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Sample records for cranial nerve symptoms

  1. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nerves—the cranial nerves—lead directly from the brain to various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. Some of the cranial nerves are ... cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, pass through ... to parts of the head, neck, and trunk. The nerves are named and numbered, ...

  2. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  3. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supply (as occurs in diabetes), drugs, and toxins. Did You Know... Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with ... depends on the cause. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  4. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  5. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement by Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  6. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  7. Cranial Nerve II

    PubMed Central

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  8. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  9. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  10. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  11. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Hiroto; KONDO, Akinori; SHIMANO, Hiroshi; YASUDA, Soichiro; MURAO, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  12. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroto; Kondo, Akinori; Shimano, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Murao, Kenichi

    2016-02-15

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  13. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  14. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    PubMed

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included. PMID:24678025

  15. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  17. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  18. Multinevritis of cranial nerves following inhalation of toxins.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Irene; Padua, Luca; Caliandro, Pietro; Evoli, Amelia; Ausili, Emanule; Sabatelli, Mario; Pitocco, Dario; Tonali, Pietro

    2003-03-01

    Cranial multineuropathy is an uncommon occurrence. We observed two cases of multinevritis of the cranial nerves which had many features in common: acute onset after toxic inhalation, occurrence of neuroparaxic block, and rapid resolution after corticosteroid therapy. We believe physicians should be aware that multinevritis of the cranial nerves may be related to acute exposure to toxic substances. Missing this diagnosis could lead to a delay in therapy. PMID:12635524

  19. Malignant lymphoma presented as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takahiko; Nakajima, Hideto; Shigekiyo, Tarou; Yokote, Taiji; Ishida, Shimon; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-01-29

    We report the case of a 62-year-old man who presented with malignant lymphoma as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy. He developed ptosis and diplopia due to right oculomotor nerve palsy. Brain MRI/MRA showed no abnormality, and he recovered with conservative medical management. Three months later, he showed diplopia due to right abducens nerve palsy and facial pain and trigeminal sensory loss. Neurological examination revealed multiple cranial nerve palsy involved cranial nerve III, V, IX, and X of the right side. Serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels were normal, and cerebrospinal fluid examination was unremarkable. Steroid and subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy didn't improve his symptoms. Six weeks after his admission, he showed rapid enlargement of the cervical lymph node and the right tonsil, and post-contrast T1-weighted MRI showed enlargement and enhancement of the left infraorbital nerve, the bilateral cavernous sinus, the bilateral facial nerves, and the left trigeminal nerve. The histopathologic examination of the tonsil biopsy revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The cause of these symptoms was thought to be infiltrating the cavernous sinus, and adjacent nerves. Spontaneous regression of malignant lymphoma is an exceptional event, but this possibility should be considered so as to the correct diagnosis and proper treatment. PMID:26616489

  20. Primary neurolymphomatosis of the lower cranial nerves presenting as Dysphagia and hoarseness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-08-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves. PMID:25083392

  1. Primary Neurolymphomatosis of the Lower Cranial Nerves Presenting as Dysphagia and Hoarseness: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves. PMID:25083392

  2. The Six Syndromes of the Sixth Cranial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Azarmina, Mohsen; Azarmina, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The sixth cranial nerve runs a long course from the brainstem to the lateral rectus muscle. Based on the location of an abnormality, other neurologic structures may be involved with the pathology related to this nerve. Sixth nerve palsy is frequently due to a benign process with full recovery within weeks, yet caution is warranted as it may portend a serious neurologic process. Hence, early diagnosis is often critical for some conditions that present with sixth nerve palsy. This article outlines a simple clinical approach to sixth nerve palsy based on its anatomy. PMID:23943691

  3. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Multiple cranial nerve palsy in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Karna, S; Biswas, J; Kumarasamy, N; Sharma, P; Solomon, S

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 32 -year- old HIV-positive Indian male who presented with sixth nerve (bilateral), ninth, tenth and twelfth nerve palsies; cerebellar and posterior column involvement. CT scan showed gyriform enhancement in the right occipital lobe and nodular leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal lobe. Cytomegalovirus serology was positive and the patient was treated as presumed CMV. HIV can present with multiple cranial neuropathy and varied neurological involvement. PMID:15884518

  5. Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M.; de Borst, G.J.; Nolan, B.W.; Indes, J.; Buck, D.B.; Lo, R.C.; Moll, F.L.; Schermerhorn, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may be diminished by cranial nerve injury (CNI). Using a quality improvement registry, we aimed to identify the nerves affected, duration of symptoms (transient vs. persistent), and clinical predictors of CNI. Methods We identified all patients undergoing CEA in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) between 2003 and 2011. Surgeon-observed CNI rate was determined at discharge (postoperative CNI) and at follow-up to determine persistent CNI (CNIs that persisted at routine follow-up visit). Hierarchical multivariable model controlling for surgeon and hospital was used to assess independent predictors for postoperative CNI. Results A total of 6,878 patients (33.8% symptomatic) were included for analyses. CNI rate at discharge was 5.6% (n = 382). Sixty patients (0.7%) had more than one nerve affected. The hypoglossal nerve was most frequently involved (n = 185, 2.7%), followed by the facial (n = 128, 1.9%), the vagus (n = 49, 0.7%), and the glossopharyngeal (n = 33, 0.5%) nerve. The vast majority of these CNIs were transient; only 47 patients (0.7%) had a persistent CNI at their follow-up visit (median 10.0 months, range 0.3–15.6 months). Patients with perioperative stroke (0.9%, n = 64) had significantly higher risk of CNI (n = 15, CNI risk 23.4%, p < .01). Predictors for CNI were urgent procedures (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1, p < .01), immediate re-exploration after closure under the same anesthetic (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.0, p < .01), and return to the operating room for a neurologic event or bleeding (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8, p < .01), but not redo CEA (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.5–1.9, p = .90) or prior cervical radiation (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3–2.5, p = .80). Conclusions As patients are currently selected in the VSGNE, persistent CNI after CEA is rare. While conditions of urgency and (sub)acute reintervention carried increased risk for postoperative CNI, a history of prior ipsilateral CEA or cervical radiation was not associated with increased CNI rate. PMID:24157257

  6. [Herpes zoster oticus with cranial nerve affection].

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Anita Guldager; Mirz, Frank

    2010-10-11

    Herpes zoster oticus (HZO) with cranial polyneuropathy is also known as Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS). After primary varicella infection, the varicella zoster virus (VZV) remains dormant in the nervous system and can reactivate later in life causing RHS. This case describes a 56-year-old man with HZO and palsy of N. V, VII, VIII, IX, X and XII. Anti-viral agents might be effective in patients with RHS, although the only randomized controlled clinical trial on this subject found no significant benefit. There are no randomized controlled trials to support the use of corticosteroid therapy. PMID:20961509

  7. Multiple cranial nerve palsies associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, N P; Garg, S; Kumar, S; Gulati, S

    2006-08-01

    Although isolated cranial nerve palsies are common in patients with diabetes mellitus, multiple simultaneous cranial neuropathies are rare. We report a 48-year-old man, a known case of diabetes mellitus, who presented with facial palsy, foot drop and painful ophthalmoplegia of the left eye. The initial differential diagnosis included diabetic polyneuropathy, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis, mucormycosis and the Tolosa Hunt syndrome. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings were consistent with those of the Tolosa Hunt syndrome. The patient had a remarkable complete resolution of his ophthalmoplegia after four weeks of steroid treatment, with repeat MR imaging showing resolution of the initial changes. PMID:16865214

  8. Brain mass and cranial nerve size in shrews and moles.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Duncan B; Sarko, Diana K; Catania, Kenneth C

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between body size, brain size, and fibers in selected cranial nerves in shrews and moles. Species include tiny masked shrews (S. cinereus) weighing only a few grams and much larger mole species weighing up to 90 grams. It also includes closely related species with very different sensory specializations - such as the star-nosed mole and the common, eastern mole. We found that moles and shrews have tiny optic nerves with fiber counts not correlated with body or brain size. Auditory nerves were similarly small but increased in fiber number with increasing brain and body size. Trigeminal nerve number was by far the largest and also increased with increasing brain and body size. The star-nosed mole was an outlier, with more than twice the number of trigeminal nerve fibers than any other species. Despite this hypertrophied cranial nerve, star-nosed mole brains were not larger than predicted from body size, suggesting that magnification of their somatosensory systems does not result in greater overall CNS size. PMID:25174995

  9. Brain Mass and Cranial Nerve Size in Shrews and Moles

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between body size, brain size, and fibers in selected cranial nerves in shrews and moles. Species include tiny masked shrews (S. cinereus) weighing only a few grams and much larger mole species weighing up to 90 grams. It also includes closely related species with very different sensory specializations – such as the star-nosed mole and the common, eastern mole. We found that moles and shrews have tiny optic nerves with fiber counts not correlated with body or brain size. Auditory nerves were similarly small but increased in fiber number with increasing brain and body size. Trigeminal nerve number was by far the largest and also increased with increasing brain and body size. The star-nosed mole was an outlier, with more than twice the number of trigeminal nerve fibers than any other species. Despite this hypertrophied cranial nerve, star-nosed mole brains were not larger than predicted from body size, suggesting that magnification of their somatosensory systems does not result in greater overall CNS size. PMID:25174995

  10. Cranial Nerve Palsies: Sarcoidosis to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Fawad; Bannout, Firas; Russell, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Cranial palsies are a very rare feature of SLE. Similarly, peripheral sensory-motor axonal neuropathy is very uncommon in SLE. The combination of the two as the presenting symptoms of SLE is a diagnostic challenge particularly in an elderly male patient with a known diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This case serves to highlight the diagnostic considerations in such a patient. The lack of response to standard therapy and the presence of subtle clues like anemia, proteinuria, and mild serositis should prompt the physician to look for alternate diagnoses. The potential association of SLE and sarcoidosis is also discussed. SLE can be present in elderly male patients with cranial and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:23401835

  11. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-01

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs. PMID:22948066

  12. [A case of zoster sine herpete with involvement of the unilateral IX, X and XI cranial and upper cervical nerves].

    PubMed

    Funakawa, I; Terao, A; Koga, M

    1999-09-01

    We describe a case of unilateral IX, X and XI cranial and upper cervical nerve palsies involving zoster sine herpete (ZSH). A 63-year-old man experienced nausea, loss of appetite and general fatigue. On 4 days of illness, dysphagia, dysarthria and difficulty in elevation of his right arm appeared. Neurological examination showed the right curtain sign, a nasal voice and a decreased right gag reflex. He could hardly elevate his right arm laterally. Needle electromyography revealed positive sharp waves in his right trapezius muscle. Although no skin lesion was detected, anti-varicella-zoster virus antibodies were positive in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Acyclovir and a steroid were ineffective for these symptoms. Although case reports of unilateral IX, X and XI cranial nerve palsies with ZSH is very rare, ZSH should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of multiple cranial nerve palsies. PMID:10614162

  13. [Endoscopic assistance in microvascular decompression of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Shimanski?, V N; Karnaukhov, V V; Sergienko, T A; Poshataev, V K; Semenov, M S

    2012-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is an effective method for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), hemifacial spasm (HFS), glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN). The aim of this study was to assess the role of endoscopic assistance in MVD for the treatment of cranial neuropathies. Since 2009 till 2011 133 patients with cranial neuropathies were treated by MVD in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute, Moscow. In 22 patients (11 patients with HFS, 10 patients with TN, 1 with GPN) endoscopic assistance was applied during the MVD. We used minimally invasive retrosigmoid approach in a unilateral position. Cerebellopontine angle was explored by 30-degree or 70-degree telescope to visualize the root entry zone of trigeminal, facial or glossopharyngeal nerves and to locate the neurovascular conflict. In 9 patients with HFS and in 1 patient with TN and in another patient with GPN endoscopy discovered offending vessels that were not visible through the microscope. In all cases endoscope was used to exclude another site of compression and to verify decompression and to identify position of teflon and offending vessel after MVD. Immediately after the surgery excellent outcome was observed in 10 patients with HFS (89%), one patient was reoperated 1.5 years after first operation with positive effect. Relief of pain in early postoperative period was observed in patients with TN and GPN. There were no major complications and postoperative mortality in our series. Endoscopic assistance is very effective and helpful technique in MVD of cranial nerves, especially in cases with HFS. In this study the use of the endoscope allowed to identify the site of compression and to confirm the position of teflon after MVD. PMID:22708429

  14. Congenital intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma of temporal fossa unassociated with any major cranial nerve.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rewati Raman; Netalkar, Audumbar S; Pawar, Sanjay J; Lad, Santosh D; Musa, Mohammed M; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Intracranial schwannomas commonly arise from the vestibular nerve and less commonly from other cranial nerves. On rare occasions, they may be intraparenchymatous, intraventricularor intrasellar. However, the occurrence of a congenital solitary intracranial extradural schwannoma unrelated to any cranial nerve in the absence of von Recklinghausan's syndrome is exceptional. The authors report a unique, heretofore unreported case of a congenital temporal extradural schwannoma, unassociated with any known cranial nerve and with a transcranial extension presenting as a temporal fossa mass since birth in a 16-year-old female patient. Total resection of this tumour was uncomplicated. A brief review of the relevant literature is presented. PMID:11749032

  15. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  16. Three-dimensional interactive atlas of cranial nerve-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Anatomical knowledge of the cranial nerves (CN) is fundamental in education, research and clinical practice. Moreover, understanding CN-related pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance. To facilitate CN knowledge anatomy and pathology understanding, we created an atlas of CN-related disorders, which is a three-dimensional (3D) interactive tool correlating CN pathology with the underlying surface and sectional neuroanatomy as well as the resulting neurological deficits. A computer platform was developed with: 1) anatomy browser along with the normal brain atlas (built earlier); 2) simulator of CN lesions; 3) tools to label CN-related pathology; and 4) CN pathology database with lesions and disorders, and the resulting signs, symptoms and/or syndromes. The normal neuroanatomy comprises about 2,300 3D components subdivided into modules. Cranial nerves contain more than 600 components: all 12 pairs of cranial nerves (CN I - CN XII) and the brainstem CN nuclei. The CN pathology database was populated with 36 lesions compiled from clinical textbooks. The initial view of each disorder was preset in terms of lesion location and size, surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy, and disorder and neuroanatomy labeling. Moreover, path selection from a CN nucleus to a targeted organ further enhances pathology-anatomy relationships. This atlas of CN-related disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students and residents to general practitioners, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal brain anatomy and CN-related pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way. PMID:23859281

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging for anatomical localization of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei in pontine lesions: initial experiences with 3T-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Nils H; Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Woernle, Christoph M; Alzarhani, Yahea A; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Kollias, Spyros S

    2014-11-01

    With continuous refinement of neurosurgical techniques and higher resolution in neuroimaging, the management of pontine lesions is constantly improving. Among pontine structures with vital functions that are at risk of being damaged by surgical manipulation, cranial nerves (CN) and cranial nerve nuclei (CNN) such as CN V, VI, and VII are critical. Pre-operative localization of the intrapontine course of CN and CNN should be beneficial for surgical outcomes. Our objective was to accurately localize CN and CNN in patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and estimate its input in surgical planning for avoiding unintended loss of their function during surgery. DTI of the pons obtained pre-operatively on a 3Tesla MR scanner was analyzed prospectively for the accurate localization of CN and CNN V, VI and VII in seven patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons. Anatomical sections in the pons were used to estimate abnormalities on color-coded fractional anisotropy maps. Imaging abnormalities were correlated with CN symptoms before and after surgery. The course of CN and the area of CNN were identified using DTI pre- and post-operatively. Clinical associations between post-operative improvements and the corresponding CN area of the pons were demonstrated. Our results suggest that pre- and post-operative DTI allows identification of key anatomical structures in the pons and enables estimation of their involvement by pathology. It may predict clinical outcome and help us to better understand the involvement of the intrinsic anatomy by pathological processes. PMID:24998855

  18. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Spataro, Rossella; La Bella, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes. PMID:25960744

  19. [Unusual manifestation of zoster sine herpete as unilateral caudal cranial nerve syndrome].

    PubMed

    Terborg, C; Förster, G; Sliwka, U

    2001-12-01

    Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies are a rare complication following varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation, especially if typical herpetic eruptions are lacking. We report a case of a 45-year-old, immunocompetent male with unilateral involvement of the cranial nerves VIII, IX, X, and XI without skin lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies revealed mononuclear pleocytosis with intrathecal antibody synthesis against VZV, while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) did not detect VZV or HSV (herpes simplex virus). The patient almost completely recovered after aciclovir administration. VZV reactivation without rash (zoster sine herpete) may lead to multiple cranial nerve palsies. PCR is a useful tool to detect VZV-DNA in CSF, but negative results do not exclude a reactivation. In case of multiple cranial nerve palsies of unknown etiology with mononuclear pleocytosis in CSF tumors of the skull base, meningitis tuberculosis, and meningeosis have to be excluded, and antiviral therapy should be discussed. PMID:11789442

  20. US Food and Drug Administration /Conformit Europe- approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Meek, M F; Coert, J H

    2008-04-01

    Several absorbable nerve conduits are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Conformit Europe (CE) for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves . Surgeons are often not aware of the different(bio) materials of these conduits when performing nerve repair. An overview of these FDA- and CE-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical use is presented . PubMed, MEDLINE, and the companies selling the conduits were consulted . The available FDA and CE absorbable nerve conduits for peripheral and cranial nerve repair are 2 collagen- and 2 synthetic- polyester based conduits. The available clinical data, the price, the length, and the composition of the tube show significant differences. Based on the available data in this paper at this moment, we favor the PGA (Neurotube) nerve conduit for repair of peripheral and cranial nerve defects because of its advantages in length, price, and availability of clinical data. However, no prospective studies comparing the available nerve conduits have been published. PMID:18437784

  1. Persistent hiccups and vomiting with multiple cranial nerve palsy in a case of zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Natsumi; Nakachi, Ryo; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man came to our hospital complaining of hiccups and vomiting lasting for five days. A neurological examination showed dysfunction of cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, IX and X on the left side. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster virus-DNA was positive. The patient responded well to treatment with intravenous acyclovir and steroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of zoster sine herpete presenting with persistent hiccups and vomiting. It is important to keep in mind that herpes zoster can present with symptoms that closely resemble those of intractable hiccups and nausea of neuromyelitis optica. Early detection of the virus is critical for making appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:25318806

  2. Isolated Cranial Nerve-III Palsy Secondary to Perimesencephalic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Abbatemarco, Justin R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare clinical finding in a patient with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this unusual case, the patient presented with complete cranial nerve-III palsy including ptosis and pupillary involvement. Initial studies revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the perimesencephalic, prepontine, and interpeduncular cisterns. Angiographic studies were negative for an intracranial aneurysm. The patient's neurological deficits improved with no residual deficits on follow-up several months after initial presentation. Our case report supports the notion that patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage have an excellent prognosis. Our report further adds a case of isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare initial presentation of this type of bleeding, adding to the limited body of the literature. PMID:26949557

  3. Glufosinate Herbicide Intoxication Causing Unconsciousness, Convulsion, and 6th Cranial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-seok; Kwak, Soo-Jung; Gil, Hyo-wook; Kim, So-Young

    2013-01-01

    Although glufosinate ammonium herbicides are considered safe when used properly, ingestion of the undiluted form can cause grave outcomes. Recently, we treated a 34-yr-old man who ingested glufosinate ammonium herbicide. In the course of treatment, the patient developed apnea, mental deterioration, and sixth cranial nerve palsy; he has since been discharged with full recovery after intensive care. This case report describes the clinical features of glufosinate intoxication with a focus on sixth cranial nerve palsy. Our observation suggests that neurologic manifestations after ingestion of a "low-grade toxicity herbicide" are variable and more complex than that was previously considered. PMID:24265537

  4. Arachnoid cyst causing third cranial nerve palsy manifesting as isolated internal ophthalmoplegia and iris cholinergic supersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ashker, Lamees; Weinstein, Joel M; Dias, Mark; Kanev, Paul; Nguyen, Dan; Bonsall, Dean J

    2008-09-01

    An 8-month-old boy presented with anisocoria, a sluggishly reactive right pupil, and cholinergic supersensitivity as the only signs of what proved months later to be compressive third cranial nerve palsy due to an arachnoid cyst. Tonic constriction and dilation, segmental iris sphincter palsy, aberrant regeneration phenomena, ductional deficits, and ptosis were absent. The initial diagnosis was postganglionic internal ophthalmoplegia attributed to a viral ciliary ganglionopathy. Nineteen months later, he had developed an incomitant exodeviation and a supraduction deficit. Brain MRI revealed a mass consistent with an arachnoid cyst compressing the third cranial nerve in the right interpeduncular cistern. Resection of the cyst led to a persistent complete third cranial nerve palsy. This is the second reported case of prolonged internal ophthalmoplegia in a young child as a manifestation of a compressive third cranial nerve palsy. Our patient serves as a reminder that isolated internal ophthalmoplegia with cholinergic supersensitivity is compatible with a preganglionic compressive third nerve lesion, particularly in a young child. PMID:18769282

  5. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    PubMed

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1033-1061, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26356988

  6. The 12, 24, or is it 26 cranial nerves?

    PubMed Central

    Welsby, P

    2004-01-01

    Many of our perceptions are gained through interpretative organs that we assume to be providing objective accounts. Notably, however, neither vision nor hearing provide an objective account of reality. This paper challenges the "conventional wisdoms" held regarding the optic, auditory, and hypoglossal nerves, and the nerves of eye movement. PMID:15466996

  7. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy ... mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, helps ...

  8. It's All in the Mime: Actions Speak Louder than Words When Teaching the Cranial Nerves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The…

  9. It's All in the Mime: Actions Speak Louder than Words When Teaching the Cranial Nerves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The…

  10. Nav2 is necessary for cranial nerve development and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is required for nervous system development, including the developing hindbrain region. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) was first identified as an atRA-responsive gene in human neuroblastoma cells (retinoic acid-induced in neuroblastoma 1, Rainb1), and is required for atRA-mediated neurite outgrowth. In this paper, we explore the importance of Nav2 in nervous system development and function in vivo. Results Nav2 hypomorphic homozygous mutants show decreased survival starting at birth. Nav2 mutant embryos show an overall reduction in nerve fiber density, as well as specific defects in cranial nerves IX (glossopharyngeal) and X (vagus). Nav2 hypomorphic mutant adult mice also display a blunted baroreceptor response compared to wild-type controls. Conclusions Nav2 functions in mammalian nervous system development, and is required for normal cranial nerve development and blood pressure regulation in the adult. PMID:20184720

  11. [Localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis with multiple cranial nerve failure -- case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Winkler, F; Seelos, K; Hempel, J M; Pfister, H-W

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the more frequent hematogenously spread cerebral aspergillosis, localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis is a fungal infection that can also occur in patients who are not severely immunosuppressed. This illness can be effectively treated in some of these patients by early and rigorous therapy. Localized invasion of the fungus, generally from one of the nasal sinuses, causes intracranial growth mainly along the base of the skull and larger vessels,where fibrous, granulomatous tissue develops. This generally leads to damage of the cranial nerves (primarily I-VI) as well as localized pain syndromes. We report on the clinical course documented by MRI of a patient with localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis who had multiple failure of cranial nerves following surgery for an aspergilloma of the maxillary sinus. Clinical course, imaging findings, and treatment of the illness are discussed with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:12486570

  12. Issues in the Optimal Selection of a Cranial Nerve Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Goldsmith, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) is a safe technique that is of clear clinical value in the preservation of cranial nerves in skull base surgery and is rapidly becoming the standard of care. Available nerve monitoring systems vary widely in capabilities and costs. A well-informed surgeon may best decide on monitoring needs based on surgical case selection, experience, operating room space, availability of monitoring personnel, and cost. Key system characteristics that should be reviewed in the decision-making process include the monitoring technique (electromyography, pressure transducer, direct nerve monitoring, brainstem auditory evoked potential) and the stimulus technique (stimulating parameters, probe selection). In the past, IONM has been primarily employed in posterior fossa and temporal bone surgery, but the value of IONM is being recognized in more skull base and head and neck surgeries. Suggested IONM strategies for specific surgeries are presented. PMID:17170916

  13. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy ... Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type -- is a mononeuropathy . This means that only one nerve is damaged. The condition affects the third cranial (oculomotor) ...

  14. US Food and Drug Administration/Conformit Europe-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Meek, M F; Coert, J H

    2008-01-01

    Several absorbable nerve conduits are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Conformit Europe (CE) for clinical repair of peripheral and cranial nerves. Surgeons are often not aware of the different (bio)materials of these conduits when performing nerve repair. An overview of these FDA- and CE-approved absorbable nerve conduits for clinical use is presented. PubMed, MEDLINE, and the companies selling the conduits were consulted. The available FDA and CE absorbable nerve conduits for peripheral and cranial nerve repair are 2 collagen- and 2 synthetic-polyester-based conduits. The available clinical data, the price, the length, and the composition of the tube show significant differences. Based on the available data in this paper at this moment, we favor the PGA (Neurotube) nerve conduit for repair of peripheral and cranial nerve defects because of its advantages in length, price, and availability of clinical data. However, no prospective studies comparing the available nerve conduits have been published. PMID:18281807

  15. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food residue remained in the vallecula and pyriform sinus, and there was reduced motion of the pharynx and larynx. Electromyography confirmed bilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. PMID:26949684

  16. Histoenzymological analysis of mesencephalic auditory, tegmental and cranial nerve nuclei in the frog (Rana tigrina).

    PubMed Central

    Sood, P P

    1978-01-01

    The distributions of acid and alkaline phosphatases, 5-nucleotidase, ATPase, non-specific esterase, specific cholinesterase, succinic dehydrogenase and beta-galactosidase are described in the mesencephalic auditory, tegmental and cranial nerve nuclei of the frog (Rana tigrina). The main results of the study are as follows: The laminar, principal, and magnocellular nuclei of the torus semicircularis, which are associated with auditory functions, show intense activity of specific cholinesterase. On the other hand, the commissural and subependymal mid-line nuclei, whose functions are doubtful, show a complete lack of this enzyme. The nucleus isthmi shows intense acid phosphatase, ATPase, non-specific esterase, specific cholinesterase and succinic dehydrogenase activities. Non-specific esterase is virtually absent from all the areas studied except the nucleus isthmi and the 3rd and 4th cranial nerve nuclei. Most of the commissures and fibre tracts show intense activity for beta-galactosidase and 5-nucleotidase. The possible roles of these enzymes in glycolipid and myelin metabolism are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Figs. 6-7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Figs. 17-19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 PMID:214417

  17. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  18. Carotid and cranial nerve reconstruction after removal of cavernous sinus lesions.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Sen, C N; Lanzino, G; Pomonis, S

    1991-12-01

    During the last 7 years, approximately 170 neoplasms, and 35 vascular lesions involving the cavernous sinus were treated by the first two authors. During the treatment of such lesions, the direct vein graft reconstruction of the internal carotid artery from the petrous to the supraclinoid or infraclinoid ICA was performed in 23 patients. Graft occlusion occurred in 3 patients and in one of these, it was successfully salvaged by placing a long venous graft from the extracranial ICA to the M3 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The latter 3 patients were neurologically normal. One patient with significant atherosclerotic disease suffered the dissection of the distal internal carotid artery with the graft being patent. The suturing technique. This patient eventually died. Two patients with severely compromised collateral circulation suffered minor strokes due to the temporary occlusion of the ICA. This has been avoided in the more recent patients by the adoption of brain protection techniques such as moderate hypothermia, induced hypertension, and barbiturate coma. Low dose heparin therapy during grafting and high dose intravenous steroids prior to the grafting also appear to be beneficial. Direct vein graft reconstruction of the intracavernous carotid artery is a valuable tool during the management of cavernous sinus lesions. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique as well as the pros and cons of other revascularization techniques will be discussed. During microsurgical removal of cavernous sinus lesions, the cranial nerves III-VI were reconstructed by direct resuture or by nerve grafting in 16 patients. In the majority of these patients, recovery of cranial nerve function was observed, which was very encouraging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1803071

  19. Carboxypeptidase A6 in Zebrafish Development and Implications for VIth Cranial Nerve Pathfinding

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Peter J.; Ma, Leung-hang; Baker, Robert; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is an extracellular protease that cleaves carboxy-terminal hydrophobic amino acids and has been implicated in the defective innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the VIth cranial nerve in Duane syndrome. In order to investigate the role of CPA6 in development, in particular its potential role in axon guidance, the zebrafish ortholog was identified and cloned. Zebrafish CPA6 was secreted and interacted with the extracellular matrix where it had a neutral pH optimum and specificity for C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids. Transient mRNA expression was found in newly formed somites, pectoral fin buds, the stomodeum and a conspicuous condensation posterior to the eye. Markers showed this tissue was not myogenic in nature. Rather, the CPA6 localization overlapped with a chondrogenic site which subsequently forms the walls of a myodome surrounding the lateral rectus muscle. No other zebrafish CPA gene exhibited a similar expression profile. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of CPA6 combined with retrograde labeling and horizontal eye movement analyses demonstrated that deficiency of CPA6 alone did not affect either VIth nerve development or function in the zebrafish. We suggest that mutations in other genes and/or enhancer elements, together with defective CPA6 expression, may be required for altered VIth nerve pathfinding. If mutations in CPA6 contribute to Duane syndrome, our results also suggest that Duane syndrome can be a chondrogenic rather than a myogenic or neurogenic developmental disorder. PMID:20885977

  20. Bilateral facial nerve palsy as the sole initial symptom of syphilis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy is an exceedingly rare condition and presents a diagnostic challenge. Bilateral facial nerve palsy may result from cranial trauma, congenital abnormalities, inflammation, infiltration, or infection, but is rarely associated with syphilis. Here, we report a case of syphilis in which bilateral facial nerve palsy was the only initial symptom. A 22-year-old man presented at our emergency department with isolated bilateral facial nerve palsy. Results for initial serum and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were normal, including the rapid plasma reagin titer. One week later, the patient developed rashes on the torso, palms, and soles. At this time, a high serum rapid plasma reagin titer was detected, and the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test was positive. Once the tests were confirmed, the patient admitted to a history of unprotected sexual behavior. Penicillin G treatment was effective, and a 3-month follow-up examination demonstrated a complete recovery. We recommend that syphilis be considered when diagnosing sexually experienced young men presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy, even in the absence of skin manifestations. Failure to recognize facial signs of syphilis could result in inappropriate management, affecting the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:26166431

  1. Cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal encasing the VII and VIII cranial nerve complex: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Carpineta, Ettore; Cacciotti, Guglielmo; Di Scipio, Ettore; Roperto, Raffaelino

    2016-04-01

    Cavernous angiomas originating in the internal auditory canal are very rare. In the available literature, only 65 cases of cavernomas in this location have been previously reported. We describe the case of a 22-year-old woman surgically treated for a cavernous hemangioma in the left internal auditory canal, mimicking on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging MRI an acoustic neuroma. Neurological symptoms were hypoacusia and dizziness. The cavernous angioma encased the seventh and, partially, the eighth cranial nerve complex. A "nearly total" removal was performed, leaving a thin residual of malformation adherent to the facial nerve. Postoperative period was uneventful; hearing was unchanged, but the patient had a moderate inferior left facial palsy (House-Brackmann grade II) slightly improved during the following weeks. On the basis of the observation of this uncommon case, we propose a revision of the literature and discuss clinical features, differential diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26876892

  2. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) arising from the 3rd cranial nerve in infants: a clinical-radiological entity?

    PubMed

    Oh, Christopher C; Orr, Brent A; Bernardi, Bruno; Garré, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Andrea; Figà-Talamanca, Lorenzo; Robinson, Giles W; Patay, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is a rare embryonal tumor of the central nervous system with preponderance in very young children, the majority of whom are younger than 3 years of age at diagnosis. Historically, outcomes of this aggressive disease, even with extensive multimodal therapy, have been dismal. Recent improvements have come from therapies directed exclusively towards ATRT, but misdiagnosis or delays in the correct diagnosis lead to significantly worse survival rates. ATRTs most commonly occur supratentorially but have been described in virtually all central nervous system locations, including the cerebellopontine angle cistern, meninges, and spinal canal, and extradural locations. ATRTs originating from cranial nerves are rare. Here, we describe three cases of solitary ATRT arising from the 3rd cranial nerve (CN III) or close to its origin in the midbrain, all of which presented in patients within 6 months of birth, with isolated unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and strikingly similar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. These MRI features include IV contrast enhancement, relative T2 hyposignal, and restricted water diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient images, findings which are consistent with angiogenesis and high cellularity, and hence, suggestive of malignancy. We conclude that ATRT should be placed high on the differential diagnosis list when encountering a young infant presenting with isolated, unilateral 3rd nerve palsy and a small, solitary tumor arising from CN III that demonstrates malignant conventional and diffusion-weighted imaging features on MRI. PMID:26148473

  3. Relationships between clinical symptom severity scales and nerve conduction measures in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    You, H; Simmons, Z; Freivalds, A; Kothari, M J; Naidu, S H

    1999-04-01

    This study examined the severity of symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in relation to nerve conduction measures of the median nerve. Clinical symptom severity and nerve conduction studies were evaluated for 64 hands with CTS in 45 patients. We found the following: (1) significant relationships identified among the clinical scales resulted in a dichotomous symptom classification scheme into primary and secondary symptoms, with the former being more specific for those symptoms usually seen in association with nerve injury; (2) there were significant relationships between symptom severity and nerve conduction abnormality; (3) the primary symptom scale correlated more strongly with the electrodiagnostic measures of nerve injury than did the secondary symptom scale. Based on these findings, we believe that these clinical scales have biological significance and reflect median nerve injury. This would support their potential utility for evaluating the outcome of CTS treatment and developing a model for exposure-severity relationship. PMID:10204785

  4. It's all in the mime: Actions speak louder than words when teaching the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The research design involved exposure of the same group of students to didactic followed by miming lecturing of CNs. The effectiveness of each lecturing strategy was measured via pre- and post-testing. Student perceptions of these strategies were measured by a survey. As an example of miming, gestures for CN VII included funny faces for muscles of facial expression, kangaroo vocalization for taste, spitting action for saliva production, and crying for lacrimal gland production. Accounting for extra duration of the miming lecture, it was shown that pre- to post-test improvement was higher for the miming presentation than for the didactic (0.47 ± 0.03 marks/minute versus 0.33 ± 0.03, n = 39, P < 0.005). Students perceived that the miming lecture was more interactive, engaging, effective, and motivating to attend (mean on five-point Likert scale: 4.62, 4.64, 4.56, 4.31, respectively) than the didactic lecture. In the final examination, performance was better (P < 0.001, n = 39) on the CN than on the non-CN questions-particularly for students scoring ≤60%. While mediating factors need elucidation (e.g., learning due to repetition of content), this study's findings support the theory that gestures and body movements help learners to acquire anatomical knowledge. PMID:25952466

  5. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 34.444, p < 0.001). Fifty-nine cases experienced CNP in more than one cranial nerve. Twenty-two of 27 cases (68.8%) of intragroup CNP and 11 of 32 cases (40.7%) of intergroup CNP occurred synchronously ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  6. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Lower Cranial Nerves in Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to Skull Base Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D.; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J.; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective?The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits. Design?We retrospectively identified 73 patients out of 990 patients who had EEA in our institution who had at least one CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as group I and those who did not as group II. Results?We monitored a total of 342 CNs. A total of 62 nerves had SG f-EMG activity including CN VII?=?18, CN IX?=?16, CN X?=?13, CN XI?=?5, and CN XII?=?10. No nerve deficit was found in the nerves that had significant activity during procedure. A total of five nerve deficits including (CN IX?=?1, CN X?=?2, CN XII?=?2) were observed in the group that did not display SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions?f-EMG seems highly sensitive to surgical manipulations and in locating CNs. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of lower CNs during EEA procedures need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG. PMID:23904999

  7. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema; Polacek, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  8. Coherent inspiratory oscillation of cranial nerve discharges in perfused neonatal cat brainstem in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, F; Morin-Surun, M P; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    1. To understand the neural organization of respiratory movement control and its developmental transformation, we studied the temporal characteristics of inspiratory activities, especially nerve-to-nerve short-term synchronization, in an in vitro preparation of the isolated, perfused brainstem of kittens aged 0-14 days (postnatal day (P) 0-14). 2. In the inspiratory discharges of facial, vagus, glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves, a stable oscillation with a period of 30-40 ms (i.e. approximately 30 Hz) was observed in all preparations examined. In addition, we demonstrated that this oscillation presents a strong short-term synchrony between distinct inspiratory nerves. This nerve-to-nerve synchronization was already apparent at approximately 12 h after birth. The degree of synchronization as evaluated by coherence spectral analysis was larger than 0.85 in all cases at any age examined. 3. This nerve-to-nerve coherence was not affected by changes in temperature (28-36 degrees C), whereas respiratory rate, oscillation frequency and oscillation amplitude as estimated by power spectral analysis were highly temperature sensitive. 4. The nerve-to-nerve synchronization, as well as the approximately 30 Hz oscillation, remained unchanged after a pontomedullary transection, indicating that the medullary network, completely isolated from other structures and afferents, is sufficient to produce both fast oscillation and nerve-to-nerve synchronization. 5. Based on these observations in vitro, we conclude that nerve-to-nerve coherent inspiratory oscillation generated in the brainstem is already functional early in life. Images Figure 4 PMID:8961194

  9. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T. . E-mail: cgmhnog@yahoo.com

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those evaluated with CT or Tm, with a 15-30% improvement in local tumor control and survival. Patients with extensive CN palsy had worse survival than those with only lower CN or upper CN involvement (5-year DSS 20.4% vs. 43.2% and 40.4%, respectively; p < 0.001). Patients who recovered from CN palsy had better survival than those who did not (47% vs. 26%, p < 0.001). Brachytherapy was associated with poorer local control, whereas a total external dose of more than 70 Gy improved local tumor control and marginally improved DSS. Subgroup analysis in CT and MRI patients group, either DSS or OS was significantly associated with imaging modality, N stage, or location of or remission of CN palsy. Conclusion: The use of MRI was associated with improved tumor control and survival of patients with NPC causing CN palsy. Patients recovering from CN palsy had better survival. A higher radiation dose delivered by external beam may achieve better tumor control than brachytherapy.

  10. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  11. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of the cranial nerves and their nuclei correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Johnson, Aleksandra; Chua, Beng Choon; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cranial nerves and their nuclei is critical in clinical practice, medical research and education. However to our best knowledge, a comprehensive source capturing full three-dimensional (3D) relationships of the cranial nerves along with surrounding neuroanatomy is not yet available. This work addresses the construction and validation of an atlas of the cranial nerves with their nuclei, correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature, and magnetic resonance imaging. The atlas is interactive, stereotactic, 3D, detailed, fully parcellated, completely labeled, consistent in 3D, electronically dissectible, and scalable. A 3D geometrical model of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves with nuclei was created from an in vivo magnetic resonance scan exploiting in-house developed tools and methods, including tubular and iso-surface modeling, interactive editing, and mesh compression. This virtual model contains 439 objects with 121 different names, labeled based on Terminologia Anatomica. The model was integrated with a 3D atlas of structure, vasculature and tracts developed earlier, and correlated with sectional magnetic resonance anatomy. The whole model or its components can be interactively rotated, zoomed, panned, and add or removed with a simple few clicks. The studied material can be adaptively selected in an in-depth manner by using controls available in the user interface. This atlas is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, automatic student assessment, preparing materials, and localization in clinical neurology. PMID:22425656

  12. Causal Relation between Nerve Compression and Migraine Symptoms and the Therapeutic Role of Surgical Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mansher; Rios Diaz, Arturo J.; Gobble, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nerve decompression has been recently described as a therapy for migraine headaches. Multiple studies have demonstrated significant symptomatic relief or complete resolution of migraine symptoms in patients with surgical decompression. However, there is no study describing a causal relation between migraine headaches and nerve compression and resolution of symptoms with tumor removal and nerve decompression. Methods: We were presented with a biological example of compression neuropathy causing migraine headaches due to greater occipital nerve compression by a lipoma from a remote head trauma. Included is a literature review of nerve decompression therapy for migraine. Results: Migraine symptoms were completely resolved on removal of the mass and nerve decompression. The patient has not required any migraine medications since the surgery. Conclusions: This case serves as a biological example to validate the true causal relationship between greater occipital nerve compression and migraine headaches. PMID:26090285

  13. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. Methods: To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Results: Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Conclusion: Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients. PMID:26674155

  14. Development and Use of an Interactive Computerized Dog Model to Evaluate Cranial Nerve Knowledge in Veterinary Students.

    PubMed

    Bogert, K; Platt, Simon; Haley, Allison; Kent, Marc; Edwards, Gaylen; Dookwah, H; Johnsen, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, the cognitive skills necessary to interpret neurological disorders from text-based case descriptions may not translate into the diagnostic capabilities required for clinical neurological patients. As live animals exhibiting certain specific neurological disorders are infrequent during a student's exposure to clinics, students may graduate without the experience necessary to make an accurate diagnosis in the field. To address this, we have developed a computerized simulated dog head that can exhibit cranial nerve dysfunctions and respond to specific testing procedures in a clinically accurate manner. To evaluate whether this type of model could add value to traditional student assessments, we created a multiple-choice quiz system with three types of questions: standard text-based cases, videos of an expert performing an examination of the simulated dog, and an interactive version requiring the student to perform an appropriate examination of the simulated dog to uncover the lesion localization. In an experiment conducted with 97 freshman veterinary students who had recently been taught cranial nerve anatomy and function, we found that examination performance decreased with the need for interactivity compared to memorization of fact, while satisfaction increased. Students were less likely to identify the correct disorder when they had to conduct the examination of the virtual dog themselves, revealing an inadequacy in traditional neuroanatomical teaching. However, students overwhelmingly supported the use of interactive question for assessment. Interestingly, performance on text-based questions did not correlate significantly with interactive or video questions. The results have implications for veterinary teaching and assessment within the classroom and in clinical environments. PMID:26560546

  15. Image findings of cranial nerve pathology on [18F]-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT): a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Osama A; Muzaffar, Razi; Shetty, Vilaas; Osman, Medhat M

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to increase awareness about the utility of (18)F -FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) pathology. We discuss the clinical implication of detecting perineural tumor spread, emphasize the primary and secondary (18)F -FDG-PET/CT findings of CN pathology, and illustrate the individual (18)F -FDG-PET/CT CN anatomy and pathology of 11 of the 12 CNs. PMID:26634826

  16. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications. PMID:23416136

  17. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the extracranial vasculature correlated with the intracranial vasculature, cranial nerves, skull and muscles.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Shoon Let Thaung, Thant; Choon Chua, Beng; Hnin Wut Yi, Su; Yang, Yili; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to construct a 3D, interactive, and reference atlas of the extracranial vasculature spatially correlated with the intracranial blood vessels, cranial nerves, skull, glands, and head muscles.The atlas has been constructed from multiple 3T and 7T magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) brain scans, and 3T phase contrast and inflow MRA neck scans of the same specimen in the following steps: vessel extraction from the scans, building 3D tubular models of the vessels, spatial registration of the extra- and intracranial vessels, vessel editing, vessel naming and color-coding, vessel simplification, and atlas validation.This new atlas contains 48 names of the extracranial vessels (25 arterial and 23 venous) and it has been integrated with the existing brain atlas.The atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the extracranial vasculature with a few clicks; is useful for educators to prepare teaching materials; and potentially can serve as a reference in the diagnosis of vascular disease and treatment, including craniomaxillofacial surgeries and radiologic interventions of the face and neck. PMID:25923683

  18. Cranial and Cervical Muscular Weakness in Mitochondrial Myopathy Is Associated With Resolution of Migraine Headaches: Further Evidence That Muscular Compression of Cranial and Peripheral Nerves Is a Cause of Headache in a Subset of Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A significant subset of patients with migraine headaches has pain relief after neuroplasty/muscular decompression of select cranial and cervical nerves. In the majority of cases, compression occurs secondary to compression of the nerves by adjacent muscles. Previous studies have shown that both surgical decompression and chemical denervation (eg, botulinum toxin) provide relief of migraine headaches; however, controversy remains. If some migraine headaches are caused by muscular compression, then paresis of the compressing muscles by underlying myopathic/metabolic disease should result in migraine relief in some patients. Methods: We report a case of mitochondrial myopathy causing weakness primarily of the muscles of facial expression and the neck in the context of chronic migraine headaches (>20-year history). Muscle biopsy was obtained to confirm the myopathic diagnosis. Results: There was complete resolution of the patient's migraine headaches that occurred simultaneously with the onset of symptomatic paresis of the muscles of facial expression and the neck. The relief has persisted for more than 10 months. Neurologic evaluation and muscle biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy. Conclusions: Pathologic paresis/paralysis of facial and/or cervical muscles can result in persistent resolution of migraine headache pain, giving further evidence to the concept that peripheral and/or cranial nerve compression causes migraine headache pain in a subset of patients with a diagnosis of migraine. PMID:26171092

  19. Delayed Pneumocephalus-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a common occurrence after cranial surgery, with patients typically remaining asymptomatic from a moderate amount of intracranial air. Postsurgical pneumocephalus rarely causes focal neurological deficits; furthermore, cranial neuropathy from postsurgical pneumocephalus is exceedingly uncommon. Only 3 cases have been previously reported that describe direct cranial nerve compression from intracranial air resulting in an isolated single cranial nerve deficit. The authors present a patient who developed dysconjugate eye movements from bilateral oculomotor nerve palsy. Direct cranial nerve compression occurred as a result of postoperative pneumocephalus in the interpeduncular cistern. The isolated cranial neuropathy gradually recovered as the intracranial air was reabsorbed. PMID:24151506

  20. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11) deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karpinski, Beverly A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fralish, Matthew S.; Nuwayhid, Samer; Zohn, Irene E.; Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA) signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V), glossopharyngeal (IX) or vagus (X) cranial nerves (CNs) that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS. PMID:24357327

  1. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Local tumors or swelling can press on and ... show: Enlarged (dilated) pupil of the affected eye Eye movement abnormalities Eyes that are not aligned Your health ...

  2. A Comparative Morphometric Analysis of Three Cranial Nerves in Two Phocids: The Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) and the Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Wohlert, Dennis; Kröger, Jürgen; Witt, Martin; Schmitt, Oliver; Wree, Andreas; Czech-Damal, Nicole; Siebert, Ursula; Folkow, Lars; Hanke, Frederike D

    2016-03-01

    While our knowledge about the senses of pinnipeds has increased over the last decades almost nothing is known about the organization of the neuroanatomical pathways. In a first approach to this field of research, we assessed the total number of myelinated axons of three cranial nerves (CNs) in the harbor (Phoca vitulina, Pv) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata, Cc). Axons were counted in semithin sections of the nerves embedded in Epon and stained with toluidine blue. In both species, the highest axon number was found within the optic nerve (Pv 187,000 ± 8,000 axons, Cc 481,600 ± 1,300 axons). Generally, considering absolute axon numbers, far more axons were counted within the optic and trigmenial nerve (Pv 136,700 ± 2,500 axons, Cc 179,300 ± 6,900 axons) in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. The axon counts of the vestibulocochlear nerve are nearly identical for both species (Pv 87,100 ± 8,100 axons, Cc 86,600 ± 2,700 axons). However, when comparing cell density, the cell density is almost equal for all nerves for both species except for the optic nerve in which cell density was particularly higher than in the other nerves and higher in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. We here present the first comparative analysis of three CNs in two phocid seals. While the CNs of these closely related species share some general characteristics, pronounced differences in axon numbers/densities are apparent. These differences seem to reflect differences in e.g. size, habitat, and/or functional significance of the innervated sensory systems. Anat Rec, 299:370-378, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26643122

  3. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology ...

  4. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  5. Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm: Evaluation of Symptoms after Endovascular Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ko, J.H.; Kim, Y-J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We report the outcome of endovascular treatment in a series of patients presenting with posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing ocular motor nerve palsy. A retrospective study was made of ten patients who were treated by coil embolization of posterior communicating artery aneurysm caused by oculomotor nerve palsy. The assessed parameters were as follows: patient’s age, presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, aneurysm size, preoperative severity of symptoms, and timing of treatment after onset of symptoms. Improvement of oculomotor nerve palsy after treatment was noted in eight patients (80.0%). Complete recovery was noted in seven patients (70.0%), partial recovery in one patient (10.0%), and no recovery in two patients (20%). Clinical presentations with early management (?2 days) were significant in influencing recovery. Complete recovery from ocular motor nerve palsy was significantly higher in patients with initial incomplete palsy compared with initial complete palsy patients (6/6 versus 1/4). Early treatment and initial partial palsy are relevant to improving prognoses. Endovascular treatment is favored method for treating oculomotor palsy. PMID:22192543

  6. Chiropractic management of a patient with ulnar nerve compression symptoms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Illes, Jennifer D.; Johnson, Theodore L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management of a patient with arm and hand numbness and who was suspected to have ulnar nerve compression. Clinical Features A 41-year-old woman presented with hand weakness and numbness along the medial aspect of her right forearm and the 3 most medial fingers. The onset of symptoms presented suddenly, 3 weeks prior, when she woke up in the morning and assumed she had “slept wrong.” The patient’s posture showed protracted shoulders and moderate forward head carriage. Orthopedic assessment revealed symptomatic right elevated arm stress test, grip strength asymmetry, and a Tinel sign at the right cubital tunnel. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated using chiropractic care, which consisted of manipulative therapy, myofascial therapy, and elastic therapeutic taping. Active home care included performing postural exercises and education about workstation ergonomics. She demonstrated immediate subjective improvement of her numbness and weakness after the first treatment. Over a series of 11 treatments, her symptoms resolved completely; and she was able to perform work tasks without dysfunction. Conclusion Chiropractic treatment consisting of manipulation, soft tissue mobilizations, exercise, and education of workstation ergonomics appeared to reduce the symptoms of ulnar nerve compression symptoms for this patient. PMID:24294148

  7. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia. PMID:24236266

  8. Tapia's syndrome in the intensive care unit: a rare cause of combined cranial nerve palsy following intubation.

    PubMed

    Coninckx, M; Cardoen, S; Hemelsoet, D

    2015-12-01

    Tapia's syndrome is characterized by unilateral paralysis of the tongue and vocal cord, and is caused by a concurrent lesion of both the recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerves. The proposed mechanism in most patients is compression or stretching of these nerves on their extracranial course due to airway manipulation under general anaesthesia. As Tapia's syndrome is a rare and possibly devastating condition, recognition of the presence of concurrent paralyses is an important step in diagnosis and treatment. We report two cases of Tapia's syndrome as a complication of intubation in the intensive care unit. PMID:26088745

  9. An analysis of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones which occurs on stimulation of some cranial nerve afferents

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, T. J.; Sampson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    1. Inhibition and excitation of spontaneous phrenic nerve discharges in response to stimulation of the sinus, glossopharyngeal, aortic and superior laryngeal (SLN) nerves has been investigated in cats. 2. The inhibition, in response to a single shock, had a latency of 5-10 msec and lasted for 20-40 msec; the response to SLN stimulation was the most prolonged. 3. Excitation of phrenic motoneurones also occurred and was seen either before or after the end of the inhibition of the inspiratory burst and sometimes also during expiration. 4. Intravenous strychnine blocked the inhibition. 5. Intracellular recording from phrenic motoneurones showed that hyperpolarization was evoked by each nerve during the central phrenic depolarizing potential (CPDP) but only rarely in the interval between these potentials. 6. When the CPDP was suppressed, hyperpolarization could sometimes be evoked. 7. There were no changes in amplitude or time course of hyperpolarization during the passage of current through the cell membrane. No change in membrane conductance could be shown by passing current pulses. 8. Raising the pressure in the carotid sinus also depressed phrenic activity and evoked a hyperpolarization whilst the CPDP was suppressed. 9. Inspiratory interneurones in the brain stem were suppressed by nerve stimulation and by a rise in carotid sinus pressure. 10. Expiratory interneurones in the brain stem were both excited and suppressed by electrical stimuli and unaffected by a change in carotid sinus pressure. PMID:5499533

  10. ["Left hemicranium, the cranial nerves" by Tramond: An anatomical model in wax from the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière's Museum in Paris: description and tri-dimensional photographic reconstruction (TDPR)].

    PubMed

    Paravey, S; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    An anatomical model in wax made by Tramond (middle of the 19th century) represented the cranial nerves of a left hemicranium. The aim of the study was to verify its anatomical veracity, to realize a tri-dimensional visualization by computer, and finally to numerize and to diffuse it to the general public in the purpose of culture on the internet. The model belonged to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum (Paris Descartes university). It represented the cranial nerves especially the facial and the trigeminal nerves and their branches. To perform the photographic rotation every 5° along 360°, we used a special device made of two identical superimposed marble disks linked by a ball bearing. A digital camera and the Quick Time Virtual Reality software were used. Seventy-two pictures were shot. This wax was realized with a great morphological accuracy from a true cranium as a support for the cranial nerves. The work of numerization and its free diffusion on the Internet permitted to deliver to everybody the images of this sample of the collection of the Orfila Museum, the pieces of which were evacuated on December 2009 after its closure. PMID:21493118

  11. Fourth cranial nerve palsy and bilateral acute retinal necrosis following human herpesvirus 6 infection of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Eleni; Ch'ng, Soon; Kulkarni, Archana; Anwar, Samira; Empeslidis, Theodoros

    2014-06-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rare, potentially blinding condition typically affecting immunocompetent individuals. It is defined by the clinical triad of vitreous inflammation, occlusive vasculopathy, and progressive retinal necrosis, usually located in peripheral retina with circumferential extension. Varicella zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and occasionally cytomegalovirus (CMV) are the common causative agents of ARN. Reports of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) infection of the central nervous system (CNS) associated with ocular inflammatory disease are extremely rare. We here report the case of a 22-year-old immunocompetent male who presented with acute bilateral ARN and fourth nerve palsy, following HHV6 infection of the CNS and EBV infectious mononucleosis. PMID:24328436

  12. Pre-Operative Image-based Segmentation of the Cranial Nerves and Blood Vessels in Microvascular Decompression: Can we Prevent Unnecessary Explorations?

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, P; Golby, A; Eichberg, D; Abolfotoh, M; Dunn, IF; Mukundan, S; Hulou, MM; Al-Mefty, O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based pre-operative segmentation using the gold standard endoscopic and microscopic findings for localization and pre-operative diagnosis of the offensive vessel. Patients and Methods Fourteen TN and 6 HS cases were randomly selected. All patients had 3T MRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE Sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet and fused. Individual segmentation of the affected cranial nerves and the compressing vascular structure was performed by a neurosurgeon, and the results were compared with the microscopic and endoscopic findings by two blinded neurosurgeons. For each case, at least three neurovascular landmarks were targeted. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe over each target, and errors of localization were measured in mm. Results All patients underwent retro-sigmoid craniotomy and MVD using both microscope and endoscope. Based on image segmentation, the compressing vessel was identified in all cases except one, which was also negative intraoperatively. Perfect correspondence was found between image-based segmentation and endoscopic and microscopic images and videos (Dice coefficient of 1). Measurement accuracy was 0.45+/-0.21 mm (mean +/-SD). Conclusion Image-based segmentation is a promising method for pre-operative identification and localization of offending blood vessels causing HFS and TN. Using this method may prevent some unnecessary explorations on especially atypical cases with no vascular contacts. However, negative pre-operative image segmentation may not preclude one from exploration in classic cases of TN or HFS. A multicenter study with larger number of cases is recommended. PMID:26476700

  13. Simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation mitigates simulator sickness symptoms in healthy adults: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flight simulators have been used to train pilots to experience and recognize spatial disorientation, a condition in which pilots incorrectly perceive the position, location, and movement of their aircrafts. However, during or after simulator training, simulator sickness (SS) may develop. Spatial disorientation and SS share common symptoms and signs and may involve a similar mechanism of dys-synchronization of neural inputs from the vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive systems. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a maneuver used for pain control, was found to influence autonomic cardiovascular responses and enhance visuospatial abilities, postural control, and cognitive function. The purpose of present study was to investigate the protective effects of TENS on SS. Methods Fifteen healthy young men (age: 28.6 ± 0.9 years, height: 172.5 ± 1.4 cm, body weight: 69.3 ± 1.3 kg, body mass index: 23.4 ± 1.8 kg/m2) participated in this within-subject crossover study. SS was induced by a flight simulator. TENS treatment involved 30 minutes simultaneous electrical stimulation of the posterior neck and the right Zusanli acupoint. Each subject completed 4 sessions (control, SS, TENS, and TENS + SS) in a randomized order. Outcome indicators included SS symptom severity and cognitive function, evaluated with the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) and d2 test of attention, respectively. Sleepiness was rated using the Visual Analogue Scales for Sleepiness Symptoms (VAS-SS). Autonomic and stress responses were evaluated by heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary stress biomarkers (salivary alpha-amylase activity and salivary cortisol concentration). Results Simulator exposure increased SS symptoms (SSQ and VAS-SS scores) and decreased the task response speed and concentration. The heart rate, salivary stress biomarker levels, and the sympathetic parameter of HRV increased with simulator exposure, but parasympathetic parameters decreased (p < 0.05). After TENS treatment, SS symptom severity significantly decreased and the subjects were more able to concentrate and made fewer cognitive test errors (p < 0.05). Conclusions Sympathetic activity increased and parasympathetic activity decreased after simulator exposure. TENS was effective in reducing SS symptoms and alleviating cognitive impairment. Trial registration number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register: http://ACTRN12612001172897 PMID:23587135

  14. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  15. Signs and symptoms versus nerve conduction studies to diagnose diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy: Cl vs. NPhys trial.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Peter J; Overland, Carol J; Low, Phillip A; Litchy, William J; Davies, Jenny L; Dyck, P James B; O'Brien, Peter C; Albers, James W; Andersen, Henning; Bolton, Charles F; England, John D; Klein, Christopher J; Llewelyn, J Gareth; Mauermann, Michelle L; Russell, James W; Singer, Wolfgang; Smith, A Gordon; Tesfaye, Solomon; Vella, Adrian

    2010-08-01

    The purpose was to test whether physicians can validly and reproducibly diagnose diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). Twelve physicians assessed 24 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) on consecutive days (576 examinations) with physical features and voice disguised. Results were compared to gold standard 75% group diagnosis (dx) and a nerve conduction score (Sigma5 NC nds). Masking of patients was achieved. Reproducibility measured by the kappa coefficient and compared to Sigma5 NC nd varied considerably among physicians: median and ranges: signs 0.8 (0.32-1.0); symptoms 0.79 (0.36-1.0), and diagnoses 0.47 (0.33-0.84), both low and high scores indicating poor performance. There was substantial agreement between 75% group dx and confirmed NC abnormality (abn). As compared to Sigma5 NC, individual physicians' clinical dx was excessively variable and frequently inaccurate. Study physician dx from signs and symptoms were excessively variable, often overestimating DSPN. Specific approaches to improving clinical proficiency should be tested. PMID:20658599

  16. Multiple cranial neuropathy (a teaching case).

    PubMed

    Toro, Jaime; Millán, Carlos; Díaz, Camilo; Reyes, Saúl

    2013-10-01

    There are few reports of the multiple cranial neuropathy variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). Patients usually present with facial diplegia, lower cranial nerve involvement and hypo or areflexia. It is crucial to identify promptly this unusual cranial variant but the clinical characteristics remain poorly defined. This GBS variant usually has a rapid progressive course with respiratory muscle paralysis. Most of the patients recover well, although the process is slow. We report a 54 year old man presenting with facial diplegia, progressive ophthalmoplegia, lower cranial nerve involvement, sensory ataxia and generalized areflexia. This GBS variant is very unusual and seldom described in the literature; it is oftenly misdiagnosed. The clinical features and nerve conduction studies (absent F-waves, motor conduction block) provide evidence to support a diagnosis of an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with a regional cranial variant of GBS. PMID:25877853

  17. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip

    PubMed Central

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H.; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. METHODS The authors recorded subjects’ eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. RESULTS In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2 patients with known CN III palsy had significantly decreased ratios of 0.19 and 0.06, respectively. Three patients with surgically treatable pathological conditions impacting CN VI, such as infratentorial mass effect or hydrocephalus, had significantly increased ratios (1.84, 1.44, and 1.34, respectively) relative to normal controls, and 6 patients with supratentorial mass effect had significantly decreased ratios (0.27, 0.53, 0.62, 0.45, 0.49, and 0.41, respectively). These alterations in eye tracking all reverted to normal ranges after surgical treatment of underlying pathological conditions in these 9 neurosurgical cases. CONCLUSIONS This proof of concept series of cases suggests that the use of eye tracking to detect CN palsy while the patient watches television or its equivalent represents a new capacity for this technology. It may provide a new tool for the assessment of multiple CNS functions that can potentially be useful in the assessment of awake patients with elevated intracranial pressure from hydrocephalus or trauma. PMID:25495739

  18. Cranial sutures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... could not grow enough. The child would develop brain damage. Feeling the cranial sutures and fontanelles is one way that doctors and nurses follow the child's growth and development. They are able to assess the pressure inside ...

  19. Successful treatment with acyclovir and a corticosteroid for lower cranial polyneuropathy in zoster sine herpete: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Nakahara Ph D, Toshiki; Nakajima, Sho; Nakazato, Tomoko; Mikasa, Michitaka; Furukawa Ph D, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-23

    A 62-year-old woman developed meningitis as well as acute paralysis of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves on the right side and also had dysfunction of the left hypoglossal nerve. Although there was no evidence of a typical cutaneous or mucosal herpetic lesion, PCR detection of varicella zoster virus (VZV)-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the clinical diagnosis of polyneuritis cranialis due to VZV infection and zoster sine herpete. After starting intravenous acyclovir and methylprednisolone, her hypoglossal nerve palsy disappeared within a day and all other symptoms and signs dramatically improved. A rapid improvement observed in our patient suggests that the right cranial polyneuropathy could be caused by inflammation associated with epineurial edema (where the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves pass through the right jugular foramen), whereas the exact mechanism of the twelfth cranial nerve involvement on the contralateral side is unknown. Our clinical findings indicate that acute lower cranial polyneuropathy in patients with zoster sine herpete should be treated immediately with combined administration of acyclovir and an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. PMID:26511031

  20. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves. PMID:26743918

  1. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  2. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  3. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  4. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  5. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  6. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  7. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  8. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  9. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  10. Tumors of the cranial base: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, L.N.; Schramm, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of this book highlights the differences and similarities in the pathology and biology of the various types of neoplasms of the cranial base. The second section covers improvements in radiological diagnosis with the advent of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and a better knowledge of radiological anatomy. It also examines the significance and proper evaluation of minor symptoms to enable earlier diagnosis, as well as the advances in interventional radiology that have produced the balloon occlusion text and tumor embolization. Section three is on advanced neuroanesthetic techniques and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Section four describes specialized treatment modalities including microsurgical resection with the laser, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Section five reviews the latest techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base following resection, as well as the preservation and reconstruction of cranial nerves and cerebral blood vessels exposed during the surgery. The final three sections examine the lesions and surgical techniques specific to the different anatomical regions, i.e, the anterior, middle and posterior cranial base.

  11. Measurements of the Obersteiner-Redlich zone of the vagus nerve and their possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    S?oniewski, P; Korejwo, G; Zieli?ski, P; Mory?, J; Krzyzanowski, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe anatomical variability of the root entry zone (REZ), also called the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, that represents the "junction zone" of glia and Schwann sheath of the cranial nerves. This zone has some clinical implications. The pulsatile compression of REZ by a vessel may produce clinical symptoms, such us trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, glossopharyngeal neuralgia torticollis spasmodicus or even symptoms of essential hypertension when a vascular cross compression of REZ of a left vagus nerve is present. The vessel--cranial nerve contact in the skull base cysterns may be visualized in radiologic examinations, most accurately in magnetic resonance imaging. Because, we cannot distinguish the REZ from the rest of the vagus nerve in radiologic examinations we decided to measure the length of its REZ. The microanatomical study of the length of REZ zone of the vagus nerve was performed on 21 nerves taken from 17 human brain stems (12 men, 5 women, 14 left, 7 right), fixed with 8% buffered formalin solution. Paraffin embedded tissue was cut into 10-micron-thick sections parallel to the nerve longitudinal axis and stained with hematoxilin & eosin. Each of the nerves showed the presence of a zone of oligodendrocyte myelination, mean length 2 +/- 0.3 mm. In 17 nerves the transitional zone formed a cone-like process, in 4 nerves was shaped irregularly. The length of REZ (oligodendrocyte myelination plus "glial dome") had the mean length 3.5 +/- 0.9 mm. PMID:10504781

  12. Use of the holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for cranial nerve decompression: an in vivo study using the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Qadir, R; Kennedy, D

    1993-06-01

    A study was designed to evaluate the utility and safety of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for precise bony decompression of neural canals. In vivo rabbit studies were performed to measure temperature changes and nerve degeneration which occurred when the facial canal was decompressed with the laser as compared to the diamond burr. Marked temperature elevations were noted with the laser (n = 4), but not with the burr (n = 4). Seven of nine nerves decompressed with the laser revealed moderate to severe degeneration, whereas two control nerves decompressed with the drill demonstrated only minimal degeneration. It is concluded that this laser should not be used for nerve decompression unless better control of temperature elevation can be achieved. PMID:8502097

  13. [Multiple cranial neuropathies in a patient with IgG4-related hypertrophic pachymeningitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Jun; Ouma, Shinji; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Sakata, Noriyuki; Inoue, Toru

    2014-07-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented with acute loss of vision. She experienced subacute headache, hearing loss on the left side, hoarseness, and dysphagia during the previous 10 months. On admission, she had bilateral loss of vision, without any ophthalmological abnormalities, and multiple cranial nerve palsies, including left hearing loss and right IX, X, and XI nerve palsies. Head magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement revealed hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Laboratory findings showed no abnormalities except for an increased sedimentation rate and increased C-reactive protein levels. A biopsy of the dura mater was performed, and histopathological analysis revealed inflammatory thickening of the dura mater with plasma cell infiltration; the infiltrating cells were immunoreactive to an anti-IgG4 antibody, thereby indicating an IgG4-related disorder. Furthermore, the histopathological analysis revealed evidence of vasculitis in both veins and arteries. After corticosteroid treatment, her visual acuity dramatically improved. Acute loss of vision with multiple cranial nerve palsies may be an uncommon presentation of IgG4-related hypertrophic pachymeningitis. However, it should be recognized that these conditions might be underdiagnosed. The possibility of central nervous system involvement in IgG4-related disorders should be considered in patients with multiple cranial nerve neuropathies associated with hypertrophic pachymeningitis, even in the absence of systemic sclerosis symptoms. In our case, early treatment with corticosteroids showed immediate effectiveness in correcting the visual symptoms. PMID:24998832

  14. Acute Cranial Neuropathies Heralding Neurosyphilis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Neurosyphilis Symptoms: Diplopia •facial droop • facial nerve palsy • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Symptomatic early neurosyphilis with isolated acute multiple cranial nerves palsy as initial manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It is caused by direct invasion of the central nervous system by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. Case Report: A 31-year-old African-American homosexual man presented with bilateral hearing loss, constant vertigo, intermittent horizontal diplopia, and bilateral facial droop, which was associated with occipital headache without fever. Neurological examination revealed bilateral vestibulocochlear and facial nerve palsy. On brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after administration of gadolinium, he was found to have extensive isolated basilar meningeal enhancement involving the midbrain, pons along the seven and eight nerves complex bilaterally, consistent with basal meningoencephalitis. Conclusions: Neurosyphilis can present as initial manifestation of HIV infection with early involvement of basal meninges and cranial nerves. It is important to understand that neurosyphilis is still a significant disease with complex neurological presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis is crucial due to potential persistent disabilities that can be easily treated or even prevented. PMID:25265092

  15. A study of Guillain–Barré syndrome with reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita; Banakar, Basavaraj F.; Pujar, Guruprasad S.; Khichar, Shubhakaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Focused studies on cranial neuropathy in Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and its prognostic implication are not done previously. Aim: To study the clinical profile of GBS patients with special reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication. Materials and Methods: The study included 61 patients with GB syndrome, fulfilling Asbury Cornblath's criteria for GB syndrome. A pre-designed semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data regarding demographic profile and clinical profile. All patients underwent detailed neurological examination, investigations including nerve conduction studies and CSF examination and treated according to the severity of the illness. Patients were followed up for 6 months. During analysis two groups were made depending on cranial nerve involvement, and compared with respect to various parameters. Results: Out of 61 patients 38 (62.3%) patients had cranial nerve palsies, in that 25 had multiple cranial nerve palsies, and 13 had single isolated nerve palsy. A majority of 30 (49.2%) had bulbar palsy, 28 (46%) had facial nerve palsy, and all had bilateral involvement except 3 patients who had unilateral palsy. Hypoglossal nerve involvement was seen in six (10%) patients and four (6.5%) patients had ophthalmoplegia. Only one had bilateral vestibulocochlear nerve palsy. On comparing various clinico-electrophysiological parameters among patients of GB syndrome with and without cranial nerve involvement, the presence of respiratory paralysis, IVIg and ventilatory support requirement had significant association with cranial nerve involvement in GBS. Conclusion: Our study found a correlation between cranial nerve palsies and severity of the illness. Cranial nerve innervated muscles recover earlier as compared to distal limb muscles. No association was found between outcome at 6 months and cranial nerve involvement. PMID:25540538

  16. CELL ADHESION MOLECULE CADHERIN-6 FUNCTION IN ZEBRAFISH CRANIAL AND LATERAL LINE GANGLIA DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q.; Dalman, M. R.; Sarmah, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, Y.; Hurlbut, A. K.; Spencer, M. A.; Pancoe, L.; Marrs, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherins regulate the vertebrate nervous system development. We previously showed that cadherin-6 message (cdh6) was strongly expressed in the majority of the embryonic zebrafish cranial and lateral line ganglia during their development. Here, we present evidence that cdh6 has specific functions during cranial and lateral line ganglia and nerve development. We analyzed the consequences of cdh6 loss-of-function on cranial ganglion and nerve differentiation in zebrafish embryos. Embryos injected with zebrafish cdh6 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs, which suppress gene expression during development; cdh6 morphant embryos) displayed a specific phenotype, including (i) altered shape and reduced development of a subset of the cranial and lateral line ganglia (e.g. the statoacoustic ganglion and vagal ganglion) and (ii) cranial nerves were abnormally formed. This data illustrates an important role for cdh6 in the formation of cranial ganglia and their nerves. PMID:21584906

  17. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Injury in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Loro, William A.; Owens, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To introduce the case of a collegiate wrestler who suffered a traumatic unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury. This case presents the opportunity to discuss the diagnosis and treatment of a 20-year-old man with an injury to his right hypoglossal nerve. Background: Injuries to the hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XII) are rare. Most reported cases are the result of malignancy, with traumatic causes less common. In this case, a collegiate wrestler struck his head on the wrestling mat during practice. No loss of consciousness occurred. The wrestler initially demonstrated signs and symptoms of a mild concussion, with dizziness and a headache. These concussion symptoms cleared quickly, but the athlete complained of difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) and demonstrated slurred speech (dysarthria). Also, his tongue deviated toward the right. No other neurologic deficits were observed. Differential Diagnosis: Occipital-cervical junction fracture, syringomyelia, malignancy, iatrogenic causes, cranial nerve injury. Treatment: After initial injury recognition, the athletic trainer placed the patient in a cervical collar and transported him to the emergency department. The patient received prednisone, and the emergency medicine physician ordered cervical spine plain radiographs, brain computed tomography, and brain and internal auditory canal magnetic resonance imaging. The physician consulted a neurologist, who managed the patient conservatively, with rest and no contact activity. The neurologist allowed the patient to participate in wrestling 7 months after injury. Uniqueness: To our knowledge, no other reports of unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury from relatively low-energy trauma (including athletics) exist. Conclusions: Hypoglossal nerve injury should be considered in individuals with head injury who experience dysphagia and dysarthria. Athletes with head injuries require cranial nerve assessments. PMID:19771294

  18. Isolated abducens nerve palsy due to pituitary apoplexy after mild head trauma.

    PubMed

    Kayayurt, Kamil; Gündogdu, Ömer Lütfi; Yava?i, Özcan; Metin, Yavuz; Ugras, Erhan

    2015-10-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a relatively rare condition. Cranial nerve palsies may develop due to compression of the surrounding structures by the rapidly expanding tumor. While the most commonly affected nerve is the oculomotor nerve, abducens nerve palsy may also occur less commonly. A 68-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of severe headache, nausea, vomiting, and diplopia after head trauma due to falling. His magnetic resonance imaging evaluation demonstrated a large pituitary adenoma and bleeding into the tumor, which was acutely expanding and leading to compression of the abducens nerve laterally. Isolated abducens palsy due to posttraumatic pituitary apoplexy is a rare clinical condition, and as the symptoms and signs are nonspecific, it can commonly remain clinically undiagnosed. In this article, our aim was to draw attention to a clinical condition in which unfavorable complications may develop if the diagnosis is overlooked. PMID:26314216

  19. Fluid structure interaction analysis reveals facial nerve palsy caused by vertebral-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kambayashi, Yukinao; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Shinohara, Sho; Fujiwara, Hidemoto; Nakazato, Shinji; Watanabe, Masato; Dahmani, Chiheb; Yamamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko; Murayama, Yuichi

    2015-11-01

    Cranial nerve palsy caused by aneurysmal compression has not been fully evaluated. The main causes of symptoms are considered to be direct mechanical compression and aneurysm pulsations. Recent studies indicate that nerve dysfunction is mainly induced by pulsation rather than by direct compression, and successful cases of endovascular surgery have been reported. We describe a patient with an unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (VA-PICA) aneurysm compressing the facial nerve at the root exit zone (REZ). The patient presented with peripheral facial nerve palsy but not hemifacial spasm and was successfully treated by coil embolization. To investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral facial nerve palsy, fluid structure interaction (FSI) analysis can approximate displacement and the magnitude of aneurysmal wall motion due to hemodynamic forces. In our case, maximum mesh displacement was observed at the aneurysmal wall attached to the facial nerve inside the pons rather than the REZ, which explains the clinical manifestation of facial nerve palsy in the absence of hemifacial spasm. This preliminary report demonstrates the utility of FSI analysis for investigating cranial nerve neuropathy. PMID:26453756

  20. Schwannoma of Extraocular Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Wasim; Boggan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of schwannoma arising from the third cranial nerve in a thirteen year old male is reported. The patient presented with paresis of the right oculomotor nerve and ipsilateral hemiparesis. The clinical features of this case are discussed and the pertinent medical literature reviewed. ImagesFigure 1p220-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171175

  1. Late Radiation-Associated Dysphagia (Late-RAD) with Lower Cranial Neuropathy after Oropharyngeal Radiotherapy: A Preliminary Dosimetric Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Lewin, Jan S.; Baron, Charles A.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Rosenthal, David I.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Schwartz, David S.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Hutcheson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Late radiation-associated dysphagia (late-RAD) is a rare delayed toxicity, commonly associated with lower cranial neuropathies, in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) survivors. Prevention of late-RAD is paramount because the functional impairment can be profound, progressive, and refractory to standard therapies. The objective of this analysis was to identify candidate dosimetric predictors of late-RAD and associated lower cranial neuropathies after radiotherapy (RT) or chemo-RT (CRT) for OPC. Methods An unmatched retrospective case-control analysis was conducted. OPC patients treated with definitive RT or CRT (1999–2006) were included. Late-RAD was defined by new or progressive pharyngeal dysphagia per modified barium swallow (MBS) studies after recovery from acute toxicity with an interval of adequate function. As a secondary endpoint, predictors of late lower cranial neuropathies associated with late-RAD cases were examined. Controls were followed prospectively on an institutional trial a minimum of 4 years without symptoms of late-RAD. Dysphagia-aspiration related structures (DARS) and regions of interest containing cranial nerve paths (RCCNPs) were retrospectively contoured. Dose volume histograms were calculated. Non-parametric bivariate associations were analyzed with Bonferroni correction and multiple logistic regression models were fit. Results Thirty-eight patients were included (12 late-RAD cases, 26 controls). Median latency to late-RAD was 5.8 years (range: 4.5–11.3 years). Lower cranial neuropathies were present in 10 of 12 late-RAD cases (IX=4, X=6, XII=8), 7 of whom had multiple nerve palsies. IMRT was delivered in all controls and 25% of cases (p<0.001); the remainder received 3D-CRT. Smoking history, tumor subsite, fractionation schedule, neck dissection, and concurrent chemotherapy did not significantly differ between cases and controls (p>0.05). T-stage was significantly higher in late-RAD cases (p=0.002); N-stage was higher in controls (p=0.109). Mean superior pharyngeal constrictor (SPC) dose was higher in cases relative to controls (median: 70.5 vs 61.6 Gy). Adjusting for T-stage or total RT dose, mean SPC dose significantly predicted late-RAD (p=0.036) and related cranial neuropathies (p=0.019). RCCNPs did not significantly predict late-RAD or cranial neuropathies. Conclusions SPC dose may predict for late-RAD and related lower cranial neuropathies. These data, and those of previous studies that have associated SPC dose with classical dysphagia endpoints, suggest impetus to constrain dose to the SPCs when possible. PMID:24906528

  2. [Isolated sixth nerve palsy--presenting sign of multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Zahavi, Alon; Manor, Riri S; Lahav, Meir; Bakon, Mati; Kalish, Hadas

    2013-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a disease caused by neoplastic plasma cells. Initial symptoms in most cases described in the literature include chest and lumbar pain, paresthesia, paraplegia, general weakness and renal failure. We report a case of isolated sixth nerve palsy causing diplopia as the presenting sign of multiple myeloma. Awareness of such a rare clinical presentation - especially when the existence of multiple myeloma is ignored after visualization of a cranial mass with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT)--can prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and delay the appropriate treatment. PMID:23513504

  3. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation rescue surgery after multiple multilevel procedures for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Madeleine; Strohl, Kingman; Palomo, J Martin; Ponsky, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) is a new procedure offered for the treatment of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that has been shown to decrease the severity and symptoms of OSA in select patients. We report on a case of a patient with persistent symptoms and findings of OSA despite a history of multiple multilevel procedures, including an uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) with revision, a genioglossus advancement, and a maxillomandibular advancement. The patient then underwent HNS with significant improvement of his symptoms and severity. The success of this patient's HNS surgery demonstrates that we need to examine where HNS fits into the approach to surgery for OSA. There could be benefit to considering cranial nerve stimulation earlier than conventional approaches for select patients. PMID:26700261

  4. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  5. Multiple myeloma presenting with unilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Sushrut S; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Petrous apex masses can manifest with neurologic symptoms due to their involvement of various structures, including cranial nerves (CN) V and VI. The differential diagnosis of petrous masses is broad and includes a variety of both non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. We report a rare case of multiple myeloma confined to the right petrous apex, presenting with ipsilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies. A 63-year-old woman presented with a 6-8week history of facial numbness and a 2week history of diplopia, with examination showing right-sided facial hypoesthesia in the CN V1-V3 region and right-sided lateral rectus palsy. MRI of the brain showed a solitary 2.0cm lesion confined to the right petrous apex involving the right cavernous internal carotid artery and Meckel's cave. A transnasal biopsy showed a proliferation of plasmacytoid cells, which showed diffuse immunoreactivity with antibodies to CD138 and kappa, consistent with a plasma cell dyscrasia. A bone scan subsequently revealed multiple lytic bone lesions involving the skull, left humerus, bilateral femurs and possibly the L4 vertebral body. Bone marrow biopsy and serum laboratory results confirmed the diagnosis of kappa-type multiple myeloma. Although rare, multiple myeloma may initially present with petrous involvement and associated cranial nerve deficits. PMID:26602603

  6. Isolated partial, transient hypoglossal nerve injury following acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, A.M.; Hilmi, O.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury following ipsilateral acupuncture for migraines in a 53-year-old lady. The palsy was partial, with no associated dysarthria, and transient. Further examination and imaging was negative. Cranial nerve injuries secondary to acupuncture are not reported in the literature, but are a theoretical risk given the location of the cranial nerves in the neck. Anatomical knowledge is essential in those administering the treatment, and those reviewing patients with possible complications. PMID:24876519

  7. Diagnostic nerve ultrasound in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Brown, Martin E; Eulitt, Patrick; Walker, Francis O; Lawson, Victoria H; Caress, James B

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound is emerging as a useful tool for evaluation of neuromuscular conditions, because it can provide high-resolution anatomic information to complement electrodiagnostic data. There have been few studies in which ultrasound was used to assess the peripheral nerves of individuals with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease and none involving CMT type 1B. In this study we compared nerve cross-sectional area in individuals from a single large family with CMT 1B with normal, healthy controls. We also assessed for cranial nerve enlargement in those with CMT 1B with cranial neuropathies compared to those with CMT 1B without cranial neuropathies. Individuals with CMT 1B have significantly larger median and vagus nerves than healthy controls, but no difference was seen in cranial nerve size between those with versus those without cranial neuropathies. This is the first study to characterize the ultrasonographic findings in the peripheral nerves of individuals with CMT 1B. PMID:19533637

  8. Neuromuscular hamartoma of the sciatic nerve: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sandi; Grandhi, Ramesh; Wong, Ricky; Hamilton, Ronald; Greene, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular hamartomas are rare benign tumors with mature skeletal elements mixed with mature neural elements. They present typically as solitary lesions in childhood and have been reported to be associated with cranial nerves or large peripheral nerves such as the brachial plexus, median nerve, and sciatic nerve. To date, eight cases of sciatic nerve neuromuscular hamartomas have been reported. We present a case along with an outline for the natural history of the disease with a review of the literature of the reported cases dating back to 1895. Case Description: An 11-year-old boy presented with progressive right lower extremity pain and atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right sciatic nerve mass, and electromyography demonstrated evidence of ongoing denervation and reinnervation. Initial computed tomography-guided biopsy was unrevealing and subsequent open biopsy was consistent with neuromuscular choristoma. Conclusion: Neuromuscular choristomas represent a rare disease. Symptoms of foot deformity, leg size discrepancy, and pain merit a complete work-up including spinal and peripheral nerve etiologies. PMID:23493803

  9. Facial nerve paralysis: A case report of rare complication in uncontrolled diabetic patient with mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Vandana; Sikander, Jeelani; Rangdhol, Vishwanath; Naidu, Madhulika

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic aggressive and fatal infection caused by mucor fungus. Seven types of mucormycosis are identified based on the extension and involvement of the lesion, of which the rhino orbital mucormycosis is most common in the head and neck region. Although it is widely spread in nature, clinical cases are rare and observed only in immunocompromised patients and patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Early symptoms include fever, nasal ulceration or necrosis, periorbital edema or facial swelling, paresthesia and reduced vision. Involvement of cranial nerves although not common, facial nerve palsy is a rare finding. The infection may spread through cribriform plate to the brain resulting in extensive cerebellar infarctions. Timely diagnosis and early recognition of the signs and symptoms, correction of underlying medical disorders, and aggressive medical and surgical intervention are necessary for successful therapeutic outcome. PMID:25810669

  10. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  11. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations.

  12. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... muscle of the shoulder may show signs of muscle atrophy . Tests that may be used to check axillary nerve dysfunction include: EMG and nerve conduction tests, will be ... the injury or symptoms start MRI or x-rays of the shoulder

  13. Relationship between Focal Inflammation and Symptom Exacerbation after Endovascular Coil Embolization for Symptomatic Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S.; Kurata, A.; Iwamoto, K.; Yamada, M.; Niki, J.; Miyazaki, T.; Oka, H.; Fujii, K.; Kan, S:

    2008-01-01

    Summary As endovascular surgery (EVS) of symptomatic unruptured aneurysms can result in symptom exacerbation due to intra-aneurysmal thrombosis or lump formation by coils, this treatment remains controversial. We present five women ranging in age from 58 to 76 years (mean 65.6 years) who suffered post-EVS symptom exacerbation attributable to local inflammation. The aneurysms measured from 8 to 25 mm (mean 19 mm) and were located at the cavernous portion in four patients and at the origin of the ophthalmic artery in one. All underwent endosaccular embolization under local anesthesia. Immediately after embolization, 24 h anti-coagulation therapy was started via the continuous injection of heparin; they also received anti-platelet therapy. At one to three days post-EVS, all five patients manifested worsening of their cranial nerve symptoms. In three other patients the symptoms were improved after EVS. We posit that inflammation induced by coil embolization may worsen cranial nerve symptoms transiently. Our findings suggest that post-EVS follow-up is necessary and that patients exhibiting an inflammatory reaction be treated with anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:20557759

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm for each case examined. PMID:22468993

  15. Cranial dystonia, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: clinical features and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, S P; Lang, A E

    1988-01-01

    Blepharospasm, the most frequent feature of cranial dystonia, and hemifacial spasm are two involuntary movement disorders that affect facial muscles. The cause of blepharospasm and other forms of cranial dystonia is not known. Hemifacial spasm is usually due to compression of the seventh cranial nerve at its exit from the brain stem. Cranial dystonia may result in severe disability. Hemifacial spasm tends to be much less disabling but may cause considerable distress and embarrassment. Patients affected with these disorders are often mistakenly considered to have psychiatric problems. Although the two disorders are quite distinct pathophysiologically, therapy with botulinum toxin has proven very effective in both. We review the clinical features, proposed pathophysiologic features, differential diagnosis and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin, of cranial dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052771

  16. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  17. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  18. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myelin sheath covering the nerve) Inflammatory nerve conditions (neuropathies) Additional conditions under which the test may be performed: Alcoholic neuropathy Axillary nerve dysfunction Brachial plexopathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth ...

  19. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus-induced oculomotor nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Harthan, Jennifer S.; Borgman, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) may cause a variety of ocular conditions including: dermatitis, corneal pseudo-dendrites, uveitis, retinitis, and cranial nerve palsies. Cranial nerve palsies caused by herpes zoster (HZ) are relatively uncommon clinical findings. Previous case reports have looked at this relationship, but the overall case studies are few. Other causes of nerve palsies typically need to be ruled out first with neuro-imaging and blood evaluations. However, when HZ is confirmed, treatment with oral antiviral therapy and/or oral corticosteroids along with monitoring the individual usually results in a self-limiting ophthalmoplegia that improves on its own over several months. We report a case of cranial nerve III palsy resulting from HZO.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  2. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction Osteogenesis: Evolution of Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Juling; Harshbarger, Raymond J.; Kelley, Patrick; George, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the brain in the first few years of life drives the expansion of the cranial vault. This expansion occurs primarily at the cranial sutures; premature fusion of these results in growth restriction perpendicular to the axis of the suture. The result of this is physical deformation of the cranial and facial skeleton, as well as the distortion of the underling brain and its physiology. These patients can present with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, neurodevelopmental delay, as well as the morphological features of craniosynostosis. Acquired conditions such as the slit ventricle syndrome may also result in cephalocranial disproportion with these clinical features. Traditional vault remodeling surgery is able to correct the physical abnormalities as well as correcting cephalocranial disproportion. Its limitations include the degree of scalp expansion achievable as well as resulting defects in the bone. The use of distraction osteogenesis of the cranial vault permits a controlled expansion in a predetermined vector in a gradual manner. When used in the calvarium, this combines the benefits of tissue expansion on the scalp, as well as stimulating the production of new bone, reducing the defects resulting from expansion. In this review, the authors describe some of the surgical considerations important to the use of this technique. This includes the relevant anatomy and technical aspects illustrated with the use of clinical cases. Finally, they present a summary of their experience and discuss the complications associated with cranial vault distraction osteogenesis. PMID:25383052

  3. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei penetrates the brain via destruction of the olfactory and trigeminal nerves: implications for the pathogenesis of neurological melioidosis.

    PubMed

    St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Dando, Samantha J; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Horton, Rachel E; Batzloff, Michael; Owen, Suzzanne J; Holt, Stephanie; Peak, Ian R; Ulett, Glen C; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Melioidosis is a potentially fatal disease that is endemic to tropical northern Australia and Southeast Asia, with a mortality rate of 14 to 50%. The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent which infects numerous parts of the human body, including the brain, which results in the neurological manifestation of melioidosis. The olfactory nerve constitutes a direct conduit from the nasal cavity into the brain, and we have previously reported that B. pseudomallei can colonize this nerve in mice. We have now investigated in detail the mechanism by which the bacteria penetrate the olfactory and trigeminal nerves within the nasal cavity and infect the brain. We found that the olfactory epithelium responded to intranasal B. pseudomallei infection by widespread crenellation followed by disintegration of the neuronal layer to expose the underlying basal layer, which the bacteria then colonized. With the loss of the neuronal cell bodies, olfactory axons also degenerated, and the bacteria then migrated through the now-open conduit of the olfactory nerves. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that B. pseudomallei migrated through the cribriform plate via the olfactory nerves to enter the outer layer of the olfactory bulb in the brain within 24 h. We also found that the bacteria colonized the thin respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity and then rapidly migrated along the underlying trigeminal nerve to penetrate the cranial cavity. These results demonstrate that B. pseudomallei invasion of the nerves of the nasal cavity leads to direct infection of the brain and bypasses the blood-brain barrier. IMPORTANCE Melioidosis is a potentially fatal tropical disease that is endemic to northern Australia and Southeast Asia. It is caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which can infect many organs of the body, including the brain, and results in neurological symptoms. The pathway by which the bacteria can penetrate the brain is unknown, and we have investigated the ability of the bacteria to migrate along nerves that innervate the nasal cavity and enter the frontal region of the brain by using a mouse model of infection. By generating a mutant strain of B. pseudomallei which is unable to survive in the blood, we show that the bacteria rapidly penetrate the cranial cavity using the olfactory (smell) nerve and the trigeminal (sensory) nerve that line the nasal cavity. PMID:24736221

  5. Clinical image and pathology of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Shi, C H; Niu, S T; Zhang, Z Q

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathological features, and treatment experiments of patients with hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP). The clinical findings, MRI, and pathological appearances of 9 patients with HCP were analyzed retrospectively. The thickened dura mater was markedly enhanced after contrast media injection. The lesion near the brain hemisphere presented long regions of T1- and T2-weighted abnormal signal intensities. The abnormal signal intensities of the brain tissue were decreased significantly. Pathological examination demonstrated chronic inflammation changes, with cerebral dura mater fibrous tissue showing obvious hyperplasia, and the periphery of the blood vessel showing a great quantity of infiltrating phlegmonosis cells. HCP mainly presents headache and paralysis of multiple cranial nerves. The distinctive signs on brain MRIs involve strengthening the signal in the cerebral dura. PMID:25511033

  6. Mature teratoma arising from the middle cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Rahul S; Shenoy, Asha S; Hosangadi, Anjana; Nadkarni, Trimurti D

    2004-02-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a sudden spurt in size of a bony swelling around the external ear, which was present since birth. This was associated with a painful swelling of the right half of the face and pain, redness, and decreased vision in the right eye. Neurologic examination showed decreased visual acuity in the right eye and paresis of the fifth, seventh, and eighth cranial nerves. Neuroimaging showed an extra-axial, partly cystic tumor of mixed density, located entirely within the middle cranial fossa scalloping the temporal bone and extending into the right infratemporal fossa and the right middle ear and impinging on the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. The right temporal lobe was elevated and compressed. Histopathologic examination confirmed a mature teratoma. PMID:15129907

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems that may develop: Bladder or kidney infection Diabetes foot ulcers Nerve damage that hides the symptoms of ... and a heart attack Loss of a toe, foot, or leg through amputation, usually because of a bone infection that does not heal

  8. [Paraganglioma of the vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, E; Infante-Cossío, P; García-Perla, A; Belmonte, R; Menéndez, J; Gutiérrez-Pérez, J L

    2006-06-01

    Paragangliomas of the vagus nerve are uncommon vascular benign neoplasms of neuroectodermic origin. Initial clinical manifestation is usually as an asymptomatic cervical mass, although sometimes may cause lower cranial nerve palsies. These paragangliomas seldom associate to high levels of circulating catecholamines. Diagnosis is based on the clinics aided by imaging, where CT and MRI play an important role. Angiography is not only diagnostic, but it also allows preoperative embolization of the mass. Most accepted treatment is surgical removal, even though some paragangliomas are suitable for radiation therapy in very specific patients. In this paper we describe a new case of paraganglioma of the vagus nerve in a cervical location, with hypertensive episodes and high catecholamine-levels. The authors review the literature describing the clinical presentation, the diagnosis and the treatment of this rare lesion. PMID:16855784

  9. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length. PMID:19330282

  10. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases: a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Chun-ying; Zou, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections; patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.0001, RR: 1.35, 95%CI: 1.30–1.40). The average nerve conduction velocity in the nerve growth factor group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, MD: 4.59 m/s, 95%CI: 4.12–5.06). The incidence of pain or scleroma at the injection site in the nerve growth factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, RR: 6.30, 95%CI: 3.53–11.27), but such adverse effects were mild. CONCLUSION: Nerve growth factor can significantly improve nerve function in patients with nervous system disease and is safe and effective. PMID:26109961

  11. Alarin in cranial autonomic ganglia of human and rat.

    PubMed

    Schrödl, Falk; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Trost, Andrea; Strohmaier, Clemens; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Bruckner, Daniela; Krefft, Karolina; Kofler, Barbara; Brandtner, Herwig; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2015-02-01

    Extrinsic and intrinsic sources of the autonomic nervous system contribute to choroidal innervation, thus being responsible for the control of choroidal blood flow, aqueous humor production or intraocular pressure. Neuropeptides are involved in this autonomic control, and amongst those, alarin has been recently introduced. While alarin is present in intrinsic choroidal neurons, it is not clear if these are the only source of neuronal alarin in the choroid. Therefore, we here screened for the presence of alarin in human cranial autonomic ganglia, and also in rat, a species lacking intrinsic choroidal innervation. Cranial autonomic ganglia (i.e., ciliary, CIL; pterygopalatine, PPG; superior cervical, SCG; trigeminal ganglion, TRI) of human and rat were prepared for immunohistochemistry against murine and human alarin, respectively. Additionally, double staining experiments for alarin and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxilase (TH), substance P (SP) were performed in human and rat ganglia for unequivocal identification of ganglia. For documentation, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used, while quantitative RT-PCR was applied to confirm immunohistochemical data and to detect alarin mRNA expression. In humans, alarin-like immunoreactivity (alarin-LI) was detected in intrinsic neurons and nerve fibers of the choroidal stroma, but was lacking in CIL, PPG, SCG and TRI. In rat, alarin-LI was detected in only a minority of cranial autonomic ganglia (CIL: 3.5%; PPG: 0.4%; SCG: 1.9%; TRI: 1%). qRT-PCR confirmed the low expression level of alarin mRNA in rat ganglia. Since alarin-LI was absent in human cranial autonomic ganglia, and only present in few neurons of rat cranial autonomic ganglia, we consider it of low impact in extrinsic ocular innervation in those species. Nevertheless, it seems important for intrinsic choroidal innervation in humans, where it could serve as intrinsic choroidal marker. PMID:25497346

  12. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus)

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Rosa M.; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Dickson, Kathryn A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic–mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1±7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (±s.e.m.) of 2.1±0.3°C and a maximum of 6.3°C above myotomal muscle temperature (Tm), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with Tm and temperature elevation was greater at lower Tm. The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  13. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus).

    PubMed

    Runcie, Rosa M; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R; Frank, Lawrence R; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2009-02-01

    Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic-mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1+/-7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (+/-s.e.m.) of 2.1+/-0.3 degrees C and a maximum of 6.3 degrees C above myotomal muscle temperature (T(m)), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with T(m) and temperature elevation was greater at lower T(m). The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  14. Ancient Legacy of Cranial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ghannaee Arani, Mohammad; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Sarbandi, Fahimeh

    2012-01-01

    Cranial injury, as it is known today, is not a new concern of modern medicine. On stepping on the earth, the man was in reality encountered with various types of injuries, particularly those of a cranial nature. Leading a life, whether wild or civilized, has always been associated with injuries for human race from the very beginning of birth. Therefore, managing cases of this type has gradually forced him to establish and fix strategies and approaches to handle the dilemma. This study is thus focused on tracing the first documented traumatized cranial cases ever reported, ranging from those trials attributed to our ancient predecessors to the identical examples in the present time. PMID:24396747

  15. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure to prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that...

  19. CT measurements of cranial growth: microcephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Torkelson, R.D.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) head scans were measured to determine the cranial dimensions of four children with microcephaly. These measurements were compared with cranial dimensions of normal children. CT proved to be useful in determining the developmental status of children with neurologic problems relative to their normal counterparts on the basis on cranial dimensions.

  20. Myotonia-like symptoms in a patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Nakanishi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Atsuta, Naoki; Yamada, Shinichiro; Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Hashizume, Atsushi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with a 4-year history of worsening muscle stiffness and weakness in his right hand. He showed elevated serum creatine kinase levels at the onset of muscle stiffness that was characterized by delayed muscle relaxation after voluntary contraction. This symptom often occurred during cold exposure, and was partially attenuated by sodium channel blockade. Electrodiagnostic findings in repetitive nerve stimulation, short-exercise, and cooling tests were normal. Electromyography showed chronic denervation potentials in his cranial, cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral myotomes without myotonic discharge. He exhibited facial and tongue fasciculations, hypernasality, gynecomastia, neurogenic changes in muscle biopsy, and increased serum testosterone levels. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) was diagnosed on the basis of the CAG trinucleotide expansion in the gene coding androgen receptor. A myotonia-like symptom without myotonic discharge may present as an early neurological sign of SBMA, which possibly reflects a sodium channel dysfunction in skeletal muscles. PMID:26363965

  1. A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with invasive Aspergillus mastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Hato, Naohito; Okada, Yoko; Sato, Eriko; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) associated with invasive Aspergillus mastoiditis. A 63-year-old man with diabetes mellitus underwent mastoidectomy because of chronic discharge from his left ear. The mastoidectomy was unsuccessful in resolving purulent otorrhea; moreover, 7 months later, the patient developed left abducens nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed HCP at the left middle cranial fossa. Although the pathogen could not be identified, an Aspergillus infection was considered based on elevated serum ?-d-glucan and a positive Aspergillus antigen test result. Voriconazole treatment resolved diplopia and left otorrhea and dramatically improved HCP. PMID:26003880

  2. P-ANCA cranial pachymeningitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, D; Maillot, F; Hommet, C; Arsène, S; Cottier, J P; Lamisse, F; Guillevin, L

    2005-04-01

    Pachymeningitis is an inflammatory process that thickens the dura mater. This disease has various etiologies including infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune diseases. We present the case of a patient who developed cranial pachymeningitis with a clinical and biological picture suggestive of a neurological form of vasculitis. A 51-year-old woman developed rhinitis, otitis media, headaches, and deterioration of her condition after a course of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. After a booster dose of the vaccine, she developed unilateral visual loss and impairment of multiple cranial nerves. Blood analysis showed inflammation and presence of antimyeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed pachymeningitis. A complete remission was obtained with immunosuppressive therapy. The initial clinical presentation and subsequent remission under immunosuppressive therapy were suggestive of a vasculitis with nervous system involvement. Though vasculitis was not proven histologically in this patient, we believe that MPO-ANCA-related autoimmunity provoked the patient's disease as already reported in similar cases. As pachymeningitis is a fibrosing process, early recognition and treatment of an autoimmune etiology, even in the absence of previous pulmonary or renal involvement, is required to prevent definitive neurological impairment. PMID:15578248

  3. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  4. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  5. [Giant mucocele of the paranasal sinuses with extension to the contralateral posterior cranial fossa and reversible retrocochlear deafness].

    PubMed

    Rudert, H; Harder, T; Werner, J A; Lippert, B M

    1993-05-01

    Report on a huge mucocele of the right maxillary sinus extending into the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses, and protruding into the contralateral left posterior cranial fossa. The patient, a 45-year old male, had no history of paranasal sinus energy, nasal or paranasal symptoms. He went to his physician because of a slowly developing deafness in his left ear and because of episodes of loss of consciousness when blowing his nose. A reversible episode of vertigo and reversible paresis of the left abducent nerve 17 years previously, were later assumed to have been the first symptoms of endocranial extension of the mucocele. The diagnosis of a mucocele was made by MRI. MRI in T2 weighted spin-echo sequences is the best imaging technique for diagnosing a mucocele. The mucocele was treated primarily with endonasal surgery of the paranasal sinuses, using telescopes and an operating microscope. After opening the right maxillary sinus via the middle meatus liquid contents of the mucocele poured into the nasal cavity. The sack of the mucocele was removed partially. Three months later the patient was reoperated with a combined transfacial and endonasal approach, because of progression from partial hearing loss to total deafness. Postoperatively hearing improved nearly completely and compression of the pons and the posterior fossa had disappeared on MRI. It is concluded that in mucoceles no longer the extirpation of the sack, but endonasal marsupialization, using the operating microscope and telescopes, is the therapy of choice. PMID:8323630

  6. Cranial aspergilloma masquerading as meningioma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singh, Prabhat; Kumar, Achal; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cranial aspergillosis may present as meningitis, cerebral abscess, cerebral infarcts/haemorrhages or extra-axial mass. Extra-axial cranial aspergilloma may mimic meningioma owing to mass-like characteristics and intense contrast enhancement on MRI there by delaying the diagnosis and further worsening the already bad prognosis in these patients. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who presented with signs of raised intracranial hypertension, secondary optic atrophy and a contrast-enhancing mass arising from the planum sphenoidale. Postoperatively, mass was diagnosed as aspergilloma on histopathology and culture. Despite antifungal treatment, patient could not be saved due to large artery infarcts in the immediate postoperative period. We discuss the clinical and MRI features that could help to have sufficient and early suspicion of fungal aetiology in these patients. PMID:23307467

  7. Cranial aspergilloma masquerading as meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Singh, Prabhat; Kumar, Achal; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cranial aspergillosis may present as meningitis, cerebral abscess, cerebral infarcts/haemorrhages or extra-axial mass. Extra-axial cranial aspergilloma may mimic meningioma owing to mass-like characteristics and intense contrast enhancement on MRI there by delaying the diagnosis and further worsening the already bad prognosis in these patients. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who presented with signs of raised intracranial hypertension, secondary optic atrophy and a contrast-enhancing mass arising from the planum sphenoidale. Postoperatively, mass was diagnosed as aspergilloma on histopathology and culture. Despite antifungal treatment, patient could not be saved due to large artery infarcts in the immediate postoperative period. We discuss the clinical and MRI features that could help to have sufficient and early suspicion of fungal aetiology in these patients. PMID:23307467

  8. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  9. Nerve agents: implications for anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Hrobak, Paula Kay

    2008-04-01

    Anesthesia providers may be called to treat injuries from chemical weapons or spills, for which prompt treatment is vital. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of nerve agents and the resultant pathophysiology and to be able to quickly recognize the signs and symptoms of nerve agent exposure. This review article addresses the different types of nerve agents that are currently being manufactured as well as the symptomatic and definitive treatment of the patient who presents with acute nerve agent toxicity. This article also reviews the physiology of the neuromuscular junction and the autonomic nervous system receptors that nerve agent toxicity affects. PMID:18478812

  10. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  11. Spontaneous intraneural hematoma of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Shawn S; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Mintz, Douglas N; DiCarlo, Edward F; Weiland, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Symptomatic intraneural hemorrhage occurs rarely. It presents with pain and/or weakness in the distribution following the anatomic innervation pattern of the involved nerve. When a purely sensory nerve is affected, the symptoms can be subtle. We present a previously healthy 36-year-old female who developed an atraumatic, spontaneous intraneural hematoma of her sural nerve. Sural dysfunction was elicited from the patient's history and physical examination. The diagnosis was confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical decompression provided successful resolution of her preoperative symptoms. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported previously. Our case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion for nerve injury or compression in patients whose complaints follow a typical peripheral nerve distribution. Prior studies have shown that the formation of intraneural hematoma and associated compression of nerve fibers result in axonal degeneration, and surgical decompression decreases axonal degeneration and aids functional recovery. PMID:25311865

  12. Nerve physiology: mechanisms of injury and recovery.

    PubMed

    Menorca, Ron M G; Fussell, Theron S; Elfar, John C

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common conditions, with broad-ranging groups of symptoms depending on the severity and nerves involved. Although much knowledge exists on the mechanisms of injury and regeneration, reliable treatments that ensure full functional recovery are scarce. This review aims to summarize various ways these injuries are classified in light of decades of research on peripheral nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:23895713

  13. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  14. The management of cranial injuries in antiquity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mindea, Stefan A; Batjer, H Hunt

    2007-01-01

    Cranial injuries were among the earliest neurosurgical problems faced by ancient physicians and surgeons. In this review, the authors trace the development of neurosurgical theory and practice for the treatment of cranial injuries beginning from the earliest ancient evidence available to the collapse of the Greco-Roman civilizations. The earliest neurosurgical procedure was trephination, which modern scientists believe was used to treat skull fractures in some civilizations. The Egyptian papyri of Edwin Smith provide a thorough description of 27 head injuries with astute observations of clinical signs and symptoms, but little information on the treatment of these injuries. Hippocrates offered the first classification of skull fractures and discussion of which types required trephining, in addition to refining this technique. Hippocrates was also the first to understand the basis of increased intracranial pressure. After Hippocrates, the physicians of the Alexandrian school provided further insight into the clinical evaluation of patients with head trauma, including the rudiments of a Glasgow Coma Scale. Finally, Galen of Pergamon, a physician to fallen gladiators, substantially contributed to the understanding of the neuroanatomy and physiology. He also described his own classification system for skull fractures and further refined the surgical technique of trephination. From the study of these important ancient figures, it is clearly evident that the knowledge and experience gained from the management of cranial injuries has laid the foundation not only for how these injuries are managed today, but also for the development of the field of neurosurgery. PMID:17961060

  15. Stroke Awareness in Luxemburg: Deficit Concerning Symptoms and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Droste, Dirk W; Safo, Jacqueline; Metz, René J; Osada, Nani

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Awareness of stroke risk factors is important for stroke prevention. Knowledge of stroke symptoms and awareness regarding the necessity of seeking urgent stroke treatment are vital to provide rapid admission to a stroke unit. Data on this specific knowledge in Luxemburg are lacking. METHODS We investigated 420 patients from the Department of Neurology and their relatives using a questionnaire. There were 44% men and 56% women; 25% were immigrants and 75% Luxemburgish nationals; 13% already had had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA); and the mean age was 55 years ranging from 18 to 87 years. RESULTS A total of 88% of participants knew that a stroke occurs in the head/brain. In all, 10% of participants did not know any symptom of a stroke. The most frequently quoted symptoms (>15%) were paralysis/weakness (36%), speech disorders (32%), cranial nerve deficit (16%), vertigo (15%), and visual disorders (15%). Sensory deficits were mentioned by only 4% of patients. Known risk factors (>15%) were smoking (40%), hypertension (32%), alcohol (32%), poor nutrition (28%), high cholesterol (26%), stress (23%), and lack of exercise (19%). Age (4%), diabetes (6%), carotid stenosis (2%), and heart disease (1%) were less frequently known. In all, 11% of participants did not know any risk factor of a stroke. A total of 89% of participants would correctly call the 112 (emergency phone number). The following groups were better informed: Luxemburgish nationals, younger people, and participants with higher education level. Stroke/TIA patients were better informed concerning stroke symptoms, but unfortunately not concerning how to react in the case of a stroke. There was no relevant gender difference. DISCUSSION Although most of the participants knew what to do in the case of a stroke, they did not know the relevant stroke symptoms and risk factors. Future campaigns should therefore focus on risk factors and symptoms, and should address immigrants, elderly persons, less-educated persons, and patients who had already suffered a stroke/TIA. PMID:25452703

  16. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Damar, Murat; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Şevik Eliçora, Sultan; Bişkin, Sultan; Erten, Gül; Biz, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature. PMID:26904338

  17. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Damar, Murat; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Şevik Eliçora, Sultan; Bişkin, Sultan; Erten, Gül; Biz, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature. PMID:26904338

  18. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  19. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to be caused by irritation of the ninth cranial nerve, called the glossopharyngeal nerve. Symptoms usually begin in ... severe pain in areas connected to the ninth cranial nerve: Back of the nose and throat (nasopharynx) Back ...

  20. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  1. Medial Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fibromatosis Medial and lateral plantar nerve entrapment is compression of nerve branches at the inner heel (the ... nerve or surgery to free the nerve from compression may help relieve pain. Foot Problems Overview of ...

  2. Sciatic Nerve Injury Associated with Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Helfet, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures may be a result of the initial trauma or injury at the time of surgical reconstruction. Patients may present with a broad range of symptoms ranging from radiculopathy to foot drop. There are several posttraumatic, perioperative, and postoperative causes for sciatic nerve palsy including fracture–dislocation of the hip joint, excessive tension or inappropriate placement of retractors, instrument- or implant-related complications, heterotopic ossification, hematoma, and scarring. Natural history studies suggest that nerve recovery depends on several factors. Prevention requires attention to intraoperative limb positioning, retractor placement, and instrumentation. Somatosensory evoked potentials and spontaneous electromyography may help minimize iatrogenic nerve injury. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis can help reduce delayed sciatic nerve entrapment. Reports on sciatic nerve decompression are not uniformly consistent but appear to have better outcomes for sensory than motor neuropathy. PMID:19089496

  3. Ganglioneuromas involving the hypoglossal nerve and the vagus nerve in a child: Surgical difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Lele, Saudamini; Nada, Ritambra

    2016-02-01

    Ganglioneuromas are benign tumors that arise from the Schwann cells of the autonomic nervous system. They are usually seen in the posterior mediastinum and the paraspinal retroperitoneum in relation to the sympathetic chain. In the head and neck, they are usually related to the cervical sympathetic ganglia or to the ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve or the hypoglossal nerve. We describe what we believe is the first reported case of multiple ganglioneuromas of the parapharyngeal space in which two separate cranial nerves were involved. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a 2-year history of a painless and slowly progressive swelling on the left side of her neck and a 1-year history hoarseness. She had no history of relevant trauma or surgery. Intraoperatively, we found two tumors in the left parapharyngeal space-one that had arisen from the hypoglossal nerve and the other from the vagus nerve. Both ganglioneuromas were surgically removed, but the affected nerves had to be sacrificed. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited hypoglossal nerve and vocal fold palsy, but she was asymptomatic. In addition to the case description, we discuss the difficulties we faced during surgical excision. PMID:26930339

  4. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  5. Cranial bone deformity after forehead tissue expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; You, Jianjun; Wang, Sheng; Fan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    The expanded forehead flap is frequently used for nasal reconstruction. When expanding the forehead tissue, the underlying cranial bones are compressed by the inserted expander. Many effects of tissue expansion on the bone have been reported including bone remolding, erosion, displacement, and so forth. In this work, we report a peculiar patient of cranial bone deformity after forehead tissue expansion, which demanded a surgical revision. PMID:25723659

  6. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, M.; Johnny, J. Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations. PMID:26015748

  7. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  8. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils. PMID:18402165

  9. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Esther; vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M.; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lehnherr, André; Rieder, Philip; Keller, Philip J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Gesemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In this study we have analyzed the function of the MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2A (MDGA2A) protein in zebrafish cranial motoneuron development. MDGA2A is prominently expressed in distinct clusters of cranial motoneurons, especially in the ones of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Analyses of MDGA2A knockdown embryos by light sheet and confocal microscopy revealed impaired migration and aberrant axonal outgrowth of these neurons; suggesting that adhesive interactions mediated by MDGA2A are required for the proper arrangement and outgrowth of cranial motoneuron subtypes. PMID:25572423

  10. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident, an operation is indicated from our experience. PMID:12874724

  11. Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy due to an inflammatory process within the sella and parasellar regions.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Hwang, Michelle S; Strickland, Ben A; Khishfe, Basem

    2016-01-01

    Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy raises concern about a serious intracranial condition. Abducens nerve palsy is a common isolated palsy due to its susceptibility to injury along its long course. Non-traumatic isolated abducens nerve palsy is often caused by a mass that indirectly stretches and compresses the nerve. Pathological processes directly causing bilateral isolated involvement of the abducens nerve are rare. We describe a 24-year-old man who presented with isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy. Radiological imaging and laboratory tests were consistent with an aggressive bacterial infectious process located in the sellar region with parasellar extension. If promptly addressed, sixth cranial nerve palsy appears to be reversible with aggressive medical therapy and endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:26482458

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; Lopes de Morais, Andreia; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy. PMID:26645547

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePLUS

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  14. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Sangeeta P; Wanjari, Panjab V; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia. PMID:24552945

  15. [Hypoglossal nerve in its intralingual trajectory: anatomy and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Sequert, C; Lestang, P; Baglin, A C; Wagner, I; Ferron, J M; Chabolle, F

    1999-09-01

    There is little literature on the intralingual trajectory of the hypoglosal nerve. We performed an anatomical dissection on 6 cadavers and completed our study with histological examinations. The 12th cranial nerve enters the lower part of the tongue laterally, reaching the anterior border of the hypoglossal muscle where it follows the ascending lingual artery medially to terminate anteriorly to the lingual V. Its terminal branches spread out horizontally in each half of the tongue. There is a paramedial branch, found in all cases, which projects downwardly, posteriorly and medially at the basilingual portion of the genioglossal muscle. These anatomic findings indicate that basiglossectomy removing the entire base of the tongue can be performed without functional sequelae. A certain degree of somatotopy is also found with specific fibers reaching the protractor and retractor muscles. This nerve distribution supports attempts at selective electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve with the aim of dilating the upper airways in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:10519010

  16. Use of bioabsorbable plates for cranial fixation.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kosumo; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Sugimura, Toshihide; Kawasaki, Kazutsune; Kimura, Teruo; Izumi, Naoto; Hashimoto, Masaaki

    2009-11-01

    LactoSorb fixation plates are made of a bioabsorbable polymer (82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid), and the strength is not inferior to titanium plates. LactoSorb has been used in the fields of pediatric neurosurgery and facial plastic surgery. Cranial fixation in craniotomy is mostly performed using titanium plates and clamps, but there are issues with esthetics and artifacts on postoperative radiographic images. Absorbable plates solve these problems, but are slightly thicker and more expensive. Here, we describe a technique to solve these disadvantages by inserting absorbable plates into the diploe. The present method was employed in 46 patients, and esthetically favorable results were obtained without intraoperative and postoperative complications. Absorbable plates may replace titanium plates as the main device for cranial fixation. The present method is particularly useful for cranial fixation in adults with a thin scalp. PMID:19940411

  17. The cranial endoskeleton of Tiktaalik roseae.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jason P; Daeschler, Edward B; Jenkins, Farish A; Shubin, Neil H

    2008-10-16

    Among the morphological changes that occurred during the 'fish-to-tetrapod' transition was a marked reorganization of the cranial endoskeleton. Details of this transition, including the sequence of character acquisition, have not been evident from the fossil record. Here we describe the braincase, palatoquadrate and branchial skeleton of Tiktaalik roseae, the Late Devonian sarcopterygian fish most closely related to tetrapods. Although retaining a primitive configuration in many respects, the cranial endoskeleton of T. roseae shares derived features with tetrapods such as a large basal articulation and a flat, horizontally oriented entopterygoid. Other features in T. roseae, like the short, straight hyomandibula, show morphology intermediate between the condition observed in more primitive fish and that observed in tetrapods. The combination of characters in T. roseae helps to resolve the relative timing of modifications in the cranial endoskeleton. The sequence of modifications suggests changes in head mobility and intracranial kinesis that have ramifications for the origin of vertebrate terrestriality. PMID:18923515

  18. Rationale, Science, and Economics of Surgical Nerve Decompression for Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Complications.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, David Scott

    2016-04-01

    Nerve decompression is effective and safe for dealing with the pain and numbness symptoms of the frequent nerve compression entrapments in diabetic symmetric peripheral neuropathy (DSPN). Evidence has accumulated of balance and stability improvements and protection against diabetic foot ulceration, recurrence and its complication cascade. Nerve decompression proffers significant benefit versus the large socioeconomic costs of DSPN complications. Advancing understanding of the mechanism of nerve compression and altered axonal activity in diabetes clarifies the basis of clinical benefit. Clinicians should seek out and recognize nerve entrapments and consider advising nerve decompression for relief of DSPN symptoms and prevention of complications. PMID:27013417

  19. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing. PMID:26336812

  20. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  1. Optic Neuropathy Due to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Proven With Optic Nerve Sheath Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khurrum; Malik, Amina I; Almarzouqi, Sumayya J; Morgan, Michael L; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia; Lee, Andrew G

    2016-03-01

    Central nervous system involvement from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) occurs infrequently, and manifestations include cognitive and cerebellar dysfunction and cranial nerve palsies. We report a 45-year-old man with CLL believed to be in clinical remission, who presented with vision loss and bilateral optic disc edema. His optic neuropathy due to CLL was proven by optic nerve sheath biopsy, and he experienced visual recovery after treatment with ibrutinib and intrathecal methotrexate. PMID:26436987

  2. Frameless Stereotactic Localization in Cranial Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzelli, Guy J.; Origitano, Thomas C.; Stankiewicz, James A.; Anderson, Douglas E.

    2000-01-01

    Mastery of the three-dimensional anatomic relationships of the cranial base/paranasal sinuses is required to reduce the incidence of iatrogenic surgical complications, facilitate complete tumor extirpation, and enhance functional outcomes. Real-time intraoperative localization technology is one method available to assist the cranial base surgeon. We report our institutional experience with the StealthStationâ„¢ treatment guidance platform. Eighty-eight consecutive patients with pathology of the cranial base/paranasal sinuses were operated on with the aid of real-time frameless stereotactic localization. Preoperative image data sets were acquired with either CT or MRI scans. Patient demographics, accuracy of the data sets, surgical approaches, pathology, complications, and further applications of this technology are presented. Procedures were performed on 47 women and 41 men ranging in age from 6 to 85 years. In these 88 procedures, 44 MRI and 44 CT scans with a mean accuracy of 1.57 and 1.23 mm, respectively, were used. Approaches to the cranial base included midface degloving (25), endoscopic (23), craniofacial (13), maxillectomy (12), rhinotomy without maxillectomy (5), transoral (5), pterional (2), transcondylar (1), and transcervical (2). Indications for surgery included severe inflammatory disease of the paranasal sinuses with epidural or subdoral abscess, or both (7), cerebrospinal fluid fistula or encephalocele, or both (11), and 40 benign and 30 malignant tumors. Complications occurred in 10 of 88 patients (11%). Real-time intraoperative localization can be applied to cranial base surgery in a variety of scenarios. The instantaneous transfer of imaging data to the surgical field is useful in localizing pathology, enhancing operative safety, and reducing morbidity, thereby improving outcomes. This technology will certainly play an integral role in minimizing complications and improving surgical outcomes as cranial base surgery moves into the next millennium. PMID:17171136

  3. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  4. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Felice, KJ. Focal neuropathies of the femoral, obturator, lateral femoral cutaneous and other nerves of the thigh and pelvis. In: Bromberg MB, Smith ...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4370 Pneumatic cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4370 Pneumatic cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4370 Pneumatic cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4370 Pneumatic cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4370 Pneumatic cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  15. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  16. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  17. Cranial computed tomography and MRI. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physics and Instrumentation: CT and MRI; Normal Cranial CT and MRI Anatomy; The Orbit; The ventricles and Subarachnoid Spaces in Children; Primary Tumors in Children; Trauma: Craniocerebral and Craniofacial; Infectious Disease; and Stroke.

  18. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy. PMID:26752912

  19. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy. PMID:26752912

  20. Are routine cranial ultrasounds necessary in premature infants greater than 30 weeks gestation?

    PubMed

    Harris, N Ja'Neice; Palacio, Diana; Ginzel, Andrew; Richardson, C Joan; Swischuk, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the recommendation of the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society that screening cranial ultrasonography be performed routinely on all infants of less than 30 weeks gestation at 7 to 14 days of age and again between 36 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age, and, by using this practice parameter, to determine the number of babies with a clinically significant abnormal screening cranial ultrasound (US) who would otherwise have been missed. A retrospective study of 486 infants of 30 to 33 weeks gestation born January 1, 1999 to June 30, 2004 was done. All had screening cranial ultrasounds. Grade III and/or grade IV intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurred in 4 (0.8%) infants of 30 to 31 weeks gestation. Infants with significant IVH had either risk factors for brain injury or symptoms that would eventually warrant US during their hospitalization. Seven (1.4%) infants had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). All infants with a final diagnosis of PVL had pre- and/or perinatal risk factors associated with PVL. There was a significant trend toward fewer abnormal cranial ultrasounds from 30 to 33 weeks gestation (p=0.04). Our study supports the recommendation by the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society that screening US can be limited but suggests that the gestational age cut off should be 30 weeks or less. PMID:17094042

  1. A Case of Hemifacial Spasm Caused by an Artery Passing Through the Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeonseon

    2015-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by unilateral facial nerve dysfunction. The usual cause involves vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve, but compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve is very unusual. A 20-year-old man presented with left facial spasm that had persisted for 4 years. Compression of the left facial nerve root exit zone by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) was revealed on magnetic resonance angiography. During microvascular decompression surgery, penetration of the distal portion of the facial nerve root exit zone by the AICA was observed. At the penetrating site, the artery was found to have compressed the facial nerve and to be immobilized. The penetrated seventh cranial nerve was longitudinally split about 2 mm. The compressing artery was moved away from the penetrating site and the decompression was secured by inserting Teflon at the operative site. Although the facial spasm disappeared in the immediate postoperative period, the patient continued to show moderate facial weakness. At postoperative 12 months, the facial weakness had improved to a mild degree. Prior to performing microvascular decompression of HFS, surgeons should be aware of a possibility for rare complex anatomy, such as compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve, which cannot be observed by modern imaging techniques. PMID:25810866

  2. A case of hemifacial spasm caused by an artery passing through the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeonseon; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by unilateral facial nerve dysfunction. The usual cause involves vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve, but compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve is very unusual. A 20-year-old man presented with left facial spasm that had persisted for 4 years. Compression of the left facial nerve root exit zone by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) was revealed on magnetic resonance angiography. During microvascular decompression surgery, penetration of the distal portion of the facial nerve root exit zone by the AICA was observed. At the penetrating site, the artery was found to have compressed the facial nerve and to be immobilized. The penetrated seventh cranial nerve was longitudinally split about 2 mm. The compressing artery was moved away from the penetrating site and the decompression was secured by inserting Teflon at the operative site. Although the facial spasm disappeared in the immediate postoperative period, the patient continued to show moderate facial weakness. At postoperative 12 months, the facial weakness had improved to a mild degree. Prior to performing microvascular decompression of HFS, surgeons should be aware of a possibility for rare complex anatomy, such as compression by an artery passing through the facial nerve, which cannot be observed by modern imaging techniques. PMID:25810866

  3. Follow-up evaluation with ultrasonography of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Yue; Yue, Linxian; Chiu, Jack; He, Fanding; Wu, Xiaojing; Zang, Bin; Lu, Bin; Yao, Xiaoke; Jiang, Zirui

    2014-01-01

    Published data on earthquake-associated peripheral nerve injury is very limited. Ultrasonography has been proven to be efficient in the clinic to diagnose peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound in the evaluation of persistent peripheral nerve injuries 1 year after the Wenchuan earthquake. Thirty-four patients with persistent clinical symptoms and neurologic signs of impaired nerve function were evaluated with sonography prior to surgical repair. Among 34 patients, ultrasonography showed that 48 peripheral nerves were entrapped, and 11 peripheral nerves were disrupted. There was one case of misdiagnosis on ultrasonography. The concordance rate of ultrasonographic findings with those of surgical findings was 98%. A total of 48 involved nerves underwent neurolysis and the symptoms resolved. Only five nerves had scar tissue entrapment. Preoperative and postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic results were concordant, which verified that ultrasonography is useful for preoperative diagnosis and postoperative evaluation of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:25206859

  4. Intraoperative Electrophysiologic Monitoring of Ocular Motor Nerves Under Conditions of Partial Neuromuscular Blockade During Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Takanori; Shimizu, Kiyoshi; Karasawa, Jun; Furuya, Hitoshi

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility and usefulness of intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the oculomotor nerve (CN III), trochlear nerve (CN IV), and abducens nerve (CN IV) were evaluated under conditions of partial neuromuscular blockade in 21 patients undergoing skill base surgery. Intracranial electrical stimulation of each nerve was performed, and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were reconded from the inferior or superior rectus muscle, the superior oblique muscle, and the lateral rectus muscle for monitoring of CN III, IV, and VI, respectively. Partial neuromuscular blockade was achieved by controlled infusion of vecuronium titrated to eliminate about 90% of the twitch response of the abductor pollicis brevis to electrical stimulation of the median nerve. A total of 30 cranial nerves were stimulated intraoperatively. Of these, 29 were successfully monitored (19 CN III, 6 CN IV, 4 CN VI). A relationship was found between intraoperative findings of cranial nerve monitoring, such as disappearance of response and increase in latency and stimulus threshold during manipulation of a lesion, and the presence of postoperative nerve deficits. We conclude that intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of ocular motor nerves is feasible during partial neuromuscular blockade, and that partial neuromuscular blockade does not affect the relationship between findings of intraoperative monitoring and postoperative nerve function. PMID:17170948

  5. Prolonged Bilateral Reactive Miosis as a Symptom of Severe Insulin Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Gradwohl-Matis, Ilse; Pann, Jakob; Schmittinger, Christian A.; Brunauer, Andreas; Dankl, Daniel; Dünser, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 64 Final Diagnosis: Insulin self poisoning Symptoms: Coma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Supportive care Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Miosis occurs following exposure to toxins that decrease the sympathomimetic tone, increase the cholinergic tone, or exert sedative-hypnotic effects, but has not been reported in insulin poisoning. Case Report: A 64-year- old woman without co-morbidities was found unconscious next to an empty insulin pen. Her Glasgow Coma Scale was 3 with absent reflexes, bilateral reactive miosis, and injection marks across the abdominal wall. The patient was endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, and transferred to this hospital. At admission, the blood glucose level was 34 mg/dL. Glasgow Coma Scale remained at 3, with persistent bilateral reactive miosis. The toxicology screening was negative for ethanol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, amphetamines, cannabinoids, salicylates, acetaminophen, and cocaine. Cranial computed tomography with angiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show any structural brain lesions. Intravenous glucose was continued at 6–14 g/h for 3 days. On repeated neurological examinations, the patient remained deeply comatose, with partial loss of cranial nerve function. Bilateral reactive miosis persisted for 4 days. From day 5 on, the patient awoke progressively. At discharge, the patient was fully alert and orientated, without a focal neurological deficit. Conclusions: Prolonged bilateral reactive miosis can be a clinical symptom accompanying metabolic encephalopathy in severe insulin poisoning. Functional impairment of the pons due to relative hypoperfusion during hypoglycemia may serve as a reasonable pathophysiologic explanation for this phenomenon. PMID:25556593

  6. Development of synchronized activity of cranial motor neurons in the segmented embryonic mouse hindbrain

    PubMed Central

    Gust, J; Wright, J J; Pratt, E B; Bosma, M M

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity synchronized among groups of related neurons is a widespread and important feature of central nervous system development. Among the many places from which spontaneous rhythmic activity has been recorded early in development are the cranial motor nerve roots that exit the hindbrain, the motor neuron pool that, at birth, will control the rhythmic motor patterns of swallow, feeding and the oral components of respiratory behaviour. Understanding the mechanism and significance of this hindbrain activity, however, has been hampered by the difficulty of identifying and recording from individual hindbrain motor neurons in living tissue. We have used retrograde labelling to identify living cranial branchiomeric motor neurons in the hindbrain, and [Ca2+]i imaging of such labelled cells to measure spontaneous activity simultaneously in groups of motor neuron somata. We find that branchiomeric motor neurons of the trigeminal and facial nerves generate spontaneous [Ca2+]i transients throughout the developmental period E9.5 to E11.5. During this two-day period the activity changes from low-frequency, long-duration events that are tetrodotoxin insensitive and poorly coordinated among cells, to high-frequency short-duration events that are tetrodotoxin sensitive and tightly coordinated thoughout the motor neuron population. This early synchronization may be crucial for correct neuron-target development. PMID:12730346

  7. Transzygomatic Approach with Intraoperative Neuromonitoring for Resection of Middle Cranial Fossa Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung Chul; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The authors reviewed the surgical experience and operative technique in a series of 11 patients with middle fossa tumors who underwent surgery using the transzygomatic approach and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) at a single institution. This approach was applied to trigeminal schwannomas (n?=?3), cavernous angiomas (n?=?3), sphenoid wing meningiomas (n?=?3), a petroclival meningioma (n?=?1), and a hemangiopericytoma (n?=?1). An osteotomy of the zygoma, a low-positioned frontotemporal craniotomy, removal of the remaining squamous temporal bone, and extradural drilling of the sphenoid wing made a flat trajectory to the skull base. Total resection was achieved in 9 of 11 patients. Significant motor pathway damage can be avoided using a change in motor-evoked potentials as an early warning sign. Four patients experienced cranial nerve palsies postoperatively, even though free-running electromyography of cranial nerves showed normal responses during the surgical procedure. A simple transzygomatic approach provides a wide surgical corridor for accessing the cavernous sinus, petrous apex, and subtemporal regions. Knowledge of the middle fossa structures is essential for anatomic orientation and avoiding injuries to neurovascular structures, although a neuronavigation system and IOM helps orient neurosurgeons. PMID:23372992

  8. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalm, Marie; Abel, Edvard; Wasling, Pontus; Nyman, Jan; Hietala, Max Albert; Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars; Elam, Mikael; Blennow, Kaj; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  9. Benign anatomical mistakes: the correct anatomical term for the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, John E

    2002-01-01

    The term recurrent laryngeal nerve has been adopted by Nomina Anatomica (1989) and Terminologia Anatomica (1998) to describe this vagus branch from its origin, its turn dorsally around the subclavian artery and the aortic arch, and its cranial pathway until it reaches its terminal organs in the neck. However, there is still much confusion, and either the terms inferior and recurrent laryngeal nerve are used interchangeably or inferior laryngeal nerve is considered the terminal branch of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. We hereby feel that it is necessary to reassess the term and we propose the term inferior laryngeal nerve for the entire nerve under consideration, from its origin from the vagus nerve to its destinations, including tracheal, esophageal, and pharyngeal branches. If the term superior laryngeal nerve is a given, standard and accepted term in the anatomical terminology, then logically the term inferior laryngeal nerve should also be accepted, as opposed to it. Of course the upward travel of the inferior laryngeal nerve is "recurrent". When nonrecurrence is encountered together with an arteria lusoria, a retroesophageal right subclavian artery or a right aortic arch, we consider that the term nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerve should be used to describe the deviation from the normal. PMID:12467328

  10. Cranial CT findings in patients with meningomyelocele.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R D; Breckbill, D; Dennis, M W; Davis, D O

    1979-04-01

    The association between meningomyelocele and various cranial abnormalities, particularly Chiari II malformation is well established. Cranial CT scans in 47 patients with meningomyelocele proved to be a safe and effective method of elucidating the type and extent of anatomic abnormalities associated with this disorder, and evaluating and following the degree of hydrocephalus seen in these patients. Of the 47 patients, 43 (92%) showed CT findings indicative of an abnormally low fourth ventricle, the hallmark finding in Chiari II malformation. In 67% the fourth ventricle was not visualized, and in 25% it was directly visualized in an abnormally caudal position. Other findings included hydrocephalus (85%), a striking and possibly unique heart-shaped psuedomass in the posterior fossa (58%), and abnormal configuration of the lateral ventricles ("vampire bat" configuration). Calvarial abnormalities, in particular lacunar skull, were also noted at CT. PMID:106696

  11. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Aydin, Kubilay; Tomac, Nazan; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. PMID:14534755

  12. Cranial osteology of meiglyptini (aves: piciformes: picidae).

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    THE MEIGLYPTINI COMPRISE EIGHT SPECIES GROUPED INTO THREE GENERA: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  13. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  14. Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves as an unknown cause of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Aota, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves induces low back pain and leg symptoms. The middle cluneal nerves can become spontaneously entrapped where this nerve pass under the long posterior sacroiliac ligament. A case of severe low back pain, which was completely treated by release of the middle cluneal nerve, was presented. Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves is possibly underdiagnosed cause of low-back and/or leg symptoms. Spinal surgeons should be aware of this clinical entity and avoid unnecessary spinal surgeries and sacroiliac fusion. This paper is to draw attention by pain clinicians in this unrecognized etiology. PMID:27004164

  15. Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves as an unknown cause of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Aota, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves induces low back pain and leg symptoms. The middle cluneal nerves can become spontaneously entrapped where this nerve pass under the long posterior sacroiliac ligament. A case of severe low back pain, which was completely treated by release of the middle cluneal nerve, was presented. Entrapment of middle cluneal nerves is possibly underdiagnosed cause of low-back and/or leg symptoms. Spinal surgeons should be aware of this clinical entity and avoid unnecessary spinal surgeries and sacroiliac fusion. This paper is to draw attention by pain clinicians in this unrecognized etiology. PMID:27004164

  16. Application and histology-driven refinement of active contour models to functional region and nerve delineation: towards a digital brainstem atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nirmal; Sultana, Sharmin; Rashid, Tanweer; Krusienski, Dean; Audette, Michel A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the digital formatting of a printed atlas of the brainstem and the delineation of cranial nerves from this digital atlas. It also describes on-going work on the 3D resampling and refinement of the 2D functional regions and nerve contours. In MRI-based anatomical modeling for neurosurgery planning and simulation, the complexity of the functional anatomy entails a digital atlas approach, rather than less descriptive voxel or surface-based approaches. However, there is an insufficiency of descriptive digital atlases, in particular of the brainstem. Our approach proceeds from a series of numbered, contour-based sketches coinciding with slices of the brainstem featuring both closed and open contours. The closed contours coincide with functionally relevant regions, whereby our objective is to fill in each corresponding label, which is analogous to painting numbered regions in a paint-by-numbers kit. Any open contour typically coincides with a cranial nerve. This 2D phase is needed in order to produce densely labeled regions that can be stacked to produce 3D regions, as well as identifying the embedded paths and outer attachment points of cranial nerves. Cranial nerves are modeled using an explicit contour based technique called 1-Simplex. The relevance of cranial nerves modeling of this project is two-fold: i) this atlas will fill a void left by the brain segmentation communities, as no suitable digital atlas of the brainstem exists, and ii) this atlas is necessary to make explicit the attachment points of major nerves (except I and II) having a cranial origin. Keywords: digital atlas, contour models, surface models

  17. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed. PMID:26904304

  18. Microstructural alterations in trigeminal neuralgia determined by diffusion tensor imaging are independent of symptom duration, severity, and type of neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Juergen; Thon, Niklas; Stahl, Robert; Lummel, Nina; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Linn, Jennifer; Mehrkens, Jan-Hinnerk

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT In this prospective study diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to evaluate the influence of clinical and anatomical parameters on structural alterations within the fifth cranial nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) due to neurovascular compression. METHODS Overall, 81 patients (40 men and 41 women; mean age 60 ± 5 years) with typical TN were included who underwent microsurgical decompression. Preoperative 3.0-T high-resolution MRI and DTI were analyzed in a blinded fashion. The respective fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient values were compared with the clinical, imaging, and intraoperative data. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. RESULTS DTI analyses revealed significantly lower FA values within the vulnerable zone of the affected trigeminal nerve compared with the contralateral side (p = 0.05). The DTI analyses also included 3 patients without clear evidence of neurovascular conflict on preoperative MRI. No differences were seen between arterial and venous compression. Lower FA values were found 5 months after symptom onset; however, no correlation was found with the duration of symptoms or severity of compression. CONCLUSIONS DTI analysis allows the quantification of structural alterations, even in those patients without any discernible neurovascular contact on MRI. Moreover, our findings support the hypothesis that both the arteries and veins can cause structural alterations that lead to TN. These aspects can be useful for making treatment decisions. PMID:26406792

  19. Evaluation of a multi-component approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) using guided visualizations, cranial electrotherapy stimulation, and vibroacoustic sound.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Donna R B; Ei, Sue; Rogers, Kim R; Cross, Chad L

    2007-05-01

    This pilot study examines the use of guided visualizations that incorporate both cognitive and behavioral techniques with vibroacoustic therapy and cranial electrotherapy stimulation to form a multi-component therapeutic approach. This multi-component approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat patients presenting with a range of symptoms including anxiety, depression, and relationship difficulties. Clients completed a pre- and post-session symptom severity scale and CBT skills practice survey. The program consisted of 16 guided visualizations incorporating CBT techniques that were accompanied by vibroacoustic therapy and cranial electrotherapy stimulation. Significant reduction in symptom severity was observed in pre- and post-session scores for anxiety symptoms, relationship difficulties, and depressive symptoms. The majority of the clients (88%) reported use of CBT techniques learned in the guided visualizations at least once per week outside of the sessions. PMID:17400144

  20. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  1. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  2. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  3. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this delicate surgery without any cuts to the face. In the following sections, we will review the indications, risks and benefits of endoscopic optic nerve decompression. Indications The reasons for optic nerve decompression usually ...

  4. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  5. Spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy with hourglass-like fascicular constriction within the main trunk of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Nagano, A; Shibata, K; Tokimura, H; Yamamoto, S; Tajiri, Y

    1996-03-01

    Interfascicular neurolysis was performed in nine patients with spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy. In eight of these patients, an hourglass-like constriction in the fascicles forming the anterior interosseous nerve was found within the main trunk of the median nerve at 2-7.5 cm above the medial epicondyle. The clinical signs and symptoms of these eight patients were similar to those that have been described to isolated neuritis. While the etiology remains unknown, when spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy is suspected to be caused by isolated neuritis, interfascicular neurolysis should be performed to confirm the lesion and to discover whether fascicular constriction is present. PMID:8683060

  6. Engineering Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Laura; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2013-01-01

    Current approaches for treating peripheral nerve injury have resulted in promising, yet insufficient functional recovery compared to the clinical standard of care, autologous nerve grafts. In order to design a construct that can match the regenerative potential of the autograft, all facets of nerve tissue must be incorporated in a combinatorial therapy. Engineered biomaterial scaffolds in the future will have to promote enhanced regeneration and appropriate reinnervation by targeting the highly sensitive response of regenerating nerves to their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:23790730

  7. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  8. Prediction of neurodevelopmental outcome in the preterm infant: short latency cortical somatosensory evoked potentials compared with cranial ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, L S; Eken, P; Pierrat, V; Daniels, H; Casaer, P

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and twenty six preterm infants, with a gestational age of 34 weeks or less, were studied to compare the predictive value of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) with that of cranial ultrasound. A normal N1 latency was no guarantee of a normal outcome, nor did a persistently delayed N1 latency always correlate with a poor outcome. As a predictor of cerebral palsy, SEPs had a sensitivity of 44% and a specificity of 92%. The presence of a large haemorrhage (grade IIb/III) or cystic leukomalacia on cranial ultrasound predicted cerebral palsy with a sensitivity of 73.6% and a specificity of 83.1%. These results demonstrate that the role of SEPs recorded after median nerve stimulation is limited in preterm infants. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1444553

  9. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  10. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. PMID:25937552

  11. High noon back pain- severe pseudoradicular pain as a lead symptom of superficial siderosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Siglienti, Ines; Gold, Ralf; Schlamann, Marc; Hindy, Nicolai El; Sure, Ulrich; Forsting, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A superficial siderosis of the central nervous system following a traumatic cervical nerve root avulsion usually leads to gait difficulties and hearing loss, whereas back pain is described only rarely. Here we report on the first case with circadian occurrence of severe back pain as the only symptom of a superficial siderosis. We present a case with the most severe pseudoradicular lumbosacral pain occurring daily at noon for the past 5 weeks. The 48-year-old male white patient did not complain of pain in the morning. A traumatic root avulsion 26 years earlier led to a brachial plexus palsy and Horner’s syndrome in this patient. Superficial hemosiderosis in cranial MRI and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealing massive red blood cells as well as xanthochromia and elevated protein levels (742 mg/l) led to the diagnosis of a superficial siderosis. A pseudomeningocele caused by a cervical nerve root avulsion is described as a rare reason for superficial siderosis. Surgery on a pseudomeningocele, diagnosed by MRI, led to an immediate disappearance of complaints in our case. Regular neurological investigation and possibly repeated lumbar puncture to exclude superficial siderosis should be considered in cases with severe back pain and a history of traumatic root avulsion. Modern susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWI) techniques, sensible to the detection of superficial hemosiderosis, might be helpful in the making of a diagnosis. PMID:25371709

  12. Symptom Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Symptom Management A brain injury can affect a person physically ... Diagnosis and Assessment Treatment and Recovery Caregiving Symptom Management Life After TBI Defense and Veterans Brain Injury ...

  13. Recognizing Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Donate Recognizing Symptoms An attack of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can happen at any time. It ... factors. Get the Symptom Diary Attack of the Irritable Bowel From " The Art of IBS " © IFFGD Pain or ...

  14. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 ?m. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 ?m through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 ?m of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  15. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  16. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. PMID:26747398

  17. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury.

    PubMed

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. PMID:26747398

  18. Cranial mediastinal liposarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kondo, H; Wickins, S C; Conway, J A; Mallicote, M F; Sanchez, L C; Agnew, D W; Farina, L L; Abbott, J R

    2012-11-01

    A 23-year-old Anglo-Arabian mare was presented with tachypnea, dyspnea, and pitting edema of the ventral thoracic subcutis. On necropsy, a tan to red, friable, irregularly shaped mass (23 × 20 × 18 cm) occupied the cranial mediastinum. Histologically, the mass was classified as a liposarcoma and was composed of short interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped to irregularly rounded cells with discrete, variably sized, clear cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were stained with oil red O in frozen sections of formalin-fixed tissue. PMID:22287648

  19. Cranial juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma: case report.

    PubMed

    Barrena López, Cristina; Bollar Zabala, Alicia; Úrculo Bareño, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma (JPOF) is a fibroosseous tumor that arises in the craniofacial bones in young people. This lesion usually originates in the jaw, orbit, and ethmoid complex but can also be associated with the skull base and calvaria. Diagnosis must be made based on observing typical radiological and histopathological features. Although JPOF is a rare pathological entity, neurosurgeons must consider this odontogenic lesion in the differential diagnosis of skull masses given the lesion's aggressive behavior and locally invasive growth. Treatment must be gross-total resection. In the following article, the authors present a case of cranial JPOF and discuss various aspects of this entity. PMID:26588460

  20. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  1. The mechanical properties of cranial bone: the effect of loading rate and cranial sampling position.

    PubMed

    Motherway, Julie A; Verschueren, Peter; Van der Perre, Georges; Vander Sloten, Jos; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2009-09-18

    Linear and depressed skull fractures are frequent mechanisms of head injury and are often associated with traumatic brain injury. Accurate knowledge of the fracture of cranial bone can provide insight into the prevention of skull fracture injuries and help aid the design of energy absorbing head protection systems and safety helmets. Cranial bone is a complex material comprising of a three-layered structure: external layers consist of compact, high-density cortical bone and the central layer consists of a low-density, irregularly porous bone structure. In this study, cranial bone specimens were extracted from 8 fresh-frozen cadavers (F=4, M=4; 81+/-11 years old). 63 specimens were obtained from the parietal and frontal cranial bones. Prior to testing, all specimens were scanned using a microCT scanner at a resolution of 56.9 microm. The specimens were tested in a three-point bend set-up at different dynamic speeds (0.5, 1 and 2.5 m/s). The associated mechanical properties that were calculated for each specimen include the 2nd moment of inertia, the sectional elastic modulus, the maximum force at failure, the energy absorbed until failure and the maximum bending stress. Additionally, the morphological parameters of each specimen and their correlation with the resulting mechanical parameters were examined. It was found that testing speed, strain rate, cranial sampling position and intercranial variation all have a significant effect on some or all of the computed mechanical parameters. A modest correlation was also found between percent bone volume and both the elastic modulus and the maximum bending stress. PMID:19640538

  2. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies. Results In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement. Conclusions The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management. PMID:24421983

  3. Multiple schwannomas of the digital nerves and superficial radial nerve: two unusual cases of segmental schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Gutkowska, Olga; Kuli?ski, Sebastian; Urban, Maciej; Ha?o?, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of segmental sporadic schwannomatosis characterized by unusual location of multiple schwannomas in digital nerves (case 1) and the superficial radial nerve (case 2) are described in this paper. In the first of the described cases, 6 tumours located at the base of the middle finger and in its distal portion were excised from both digital nerves. In the second case, 3 tumours located in the proximal 1/3 and halfway down the forearm were removed from the superficial radial nerve. In both cases, symptoms such as palpable tumour mass, pain, paraesthesias, and positive Tinel-Hoffman sign resolved after operative treatment. Final diagnoses were made based on histopathological examination results. In the second of the described cases, the largest of the excised lesions had features enabling diagnosis of a rare tumour type - ancient schwannoma. PMID:26216119

  4. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  5. Cranial remains of an Eocene tarsier

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Ni, Xijun; Beard, K. Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of tarsiers relative to anthropoids and Paleogene omomyids remains a subject of lively debate that lies at the center of research into anthropoid origins. Omomyids have long been regarded as the nearest relatives of tarsiers, but a sister group relationship between anthropoids and tarsiers has also been proposed. These conflicting phylogenetic reconstructions rely heavily on comparisons of cranial anatomy, but until now, the fossil record of tarsiers has been limited to a single jaw and several isolated teeth. In this article, we describe cranial material of a fossil tarsiid from the middle-Eocene Shanghuang fissure-fillings in southern Jiangsu Province, China. This facial fragment, which is allocated to Tarsius eocaenus, is virtually identical to the corresponding anatomy in living tarsiers and differs substantially from that of early anthropoids such as Bahinia, Phenacopithecus, and Parapithecus. This new specimen indicates that tarsiers already possessed greatly enlarged orbits and a haplorhine oronasal configuration by the time they are first documented in the fossil record during the middle Eocene. PMID:16537385

  6. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Selvik, G.; Alberius, P.; Fahlman, M.

    1986-04-01

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  8. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-?s-long pulses of 2.12 ?m radiation delivered via a 600-?m-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  9. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. 4.124 Section 4.124 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders § 4.124 Neuralgia, cranial or...

  10. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. 4.123 Section 4.123 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Neurological Conditions and Convulsive Disorders § 4.123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral....

  11. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section 882.4325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section 882.4325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial...

  13. The contribution of subsistence to global human cranial variation.

    PubMed

    Noback, Marlijn L; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    Diet-related cranial variation in modern humans is well documented on a regional scale, with ample examples of cranial changes related to the agricultural transition. However, the influence of subsistence strategy on global cranial variation is less clear, having been confirmed only for the mandible, and dietary effects beyond agriculture are often neglected. Here we identify global patterns of subsistence-related human cranial shape variation. We analysed a worldwide sample of 15 populations (n = 255) with known subsistence strategies using 3-D landmark datasets designed to capture the shape of different units of the cranium. Results show significant correlations between global cranial shape and diet, especially for temporalis muscle shape and general cranial shape. Importantly, the differences between populations with either a plant- or an animal-based diet are more pronounced than those between agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, suggesting that the influence of diet as driver of cranial variation is not limited to Holocene transitions to agricultural subsistence. Dental arch shape did not correlate with subsistence pattern, possibly indicating the high plasticity of this region of the face in relation to age, disease and individual use of the dentition. Our results highlight the importance of subsistence strategy as one of the factors underlying the evolution of human geographic cranial variation. PMID:25661439

  14. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre-otic paraxial mesoderm in amphibians, to determine developmental causes underlying the complicated changes in cranial muscle development and architecture within amphibians, and in particular how the novel mouth apparatus in frog tadpoles evolved. This will also form a foundation for further research into the molecular mechanisms that regulate rostral head morphogenesis. Our empirical studies are discussed within a theoretical framework concerned with the evolutionary origin and developmental basis of novel anatomical structures in general. We argue that a common developmental origin is not a fool-proof guide to homology, and that a view that sees only structures without homologs as novel is too restricted, because novelties must be produced by changes in the same framework of developmental processes. At the level of developmental processes and mechanisms, novel structures are therefore likely to have homologs, and we need to develop a hierarchical concept of novelty that takes this into account. PMID:22780231

  15. Morphogenesis of the cranial segments and distribution of neural crest in the embryos of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Packard, D S

    1984-04-01

    Recent studies of the heads of vertebrates have shown a primitive pattern of segmentation in the mesoderm and neural plate not previously recognized. The role of this pattern in the subsequent distribution of cranial crest and the development of branchial arches and cranial nerves, may resolve century-old arguments about the evolution of vertebrate segmentation. In this study, we examine the early embryonic development of the cranium of a primitive amniote, the snapping turtle, with the SEM. We show that the paraxial mesoderm cranial to the first-formed somites is segmented and that this pattern is based on somitomeres, similar to those described in the embryos of chick and mouse. Seven contiguous pairs of somitomeres comprise the "head mesoderm"; the first pair of somites actually arise from the eighth pair of somitomeres added to the axis. Cranial somitomeres are associated with specific brain regions, in that the first pair lie adjacent to prosencephalon, the second and third pair are adjacent to the mesencephalon, and the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh pair of somitomeres lie adjacent to individual neuromeres of the rhombencephalon. Prior to the closure of the anterior neuropore, cranial neural crest cells first emerge from the mesencephalon and migrate onto the second and third somitomeres. Shortly thereafter, neural crest cells emerge at more caudal levels of the rhombencephalon, beginning at the juncture of the fifth and sixth somitomeres. Eventually, neural crest originating from the mesencephalon spreads caudally as far as the fourth somitomere, leaving a gap in crest emigration adjacent to the fifth somitomere. The otic placode develops from the surface ectoderm covering the sixth and seventh somitomeres, and the adjacent rhombencephalic neural crest moves around the cranial and caudal edge of the placode. At more caudal levels, rhombencephalic crest cells merge with cervical crest populations to form a continuous sheet over the somites. By the time the anterior neuropore closes, some of the mesencephalic crest cells return from the paraxial mesoderm to spread onto the rostral wall of the optic vesicle and future telencephalon. The segmentation of the mesoderm and patterned distribution of cranial neural crest seen in snapping turtle embryos, further strengthens the argument that the heads of amniotes are derived from a common metameric pattern established early during gastrulation. PMID:6706002

  16. Updates on the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial nerve malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    L’Heureux-Lebeau, Bénédicte; Saliba, Issam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare entities and MPNSTs of intracranial nerves are even more sporadic. MPNSTs present diagnosis and treatment challenges since there are no defined diagnosis criteria and no established therapeutic strategies. Methods: We reviewed literature for MPNST-related articles. We found 45 relevant studies in which 60 cases were described. Results: We identified 60 cases of intracranial nerve MPNSTs. The age ranged from 3 to 75 years old. Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. The most involved cranial nerves (CNs) were CN VIII (60%), CN V (27%), and CN VII (10%). Most of the MPNSTs reported (47%) arose sporadically, 40% arose from a schwannoma, 8% arose from a neurofibroma, and 6% arose from an unspecified nerve tumor. Twenty patients had a history of radiation exposure, four patients had neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), four patients had neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and NF2 was suspected in two other patients. Twenty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy and presented a higher survival rate. Seventy-two percent of patients died of their disease while 28% of patients survived. One-year survival rate was 33%. Forty-five percent of tumors recurred and 19% of patients had metastases. Conclusion: MPNSTs involving CNs are very rare. Diagnosis is made in regards to the histological and pathological findings. Imaging may help orient the diagnosis. A preexisting knowledge of the clinical situation is more likely to lead to a correct diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is radical surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy. Since these tumors are associated with a poor prognosis, a close follow-up is mandatory. PMID:23667313

  17. Spinal nerve root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Christopher P; Kellner, Michael A; Winfree, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Spinal nerve root stimulation (SNRS) is a neuromodulation technique that is used to treat chronic pain. This modality places stimulator electrode array(s) along the spinal nerve roots, creating stimulation paresthesias within the distribution of the target nerve root(s), thereby treating pain in that same distribution. There are several different forms of spinal nerve root stimulation, depending upon the exact electrode positioning along the nerve roots. SNRS combines the minimally invasive nature, central location, and ease of placement of spinal cord stimulation with the focal targeting of stimulation paresthesias of peripheral nerve stimulation. This hybrid technique may be an effective alternative for patients in whom other forms of neurostimulation are either ineffective or inappropriate. PMID:21422788

  18. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  19. Osteichthyan-like cranial conditions in an Early Devonian stem gnathostome.

    PubMed

    Giles, Sam; Friedman, Matt; Brazeau, Martin D

    2015-04-01

    The phylogeny of Silurian and Devonian (443-358 million years (Myr) ago) fishes remains the foremost problem in the study of the origin of modern gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). A central question concerns the morphology of the last common ancestor of living jawed vertebrates, with competing hypotheses advancing either a chondrichthyan- or osteichthyan-like model. Here we present Janusiscus schultzei gen. et sp. nov., an Early Devonian (approximately 415 Myr ago) gnathostome from Siberia previously interpreted as a ray-finned fish, which provides important new information about cranial anatomy near the last common ancestor of chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. The skull roof of Janusiscus resembles that of early osteichthyans, with large plates bearing vermiform ridges and partially enclosed sensory canals. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) reveals a braincase bearing characters typically associated with either chondrichthyans (large hypophyseal opening accommodating the internal carotid arteries) or osteichthyans (facial nerve exiting through jugular canal, endolymphatic ducts exiting posterior to the skull roof) but lacking a ventral cranial fissure, the presence of which is considered a derived feature of crown gnathostomes. A conjunction of well-developed cranial processes in Janusiscus helps unify the comparative anatomy of early jawed vertebrate neurocrania, clarifying primary homologies in 'placoderms', osteichthyans and chondrichthyans. Phylogenetic analysis further supports the chondrichthyan affinities of 'acanthodians', and places Janusiscus and the enigmatic Ramirosuarezia in a polytomy with crown gnathostomes. The close correspondence between the skull roof of Janusiscus and that of osteichthyans suggests that an extensive dermal skeleton was present in the last common ancestor of jawed vertebrates, but ambiguities arise from uncertainties in the anatomy of Ramirosuarezia. The unexpected contrast between endoskeletal structure in Janusiscus and its superficially osteichthyan-like dermal skeleton highlights the potential importance of other incompletely known Siluro-Devonian 'bony fishes' for reconstructing patterns of trait evolution near the origin of modern gnathostomes. PMID:25581798

  20. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 ?M QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  1. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 ?M QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1? ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1? inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  2. Noninvasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-09-01

    Nonpharmacologic and nonsurgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36-msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histologic and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB), as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:22763009

  3. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  4. Transient Delayed Facial Nerve Palsy After Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tzermpos, Fotios H.; Cocos, Alina; Kleftogiannis, Matthaios; Zarakas, Marissa; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy, as a complication of an inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, is a rarely reported incident. Based on the time elapsed, from the moment of the injection to the onset of the symptoms, the paralysis could be either immediate or delayed. The purpose of this article is to report a case of delayed facial palsy as a result of inferior alveolar nerve block, which occurred 24 hours after the anesthetic administration and subsided in about 8 weeks. The pathogenesis, treatment, and results of an 8-week follow-up for a 20-year-old patient referred to a private maxillofacial clinic are presented and discussed. The patient's previous medical history was unremarkable. On clinical examination the patient exhibited generalized weakness of the left side of her face with a flat and expressionless appearance, and she was unable to close her left eye. One day before the onset of the symptoms, the patient had visited her dentist for a routine restorative procedure on the lower left first molar and an inferior alveolar block anesthesia was administered. The patient's medical history, clinical appearance, and complete examinations led to the diagnosis of delayed facial nerve palsy. Although neurologic occurrences are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures, such as inferior alveolar block anesthesia, could initiate facial nerve palsy. Attention should be paid during the administration of the anesthetic solution. PMID:22428971

  5. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov Facing AIDS ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  6. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  7. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homosapiens.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel E; McBratney, Brandeis M; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-02-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to "anatomically modern" H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of "archaic" Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of "archaic" Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  8. Median nerve schwannoma: A case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Padasali, Praveen S; Shankaregowda, V S; Kshirsagar, Shriram D

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a median nerve schwannoma, a rare type of a benign tumor of Schwann cells that presents as a palpable and painful mass on the flexor aspect of the forearm. Schwannomas of the median nerve make up 0.1-0.3% of all hand tumors. Symptoms are caused by an entrapment syndrome resulting from the growing tumor. Pain is the most common complaint of schwannomas. Imaging studies include computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. It is difficult to differentiate schwanommas from neurofibromas solely on the basis of a radiological investigation. Tumors of the median nerve are diagnostically challenging and median nerve schwannomas are rare. Diagnostic pearls are described to facilitate a more accurate and timely diagnosis. These characteristics include mobility, Tinel's sign, S-100 histological staining, and Antoni patterns. With a correct diagnosis, the tumor can be extirpated with preservation of nerve function and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:26396609

  9. Signet ring cell adenocarcinoma and bilateral leptomeningeal involvement of optic nerve sheaths.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Haseeb, Mohammed Q; Tulbah, Asma M; Hamed, Salem H; Al Hazzaa, Selwa A; Dogar, Mohammad A

    2015-06-01

    Signet ring cell adenocarcinoma has a propensity for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, and although bilateral optic nerve involvement is rare, this may occur with or without obvious signs of diffuse leptomeningeal involvement. We describe a 41-year-old woman who presented with a brief history of simultaneous bilateral visual deterioration and a distended abdomen. Examination revealed bilateral no light perception vision and bilateral optic disc edema. Radiologic work-up showed large multiple pelvic masses involving the ovaries, multifocal boney deposits, and widespread central nervous system carcinomatosis, involving the optic nerves and the first, fifth, and eighth cranial nerves. Biopsy of an ovarian mass demonstrated islands of signet ring cells. Signet cell adenocarcinomatous infiltration of the leptomeningeal space should be considered in cases of bilateral simultaneous vision loss with signs suggestive of leptomeningeal infiltration of the optic nerve sheath. PMID:25839780

  10. Complete Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Direct Compression of the Posterior Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Na, Sang-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy frequently occurs because of external compression by an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm and diabetes mellitus. In addition, pontine infarction, cavernous sinus tumors, demyelinating disease, and autoimmune disorder are well-known causes of oculomotor nerve palsy. However, cases of complete oculomotor nerve palsy by neurovascular conflicts presented with a sudden onset of clinical symptoms are extremely rare. We experienced a rare case of complete oculomotor nerve palsy because of direct vascular compression of the oculomotor nerve by the posterior cerebral artery. PMID:25939862

  11. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  12. Imaging the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    The hypoglossal nerve is a pure motor nerve. It provides motor control to the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles thus being essential for normal tongue movement and coordination. In order to design a useful imaging approach and a working differential diagnosis in cases of hypoglossal nerve damage one has to have a good knowledge of the normal anatomy of the nerve trunk and its main branches. A successful imaging evaluation to hypoglossal diseases always requires high resolution studies due to the small size of the structures being studied. MRI is the preferred modality to directly visualize the nerve, while CT is superior in displaying the bony anatomy of the neurovascular foramina of the skull base. Also, while CT is only able to detect nerve pathology by indirect signs, such as bony expansion of the hypoglossal canal, MRI is able to visualize directly the causative pathological process as in the case of small tumors, or infectious/inflammatory processes affecting the nerve. The easiest way to approach the study of the hypoglossal nerve is to divide it in its main segments: intra-axial, cisternal, skull base and extracranial segment, tailoring the imaging technique to each anatomical area while bearing in mind the main disease entities affecting each segment. PMID:20347541

  13. Erector Spinal Muscular Schwannoma of the Dorsal Ramus Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Chang Hyun; Moon, Jae Gon; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of intramuscular schwannoma originating from the dorsal ramus nerve in a 62-year-old woman. The mass grew slowly, with pain developing upon touch five years prior. No neurological deficit was detected. The mass was observed in the erector spinae muscles in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical excision was performed. The mass was well encapsulated with clear margin. The lesion appeared to originate from the cranial side. We completely removed the mass including the origin. Histopathology confirmed a schwannoma diagnosis. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a dorsal ramus-nerve schwannoma within the erector spinae muscles. PMID:26512285

  14. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve. PMID:21422790

  15. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  16. Trigeminal nerve morphology in Alligator mississippiensis and its significance for crocodyliform facial sensation and evolution.

    PubMed

    George, Ian D; Holliday, Casey M

    2013-04-01

    Modern crocodylians possess a derived sense of face touch, in which numerous trigeminal nerve-innervated dome pressure receptors speckle the face and mandible and sense mechanical stimuli. However, the morphological features of this system are not well known, and it remains unclear how the trigeminal system changes during ontogeny and how it scales with other cranial structures. Finally, when this system evolved within crocodyliforms remains a mystery. Thus, new morphological insights into the trigeminal system of extant crocodylians may offer new paleontological tools to investigate this evolutionary transformation. A cross-sectional study integrating histological, morphometric, and 3D imaging analyses was conducted to identify patterns in cranial nervous and bony structures of Alligator mississippiensis. Nine individuals from a broad size range were CT-scanned followed by histomorphometric sampling of mandibular and maxillary nerve divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Endocast volume, trigeminal fossa volume, and maxillomandibular foramen size were compared with axon counts from proximal and distal regions of the trigeminal nerves to identify scaling properties of the structures. The trigeminal fossa has a significant positive correlation with skull length and endocast volume. We also found that axon density is greater in smaller alligators and total axon count has a significant negative correlation with skull size. Six additional extant and fossil crocodyliforms were included in a supplementary scaling analysis, which found that size was not an accurate predictor of trigeminal anatomy. This suggests that phylogeny or somatosensory adaptations may be responsible for the variation in trigeminal ganglion and nerve size in crocodyliforms. PMID:23408584

  17. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  18. Cavernous portion of the trochlear nerve with special reference to its site of entrance.

    PubMed Central

    Bisaria, K K

    1988-01-01

    In a study of 80 cavernous sinuses in 40 cadavers, the trochlear nerve entered the cavernous sinus in 87.5% of cases before the crossing, in 7.5% at the crossing and in 5.0% after the crossing of the free and the attached margins of the tentorium cerebelli. In 77.5% of specimens the trochlear nerve showed a marked bend with flattening at the site of its entrance into the cavernous sinus. The nerve ran between the superficial and deep layers of dura, partly between them, in the thickness of the deeper layer, or deep to the deep layer but adherent to it. These findings do not conform with the description of its course by other workers in the past. In 72.5% of specimens the size of the trochlear nerve was larger during its course in the cavernous sinuses but in 20.0% of specimens such an increase in thickness was noted even in the posterior cranial fossa. Only in one specimen was the trochlear nerve adherent to the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. Cases showing the trochlear nerve entering the cavernous sinus after the crossing of the two margins of tentorium cerebelli and the splitting and branching of the trochlear nerve in the cavernous sinus have not hitherto been reported. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3248970

  19. Nerve injury induces the expression of syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Tanaka, T; Bando, Y; Yoshida, S

    2015-08-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have important functions in development of the central nervous system; however, their functions in nerve injury are not yet fully understood. We previously reported the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in cranial motor neurons after nerve injury, suggesting the importance of syndecan-1 in the pathology of motor nerve injury. In this study, we examined the expression of syndecan-1, a type of HSPG, in primary sensory neurons after nerve injury in mice. Sciatic nerve axotomy strongly induced the expression of syndecan-1 in a subpopulation of injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which were small in size and had CGRP- or isolectin B4-positive fibers. Syndecan-1 was also distributed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord ipsilateral to the axotomy, and located on the membrane of axons in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Not only sciatic nerve axotomy, infraorbital nerve axotomy also induced the expression of syndecan-1 in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Moreover, syndecan-1 knockdown in cultured DRG neurons induced a shorter neurite extension. These results suggest that syndecan-1 expression in injured primary sensory neurons may have functional roles in nerve regeneration and synaptic plasticity, resulting in the development of neuropathic pain. PMID:26002314

  20. Development of a Computer-Assisted Cranial Nerve Simulation from the Visible Human Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Jeffrey C.; Fung, Kevin; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in technology and personal computing have allowed for the development of novel teaching modalities such as online web-based modules. These modules are currently being incorporated into medical curricula and, in some paradigms, have been shown to be superior to classroom instruction. We believe that these modules have the potential of…

  1. Acoustic neuromas. Progression of hearing impairment and function of the eighth cranial nerve.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Terkildsen, K; Tos, M

    1983-07-01

    The results obtained by conventional otologic evaluation are reported for fifty-nine patients with acoustic neuromas, sixty-one patients primarily suspected of an acoustic neuroma but in whom Pantopaque cisternography had invalidated the diagnosis, and in seventy-one patients with Meniere's disease. The audiologic tests were confined to the following: pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, recruitment examination by ABLB and Metz recruitment tests, and examination for reflex decay a.m. Anderson. Nineteen patients had an audiogram taken at their initial visit with the otologist, and already at this examination--4.2 years before the diagnosis was made--a high-tone hearing impairment was present. Fourteen patients had anacusis in the tumor ear and one patient had an impairment of 90 dB. The audiologic evaluations are based only on patients with hearing equal to or better than 80 dB. There was no connection between preoperative hearing impairment and the age at operation, and anacusis was found in all age groups. Four patients had recruitment by the ABLB test and six patients by the Metz recruitment test. When these two tests were combined, two patients had recruitment by both tests. Twenty percent had pathologic stapedial reflex decay. Only one patient had a normal differential caloric test. It is concluded that the typical patient with an acoustic neuroma has a gradually increasing unilateral hearing impairment of eight years' duration. A pronounced high-tone impairment with PTA of 55 dB and a poor discrimination score are to be expected. The patient is uncertain at pure-tone threshold determination and displays a lack of recruitment at both ABLB and Metz recruitment tests. The patient has a decreased or nonexistent differential caloric reaction in the ear in question. A normal differential caloric test does in all probability exclude an acoustic neuroma; however, all possible audiometric and anamnestic configurations may be encountered, and deviation from the "typical" picture should not lure the investigator into excluding the presence of a neuroma. PMID:6881306

  2. Development of a Computer-Assisted Cranial Nerve Simulation from the Visible Human Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Jeffrey C.; Fung, Kevin; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in technology and personal computing have allowed for the development of novel teaching modalities such as online web-based modules. These modules are currently being incorporated into medical curricula and, in some paradigms, have been shown to be superior to classroom instruction. We believe that these modules have the potential of…

  3. Benign occipital unicameral bone cyst causing lower cranial nerve palsies complicated by iophendylate arachnoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, W. G.; Kalbag, R. M.; Ramani, P. S.; Tomlinson, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A 20 year old girl presented with a history of neck and occipital pain for six weeks, which was found to be due to a unicameral bone cyst of the left occipital condylar region. The differential diagnosis of bone cysts in the skull is discussed. Six months after the operation, the patient again presented with backache due to adhesive arachnoiditis. The latter was believed to have arisen as a result of a combination of spinal infective meningitis and intrathecal ethyl iodophenyl undecylate (iophendylate, Myodil, Pantopaque). The nature of meningeal reactions to iophendylate and the part played by intrathecal corticosteroids in relieving the arachnoiditis in the present case are discussed. Images

  4. EMBRYOLOGICAL ORIGIN FOR AUTISM: DEVELOPMENTAL ANOMALIES OF THE CRANIAL NERVE MOTOR NUCLEI. (R824758)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Transference symptom.

    PubMed

    Sirois, François

    2008-08-01

    Transference symptom is a hazy notion in Freud's writings. The notion is presented here as a particular moment in the crystallization of the transference neurosis. It results from a double cathexis of the analytic frame and the analyst resulting in a symbolic distortion that is represented plastically within the session, as occurs in dreams. The transference symptom proceeds from two different preconscious cathexes, one attached to the reality of the frame, the other to the drive linked to the analyst. A psychic space is thereby opened up for interpreting both the resistance and the unconscious derivatives of infantile conflict. The transference symptom is a compromise formation that includes the analyst and questions the countertransference stance. Three different analytic situations give rise to transference symptoms according to the relative balance between frame and process in the analytic encounter. The concept is compared with enactment. PMID:18816340

  6. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  7. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Photos ...

  8. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  9. Reappraisal of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1981-04-01

    In every case of acute injury involving the nerve, the surgeon must decide whether a primary repair of an elective early secondary repair is the treatment of choice. In a clean-cut nerve without defect, immediate primary repair, using trunk-to-trunk coaptation with epineurial sutures, offers an optimal solution. In the periphery of the median and the ulnar nerves, in which motor and sensory fascicles are already separated, fascicular dissection is performed, and coaptation of fascicle groups should be done. In medical centers with excellent facilities, such nerve repair will give good results even in very severe lesions. This repair can be performed also as a delayed primary procedure. If there is a nerve defect, a primary grafting procedure must be considered. We do not recommend this as a routine procedure because the nerve grafts might be lost if a complication occurs. The decision to perform a planned early secondary repair is an equally good alternative, especially in cases of a nerve defect, severe concomitant injuries, or both. In case of a combined nerve and tendon lesion in the carpal tunnel, the nerve repair can be performed at a later procedure without exposing the repaired flexor tendons, thus avoiding adhesion between tendons and nerves. If a decision is made in favor of an early secondary repair, the two stumps can be approximated by stitches to prevent retraction, if this can be achieved without tension. Approximation under tension in case of a larger defect would damage the two stumps and create an even larger defect. Marking the nerve ends by sutures is not necessary because exploration with always start in normal tissue, exposing the nerves from the proximal or the distal segments. Early secondary repair is performed during the third week, or later if this is demanded by local conditions. When indicated, plastic surgical procedures can eliminate constricting scars and provide an optimal soft tissue environment. After exploration and preparation of the two stumps, the surgeon must decide whether direct suturing or a nerve graft is indicated. If after very limited mobilization and slight flexion the nerve stumps cannot be coapted easily, a nerve graft should be used. The quality of motor recovery decreases steadily after a 6 month delay of repair. Late secondary repairs or reoperation of failure of primary repair should be performed within this time limit, although this does not mean that motor recovery cannot occur after a longer time interval. Useful motor recovery was achieved in certain cases after 18 months or more. Obviously the results might have been better if the time interval had been shorter. If a patient is seen with a nerve lesion after a long time interval, nerve repair is still indicated if sensibility is the main functional objective. In other long-standing cases, the nerve repair is combined with tendon transfer or capsulorrhaphy. After a particularly long time interval or in old patients, only palliative surgery is indicated. PMID:7233326

  10. Ecological correlates to cranial morphology in Leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Emma; Bumacod, Nicholas; Wedel, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian order Lagomorpha has been the subject of many morphometric studies aimed at understanding the relationship between form and function as it relates to locomotion, primarily in postcranial morphology. The leporid cranial skeleton, however, may also reveal information about their ecology, particularly locomotion and vision. Here we investigate the relationship between cranial shape and the degree of facial tilt with locomotion (cursoriality, saltation, and burrowing) within crown leporids. Our results suggest that facial tilt is more pronounced in cursors and saltators compared to generalists, and that increasing facial tilt may be driven by a need for expanded visual fields. Our phylogenetically informed analyses indicate that burrowing behavior, facial tilt, and locomotor behavior do not predict cranial shape. However, we find that variables such as bullae size, size of the splenius capitus fossa, and overall rostral dimensions are important components for understanding the cranial variation in leporids. PMID:25802812

  11. Structural and functional assessment of skin nerve fibres in small-fibre pathology.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R; Polydefkis, M; Jensen, T S

    2015-09-01

    Damage to nociceptor nerve fibres may give rise to peripheral neuropathies, some of which are pain free and some are painful. A hallmark of many peripheral neuropathies is the loss of small nerve fibres in the epidermis, a condition called small-fibre neuropathy (SFN) when it is predominantly the small nerve fibres that are damaged. Historically, SFN has been very difficult to diagnose as clinical examination and nerve conduction studies mainly detect large nerve fibres, and quantitative sensory testing is not sensitive enough to detect small changes in small nerve fibres. However, taking a 3-mm punch skin biopsy from the distal leg and quantification of the nerve fibre density has proven to be a useful method to diagnose SFN. However, the correlation between the nerve fibre loss and other test results varies greatly. Recent studies have shown that it is possible not only to extract information about the nerve fibre density from the biopsies but also to get an estimation of the nerve fibre length density using stereology, quantify sweat gland innervation and detect morphological changes such as axonal swelling, all of which may be additional parameters indicating diseased small fibres relating to symptoms reported by the patients. In this review, we focus on available tests to assess structure and function of the small nerve fibres, and summarize recent advances that have provided new possibilities to more specifically relate structural findings with symptoms and function in patients with SFN. PMID:25546653

  12. Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bäumer, Philipp; Meinck, Hans-Michael; Schiefer, Johannes; Weiler, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Kele, Henrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine lesion sites and spatial lesion patterns in spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (AINS) with high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Methods: In 20 patients with AINS and 20 age- and sex-matched controls, MRN of median nerve fascicles was performed at 3T with large longitudinal anatomical coverage (upper arm/elbow/forearm): 135 contiguous axial slices (T2-weighted: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 ms, time of acquisition: 15 minutes 48 seconds, in-plane resolution: 0.25 × 0.25 mm). Lesion classification was performed by visual inspection and by quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal after segmentation of median nerve voxels. Results: In all patients and no controls, T2 lesions of individual fascicles were observed within upper arm median nerve trunk and strictly followed a somatotopic/internal topography: affected were those motor fascicles that will form the anterior interosseous nerve further distally while other fascicles were spared. Predominant lesion focus was at a mean distance of 14.6 ± 5.4 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Discriminative power of quantitative T2 signal analysis and of qualitative lesion rating was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity (p < 0.0001). Fascicular T2 lesion patterns were rated as multifocal (n = 17), monofocal (n = 2), or indeterminate (n = 1) by 2 independent observers with strong agreement (kappa = 0.83). Conclusion: It has been difficult to prove the existence of fascicular/partial nerve lesions in spontaneous neuropathies using clinical and electrophysiologic findings. With MRN, fascicular lesions with strict somatotopic organization were observed in upper arm median nerve trunks of patients with AINS. Our data strongly support that AINS in the majority of cases is not a surgically treatable entrapment neuropathy but a multifocal mononeuropathy selectively involving, within the main trunk of the median nerve, the motor fascicles that continue distally to form the anterior interosseous nerve. PMID:24415574

  13. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  14. A Stable Cranial Neural Crest Cell Line from Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Mamoru; Arias, Athena C.; Liu, Liqiong; Chen, Yi-Bu; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2012-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells give rise to ectomesenchymal derivatives such as cranial bones, cartilage, smooth muscle, dentin, as well as melanocytes, corneal endothelial cells, and neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system. Previous studies have suggested that although multipotent stem-like cells may exist during the course of cranial neural crest development, they are transient, undergoing lineage restriction early in embryonic development. We have developed culture conditions that allow cranial neural crest cells to be grown as multipotent stem-like cells. With these methods, we obtained 2 independent cell lines, O9-1 and i10-1, which were derived from mass cultures of Wnt1-Cre; R26R-GFP-expressing cells. These cell lines can be propagated and passaged indefinitely, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. Whole-genome expression profiling of O9-1 cells revealed that this line stably expresses stem cell markers (CD44, Sca-1, and Bmi1) and neural crest markers (AP-2α, Twist1, Sox9, Myc, Ets1, Dlx1, Dlx2, Crabp1, Epha2, and Itgb1). O9-1 cells are capable of contributing to cranial mesenchymal (osteoblast and smooth muscle) neural crest fates when injected into E13.5 mouse cranial tissue explants and chicken embryos. These results suggest that O9-1 cells represent multipotent mesenchymal cranial neural crest cells. The O9-1 cell line should serve as a useful tool for investigating the molecular properties of differentiating cranial neural crest cells. PMID:22889333

  15. Suprascapular nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Corò, L; Azuelos, A; Alexandre, A

    2005-01-01

    It is important to be aware of neuropathy involving the suprascapular nerve. While direct trauma to the suprascapular nerve is the usual cause (direct blow to the base of the neck or posterior shoulder, shoulder dislocation or fracture), the problem may result from overuse injuries (such as repetitive tennis serving or spiking of a volley ball), excessive horizontal adduction, weight lifting, backpacking or no apparent reason. These last three years we have operated 8 cases of suprascapular nerve neurolysis at the level of suprascapular incision, and section of the transverse scapular ligament through the back supraspinal approach. PMID:15830964

  16. Potential toxicities of prophylactic cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Frank A; Welzel, Grit; Abo-Madyan, Yasser; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-12-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) with total doses of 20-30 Gy reduces the incidence of brain metastasis (BM) and increases survival of patients with limited and extensive-disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) that showed any response to chemotherapy. PCI is currently not applied in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) since it has not proven to significantly improve OS rates in stage IIIA/B, although novel data suggest that subgroups that could benefit may exist. Here we briefly review potential toxicities of PCI which have to be considered before prescribing PCI. They are mostly difficult to delineate from pre-existing risk factors which include preceding chemotherapy, patient age, paraneoplasia, as well as smoking or atherosclerosis. On the long run, this will force radiation oncologists to evaluate each patient separately and to estimate the individual risk. Where PCI is then considered to be of benefit, novel concepts, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and/or neuroprotective drugs with potential to lower the rates of side effects will eventually be superior to conventional therapy. This in turn will lead to a re-evaluation whether benefits might then outweigh the (lowered) risks. PMID:25806190

  17. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  18. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  19. Major cranial changes during Triceratops ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R; Goodwin, Mark B

    2006-01-01

    This is the first cranial ontogenetic assessment of Triceratops, the well-known Late Cretaceous dinosaur distinguished by three horns and a massive parietal–squamosal frill. Our analysis is based on a growth series of 10 skulls, ranging from a 38?cm long baby skull to about 2?m long adult skulls. Four growth stages correspond to a suite of ontogenetic characters expressed in the postorbital horns, frill, nasal, epinasal horn and epoccipitals. Postorbital horns are straight stubs in early ontogeny, curve posteriorly in juveniles, straighten in subadults and recurve anteriorly in adults. The posterior margin of the baby frill is deeply scalloped. In early juveniles, the frill margin becomes ornamented by 17–19 delta-shaped epoccipitals. Epoccipitals are dorsoventrally compressed in subadults, strongly compressed and elongated in adults and ultimately merge onto the posterior frill margin in older adults. Ontogenetic trends within and between growth stages include: posterior frill margin transitions from scalloped to wavy and smooth; progressive exclusion of the supraoccipital from the foramen magnum; internal hollowing at the base of the postorbital horns; closure of the midline nasal suture; fusion of the epinasal onto the nasals; and epinasal expansion into a morphologically variable nasal horn. We hypothesize that the changes in horn orientation and epoccipital shape function to allow visual identity of juveniles, and signal their attainment of sexual maturity. PMID:17015322

  20. Major cranial changes during Triceratops ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Horner, John R; Goodwin, Mark B

    2006-11-01

    This is the first cranial ontogenetic assessment of Triceratops, the well-known Late Cretaceous dinosaur distinguished by three horns and a massive parietal-squamosal frill. Our analysis is based on a growth series of 10 skulls, ranging from a 38 cm long baby skull to about 2 m long adult skulls. Four growth stages correspond to a suite of ontogenetic characters expressed in the postorbital horns, frill, nasal, epinasal horn and epoccipitals. Postorbital horns are straight stubs in early ontogeny, curve posteriorly in juveniles, straighten in subadults and recurve anteriorly in adults. The posterior margin of the baby frill is deeply scalloped. In early juveniles, the frill margin becomes ornamented by 17-19 delta-shaped epoccipitals. Epoccipitals are dorsoventrally compressed in subadults, strongly compressed and elongated in adults and ultimately merge onto the posterior frill margin in older adults. Ontogenetic trends within and between growth stages include: posterior frill margin transitions from scalloped to wavy and smooth; progressive exclusion of the supraoccipital from the foramen magnum; internal hollowing at the base of the postorbital horns; closure of the midline nasal suture; fusion of the epinasal onto the nasals; and epinasal expansion into a morphologically variable nasal horn. We hypothesize that the changes in horn orientation and epoccipital shape function to allow visual identity of juveniles, and signal their attainment of sexual maturity. PMID:17015322

  1. Autonomous death of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) cranial myotomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, H M; Neff, A W; Malacinski, G M

    1989-09-01

    The death of cranial myotomes during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis is employed as a model system to study programmed cell death. The first primary myotomes to differentiate and functionally develop are in the occipital region of the embryonic head. Between stages 27 (tailbud) and 48 (feeding tadpole), they degenerate and disappear in a craniocaudal sequence. Descriptive and experimental studies were undertaken to establish whether this apparent cell (myotome) death program is autonomous or whether it depends on interactions with surrounding tissues (e.g., otic vesicle). Removal of the adjacent otic vesicle did not affect cranial myotome death. Likewise, grafting the otic vesicle to a novel location along the somite file did not induce local myotome degeneration (death). Cranial myotome primordia grafted into the trunk region degenerated on schedule. Trunk myotome primordia grafted to the cranial myotome location did not degenerate. It is therefore concluded that the cranial myotome death program has become autonomous by the time the cranial myotomes reach the developmental stage of segmentation. PMID:2769206

  2. Facial Nerve Axotomy in Mice: A Model to Study Motoneuron Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Deborah N.; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Batka, Richard J.; Haulcomb, Melissa M.; Miller, Whitney M.; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this surgical protocol is to expose the facial nerve, which innervates the facial musculature, at its exit from the stylomastoid foramen and either cut or crush it to induce peripheral nerve injury. Advantages of this surgery are its simplicity, high reproducibility, and the lack of effect on vital functions or mobility from the subsequent facial paralysis, thus resulting in a relatively mild surgical outcome compared to other nerve injury models. A major advantage of using a cranial nerve injury model is that the motoneurons reside in a relatively homogenous population in the facial motor nucleus in the pons, simplifying the study of the motoneuron cell bodies. Because of the symmetrical nature of facial nerve innervation and the lack of crosstalk between the facial motor nuclei, the operation can be performed unilaterally with the unaxotomized side serving as a paired internal control. A variety of analyses can be performed postoperatively to assess the physiologic response, details of which are beyond the scope of this article. For example, recovery of muscle function can serve as a behavioral marker for reinnervation, or the motoneurons can be quantified to measure cell survival. Additionally, the motoneurons can be accurately captured using laser microdissection for molecular analysis. Because the facial nerve axotomy is minimally invasive and well tolerated, it can be utilized on a wide variety of genetically modified mice. Also, this surgery model can be used to analyze the effectiveness of peripheral nerve injury treatments. Facial nerve injury provides a means for investigating not only motoneurons, but also the responses of the central and peripheral glial microenvironment, immune system, and target musculature. The facial nerve injury model is a widely accepted peripheral nerve injury model that serves as a powerful tool for studying nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:25742324

  3. Facial nerve axotomy in mice: a model to study motoneuron response to injury.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Deborah N; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Batka, Richard J; Haulcomb, Melissa M; Miller, Whitney M; Jones, Kathryn J

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this surgical protocol is to expose the facial nerve, which innervates the facial musculature, at its exit from the stylomastoid foramen and either cut or crush it to induce peripheral nerve injury. Advantages of this surgery are its simplicity, high reproducibility, and the lack of effect on vital functions or mobility from the subsequent facial paralysis, thus resulting in a relatively mild surgical outcome compared to other nerve injury models. A major advantage of using a cranial nerve injury model is that the motoneurons reside in a relatively homogenous population in the facial motor nucleus in the pons, simplifying the study of the motoneuron cell bodies. Because of the symmetrical nature of facial nerve innervation and the lack of crosstalk between the facial motor nuclei, the operation can be performed unilaterally with the unaxotomized side serving as a paired internal control. A variety of analyses can be performed postoperatively to assess the physiologic response, details of which are beyond the scope of this article. For example, recovery of muscle function can serve as a behavioral marker for reinnervation, or the motoneurons can be quantified to measure cell survival. Additionally, the motoneurons can be accurately captured using laser microdissection for molecular analysis. Because the facial nerve axotomy is minimally invasive and well tolerated, it can be utilized on a wide variety of genetically modified mice. Also, this surgery model can be used to analyze the effectiveness of peripheral nerve injury treatments. Facial nerve injury provides a means for investigating not only motoneurons, but also the responses of the central and peripheral glial microenvironment, immune system, and target musculature. The facial nerve injury model is a widely accepted peripheral nerve injury model that serves as a powerful tool for studying nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:25742324

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose?Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods?Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4?Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0?Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results?The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion?FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  5. Quantitative computed tomography and cranial burr holes: a model to evaluate the quality of cranial reconstruction in humans.

    PubMed

    Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Ferreira, Marcelo Paglioli; Kraemer, Jorge Luiz; Lenhardt, Rene; Alves, Ronnie Peterson Marcondes; Wunderlich, Ricardo Castilho; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2012-05-01

    Current methods to evaluate the biologic development of bone grafts in human beings do not quantify results accurately. Cranial burr holes are standardized critical bone defects, and the differences between bone powder and bone grafts have been determined in numerous experimental studies. This study evaluated quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a method to objectively measure cranial bone density after cranial reconstruction with autografts. In each of 8 patients, 2 of 4 surgical burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous wet bone powder collected during skull trephination, and the other 2 holes, with a circular cortical bone fragment removed from the inner table of the cranial bone flap. After 12 months, the reconstructed areas and a sample of normal bone were studied using three-dimensional QCT; bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Mean (SD) bone density was 1535.89 (141) HU for normal bone (P < 0.0001), 964 (176) HU for bone fragments, and 453 (241) HU for bone powder (P < 0.001). As expected, the density of the bone fragment graft was consistently greater than that of bone powder. Results confirm the accuracy and reproducibility of QCT, already demonstrated for bone in other locations, and suggest that it is an adequate tool to evaluate cranial reconstructions. The combination of QCT and cranial burr holes is an excellent model to accurately measure the quality of new bone in cranial reconstructions and also seems to be an appropriate choice of experimental model to clinically test any cranial bone or bone substitute reconstruction. PMID:22565868

  6. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  7. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and successfully treated. Some people may have a partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... mild to severe) Movement loss in the toes (partial or complete) Repeated or unnoticed injury to the ...

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  9. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  10. [Optic nerve disc drusen].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O; C?lug?ru, D; C?lug?ru, M; Emese, Kaucsar

    2006-01-01

    Optic nerve head drusen represents a frequent condition, with unknown pathogenesis, mostly asymptomatic. Here, we present a patient with visual impairment, who has reacted well to anti-inflammatory and vasodilator treatment. PMID:16927754

  11. [Nerve injuries and posttraumatic therapy].

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Vogt, P M

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are a common clinical problem and can represent a major challenge, especially after trauma. In order to achieve optimal therapy, an early and adequate diagnosis with subsequent therapy is critical for functional preservation and restoration. Especially after complete severance of a peripheral nerve, the surgical techniques for nerve coaptation are an important prerequisite for peripheral nerve regeneration. The importance and necessity of adequate nerve coaptation and nerve transplantation are presented in detail. In addition, the types of primary and secondary nerve reconstruction procedures are described as well as the optimal time point of nerve repair. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the possibilities for diagnosis and intervention after nerve injury, additionally including an algorithm for surgical intervention. Furthermore, possible pitfalls and factors for improving the functional outcome are presented to optimize results with trauma-related nerve injury. PMID:24903504

  12. Laryngeal nerve "anastomoses".

    PubMed

    Naidu, L; Lazarus, L; Partab, P; Satyapal, K S

    2014-02-01

    Laryngeal nerves have been observed to communicate with each other and forma variety of patterns. These communications have been studied extensively and have been of particular interest as it may provide an additional form of innervation to the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. Variations noted in incidence may help explain the variable position of the vocal folds after vocal fold paralysis. This study aimed to examine the incidence of various neural communications and to determine their contribution to the innervation of the larynx. Fifty adult cadaveric en-bloc laryngeal specimens were studied. Three different types of communications were observed between internal and recurrent laryngeal nerves viz. (1) Galen's anastomosis (81%):in 13%, it was observed to supply the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; (2) thyroarytenoid communication (9%): this was observed to supply the thyroarytenoid muscle in 2% of specimens and (3) arytenoid plexus (28%): in 6%, it supplied a branch to the transverse arytenoid muscle. The only communication between the external and recurrent laryngeal nerves was the communicating nerve (25%). In one left hemi-larynx, the internal laryngeal nerve formed a communication with the external laryngeal nerve, via a thyroid foramen. The neural communications that exist in the larynx have been thought to play a role in laryngeal innervation. The results of this study have shown varying incidences in neural communications. Contributions from these communications have also been noted to various intrinsic laryngeal muscles which may be a possible factor responsible for the variable position of the vocal folds in certain cases of vocal fold paralysis. PMID:24590520

  13. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed. PMID:25861888

  14. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility for elective anterior cruciate ligament repair. He had no background history of any significant medical problems. He opted for general anesthesia over a regional technique. He was induced with fentanyl and propofol and a size 4 laryngeal mask airway was inserted without any problems. His head was in a neutral position during the surgery. After surgery in the recovery room, he complained of numbness in his lower lip. He also developed extensive scabbing of the lower lip on the second day after surgery. The numbness and scabbing started improving after a week, with complete recovery after two weeks. Conclusion We report the first case of vascular occlusion and injury to the inferior alveolar nerve, causing scabbing and numbness of the lower lip, resulting from laryngeal mask airway use. This is an original case report mostly of interest for anesthetists who use the laryngeal mask airway in day-to-day practice. Excessive inflation of the laryngeal mask airway cuff could have led to this complication. Despite the low incidence of cranial nerve injury associated with the use of the laryngeal mask airway, vigilant adherence to evidence-based medicine techniques and recommendations from the manufacturer's instructions can prevent such complications. PMID:21447166

  15. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. Anat Rec, 299:361-369, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26692361

  16. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nelke, Kamil H; ?uczak, Klaudiusz; Pawlak, Wojciech; ?ysenko, Lidia; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The facial nerve (VII) is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed. PMID:26400886

  17. Transorbital sonography in CIDP patients: No evidence for optic nerve hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Krogias, Christos; Ayzenberg, Ilya; Schroeder, Christoph; Grüter, Thomas; Gold, Ralf; Yoon, Min-Suk

    2016-03-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired, chronic progressive or relapsing immune mediated disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Thickening of cranial nerves as a sign of central nerve involvement is increasingly reported in the last years. Our aim was to assess systematically for the first time the frequency of optic nerve hypertrophy in patients with CIDP by means of transorbital sonography (TOS). Thirty-four optic nerves of 17 patients with CIDP (age=60.8±13.3y, range=39-82y; 7 female) were examined by TOS. The diameter of Optic nerve (OND) as well as the intern and extern diameters of the sheath (ONDSi, ONSDe) was measured 3mm behind the optic disc. Findings were compared to the data of 15 healthy controls. CIDP-patients showed a mean OND of 2.8±0.4mm, an ONSDi of 4.7±0.7mm, and an ONSDe of 6.3±0.9mm. No papilledema was detectable. There was no significant difference to the healthy control group. Our study revealed no evidence for a frequent optic nerve involvement in CIDP. Reported cases seem to represent exceptions. Transorbital sonography could be a useful tool in these rare cases with optic nerve hypertrophy. PMID:26944149

  18. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ∼ 515 kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15 sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction. PMID:21639724

  19. Generalised cranial artery spasm in human rabies.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, R E; Roy-Burman, A; Martin, K W; Christensen, J C; Westenkirschner, D F; Fleck, J D; Glaser, C; Hyland, K; Rupprecht, C E

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, a teenager survived bat-associated rabies through the Milwaukee protocol (MP). This survivor and another patient with dog-associated rabies were found to have developed deficiencies of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and associated neurotransmitters. BH4 is also essential for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), so rabies is predicted to cause constriction of cerebral arteries. We assume that rabies virus, which almost exclusively targets neurons, would disproportionately affect cerebral over systemic perfusion by disrupting nNOS and lead to generalised cerebral artery spasm. Cranial artery vasospasm, therefore, was actively sought in two rabies patients, with the intention to specifically treat with BH4 and L-arginine when necessary. Flow velocities and resistive (RI) or pulsatility indices (PI) of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) were obtained by transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD). A survival analysis of 8 attempts at the MP is presented. Of these, two cases are reported here. The first case is one child with bat-associated rabies who developed severe bilateral MCAspasm on hospital day (HD)-10 that responded to very low dose (0.2 mcg/kg/min) nitroprusside. The second case, a child with dog-associated rabies, developed spasm of MCA on HD-6 that responded to 6 mg/kg/day BH4. A second spasm with high RI (without cerebral oedema or increased intracranial pressure) responded to 20 mg/kg/day BH4 and 0.5 g/kg/dose L-arginine. Review of the TCD of the first child showed a similar second spasm seven days after first episode. Cerebral artery vasospasm occurred in the two children with rabies, but was clinically silent by standard monitoring. Spasm responded to drugs directed at the NOS pathway. Animal models for treatment of rabies are sorely needed to evaluate therapy. PMID:18634498

  20. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Angel; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; James, Aaron W.

    2013-01-01

    During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The HH family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Desert Hedgehog (DHH), of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH). Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of IHH deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development. PMID:23565096

  1. Small nerve fiber involvement in CMT1A

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Fiore; Provitera, Vincenzo; Pisciotta, Chiara; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Iodice, Rosa; Shy, Michael E.; Santoro, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the involvement of small nerve fibers in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A). Methods: We used indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy on punch biopsies from glabrous (fingertip) and hairy (thigh and leg) skin of 20 unrelated patients with CMT1A to quantify somatic and autonomic nerve fibers. In particular, we quantified epidermal nerve fibers (ENF), Meissner corpuscles (MC), intrapapillary myelinated endings (IME), and sudomotor nerves. We correlated morphologic data with findings from quantitative sensory testing, sudomotor output, sympathetic skin response, and cardiovascular reflexes. A control population of healthy age- and sex-matched controls was included with a matching ratio of 1:2. Results: We found a length-dependent loss of ENFs that worsened with aging. We also observed a loss of MCs, IMEs, and sudomotor nerves. The loss of ENF at distal leg correlated with the increase in heat-pain thresholds (p < 0.05) and with tactile thresholds (p < 0.05). Sudomotor nerve fiber loss correlated with ENF density (p < 0.05) and sweating output (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We demonstrated through morphologic, physical, and psychophysical testing that small somatic and autonomic fibers are abnormal and cause symptoms in patients with CMT1A. Awareness of such symptoms by the clinician could lead to better treatment. PMID:25540311

  2. [Technique and applications of stereolithographic cranial models].

    PubMed

    Wolf, H P; Lindner, A; Millesi, W; Knabl, J; Watzke, I

    1994-01-01

    3-D-modelling of the skull is useful referring to improve diagnostics, for surgical planning and simulation of surgical procedure. Stereolithography is a constructive process producing a model by building it up layer by layer with plastic using an "ultraviolet" laser to catalyse the polymerization of a liquid plastic solution. This fast prototyping derives from using a new interface between a CT-Scanner and a SLA. By avoiding the tool path problems inherent in conventional computerdriven CNC milling machines we succeeded in producing closed cavities and even intraosseous course of vessels and nerves. The compact and smooth surface makes manual postprocessing unnecessary. By using a new software (interpolation +/- 0.25 mm) we could improve the accuracy. At our studies we found a maximum aberration of at least 0.25 mm. PMID:8088661

  3. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks. PMID:24700023

  4. Menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Menopause is a physiological event. In the UK, the median age for onset of menopausal symptoms is 45.5 to 47.5 years. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time, although they can persist for decades in some women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments for menopausal symptoms? What are the effects of non-prescribed treatments for menopausal symptoms? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: agnus castus, antidepressants, black cohosh, clonidine, oestrogens, phyto-oestrogens, progestogens, testosterone, and tibolone. PMID:21696644

  5. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures. PMID:26413963

  6. Emergency Physician Attitudes, Preferences, and Risk Tolerance for Stroke as a Potential Cause of Dizziness Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kene, Mamata V.; Ballard, Dustin W.; Vinson, David R.; Rauchwerger, Adina S.; Iskin, Hilary R.; Kim, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated emergency physicians’ (EP) current perceptions, practice, and attitudes towards evaluating stroke as a cause of dizziness among emergency department patients. Methods We administered a survey to all EPs in a large integrated healthcare delivery system. The survey included clinical vignettes, perceived utility of historical and exam elements, attitudes about the value of and requisite post-test probability of a clinical prediction rule for dizziness. We calculated descriptive statistics and post-test probabilities for such a clinical prediction rule. Results The response rate was 68% (366/535). Respondents’ median practice tenure was eight years (37% female, 92% emergency medicine board certified). Symptom quality and typical vascular risk factors increased suspicion for stroke as a cause of dizziness. Most respondents reported obtaining head computed tomography (CT) (74%). Nearly all respondents used and felt confident using cranial nerve and limb strength testing. A substantial minority of EPs used the Epley maneuver (49%) and HINTS (head-thrust test, gaze-evoked nystagmus, and skew deviation) testing (30%); however, few EPs reported confidence in these tests’ bedside application (35% and 16%, respectively). Respondents favorably viewed applying a properly validated clinical prediction rule for assessment of immediate and 30-day stroke risk, but indicated it would have to reduce stroke risk to <0.5% to be clinically useful. Conclusion EPs report relying on symptom quality, vascular risk factors, simple physical exam elements, and head CT to diagnose stroke as the cause of dizziness, but would find a validated clinical prediction rule for dizziness helpful. A clinical prediction rule would have to achieve a 0.5% post-test stroke probability for acceptability. PMID:26587108

  7. Serial anthropometry predicts peripheral nerve dysfunction in a community cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Herman, William H.; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for glucose intolerance, but the independent role of obesity in the development of peripheral neuropathy is unclear. This study assessed the impact of body size trajectories on prevalent nerve dysfunction in community-dwelling women with and without glucose intolerance. Methods Annual (1996–2008) anthropometric measures of weight, height, waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI, weight[kg]/height[m2]) were assessed in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation – Michigan site. Glucose intolerance was defined annually based on current use of diabetes medications, self-reported diabetes diagnosis, and, when available, fasting glucose. Peripheral nerve dysfunction in 2008 was defined as abnormal monofilament testing or ?4 symptoms or signs. Linear mixed models were used to determine trajectories of anthropometry by subsequently-identified nerve dysfunction status. Results Mean BMI was 32.4 kg/m2 at baseline and 27.8% of women had nerve dysfunction in 2008. BMI, weight, and waist circumference increased over time. Women who would have nerve dysfunction were significantly larger than women without dysfunction, independent of glucose intolerance. At mean baseline age of 46, BMI, weight, and waist circumference differed significantly (p-value<0.01) by subsequent nerve dysfunction status, independent of glucose intolerance and hypertension. These body size differences were maintained but not exacerbated over time. Conclusions Peripheral nerve dysfunction is prevalent among community-dwelling women. Twelve years before the nerve assessment, anthropometry differed between women who would and would not have nerve dysfunction, differences that were maintained over time. Obesity deserves attention as an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for peripheral nerve dysfunction. PMID:23161607

  8. Transorbital Neuroendoscopic Management of Sinogenic Complications Involving the Frontal Sinus, Orbit, and Anterior Cranial Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae H.; Sardesai, Maya G.; Ferreira, Manuel; Moe, Kris S.

    2012-01-01

    Transnasal endoscopic surgery has remained at the forefront of surgical management of sinogenic complications involving the frontal sinus, orbit, and anterior skull base. However, the difficulty in accessing certain areas of these anatomical regions can potentially limit its use. Transorbital neuroendoscopic surgery (TONES) was recently introduced to transgress the limits of transnasal endoscopic surgery; the access that it provides could add additional surgical pathways for treating sinogenic complications involving the frontal sinus, orbit, and anterior cranial fossa. We describe a prospective series of 13 patients who underwent TONES for the management of various sinogenic complications, including epidural abscess, orbital abscess, and fronto-orbital mucocele or mucopyocele, as well as subperiosteal abscess presenting with orbital apex syndrome. The primary outcome measurement was the efficacy of TONES in treating these pathologies. TONES provided effective access to the frontal sinus, orbit, and the anterior cranial fossa. All patients demonstrated postoperative resolution of initial clinical symptoms with well-hidden surgical scars. There were no ophthalmologic complications or recurrence of pathology. Based on our experience, TONES appears to provide a valuable addition to the current surgical armamentarium for treating selected complications of sinusitis. PMID:24294556

  9. An osteological and histological investigation of cranial joints in geckos.

    PubMed

    Payne, Samantha L; Holliday, Casey M; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2011-03-01

    Cranial kinesis is a widespread feature of gekkotan lizards. Previous studies of kinesis in lizards often described the relevant, mobile joints as synovial, thus characterized by the presence of a synovial cavity lined with articular cartilage. To date however, detailed investigations of cranial joint histology are lacking. We examined eight cranial joints (quadrate-articular, quadrate-pterygoid, quadrate-otooccipital, quadrate-squamosal, epipterygoid-prootic, epipterygoid-pterygoid, basisphenoid-pterygoid, and frontal-parietal) in five gekkotan species (Oedura lesueuerii, Eublepharis macularius, Hemitheconyx caudicinctus, Tarentola annularis, and Chondrodactylous bibronii) using microcomputed tomography and serial histology. Particular focus was given to the relationship between the bony and soft-tissue components of the joint. Our results demonstrate that only three of these joints are synovial: the quadrate-articular, epipterygoid-pterygoid, and basisphenoid-pterygoid joints. The frontal-parietal and quadrate-pterygoid joints are syndesmosis (fibrous), the epipterygoid-prootic and quadrate-otooccipital joints are synchondroses (cartilaginous without a synovial cavity) and the quadrate-squamosal joint was not present. Based on previous descriptions, we determine that the structure of some cranial joints is variable among lizard taxa. We caution that osteology does not necessarily predict cranial joint histology. Although the functional implications of these findings remain to be explored we note that the development of synovial joints appears to be associated with a neural crest origin for the elements involved. PMID:21254447

  10. Plagiocephaly and brachycephaly treatment with cranial orthosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schreen, Gerd; Matarazzo, Carolina Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The number of cranial deformities has increased considerably since international efforts of pediatricians to recommend parents putting their babies to sleep in the supine position as a strategy to reduce sudden death syndrome of the newborn. On the one hand, this program has demonstrated very efficient results at reducing deaths and, on the other hand, such recommendation has increased the incidence of cranial asymmetries. In addition, infants are kept too long in one position, much of this due to abusive use of strollers, baby carriers, car seats, swings and other devices. Among resulting asymmetries, the most frequently found are plagiocephaly (parallelogram shaped skull, with posterior unilateral flattening with the opposite frontal area also flattened) and brachycephaly (occipital bilateral flattening). The present study is a case report of a patient with brachycephaly associated with deformational plagiocephaly treated with cranial orthosis. The same physician clinically evaluated the patient before and after treatment using photographic recording and a laser scanning device, which allows the accurate measurement of variables determining asymmetries. It became clear during treatment that there was significant improvement in cranial symmetry documented by decrease in the cephalic index, diagonal difference and volume gain in the quadrant that was flattened. The authors conclude that orthotic therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for position cranial asymmetries. PMID:23579755

  11. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  12. Injection nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Arindhom; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Devi, Bhagavathula Indira; Shukla, Dhaval

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of surgery for injection nerve palsies. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with INP who were treated at our institute during May 2000 to May 2009. Clinical, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and operative findings were noted. Intraoperative nerve action potential monitoring was not used in any case. Outcome of patients who were followed was reviewed. Results: INP comprised 92 (11%) of 837 nerve injury patients. Seventy one patients were children less than 16 years. The nerves involved were sciatic in 80 patients, radial in 8, and others in four. Fifty seven patients had power, grade 0/5. ENMG studies revealed absent compound muscle action potential in 64 and absent sensory nerve action potential in 67 patients. Thirty nine (42.3%) of 92 patients underwent surgery. The mean duration since injury in these patients was 5.2 months (3 months to 11 months). All underwent neurolysis. Only 18 patients who underwent surgery had a follow up of more than 3 months. Ten (55.5%) patients had good or fair outcome after surgery. Except for grade of motor deficit prior to surgery, none of the variables were found to significantly affect the outcome. Conclusion: The outcome of INP is generally good and many patients recover spontaneously. The outcome of surgery is dependent on preoperative motor power. PMID:23546341

  13. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes to neural patterning, in the proper development of neural and cranial structures. Our study of a T18 specimen emphasizes the intricate interplay between bone and brain development in midline craniofacial abnormalities in general. PMID:26018729

  14. Massive nerve root enlargement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schady, W; Goulding, P J; Lecky, B R; King, R H; Smith, C M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report three patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) presenting with symptoms suggestive of cervical (one patient) and lumbar root disease. METHODS: Nerve conduction studies, EMG, and nerve biopsy were carried out, having found the nerve roots to be very enlarged on MRI, CT myelography, and at surgery. RESULTS: Clinically, peripheral nerve thickening was slight or absent. Subsequently one patient developed facial nerve hypertrophy. This was mistaken for an inner ear tumour and biopsied, with consequent facial palsy. Neurophysiological tests suggested a demyelinating polyneuropathy. Sural nerve biopsy showed in all cases some loss of myelinated fibres, inflammatory cell infiltration, and a few onion bulbs. Hypertrophic changes were much more prominent on posterior nerve root biopsy in one patient: many fibres were surrounded by several layers of Schwann cell cytoplasm. There was an excellent response to steroids in two patients but not in the third (most advanced) patient, who has benefited only marginally from intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. CONCLUSIONS: MRI of the cauda equina may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of CIDP. Images PMID:8971116

  15. Phrenic nerve injury in infants and children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Q; Ross-Russell, R; Mulvey, D; Green, M; Shinebourne, E A

    1991-01-01

    Fifty infants and 50 children less than 15 years undergoing palliative or corrective cardiac surgery in the Brompton Hospital between March and October 1988 had direct percutaneous stimulation of the phrenic nerve before and after operation. Ten patients, six under 1 year of age and four over, developed unilateral phrenic nerve injury. In those aged less than 1 year recovery after operation was prolonged because their diaphragmatic palsy made it difficult to wean them from the ventilator. Older children had symptoms but their rate of recovery did not seem to be affected by the phrenic nerve injury. Phrenic nerve damage was no more frequent after a lateral thoracotomy than after a median sternotomy. There was no significant association with the type of operation performed, the experience of the surgeon, the use of bypass or topical ice, the duration of bypass, circulatory arrest or aortic cross clamping, or the age of the patient at the time of operation. In patients who had cardiopulmonary bypass the risk of injury was significantly higher in those who had undergone previous operation. The 10% frequency of phrenic nerve injury determined in this prospective study was higher than that seen in earlier retrospective reports. Direct percutaneous stimulation of the phrenic nerve can be used at the bedside in infants and children to facilitate early and accurate diagnosis of phrenic nerve palsy, and the results may influence early management. Images PMID:2039675

  16. Histopathological effects of radiosurgery on a human trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alhindi, Hindi; Alhebshi, Adnan; Albloushi, Monirah; Baeesa, Saleh; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiosurgery is a well-established treatment modality for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The exact mechanism of pain relief after radiosurgery is not clearly understood. Histopathology examination of the trigeminal nerve in humans after radiosurgery is rarely performed and has produced controversial results. Case Description: We report on a 45-year-old female who received radiosurgery treatment for trigeminal neuralgia by Cyberknife. A 6-mm portion of the cisternal segment of trigeminal nerve received a dose of 60 Gy. The clinical benefit started 10 days after therapy and continued for 8 months prior to a recurrence of her previous symptoms associated with mild background pain. She underwent microvascular decompression and partial sensory root sectioning. Atrophied trigeminal nerve rootlets were grossly noted intraoperatively under surgical microscope associated with changes in trigeminal nerve color to gray. A biopsy from the inferolateral surface of the nerve proximal to the midcisternal segment showed histological changes in the form of fibrosis and axonal degeneration. Conclusion: This case study supports the evidence of histological damage of the trigeminal nerve fibers after radiosurgery therapy. Whether or not the presence and degree of nerve damage correlate with the degree of clinical benefit and side effects are not revealed by this study and need to be explored in future studies. PMID:24605252

  17. Optic nerve sonography: A noninvasive means of detecting raised intracranial pressure in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Aduayi, Olufunso Simisola; Asaleye, Christianah Mopelola; Adetiloye, Victor Adebayo; Komolafe, Edward Oluwole; Aduayi, Victor Adovi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to assess the use of optic nerve sonography (ONS) as a quick, noninvasive diagnostic test tool for detecting raised the intracranial pressure (ICP). Materials and Methods: A prospective blinded observational study was conducted at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study population consisted of 160 adult patients referred to the radiology department for cranial computed tomography (CT) scan. There were 80 subjects and 80 controls. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) was measured by a radiologist using a 7.5 Megahertz ultrasound probe while cranial CT was reviewed by other radiologists blinded to the ONSD. Results: Sixty-nine subjects (86.3%) had intracranial space occupying lesions (SOL) with cranial CT confirmed features of increased ICP, mean binocular ONSD of 5.7 ± 0.59 mm while 11 (13.7%) had intracranial SOL without any cranial CT evidence of increased ICP, mean binocular ONSD of 4.8 ± 0.39 mm. The difference of mean ONSD of the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). The controls had a mean binocular ONSD of 4.5 ± 0.22 mm and the difference in mean binocular ONSD for subjects with raised ICP and the controls were also statistically significant (P = 0.0001). A cut-off value of 5.2 mm (sensitivity 81.2% [95% confidence interval (CI): 69.9–89.6], specificity 100% [95% CI: 71.5–100]) was obtained from the receiver operator characteristics curve as the mean binocular ONSD that best predicts raised ICP confirmed by at least a sign on cranial CT. Conclusions: Optic nerve sonography can differentiate between normal and elevated ICP and may serve as a useful screening tool in resource-limited practice. PMID:26752428

  18. Clinical History, Prognostic Factors, and Management of Facial Nerve in Malignant Tumors of the Parotid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Mario; Giglia, Veronica; Bastanza, Giovanni; De Corso, Eugenio; Almadori, Giovanni; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We analyzed the outcomes following clinical management of parotid masses that were determined to be malignant tumors after parotidectomy. Methods We evaluated data from 70 patients with parotid malignancies between November 1994 and December 2005. Results Among salivary histotypes (n=49), the most significant prognostic parameter was cT4 stage at diagnosis (P=0.0055, log-rank) both for clinical involvement of the facial nerve and for invasion of other structures. The main cause of cancer-related death was a distant metastasis. Conclusion The present series confirms that the main prognostic parameter in salivary parotid malignancies was cT4 classification at diagnosis, often due to clinical involvement of the facial nerve. The oncological outcome of salivary malignancies was influenced by distant metastasis more than most other head and neck sites. We recommend dissecting and preserving the functioning VIIth cranial nerve during surgery for parotid malignancies. PMID:24917910

  19. Is the term "fasciculus opticus cerebralis" more justifiable than the term "optic nerve"?

    PubMed

    Vojnikovi?, Bojo; Bajek, Snjezana; Bajek, Goran; Strenja-Lini?, Ines; Grubesi?, Aron

    2013-04-01

    The terminology of the optic nerve had already been changed three times, since 1895 until 1955 when the term "nervus opticus" was introduced in the "Terminologia Anatomica". Following our study we claim that, from the aspect of phylogenetic evolution of binocular vision development as well as optical embryogenesis where opticus is evidently presented as a product of diencephalic structures, the addition of the term "nervus" to opticus is not adequate and justified. From the clinical aspect the term "nervus opticus" is also inadequate, both as a "nerve" that has no functional regenerative properties, unlike other cranial nerves, as well as from a pedagogical and didactical aspect of educating future physicians. We suggest that the term "Fasciculus Opticus Cerebralis" should be used as it much better explains the origin as well as its affiliation to the central nervous system. PMID:23837214

  20. The Biomechanics of Cranial Forces During Figure Skating Spinning Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, David H; Kostyun, Regina O; Solomito, Matthew J

    2015-03-01

    Several facets of figure skating, such as the forces associated with jumping and landing, have been evaluated, but a comprehensive biomechanical understanding of the cranial forces associated with spinning has yet to be explored. The purpose of this case study was to quantify the cranial rotational acceleration forces generated during spinning elements. This case report was an observational, biomechanical analysis of a healthy, senior-level, female figure skating athlete who is part of an on-going study. A triaxial accelerometer recorded the gravitational forces (G) during seven different spinning elements. Our results found that the layback spin generated significant cranial force and these forces were greater than any of the other spin elements recorded. These forces led to physical findings of ruptured capillaries, dizziness, and headaches in our participant. PMID:26244218

  1. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Frederick-Dyer, Katherine; Ferguson, N Lynn; Lewis, James; Fu, Yitong

    2012-09-01

    Fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) is a rare, benign lesion of the peripheral nerves most frequently involving the median nerve and its digital branches (80 %). Pathognomonic MR features of FLH such as coaxial-cable-like appearance on axial planes and a spaghetti-like appearance on coronal planes have been described by Marom and Helms, obviating the need for diagnostic biopsy. We present a case of fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve) with associated subcutaneous fat proliferation. PMID:22526881

  2. Reliable Assessors of Infant Cranial Asymmetry in Child Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Lennartsson, Freda; Wennergren, Göran; Nordin, Per

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired cranial asymmetry is prevalent in infants today and largely attributed to the supine sleep position recommended for infant safety. There is a risk of permanent cranial asymmetry, so prevention and early detection are important. A prevention project was initiated in Sweden, and an intervention was planned. The aim of this study was to evaluate reliability of assessors judging infant cranial asymmetry in order to evaluate if they could be considered reliable interchangeable assessors in the planned intervention. Materials and Methodology: Five assessors were taught how to assess infant cranial asymmetry using illustrated severity assessments. They were intra-rater and inter-rater reliability tested by taking a photograph test-retest and an infant test. Agreement matrices were devised to illustrate assessor agreement based on both type and degree of cranial asymmetry. Agreement based on degree of asymmetry was analyzed by calculating AC2 using quadratic weights. Results were adjusted to arrive at the perceived genuine agreement and interpreted according to Landis and Koch’s strength of agreement intervals. Results: In the photograph test, mean percentage of perfect intra-rater agreement was 73. Adjusted mean intra-rater AC2 was 0.69 [0.63; 0.76], and adjusted inter-rater AC2s were 0.72 [0.64; 0.81] and 0.71 [0.63; 0.79]. In the infant test, the adjusted inter-rater AC2 was 0.73 [0.60; 0.87]. Results indicate substantial strength of assessor agreement. Conclusion: Assessors were reliable and interchangeable. In a larger clinical context, results indicate that educating child health care nurses to assess infant cranial asymmetry can be used for early detection. PMID:26401172

  3. Syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve: winged scapula?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jefferson Braga; Gerhardt, Samanta; Pacheco, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from early intervention surgery in patients with the syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve and consequent winged scapula. Methods Six patients with a syndrome of nerve trapping without specific nerve strain limitations were followed up. Results The patients achieved improvement of their symptoms 6–20 months after the procedure. The motor symptoms completely disappeared, without any persistent pain. The medial deformity of the winged scapula improved in all cases, without any residual esthetic disorders. Conclusion The approach of early surgical release seems to be a better predictor for recovery from non-traumatic paralysis of the anterior serratus muscle. PMID:26535205

  4. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of friction massage in tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Wang, Han-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Friction massage is a commonly used physical therapy that is usually safe and without complication. We report an unusual case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that arose after friction massage. Electrophysiologic findings confirmed a focal neuropathy 4-6 cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The neurologic symptoms resolved completely 2 mos after discontinuation of friction massage. This case experience broadens the spectrum of etiologies of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies may be a useful adjunct to a thorough physical examination to confirm the diagnosis and is important to prognostic evaluation, if unexplained neurologic symptoms develop after certain physical therapy procedures. Further treatment includes avoiding compression and observation. PMID:19966559

  5. Chinese Medicine in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Experimental Research on Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Yuanlin; Liang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of chronic diabetes mellitus. Pathological characteristics of DPN include axonal atrophy, nerve demyelination, and delayed regeneration of peripheral sensory nerve fibers. The goal of treatment in DPN is not only to ameliorate neurological symptoms but also to slow or reverse the underlying neurodegenerative process. Schwann cells and neurotrophic factors play important roles in the repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves. The present paper reviews current studies and evidence regarding the neurological effects of traditional Chinese medicine, with an emphasis on recent developments in the area of nerve repair and regeneration in DPN. PMID:22927874

  6. Treatment of cranial synostosis: the directive growth approach.

    PubMed

    Mann, Robert J; Burton, Michael E

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction for single sutural synostosis typically involves cranial reshaping to correct for compensatory growth changes. Current remodeling techniques involve obliteration of both pathologic and normal sutures. Presented here is a case report describing a new approach to the treatment of single cranial synostosis. The concept involves excision of the offending suture and transient plating of the remaining functional sutures. Compensatory sutures are then allowed to direct the growth forces to the area of the synostosis, leading to the reversal of the compensatory shape deformity. This more natural approach leaves functioning sutures intact and allows for their active participation in the reshaping process. PMID:25006948

  7. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  8. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests. PMID:25023222

  9. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Luigi; Tieghi, Riccardo; Polito, Jessica; Galiè, Manlio

    2006-05-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is an uncommon event. A case report is presented based on a patient (32-year-old female) who sustained a traumatic left condyle fracture with superior dislocation into the middle cranial fossa due to a high-speed car accident. The diagnosis was done four months after trauma. Via a preauricular approach, left condylectomy and transposition of temporal muscle flap was performed. Postoperatively, the patient stayed for two weeks with intermaxillary fixation and four months of physical therapy. PMID:16770205

  10. Isolated sixth nerve palsy: an uncommon presenting sign of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, D; Kupersmith, M J; Turbin, R; Bose, S; Roth, R

    2000-09-01

    We describe three patients in whom an isolated sixth nerve palsy was the only clinical symptom or sign of multiple sclerosis (MS). Data were collected prospectively over 6 years on these three patients, who showed no other signs of brainstem dysfunction or prior symptoms; in addition. Retrospective analysis of all patients with MS and all patients with sixth nerve palsy referred to a neuro-ophthalmology service between 1982 and 1998 showed isolated sixth nerve palsy to be the presenting sign of MS in only 0.5% of these patients. MS was the cause of isolated sixth nerve palsy in 0.8% of all patients and in 1.6% of those aged 18-50 years. Although it has been previously suggested that sixth nerve palsy is a not uncommon presenting sign of MS, our results suggest it is rare. PMID:11081810

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Blanco, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2016-03-01

    Superficial nerves can be visualized through ultrasonography in the cattle and facilitate local anesthetic disposition around nerve structures. Expected advantages include a higher successful rate of nerve block improving the degree and duration of the block. Among others, conduction nerves of clinical interest in cattle include the paravertebral nerves, nerves of the epidural space, the brachial plexus, and the sciatic and femoral nerves, and nerves of the head. PMID:26922116

  13. Trigeminal pain under vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carius, Astrid; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Three epilepsy patients treated by cyclic continuous vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) experienced trigeminal pain during the periods of stimulation, which was reported as toothache in the left lower jaw, ipsilateral to the side of stimulation. The symptom occurred with a latency of days to weeks following an increase in stimulation current intensity (SCI). Trigeminal pain was reversible with decrease in SCI, or subsided due to habituation. These findings show that clinically relevant effects of VNS on nociception may occur. Because of the late onset and variable form of this side effect, trigeminal pain may not be regarded as VNS-related which may result in unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. PMID:16202528

  14. The primary projections of the lateral-line nerves of the Florida gar, Lepisosteus platyrhincus.

    PubMed

    Song, J K; Northcutt, R G

    1991-01-01

    Gars, like most other ray-finned fishes, possess lines of superficial and canal neuromasts that form highly ordered spatial arrays on the head and trunk. These neuromasts are innervated by three pairs of cranial nerves: anterior, middle and posterior lateral-line nerves. Application of horseradish peroxidase to the roots of these nerves indicates that the afferent fibers of each nerve terminate throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ipsilateral octavolateralis column, composed of medial and caudal octavolateralis nuclei, as well as rostrally in the eminentia granularis of the cerebellum. The afferents of each nerve terminate within different regions of these nuclei, thus preserving a rostrocaudal somatotopy of the peripheral receptors. The individual rami of these nerves innervate peripheral receptors in a dorsoventral sequence; however, application of horseradish peroxidase to these rami indicates an almost total overlap of the terminal fields of adjacent rami and, thus, little or no preservation of dorsoventral somatotopy of the peripheral receptors. Similarly, the terminal fields of fibers that innervate canal and superficial neuromasts overlap extensively, and there is no evidence for separate maps of canal and superficial neuromasts. Furthermore, the position of the terminal fields of superficial neuromasts is not consistent with a hypothesis that these receptors may have evolved into electroreceptors in some teleosts. However, these experiments do indicate that superficial neuromasts, like canal neuromasts, are innervated by efferent fibers of rostral and caudal efferent nuclei, but there is no evidence of a diencephalic efferent nucleus as occurs in teleosts. PMID:2029608

  15. Selective Tracing of Auditory Fibers in the Avian Embryonic Vestibulocochlear Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Sharpley, Michelle R.; Tjia, Michelle; Cramer, Karina S.

    2013-01-01

    The embryonic chick is a widely used model for the study of peripheral and central ganglion cell projections. In the auditory system, selective labeling of auditory axons within the VIIIth cranial nerve would enhance the study of central auditory circuit development. This approach is challenging because multiple sensory organs of the inner ear contribute to the VIIIth nerve 1. Moreover, markers that reliably distinguish auditory versus vestibular groups of axons within the avian VIIIth nerve have yet to be identified. Auditory and vestibular pathways cannot be distinguished functionally in early embryos, as sensory-evoked responses are not present before the circuits are formed. Centrally projecting VIIIth nerve axons have been traced in some studies, but auditory axon labeling was accompanied by labeling from other VIIIth nerve components 2,3. Here, we describe a method for anterograde tracing from the acoustic ganglion to selectively label auditory axons within the developing VIIIth nerve. First, after partial dissection of the anterior cephalic region of an 8-day chick embryo immersed in oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid, the cochlear duct is identified by anatomical landmarks. Next, a fine pulled glass micropipette is positioned to inject a small amount of rhodamine dextran amine into the duct and adjacent deep region where the acoustic ganglion cells are located. Within thirty minutes following the injection, auditory axons are traced centrally into the hindbrain and can later be visualized following histologic preparation. This method provides a useful tool for developmental studies of peripheral to central auditory circuit formation. PMID:23542875

  16. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  17. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... full recovery. In some cases, there may be partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... Deformity of the hand Partial or complete loss of sensation in the hand or fingers Partial or complete loss of wrist or hand movement Recurrent ...

  18. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... full recovery. In some cases, there may be partial or complete loss of movement or sensation. Nerve ... Deformity of the hand (rare) Partial or complete loss of hand movement Partial or complete loss of sensation in the fingers Recurrent or unnoticed injury to the ...

  19. Familial amyloidosis with cranial neuropathy and corneal lattice dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, G; Galassi, G; Kamieniecka, Z; Schlaeger, J; Trojaborg, W

    1979-01-01

    Five siblings of a Danish family with slowly progressive involvement of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves beginning at the age of 55-65 years were examined. All had asymptomatic corneal lattice dystrophy. Clinical and electrophysiological investigations also showed evidence of slight neurogenic involvement of the limbs. Conduction velocity along sensory nerves was normal but amplitude of sensory potentials was severely reduced suggesting an axonal affection which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The neuropathy was secondary to amyloidosis revealed by skin and sural nerve biopsies. Images PMID:228009

  20. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Incident Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Caserotti, Paolo; Harris, Tamara B.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Cauley, Jane A.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Peripheral nerve impairments are highly prevalent in older adults and are associated with poor lower-extremity function. Whether sensorimotor nerve function predicts incident mobility disability has not been determined. We assessed the relationship between sensorimotor nerve function and incident mobility disability over 10 years. Design Prospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Setting Two U.S. clinical sites. Participants Population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults with no mobility disability at 2000/01 exam (N = 1680; mean ± SD: age = 76.5 ± 2.9, BMI = 27.1 ± 4.6; 50.2% women, 36.6% black and 10.7% with diabetes). Measurements Motor nerve conduction amplitude (poor: <1 mV) and velocity (poor: <40 m/s) were measured on the deep peroneal nerve. Sensory nerve function was measured using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and vibration detection threshold at the toe. Lower-extremity symptoms included numbness or tingling and sudden stabbing, burning, pain or aches. Incident mobility disability assessed semiannually over 8.5 years (IQR: 4.5–9.6) was defined as two consecutive self-reports of a lot of difficulty or inability to walk ¼ mile or climb 10 steps. Results Nerve impairments were detected in 55% of participants and 30% developed mobility disability. Worse motor amplitude (HR = 1.29 per SD, 95% CI: 1.16–1.44), vibration detection threshold (HR = 1.13 per SD, 95% CI: 1.04–1.23), symptoms (HR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.36–2.17), 2 motor (HR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.43–3.09), 2 sensory (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.37–2.68), and ?3 nerve impairments (HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.54–3.53) predicted incident mobility disability, after adjustment. Quadriceps strength mediated relationships between certain nerve impairments and mobility disability, although most remained significant. Conclusion Poor sensorimotor nerve function independently predicted mobility disability. Future work should investigate modifiable risk factors and interventions like strength training for preventing disability and improving function in older adults with poor nerve function. PMID:25482096

  1. Segmental thoracic lipomatosis of nerve with nerve territory overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN), or fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of fibrofatty enlargement of the peripheral nerves. It is associated with bony and soft tissue overgrowth in approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases. It most commonly affects the median nerve at the carpal tunnel or digital nerves in the hands and feet. The authors describe a patient with previously diagnosed hemihypertrophy of the trunk who had a history of large thoracic lipomas resected during infancy, a thoracic hump due to adipose proliferation within the thoracic paraspinal musculature, and scoliotic deformity. She had fatty infiltration in the thoracic spinal nerves on MRI, identical to findings pathognomonic of LN at better-known sites. Enlargement of the transverse processes at those levels and thickened ribs were also found. This case appears to be directly analogous to other instances of LN with overgrowth, except that this case involved axial nerves rather than the typical appendicular nerves. PMID:24506247

  2. Cranial Anatomy and Palaeoneurology of the Archosaur Riojasuchus tenuisceps from the Los Colorados Formation, La Rioja, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    von Baczko, Maria Belen; Desojo, Julia Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Riojasuchus tenuisceps Bonaparte 1967 is currently known from four specimens, including two complete skulls, collected in the late 1960s from the upper levels of the Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic), La Rioja, Argentina. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the skulls of the holotype and a referred specimen of Riojasuchus tenuisceps and the repreparation of the latter allows recognition of new features for a detailed analysis of its cranial anatomy and its comparison with a wide variety of other archosauriform taxa. The diagnosis of Riojasuchus tenuisceps is emended and two autapomorphies are identified on the skull: (1) a deep antorbital fossa with its anterior and ventral edges almost coinciding with the same edges of the maxilla itself and (2) a suborbital fenestra equal in size to the palatine-pterygoid fenestra. Also, the first digital 3D reconstruction of the encephalon of Riojasuchus tenuisceps was carried out to study its neuroanatomy, showing a shape and cranial nerve disposition consistent to that of other pseudosuchians. PMID:26849433

  3. Cranial Anatomy and Palaeoneurology of the Archosaur Riojasuchus tenuisceps from the Los Colorados Formation, La Rioja, Argentina.

    PubMed

    von Baczko, Maria Belen; Desojo, Julia Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Riojasuchus tenuisceps Bonaparte 1967 is currently known from four specimens, including two complete skulls, collected in the late 1960s from the upper levels of the Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic), La Rioja, Argentina. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the skulls of the holotype and a referred specimen of Riojasuchus tenuisceps and the repreparation of the latter allows recognition of new features for a detailed analysis of its cranial anatomy and its comparison with a wide variety of other archosauriform taxa. The diagnosis of Riojasuchus tenuisceps is emended and two autapomorphies are identified on the skull: (1) a deep antorbital fossa with its anterior and ventral edges almost coinciding with the same edges of the maxilla itself and (2) a suborbital fenestra equal in size to the palatine-pterygoid fenestra. Also, the first digital 3D reconstruction of the encephalon of Riojasuchus tenuisceps was carried out to study its neuroanatomy, showing a shape and cranial nerve disposition consistent to that of other pseudosuchians. PMID:26849433

  4. Cranial Fasciitis: A Systematic Review and Diagnostic Approach to a Pediatric Scalp Mass.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan D; Wang, Eric K; Lloyd, Mark S; Lam, Sandi K; Khechoyan, David Y

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fasciitis is an uncommon, benign fibroproliferative condition of the scalp or skull that arises in children. Clinically, it manifests as a firm, nontender, subcutaneous, enlarging mass. The purpose of our study was to review the literature on cranial fasciitis to create a diagnostic algorithm using the latest patient at our institution as an example. The authors conducted a systematic review examining all published cases of cranial fasciitis in English literature. The authors then created a diagnostic algorithm to help distinguish cranial fasciitis from other similarly presenting cranial masses. To demonstrate this algorithm, the authors detailed the latest patient with cranial fasciitis at our institution. The authors extracted data from 53 published reports documenting 72 patients of cranial fasciitis. Our patient presented similarly to what was reported in the literature. A 7-week-old boy presented with 2 small parietal scalp masses that were noted shortly after birth. After noncontrast computed tomography imaging, the enlarging masses were resected and found to have eroded the outer cranial vault cortex. Histological analysis revealed cranial fasciitis. The differential diagnosis for an enlarging scalp mass in an infant or child is broad. Cranial fasciitis cannot be diagnosed based on clinical presentation alone. Imaging is usually employed to further characterize lesions after initial examination but histopathological analysis is essential for diagnosis. The locally invasive nature of cranial fasciitis makes it difficult to distinguish from malignant conditions such as sarcomas. However, if the diagnosis of cranial fasciitis is considered early, patients can achieve prompt clinical resolution following simple resection. PMID:26703041

  5. Cranial trauma and the assessment of posttraumatic survival time.

    PubMed

    Steyn, M; De Boer, H H; Van der Merwe, A E

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of trauma on skeletal remains can be very difficult, especially when it comes to the estimation of posttraumatic survival time in partially healed lesions. The ability to reliably estimate the time an individual has survived after sustaining an injury is especially important in cases of child abuse and torture, but can also aid in determining the association between an injury and eventual death. Here a case from South Africa is reported, where the skeletal remains of an unknown individual were found with cranial and scapular fractures. These fractures all presented with macroscopic features indicative of healing. Using recently published data on the timing of fractures by De Boer et al., the two sets of cranial trauma and the scapular fracture were assessed by means of radiology, histology and microCT scanning. This was primarily done in order to obtain more information on the events surrounding the death of this individual, but also to assess the usability of the published methods on cranial fractures. It was found that the initial trauma was most likely sustained at least two weeks before death, whilst a neurosurgical procedure was performed at least one week before death. It seems that cranial fractures, especially if stable, may show some different healing features than postcranial fractures. The individual has since been identified, but unfortunately as is often the case in South Africa, limited information is available and the medical records could not be found. PMID:25217847

  6. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  7. Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia after intrathecal chemotherapy and cranial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, F.E.; Nissenblatt, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    A 26-year-old man developed transient bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia after cranial irradiation and intrathecal administration of methotrexate for lymphoma. Resolution of the ophthalmoplegia and the decrease in abnormally high levels of cerebrospinal fluid myelin basic protein after discontinuation of intrathecal medication suggested demyelination from chemotherapy and irradiation.

  8. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  9. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  10. Increased cranial capacity in hominid evolution and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chaline, Jean

    2003-08-01

    One of the major trends in primate evolution generally and hominid evolution in particular, is cranio-facial contraction accompanied by an increase in cranial capacity. Landmark-based morphometric methods are applied to adult skulls of great apes (Gorilla, Pan), australopithecines (Australopithecus and Paranthropus), and humans (Homo eragster, erectus, neanderthalensis, and sapiens). Morphological changes quantified by vector fields (Procrustes methods) indicate that these skull plans are characterized by distinctive degrees of cranio-facial contraction. These suggest the existence of three discrete skull organization plans: "great ape", "australopithecine" and "Homo". This paper focuses on the "Homo" skull bauplan and discusses the possible relationships between greatly increased cranial capacity and preeclampsia. The earliest species of the human lineage exhibit less cranio-facial contraction and smaller cranial capacity than Homo neanderthalensis and modern Homo sapiens. Neandertalization introduces a posterior elongation of the skull and leads to a large increase in cranial capacity in the last Neandertals, with values as large as in present-day H. sapiens. Consequently, a new biological hypothesis is proposed to account for the unexplained disappearance of H. neanderthalensis some 30000 years ago related to the possible appearance of preeclampsia as a factor affecting the survival of the species. PMID:12896818

  11. Vertebrate cranial placodes as evolutionary innovations--the ancestor's tale.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary innovations often arise by tinkering with preexisting components building new regulatory networks by the rewiring of old parts. The cranial placodes of vertebrates, ectodermal thickenings that give rise to many of the cranial sense organs (ear, nose, lateral line) and ganglia, originated as such novel structures, when vertebrate ancestors elaborated their head in support of a more active and exploratory life style. This review addresses the question of how cranial placodes evolved by tinkering with ectodermal patterning mechanisms and sensory and neurosecretory cell types that have their own evolutionary history. With phylogenetic relationships among the major branches of metazoans now relatively well established, a comparative approach is used to infer, which structures evolved in which lineages and allows us to trace the origin of placodes and their components back from ancestor to ancestor. Some of the core networks of ectodermal patterning and sensory and neurosecretory differentiation were already established in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians and were greatly elaborated in the bilaterian ancestor (with BMP- and Wnt-dependent patterning of dorsoventral and anteroposterior ectoderm and multiple neurosecretory and sensory cell types). Rostral and caudal protoplacodal domains, giving rise to some neurosecretory and sensory cells, were then established in the ectoderm of the chordate and tunicate-vertebrate ancestor, respectively. However, proper cranial placodes as clusters of proliferating progenitors producing high-density arrays of neurosecretory and sensory cells only evolved and diversified in the ancestors of vertebrates. PMID:25662263

  12. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S; Jantz, Richard L

    2002-11-12

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  13. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Corey S.; Jantz, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  14. Cranial-base repair using endoscopic laser welding.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Palmer, James N

    2009-10-01

    As the scope of transnasal cranial-base surgery expands, reconstruction of the complex residual defects remains a challenge. Laser welding is a novel technology that can be performed endoscopically and offers the potential of producing instantaneous, watertight repairs using a chromophore-doped biologic solder. PMID:19909868

  15. Sphenoid shortening and the evolution of modern human cranial shape.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, D E

    1998-05-14

    Crania of 'anatomically modern' Homo sapiens from the Holocene and Upper Pleistocene epochs differ from those of other Homo taxa, including Neanderthals, by only a few features. These include a globular braincase, a vertical forehead, a dimunitive browridge, a canine fossa and a pronounced chin. Humans are also unique among mammals in lacking facial projection: the face of the adult H. sapiens lies almost entirely beneath the anterior cranial fossa, whereas the face in all other adult mammals, including Neanderthals, projects to some extent in front of the braincase. Here I use radiographs and computed tomography to show that many of these unique human features stem partly from a single, ontogenetically early reduction in the length of the sphenoid, the central bone of the cranial base from which the face grows forward. Sphenoid reduction, through its effects on facial projection and cranial shape, may account for the apparently rapid evolution of modern human cranial form, and suggests that Neanderthals and other archaic Homo should be excluded from H. sapiens. PMID:9603517

  16. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001). Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with the South American taxon Gasparinisaura, but never both at the same time. The new morphological observations presented herein, combined with re-examination of the holotype of Parksosaurus, suggest that Parksosaurus shares a closer relationship with Thescelosaurus than with Gasparinisaura, and that many of the features previously cited to support a relationship with the latter taxon are either also present in Thescelosaurus, are artifacts of preservation, or are the result of incomplete preparation and inaccurate interpretation of specimens. Additionally, the overall morphology of the skull and lower jaws of both Thescelosaurus and Parksosaurus also closely resemble the Asian taxa Changchunsaurus and Haya, though the interrelationships of these taxa have yet to be tested in a phylogenetic analysis that includes these new morphological data for T. neglectus. PMID:25405076

  17. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Clint A

    2014-01-01

    Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001). Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and 'cheek' tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with the South American taxon Gasparinisaura, but never both at the same time. The new morphological observations presented herein, combined with re-examination of the holotype of Parksosaurus, suggest that Parksosaurus shares a closer relationship with Thescelosaurus than with Gasparinisaura, and that many of the features previously cited to support a relationship with the latter taxon are either also present in Thescelosaurus, are artifacts of preservation, or are the result of incomplete preparation and inaccurate interpretation of specimens. Additionally, the overall morphology of the skull and lower jaws of both Thescelosaurus and Parksosaurus also closely resemble the Asian taxa Changchunsaurus and Haya, though the interrelationships of these taxa have yet to be tested in a phylogenetic analysis that includes these new morphological data for T. neglectus. PMID:25405076

  18. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. PMID:21328563

  19. Extreme Cranial Ontogeny in the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R.; Goodwin, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Extended neoteny and late stage allometric growth increase morphological disparity between growth stages in at least some dinosaurs. Coupled with relatively low dinosaur density in the Upper Cretaceous of North America, ontogenetic transformational representatives are often difficult to distinguish. For example, many hadrosaurids previously reported to represent relatively small lambeosaurine species were demonstrated to be juveniles of the larger taxa. Marginocephalians (pachycephalosaurids + ceratopsids) undergo comparable and extreme cranial morphological change during ontogeny. Methodology/Principal Findings Cranial histology, morphology and computer tomography reveal patterns of internal skull development that show the purported diagnostic characters for the pachycephalosaurids Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch spinifer are ontogenetically derived features. Coronal histological sections of the frontoparietal dome of an adult Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis reveal a dense structure composed of metaplastic bone with a variety of extremely fibrous and acellular tissue. Coronal histological sections and computer tomography of a skull and frontoparietal dome of Stygimoloch spinifer reveal an open intrafrontal suture indicative of a subadult stage of development. These dinosaurs employed metaplasia to rapidly grow and change the size and shape of their horns, cranial ornaments and frontoparietal domes, resulting in extreme cranial alterations during late stages of growth. We propose that Dracorex hogwartsia, Stygimoloch spinifer and Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis are the same taxon and represent an ontogenetic series united by shared morphology and increasing skull length. Conclusions/Significance Dracorex hogwartsia (juvenile) and Stygimoloch spinifer (subadult) are reinterpreted as younger growth stages of Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis (adult). This synonymy reduces the number of pachycephalosaurid taxa from the Upper Cretaceous of North America and demonstrates the importance of cranial ontogeny in evaluating dinosaur diversity and taxonomy. These growth stages reflect a continuum rather than specific developmental steps defined by “known” terminal morphologies. PMID:19859556

  20. Posterior cranial fossa box expansion leads to resolution of symptomatic cerebellar ptosis following Chiari I malformation repair.

    PubMed

    Heller, Justin B; Lazareff, Jorge; Gabbay, Joubin S; Lam, Sandi; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2007-03-01

    Chiari I malformation occurs when the cerebellar tonsils herniate downward through the foramen magnum into the upper cervical spinal canal. If the posterior fossa craniectomy during corrective surgery leads to excessive enlargement of the foramen magnum, the complication of cerebellar ptosis may result. To treat this difficult problem a posterior cranial fossa box expansion was devised and studied. Patients who developed symptomatic cerebellar ptosis (confirmed by MRI) following cranial vault decompression for Chiari I malformations underwent a posterior fossa box expansion (n=7). This procedure involved coverage of posterior aspect of the enlarged foramen magnum with a split-thickness calvarial bone graft box. The box reconstruction provided separation between the neck musculature, soft tissues from the neural tissue; prevention of cerebellar prolapse; and expansion of the posterior cranial vault. Patients had a mean of 12+/-1 months between initial suboccipital craniectomy and confirmation of symptomatic cerebellar ptosis. Mean age at the time of posterior fossa box reconstruction was 31+/-9 years (range of 14 to 44 years). Preoperative symptoms of headache (7/7, 100%), upper extremity numbness (5/7, 71%) or paresthesias (3/7, 43%), respiratory disturbance (2/7, 29%) and inability to walk (2/7, 29%) improved in all patients postoperatively. At more than 12 month follow-up 6/7 patients (86%) were both disease-free (MRI confirmation) and symptom-free. One out of seven patients had return of headache in a more mild form. Thus, in our patient group the posterior fossa box reconstruction led to resolution of symptomatic cerebellar ptosis following Chiari I malformation repair. PMID:17414275

  1. Mechanisms underlying the neuronal-based symptoms of allergy.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Taylor-Clark, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Persons with allergies present with symptoms that often are the result of alterations in the nervous system. Neuronally based symptoms depend on the organ in which the allergic reaction occurs but can include red itchy eyes, sneezing, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, coughing, bronchoconstriction, airway mucus secretion, dysphagia, altered gastrointestinal motility, and itchy swollen skin. These symptoms occur because mediators released during an allergic reaction can interact with sensory nerves, change processing in the central nervous system, and alter transmission in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric autonomic nerves. In addition, evidence supports the idea that in some subjects this neuromodulation is, for reasons poorly understood, upregulated such that the same degree of nerve stimulus causes a larger effect than seen in healthy subjects. There are distinctions in the mechanisms and nerve types involved in allergen-induced neuromodulation among different organ systems, but general principles have emerged. The products of activated mast cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident cells can overtly stimulate nerve endings, cause long-lasting changes in neuronal excitability, increase synaptic efficacy, and also change gene expression in nerves, resulting in phenotypically altered neurons. A better understanding of these processes might lead to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting the suffering of those with allergies. PMID:24433703

  2. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment. PMID:25878687

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Musculocutaneous Nerve Block in Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Chen; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Chiou, Hong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is a common and challenging complication of herpes zoster infection, particularly in older people. In recent decades, first-line treatments, including oral or topical medication, have become well established. However, few studies have reported the efficacy of interventional procedures for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Here, the authors present a case of intractable postherpetic neuralgia treated with musculocutaneous peripheral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. Symptoms remained controlled at 1 mo follow-up. Ultrasound can be readily applied to improve the accuracy and efficiency of peripheral nerve block as it is currently widely used to evaluate the musculoskeletal system in clinical settings. PMID:26390394

  4. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  5. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  6. The olfactory system, not the terminal nerve, functions as the primary chemosensory pathway mediating responses to sex pheromones in male goldfish.

    PubMed

    Fujita, I; Sorensen, P W; Stacey, N E; Hara, T J

    1991-01-01

    Studies of the neural mechanisms underlying responsiveness to sex pheromones in male goldfish suggest that, contrary to a currently popular hypothesis, the olfactory system (cranial nerve 1), and not the terminal nerve (cranial nerve 0), mediates chemosensory responses to pheromones. When the olfactory epithelium of male goldfish was exposed to two identified sex pheromones, 17 alpha, 20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one and a mixture of prostaglandin F2 alpha and its metabolite 15-keto-prostaglandin F2 alpha, the spontaneous activity of olfactory neurons located in the medical portion of the olfactory bulb changed, while activity of terminal nerve cell bodies did not. A variety of other synthetic and natural odors also failed to alter the activity of terminal nerve cell bodies as did visual, magnetic, thermal, and auditory cues. Terminal nerve activity was, however, inhibited by tactile stimulation, suggesting that this system may have a modulatory role associated with the physical interactions that characterize goldfish spawning behavior. PMID:1662555

  7. Epidermal nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Engelstad, JaNean K.; Taylor, Sean W.; Witt, Lawrence V.; Hoebing, Belinda J.; Herrmann, David N.; Klein, Christopher J.; Johnson, David M.; Davies, Jenny L.; Carter, Rickey E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Our first objective was to explore the value of estimating 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs)/mm for number of sections to be evaluated and for confidently judging normality or abnormality. Our second objective was to introduce a new continuous measure combining nerve conduction and ENFs/mm. Methods: The 95% CI studies were performed on 1, 1–2, 1–3 - - - 1–10 serial skip sections of 3-mm punch biopsies of leg and thigh of 67 healthy subjects and 23 patients with diabetes mellitus. Results: Variability of differences of ENFs/mm counts (and 95% CIs) from evaluation of 1, 1–2, 1–3 - - - 1–9 compared with 1–10 serial skip sections decreased progressively without a break point with increasing numbers of sections evaluated. Estimating 95% CIs as sections are evaluated can be used to judge how many sections are needed for adequate evaluation, i.e., only a few when counts and 95% CIs are well within the range of normality or abnormality and more when values are borderline. Also provided is a methodology to combine results of nerve conduction and ENFs/mm as continuous measures of normality or abnormality. Conclusion: Estimating 95% CIs of ENFs/mm is useful to judge how many sections should be evaluated to confidently declare counts to be normal or abnormal. Also introduced is a continuous measure of both large-fiber (nerve conduction) and small-fiber (ENFs/mm) normal structures/functions spanning the range of normality and abnormality for use in therapeutic trials. PMID:23100396

  8. Coping with Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order Free Materials Today Coping with Symptoms & Side Effects How can the symptoms ... offered in Spanish. View all Resources Related to Coping with Symptoms About PDF About PDF PDF People ...

  9. Impact of phrenic nerve paralysis on the surgical outcome of intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Kita, Yusuke; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Hoshikawa, Shinya; Hara, Yukinori; Iijima, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries (BPI) can be complicated by diaphragmatic paralysis (DP). This study determined the influence of DP on biceps brachii (BB) recovery after intercostal nerve transfer (ICNT) for BPI and investigated the respiratory complications of ICNT. The study included 100 patients, 84 showing no DP in preoperative and early postoperative chest radiographic images (non-DP group) and 16 with DP that persisted for over one year after surgery (DP group). The postoperative reinnervation time did not differ between groups. BB strength one year after surgery was lower in the DP group than non-DP group (p = 0.0007). No differences were observed 2-3 years after surgery. In the DP group, four patients had respiratory symptoms that affected daily activities and their outcomes deteriorated (p = 0.04). Phrenic nerve transfer should not be combined with ICNT in patients with poor respiratory function because of the high incidence of respiratory complications. PMID:25609274

  10. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  12. Nerve grafting in the repair of complicated peripheral nerve trauma.

    PubMed

    Walton, R; Finseth, F

    1977-10-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma has been a challenge to surgeons, with significant advances in the surgery of repair occurring in major wars. The standard method of treatment involving wide mobilization and end-to-end suture to close traumatic gaps in peripheral nerves has not produced consistently acceptable results, particularly with large gaps. However, with the recent development of microsurgical techniques and instrumentation, the method of interfascicular nerve grafting has been applied to selected patients with trauma problems of the peripheral nerve, by resecting and autogenous nerve grafting at staggered levels to distribute scar formation, followed by plaster immobilization for 3 weeks. Ten patients are reported, with motor nerve recovery ranging from M2 to M4 and sensory recovery, S2-S4 (See Table I), based on Seddon's classification (11). PMID:909120

  13. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25221597

  14. Reduced incidence of the somnolence syndrome after prophylactic cranial irradiation in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uzal, D; Ozyar, E; Hayran, M; Zorlu, F; Atahan, L; Yetkin, S

    1998-07-01

    A prospective double blind randomized trial comparing two different dose schedules of continuous steroid coverage during prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) in leukemic children was conducted to find out the optimum dose to be prescribed to reduce the incidence of Somnolence Syndrome (SS). Between April 1994 and February 1996, 32 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia received CRT of 18 Gy in 10 fractions. Patients were randomized to receive oral dexamethasone of 2 or 4 mg/m2 during radiotherapy. The diagnosis of SS was made clinically based on symptoms of somnolence. All patients were followed for a minimum of 8 months. The overall incidence of SS was 40%. The development of SS was steroid dose dependent. In low dose steroid arm the incidence of SS was 64.3% (9/14), compared to 17.6% (3/17) in high dose arm with statistically significant difference (P = 0.008). The median time to development of SS was 4 weeks. The most common symptom of SS was drowsiness followed by anorexia, headache, nausea, vomiting, decreased activity, irritability, fever and ataxia, respectively. The duration of symptoms ranged from 2 to 14 days. The development of SS was not related to the presence of acute reactions, age at the time of CRT and sex. In all cases the symptoms subsided completely and spontaneously. Our results suggest that steroid coverage at a dose of 4 mg/m2 during CRT reduces the incidence of SS. However, a multicentric prospective randomized trial is needed to determine the role and the optimal dose of steroid. PMID:9756169

  15. Evaluation of the function status of the ulnar nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Liu, N; Wang, Y W; Zhang, Z C; Zheng, L N; Zhu, J

    2015-01-01

    Many carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients have symptoms in both the median and ulnar digits more frequently than in the median digits alone. This is possibly because of close anatomical contiguity of the carpal tunnel and Guyon's canal, and the high pressure may also affect the latter, causing indirect compression of ulnar nerve fibers. Thus, we evaluated the functional status of the ulnar nerve in patients with CTS in order to investigate the relationship between ulnar nerve impairment and sensory symptoms of the ulnar territory. Electrophysiological studies were conducted in CTS patients and healthy controls. CTS patients were divided into the mild/moderate group and severe group; they were further divided into the symptomatic and asymptomatic subgroups according to the sensory symptom of the fifth digit region. The findings suggest that CTS patients could have coexisting ulnar nerve wrist entrapments that might exacerbate the severity of CTS. Sensory impairment in the ulnar territory was observed more frequently in the mild/moderate stage of CTS, which is associated with ulnar nerve involvement. These findings also suggest that damage to the ulnar nerve fibers caused by compression forces in Guyon's canal may underlie the ulnar spread of symptoms in CTS. PMID:25966136

  16. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    ICHINOHE, Tom; KANNO, Nobuo; HARADA, Yasuji; YOGO, Takuya; TAGAWA, Masahiro; SOETA, Satoshi; AMASAKI, Hajime; HARA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  17. Heritability of human cranial dimensions: comparing the evolvability of different cranial regions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative craniometrical traits have been successfully incorporated into population genetic methods to provide insight into human population structure. However, little is known about the degree of genetic and non-genetic influences on the phenotypic expression of functionally based traits. Many studies have assessed the heritability of craniofacial traits, but complex patterns of correlation among traits have been disregarded. This is a pitfall as the human skull is strongly integrated. Here we reconsider the evolutionary potential of craniometric traits by assessing their heritability values as well as their patterns of genetic and phenotypic correlation using a large pedigree-structured skull series from Hallstatt (Austria). The sample includes 355 complete adult skulls that have been analysed using 3D geometric morphometric techniques. Heritability estimates for 58 cranial linear distances were computed using maximum likelihood methods. These distances were assigned to the main functional and developmental regions of the skull. Results showed that the human skull has substantial amounts of genetic variation, and a t-test showed that there are no statistically significant differences among the heritabilities of facial, neurocranial and basal dimensions. However, skull evolvability is limited by complex patterns of genetic correlation. Phenotypic and genetic patterns of correlation are consistent but do not support traditional hypotheses of integration of the human shape, showing that the classification between brachy- and dolicephalic skulls is not grounded on the genetic level. Here we support previous findings in the mouse cranium and provide empirical evidence that covariation between the maximum widths of the main developmental regions of the skull is the dominant factor of integration in the human skull. PMID:19166470

  18. Cranial Treatment and Spinal Manipulation for a Patient With Low Back Pain: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Wayne; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present chiropractic management of a patient with chronic low back pain by focusing on the craniomandibular system. Clinical Features A 37-year-old man consulted a chiropractor for pain in the lumbosacral area with radiation down the anterolateral side of the upper left leg. The symptoms started after a fall the previous year. Examination showed a post-traumatic chronic L4-L5 facet dysfunction and left sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. Chiropractic spinal manipulation to the lumbar spine and pelvis gave only temporary relief from the pain. Intervention and Outcome A year later a bone scintigraphy was conducted, in which a lesion was found over the right sphenoid area. Cranial treatment of this area was added to the chiropractic treatment plan. After this treatment, the patient reported that he was pain free and could return to normal activities of daily living. Conclusion The clinical progress of this case suggests that for some patients, adding craniosacral therapy may be helpful in patients with low back symptoms. PMID:26644786

  19. Nerve Agent Toxicity and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Holstege, Christopher P; Dobmeier, Stephen G

    2005-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of nerve agent toxicity varies widely, ranging from the classic cholinergic syndrome to flaccid paralysis and status epilepticus. All nerve agents are capable of producing marked neuropathology. Seizure control is strongly associated with protection against acute lethality and brain pathology. The mainstays of therapy of nerve agent poisoned patients are atropine, pralidoxime, and benzodiazepines. Fosphenytoin provides little therapeutic anticonvulsant effectiveness for nerve agent-induced status epilepticus. Tachycardia is not a contraindication to treatment with atropine in nerve agent toxicity. Atropine should be administered to alleviate respiratory distress, symptomatic bradycardia, and as an adjunct to benzodiazepines and pralidoxime to alleviate seizure activity. In significant nerve agent toxicity, a continuous pralidoxime infusion may be considered. PMID:15676112

  20. Median palmar cutaneous nerve injury in a volleyball player.

    PubMed

    Gitkind, Andrew I; Zhao, Peng; Oh-Park, Moo Yeon; Fast, Avital

    2009-04-01

    A 14-yr-old female patient, a competitive high school volleyball player, was seen for an evaluation of right-hand numbness and tingling. Her symptoms began insidiously, midway through her second season of competitive play. Numbness and tingling improved with rest but returned immediately after resuming competition. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging were within normal limits. Meticulous sensory examination revealed a decrease in sensation to light touch over an area consistent with the distribution of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. It is postulated that the patient's complaints were due to right median palmar cutaneous nerve damage secondary to repetitive trauma to the right forearm and wrist as a result of her competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of median palmar cutaneous nerve damage as a result of participation in competitive volleyball. PMID:19077672

  1. Endoscopic Robotic Decompression of the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose Carlos; de Souza Montero, Edna Frasson

    2014-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment can be treated by a number of surgical techniques when necessary. Endoscopic techniques have recently been developed to access the ulnar nerve by use of a minimally invasive approach. However, these techniques have been considered difficult and, many times, dangerous procedures, reserved for experienced elbow arthroscopic surgeons only. We have developed a new endoscopic approach using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) that may be easier and safer. Standardization of the technique was previously developed in cadaveric models to achieve the required safety, reliability, and organization for this procedure, and the technique was then used in a live patient. In this patient the nerve entrapment symptoms remitted after the surgical procedure. The robotic surgical procedure presented a cosmetic advantage, as well as possibly reduced scar formation. This is the first note on this surgical procedure; the procedure needs to be tested and even evolved until a state-of-the-art standard is reached. PMID:25126508

  2. Usefulness of additional measurements of the median nerve with ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Claes, F; Meulstee, J; Claessen-Oude Luttikhuis, T T M; Huygen, P L M; Verhagen, W I M

    2010-12-01

    High resolution sonography is a relatively new diagnostic technique in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Normal values in different studies, however, vary and this makes their practical use difficult. The aim of this study was to establish normal values for the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and to investigate the value of measuring additional parameters. Ninety-eight wrists of 29 women and 25 men without signs or symptoms of CTS were included. Width and circumference of the wrist were measured. The CSA of the median nerve at the level of the pisiform bone was measured using ultrasonography. We found a significant correlation between the CSA of the median nerve at the wrist and wrist circumference. Measuring wrist circumference will establish the upper level of normal more accurately compared to predictions solely based upon gender. This has important implications in diagnosing CTS with ultrasonography. PMID:20429021

  3. Neanderthal cranial ontogeny and its implications for late hominid diversity.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, M S; Zollikofer, C P

    2001-08-01

    Homo neanderthalensis has a unique combination of craniofacial features that are distinct from fossil and extant 'anatomically modern' Homo sapiens (modern humans). Morphological evidence, direct isotopic dates and fossil mitochondrial DNA from three Neanderthals indicate that the Neanderthals were a separate evolutionary lineage for at least 500,000 yr. However, it is unknown when and how Neanderthal craniofacial autapomorphies (unique, derived characters) emerged during ontogeny. Here we use computerized fossil reconstruction and geometric morphometrics to show that characteristic differences in cranial and mandibular shape between Neanderthals and modern humans arose very early during development, possibly prenatally, and were maintained throughout postnatal ontogeny. Postnatal differences in cranial ontogeny between the two taxa are characterized primarily by heterochronic modifications of a common spatial pattern of development. Evidence for early ontogenetic divergence together with evolutionary stasis of taxon-specific patterns of ontogeny is consistent with separation of Neanderthals and modern humans at the species level. PMID:11484052

  4. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  5. Molecular and tissue interactions governing induction of cranial ectodermal placodes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Whereas neural crest cells are the source of the peripheral nervous system in the trunk of vertebrates, the “ectodermal placodes,” together with neural crest, form the peripheral nervous system of the head. Cranial ectodermal placodes are thickenings in the ectoderm that subsequently ingress or invaginate to make important contributions to cranial ganglia, including epibranchial and trigeminal ganglia, and sensory structures, the ear, nose, lens, and adenohypophysis. Recent studies have uncovered a number of molecular signals mediating induction and differentiation of placodal cells. Here, we described recent advances in understanding the tissue interactions and signals underlying induction and neurogenesis of placodes, with emphasis on the trigeminal and epibranchial. Important roles of Fibroblast Growth Factors, Platelet Derived Growth Factors, Sonic Hedgehog, TGF? superfamily members, and Wnts are discussed. PMID:19500565

  6. Endoscopic transnasal approach to anterior and middle cranial base lesions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sien Hui; Brand, Yves; Prepageran, Narayanan; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience in managing pathologies involving the anterior and middle cranial base using an endoscopic transnasal approach, highlighting the surgical technique, indications, and complications. The different types of endoscopic approaches used include the transtuberculum/transplanum, transcribiform, transsellar, and cavernous sinus approaches. The common indications include repair of cerebrospinal fluid leaks (both spontaneous and post traumatic) and excision of pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, esthesioneuroblastomas, and other malignancies of the anterior cranial base. Careful reconstruction is performed with the multilayer technique utilizing fat, fascia lata, and fibrin sealant. The endoscopic transnasal approach, coupled with the present-day sophisticated neuronavigation systems, allows access to lesions in the midline extending from the cribriform plate to the craniovertebral junction. However, preoperative planning and careful selection of cases with evaluation of each case on an individual basis with regard to the lateral extension of the lesion are imperative. PMID:26448224

  7. Specific induction of PAG608 in cranial and spinal motor neurons of L-DOPA-treated parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masako; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Higashi, Youichirou; Eslava-Alva, Maria J; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Asanuma, Masato; Ogawa, Norio

    2008-04-01

    We identified p53-activated gene 608 (PAG608) as a specifically induced gene in striatal tissue of L-DOPA (100mg/kg)-injected hemi-parkinsonian rats using differential display assay. In the present study, we further examined morphological distribution of PAG608 in the central nervous system of L-DOPA-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats. PAG608 expression was markedly induced in fibers and neuronal cells of the lateral globus pallidus and reticular thalamic nucleus adjacent to internal capsule, specifically in the parkinsonian side of L-DOPA-treated models. The protein was also constitutively expressed in motor neurons specifically in either side of the pontine nucleus and motor nuclei of trigeminal and facial nerves. Furthermore, L-DOPA-induced PAG608 expression on motor neurons in the contralateral side of the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the lateral corticospinal tract without cell loss. The specific induction of PAG608 6-48h after L-DOPA injection in the extrapyramidal tracts, pyramidal tracts and corresponding lower motor neurons of the spinal cords suggests its involvement in molecular events in stimulated motor neurons. Taken together with the constitutive expression of PAG608 in the motor nuclei of cranial nerves, PAG608 may be a useful marker of stressed or activated lower motor neurons. PMID:18242749

  8. Using the nerve stimulator for peripheral or plexus nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Urmey, W F

    2006-06-01

    Conventional methodology for nerve location utilizes anatomical landmarks followed by invasive exploration with a needle to a suitable endpoint. An appropriate endpoint can be either anatomical in nature (e.g. transaterial technique) or functional (paresthesia or motor response to electrical stimulation). Ability to electrically stimulate a peripheral nerve or plexus depends upon many variables, including; 1) conductive area at the electrode, 2) electrical impedance, 3) electrode-to-nerve distance, 4) current flow (amperage), and 5) pulse duration. Electrode conductive area follows the equation R = rhoL/A, where R = electrical resistance, p = tissue resistivity, L = electrode-to-nerve distance, and A = electrode conductive area. Therefore resistance varies to the inverse of the electrode's conductive area. Tissue electrical impedance varies as a function of the tissue composition. In general, tissues with higher lipid content have higher impedances. Modern electrical nerve stimulators are designed to keep current constant, in spite of varying impedance. The electrode-to-nerve distance has the most influence on the ability to elicit a motor response to electrical stimulation. This is governed by Coulomb's law: E = K(Q/r2) where E = required stimulating charge, K= constant, Q = minimal required stimulating current, and r = electrode-to-nerve distance. Therefore, ability to stimulate the nerve at low amperage (e.g. < 0.5 mA), indicates an extremely close position to the nerve. Similarly, increasing current flow (amperage) increases the ability to stimulate the nerve at a distance. Increasing pulse duration increases the flow of electrons during a current pulse at any given amperage. Therefore, reducing pulse duration to very short times (e.g. 0.1 or 0.05 ms) diminishes current dispersion, requiring the needle tip to be extremely close to the nerve to elicit a motor response. The above parameters can be varied optimally to enhance successful nerve location and subsequent blockade. Unlike imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, electrical nerve stimulation depends upon nerve conduction. Similarly, percutaneous electrode guidance (PEG) makes use of the above variables to allow prelocation of the nerve by transcutaneous stimulation. PMID:16682917

  9. Encephalization and diversification of the cranial base in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Aristide, Leandro; Dos Reis, Sergio F; Machado, Alessandra C; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T; Perez, S Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The cranial base, composed of the midline and lateral basicranium, is a structurally important region of the skull associated with several key traits, which has been extensively studied in anthropology and primatology. In particular, most studies have focused on the association between midline cranial base flexion and relative brain size, or encephalization. However, variation in lateral basicranial morphology has been studied less thoroughly. Platyrrhines are a group of primates that experienced a major evolutionary radiation accompanied by extensive morphological diversification in Central and South America over a large temporal scale. Previous studies have also suggested that they underwent several evolutionarily independent processes of encephalization. Given these characteristics, platyrrhines present an excellent opportunity to study, on a large phylogenetic scale, the morphological correlates of primate diversification in brain size. In this study we explore the pattern of variation in basicranial morphology and its relationship with phylogenetic branching and with encephalization in platyrrhines. We quantify variation in the 3D shape of the midline and lateral basicranium and endocranial volumes in a large sample of platyrrhine species, employing high-resolution CT-scans and geometric morphometric techniques. We investigate the relationship between basicranial shape and encephalization using phylogenetic regression methods and calculate a measure of phylogenetic signal in the datasets. The results showed that phylogenetic structure is the most important dimension for understanding platyrrhine cranial base diversification; only Aotus species do not show concordance with our molecular phylogeny. Encephalization was only correlated with midline basicranial flexion, and species that exhibit convergence in their relative brain size do not display convergence in lateral basicranial shape. The evolution of basicranial variation in primates is probably more complex than previously believed, and understanding it will require further studies exploring the complex interactions between encephalization, brain shape, cranial base morphology, and ecological dimensions acting along the species divergence process. PMID:25743433

  10. Development and Tissue Origins of the Mammalian Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, S.; Bamforth, S. D.; Olsen, B. R.; Morriss-Kay, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate cranial base is a complex structure composed of bone, cartilage and other connective tissues underlying the brain; it is intimately connected with development of the face and cranial vault. Despite its central importance in craniofacial development, morphogenesis and tissue origins of the cranial base have not been studied in detail in the mouse, an important model organism. We describe here the location and time of appearance of the cartilages of the chondrocranium. We also examine the tissue origins of the mouse cranial base using a neural crest cell lineage cell marker, Wnt1-Cre/R26R, and a mesoderm lineage cell marker, Mesp1-Cre/R26R. The chondrocranium develops between E11 and E16 in the mouse, beginning with development of the caudal (occipital) chondrocranium, followed by chondrogenesis rostrally to form the nasal capsule, and finally fusion of these two parts via the midline central stem and the lateral struts of the vault cartilages. X-Gal staining of transgenic mice from E8.0 to 10 days post-natal showed that neural crest cells contribute to all of the cartilages that form the ethmoid, presphenoid, and basisphenoid bones with the exception of the hypochiasmatic cartilages. The basioccipital bone and non-squamous parts of the temporal bones are mesoderm derived. Therefore the prechordal head is mostly composed of neural crest-derived tissues, as predicted by the New Head Hypothesis. However, the anterior location of the mesoderm-derived hypochiasmatic cartilages, which are closely linked with the extra-ocular muscles, suggests that some tissues associated with the visual apparatus may have evolved independently of the rest of the “New Head”. PMID:18680740

  11. Posterior cranial vault distraction with resorbable distraction devices.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Samuel M; Gachiani, John M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior cranial vault distraction is recognized as a viable initial approach to patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. It offers advantages to initial anterior vault surgery and to traditional 1-stage advancements. Reports of posterior vault distraction have thus far focused on the use of standard titanium distractors. We present a case of posterior vault distraction with resorbable distraction devices, obviating the need for a second surgery and anesthetic for distractor removal. Distraction was performed successfully without complications or device-related issues. PMID:25006906

  12. Dynamic 320-section CT angiography in cranial arteriovenous shunting lesions.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, P A; Bosman, T; van Walderveen, M A A; Krings, T; Leroux, A A; Willems, P W A

    2010-04-01

    Novel 320-section CT scanning equipment enables dynamic noninvasive angiographic imaging of the entire cranial vasculature (4D-CTA). We describe this technique and demonstrate its potential in arteriovenous shunting lesions. 4D-CTA imaging resulted in a correct diagnosis, lesion classification, and treatment-strategy selection in 3 patients, compared with CA. We think that 4D-CTA can further reduce the need for CA, sparing the patient the discomfort and risk associated with an invasive procedure. PMID:19875470

  13. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  14. Heterochrony and developmental modularity of cranial osteogenesis in lipotyphlan mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Here we provide the most comprehensive study to date on the cranial ossification sequence in Lipotyphla, the group which includes shrews, moles and hedgehogs. This unique group, which encapsulates diverse ecological modes, such as terrestrial, subterranean, and aquatic lifestyles, is used to examine the evolutionary lability of cranial osteogenesis and to investigate the modularity of development. Results An acceleration of developmental timing of the vomeronasal complex has occurred in the common ancestor of moles. However, ossification of the nasal bone has shifted late in the more terrestrial shrew mole. Among the lipotyphlans, sequence heterochrony shows no significant association with modules derived from developmental origins (that is, neural crest cells vs. mesoderm derived parts) or with those derived from ossification modes (that is, dermal vs. endochondral ossification). Conclusions The drastic acceleration of vomeronasal development in moles is most likely coupled with the increased importance of the rostrum for digging and its use as a specialized tactile surface, both fossorial adaptations. The late development of the nasal in shrew moles, a condition also displayed by hedgehogs and shrews, is suggested to be the result of an ecological reversal to terrestrial lifestyle and reduced functional importance of the rostrum. As an overall pattern in lipotyphlans, our results reject the hypothesis that ossification sequence heterochrony occurs in modular fashion when considering the developmental patterns of the skull. We suggest that shifts in the cranial ossification sequence are not evolutionarily constrained by developmental origins or mode of ossification. PMID:22040374

  15. Craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas: historical overview.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Loumiotis, Ioannis; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    The surgical treatment of meningiomas located at the base of the anterior cranial fossa is often challenging, and the evolution of the surgical strategy to resect these tumors parallels the development of craniotomy, and neurosurgery in general, over the past century. Early successful operations to treat these tumors were pioneered by prominent figures such as Sir William Macewen and Francesco Durante. Following these early reports, Harvey Cushing made significant contributions, allowing a better understanding and treatment of meningiomas in general, but particularly those involving the anterior cranial base. Initially, large-sized unilateral or bilateral craniotomies were necessary to approach these deep-seated lesions. Technical advances such as the introduction of electrosurgery, the operating microscope, and refined microsurgical instruments allowed neurosurgeons to perform less invasive surgical procedures with better results. Today, a wide variety of surgical strategies, including endoscopic surgery and radiosurgery, are used to treat these tumors. In this review, the authors trace the evolution of craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas. PMID:24684326

  16. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  17. Distinct spatiotemporal roles of hedgehog signalling during chick and mouse cranial base and axial skeleton development.

    PubMed

    Balczerski, B; Zakaria, S; Tucker, A S; Borycki, A G; Koyama, E; Pacifici, M; Francis-West, P

    2012-11-15

    The cranial base exerts a supportive role for the brain and includes the occipital, sphenoid and ethmoid bones that arise from cartilaginous precursors in the early embryo. As the occipital bone and the posterior part of the sphenoid are mesoderm derivatives that arise in close proximity to the notochord and floor plate, it has been assumed that their development, like the axial skeleton, is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signalling. Here we examined the development of the cranial base in chick and mouse embryos to compare the molecular signals that are required for chondrogenic induction in the trunk and head. We found that Shh signalling is required but the molecular network controlling cranial base development is distinct from that in the trunk. In the absence of Shh, the presumptive cranial base did not undergo chondrogenic commitment as determined by the loss of Sox9 expression and there was a decrease in cell survival. In contrast, induction of the otic capsule occurred normally demonstrating that induction of the cranial base is uncoupled from formation of the sensory capsules. Lastly, we found that the early cranial mesoderm is refractory to Shh signalling, likely accounting for why development of the cranial base occurs after the axial skeleton. Our data reveal that cranial and axial skeletal induction is controlled by conserved, yet spatiotemporally distinct mechanisms that co-ordinate development of the cranial base with that of the cranial musculature and the pharyngeal arches. PMID:23009899

  18. In vivo nerve-macrophage interactions following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Allison; Wolman, Marc A.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Granato, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, the peripheral nervous system has retained its regenerative capacity, enabling severed axons to reconnect with their original synaptic targets. While it is well documented that a favorable environment is critical for nerve regeneration, the complex cellular interactions between injured nerves with cells in their environment, as well as the functional significance of these interactions, have not been determined in vivo and in real time. Here we provide the first minute-by-minute account of cellular interactions between laser transected motor nerves and macrophages in live intact zebrafish. We show that macrophages arrive at the lesion site long before axon fragmentation, much earlier than previously thought. Moreover, we find that axon fragmentation triggers macrophage invasion into the nerve to engulf axonal debris, and that delaying nerve fragmentation in a Wlds model does not alter macrophage recruitment but induces a previously unknown ‘nerve scanning’ behavior, suggesting that macrophage recruitment and subsequent nerve invasion are controlled by separate mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that macrophage recruitment, thought to be dependent on Schwann cell derived signals, occurs independently of Schwann cells. Thus, live cell imaging defines novel cellular and functional interactions between injured nerves and immune cells. PMID:22423110

  19. Magnetic nerve stimulation without interlinkage between nerve and magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, S.; Harada, K.; Ji, C.; Oomura, Y.

    1984-09-01

    A new method of magnetic stimulation of nerves is proposed. Nerves are located on a core aperture outside the core which is implanted in the body. Nerves can be stimulated by the secondary currents which flow in the body fluids around the core when the magnetic flux in the core is changed. One of the advantages in this method is to be able to avoid the interlinkage between the core and nerves. The equivalent resistance of tissues around the core is calculated, and current density for nerve excitation is estimated. The validity of the new method is demonstrated by experiments using frog nerve-muscle preparations. The results show that the nerve can be excited by a change of magnetic flux which generates an EMF of 0.8-volts peak amplitude and 0.8-ms duration in a monitor wire. The current density in the vicinity of the core aperture for nerve excitation is 3.2 mA/cm/sup 2/.

  20. Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Human Cervical and Thoracic Vagus Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Atsuko; Green, Hunter R.; Lee, Thomas D.; Hong, LongSheng; Tan, Jian; Vinters, Harry V.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNS) has been used for chronic heart failure (CHF), and is believed to improve imbalance of autonomic control by increasing parasympathetic activity. Although it is known that there is neural communication between the VN and the cervical sympathetic trunk, there are few data regarding the quantity and/or distribution of the sympathetic components within the VN. Objective To examine the sympathetic component within human VN and correlate these with the presence of cardiac and neurologic diseases. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on 31 human cervical and thoracic VNs (total 104 VNs) from autopsies and we reviewed the patients’ records. We correlated the quantity of sympathetic nerve fibers within the VNs with cardiovascular and neurologic disease states. Results All 104 VNs contain TH positive (sympathetic) nerve fibers; the mean TH positive areas were 5.47% in right cervical, 3.97% in left cervical, 5.11% in right thoracic, and 4.20% in left thoracic VN. The distribution of TH positive nerve fibers varied from case to case: central, peripheral, or scattered throughout nerve bundles. No statistically significant differences in nerve morphology were seen between diseases in which VNS is considered effective (depression and CHF), and other cardiovascular diseases, or neurodegenerative disease. Conclusion Human VNs contain sympathetic nerve fibers. The sympathetic component within the VN could play a role in physiologic effects reported with VNS. The recognition of sympathetic nerve fibers in the VNs may lead to better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of VNS. PMID:24768897

  1. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve. PMID:25892706

  2. Occipital Nerve Blocks for Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Trevor A; Orr, Serena; Bodell, Lisa; Lockyer, Lisette; Rajapakse, Thilinie; Barlow, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Posttraumatic headache is one of the most common and disabling symptoms after traumatic brain injury. However, evidence for treating posttraumatic headache is sparse, especially in the pediatric literature. This retrospective chart review evaluated the use of occipital nerve blocks in adolescents treated for posttraumatic headache following mild traumatic brain injury, presenting to the Complex Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury clinic. Fifteen patients (mean age 15.47; range: 13-17) received occipital nerve block for posttraumatic headache. Follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at 5.57 (standard deviation = 3.52) months postinjury. The headache burden was high, with all except one having headaches 15 or more days per month (median 30, range 10-30). Sixty-four percent reported long-term response to the occipital nerve blocks, with associated improved quality of life and decreased postconcussion symptom scores (P < .05). One patient reported transient allopecia. Occipital nerve blocks are well tolerated and can be helpful in posttraumatic headache. PMID:25406154

  3. Vanilloid receptors presynaptically modulate cranial visceral afferent synaptic transmission in nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Mark W; Bailey, Timothy W; Jin, Young-Ho; Andresen, Michael C

    2002-09-15

    Although the central terminals of cranial visceral afferents express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), little is known about their functional properties at this first synapse within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Here, we examined whether VR1 modulates afferent synaptic transmission. In horizontal brainstem slices, solitary tract (ST) activation evoked EPSCs. Monosynaptic EPSCs had low synaptic jitter (SD of latency to successive shocks) averaging 84.03 +/- 3.74 microsec (n = 72) and were completely blocked by the non-NMDA antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfonyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX). Sustained exposure to the VR1 agonist capsaicin (CAP; 100 nm) blocked ST EPSCs (CAP-sensitive) in some neurons but not others (CAP-resistant). CAP-sensitive EPSCs had longer latencies than CAP-resistant EPSCs (4.65 +/- 0.27 msec, n = 48 vs 3.53 +/- 0.28 msec, n = 24, respectively; p = 0.011), but they had similar jitter. CAP evoked two transient responses in CAP-sensitive neurons: a rapidly developing inward current (I(cap)) (108.1 +/- 22.9 pA; n = 21) and an increase in spontaneous synaptic activity. After 3-5 min in CAP, I(cap) subsided and ST EPSCs disappeared. NBQX completely blocked I(cap). The VR1 antagonist capsazepine (10-20 microm) attenuated CAP responses. Anatomically, second-order NTS neurons were identified by 4-(4-dihexadecylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide transported from the cervical aortic depressor nerve (ADN) to stain central terminals. Neurons with fluorescent ADN contacts had CAP-sensitive EPSCs (n = 5) with latencies and jitter similar to those of unlabeled monosynaptic neurons. Thus, consistent with presynaptic VR1 localization, CAP selectively activates a subset of ST axons to release glutamate that acts on non-NMDA receptors. Because the CAP sensitivity of cranial afferents is exclusively associated with unmyelinated axons, VR1 identifies C-fiber afferent pathways within the brainstem. PMID:12223576

  4. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001) and an increased 30-day morbidity rate of 25.9% versus 14.14% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001). The 30-day morbidity rates for all patients undergoing cranial procedures were stratified by diagnosis: 26.5% aneurysm, 24.7% sellar tumor, 19.7% extra-axial tumor, 14.8% intra-axial tumor, 14.4% arteriovenous malformation, and 5.6% pain. Following multivariable regression, the 30-day mortality in anemic patients was threefold higher than in non-anemic patients (4.1% vs 1.3%; OR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.65-4.66). The odds of postoperative morbidity in anemic patients were significantly higher than in non-anemic patients (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). There was a significant difference in postoperative morbidity event odds with a hematocrit level above (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.78-1.48) and below (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.55-3.42) 33% [hemoglobin (Hgb) 11 g/dl]. Conclusions: Preoperative anemia in elective cranial neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

  5. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body. A nerve is like a telephone cable wrapped in insulation. An outer layer of tissue ... nerve, just like the insulation surrounding a telephone cable (see Figure 1). A nerve contains millions of ...

  6. The importance of pelvic nerve fibers in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Fraser, Ian S

    2015-08-01

    Several lines of recent evidence suggest that pelvic innervation is altered in endometriosis-affected women, and there is a strong presumption that nerve fibers demonstrated in eutopic endometrium (of women with endometriosis) and in endometriotic lesions play roles in the generation of chronic pelvic pain. The recent observation of sensory C, sensory A-delta, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in the functional layer of endometrium of most women affected by endometriosis, but not demonstrated in most women who do not have endometriosis, was a surprise. Nerve fiber densities were also greatly increased in myometrium of women with endometriosis and in endometriotic lesions compared with normal peritoneum. Chronic pelvic pain is complex, and endometriosis is only one condition which contributes to this pain. The relationship between the presence of certain nerve fibers and the potential for local pain generation requires much future research. This paper reviews current knowledge concerning nerve fibers in endometrium, myometrium and endometriotic lesions, and discusses avenues of research that may improve our knowledge and lead to enriched understanding and management of endometriotic pain symptoms. PMID:26314611

  7. Peripheral nerve tumours: 30-year experience in the surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Gutkowska, Olga; Mazurek, Piotr; Koszewicz, Magdalena; Zió?kowski, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral nerve tumours are relatively rare type of soft tissue tumours. The aim of this work is to present our experience with surgical treatment of this type of lesions. Clinical material consists of 94 patients (56 females, 38 males), in whom 101 tumours deriving from peripheral nervous system were removed. The patients underwent surgical treatment between 1983 and 2012. Tumours occurred mainly in the upper extremity (72 tumours), less often in the lower extremity (25 tumours). Lesions developed in major peripheral nerves (51 tumours) and small nerve branches (50 tumours). The most common symptoms reported before surgery included presence of tumour mass (100 %), positive Hoffmann-Tinel sign (95.6 %) and paraesthesia (93.4 %). Less often sensory deficit (89.1 %) and pain (71.7 %) were observed. Motor deficit was the least common manifestation (41.3 %). Benign tumours prevailed in presented material (94 tumours). In 7 cases, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) was identified. As a result of surgical treatment in the group of tumours deriving from major peripheral nerves, in 87.8 % of the patients, pain relief was achieved; in 84 %, Hoffmann-Tinel sign was negative; and in 79 %, paraesthesia resolved. Sensory function improvement was observed in 51.2 % of the patients while motor function improved in 26.3 % of the patients. None of the patients experienced tumour relapse. In the group of tumours deriving from small nerve branches, 47 patients had no signs of tumour recurrence. One female patient diagnosed with MPNST suffered a relapse. Obtaining satisfactory results of peripheral nerve tumour treatment requires both careful differential diagnosis and well thought-out strategy at every stage of therapeutic management. PMID:25727458

  8. Schwannoma of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm: a rare location with concomitant compression neuropathy of the ulnar nerve.

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Gutkowska, Olga; Martynkiewicz, Jacek; B?k, Micha?; Ha?o?, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a case of rare location of schwannoma in the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm at the level of the axilla. Preliminary diagnostic examination of the tumour was carried out in another hospital by means of open biopsy. In the preoperative period symptoms of ulnar nerve dysfunction (paraesthesias, positive Hoffmann-Tinel sign) dominated the clinical picture. After having performed imaging studies and electromyographic (EMG) examination, the patient was scheduled for an operation. The tumour, measuring 3.5 × 3.0 × 1.5 cm, was resected without damage to the fascicular structure. Presence of paraesthesias in the distribution of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm, which was first noted in the postoperative period, persists in moderate severity until now. As a result of the performed operative treatment, such symptoms as palpable tumour mass, pain, paraesthesias in the ulnar nerve distribution and positive Hoffmann-Tinel sign resolved. On the basis of histopathological examination results the final diagnosis of classical schwannoma was established. PMID:26443319

  9. Use of a pedicled adipose flap as a sling for anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve.

    PubMed

    Danoff, Jonathan R; Lombardi, Joseph M; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2014-03-01

    In patients with primary cubital tunnel syndrome, we hypothesize that using a vascularized adipose sling to secure the ulnar nerve during anterior subcutaneous transposition will lead to improved patient outcomes. The adipose flap is designed to surround the ulnar nerve with a pliable, vascularized fat envelope, mimicking the natural fatty environment of peripheral nerves. This technique may offer advantages in securing the anteriorly transposed ulnar nerve and reducing instances of postoperative perineural scarring. Patients experience good functional outcomes; most experience resolution of symptoms. PMID:24503232

  10. [Positioning Injuries to Peripheral Nerves during Laparoscopic Colon and Rectum Surgery].

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, D B; Wolken, H; Ellebrecht, C T; Bruch, H-P; Kleemann, M

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic colon and rectum operations expose peripheral nerves to risk due to extreme patient positions needed to achieve gravity displacement during the surgical procedures. The general incidence of position-caused nerve injuries in surgery is not well known and is estimated to be about 0.5?% in the literature. There are no current data concerning laparoscopic operations. This study assesses the incidence and outcome of surgery-associated neurological symptoms after laparoscopic colon and rectum surgical procedures. We analysed the number of position-caused nerve injuries and their outcome from 1992-2010 in a prospectively managed data base. Risk factors like age, BMI, procedure duration and abduction of the upper extremities were analysed. There were 19 (0.7?%) position-caused nerve injuries among 2698 laparoscopic operations on the colon and rectum. The incidence of surgery-associated neurological symptoms was 1.08?% after laparoscopic rectum and 0.54?% after laparoscopic colon surgical procedures. Both operation time (267 vs. 185 minutes) and BMI (27.93 vs. 25.79?kg/m(2)) were revealed as risk factors for position-caused nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities reduced the incidence of positioning nerve injuries from 0.23?% to 0.1?%. Postoperative neurological symptoms were in most cases reversible (89.47?%). The incidence of postoperative nerve injuries since 2007 is low after laparoscopic rectum and colon operations and is mostly completely reversible. Both procedure duration and BMI are probable risk factors for surgery-associated nerve injuries. Adduction of the upper extremities provides an opportunity to reduce position-caused nerve injuries. PMID:23824613

  11. The superior laryngeal nerve injury of a famous soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci.

    PubMed

    Marchese-Ragona, R; Restivo, D A; Mylonakis, I; Ottaviano, G; Martini, A; Sataloff, R T; Staffieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) has been attributed much less clinical significance than the recurrent laryngeal nerve. It has sometimes been described as the 'neglected' nerve in thyroid surgery, although injury to this nerve can cause significant disability. The external branch of the SLN is the only motor supply to the cricothyroid muscle, which increases the tension of the ipsilateral vocal fold during highfrequency phonation, particularly in women and voice professionals. Damage to this nerve can manifest as ipsilateral cricothyroid muscle paralysis, and clinical symptoms may include a hoarse, breathy voice, frequent throat clearing, vocal fatigue or diminished vocal frequency range, especially when rising pitch. SLN paralysis can be a significant issue for those whose careers depend largely on a full range of voice. The famous opera soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci, suffered SLN injury during thyroid surgery with distressing consequences. PMID:23620644

  12. Otitis complicated by Jacod's syndrome with unusal facial nerve involvement: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Kocer; Buket, Sanlisoy; Dilek, Agircan; Munevver, Okay; Ayse, Aralasmak

    2015-04-01

    Otitis media is a well-known condition and its infra-temporal and intracranial complications are extremely rare because of the widespread usage of antibiotic treatment. We report a case of 63-year-old female with complaints of right-sided facial pain and diplopia. She had a history of acute otitis media before 4 months of admission to our neurology unit. Neurological examination showed that total ophthalmoplegia with ptosis, mydriasis, decreased vision and loss of pupil reflex on the right side. In addition, there was involvement of 5th and 7th cranial nerves. Neurological and radiological follow-up examinations demonstrated Jacod's Syndrome with unusual facial nerve damage and infection in aetiology. Sinusitis is the most common aetiology, but there are a few cases reported Jacod's Syndrome originating from otitis media. PMID:25976583

  13. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  14. Nerve welding by Ar+ laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong-Ji; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Deng, Zue-Xing; Xu, Gue-Xiang

    1998-11-01

    The comparative study of sciatic nerve microepincutral anastomoses with Ar+ laser and conventional suture techniques was made on rats. Total tests included electrophysiological and histopathological studies. The result of the experiment showed that nerve welding with laser is better than conventional suture techniques.

  15. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  16. Trigeminal Neuralgia as an Unusual Isolated Symptom of Pituitary Adenoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gurcan, Oktay; Gurcay, Ahmet Gurhan; Kazanci, Atilla; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Turkoglu, Omer Faruk; Komurcu, Hatice Ferhan; Beskonakli, Ethem

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas account for approximately 10% of intracranial tumors and 5% are locally invasive. Cavernous sinus invasion by pituitary tumors presents mostly with cranial nerve palsies, especially involving the third, fourth and sixth cranial nerves, which is well documented in the literature. However, an isolated complaint of trigeminal neuralgia due to pituitary adenoma is an extremely rare entity with a limited number of reported cases. A 51-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with complaints of pain and numbness on the left side of face for six months, with each event lasting 5-10 seconds. No improvement was obtained with administration of carbamazepine therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sellar region revealed a mass with the left cavernous sinus invasion. The patient underwent surgery via endoscopic transsphenoidal approach and after than radiosurgery with gammaknife. The patient's complaints resolved totally after gamma-knife radiosurgery. We report herein a case of pituitary adenoma with an isolated complaint of trigeminal neuralgia. Pituitary adenomas may be presented with cavernous sinus invasion and multiple cranial nerve palsies but isolated trigeminal neuralgia due to pituitary adenoma is an extremely rare entity. PMID:26768887

  17. Peripheral nerve lengthening as a regenerative strategy

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Kenneth M.; Brown, Justin M.; Shah, Sameer B.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic function, incurring substantial financial costs and diminished quality of life. For large nerve gaps, proximal lesions, or chronic nerve injury, the prognosis for recovery is particularly poor, even with autografts, the current gold standard for treating small to moderate nerve gaps. In vivo elongation of intact proximal stumps towards the injured distal stumps of severed peripheral nerves may offer a promising new strategy to treat nerve injury. This review describes several nerve lengthening strategies, including a novel internal fixator device that enables rapid and distal reconnection of proximal and distal nerve stumps. PMID:25317163

  18. Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Faroni, Alessandro; Smith, Richard JP; Reid, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are common and cause life-changing problems for patients alongside high social and health care costs for society. Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacrificing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to provide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacrifice of a functional nerve. Stem cells are prime candidates as accelerators of regeneration in these nerve grafts. This review examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts. PMID:25221589

  19. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  20. An elbow dislocation in a child with missed medial epicondyle fracture and late ulnar nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Haflah, Nor Hazla Mohamed; Ibrahim, Sharaf; Sapuan, Jamari; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2010-09-01

    Elbow dislocations associated with a medial epicondyle fracture and ulnar nerve palsy are uncommon injuries. We present the case of an 11-year-old girl with an elbow dislocation treated by closed manual reduction. The medial epicondyle fracture was missed initially until she developed an ulnar nerve palsy 2 months later. Intraoperatively we discovered the bony epicondyle piercing the joint capsule and compressing the ulnar nerve. Removal of the bony fragment relieved her symptoms and she returned to normal activities at 1 year follow-up. We would like to highlight this rare occurrence and present the detailed history and management of this case. PMID:20555271

  1. Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Statistics More Resources Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

  2. Numbness after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization: the Results from a Nerve Conduction Study of the Superficial Radial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho-Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Han, Jae Deok; Lee, Hyun Jong; Kim, Je Sang; Park, Jin Sik; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Choi, Young Jin; Shim, Won-Heum; Kwon, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Numbness on the hand occurs infrequently after a transradial cardiac catheterization (TRC). The symptom resembles that of neuropathy. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, the predicting factors and the presence of neurological abnormalities of numbness, using a nerve conduction study (NCS). Subjects and Methods From April to December 2013, all patients who underwent a TRC were prospectively enrolled. From among these, the patients who experienced numbness on the ipsilateral hand were instructed to describe their symptoms using a visual analogue scale; subsequently, NCSs were performed on these patients. Results Of the total 479 patients in the study sample, numbness occurred in nine (1.8%) following the procedure. The NCS was performed for eight out of the nine patients, four (50%) of which had an abnormal NCS result at the superficial radial nerve. A larger sheath and history of myocardial infarction (p=0.14 and 0.08 respectively) tended towards the occurrence of numbness; however, only the use of size 7 French sheaths was an independent predictor for the occurrence of numbness (odds ratio: 5.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-28.58, p=0.042). The symptoms disappeared for all patients but one, within four months. Conclusion A transient injury of the superficial radial nerve could be one reason for numbness after a TRC. A large sheath size was an independent predictor of numbness; therefore, large sized sheaths should be used with caution when performing a TRC. PMID:27014346

  3. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain ...

  4. The impact of cranial irradiation on the growth of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.J.; Foster, M.B.; D'Ercole, A.J.; McMillan, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Heights, height velocities, weights, and weight velocities were measured serially in 21 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had survived three to five years in continuous complete remission. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment regimens that varied according to whether cranial irradiation was used. Patients receiving cranial irradiation had lower height velocities during therapy than normal subjects and patients not receiving cranial irradiation. Twenty-two other children with ALL, who were irradiated but not randomized, exhibited similar alterations in growth. These results indicate that cranial irradiation, and not leukemia or antileukemia chemotherapy, causes reduced growth.

  5. Does the Cranial Mesenchyme Contribute to Neural Fold Elevation During Neurulation?

    PubMed Central

    Zohn, Irene E.; Sarkar, Anjali A.

    2012-01-01

    The central nervous system is derived from the neural plate that undergoes a series of complex morphogenetic events resulting in formation of the neural tube in a process known as neurulation. The cellular behaviors driving neurulation in the cranial region involve forces generated by the neural tissue itself as well as the surrounding epithelium and mesenchyme. Of interest, the cranial mesenchyme underlying the neural plate undergoes stereotypical rearrangements hypothesized to drive elevation of the neural folds. As the neural folds rise, the hyaluronate-rich extracellular matrix greatly expands resulting in increased space between individual cranial mesenchyme cells. Based on inhibitor studies, expansion of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in driving neural fold elevation; however, since the surrounding neural and epidermal ectoderm were also affected by inhibitor exposure, these studies are inconclusive. Similarly, treatment of neurulating embryos with teratogenic doses of retinoic acid results in altered organization of the cranial mesenchyme but alterations in surrounding tissues are also observed. The strongest evidence for a critical role for the cranial mesenchyme in neural fold elevation comes from studies of genes expressed exclusively in the cranial mesenchyme that when mutated result in exencephaly associated with abnormal organization of the cranial mesenchyme. Twist is the best studied of these and is expressed in both the paraxial mesoderm and neural crest derived cranial mesenchyme. Here we review the evidence implicating the cranial mesenchyme in providing a driving force for neural fold elevation to evaluate whether there is sufficient data to support this hypothesis. PMID:22945385

  6. Does the cranial mesenchyme contribute to neural fold elevation during neurulation?

    PubMed

    Zohn, Irene E; Sarkar, Anjali A

    2012-10-01

    The central nervous system is derived from the neural plate, which undergoes a series of complex morphogenetic events resulting in formation of the neural tube in a process known as neurulation. The cellular behaviors driving neurulation in the cranial region involve forces generated by the neural tissue itself as well as the surrounding epithelium and mesenchyme. Of interest, the cranial mesenchyme underlying the neural plate undergoes stereotypical rearrangements hypothesized to drive elevation of the neural folds. As the neural folds rise, the hyaluronate-rich extracellular matrix greatly expands resulting in increased space between individual cranial mesenchyme cells. Based on inhibitor studies, expansion of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in driving neural fold elevation; however, because the surrounding neural and epidermal ectoderm were also affected by inhibitor exposure, these studies are inconclusive. Similarly, treatment of neurulating embryos with teratogenic doses of retinoic acid results in altered organization of the cranial mesenchyme, but alterations in surrounding tissues are also observed. The strongest evidence for a critical role for the cranial mesenchyme in neural fold elevation comes from studies of genes expressed exclusively in the cranial mesenchyme that when mutated result in exencephaly associated with abnormal organization of the cranial mesenchyme. Twist is the best studied of these and is expressed in both the paraxial mesoderm and neural crest derived cranial mesenchyme. In this article, we review the evidence implicating the cranial mesenchyme in providing a driving force for neural fold elevation to evaluate whether there are sufficient data to support this hypothesis. PMID:22945385

  7. Localisation of the spinal nucleus of the accessory nerve in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M; Salman, S S

    1986-01-01

    The spinal nucleus of the accessory nerve (SNA) was localised in eight adult rabbits by a retrograde degeneration technique using thionine as a stain for the Nissl substance. The SNA was found to extend from the caudal one fifth of the medulla oblongata to the cranial one fourth of the sixth cervical segment. In the caudal part of the medulla oblongata, the SNA was located in the dorsal part of the detached ventral grey column. In the first cervical segment, the SNA was dorsolateral to the dorsomedial column and dorsal to the ventromedial column of the ventral grey column. In the cranial part of the second cervical segment, the SNA shifted laterally to the lateral margin of the ventral grey column. After this lateral shift, the SNA was located in the lateral part of the ventral grey column of the second, third and fourth cervical segments. In the fifth and cranial one fourth of the sixth cervical segments, the SNA was not a well defined column of cells but was represented by isolated cells scattered in the ventral part of the ventral grey column between the phrenic nucleus and the ventral border of the grey matter. The total number of chromatolysed cells found in the SNA of the right experimental side varied from 2723 to 3210. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:3429311

  8. Morphology and variation in porpoise (Cetacea: Phocoenidae) cranial endocasts.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Rachel A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of endocranial anatomy in cetaceans is important from the perspective of echolocation ability, intelligence, social structure, and alternate pathways for circulation to the brain. Apart from the importance of studying brain shape and asymmetries as they relate to aspects of behavior and intelligence, cranial endocasts can show a close correspondence to the hydrostatic shape of the brain in life, and canals and grooves can preserve features of the circulatory system. Multiple samples are rarely available for studies of individual variation, especially in fossils, thus a first step in quantifying variation and making comparisons with fossils is made possible with CT scans of osteological specimens. This study presents a series of high-resolution X-ray CT-derived cranial endocasts of six extant species of Phocoenidae, a clade including some of the smallest and one of the rarest cetaceans. Degree of gyrification varies interspecifically and intraspecifically, possibly resulting from variation in preservation of the ossified meninges. Computed tomographic data show that visually assessed asymmetry in the cranial endocasts is not correlated with volumetric measurements, but nonetheless may reflect torsion in the skull's shape such that the right cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres extend rostrally and laterally more than the left. Vasculature and canals are similar to other described cetacean species, but the hypophyseal casts are unusual. Similarities between brain shape and volume measurements in the different species can be attributed to paedomorphism and concomitant variation in ecological preferences. This may explain similarities Neophocaena phocaenoides and Phocoena sinus share with the juvenile Phocoena phocoena specimen studied. PMID:23613315

  9. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Wollner, N.; Fuks, Z.

    1987-03-01

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Giant tricholemmal squamous cell carcinoma with cranial infiltration.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Bayyoud, Yousef; Kittner, Thomas; Dürig, Eberhard

    2011-04-01

    Tricholemmal squamous cell carcinoma is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma thought to follow a more benign course. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old man with a giant tricholemmal squamous cell carcinoma on his scalp. Further investigations demonstrated a skull destruction and cranial invasion. Curative treatment was impossible, but tumor mass reduction and wound closure by sandwich split-thickness skin mesh graft transplantation using a dermal template was performed. Problems of advanced squamous cell carcinoma on the scalp are discussed. PMID:21532876

  11. Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma with Simultaneous Cranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hwan-Su; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is reported at a rare level of incidence, and is frequently associated with underlying coagulopathy or those receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet agents; some cases accompany concomitant intracranial hemorrhage. The spontaneous development of spinal subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a neurological emergency; therefore, early diagnosis, the discontinuation of anticoagulant, and urgent surgical decompression are required to enable neurological recovery. In this report, we present a simultaneous spinal subdural hematoma and cranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, which mimicked an aneurysmal origin in a female patient who had been taking warfarin due to aortic valve replacement surgery. PMID:26113966

  12. Cannabis use in HIV for pain and other medical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Woolridge, Emily; Barton, Simon; Samuel, Jonathon; Osorio, Jess; Dougherty, Andrew; Holdcroft, Anita

    2005-04-01

    Despite the major benefits of antiretroviral therapy on survival during HIV infection, there is an increasing need to manage symptoms and side effects during long-term drug therapy. Cannabis has been reported anecdotally as being beneficial for a number of common symptoms and complications in HIV infections, for example, poor appetite and neuropathy. This study aimed to investigate symptom management with cannabis. Following Ethics Committee approval, HIV-positive individuals attending a large clinic were recruited into an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire study. Up to one-third (27%, 143/523) reported using cannabis for treating symptoms. Patients reported improved appetite (97%), muscle pain (94%), nausea (93%), anxiety (93%), nerve pain (90%), depression (86%), and paresthesia (85%). Many cannabis users (47%) reported associated memory deterioration. Symptom control using cannabis is widespread in HIV outpatients. A large number of patients reported that cannabis improved symptom control. PMID:15857739

  13. A Unique Case of Common Peroneal Nerve Entrapment.

    PubMed

    Myers, Richard J; Murdock, Elizabeth E; Farooqi, Mehwish; Van Ness, Grace; Crawford, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    The authors present a case of a previously healthy 36-year-old man with a 3-day history of spontaneous complete right lower extremity foot drop. He noticed the symptoms immediately when he attempted to stand after waking from sleep. The patient had no history of similar symptoms, recent trauma, or peripheral nerve disease. Physical examination showed a slap foot gait, complete numbness of the lateral leg and dorsal foot, and 0/5 strength with ankle and great toe dorsiflexion and ankle eversion. Serum laboratory studies showed normal values. Nerve conduction studies confirmed increased latency and decreased amplitude of the right peroneal nerve at the knee, whereas electromyography showed denervation of the tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum brevis. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs showed a normal right knee with the exception of a posterior fibular neck exostosis. Physical therapy, an ankle-foot orthosis, and a 5-day course of oral prednisone burst (50 mg) were prescribed. After 1 month of therapy without resolution, the patient underwent surgical release of the common peroneal nerve and excision of the bony prominence. Twelve days postoperatively, the patient had no sensory improvements but had improved findings on motor examination. Three months postoperatively, the patient had near-normal sensation to light touch in the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, with 5/5 strength and a normal gait. The patient returned to all activity without limitations. The authors present this unique case describing a fibro-osseous source of common peroneal compressive neuropathy and review the literature for spontaneous peroneal entrapment, highlighting the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26186329

  14. Facial Nerve Paralysis in Patients With Chronic Ear Infections: Surgical Outcomes and Radiologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features, radiologic findings, and treatment outcomes in patients of facial nerve paralysis with chronic ear infections. And we also aimed to evaluate for radiologic sensitivities on facial canal, labyrinth and cranial fossa dehiscences in middle ear cholesteatomas. Methods A total of 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for clinical features, radiologic findings, surgical findings, and recovery course. In addition, retrospective review of temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and operative records in 254 middle ear cholesteatoma patients were also performed. Results Of the 13 patients, eight had cholesteatomas in the middle ear, while two patients exhibited external auditory canal cholesteatomas. Chronic suppurative otitis media, petrous apex cholesteatoma and tuberculous otitis media were also observed in some patients. The prevalence of facial paralysis in middle ear cholesteatoma patients was 3.5%. The most common involved site of the facial nerve was the tympanic segment. Labyrinthine fistulas and destruction of cranial bases were more frequently observed in facial paralysis patients than nonfacial paralysis patients. The radiologic sensitivity for facial canal dehiscence was 91%. The surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory in all patients except in two patients who had petrous apex cholesteatoma and requiring conservative management. Conclusion Facial paralyses associated with chronic ear infections were observed in more advanced lesions and the surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory. Facial canal dehiscences can be anticipated preoperatively with high resolution CTs. PMID:26330915

  15. Somatosensory symptoms in unmedicated de novo patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Mehl, Arne; Geffe, Sarah; Benik, Steffen; Tütüncü, Serdar; Klostermann, Fabian; Marzinzik, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition presenting with motor and non-motor symptoms including somatosensory disturbances. As neuropathic syndromes in advanced PD patients are supposed to be due to antiparkinsonian medication, we studied the presence of somatosensory symptoms and peripheral nerve function in drug naïve patients with PD as well as age-matched healthy controls. Somatosensory symptoms and signs were investigated in 39 de novo PD patients and 32 age-matched healthy controls using the modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scale. To elucidate potential underlying mechanisms, peripheral nerve function was analyzed with sensory and motor neurography. About two thirds of de novo diagnosed levodopa naïve PD patients (66.7 %) reported somatosensory symptoms in comparison to one third of the control group (31.2 %) (p = 0.003). The presence of PD (p = 0.017) was a predictive factor for the occurrence of somatosensory symptoms among all participants. In contrast to the significantly higher frequency of somatosensory symptoms in patients with PD compared to controls, neurographically based peripheral nerve function did not differ between the groups. Our results indicate that somatosensory symptoms are a PD feature, which can be found when diagnosed first and independently of dopaminergic treatment. As the electrophysiologically determined peripheral nerve function was not different from that obtained in the control group, somatosensory symptoms are inherent in early PD and may be, at least partially, of central origin. PMID:26392189

  16. [Relapsing infection of cranial prosthesis sustained by Enterobacter cloacae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Garazzino, Silvia; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2008-03-01

    We describe the case of a young man who suffered from relapsing infections of a cranial prosthesis implanted in 1982 after a serious accident. The presence of a bacterial infection was diagnosed by microbiological assays performed on purulent drainage from the surgical wound, removed prosthetic material and bone biopsies obtained intraoperatively. The first prosthesis infection was sustained by two nosocomial pathogens, Enterobacter cloacae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); it was treated for eight weeks with parenteral antibiotic therapy, including teicoplanin and piperacillin/tazobactam, in association with surgical debridement and prosthesis removal. The following relapse, sustained by Enterobacter cloacae, was treated with a prolonged course of parenteral antibiotic therapy and prosthesis substitution. A third infection was diagnosed two months after the last cranioplasty: cultures of purulent drainage grew MRSA and Staphylococcus gallinarum. In addition to radical debridement, oral antibiotic treatment including linezolid was introduced. Antibiotic therapy was stopped after 10 weeks; at a follow-up visit performed after three years no signs or symptoms of relapse were evident. This case shows the difficulty in eradicating prosthesis infections, and demonstrates the central role of radical surgical debridement and the need of appropriate antibiotic treatment in dosing and duration. PMID:18367884

  17. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. Q.; Yang, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption.

  18. Madreporic coral for cranial base reconstruction. 8 years experience.

    PubMed

    Roux, F X; Brasnu, D; Menard, M; Devaux, B; Nohra, G; Loty, B

    1995-01-01

    The authors, since 1985, have used 587 Madreporic Coral grafts as bone substitute in a total of 183 patients, among them in 80 cases for repair of cranial base bone defects. They report their long-term results. Partial resorption to about 40% of the initial volume occurred in almost all cases within 8 to 10 months, with complete resorption after about one year. 20% of the coral blocks moved spontaneously or split into pieces, but could easily be withdrawn rhinoscopically through the nostrils. No CSF leakage was noticed afterwards. The local infection rate was only 4%, always close to the basal coral graft. This is lower than the infection rate after using autologous bone harvested from the inner table of the bone flap (20%). Infections were cured by removal of the coral graft. Despite the mentioned draw backs, Madreporic Coral graft implants can be recommended as bone substitute in cranial base surgery: 1. The material simplifies the surgical procedure; 2. Harvesting of autologous bone is no longer necessary; 3. Transmission of infections like AIDS, Hepatitis C or Creutzfeld-Jacob-disease can be avoided with certainty. PMID:8748767

  19. Unsteady 3D flow simulations in cranial arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph; Karniadakis, George

    2008-11-01

    High resolution unsteady 3D flow simulations in major cranial arteries have been performed. Two cases were considered: 1) a healthy volunteer with a complete Circle of Willis (CoW); and 2) a patient with hydrocephalus and an incomplete CoW. Computation was performed on 3344 processors of the new half petaflop supercomputer in TACC. Two new numerical approaches were developed and implemented: 1) a new two-level domain decomposition method, which couples continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the computational domain; and 2) a new type of outflow boundary conditions, which imposes, in an accurate and computationally efficient manner, clinically measured flow rates. In the first simulation, a geometric model of 65 cranial arteries was reconstructed. Our simulation reveals a high degree of asymmetry in the flow at the left and right parts of the CoW and the presence of swirling flow in most of the CoW arteries. In the second simulation, one of the main findings was a high pressure drop at the right anterior communicating artery (PCA). Due to the incompleteness of the CoW and the pressure drop at the PCA, the right internal carotid artery supplies blood to most regions of the brain.

  20. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tekkök, ?smail Hakk?

    2015-01-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM. PMID:26361537

  1. Heterochrony and patterns of cranial suture closure in hystricognath rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Sutures, joints that allow one bone to articulate with another through intervening fibrous connective tissue, serve as major sites of bone expansion during postnatal craniofacial growth in the vertebrate skull and represent an aspect of cranial ontogeny which may exhibit functional and phylogenetic correlates. Suture evolution among hystricognath rodents, an ecologically diverse group represented here by 26 species, is examined using sequence heterochrony methods, i.e. event pairing and parsimov. Although minor nuances in suture closure sequence exist between species, the overall sequence was found to be conserved both across the hystricognath group and, to an increasing degree, within selected clades. At species level, suture closure pattern exhibited a significant positive correlation with patterns previously reported for hominoids. Patterns for most clades revealed the first sutures to close are those contacting the exoccipital, interparietal, and palatine bones. Heterochronic shifts were found along 19 of 35 branches within the hystricognath phylogeny. The number of shifts per node ranged from one to seven events and, overall, involved 21 of 34 suture sites. The topology generated by parsimony analyses of the event pair matrix yielded only one grouping that was congruent with the evolutionary relationships, compiled from morphological and molecular studies, taken as framework. Sutures contacting the exoccipital displayed the highest levels of most complete closure across all species. Level of suture closure is negatively correlated with cranial length (P < 0.05). Differing life history and locomotory strategies are coupled in part with differing suture closure patterns among several species. PMID:19245501

  2. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base

    PubMed Central

    Kimbel, William H.; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee–human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  3. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base.

    PubMed

    Kimbel, William H; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D

    2014-01-21

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee-human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  4. The role of the mesenchyme in cranial neural fold elevation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris-Wiman, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been previously postulated that the expansion of an hyaluronate-rich extracellular matrix in the fold mesenchyme is responsible for neural fold elevation. In this study we provide evidence that such expansions may play an important role in cranial neural fold elevation by pushing the folds towards the dorsal midline to assist in their elevation. For mesenchymal expansion to result in fold elevation, hyaluronate (HA) and mesenchymal cells must be non-randomly distributed within the mesenchyme. Patterns of mesenchymal cell distribution and cell proliferation were analyzed using the computer-assisted method of smoothed spatial averaging. The distribution of Alcian blue-stained and {sup 3}H-glucosamine-labelled HA was also analyzed during cranial neural fold elevation using established image processing techniques. Analysis of the distribution of {sup 3}H-thymidine-labelled mesenchymal cells indicated that differential mitotic activity was not responsible for decreased mesenchymal cell density. Likewise, analysis of distribution patterns of {sup 3}H-glucosamine-labelled HA indicated that decreased HA concentration was not produced by regional differences in HA synthesis. These results suggest that decreases in mesenchymal cell density and HA concentration that occur during neural fold elevation are produced by mesenchymal expansion.

  5. Morphological features of nerves in skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Wendelschafer-Crabb, G; Kennedy, W R; Walk, D

    2006-03-15

    Skin biopsy is an effective test for diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. The most commonly reported indication of abnormality in a skin biopsy is reduction of epidermal nerve density. Morphological changes of epidermal nerves and the underlying subepidermal nerve plexus provide added evidence for the presence of neuropathy. We determined the prevalence of epidermal axon swellings, dermal axon swellings, and a unique type of epidermal nerve that we call a crawler, in a group of normal subjects, diabetic subjects, and patients with idiopathic small fiber neuropathy. Other morphologic features examined include thinning of the subepidermal nerve plexus, sprouts at nerve terminals, encapsulated endings, and immunoreactive basal cells. PMID:16448669

  6. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... damage the nerves and cause a complication called neuropathy. This generally begins as loss of sensation in the toes, and possibly fingers. Eventually, the neuropathy can move up the person's legs or arms.

  8. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Erkan; van Eijk, Tess; Henssen, Dylan; Arnts, Inge; Steegers, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP may be very diverse, varying from many orthopedic conditions to non-orthopedic conditions. The fact that the suprascapular nerve is one of the most important nerves supplying the shoulder region makes this nerve an interesting target in treating patients suffering shoulder pain. Invasive treatment options are peripheral nerve blocks, temporary electrical stimulation, and neurostimulation. To our best knowledge, thus far there are only a few reports describing the technique of permanent neurostimulation of the suprascapular nerve. In this article we present a patient suffering shoulder pain after she underwent surgery for cervical stenosis. After a step by step treatment protocol was done, we finally offered her trial stimulation of the suprascapular nerve. A single quad lead was implanted via a posterior approach under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance. Two weeks after successful stimulation, we implanted a permanent neuromodulation system. Permanent neurostimulation of the suprascapular nerve and its end branches may be a new interesting target in treating patients suffering shoulder pain due to various etiologies. In our patient the follow-up period is 9 months with an excellent result in pain relief, we observed no complications thus far, especially no dislocation or breakage of the lead. In this report, literature on this subject is reviewed, and our technique is well documented with additional anatomical illustrations. PMID:26752491

  9. Hiccups as a myocardial ischemia symptom.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Waldemar; Szabowski, S?awomir; Stepie?, Marta; Krzywkowska, Katarzyna; Krzywkowski, Artur; Marciniak, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    A hiccup is involuntary, paroxysmal inspiratory movements of the chest wall associated with diaphragm and accessory respiratory muscle contractions, with the synchronized closure of glottis. The mechanism underlying this common primitive reflex plays an important role in protecting airways against esophageal aspiration. The hiccup reflex mechanism is based on the afferent pathway (vagus and phrenic nerve and sympathetic fibers innervating chest organs, the abdomen, the ear, the nose and the throat stimulation, and the stimulation of hiccup center in the central nervous system, mainly reflecting psychogenic or metabolic disorders) and the efferent pathway (phrenic nerves). An incidental hiccup is a common problem, usually resolves spontaneously and does not present a clinical issue. The clinical issue arises in the case of pathologic persistent hiccups or symptomatic secondary hiccups which may lead to significant fatigue, insomnia or depression. Generally, pathologic hiccups are associated with considerable discomfort concerning both the "stigmatized" person and his or her personal surroundings in which it evokes different emotions, from amusement through impatience to uneasiness and the suggestion of a medical visit as an expression of concern for a given person. The most common causes of pathologic symptomatic hiccups are nervous system diseases, either the central nervous system (proliferative, angiogenic, inflammatory disorders), or the peripheral nervous system: the irritation of the phrenic nerve (proliferative disorders, goitre) and the vagus nerve (otolaryngologic diseases, meningitis, esophageal, stomach and duodenal diseases, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enteritis). The vagus nerve irritation with subsequent hiccups may be caused by chest disorders (injury, surgery) and heart diseases (myocardial infarction). In the present paper we describe the case of a 62-year-old male with recurrent hiccups associated with exertion as a secondary symptom of myocardial ischemia. PMID:18476462

  10. Cranial Size and IQ in Asian Americans from Birth to Age Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, J. Philippe

    1997-01-01

    Data from the Collaborative Perinatal Project analyzed for a subsample of 100 Asian Americans showed a higher IQ for the Asian American sample at age 7, and larger cranial capacity at birth, 4 months, 1 year, and 7 years as compared to Whites and Blacks. Socioeconomic status related to cranial capacity and IQ scores, but not stature or weight.…

  11. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4300 Manual cranial drills,...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4300 Manual cranial drills,...

  13. Peripheral nerve injuries treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijun; Liu, Zhigang; Pan, Yuemei; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Zhixin; Lu, Laijin

    2014-04-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incompletely functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. Current researches have extensively focused on the new approaches for the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. This review summarizes treatments of peripheral nerve injures, from conventional suturing method, to conduit coaptation with stem cell and growth factor, and review the developments of research and clinical application of these therapies. PMID:24037713

  14. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  15. Targeting Peripheral Afferent Nerve Terminals for Cough and Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic unproductive coughing and dyspnea are symptoms that severely diminish the quality of life in a substantial proportion of the population. There are presently few if any drugs that effectively treat these symptoms. Rational drug targets for cough and dyspnea have emerged over the recent years based on developments in our understanding of the innervation of the respiratory tract. These drug targets can be subcategorized into those that target the vagal afferent nerve endings, and those that target neural activity within the CNS. This review focuses on targets presumed to be in the peripheral terminals of afferent nerves within the airways. Conceptually, the activity of peripheral afferent nerves involved with unwanted urge-to-cough or dyspnea sensations can be inhibited by limiting the intensity of the stimulus, inhibiting the amplitude of the stimulus-induced generator potential, or inhibiting the transduction between the generator potential and action potential discharge and conduction. These mechanisms reveal many therapeutic strategies for anti-tussive and anti-dyspnea drug development with peripheral sites of action. PMID:21705272

  16. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  17. From nerve net to nerve ring, nerve cord and brain - evolution of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-17

    The puzzle of how complex nervous systems emerged remains unsolved. Comparative studies of neurodevelopment in cnidarians and bilaterians suggest that this process began with distinct integration centres that evolved on opposite ends of an initial nerve net. The 'apical nervous system' controlled general body physiology, and the 'blastoporal nervous system' coordinated feeding movements and locomotion. We propose that expansion, integration and fusion of these centres gave rise to the bilaterian nerve cord and brain. PMID:26675821

  18. Diagnostic value of history and physical examination in patients suspected of lumbosacral nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    Vroomen, P; de Krom, M C T F M; Wilmink, J; Kester, A; Knottnerus, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patient characteristics, symptoms, and examination findings in the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral nerve root compression causing sciatica. Methods: The study involved 274 patients with pain radiating into the leg. All had a standardised clinical assessment and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The associations between patient characteristics, clinical findings, and lumbosacral nerve root compression on MR imaging were analysed. Results: Nerve root compression was associated with three patient characteristics, three symptoms, and four physical examination findings (paresis, absence of tendon reflexes, a positive straight leg raising test, and increased finger-floor distance). Multivariate analysis, analysing the independent diagnostic value of the tests, showed that nerve root compression was predicted by two patient characteristics, four symptoms, and two signs (increased finger-floor distance and paresis). The straight leg raise test was not predictive. The area under the curve of the receiver-operating characteristic was 0.80 for the history items. It increased to 0.83 when the physical examination items were added. Conclusions: Various clinical findings were found to be associated with nerve root compression on MR imaging. While this set of findings agrees well with those commonly used in daily practice, the tests tended to have lower sensitivity and specificity than previously reported. Stepwise multivariate analysis showed that most of the diagnostic information revealed by physical examination findings had already been revealed by the history items. PMID:11971050

  19. Two Immigrants with Tuberculosis of the Ear, Nose, and Throat Region with Skull Base and Cranial Nerve Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Richardus, Renate A.; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Steens, Stefan C. A.; Arend, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    We report two immigrants with tuberculosis of the skull base and a review of the literature. A Somalian man presented with bilateral otitis media, hearing loss, and facial and abducens palsy. Imaging showed involvement of both mastoid and petrous bones, extending via the skull base to the nasopharynx, suggesting tuberculosis which was confirmed by characteristic histology and positive auramine staining, while Ziehl-Neelsen staining and PCR were negative. A Sudanese man presented with torticollis and deviation of the uvula due to paresis of N. IX and XI. Imaging showed a retropharyngeal abscess and lysis of the clivus. Histology, acid-fast staining, and PCR were negative. Both patients had a positive Quantiferon TB Gold in-tube result and improved rapidly after empiric treatment for tuberculosis. Cultures eventually yielded M. tuberculosis. These unusual cases exemplify the many faces of tuberculosis and the importance to include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of unexplained problems. PMID:21541186

  20. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the weighted strategy isocentric positioning correction provided the reduction of fiducial registration errors, featuring up to 61.7% decrease in median values (versus 46.8% for the unweighted strategy) of initial displacements. The weighted strategy proved high performance in minimizing the effects of fiducial localization errors, showing a great potential in improving patient setup. The clinical data analysis revealed that the application of a robust reconstruction algorithm may provide high-quality results in patient setup verification, by properly managing external fiducials localization errors.