 11 TTR+ cases, in which DNA could be obtained, sequencing of the gene showed that each of the 9 cases was heterozygous for a gene mutation; 7 had previously described mutations and 2 undescribed mutations. Therefore, in the nine sporadic cases without plasma monoclonal light chains, the immunohistochemical characterization correctly identified the protein in amyloid as transthyretin. Likewise, there was a high concordance between immunoglobulin light chains in plasma and light chains in amyloid in primary amyloidosis. Evaluation of the type, distribution, and severity of the neurologic symptoms and deficits showed: 1) the sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy of amyloidosis characteristically affects proximal as well as distal limbs, and 2) the type of amyloidosis probably cannot be determined from the characteristics or severity of the neuropathy alone or from the location or size of amyloid deposits in nerve. Images Figure 1 PMID:1321563

  8. Hyperfractionated Low-Dose (21 Gy) Radiotherapy for Cranial Skeletal Metastases in Patients With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Barker, Christopher A.; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel; Yataghene, Karima; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To present a large experience (73 patients) using a standard radiotherapy (RT) protocol to prevent relapse in cranial sites where measurable metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), an adverse prognostic marker, is common. Methods and Materials: High-risk NB patients with measurable cranial disease at diagnosis or residual cranial disease after induction therapy had those sites irradiated with hyperfractionated 21 Gy; a brain-sparing technique was used for an extensive field. The patients were grouped according to the response to systemic therapy. Thus, when irradiated, Group 1 patients were in complete remission and Group 2 patients had primary refractory disease. Follow-up was from the start of cranial RT. Results: At 3 years, the 39 Group 1 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 51%; control of cranial disease was 79%. Two relapses involved irradiated cranial sites. Two other patients relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites 6 and 12 months after a systemic relapse. At 3 years, the 34 Group 2 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 33%; control of cranial disease was 52%. Group 2 included 19 patients who had residual cranial (with or without extracranial) disease. The cranial sites showed major (n = 13), minor (n = 2), or no response (n = 4) to RT. Five patients had progression in the cranial RT field at 10-27 months. Group 2 also included 15 patients who had persistent NB in extracranial, but not cranial, sites. Of these 15 patients, 2 relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites and elsewhere at 8 and 14 months. Cranial RT was well tolerated, with no Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated 21-Gy cranial RT might help control NB and is feasible without significant toxicity in children.

  9. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration with synkinesis. FNP after acoustic neuroma surgery remains the most common indication for FN rehabilitation. PMID:25859138

  10. Determining the sex of human remains through cranial morphology.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tracy L

    2005-05-01

    Sex determination is the keystone of a biological profile, yet few qualitative methods of cranial sex determination have been tested. This analysis examines the accuracy and precision of 17 morphological features of the skull commonly used to determine the sex of unknown skeletal remains. The sample consists of 46 identified skulls from the 19th century St. Thomas' Anglican Church Cemetery in Belleville, Canada. Nasal aperature, zygomatic extension, malar size/rugosity, and supraorbital ridge proved the most useful; of secondary value are chin form and nuchal crest; mastoid size is of tertiary consideration; nasal size and mandibular symphysis/ramus size rank fourth; forehead shape ranks fifth; and palate size/shape are sixth. Skull size/architecture provides an internal standard to assess the relative sizes of other traits. This research is a necessary step in establishing the credibility of morphological sex determination with respect to the Daubert and Mohan criteria for admissibility in a court of law. PMID:15932077

  11. Bioceramic Implant Induces Bone Healing of Cranial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kihlström, Lars; Lundgren, Kalle; Trobos, Margarita; Engqvist, Håkan; Thomsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Autologous bone or inert alloplastic materials used in cranial reconstructions are techniques that are associated with resorption, infection, and implant exposure. As an alternative, a calcium phosphate–based implant was developed and previously shown to potentially stimulate bone growth. We here uncover evidence of induced bone formation in 2 patients. Histological examination 9 months postoperatively showed multinuclear cells in the central defect zone and bone ingrowth in the bone-implant border zone. An increased expression of bone-associated markers was detected. The other patient was investigated 50 months postoperatively. Histological examination revealed ceramic materials covered by vascularized compact bone. The bone regenerative effect induced by the implant may potentially improve long-term clinical outcome compared with conventional techniques, which needs to be verified in a clinical study. PMID:26495204

  12. Optogenetic control of nerve growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjun; Koppes, Ryan A.; Froriep, Ulrich P.; Jia, Xiaoting; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H.; McLaughlin, Bryan L.; Anikeeva, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical stimulation. In this report, we explore optogenetic control of neurite growth as a cell-specific alternative to electrical stimulation. By investigating a broad range of optical stimulation parameters on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) expressing channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2), we identified conditions that enhance neurite outgrowth by three-fold as compared to unstimulated or wild-type (WT) controls. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of ChR2 expressing DRGs induces directional outgrowth in WT DRGs co-cultured within a 10?mm vicinity of the optically sensitive ganglia. This observed enhancement and polarization of neurite growth was accompanied by an increased expression of neural growth and brain derived neurotrophic factors (NGF, BDNF). This work highlights the potential for implementing optogenetics to drive nerve growth in specific cell populations. PMID:25982506

  13. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: a rare manifestation of internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Santos, Telma; Morais, Hugo; Oliveira, Gustavo; Barros, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old man reported sudden-onset binocular double vision that appeared 3?days earlier. He denied history of headache/cervical pain or trauma. He had a medical history of well-controlled diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Neurological examination revealed a left-sided ptosis and binocular horizontal diplopia in dextroversion without apparent extraocular-muscle paresis or pupillary involvement. Other cranial nerves were spared as well as motor, sensory and coordination systems. There were no signs of ocular erythema, proptosis or palpable orbital mass. Brain MR angiography revealed a crescent-shaped mural hyperintensity in left internal carotid artery (ICA) at skull base, extending to intrapetrous segment, with reduced calibre and flow, suggesting a left ICA dissection. The patient was started on antiaggregation therapy. A year later he was asymptomatic and CT angiography confirmed ICA recanalisation. PMID:25323280

  14. Intra-Cranial Recordings of Brain Activity During Language Production

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Anaïs; Trébuchon, Agnès; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine; Alario, F.-Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings in the neurophysiology of language production have provided a detailed description of the brain network underlying this behavior, as well as some indications about the timing of operations. Despite their invaluable utility, these data generally suffer from limitations either in terms of temporal resolution, or in terms of spatial localization. In addition, studying the neural basis of speech is complicated by the presence of articulation artifacts such as electro-myographic activity that interferes with the neural signal. These difficulties are virtually absent in a powerful albeit much less frequent methodology, namely the recording of intra-cranial brain activity (intra-cranial electroencephalography). Such recordings are only possible under very specific clinical circumstances requiring functional mapping before brain surgery, most notably in patients that suffer from pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Here we review the research conducted with this methodology in the field of language production, with explicit consideration of its advantages and drawbacks. The available evidence is shown to be diverse, both in terms of the tasks and the cognitive processes tested and in terms of the brain localizations being studied. Still, the review provides valuable information for characterizing the dynamics of the neural events occurring in the language production network. Following modality specific activities (in auditory or visual cortices), there is a convergence of activity in superior temporal sulcus, which is a plausible neural correlate of phonological encoding processes. Later, between 500 and 800?ms, inferior frontal gyrus (around Broca’s area) is involved. Peri-rolandic areas are recruited in the two modalities relatively early (200–500?ms window), suggesting a very early involvement of (pre-) motor processes. We discuss how some of these findings may be at odds with conclusions drawn from available meta-analysis of language production studies. PMID:22207857

  15. Computer aided design of large-format prefabricated cranial plates.

    PubMed

    Dean, David; Min, Kyoung-June; Bond, Angus

    2003-11-01

    The authors' objective in this project was to replace current state-of-the-art manual methods for preoperative production (i.e., prefabrication) of large-format (>100 cm2) cranioplasties with a system for computer-aided design and direct computer-aided manufacture of the implant's shape. This system uses standard 3D CT data, requires no specialized training, and produces an accurately fitting cranioplasty that can be recast in the physician's material of choice (e.g., polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA] or pre-bent titanium plating). The authors begin by locating the cranial defect margin on a skull surface image generated from a 3D head CT-scan. A right-to-left mirrored or average 3D skull surface template image is then fit to the patient's skull surface image. The area around the defect is cut out and stitched to the previously isolated defect margin. This defect-filling surface is then tapered and 3D printed. The 3D printed implant model is then recast in a biocompatible material. Manually generated cranial implants produced for five patients were compared with implants resulting from this new computer-based method. All five computer-generated implants were better fitting and more cosmetically suitable than the manually generated skull plates received by these patients. These well-fitting implants are more likely to protect the brain from trauma and infection. Therefore, the authors conclude that their new production method provides a better result with less expense than current methods for preoperative or intraoperative fabrication of large-format cranioplasties. PMID:14600623

  16. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D; Stringer, Chris B

    2015-10-22

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on. PMID:26468243

  17. Cranial musculature in the larva of the caecilian, Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Within the Gymnophiona (caecilians) oviparous species with biphasic life-cycles possess a free living semi-aquatic larval stage that feeds in aquatic habitats. The larvae pass through a metamorphosis to a purely terrestrial adult stage. It is likely that the cranial morphology of caecilian larvae has specializations for aquatic feeding. However, little is known about the cranial morphology, and the cranial musculature is especially neglected in the literature. This study provides a detailed description of the jaw and hyobranchial musculature in larval stages of a caecilian. We studied late embryonic and early larval specimens of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis. Furthermore, we compared and homologized the cranial muscles found in larval I. kohtaoensis with the muscles described for adult caecilians. Most cranial muscles of larval I. kohtaoensis are also present in the adult, except for the m. levator mandibulae externus and the m. subarcualis obliquus II. Our results were compared with the data available for larval frogs and salamanders in order to hypothesize the cranial musculature in the larva of the most recent common ancestor of the Lissamphibia. Larval caecilians, frog tadpoles, and salamander larvae share many characters in their cranial musculature, which, consequently, can be assigned to the lissamphibian ground pattern. However, the m. pterygoideus and the m. levator quadrati are unique to the Gymnophiona. PMID:17154285

  18. Schwannoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tumor of the nerve of hearing (the 8th cranial nerve, also known as the acoustic or vestibulocochlear nerve). ... the tumor affects the facial nerve (the 7th cranial nerve, which is located next to the 8th cranial ...

  19. Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ... Nerve Disorders Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is impairment of horizontal eye movements caused by damage to certain connections between nerve ...

  20. Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J

    2015-01-01

    All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M. leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. The nine-banded armadillo provides the only animal model of the pathogenesis of M. leprae infection. New tools available for this model enable the study and correlation of events occurring in epidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerves, and nerve trunks, including neurophysiologic parameters, bacterial load, and changes in gene transcription in both neural and inflammatory cells. The armadillo model is likely to enhance understanding of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy and offers a means of testing proposed interventions. PMID:25432810

  1. In vivo detection of nerve injury in familial amyloid polyneuropathy by magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, Jennifer; Hund, Ernst; Hornung, Benjamin; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan O; Kimmich, Christoph; Kristen, Arnt V; Purrucker, Jan; Röcken, Christoph; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-03-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited multisystem disorder usually manifesting with a rapidly progressive, axonal, distally-symmetric polyneuropathy. The detection of nerve injury by nerve conduction studies is limited, due to preferential involvement of small-fibres in early stages. We investigated whether lower limb nerve-injury can be detected, localized and quantified in vivo by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. We prospectively included 20 patients (12 male and eight female patients, mean age 47.9 years, range 26-66) with confirmed mutation in the transthyretin gene: 13 with symptomatic polyneuropathy and seven asymptomatic gene carriers. A large age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy volunteers served as controls (20 male and 20 female, mean age 48.1 years, range 30-73). All patients received detailed neurological and electrophysiological examinations and were scored using the Neuropathy Impairment Score-Lower Limbs, Neuropathy Deficit and Neuropathy Symptom Score. Magnetic resonance neurography (3 T) was performed with large longitudinal coverage from proximal thigh to ankle-level and separately for each leg (140 axial slices/leg) by using axial T2-weighted (repetition time/echo time = 5970/55 ms) and dual echo (repetition time 5210 ms, echo times 12 and 73 ms) turbo spin echo 2D sequences with spectral fat saturation. A 3D T2-weighted inversion-recovery sequence (repetition time/echo time 3000/202 ms) was acquired for imaging of the spinal nerves and lumbar plexus (50 axial slice reformations). Precise manual segmentation of the spinal/sciatic/tibial/common peroneal nerves was performed on each slice. Histogram-based normalization of nerve-voxel signal intensities was performed using the age- and sex-matched control group as normative reference. Nerve-voxels were subsequently classified as lesion-voxels if a threshold of >1.2 (normalized signal-intensity) was exceeded. At distal thigh level, where a predominant nerve-lesion-voxel burden was observed, signal quantification was performed by calculating proton spin density and T2-relaxation time as microstructural markers of nerve tissue integrity. The total number of nerve-lesion voxels (cumulated from proximal-to-distal) was significantly higher in symptomatic patients (20 405 ± 1586) versus asymptomatic gene carriers (12 294 ± 3199; P = 0.036) and versus controls (6536 ± 467; P < 0.0001). It was also higher in asymptomatic carriers compared to controls (P = 0.043). The number of nerve-lesion voxels was significantly higher at thigh level compared to more distal levels (lower leg/ankle) of the lower extremities (f-value = 279.22, P < 0.0001). Further signal-quantification at this proximal site (thigh level) revealed a significant increase of proton-density (P < 0.0001) and T2-relaxation-time (P = 0.0011) in symptomatic patients, whereas asymptomatic gene-carriers presented with a significant increase of proton-density only. Lower limb nerve injury could be detected and quantified in vivo on microstructural level by magnetic resonance neurography in symptomatic familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and also in yet asymptomatic gene carriers, in whom imaging detection precedes clinical and electrophysiological manifestation. Although symptoms start and prevail distally, the focus of predominant nerve injury and injury progression was found proximally at thigh level with strong and unambiguous lesion-contrast. Imaging of proximal nerve lesions, which are difficult to detect by nerve conduction studies, may have future implications also for other distally-symmetric polyneuropathies. PMID:25526974

  2. In vivo detection of nerve injury in familial amyloid polyneuropathy by magnetic resonance neurography

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Ernst; Hornung, Benjamin; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan O.; Kimmich, Christoph; Kristen, Arnt V.; Purrucker, Jan; Röcken, Christoph; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited multisystem disorder usually manifesting with a rapidly progressive, axonal, distally-symmetric polyneuropathy. The detection of nerve injury by nerve conduction studies is limited, due to preferential involvement of small-fibres in early stages. We investigated whether lower limb nerve-injury can be detected, localized and quantified in vivo by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. We prospectively included 20 patients (12 male and eight female patients, mean age 47.9 years, range 26–66) with confirmed mutation in the transthyretin gene: 13 with symptomatic polyneuropathy and seven asymptomatic gene carriers. A large age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy volunteers served as controls (20 male and 20 female, mean age 48.1 years, range 30–73). All patients received detailed neurological and electrophysiological examinations and were scored using the Neuropathy Impairment Score–Lower Limbs, Neuropathy Deficit and Neuropathy Symptom Score. Magnetic resonance neurography (3 T) was performed with large longitudinal coverage from proximal thigh to ankle-level and separately for each leg (140 axial slices/leg) by using axial T2-weighted (repetition time/echo time = 5970/55 ms) and dual echo (repetition time 5210 ms, echo times 12 and 73 ms) turbo spin echo 2D sequences with spectral fat saturation. A 3D T2-weighted inversion-recovery sequence (repetition time/echo time 3000/202 ms) was acquired for imaging of the spinal nerves and lumbar plexus (50 axial slice reformations). Precise manual segmentation of the spinal/sciatic/tibial/common peroneal nerves was performed on each slice. Histogram-based normalization of nerve–voxel signal intensities was performed using the age- and sex-matched control group as normative reference. Nerve-voxels were subsequently classified as lesion-voxels if a threshold of >1.2 (normalized signal-intensity) was exceeded. At distal thigh level, where a predominant nerve–lesion–voxel burden was observed, signal quantification was performed by calculating proton spin density and T2-relaxation time as microstructural markers of nerve tissue integrity. The total number of nerve–lesion voxels (cumulated from proximal-to-distal) was significantly higher in symptomatic patients (20 405 ± 1586) versus asymptomatic gene carriers (12 294 ± 3199; P = 0.036) and versus controls (6536 ± 467; P < 0.0001). It was also higher in asymptomatic carriers compared to controls (P = 0.043). The number of nerve–lesion voxels was significantly higher at thigh level compared to more distal levels (lower leg/ankle) of the lower extremities (f-value = 279.22, P < 0.0001). Further signal-quantification at this proximal site (thigh level) revealed a significant increase of proton-density (P < 0.0001) and T2-relaxation-time (P = 0.0011) in symptomatic patients, whereas asymptomatic gene-carriers presented with a significant increase of proton-density only. Lower limb nerve injury could be detected and quantified in vivo on microstructural level by magnetic resonance neurography in symptomatic familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and also in yet asymptomatic gene carriers, in whom imaging detection precedes clinical and electrophysiological manifestation. Although symptoms start and prevail distally, the focus of predominant nerve injury and injury progression was found proximally at thigh level with strong and unambiguous lesion-contrast. Imaging of proximal nerve lesions, which are difficult to detect by nerve conduction studies, may have future implications also for other distally-symmetric polyneuropathies. PMID:25526974

  3. The relationship between the cranial base and jaw base in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The cranial base plays an important role in determining how the mandible and maxilla relate to each other. This study assessed the relationship between the cranial base and jaw base in a Chinese population. Methods This study involved 83 subjects (male: 27; female: 56; age: 18.4?±?4.2 SD years) from Hong Kong, who were classified into 3 sagittal discrepancy groups on the basis of their ANB angle. A cephalometric analysis of the angular and linear measurements of their cranial and jaw bases was carried out. The morphological characteristics of the cranial and jaw bases in the three groups were compared and assessments were made as to whether a relationship existed between the cranial base and the jaw base discrepancy. Results Significant differences were found in the cranial base angles of the three groups. Skeletal Class II cases presented with a larger NSBa, whereas skeletal Class III cases presented with a smaller NSBa (P?cranial base angle NSBa and the SNB for the whole sample, (r?=?-0.523, P?cranial base appears to have a certain correlation with the jaw base relationship in a southern Chinese population. The correlation between cranial base and jaw base tends to be closer in skeletal Class III cases. PMID:25129070

  4. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  5. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung Jun; Zhang, Ho Yeol

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed. PMID:26539275

  6. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental role in mitochondrial transport and mutations in some of related encoding genes cause peripheral neuropathy (TUBB3, NEFL, HSPB1, HSPB8, HSPB3, DNAJB2). In this review, we address the abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics and their role in determining CMT disease and related neuropathies. PMID:25847151

  7. A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). Methods In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n?=?23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n?=?20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression - Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. Results DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. Conclusions These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients’ depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394. PMID:25038733

  8. Two applications of end-to-side nerve neurorrhaphy in severe upper-extremity nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Fuat; Peker, Fatih; Celiköz, Bahattin

    2004-01-01

    End-to-side and side-to-side techniques (what we call alternative nerve repair techniques) have been investigated in detail in both experimental and clinical studies. There have not been any large series, but only some case reports describing either successful or disappointing functional results in the recent literature. Two cases presented here were of two extreme examples of nerve injuries that had no chance for direct repair; alternative choices were performed. One was a side-to-side neurorrhaphy between the ulnar and median nerves, and the other was an end-to-side nerve repair of the median and radial nerves to the ulnar nerve. Both patients regained their diminished protective sensation and returned to their occupations. Based on these results and our review of the current literature, we consider alternative nerve repair techniques to be reasonable, prudent, and scientific choices for the treatment of some challenging nerve injury cases. PMID:15378581

  9. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Bland, Jeremy D P; Bhat, Manzoor A; Bennett, David L H

    2014-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P<0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P<0.0001) indicative of C and A?-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P>0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P<0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P>0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P<0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients' symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P<0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  10. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Annina B.; Bland, Jeremy D. P.; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P < 0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P < 0.0001) indicative of C and A?-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P > 0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P < 0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P > 0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P < 0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients’ symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P < 0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  11. Interventional nerve visualization via the intrinsic anisotropic optical properties of the nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Kenneth W.; Meijerink, Andries; Chin, Patrick T. K.

    2015-07-01

    We present an optical concept to visualize nerves during surgical interventions. The concept relies on the anisotropic optical properties of the nerves which allows for specific switching of the optical reflection by the nervous tissue. Using a low magnification polarized imaging system we are able to visualize the on and off switching of the optical reflection of the nervous tissue, enabling a non-invasive nerve specific real-time nerve visualization during surgery.

  12. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudo?-Szopi?ska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  13. Ventral nerve cord in Phoronopsis harmeri larvae.

    PubMed

    Temereva, Elena N

    2012-01-15

    The nervous system organization is considered a phylogenetically important character among metazoans. The phylum Phoronida is included in a supraphyletic taxon known as Lophotrochozoa. Many lophotrochozoans possess a metameric ventral nerve cord as adults or larvae. Phoronids do not exhibit external metamery either as larvae or as adults. The current study describes the ventral nerve cord in the young larva of Phoronopsis harmeri. This structure is apparent both in the serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic nervous system in young larvae. The ventral nerve cord extends from the mouth to the tentacular ridge. Both serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic components consist of two ventrolateral nerves, each with several unipolar neurons. The ventrolateral nerves connect to each other by means of thin repetitive transversal nerves ("commissures"). The abundance of neurons and nerves in the epidermis of the oral field of actinotrocha larva likely reflects the importance of this area in collection of food particles. The ventral nerve cords of the actinotrocha and the metatrochophore differ in their positions with respect to ciliated bands: the cord is located between the preoral and postoral ciliated bands in the actinotrocha but between the postoral ciliated band and telotroch in the metatrochophore. The presence of the ventral nerve cord, which contains repetitive elements (neurons and "commissures"), in the early development of P. harmeri may recapitulate some stages of nervous system development during phoronid phylogeny. The larval nervous system does not contain nervous centers under the tentacular ridge that can correlate with the catastrophic metamorphosis and unique body plan of phoronids. PMID:21898789

  14. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  15. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-yuan; Hu, Hao-liang; Fei, Jian-rong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Tian-bing; Zhang, Pei-xun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 6–24 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction. PMID:25788927

  16. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft. PMID:26524659

  17. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the corpus callosum, and agenesis of the cranial nerves. Symptoms vary according to the abnormality, but often feature poor muscle tone and motor function, seizures, developmental delays, ... facial or skull features that can be recognized by a neurologist. ...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without a power source on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without a power source on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without a power source on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without a power source on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without a power source on a patient's skull. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  3. Do we routinely need cranial computed tomography for mild head injuries in Turkey?

    PubMed

    Yava?i, Ozcan; Unlüer, Erol Erden; Gün, Cem; Sa?lam, Caner; Kayayurt, Kamil; Kiliç, Turgay Yilmaz; Kara, Pinar Hanife; Vandenberk, Nergiz

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the role of clinical parameters in detecting intracranial injury and to find out whether cranial computed tomography (CT) is routinely needed for mild head injury (MHI) in Turkey. This retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the records of patients with MHI who underwent cranial CT in our emergency department. We carried out multiple logistic regression analysis, and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using SPSS 15.0. This study included 923 patients. Positive cranial CT findings were determined in 17 patients (1.8%) and six of them (0.6%) underwent surgery. Statistically significant correlations were found among headache, presence of clinical findings of skull fracture, focal neurological deficit and positive cranial CT findings. Although the incidence of the intracranial lesions, especially those requiring surgery, is low in MHI, the liberal use of CT scanning in MHI seems to be justified in countries such as Turkey. PMID:21326102

  4. A MULTISCALE COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THE GROWTH OF THE CRANIAL VAULT IN CRANIOSYNOSTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanyoung; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is a condition defined by premature closure of cranial vault sutures, which is associated with abnormalities of the brain and skull. Many causal relationships between discovered mutations and premature suture closure have been proposed but an understanding of the precise mechanisms remains elusive. This article describes a computational framework of biological processes underlying cranial growth that will enable a hypothesis driven investigation of craniosynostosis phenotypes using reaction-diffusion-advection methods and the finite element method. Primary centers of ossification in cranial vault are found using activator-substrate model that represents the behavior of key molecules for bone formation. Biomechanical effects due to the interaction between growing bone and soft tissue is investigated to elucidate the mechanism of growth of cranial vault. PMID:25909093

  5. Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering and Hematopoietic Elements Canine Cranial Reconstruction Using Autologous

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Robert

    Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering and Hematopoietic Elements Canine Cranial Reconstruction Using Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Mahesh H. Mankani,* Sergei A. Kuznetsov, Brian Shannon, Ravi K. Nalla and Skeletal Diseases Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes

  6. [Gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, D; de Deus, T; Tejera-Perez, C; Exposito-Ruiz, I; Suarez-Castro, E; Carpintero, P; Macias-Arribi, M

    2015-09-16

    Different gastrointestinal symptoms, such as excessive salivation, deterioration and other disorders affecting the teeth, dysphagia, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, difficult defecation or loss of weight are frequent events in all the stages of the development of Parkinson's disease and affect at least a third of the patients. These symptoms reflect the dysfunction of the enteric nervous system, and the stomach is one of the organs where alpha-synuclein is first deposited. Other factors, such as the dysfunction of structures in the central nervous system like the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve, hormonal factors or secondary effects deriving from the consumption of antiparkinsonian drugs, are involved in its origin. The present article offers a detailed review of the epidemiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic management aspects of the different gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26350777

  7. Cranial muscles of the anurans Leiopelma hochstetteri and Ascaphus truei and the homologies of the mandibular adductors in Lissamphibia and other gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The frogs Ascaphus truei and Leiopelma hochstetteri are members of the most basal lineages of extant anurans. Their cranial muscles have not been previously described in full and are investigated here by dissection. Comparison of these taxa is used to review a controversy regarding the homologies of the jaw adductor muscles in Lissamphibia, to place these homologies in a wider gnathostome context, and to define features that may be useful for cladistic analysis of Anura. A new muscle is defined in Ascaphus and is designated m. levator anguli oris. The differences noted between Ascaphus and Leiopelma are in the penetration of the jaw adductor muscles by the mandibular nerve (V3). In the traditional view of this anatomy, the paths of the trigeminal nerve branches define homologous muscles. This scheme results in major differences among frogs, salamanders, and caecilians. The alternative view is that the topology of origins, insertions, and fiber directions are defining features, and the nerves penetrate the muscle mass in a variable way. The results given here support the latter view. A new model is proposed for Lissamphibia, whereby the adductor posterior (levator articularis) is a separate entity, and the rest of the adductor mass is configured around it as a folded sheet. This hypothesis is examined in other gnathostomes, including coelacanth and lungfish, and a possible sequence for the evolution of the jaw muscles is demonstrated. In this system, the main jaw adductor in teleost fish is not considered homologous with that of tetrapods. This hypothesis is consistent with available data on the domain of expression of the homeobox gene engrailed 2, which has previously not been considered indicative of homology. Terminology is discussed, and "adductor mandibulae" is preferred to "levator mandibulae" to align with usage in other gnathostomes. PMID:21845732

  8. Vagal nerve stimulator: Evolving trends.

    PubMed

    Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Over three decades ago, it was found that intermittent electrical stimulation from the vagus nerve produces inhibition of neural processes, which can alter brain activity and terminate seizures. This paved way for the concept of vagal nerve stimulator (VNS). We describe the evolution of the VNS and its use in different fields of medicine. We also review the literature focusing on the mechanism of action of VNS producing desired effects in different conditions. PUBMED and EMBASE search was performed for 'VNS' and its use in refractory seizure management, depression, obesity, memory, and neurogenesis. VNS has been in vogue over for the past three decades and has proven to reduce the intensity and frequency of seizure by 50% in the management of refractory seizures. Apart from this, VNS has been shown to promote neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus after 48 hours of stimulation of the vagus nerve. Improvement has also been observed in non-psychotic major depression from a randomized trial conducted 7 years ago. The same concept has been utilized to alter behavior and cognition in rodents, and good improvement has been observed. Recent studies have proven that VNS is effective in obesity management in patients with depression. Several hypotheses have been postulated for the mechanism of action of VNS contributing to its success. VNS has gained significant popularity with promising results in epilepsy surgery and treatment-resistant depression. The spectrum of its use has also extended to other fields of medicine including obesity, memory, and neurogenesis, and there is still a viable scope for its utility in the future. PMID:23633829

  9. Activated Eosinophils in Association with Enteric Nerves in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Claire M.; Akasheh, Nadim; Woods, Sara; Kay, Elaine; Morgan, Ross K.; Thornton, Margaret A.; O’Grady, Anthony; Cummins, Robert; Sheils, Orla; Smyth, Peter; Gleich, Gerald J.; Murray, Frank M.; Costello, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Enteric neural dysfunction leads to increased mucous production and dysmotility in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prior studies have shown that tissue eosinophilia is related to disease activity. We hypothesized that interactions between eosinophils and nerves contribute to neural dysfunction in IBD. Tissue from patients with intractable IBD, endoscopic biopsies from patients with steroid responsive IBD, both when active and quiescent, and control tissue were studied. Immunohistochemical studies showed that eosinophils localize to nerves in the mucosal layer of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (p<0.001) and ulcerative colitis (UC), (p<0.01). Eosinophils localized to substance P and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunostained nerves. Real time PCR of laser capture micro-dissected enteric ganglia demonstrated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mRNA was increased 7-fold in UC (n?=?4), (p?=?0.03), and 10-fold in CD (n?=?3), (p?=?0.05). Compared with controls, eotaxin-3 (CCL-26) mRNA was increased 9-fold in UC (p?=?0.04) and 15-fold in CD (p?=?0.06). Eosinophil numbers correlated with disease activity, while deposition of major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil Transforming Growth Factor ? -1 (TGF?-1) expression were seen in therapeutically responsive disease. These data indicate a significant localization of eosinophils to nerves in IBD, mediated through neurally expressed ICAM-1 and eotaxin-3. This cell/neural interaction may influence the function of nerves and contribute to symptoms in IBD. PMID:23717571

  10. Split Cranial Bone Grafting in Children Younger Than 3 Years Old: Debunking a Surgical Myth

    PubMed Central

    Vercler, Christian J.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In cranioplasty patients split cranial bone provides excellent structural support and fundamentally “replaces like with like.” However, traditional teaching in craniofacial surgery is that cranial bone cannot be split before the age of 3 years because of the lack of diploic space. The authors have found this not to be the case and describe their experience with splitting cranial bone in children with craniosynostosis younger than 3 years. Methods The authors completed a retrospective review of 418 cranioplasties performed between 1997 and 2013 by a single surgeon on patients younger than 3 years with syndromic and nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. Average patient age at the time of the procedure was 328 days. The youngest patient was 58 days old. Results Of the 418 cranial procedures performed in this study, cranial bone could be split and used as bone graft in every case. Although the presence of Lückenschädel prevented a complete split of the inner table from the outer table of the bone flap, split cranial bone grafting could still be performed, providing significant grafting material to foster reconstruction. No complications from split cranial harvest were observed. Conclusions Contrary to popular belief and the misconception perpetuated by the Plastic Surgery In-Service Examination, the cranium of children younger than 3 years can indeed be safely and predictably split between the inner and outer cortex. This important finding provides the craniofacial surgeon with a valuable, expanded source of rigid bone for cranial vault remodeling in the pediatric patient population. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapeutic, IV. PMID:24867741

  11. Listeriosis: Definition and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Definition & Symptoms Outbreaks Soft Cheeses Distributed by ...

  12. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages ... in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Symptoms may include: ...

  13. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Glossary Downloadable Publications Symptoms and Diagnosis If you are new to dystonia, it can ... conditions. The words used to describe your specific diagnosis may be confusing. To accurately describe the form ...

  14. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection ... Veterinarians Transmission Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation ... Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum ...

  15. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  16. About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What is Kennedy's Disease Symptoms Common Misdiagnosis Treatments DNA Testing and Labs Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues Doctors ... Counter Frequently Used Links What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing for KD Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar with ...

  17. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    WRIISC War Related Illness and Injury Study Center Office of Public Health Department of Veterans Affairs MEDICALLY UNEXPLAINED SYMPTOMS ... showed that CFS was more common in Gulf War Veterans than non- Gulf War Veterans ( Kang et ...

  18. Module 3 – Symptoms

    Cancer.gov

    Module three of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version presents approaches to and management of commonly encountered symptoms and syndromes of cancer patients.

  19. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  20. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Cholera - Vibrio cholerae infection Share Compartir Illness & Symptoms Cholera is an ... by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is spread by ingestion of contaminated food ...

  1. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? A reddish or purplish rash and scaly, rough ... organs can be damaged as a result. Disease: Dermatomyositis (DM) Printer-friendly version Send by email Dermatomyositis ...

  2. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving multiple nerves.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Sharma, Rambaksh; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2012-03-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa (MDL), a rare congenital disorder, is considered by some to be a localized form of Proteus syndrome. The implication of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) gene in both strengthens this belief. We present a case who had MDL in multiple nerve territories--all on the same side of the body--with hypertrophy of mainly fibroadipose tissue throughout their distribution, thus pointing to a form of localized hemihypertrophy; both hemihypertrophy and lipomatous tumors are components of Proteus syndrome. PMID:21948052

  3. [Cerebral nerves - perineural tumor spread].

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Mack, M G

    2009-07-01

    Perineural tumor spread in the course of head and neck tumors is a form of metastatic disease in which the tumor disseminates centrifugally or centripetally along the nerve to (non)contiguous regions. Perineural tumor spread is a potentially devastating complication and has a high impact on the therapeutic management and overall prognosis. In a large proportion of patients the disease remains asymptomatic and imaging (especially MRI) plays a crucial role in the detection of lesions. Familiarity with the pertinent anatomy, knowledge of the common spread pathways and an appropriate imaging strategy allow detection of the perineural spread of the disease in the majority of the cases. PMID:19424678

  4. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550... § 882.1550 Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550... § 882.1550 Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550... § 882.1550 Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550... § 882.1550 Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550... § 882.1550 Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a...

  9. Contact Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments A - D Contact dermatitis Signs and symptoms Contact dermatitis: Signs and symptoms Allergic contact dermatitis : Testing ... these symptoms, you need immediate medical care. Allergic contact dermatitis This skin condition occurs when you have ...

  10. Menopause: Symptom Relief and Treatments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Menopause symptom relief and treatments Menopause Menopause symptom relief and treatments Working with your doctor If you ... Return to top More information on Menopause symptom relief and treatments Read more from womenshealth.gov Menopause ...

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary ... Other Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its symptoms ...

  12. The binding of tetrodotoxin to nerve membranes

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R. D.; Ritchie, J. M.; Rojas, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The% reduction in size of the externally recorded action potential produced by concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in the range 6-300 nM was determined for the small non-myelinated fibres of the rabbit cervical vagus nerve and of the walking leg nerves of crab and lobster. The concentration of TTX for 50% reduction was around 80 nM for rabbit vagus and 14 nM for crab nerve. 2. Bio-assay procedures were devised to measure the amount of TTX taken up by a nerve when it was exposed to a very small volume of a solution whose TTX content was just great enough to produce 100% block of conduction. The extracellular space of each nerve was determined with [14C]sugar so that an allowance could be made for extracellular dilution. 3. The TTX binding by rabbit, crab and lobster nerve was respectively 0·064, 0·053 and 0·036 p-mole/mg wet weight of nerve. 4. The binding of saxitoxin was measured in rabbit vagus nerve, and found to be much the same as that of TTX. 5. Control experiments on rabbit sciatic nerve, where the area of excitable membrane was much smaller, showed that there was relatively little unspecific binding of TTX. 6. In view of the evidence presented here and elsewhere that the blocking of sodium conductance by TTX involves the attachment of only one TTX molecule at each sodium site, and that unspecific binding of TTX does not cause serious errors, these results suggest that in 1 ?m2 of nerve membrane the number of sodium sites is 75 for rabbit, 49 for crab, and 36 for lobster nerve. PMID:5575342

  13. Neuropathic pain from an experimental neuritis of the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Eliav, E; Herzberg, U; Ruda, M A; Bennett, G J

    1999-11-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathies involve both axonal damage and an inflammation of the nerve. The role of the latter by itself was investigated by producing an experimental neuritis in the rat. The sciatic nerves were exposed at mid-thigh level and wrapped loosely in hemostatic oxidized cellulose (Oxycel) that on one side was saturated with an inflammatory stimulus, carrageenan (CARRA) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and on the other side saturated with saline. In other rats, a myositis was created by implanting Oxycel saturated with CFA into a pocket made in the biceps femoris at a position adjacent to where the nerve was treated. Pain-evoked responses from the plantar hind paws were tested before treatment and daily thereafter. Statistically significant heat- and mechano-hyperalgesia, and mechano- and cold-allodynia were present on the side of the inflamed nerve (CARRA or CFA) for 1-5 days after which responses returned to normal. There were no abnormal pain responses on the side of the saline-treated nerve, and none in the rats with the experimental myositis. The abnormal pain responses were inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade with MK-801, but were relatively resistant to the dose of morphine tested (10 mg/kg). Light microscopic examination of CARRA-treated nerves, harvested at the time of peak symptom severity, revealed that the treated region was mildly edematous and that there was an obvious endoneurial infiltration of immune cells (granulocytes and lymphocytes). There was either a complete absence of degeneration, or the degeneration of no more than a few tens of axons. Immunocytochemical staining for CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte markers revealed that both cell types were present in the epineurial and endoneurial compartments. The endoneurial T-cells appeared to derive from the endoneurial vasculature, rather than from migration across the nerve sheath. We conclude that a focal inflammation of the sciatic nerve produces neuropathic pain sensations in a distant region (the ipsilateral hind paw) and that this is not due to axonal damage. The neuropathic pain is specific to inflammation of the nerve because it was absent in animals with the experimental myositis and in those receiving sham-treatment. These results suggest that an acute episode of neuritis-evoked neuropathic pain may contribute to the genesis of chronically painful peripheral neuropathies, and that a chronic (or chronically recurrent) focal neuritis might produce neuropathic pain in the absence of significant (or clinically detectable) structural damage to the nerve. The model that we describe is likely to be useful in the study of the neuroimmune factors that contribute to painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:10534588

  14. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 ?L type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  15. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  16. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Variation in Baboon Cranial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Charles C.; Willmore, Katherine E.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Hildebolt, Charles; Sadler, Brooke E.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Cheverud, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The development, function, and integration of morphological characteristics are all hypothesized to influence the utility of traits for phylogenetic reconstruction by affecting the way in which morphological characteristics evolve. We use a baboon model to test the hypotheses about phenotypic and quantitative genetic variation of traits in the cranium that bear on a phenotype’s propensity to evolve. We test the hypotheses that: 1) individual traits in different functionally and developmentally defined regions of the cranium are differentially environmentally, genetically, and phenotypically variable; 2) genetic covariance with other traits constrains traits in one region of the cranium more than those in others; 3) and regions of the cranium subject to different levels of mechanical strain differ in the magnitude of variation in individual traits. We find that the levels of environmental and genetic variation in individual traits are randomly distributed across regions of the cranium rather than being structured by developmental origin or degree of exposure to strain. Individual traits in the cranial vault tend to be more constrained by covariance with other traits than those in other regions. Traits in regions subject to high degrees of strain during mastication are not any more variable at any level than other traits. If these results are generalizable to other populations, they indicate that there is no reason to suppose that individual traits from any one part of the cranium are intrinsically less useful for reconstructing patterns of evolution than those from any other part. PMID:20623673

  17. The First Virtual Cranial Endocast of a Lungfish (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi)

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Alice M.; Ahlberg, Per E.

    2014-01-01

    Lungfish, or dipnoans, have a history spanning over 400 million years and are the closest living sister taxon to the tetrapods. Most Devonian lungfish had heavily ossified endoskeletons, whereas most Mesozoic and Cenozoic lungfish had largely cartilaginous endoskeletons and are usually known only from isolated tooth plates or disarticulated bone fragments. There is thus a substantial temporal and evolutionary gap in our understanding of lungfish endoskeletal morphology, between the diverse and highly variable Devonian forms on the one hand and the three extant genera on the other. Here we present a virtual cranial endocast of Rhinodipterus kimberleyensis, from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation of Australia, one of the most derived fossil dipnoans with a well-ossified braincase. This endocast, generated from a Computed Microtomography (µCT) scan of the skull, is the first virtual endocast of any lungfish published, and only the third fossil dipnoan endocast to be illustrated in its entirety. Key features include long olfactory canals, a telencephalic cavity with a moderate degree of ventral expansion, large suparaotic cavities, and moderately enlarged utricular recesses. It has numerous similarities to the endocasts of Chirodipterus wildungensis and Griphognathus whitei, and to a lesser degree to 'Chirodipterus' australis and Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi. Among extant lungfish, it consistently resembles Neoceratodus more closely than Lepidosiren and Protopterus. Several trends in the evolution of the brains and labyrinth regions in dipnoans, such as the expansions of the utricular recess and telencephalic regions over time, are identified and discussed. PMID:25427173

  18. Sensorineural Deafness, Distinctive Facial Features and Abnormal Cranial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R.; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2008-01-01

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. PMID:18553554

  19. A Cranial Mesoderm Origin for Esophagus Striated Muscles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Swetha; Comai, Glenda; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Francou, Alexandre; Kelly, Robert G; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2015-09-28

    The esophagus links the oral cavity to the stomach and facilitates the transfer of bolus. Using genetic tracing and mouse mutants, we demonstrate that esophagus striated muscles (ESMs) are not derived from somites but are of cranial origin. Tbx1 and Isl1 act as key regulators of ESMs, which we now identify as a third derivative of cardiopharyngeal mesoderm that contributes to second heart field derivatives and head muscles. Isl1-derived ESM progenitors colonize the mouse esophagus in an anterior-posterior direction but are absent in the developing chick esophagus, thus providing evolutionary insight into the lack of ESMs in avians. Strikingly, different from other myogenic regions, in which embryonic myogenesis establishes a scaffold for fetal fiber formation, ESMs are established directly by fetal myofibers. We propose that ESM progenitors use smooth muscle as a scaffold, thereby bypassing the embryonic program. These findings have important implications in understanding esophageal dysfunctions, including dysphagia, and congenital disorders, such as DiGeorge syndrome. PMID:26387456

  20. Ontogeny of the cranial system in Laonastes aenigmamus

    PubMed Central

    Herrel, Anthony; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Keovichit, Kham; Adriaens, Dominique; Brabant, Loes; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cornette, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Rodents, together with bats, are among the ecologically most diverse and most speciose groups of mammals. Moreover, rodents show elaborate specializations of the feeding apparatus in response to the predominantly fore-aft movements of the lower jaw. The Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus was recently discovered and originally thought to belong to a new family. The difficulties in classifying L. aenigmamus based on morphological characters stem from the fact that it presents a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characteristics, including the morphology of the jaw adductors. The origin of the unusual muscular organization in this species remains, however, unclear. Here, we investigate the development of the masticatory system in Laonastes to better understand the origin of its derived morphology relative to other rodents. Our analyses show that skull and mandible development is characterized by an overall elongation of the snout region. Muscle mass increases with positive allometry during development and growth, and so does the force-generating capacity of the jaw adductor muscles (i.e. physiological cross-sectional area). Whereas fetal crania and musculature are more similar to those of typical rodents, adults diverge in the elongation of the rostral part of the skull and the disproportionate development of the zygomaticomandibularis. Our data suggest a functional signal in the development of the unusual cranial morphology, possibly associated with the folivorous trophic ecology of the species. PMID:22607030

  1. Mechanics of cranial sutures using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Jasinoski, S C; Reddy, B D; Louw, K K; Chinsamy, A

    2010-12-01

    To investigate how cranial suture morphology and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres respond to compressive and tensile loads, an idealised bone-suture-bone complex was analysed using a two-dimensional finite element model. Three suture morphologies were simulated with an increasing interdigitation index (I.I.): butt-ended, moderate interdigitated, and complex interdigitated. The collagen matrix within all sutures was modelled as an isotropic material, and as an orthotropic material in the interdigitated sutures with fibre alignment as reported in studies of miniature pigs. Static uniform compressive or tensile loading was applied to the complex. In interdigitated sutures with isotropic material properties, the orientation of the maximum (tensile) principal stresses within the suture matched the collagen fibre orientation observed in compressed and tensed sutures of miniature pigs. This suggests that randomly arranged sutural collagen fibres could optimise to an orientation most appropriate to withstand the predominant type of loading. A compression-resistant fibre arrangement imparted the highest suture strain energy relative to the isotropic and tension-resistant arrangements, indicating that this configuration maximises energy storage. A comparison across the different suture morphologies indicated that bone strain energy generally decreased with a decrease in I.I., irrespective of the sutural fibre arrangement. However, high bone stress at the interdigitation apices shifted to the limbs of the suture with an increase in I.I. These combined findings highlight the importance of suture morphology and anisotropy as properties having a significant influence on sutural mechanics. PMID:20825945

  2. Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D

    2014-08-01

    Cranial Cruciate Ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament strength, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and strength. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544

  3. Cranial size variation and lineage diversity in early Pleistocene Homo.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremiah E

    2014-03-01

    A recent article in this journal concluded that a sample of early Pleistocene hominin crania assigned to genus Homo exhibits a pattern of size variation that is time dependent, with specimens from different time periods being more different from each other, on average, than are specimens from the same time period. The authors of this study argued that such a pattern is not consistent with the presence of multiple lineages within the sample, but rather supports the hypothesis that the fossils represent an anagenetically evolving lineage (i.e., an evolutionary species). However, the multiple-lineage models considered in that study do not reflect the multiple-species alternatives that have been proposed for early Pleistocene Homo. Using simulated data sets, I show that fossil assemblages that contain multiple lineages can exhibit the time-dependent pattern of variation specified for the single-lineage model under certain conditions, particularly when temporal overlap among fossil specimens attributed to the lineages is limited. These results do not reject the single-lineage hypothesis, but they do indicate that rejection of multiple lineages in the early Pleistocene Homo fossil record is premature, and that other sources of variation, such as differences in cranial shape, should be considered. PMID:24588348

  4. Cranial dimensions and forces of biting in the domestic dog

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jennifer Lynn; Thomason, Jeffrey; Kebreab, Ermias; Zubair, Kasim; France, James

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effects of cranial size and shape in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) on predicted forces of biting. In addition to continuous size-shape analysis, nine size-shape groups were developed based on three skull shape categories and three skull size categories. Bite forces were predicted from measurements made on dried skulls using two lever models of the skull, as well as simple models derived by regression analysis. Observed bite force values were not available for the database used in this study, so only comparisons between categories and models were undertaken. The effects of shape and size on scaled predicted bite forces were evaluated. Results show that bite force increases as size increases, and this effect was highly significant (P < 0.0001). The effect of skull shape on bite force was significant in medium and large dogs (P < 0.05). Significant differences were not evident in small dogs. Size × shape interactions were also significant (P < 0.05). Bite force predictions by the two lever models were relatively close to each other, whereas the regression models diverged slightly with some negative numbers for very small dogs. The lever models may thus be more robust across a wider range of skull size-shapes. Results obtained here would be useful to the pet food industry for food product development, as well as to paleontologists interested in methods of estimating bite force from dry skulls. PMID:19245503

  5. The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish (sarcopterygii: dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Clement, Alice M; Ahlberg, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Lungfish, or dipnoans, have a history spanning over 400 million years and are the closest living sister taxon to the tetrapods. Most Devonian lungfish had heavily ossified endoskeletons, whereas most Mesozoic and Cenozoic lungfish had largely cartilaginous endoskeletons and are usually known only from isolated tooth plates or disarticulated bone fragments. There is thus a substantial temporal and evolutionary gap in our understanding of lungfish endoskeletal morphology, between the diverse and highly variable Devonian forms on the one hand and the three extant genera on the other. Here we present a virtual cranial endocast of Rhinodipterus kimberleyensis, from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation of Australia, one of the most derived fossil dipnoans with a well-ossified braincase. This endocast, generated from a Computed Microtomography (µCT) scan of the skull, is the first virtual endocast of any lungfish published, and only the third fossil dipnoan endocast to be illustrated in its entirety. Key features include long olfactory canals, a telencephalic cavity with a moderate degree of ventral expansion, large suparaotic cavities, and moderately enlarged utricular recesses. It has numerous similarities to the endocasts of Chirodipterus wildungensis and Griphognathus whitei, and to a lesser degree to 'Chirodipterus' australis and Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi. Among extant lungfish, it consistently resembles Neoceratodus more closely than Lepidosiren and Protopterus. Several trends in the evolution of the brains and labyrinth regions in dipnoans, such as the expansions of the utricular recess and telencephalic regions over time, are identified and discussed. PMID:25427173

  6. State of the art cranial ultrasound imaging in neonates.

    PubMed

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Camfferman, Fleur A; Leijser, Lara M; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound (CUS) is a reputable tool for brain imaging in critically ill neonates. It is safe, relatively cheap and easy to use, even when a patient is unstable. In addition it is radiation-free and allows serial imaging. CUS possibilities have steadily expanded. However, in many neonatal intensive care units, these possibilities are not optimally used. We present a comprehensive approach for neonatal CUS, focusing on optimal settings, different probes, multiple acoustic windows and Doppler techniques. This approach is suited for both routine clinical practice and research purposes. In a live demonstration, we show how this technique is performed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Using optimal settings and probes allows for better imaging quality and improves the diagnostic value of CUS in experienced hands. Traditionally, images are obtained through the anterior fontanel. Use of supplemental acoustic windows (lambdoid, mastoid, and lateral fontanels) improves detection of brain injury. Adding Doppler studies allows screening of patency of large intracranial arteries and veins. Flow velocities and indices can be obtained. Doppler CUS offers the possibility of detecting cerebral sinovenous thrombosis at an early stage, creating a window for therapeutic intervention prior to thrombosis-induced tissue damage. Equipment, data storage and safety aspects are also addressed. PMID:25742241

  7. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Dharia, Tejas P; Polnaya, Ashwin M

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches. PMID:23833428

  8. Radiologists' eye gaze when reading cranial CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venjakob, Antje; Marnitz, Tim; Mahler, Jan; Sechelmann, Simone; Roetting, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Gaze tracking is a common method to assess perceptual processes when reading medical images. However, little attention has yet been paid to multi-slice images. The present study examines the gaze data of four experienced radiologists reading 15 cranial Computer Tomography scans (CCT), five of which contain lesions. The participants navigated freely through the slices, while their eye position was tracked. Participants' visual search performance was examined in terms of: time per case, scrolling pattern including the number of runs through each case and number of oscillations within each case, fixation duration, time to first fixate a lesion and the initial dwell time on a lesion. The results of the study indicate that performance and reading strategy differ between radiologists. The greatest behavioral differences occurred between the two readers, who performed best. One of them, participant 4, showed extremely short periods of inspection, few oscillations between the slices, short initial dwells on lesions and short time to first fixation, whereas participant 2 performed equally as well, but took longer to read individual cases, went through the slices with many more oscillations, showed longer time to first fixation and initial dwell times on lesions. The behavior displayed by participant 4 is consistent with expert behavior reading 2-dimensional images. In contrast, participant 2's behavior resembles that of a novice, namely because of the systematic search pattern employed. The results hint that expertise may be characterized by various and diverse strategies.

  9. Assessment of the Circle of Willis with Cranial Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ayse; Coban, Gokmen; Cinar, Celal; Oran, Ismail; Uz, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Background The circle of Willis is a major collateral pathway important in ischemic conditions. The aim of our study was to assess the structural characteristics of the circle of Willis within the Turkish adult population, along with variations and arteries involved in the measurement of diameters and lengths on cranial computed tomography angiography (CTA). Material/Methods One hundred adult patients who underwent CTA images were evaluated retrospectively. Results Results of the study revealed 82% adult, 17% fetal, and 1% transitional configurations. A complete polygonal structure was observed in 28% of cases. Variations of the circle of Willis were more common in the posterior portion. Hypoplasia was found to be the most common variation and was observed as a maximum in the posterior communicating artery (AComP). Conclusions The patency and size of arteries in the circle of Willis are important in occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and cerebrovascular surgery. Although CTA is an easily accessible non-invasive clinical method for demonstrating the vascular structure, CTA should be evaluated taking into account image resolution quality and difficulties in the identification of small vessels. PMID:26343887

  10. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  11. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-10-01

    Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  12. A Safe Lab on Nerve Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving pineapples and gelatin that allows students to investigate the conditions that typically render an enzyme functionless, similar to the effect of nerve gasses. Discusses the materials, procedures, and results, drawing analogies to the effects of a nerve gas. (CW)

  13. Paclitaxel alters sensory nerve biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic that, despite its common use, frequently causes debilitating peripheral sensory neuropathy. Paclitaxel binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and through unknown mechanisms, causes abnormal microtubule aggregation. Given that microtubules contribute to the mechanical properties of cells, we tested the hypothesis that paclitaxel treatment would alter the stiffness of sensory nerves. Rat sural nerves were excised and soaked in Ringer's solution with or without paclitaxel. Nerves were secured between a force transducer and actuator, and linearly strained. Stress-strain curves were generated, from which elastic moduli were calculated. Paclitaxel treated nerves exhibited significantly higher moduli in both linear and transition regions of the curve. A composite-tissue model was then generated to estimate the stiffness increase in the cellular fraction of the nerve following paclitaxel treatment. This model was supported experimentally by data on mechanical properties of sural nerves stripped of their epineurium, and area fractions of the cellular and connective tissue components of the rat sural nerve, calculated from immunohistochemical images. Model results revealed that the cellular components of the nerve must stiffen 12x to 115x, depending on the initial axonal modulus assumed, in order to achieve the observed tissue level mechanical changes. Consistent with such an increase, electron microscopy showed increased microtubule aggregation and cytoskeletal packing, suggestive of a more cross-linked cytoskeleton. Overall, our data suggests that paclitaxel treatment induces increased microtubule bundling in axons, which leads to alterations in tissue-level mechanical properties. PMID:26321364

  14. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  15. Communications Between the Trigeminal Nerve and the Facial Nerve in the Face: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yang, Su Cheol; Song, Ju Sung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the article is to elucidate the communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve in the face. In a PubMed search, 328 studies were found using the terms 'trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, and communication.' The abstracts were read and 39 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 11 articles were analyzed. In the studies using dissection, the maxillary branch (V2) had the highest frequency (95.0%?±?8.0%) of communication with the facial nerve, followed by the mandibular branch (V3) (76.7%?±?38.5%). The ophthalmic branch (V1) had the lowest frequency of communication (33.8%?±?19.5%). In a Sihler stain, all of the maxillary branches and mandibular branches had communications with the facial nerve and 85.7% (12/14 hemifaces) of the ophthalmic branches had communications. The frequency of communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve were significantly higher (P?=?0.00, t-test) in the studies using a Sihler stain (94.7%?±?1.1%) than the studies using dissection (76.9?±?35.8). The reason for the significantly higher frequency of trigeminal-facial communication in the studies using a Sihler stain is because of the limitation of the Sihler stain itself. This technique cannot differentiate the motor nerves from sensory nerves at the periphery, and a crossover can be misinterpreted as communication near to nerve terminal. PMID:26114519

  16. Role of lumbricus extract in the nerve amplification effect during peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Zhiyong; Kou, Yuhui; Han, Na; Xu, Chungui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yanhua; Feng, Xue

    2014-01-01

    Among the methods of the peripheral nerve repair, artificial conduit bridging surgery is superior to epineurium and perineurium neurorrhaphy because of supplying enough space for nerve regeneration. Artificial conduit provides important microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration, especially for nerve amplification effect. Amplification phenomenon has been demonstrated in many studies using artificial conduit. When a finer nerve is used as a donor to connect to a distal nerve after injury, the donor nerve regenerates more lateral buds than its own fibers, which grow into distal endoneurial tubes and finally dominate the target organs. In this study, we used artificial conduit to investigate the amplification phenomenon in rats treated with Lumbricus extract as adjuvant treatment. The rats were divided into three groups at random. In the surgical groups, the proximal common peroneal nerve was used as a donor nerve to connect the distal tibial nerve. Rats in the normal group were not performed surgery. Postoperatively, the treatment group was administered Lumbricus extract as adjuvant treatment, while the model group and normal group were not given treatment. The results showed that the nerve conduction velocity, the morphometric measurements, the histological analysis and the amplification ratio in the treatment group were better than in the model group. PMID:25628798

  17. Contribution of the distal nerve sheath to nerve and muscle preservation following denervation and sensory protection.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Karen; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Minet, Wyatt; Fahnestock, Margaret; Bain, James R

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the contribution of the distal nerve sheath to sensory protection. Following tibial nerve transection, rats were assigned to one of the following groups: (1) saphenous-to-tibial nerve neurorrhaphy; (2) saphenous-to-gastrocnemius neurotization; (3) unprotected controls (tibial nerve transection); or (4) immediate common peroneal-to-tibial nerve neurorrhaphy. After a 6-month denervation period and motor reinnervation, ultrastructural, histologic, and morphometric analyses were performed on the distal tibial nerve and gastrocnemius muscle cross-sections. Sensory axons neurotized to muscle maintain existing muscle integrity, as demonstrated by less fibrosis, collagenization, and fat deposition, more than unprotected muscle, and preserve the distribution pattern of fast twitch fibers. However, neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve to the distal tibial nerve (involving the distal nerve sheath) improves existing endoneurial sheath structure, demonstrated by reduced collagen, and enhances regeneration, shown by improved axon-to-Schwann cell coupling and increased axon area. The authors conclude that sensory protection of muscle does not require the distal nerve sheath, but that preservation of the distal sheath may contribute to enhanced nerve regeneration. PMID:15672322

  18. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years. PMID:26703181

  19. OCT image segmentation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-08-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. In this study, 2-D OCT images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. Three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The features were segmented using a nearestneighbor classifier. N-ary morphological post-processing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058 +/- 0.019.

  20. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration. PMID:26256209

  1. Lead breakage and vocal cord paralysis following blunt neck trauma in a patient with vagal nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tran, Yvan; Shah, Aashit K; Mittal, Sandeep

    2011-05-15

    Patients with medically intractable seizures who are not candidates for epilepsy surgery are left with few options. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy is often a viable alternative for these patients and can have a positive impact on quality of life. Rarely complications may occur. We report a case of mild blunt neck trauma resulting in VNS malfunction and delayed vocal cord paralysis. A systematic review of the literature on VNS malfunction, self-inflicted injuries, vagal nerve injury, and common side effects including voice changes was performed. Only a handful of relevant publications were found. Symptoms following VNS dysfunction include pain, dyspnea, and dysphonia. These symptoms are usually nonspecific, and in many cases, do not help differentiate from vagal nerve traction, lead breakage, or pulse generator malfunction. In our case, lead fracture and visible traction injury to the left vagus nerve were seen during surgical exploration. The vocal cord function completely recovered after revision of the leads. Prompt medical attention including appropriate diagnostic studies and early surgical exploration is necessary in cases of delayed vocal cord dysfunction and can help prevent long-term complications such as neuroma formation. The authors present a unique case of reversible vocal cord injury from blunt neck trauma leading to left vagus nerve damage. PMID:21397256

  2. Measurements of drill-induced temperature change in the facial nerve during mastoid surgery: a cadaveric model using diamond burs.

    PubMed

    Abbas, G M; Jones, R O

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in temperature in the facial nerve that occur during mastoid drilling by the facial recess approach and to confirm the beneficial effects of constant irrigation while drilling. Mastoid drilling was performed on human cadaveric temporal bones by means of 4-mm diamond burs with and without irrigation. There were 6 subjects in each group. Changes in facial nerve temperature were recorded on a continuous-output monitor. Significant changes were found in temperature for both the irrigation and non-irrigation groups (p < .0001). Constant irrigation minimized the rise in temperature. Facial recess drilling poses a potential threat to cranial nerve VII via thermal injury. The temperature elevation in the non-irrigation group was significantly greater than that in the irrigation group and was greater than the tolerable limits of peripheral nervous tissue. This finding supports the need for constant irrigation during the approach to the facial recess in mastoid surgery. PMID:11558764

  3. Targeted fascicular biopsy of the sciatic nerve and its major branches: rationale and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Dyck, P James B; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT Nerve biopsy is typically performed in distal, noncritical sensory nerves without using imaging to target the more involved regions. The yield of these procedures rarely achieves more than 50%. In selected cases where preoperative evaluation points toward a more localized (usually a more proximal) process, targeted biopsy would likely capture the disease. Synthesis of data obtained from clinical examination, electrophysiological testing, and MRI allows biopsy of a portion of the major mixed nerves safely and efficiently. Herein, experiences with the sciatic nerve are reported and a description of the operative technique is provided. METHODS All cases of sciatic nerve biopsy performed between 2000 and 2014 were reviewed. Only cases of fascicular nerve biopsy approached from the buttock or the posterior aspect of the thigh were included. Demographic data, clinical presentation, and the presence of percussion tenderness for each patient were recorded. Reviewed studies included electrodiagnostic tests and imaging. Previous nerve and muscle biopsies were noted. All details of the procedure, final pathology, and its treatment implications were recorded. The complication rate was carefully assessed for temporary as well as permanent complications. RESULTS One hundred twelve cases (63 men and 49 women) of sciatic nerve biopsy were performed. Mean patient age was 46.4 years. Seventy-seven (68.8%) patients presented with single lower-extremity symptoms, 16 (14.3%) with bilateral lower-extremity symptoms, and 19 (17%) with generalized symptoms. No patient had normal findings on physical examination. All patients underwent electrodiagnostic studies, the findings of which were abnormal in 110 (98.2%) patients. MRI was available for all patients and was read as pathological in 111 (99.1%). The overall diagnostic yield of biopsy was 84.8% (n = 95). The pathological diagnoses included inflammatory demyelination, perineurioma, nonspecific inflammatory changes, neurolymphomatosis, amyloidosis, prostate cancer, injury neuroma, neuromuscular choristoma, sarcoidosis, vasculitis, hemangiomatosis, arteriovenous malformation, fibrolipomatous hamartoma (lipomatosis of nerve), and cervical adenocarcinoma. The series included 11 (9.9%) temporary and 5 (4.5%) permanent complications: 3 patients (2.7%) reported permanent numbness in the peroneal division distribution, and 2 patients (1.8%) were diagnosed with neuromuscular choristoma that developed desmoid tumor at the biopsy site 3 and 8 years later. CONCLUSIONS Targeted fascicular biopsy of the sciatic nerve is a safe and efficient diagnostic procedure, and in highly selected cases can be offered as the initial procedure over distal cutaneous nerve biopsy. Diagnoses were very diverse and included entities considered very rare. Even for the more prevalent diagnoses, the biopsy technique allowed a more targeted approach with a higher diagnostic yield and justification for more aggressive treatment. In this series, new radiological patterns of some entities were identified, which could be biopsied less frequently. PMID:26323814

  4. Effects of Local Compression on Peroneal Nerve Function in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Botte, Michael J.; Swenson, Michael R.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Rhoades, Charles E.; Akeson, Wayne H.

    1993-01-01

    A new apparatus was developed to compress the anterior compartment selectively and reproducibly in humans. Thirty-five normal volunteers were studied to determine short-term thresholds of local tissue pressure that produce significant neuromuscular dysfunction. Local tissue fluid pressure adjacent to the deep peroneal nerve was elevated by the compression apparatus and continuously monitored for 2-3 h by the slit catheter technique. Elevation of tissue fluid pressure to within 35-40 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure (approx. 40 mm Hg of in situ pressure in our subjects) elicited a consistent progression of neuromuscular deterioration including, in order, (a) gradual loss of sensation, as assessed by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, (b) subjective complaints, (c) reduced nerve conduction velocity, (d) decreased action potential amplitude of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle, and (e) motor weakness of muscles within the anterior compartment. Generally, higher intracompartment at pressures caused more rapid deterioration of neuromuscular function. In two subjects, when in situ compression levels were 0 and 30 mm Hg, normal neuromuscular function was maintained for 3 h. Threshold pressures for significant dysfunction were not always the same for each functional parameter studied, and the magnitudes of each functional deficit did not always correlate with compression level. This variable tolerance to elevated pressure emphasizes the need to monitor clinical signs and symptoms carefully in the diagnosis of compartment syndromes. The nature of the present studies was short term; longer term compression of myoneural tissues may result in dysfunction at lower pressure thresholds.

  5. Management of Menopausal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, Andrew M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2015-10-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen increased all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appear to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65 years; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients' risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely affects the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit-risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  6. Technology for Peripheral Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Parker, John L; Cameron, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been in use for over 50 years to treat patients suffering from chronic pain who have failed conservative treatments. Despite this long history, the devices being used have changed very little. In fact, current PNS technology was developed specifically for spinal cord stimulation. The use of technology developed for other applications in PNS has led to an unnecessary number of device complications and the limited adoption of this promising therapy. The following chapter provides an overview of PNS technology throughout the years, outlining both the benefits and limitations. We will briefly explore the electrophysiology of PNS stimulation, with an emphasis on technology and indication-specific devices. Finally, design and technical requirements of an ideal PNS device will be discussed. PMID:26394391

  7. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits. PMID:26430636

  8. Chitosan-film enhanced chitosan nerve guides for long-distance regeneration of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Cora; Stenberg, Lena; Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Wrobel, Sandra; Ronchi, Giulia; Udina, Esther; Suganuma, Seigo; Geuna, Stefano; Navarro, Xavier; Dahlin, Lars B; Grothe, Claudia; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthetic nerve grafts are developed in order to complement or replace autologous nerve grafts for peripheral nerve reconstruction. Artificial nerve guides currently approved for clinical use are not widely applied in reconstructive surgery as they still have limitations especially when it comes to critical distance repair. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of fine-tuned chitosan nerve guides (CNGs) enhanced by introduction of a longitudinal chitosan film to reconstruct critical length 15 mm sciatic nerve defects in adult healthy Wistar or diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. Short and long term investigations demonstrated that the CNGs enhanced by the guiding structure of the introduced chitosan film significantly improved functional and morphological results of nerve regeneration in comparison to simple hollow CNGs. Importantly, this was detectable both in healthy and in diabetic rats (short term) and the regeneration outcome almost reached the outcome after autologous nerve grafting (long term). Hollow CNGs provide properties likely leading to a wider clinical acceptance than other artificial nerve guides and their performance can be increased by simple introduction of a chitosan film with the same advantageous properties. Therefore, the chitosan film enhanced CNGs represent a new generation medical device for peripheral nerve reconstruction. PMID:26517563

  9. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudo?-Szopi?ska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the example of the median nerve. This nerve is among the most often examined peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part presents describes the normal anatomy and ultrasound picture of the remaining large nerve branches in the upper extremity and neck - the spinal accessory nerve, the brachial plexus, the suprascapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial and ulnar nerves. Their normal anatomy and ultrasonographic appearance have been described, including the division into individual branches. For each of them, specific reference points have been presented, to facilitate the location of the set trunk and its further monitoring. Sites for the application of the ultrasonographic probe at each reference point have been indicated. In the case of the ulnar nerve, the dynamic component of the examination was emphasized. The text is illustrated with images of probe positioning, diagrams of the normal course of the nerves as well as a series of ultrasonographic pictures of normal nerves of the upper limb. This article aims to serve as a guide in the ultrasound examination of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. It should be remembered that a thorough knowledge of the area's topographic anatomy is required for this type of examination. PMID:26674017

  10. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudo?-Szopi?ska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the example of the median nerve. This nerve is among the most often examined peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part presents describes the normal anatomy and ultrasound picture of the remaining large nerve branches in the upper extremity and neck – the spinal accessory nerve, the brachial plexus, the suprascapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial and ulnar nerves. Their normal anatomy and ultrasonographic appearance have been described, including the division into individual branches. For each of them, specific reference points have been presented, to facilitate the location of the set trunk and its further monitoring. Sites for the application of the ultrasonographic probe at each reference point have been indicated. In the case of the ulnar nerve, the dynamic component of the examination was emphasized. The text is illustrated with images of probe positioning, diagrams of the normal course of the nerves as well as a series of ultrasonographic pictures of normal nerves of the upper limb. This article aims to serve as a guide in the ultrasound examination of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. It should be remembered that a thorough knowledge of the area's topographic anatomy is required for this type of examination. PMID:26674017

  11. A fast cranial drilling technique in treating severe intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Liu, Hui-Fang; Chai, Shuai; Kang, Xuan-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study is a retrospective case analysis of 143 patients who suffered from severe intracranial hemorrhage and underwent a fast and simple procedure of cranial drilling followed with external ventricle drain treatment (referred as Fast-D here after) during 2003–2013 to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the treatment. Methods: Fast-D procedure was conducted on 143 patients with severe acute craniocerebral diseases. Those patients were evaluated using activities of daily living (ADL) scales at hospital discharge and after 6-month of physical therapy, and were compared to 36 patients with similar craniocerebral diseases but received the traditional Dandy's surgical treatment. Results: At discharge, 11% (16 cases) was classified as ADL I (fully functional for physical and social activities); 26% (37 cases) had ADL II (fully functional for physical activities but partially impaired for social activities); 34% (49 cases) was ADL III (require assistance performing physical activities); 9% (13 cases) was ADL IV (being conscious, but completely lost ability of physical activities); 27% (10 cases) was ADL V (vegetative stage); and 13% (18 cased) was ADL VI (died) among the 143 patients. Six-month physical therapy improved ADL in 88% of the patients. Those outcomes are equal or better than the more complicated Dandy's procedure probably due to the time-saving factor. Conclusion: Fast-D procedure is much faster (6.7 min vs. 53.6 min of the Dandy's procedure) and can be performed outside operating rooms (computed tomography room or bedside). This technique could serve as a tool to rapidly release intracranial pressure and reduce subsequent morbidity and mortality of severe craniocerebral diseases when resource and condition are limited and more elaborate operating room procedures are not possible. PMID:26539310

  12. Direct Invasion of the Optic Nerves, Chiasm, and Tracts by Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Merkler, Alexander E; Gaines, Nathan; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Schuetz, Audrey N; Lavi, Ehud; Simpson, Sara A; Dinkin, Marc J

    2015-10-01

    Cryptococcus spp is a common fungal infection and frequent cause of meningitis in immunocompromised patients; however, immunocompetent patients are also at risk of infection. Visual loss often occurs via elevated intracranial hypertension but can rarely occur through direct optic nerve, chiasm, or tract invasion. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with decreased acuity in both eyes. She had generalized visual field constriction in the right eye and temporal hemianopsia in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits showed multiple areas of ill-defined enhancement in the optic chiasm and tracts as well as in the diaphragmatic sella, prepontine and interpeduncular cisterns, and along cranial nerves VI, VII, and VIII bilaterally. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed 34 white blood cells, hypoglycorrhachia, and negative cryptococcal antigen and bacterial and fungal cultures. A transphenoidal biopsy of the dura and pituitary gland was unremarkable. Empiric steroids resulted in marked improvement in visual acuity in both eyes, but while tapering steroids, she developed rapid visual loss bilaterally. Repeat CSF performed 6 weeks later demonstrated a cryptococcal antigen titer of 1:512. Retroactive staining of the pituitary biopsy was positive for mucicarmine, a component of the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus spp. After induction therapy with amphotericin B and flucytosine and 1 year of fluconazole, her visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. In summary, Cryptococcus can affect immunocompetent patients and often presents with insidious, chronic meningitis. Visual loss is common in cryptococcal meningitis but usually results from fulminant papilledema related to elevated intracranial pressure. In rare cases, direct nerve or chiasm infiltration by the fungus results in vision loss. PMID:26425249

  13. Direct Invasion of the Optic Nerves, Chiasm, and Tracts by Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Nathan; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Lavi, Ehud; Simpson, Sara A.; Dinkin, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus spp is a common fungal infection and frequent cause of meningitis in immunocompromised patients; however, immunocompetent patients are also at risk of infection. Visual loss often occurs via elevated intracranial hypertension but can rarely occur through direct optic nerve, chiasm, or tract invasion. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with decreased acuity in both eyes. She had generalized visual field constriction in the right eye and temporal hemianopsia in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits showed multiple areas of ill-defined enhancement in the optic chiasm and tracts as well as in the diaphragmatic sella, prepontine and interpeduncular cisterns, and along cranial nerves VI, VII, and VIII bilaterally. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed 34 white blood cells, hypoglycorrhachia, and negative cryptococcal antigen and bacterial and fungal cultures. A transphenoidal biopsy of the dura and pituitary gland was unremarkable. Empiric steroids resulted in marked improvement in visual acuity in both eyes, but while tapering steroids, she developed rapid visual loss bilaterally. Repeat CSF performed 6 weeks later demonstrated a cryptococcal antigen titer of 1:512. Retroactive staining of the pituitary biopsy was positive for mucicarmine, a component of the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus spp. After induction therapy with amphotericin B and flucytosine and 1 year of fluconazole, her visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. In summary, Cryptococcus can affect immunocompetent patients and often presents with insidious, chronic meningitis. Visual loss is common in cryptococcal meningitis but usually results from fulminant papilledema related to elevated intracranial pressure. In rare cases, direct nerve or chiasm infiltration by the fungus results in vision loss. PMID:26425249

  14. Interpretation of fusimotor activity in cat masseter nerve during reflex jaw movements.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, S; Taylor, A

    1983-12-01

    Simultaneous recordings were made from fusimotor axons in the central ends of filaments of the masseter nerve, and from masseter and temporalis spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus of the fifth cranial nerve in lightly anaesthetized cats. Fusimotor and alpha-motor units in the masseter nerve were differentiated on the basis of their response to passive ramp and hold stretches applied to the jaw. Spindle afferents were identified as primary or secondary according to their dynamic index after administration of suxamethonium. The activity of a given fusimotor unit during reflex movements of the jaw followed one of two distinct patterns: so-called 'tonic' units showed a general increase in activity during a movement, without detailed relation to lengthening or shortening, while 'modulated' units displayed a striking modulation of their activity with shortening, and were usually silent during subsequent lengthening. Comparison of the simultaneously recorded fusimotor and spindle afferent activity suggests that modulated units may be representative of a population of static fusimotor neurones, and tonic units of a population of dynamic fusimotor neurones. In these lightly anaesthetized animals, both primary and secondary spindle afferents showed increased firing during muscle shortening as well as during lengthening. This increase during shortening is not usually seen in conscious animals and reasons are given for the view that it is due to greater depression of alpha-motor activity than of static fusimotor activity during anaesthesia. The results are discussed in relation to the theories of 'alpha-gamma co-activation' and of 'servo-assistance'; and it is suggested that static fusimotor neurones provide a 'temporal template' of the intended movement, while dynamic fusimotor neurones set the required dynamic sensitivity to deviations from the intended movement pattern. PMID:6229627

  15. Non-motor extranigral signs and symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Erik Ch

    2009-12-01

    Clinical symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) comprise both motor and non-motor symptoms. In this disease, synucleinopathic-induced, nigral dopamine deficiency-related dysfunction of the basal ganglia is held responsible for the characteristic levodopa-responsive motor signs and symptoms (bradykinesia, hypokinesia, rigidity), known as parkinsonism and essential for clinical diagnosis in PD, as well as subtle motivational and cognitive dysfunctions. Some motor symptoms, such as tremor and postural instability, and most non-motor symptoms, however, are not fully levodopa-responsive, and suggested to manifest extranigral pathology. These symptoms include autonomic, sleep, sensory and neuropsychiatric symptoms, which in some cases may precede the first signs of motor parkinsonism, closely correlating with the progression of Lewy body pathology in PD. The recognition and treatment of these mostly under-recognized and under-treated symptoms is important, as these symptoms might have more impact on the quality of life in PD patients as compared to motor parkinsonism. On top of this, recognition of these manifestations in the prodromal phase of motor PD is critical to early diagnosis and treatment, as disease-modifying drugs, once identified, should be initiated as soon as possible, preferably in this premotor phase of the disease. On top of this, (non)motor extranigral symptoms in PD might also be of iatrogenic origin, whether directly as indirectly. During conventional, oral, dopaminomimetic treatment, the progressive loss of striatal dopaminergic nerve endings with the loss of cerebral dopamine storage capacity, renders the cerebral dopamine level fully dependent of the plasma levodopa levels, thus changing dopaminergic receptor stimulation from continuous to a more pulsatile pattern. Supposedly due to this process, neuroplastic changes in (sub)cortical dopaminergic pathways might cause therapeutic response fluctuations: motor and nonmotor fluctuations with anxiety- and panic-attacks and/or mood swings, dyskinesias and punding. Finally, dopaminomimetic pharmacotherapy may also induce extranigral non-motor drug-related direct adverse effects, such as impulse control disorders. In this article, non-motor signs and symptoms of extranigral PD-related pathology will be discussed, as well as the (suggested) criteria for diagnosis and treatment. Of course, also the recognition of the signs and symptoms of the prodromal (premotor) phase, suggestive for the presence of the PD, will be discussed. Iatrogenic non-motor symptoms, though, will not be further discussed. PMID:20083010

  16. Conduction Properties Of Decellularized Nerve Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Urbanchek, M G; Shim, B S; Baghmanli, Z; Wei, B; Schroeder, K; Langhals, N B; Miriani, R M; Egeland, B M; Kipke, D R; Martin, D C; Cederna, P S

    2010-04-30

    The purpose of this study is to optimize poly(3,4,-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymerization into decellular nerve scaffolding for interfacing to peripheral nerves. Our ultimate aim is to permanently implant highly conductive peripheral nerve interfaces between amputee, stump, nerve fascicles and prosthetic electronics. Decellular nerve (DN) scaffolds are an FDA approved biomaterial (Axogen ) with the flexible tensile properties needed for successful permanent coaptation to peripheral nerves. Biocompatible, electroconductive, PEDOT facilitates electrical conduction through PEDOT coated acellular muscle. New electrochemical methods were used to polymerize various PEDOT concentrations into DN scaffolds without the need for a final dehydration step. DN scaffolds were then tested for electrical impedance and charge density. PEDOT coated DN scaffold materials were also implanted as 15-20mm peripheral nerve grafts. Measurement of in-situ nerve conduction immediately followed grafting. DN showed significant improvements in impedance for dehydrated and hydrated, DN, polymerized with moderate and low PEDOT concentrations when they were compared with DN alone (a ? 0.05). These measurements were equivalent to those for DN with maximal PEDOT concentrations. In-situ, nerve conduction measurements demonstrated that DN alone is a poor electro-conductor while the addition of PEDOT allows DN scaffold grafts to compare favorably with the "gold standard", autograft (Table 1). Surgical handling characteristics for conductive hydrated PEDOT DN scaffolds were rated 3 (pliable) while the dehydrated models were rated 1 (very stiff) when compared with autograft ratings of 4 (normal). Low concentrations of PEDOT on DN scaffolds provided significant increases in electro active properties which were comparable to the densest PEDOT coatings. DN pliability was closely maintained by continued hydration during PEDOT electrochemical polymerization without compromising electroconductivity. PMID:21841944

  17. Conduction Properties Of Decellularized Nerve Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Urbanchek, M.G.; Shim, B.S.; Baghmanli, Z.; Wei, B.; Schroeder, K.; Langhals, N.B.; Miriani, R.M.; Egeland, B.M.; Kipke, D.R.; Martin, D.C.; Cederna, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize poly(3,4,-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymerization into decellular nerve scaffolding for interfacing to peripheral nerves. Our ultimate aim is to permanently implant highly conductive peripheral nerve interfaces between amputee, stump, nerve fascicles and prosthetic electronics. Decellular nerve (DN) scaffolds are an FDA approved biomaterial (Axogen ) with the flexible tensile properties needed for successful permanent coaptation to peripheral nerves. Biocompatible, electroconductive, PEDOT facilitates electrical conduction through PEDOT coated acellular muscle. New electrochemical methods were used to polymerize various PEDOT concentrations into DN scaffolds without the need for a final dehydration step. DN scaffolds were then tested for electrical impedance and charge density. PEDOT coated DN scaffold materials were also implanted as 15–20mm peripheral nerve grafts. Measurement of in-situ nerve conduction immediately followed grafting. DN showed significant improvements in impedance for dehydrated and hydrated, DN, polymerized with moderate and low PEDOT concentrations when they were compared with DN alone (a ? 0.05). These measurements were equivalent to those for DN with maximal PEDOT concentrations. In-situ, nerve conduction measurements demonstrated that DN alone is a poor electro-conductor while the addition of PEDOT allows DN scaffold grafts to compare favorably with the “gold standard”, autograft (Table 1). Surgical handling characteristics for conductive hydrated PEDOT DN scaffolds were rated 3 (pliable) while the dehydrated models were rated 1 (very stiff) when compared with autograft ratings of 4 (normal). Low concentrations of PEDOT on DN scaffolds provided significant increases in electro active properties which were comparable to the densest PEDOT coatings. DN pliability was closely maintained by continued hydration during PEDOT electrochemical polymerization without compromising electroconductivity. PMID:21841944

  18. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  19. Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can spread up the spine and into the neck. Pain and tenderness spreading to the ribs, shoulder blades, ... have stated that their symptoms started in the neck rather than in the lower back. ... a minority of individuals, the pain does not start in the lower back, but ...

  20. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Eye Flashes of Light Irritation Itchiness Light Sensitivity Red Eye Reduced Vision Tearing See all Symptoms > Glasses, Contacts & ... around the jaw on the affected side; Increased sensitivity to sound; Excessive tearing in the eye or dry eye; Headache or neck pain; Loss ...