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Sample records for creosote bush larrea

  1. Contact dermatitis from Larrea (creosote bush).

    PubMed

    Leonforte, J F

    1986-02-01

    Six men suffering from acute dermatitis had positive patch tests to Larrea (creosote bush). The lesions preferentially involved sun-exposed sites, simulating a photodermatitis, but also were on the legs and scrotum. Our findings were more consistent with contact allergy than with a primary irritant or a phototoxic response. The patch tests were also positive to Zuccagnia punctata. In two cases the exposure to the creosote bush occurred as a result of casual occupations, in two because of household remedies (moist compresses and baths), and in the other two as a result of burning the bush and resorting to household remedies. Attention should be drawn to this contact dermatitis because the creosote bush grows abundantly all over the American continent. PMID:3950120

  2. Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Reduces Plasma and Hepatic Lipids in Hamsters Fed a High Fat and Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchyo-Tenorio, Georgina; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Andrade-Cetto, Adolfo; Cárdenas-Vázquez, René

    2016-01-01

    Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (Sesse y Moc. Ex DC, Zygophyllaceae) is a shrub found in the deserts of Northern Mexico and Southwestern United States. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat a variety of illnesses including type 2 diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract on plasma and liver parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome in hamsters fed a high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD), comparing them with those induced by ezetimibe (EZ). Seven groups of six hamsters each were formed. Six groups were fed HFD for 2 weeks. The following 2 weeks, the HFD groups received: (1) only HFD, (2) HFD + 3 mg% EZ, (3) HFD + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract, (4) only standard diet (Std Diet), (5) Std Diet + 3 mg% EZ, (6) Std Diet + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract. The beneficial effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract in the HFD hamster model were a reduction of insulin resistance, associated with lower serum insulin and leptin, lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher liver antioxidant capacity. Plasma and liver lipids tended or were reduced to values closer to those of animals fed standard diet. A similar effect on lipids was induced by EZ, although with even lower hepatic cholesterol and total lipids concentrations. In general, the change from HFD to standard diet plus ethanolic extract induced the same but deeper changes, including a reduction in plasma glucose and an increase in the percentage of HDL cholesterol. Unlike creosote bush extract, EZ increased food consumption and neutral fecal steroids, with no significant effect on body weight, epididymal fat pads, liver peroxidation or antioxidant capacity. Also EZ did not modify serum insulin and leptin. However, insulin sensitivity improved to values similar to those induced by the extract. This suggests that the mechanism of action of creosote bush ethanolic extract is different to inhibition of cholesterol absorption or increase excretion

  3. Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Reduces Plasma and Hepatic Lipids in Hamsters Fed a High Fat and Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchyo-Tenorio, Georgina; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Andrade-Cetto, Adolfo; Cárdenas-Vázquez, René

    2016-01-01

    Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (Sesse y Moc. Ex DC, Zygophyllaceae) is a shrub found in the deserts of Northern Mexico and Southwestern United States. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat a variety of illnesses including type 2 diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract on plasma and liver parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome in hamsters fed a high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD), comparing them with those induced by ezetimibe (EZ). Seven groups of six hamsters each were formed. Six groups were fed HFD for 2 weeks. The following 2 weeks, the HFD groups received: (1) only HFD, (2) HFD + 3 mg% EZ, (3) HFD + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract, (4) only standard diet (Std Diet), (5) Std Diet + 3 mg% EZ, (6) Std Diet + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract. The beneficial effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract in the HFD hamster model were a reduction of insulin resistance, associated with lower serum insulin and leptin, lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher liver antioxidant capacity. Plasma and liver lipids tended or were reduced to values closer to those of animals fed standard diet. A similar effect on lipids was induced by EZ, although with even lower hepatic cholesterol and total lipids concentrations. In general, the change from HFD to standard diet plus ethanolic extract induced the same but deeper changes, including a reduction in plasma glucose and an increase in the percentage of HDL cholesterol. Unlike creosote bush extract, EZ increased food consumption and neutral fecal steroids, with no significant effect on body weight, epididymal fat pads, liver peroxidation or antioxidant capacity. Also EZ did not modify serum insulin and leptin. However, insulin sensitivity improved to values similar to those induced by the extract. This suggests that the mechanism of action of creosote bush ethanolic extract is different to inhibition of cholesterol absorption or increase excretion

  4. Effect of manipulation of water and nitrogen supplies on the quantitative phenology of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush) in the Sonoran desert in California

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M.R.; Rundel, P.W.; Herman, D.J. ); Meinzer, F.C. ); Nilsen, E.T. ); Virginia, R.A. ); Jarrell, W.M.; Clark, P.C. )

    1988-08-01

    Two years of water and nitrogen augmentation experiments on Larrea tridentata (creosote bush) were carried out in a southern Californian warm desert wash plant community. Treatments consisted of control (C), water (W), water and soil nitrogen (W+SN), and soil nitrogen (SN). Quantitative phenological data and microclimate measurements were collected prior to the onset of and during the growth period and treatments. Predawn and midday water potentials were lower in nonirrigated than irrigated individuals. Leaf conductance was higher in irrigate than in nonirrigated shrubs, with a maximum difference of 1 cm s{sup {minus}1} observed in July 1984 under relatively low vapor pressure deficit conditions. Leaf production rates were significantly high in the irrigated (W and W+SN) treatments than in the nonirrigated (C and SN) treatments in 1984. Addition of soil nitrogen caused no increased in vegetative growth rates in 1984. In 1985, a drier year, there was only minimal growth during the spring and summer growth periods in the nonirrigated treatments, while the W and W+SN treatments resulted in significantly higher leaf and shoot growth rates. Growth rates in 1985 were significantly higher in the W + SN treatment than in the W treatment. Reproductive growth was higher in the nonirrigated than the irrigated treatments, with the lowest reproductive activity noted in the W treatment.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Larrea and its allies (Zygophyllaceae): reticulate evolution and the probable time of creosote bush arrival to North America.

    PubMed

    Lia, V V; Confalonieri, V A; Comas, C I; Hunziker, J H

    2001-11-01

    Nucleotide sequences of Rubisco Large Subunit (rbcL) and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nrDNA were obtained for the five species of Larrea and one species each of Bulnesia (ITS only) and Plectrocarpa (rbcL only). Parsimony analyses were conducted, including sequences from seven genera of Zygophyllaceae reported by other authors-Kallstroemia, Zygophyllum, Augea, Fagonia, Pintoa, Guaiacum, and Porlieria. The main conclusions of the present study are (1) the Argentine endemic Plectrocarpa tetracantha belongs to the subfamily Larreoideae (New World Clade); (2) all three phylogenies obtained from rbcL, ITS, and combined data sets show a close relationship between the tetraploid L. cuneifolia (sect. Bifolium) and the diploid multifoliolate pair L. nitida-L. ameghinoi (sect. Larrea), which could result from a possible intersectional hybrid origin of the tetraploid; (3) L. divaricata (sect. Bifolium) and L. tridentata (sect. Bifolium) form a highly supported monophyletic group, which agrees with previous cytogenetic and molecular evidence; and (4) the rate of nucleotide substitution of rbcL was estimated based on geological and fossil records. Under the molecular clock hypothesis, nucleotide sequence divergence between L. divaricata and L. tridentata suggests a Late Neogene (8.4 to 4.2 mybp) time of arrival of the diploid ancestors of L. tridentata to North American deserts. PMID:11697924

  6. Creosote bush lignans for human disease treatment and prevention: Perspectives on combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnabre, John; Bates, Robert; Huang, Ru Chih

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal properties of the most successful plant in the deserts of the western hemisphere, the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), are evidenced by the long traditional usage of the plants by the Native Americans Indian tribes in Southwestern North America and the Amerindians from South America. The plant is rich in simple bisphenyl lignans and tricyclic lignans known as cyclolignans. These compounds are responsible for many of the pharmacological activities of extracts of the plants. Some of these activities, namely antiherpes, antioxidant, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory, were known a century ago. Only recently have further studies revealed other crucial activities of the same plant molecules as powerful agents against human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and symptoms of aging. Molecular mechanisms underlying the antiviral and anticancer activities have been elucidated and involve the inhibition of SP1 dependent gene transcription. This review summarizes the recent findings on creosote bush lignans. We introduce the concept of a cocktail of safe well-characterized natural products from the creosote bush that would represent a bridge between oriental herbal medicines and Western drug-based therapies. PMID:26151022

  7. Creosote bush lignans for human disease treatment and prevention: Perspectives on combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Gnabre, John; Bates, Robert; Huang, Ru Chih

    2015-07-01

    The medicinal properties of the most successful plant in the deserts of the western hemisphere, the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), are evidenced by the long traditional usage of the plants by the Native Americans Indian tribes in Southwestern North America and the Amerindians from South America. The plant is rich in simple bisphenyl lignans and tricyclic lignans known as cyclolignans. These compounds are responsible for many of the pharmacological activities of extracts of the plants. Some of these activities, namely antiherpes, antioxidant, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory, were known a century ago. Only recently have further studies revealed other crucial activities of the same plant molecules as powerful agents against human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and symptoms of aging. Molecular mechanisms underlying the antiviral and anticancer activities have been elucidated and involve the inhibition of SP1 dependent gene transcription. This review summarizes the recent findings on creosote bush lignans. We introduce the concept of a cocktail of safe well-characterized natural products from the creosote bush that would represent a bridge between oriental herbal medicines and Western drug-based therapies. PMID:26151022

  8. "Pharm-ecology" of diet shifting: biotransformation of plant secondary compounds in creosote (Larrea tridentata) by a woodrat herbivore, Neotoma lepida.

    PubMed

    Haley, Shannon L; Lamb, John G; Franklin, Michael R; Constance, Jonathan E; Dearing, M Denise

    2008-01-01

    Diet switching in mammalian herbivores may necessitate a change in the biotransformation enzymes used to process plant secondary compounds (PSCs). We investigated differences in the biotransformation system in the mammalian herbivore, Neotoma lepida, after a radical shift in diet and secondary compound composition. Populations of N. lepida in the Mojave Desert have evolved over the past 10,000 years to feed on creosote (Larrea tridentata) from an ancestral state of consuming juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). This dietary shift represents a marked change in the dietary composition of PSCs in that creosote leaves are coated with phenolic resin, whereas juniper is high in terpenes but lacks phenolic resin. We quantified the enzyme activity of five major groups of biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450s, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, glutathione conjugation, sulfation, and glucuronidation) recognized for their importance to mammalian biotransformation for the elimination of foreign compounds. Enzyme activities were compared between populations of Mojave and Great Basin woodrats fed control and creosote diets. In response to creosote, the Mojave population had greater levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2B, CYP1A) and glutathione conjugation liver enzymes compared with the Great Basin population. Our results suggest that elevated levels of cytochrome P450s and glutathione conjugation enzymes in the Mojave population may be the underlying biotransformation mechanisms that facilitate feeding on creosote. PMID:18752424

  9. Effects of high fire frequency in creosote bush scrub vegetation of the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Plant invasions can increase fire frequency in desert ecosystems where fires were historically infrequent. Although there are many resource management concerns associated with high frequency fire in deserts, fundamental effects on plant community characteristics remain largely unstudied. Here I describe the effects of fire frequency on creosote bush scrub vegetation in the Mojave Desert, USA. Biomass of the invasive annual grass Bromus rubens L. increased following fire, but did not increase further with additional fires. In contrast, density, cover and species richness of native perennial plants each decreased following fire and continued to decrease with subsequent fires, although not as dramatically as after the initial fire. Responses were similar 5 and 14 years post-fire, except that cover of Hymenoclea salsola Torr. & A. Gray and Achnatherum speciosa Trin. & Rupr. both increased in areas burnt once. These results suggest that control of B. rubens may be equally warranted after one, two or three fires, but revegetation of native perennial plants is most warranted following multiple fires. These results are valid within the scope of this study, which is defined as relatively short term vegetation responses (???14 years) to short fire return intervals (6.3 and 7.3 years for the two and three fire frequency levels) within creosote bush scrub of the Mojave Desert. ?? 2012 IAWF.

  10. Genes encoding chavicol/eugenol synthase from the creosote bush Larrea tridentata

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kim, Sung -Jin; Vassao, Daniel Giddings; Patten, Ann M.; Eichinger, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Particular aspects provide novel methods for redirecting carbon allocation in plants or cell culture from lignification to inherently more useful and tractable materials, and to facilitate the generation of, e.g., biofuels from the remaining plant ro culture biomass. Particular aspects provided novel methods for converting monolignols into allyl/propenyl phenols, and for chavicol/eugenol formation or production. Additional aspects relate to the discovery of novel chavicol/eugenol synthases that convert p-coumaryl/coniferyl alcohol esters into chavicol/eugenol, and to novel compositions (e.g., novel proteins and nucleic acids encoding same), and novel methods using same for producing or forming chavicol/eugenol and other derivatives in cell culture and/or genetically modified plants, and for re-engineering the composition of plant biomass. Particular aspects provide novel methods for generation in culture or in planta of liquid/combustible allyl/propenyl phenols, and these phenolic products are utilized for (non-ethanol) biofuel/bioenergy purposes, while the remaining plant biomass facilitates the generation of other biofuels.

  11. Creosote

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Creosote ; CASRN 8001 - 58 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  12. Determining copper and lead binding in Larrea tridentata through chemical modification and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polette, L.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Chianelli, R.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.

    1997-12-31

    Metal contamination in soils has become a widespread problem. Emerging technologies, such as phytoremediation, may offer low cost cleanup methods. The authors have identified a desert plant, Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), which naturally grows and uptakes copper and lead from a contaminated area near a smelting operation. They determined, through chemical modification of carboxyl groups with methanol, that these functional groups may be responsible for a portion of copper(II) binding. In contrast, lead binding was minimally affected by modification of carboxyl groups. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) further support copper binding to oxygen-coordinated ligands and also imply that the binding is not solely due to phytochelatins. The EXAFS data indicate the presence of both Cu-O and Cu-S back scatters, no short Cu-Cu interactions, but with significant Cu-Cu back scattering at 3.7 {angstrom} (unlike phytochelatins with predominantly Cu-S coordination and short Cu-Cu interactions at 2.7 {angstrom}). Cu EXAFS of roots and leaves also vary depending on the level of heavy metal contamination in the environment from which the various creosote samples were obtained. In contrast, Pb XANES data of roots and leaves of creosote collected from different contaminated sites indicate no difference in valence states or ligand coordination.

  13. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  14. AmeriFlux US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Kurc, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote. Site Description - Part of the Santa Rita Experimental Range since 1901; Site vegetation has been dominated by Creosote bush since at least 1934

  15. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote. Part II: Original plant source of crude drug wood creosote].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Wood creosote is a medicine that has been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) since the first edition published in 1886. Medicines containing wood creosote and other natural ingredients have been very popular in Japan and Southeast Asian countries. In Japan, one such medicine, named Seirogan, has been used for more than 100 years. In this paper, we report the results of our examination on the historical aspects of wood creosote. One finding was that creosote, called "kereosote" at that time, was imported to Japan for the first time to Nagasaki by Johann Erdewin Niemann, who was the Director of the Dutch Mercantile House, and prescribed by Johannes Lijdius Catharinus Pompe van Meerdervoort and Anthonius Franciscus Bauduin. From our findings, we concluded that wood creosote was one of the essential medicines for the successful introduction and progression of Western medicine in Japan. Furthermore, we found that Dutch physicians introduced wood creosote to Japanese physicians, including Taizen Sato, Dokai Hayashi, and Jun Matsumoto, and that wood creosote was subsequently popularized by Rintaro (Ogai) Mori during the Russo-Japanese war. In addition, we examined the original plant for wood creosote, and consequently confirmed that the 15th edition of the JP, Supplement Two, clarifying the original plant for wood creosote, matches the pharmaceutical and historical facts. We also provide drug information relating to distinguishing between wood creosote and the creosote bush. PMID:22164686

  16. Effect of Creosote Bush-Derived NDGA on Expression of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism in Liver of High-Fructose Fed Rats: Relevance to NDGA Amelioration of Hypertriglyceridemia and Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Yihang; Hu, Jie; Shen, Wen-Jun; Singh, Madhurima; Hou, Xiaoming; Bittner, Alex; Bittner, Stefanie; Cortez, Yuan; Tabassum, Juveria; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Azhar, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of Creosote bush, has been shown to have profound effects on the core components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), lowering blood glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) levels in several models of dyslipidemia, as well as improving body weight (obesity), insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension, and ameliorating hepatic steatosis. In the present study, a high-fructose diet (HFrD) fed rat model of hypertriglyceridemia was employed to further delineate the underlying mechanism by which NDGA exerts its anti-hypertriglyceridemic action. In the HFrD treatment group, NDGA administration by oral gavage decreased plasma levels of TG, glucose, FFA, and insulin, increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and attenuated hepatic TG accumulation. qRT-PCR measurements indicated that NDGA treatment increased the mRNA expression of key fatty acid transport (L-FABP, CD36), and fatty acid oxidation (ACOX1, CPT-2, and PPARα transcription factor) genes and decreased the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipogenesis (FASN, ACC1, SCD1, L-PK and ChREBP and SREBP-1c transcription factors). Western blot analysis indicated that NDGA administration upregulated hepatic insulin signaling (P-Akt), AMPK activity (P-AMPK), MLYCD, and PPARα protein levels, but decreased SCD1, ACC1 and ACC2 protein content and also inactivated ACC1 activity (increased P-ACC1). These findings suggest that NDGA ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis primarily by interfering with lipogenesis and promoting increased channeling of fatty acids towards their oxidation. PMID:26394137

  17. Effect of Creosote Bush-Derived NDGA on Expression of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism in Liver of High-Fructose Fed Rats: Relevance to NDGA Amelioration of Hypertriglyceridemia and Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Yihang; Hu, Jie; Shen, Wen-Jun; Singh, Madhurima; Hou, Xiaoming; Bittner, Alex; Bittner, Stefanie; Cortez, Yuan; Tabassum, Juveria; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of Creosote bush, has been shown to have profound effects on the core components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), lowering blood glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) levels in several models of dyslipidemia, as well as improving body weight (obesity), insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension, and ameliorating hepatic steatosis. In the present study, a high-fructose diet (HFrD) fed rat model of hypertriglyceridemia was employed to further delineate the underlying mechanism by which NDGA exerts its anti-hypertriglyceridemic action. In the HFrD treatment group, NDGA administration by oral gavage decreased plasma levels of TG, glucose, FFA, and insulin, increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and attenuated hepatic TG accumulation. qRT-PCR measurements indicated that NDGA treatment increased the mRNA expression of key fatty acid transport (L-FABP, CD36), and fatty acid oxidation (ACOX1, CPT-2, and PPARα transcription factor) genes and decreased the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipogenesis (FASN, ACC1, SCD1, L-PK and ChREBP and SREBP-1c transcription factors). Western blot analysis indicated that NDGA administration upregulated hepatic insulin signaling (P-Akt), AMPK activity (P-AMPK), MLYCD, and PPARα protein levels, but decreased SCD1, ACC1 and ACC2 protein content and also inactivated ACC1 activity (increased P-ACC1). These findings suggest that NDGA ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis primarily by interfering with lipogenesis and promoting increased channeling of fatty acids towards their oxidation. PMID:26394137

  18. CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of creosote-contaminated materials is reviewed here by characterizing coal-tar creosote, identifying techniques for assessing the biodegradability of its many chemical constituents, examining known routes of microbial transformation of these chemicals, and reviewin...

  19. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Abrell, L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.; Ortega, J.; Guenther, A.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009) field study in southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of volatile organic compounds (VOC). While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (<5 mm precipitation) to a rainy July (>80 mm) occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. We observed a strong diurnal pattern of branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids) as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan (the later three compounds are typically assumed to form from secondary reactions within the atmosphere), as well as a group of compounds considered

  20. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Abrell, L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.; Ortega, J.; Guenther, A.

    2010-07-01

    The emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from plants impacts both climate and air quality by fueling atmospheric chemistry and by contributing to aerosol particles. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (<5 mm precipitation) to a rainy July (>80 mm) occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009) field study in Southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of VOCs. We observed a strong diurnal pattern with branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids) as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan

  1. Two-Site Comparison of Transpiration by Larrea Tridentata 2024

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of landscape changes within the desert southwestern U.S. such as increased grazing, reduced wildfire frequency, and changes in atmospheric conditions, the native creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) has encroached upon historically grass-dominated ecosystems, expanding in range and land cove...

  2. The Bush Memorial Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamline University Bulletin, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Bush Memorial Library was formally dedicated on October 9, 1971. As part of Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, the Bush Memorial Library has a reading room, audio booths, and audio-visual classroom as well as an audio control room. The Bush Memorial Library is a member of the Cooperating Libraries in Consortium which is a cooperative…

  3. Comparative spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi inhibition by Larrea Tridentata infusion and NDGA chemical extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia

    2012-10-01

    In the present comparative spectroscopic study we try to understand calcium oxalate kidney stone formation as well as its inhibition by using a traditional medicine approach with Larrea Tridentata (LT) herbal extracts and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which is a chemical extract of the LT bush. The samples were synthesized without and with LT or NDGA using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. While the use of infusion from LT decreases the sizes of calcium oxalate crystals and also changes their structure from monohydrate for pure crystals to dihydrate for crystals grown with different amounts of inhibitor, both Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopic techniques, which are the methods of analysis employed in this work, reveal that NDGA is not responsible for the change in the morphology of calcium oxalate crystals and does not contribute significantly to the inhibition process. The presence of NDGA slightly affects the structure of the crystals by modifying the strength of the C-C bonds as seen in the Raman data. Also, the current infrared absorption results demonstrate the presence of NDGA in the samples through a vibrational line that corresponds to the double bond between carbon atoms of the ester group of NDGA.

  4. 2. Creosote plant site (NE side) as viewed from passenger ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Creosote plant site (NE side) as viewed from passenger deck of Washington State Ferry as it approaches the Winslow landing. Remnants of Milwaukee Bock are visible on far left. Building at left is Office Engine Room Building with sloped roof is at center behind tanks. To the right is Boiler Building with stack. Long building is Machine Shop. Dock on right is West Dock. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  5. HVDC wall bushing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.M.; Lux, A.E.; Howes, D.R. )

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted to determine the performance of HVDC wall bushings in different wetting conditions. The in-service behavior of these wall bushing on HVDC systems at voltages of {plus minus}450 kV and above is first described to establish the conditions under which flashovers have occurred. Laboratory tests made at the EPRI High Voltage Transmission Research Center confirm that wall bushings may flash over at rated operation voltage under conditions which are intended to be representative of those experienced on operating transmission systems. Methods for improving performance are discussed, and results of tests with several types of mitigation techniques are described. The major emphasis is placed on the application of room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber. Clean fog is used to evaluate the characteristics of this material on post insulators. The encouraging performance of the post insulators coated with RTV is the basis for further evaluation on full scale wall bushings tested in nonuniform rain. In addition to tests on RTV coated wall bushings without pre-doposited contamination, attempts at achieving reasonable contamination layers on RV are described. By means of resistance measurements on horizontal insulators, the critical conditions which may lead to flashover on surfaces with different materials and coatings are investigated 15 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Effects of petroleum creosote on selected stages of embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The prenatal toxicity of petroleum creosote, a complex mixture of chemicals, was investigated via an in vivo study and an in vitro embryo culture system. Additionally, the prenatal toxicity of naphthalene, one chemical component of petroleum creosote, was determined in the in vitro system. The purpose of the study was to provide specific data on the prenatal toxicity of petroleum creosote and demonstrate the value of the two techniques. In the in vivo study, petroleum creosote was not embryotoxic or teratogenic in ICR mice when administered on gestation days 5-9, at a dose of 4000 mg/kg body weight. In vitro, petroleum creosote becomes embryotoxic to ICR mouse blastocysts at some exposure level between 22 and 33 {mu}g/ml of media. Bioactivation plays a major role in embryotoxicity of naphthalene. Naphthalene without rodent liver microsomal enzymes added to the media was not embryotoxic at levels as high as 100 {mu}g/ml media, whereas naphthalene became embryotoxic at some level between 10 and 50 {mu}g/ml of media in the presence of microsomes. The data indicate that naphthalene is one of the embryotoxic components of petroleum creosote, and that exposure to sufficient levels of petroleum creosote during early pregnancy could result in embryonic loss.

  7. REMOVAL OF CREOSOTE FROM SOIL BY BIOSLURRY REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological slurry reactors were tested for removal of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from creosote contaminated soil. ive bioslurry reactors, operated in parallel, kept the soil aerated, partially suspended and well mixed. he reactors were inoculated with indigenous mic...

  8. Fluorescence induction as a bioindicator of creosote toxicity in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Marwood, C.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of chlorophyll fluorescence induction as a photosynthetic bioindicator was evaluated as part of a study to assess the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on aquatic macrophytes. The wood preservative creosote was used as a mixed PAH source. Toxicity to aquatic plants was measured at the biomarker level using chlorophyll fluorescence induction and compared to effects at the population level in outdoor mesocosms. As well, the aquatic macrophytes Lemna gibba (G3) and Myriophyllum sp., and the green alga Selenastrum capricomutum were exposed to liquid creosote at nominal concentrations of 0.1 to 100 {micro}1/1 in static renewal 8-day toxicity bioassays. Plants were incubated in simulated solar radiation, which mimics the relative levels of UV in natural sunlight. Population-level endpoints (growth rate, cell numbers, chlorophyll content) were compared to results of the fluorescence induction assay. Growth rates of plants were significantly inhibited by creosote at concentrations above 3 {micro}l/l. However, inhibition of photosynthesis was detected by fluorescence induction at the lowest creosote concentration. Fluorescence induction assays of plants exposed to creosote in outdoor mesocosms also detected photosynthetic inhibition at lower creosote concentrations than growth assays, In addition, damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was detected by fluorescence induction after only a few hours of exposure to creosote. Chlorophyll fluorescence therefore appears to be a rapid and sensitive bioindicator for the toxicity of a PAH mixture. The fluorescence induction assay is also consistent with results from growth-based bioassays and is predictive of effects at population levels.

  9. ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR REMEDIATION OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED MATERIALS: BENCH-SCALE TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to determine the most effective of two bioremediation application strategies to ameliorate creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, Florida: olid-ph...

  10. TOXICITY OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TO FIELD-AND LABORATORY-COLONIZED ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrobenthic animal communities that colonized uncontaminated and creosote-contaminated sand during 8 weeks were compared to assess effects of marine-grade creosote on community structure. Aquaria were colonized in the laboratory by planktonic larvae entrained in continuously sup...

  11. Responses of wind erosion to disturbance in a desert scrub grassland: grass vs. bush cover, and a snapshot into recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, M.; Zobeck, T. M.; D'Odorico, P.; van Pelt, S.; Ravi, S.; Over, T. M.; Bhattachan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mixture of grass and bush vegetation that typifies many desert scrublands is a distinctive feature of the northern Chihuahuan Desert, where it represents a change in land cover driven by shrub encroachment. In such environments, the redistribution of nutrients by aeolian transport has been recognized as an important biophysical process, with a role in sustaining shrub presence. Investigation of disturbances in these landscapes (e.g. fire and grazing) will enable better understanding of their dust emission behavior with changing climate, perturbance regime and management scenarios. Here we use a portable wind tunnel to investigate the impact of fire and animals on soil erodibilty and dust emissions from different vegetation types in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Plots were selected that were a) predominantly creosote bush or b) predominantly grass covered. Dust emission was measured for these surfaces both before and after a prescribed burn was conducted. The grass plots were also clipped and artificially trampled to simulate grazing. PM10 concentrations and emission rates from the test surfaces are shown for initial blow-off experiments as the wind tunnel flow accelerates to a target velocity, plus the steady state emission flux produced under constant wind flow with an added abrader sand. An adjacent area burned 8 months previously also allowed investigation of the change in erodibility of the soil for a known time after fire. Our preliminary results indicate the extent that dust emission is changed by the introduced disturbances, and their differing effect on creosote bush and grass dominated covers.

  12. The Bush Education Budget Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Jason; Luebchow, Lindsey; Rieman, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Next week, President George W. Bush will submit his eighth and final budget request to the Congress. How has he fared with respect to education budget proposals thus far? Answer: although President Bush made the No Child Left Behind Act, which deals with elementary and secondary education, the hallmark of his education policy, from a federal…

  13. Elevated CO2 alters root N uptake and C turnover in Larrea tridentata L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the impact of elevated CO2 on root N uptake, soil N availability and the feedbacks between them, we quantified the effects of elevated CO2 and N additions on root N uptake and leaf C gain in Larrea tridentata seedlings grown in reconstituted Mojave Desert soils. After six months of growt...

  14. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  15. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  16. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  17. VARIATION IN CREOSOTEBUSH (LARREA TRIDENTATA) CANOPY MORPHOLOGY IN RELATION TO HABITAT, SOIL FERTILITY AND ASSOCIATED ANNUAL PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differences in creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) crown morphology may reflect changes in the relative demand for water vs. nutrient resources, coinciding with shrub growth and development Creosotebushes with inverted cone-shaped crowns were more abundant in water-limited environme...

  18. Variation in seedling freezing response is associated with climate in Larrea

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Diane L.; Maherali, Hafiz; Pockman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Variation in freezing severity is hypothesized to have influenced the distribution and evolution of the warm desert evergreen genus Larrea. If this hypothesis is correct, performance and survival of species and populations should vary predictably along gradients of freezing severity. If freezing environment changes in the future, the ability of Larrea to adapt will depend on the structure of variation for freezing resistance within populations. To test whether freezing responses vary among and within Larrea populations, we grew maternal families of seedlings from high and low latitude L. divaricata and high latitude L. tridentata populations in a common garden. We measured survival, projected plant area and dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) before and after cold acclimation and for 2 weeks following a single freeze. We detected significant variation in freezing resistance among species and populations. Maternal family lines differed significantly in their responses to cold acclimation and/or freezing for two out of the three populations: among L. tridentata maternal families and among low latitude L. divaricata maternal families. There were no significant differences across maternal families of high latitude L. divaricata. Our results indicate that increased freezing resistance in high latitude populations likely facilitated historical population expansion of both species into colder climates, but this may have occurred to a greater extent for L. tridentata than for L. divaricata. Differences in the structure of variation for cold acclimation and freezing responses among populations suggest potential differences in their ability to evolve in response to future changes in freezing severity. PMID:22068319

  19. Chlorophyll fluorescence from creosote-exposed plants in mesocosms: Validation of a bioindicator

    SciTech Connect

    Marwood, C.A.; Harris, M.L.; Day, K.E.; Greenberg, B.M.; Solomon, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    The chlorophyll fluorescence assay is a rapid, sensitive measure of photosynthetic competence in higher plants and algae that can be used to detect the impact of toxicants at many sites in the plant cell. Chlorophyll fluorescence was examined in plants exposed to PAHs as part of a study to validate chlorophyll fluorescence as a bioindicator by correlating effects on fluorescence with population-level effects in outdoor mesocosms. The wood preservative creosote was used as a mixed PAH source. Two species of aquatic plants, Lemna gibba and Myriophyllum sp., were exposed to 0.1--100 uL/L of creosote in 12,000 L artificial ponds. Creosote was introduced into the mesocosms using different dosing schemes to simulate leaching and spill events. The pulse amplitude modulated fluorescence technique was used to measure several parameters from plants in situ during a 60-day exposure. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were compared to creosote effects on population-level growth. Chlorophyll fluorescence was inhibited by creosote at concentrations above 3 uL/L, which also caused a similar inhibition of plant growth in the mesocosms. However, chlorophyll fluorescence was more sensitive than growth endpoints at low creosote concentrations. The chlorophyll fluorescence assay also detected damage to the photosynthetic apparatus in plants after only a few days exposure to creosote. Thus, chlorophyll fluorescence from plants exposed to creosote was well correlated with environmentally relevant endpoints at the population level. The effects of the different dosing schemes on creosote toxicity will also be discussed.

  20. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R.

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind to the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol-equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyplal-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal-tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic responses in vivo.

  1. Population, community, and bioindicator responses to creosote in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Bestari, K.; Solomon, K.; Lewis, J.; McCann, J.; Marwood, C.; Munro, K.; Day, K.

    1995-12-31

    This presentation discusses the objectives, approach and preliminary results of a three year study focusing on the development and validation of bioindicators that are relevant to responses at the population and community level. The study focuses on creosote, a common wood preservative derived from coal tar distillate and containing approximately 85% mixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as a model stressor. The first year of the study documented the effects of creosote at the population and community level in aquatic mesocosms, and provided preliminary results for the selection of several bioindicators for use in further studies. Activities during the 1994 field season focused on the establishment of the aquatic ecosystems and a refinement of the methods to be used in the treatment and sampling of experimental mesocosms. Liquid creosote was applied to the mesocosms by subsurface injection at nominal concentrations of 0.3 to 300 ppm, and the effects of creosote on aquatic plants, invertebrates and fish were assessed by sampling during a six-week post-treatment phase. Parameters measured included: survival of caged fish (fathead minnows and goldfish), size-age class of juvenile fathead minnows: diversity and abundance of invertebrates (zooplankton and benthic invertebrates) and phytoplankton, and biomass of macrophytes. Work subsequent to the 1994 field component has focused on the selection of bioindicators based on known effects of PAHs on aquatic organisms and on examination of data generated in the first field season. These bioindicators include: oxidative stress and sex steroid hormones in fish; membrane permeability in plants, invertebrates and fish; stress proteins in invertebrates; and fluorescence induction in algae and macrophytes.

  2. Ecological risk assessment for river sediments contaminated by creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.A.; Sampson, J.R.; Jacobson, M.A. ); Peek, D.C. )

    1994-12-01

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted for sediments of the lower Willamette River near a wood-treatment (creosote) facility. Both surface ad subsurface sediments near the facility are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Limited contamination of sediments by dioxins/furans, chlorinated phenols, and arsenic was also observed. Sediment bioassays based on amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and Microtox[reg sign] (Photobacterium phosphoreum) bioluminescence showed toxicity within approximately 300 ft of the shoreline, with a highly toxic area (i.e., possible acute lethal effects in sedentary benthic species) near a dock used for creosote off-loading. The relatively low concentrations of contaminants measured in crayfish muscle tissue and the absence of serious lesions in livers of large-scale sucker collected near the site suggest that excess risk to mobile species from chronic contamination is low. Cursory observations indicate that acute toxic effects on crayfish may be associated with creosote seeps. There is no evidence of adverse biological effects throughout most of the main channel of the river. Evaluation of sediment chemistry data for PAHs relative to available sediment-quality criteria proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency supports this conclusion.

  3. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  4. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak Bridge... the Bush River Yacht Club no later than noon on the Friday just preceding the day of opening or,...

  9. History of the Bush Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauriel, John J.

    The history of the Bush Public School Executive Fellows program is described. The primary objective of the program is to increase the ability of chief Minnesota school executives to guide and direct the design and delivery of public education in a more effective and efficient manner. Participation is designed to increase their ability to more…

  10. Q&A Steve Bush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Steve Bush, curriculum leader for science at Sackville School in West Sussex, was awarded the 2016 RAS Patrick Moore Medal for his contribution to astronomy education. But, as he explains here, it was only chance that led him to astronomy.

  11. Vannevar Bush backs the bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, G.P.

    1992-12-01

    This article deals with Vannevar Bush's role in controlling America's secret research on the atomic bomb from 1939 to 1942, concentrating on administrative/political/military aspects. This is one of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

  12. Creosote released from railway-ties recycled and the sanitary risks.

    PubMed

    Zicari, Giuseppe; Allegro, Giuseppe; Russo, Domenico; Rivetti, Daniela; Soardo, Vincenzo; Cerrato, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Through the history of railways, wooden crossties impregnated with potentially hazardous creosote tar, have been used for years. There are six major classes of compounds in the creosote: aromatic hydrocarbons; tar acids/phenolics; tar bases/nitrogen-containing heterocycles; aromatic amines; sulfur-containing heterocycles; and oxygen-containing heterocycles. The creosote molecules applied in railway crossties can be released in the environment and they can bioaccumulate in animals and vegetables. Some constituents (benzo(a)pyrene and phenolics like benzene) are considered as being carcinogenic which renders the entire complex of creosote to be classified as potentially carcinogenic. After several decades of use the railway-ties are been recycled for varies uses like fences, stakes for agriculture and fruit production or bank protection. In this paper are examined some environmental and sanitary risks from wood impregnated with creosote reported in the literature. PMID:23743701

  13. Survival, reproductive, and growth responses in fish to creosote exposure in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, K.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Bestari, K.T.; Robinson, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal tar distillate, consisting mainly of a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its widespread use as a wood preservative presents a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. The use of mesocosms (precolonized with zooplankton, phytoplankton, macroinvertebrates, and periphyton) enabled evaluation of the total impact of creosote exposure, resulting from both direct toxic effects and indirect community-level interactions. Two methods of creosote addition were used, resulting in two series of mesocosm exposures: sixteen ponds were dosed with liquid creosote (from 0 to 100 ppm), and eight were dosed using creosote impregnated pilings (0 to 6 pilings per pond). In addition to growth and survival in two species of fish, Carassius auratus and Pimephales promelas, a number of reproductive parameters were measured (reproductive hormones, egg production, hatching success, and weight/frequency distribution of juveniles).

  14. High voltage feed through bushing

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, J.P.

    1993-04-06

    A feed through bushing for a high voltage diode provides for using compression sealing for all sealing surfaces. A diode assembly includes a central conductor extending through the bushing and a grading ring assembly circumferentially surrounding and coaxial with the central conductor. A flexible conductive plate extends between and compressively seals against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, wherein the flexibility of the plate allows inner and outer portions of the plate to axially translate for compression sealing against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, respectively. The inner portion of the plate is bolted to the central conductor for affecting sealing. A compression beam is also bolted to the central conductor and engages the outer portion of the plate to urge the outer portion toward the grading ring assembly to obtain compression sealing therebetween.

  15. Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and its derivatives: An update

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Nurko, Jacobo; Weakley, Sarah M.; Jiang, Jun; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata, is known as chaparral or greasewood in the United States and as gobernadora or hediondilla in Mexico. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of the creosote bush, has been shown to have promising applications in the treatment of multiple diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and cancers. Creosote bush is a promising agent of North American herbal medicine, and it has extensive pharmacological effects and specific mechanisms of actions. This review provides an update of recent in vitro and in vivo research about NDGA and describes experimental studies using NDGA as antioxidant. Also, potential medical uses based on the effects of NDGA on the cardiovascular, immune and neurological systems; cancer; tissue engineering; as well as pharmacokinetics and toxicity are discussed. PMID:20424564

  16. Validating biomarkers of creosote phototoxicity to the aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.; Day, K.E.; Ren, L.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are developing and validating photosynthetic biomarker assays of creosote toxicity that are predictive of events at the population level in cultures of the floating aquatic macrophyte, Lemna gibba (G-3). Creosote was introduced as a liquid both at full strength, and in the form of a commercially available creosote `oil` (ca. 50% creosote) at doses ranging from 1--300 ppm ({micro}L/L, v/v). Because UV light enhances the toxicity of PAHs, plants also were incubated both under visible light, and under simulated solar radiation (SSR) which mimics UV levels found in natural sunlight. Static renewal (8-day) toxicity bioassays were performed, and the results from population-level endpoints (day 8 population growth and plant chlorophyll content) were compared to chlorophyll fluorescence induction assays (an index of photosystem 11 quantum yield). Population growth rates demonstrated that similar to individual PAHs, creosote in both forms exhibited UV-enhanced phototoxicity. Chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence induction parameters also were inhibited by creosote, and closely corresponded to functional responses of population growth inhibition after sufficient acclimation. Additionally, the two forms of creosote differed both with respect to overall toxicity, and with respect to their phototoxicity in the presence of UV light. Full strength creosote was at least 50% more toxic than the creosote oil, and the phototoxic effects of SSR vs. visible light were significantly more pronounced both with respect to population-level results, and to fluorescence induction results. Fluorescence induction, therefore, is a rapid and sensitive biomarker for the phototoxicity of a PAH mixture that is consistent with results from more traditional growth-based toxicity bioassays.

  17. Elevated CO2 increases root uptake of organic and inorganic N in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We quantified the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on root nitrogen (N) uptake and leaf carbon (C) turnover in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata. We also examined the impact of elevated CO2 on soil N fluxes and plant-soil feedbacks. Seedlings of L. tridentata were grown in reconstituted Mojave...

  18. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin and Coal Tar Creosote Exposure in a Railroad Worker

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Chris; Hunt, Stephen Carl; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2005-01-01

    A 50-year-old male railroad worker presented to his primary care physician with an erythematous, tender skin lesion on the right knee; a biopsy of this lesion revealed squamous cell carcinoma in situ. The site of the lesion was sun-protected but had been associated with 30 years of creosote-soaked clothing. In this article, we review dermal and other malignancies associated with creosote, along with creosote occupational exposures and exposure limits. This is a unique case, given the lack of other, potentially confounding, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and the sun-protected location of the lesion. PMID:15626654

  19. Vannevar Bush: Fifty Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-12-01

    It is ironic that the 50th anniversary year of Vannevar Bush's Report to President Truman entitled "Science the Endless Frontier", which put into motion the eminently successful current system of education of scientists in this country occurs at a time when serious questions are being asked about the usefulness of that very system. Bush viewed his proposal to establish a national research foundation (later to be called the National Science Foundation) as a "social compact." Judgment of scientific merit would be delegated to expert peers in return for scientific progress, which would ultimately benefit the nation in terms of scientific needs--military security, economic productivity, and enhanced quality of life. Bush wanted the funding of basic research intertwined with training, and preferred to use universities for this purpose rather than industrial or national labs. Bush viewed college and university scientists as teachers and investigators. He believed university-based research would uniquely encourage and engage the next generation of scientists as no other institutional arrangement could. Bush did not trust industry's commitment to basic research, an instinct that proved prophetic. The academic reserve of scientists (PhD's in training and postdoctoral students) that existed before World War II, and upon which the United States could draw for its needs, which were primarily associated with defense efforts, was probably one of the defining factors in Bush's suggested strategy. Currently, that reserve of talent has gotten so large that it is the obvious throttle in the pipeline slowing the continued development of the university research enterprise. Since 1977, the rate at which we have trained new scientists exceeds an average of 4% annually. Since 1987, the "science work force"--PhD's--has grown at three times the rate of the general labor supply. Temporary positions for postdoctoral scientists have grown even faster (over 5% per year since 1989). To compound

  20. Fluorescence induction as a biomarker of creosote phototoxicity to the aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.; Ren, L.; Greenberg, B.M.; Day, K.E. |

    1996-12-31

    Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) toxicity to aquatic plants were developed using the wood preservative creosote. The authors tested physiological indicators of photosynthetic performance in cultures of the floating aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba (G3). Creosote was applied at concentrations ranging from 1--300 ppm, and plants were grown under laboratory lighting that mimics the relative levels of UV radiation found in natural sunlight (simulated solar radiation; SSR). Population growth bioassays demonstrated that similar to individual PAHs, creosote exhibited UV-enhanced phototoxicity. Chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence induction parameters were also diminished by creosote, and closely corresponded to functional responses of population growth by the end of each experiment. Fluorescence induction thus is a validated biomarker assay that is closely and functionally related to population growth inhibition in aquatic plants.

  1. DETOXIFICATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL AND CREOSOTE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY PHYSICAL EXTRACTION CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical analyses revealed that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) and other organic compounds were present in a perennial freshwater stream that flowed through the abandoned American Creosote Works, designated for Superfund cleanup by the U.S Environmental Protection Agenc...

  2. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. xcept for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated ma...

  3. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. Except for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated m...

  4. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael; Oakeson, Kelly F; Yandell, Mark; Halpert, James R; Dearing, Denise

    2016-09-01

    We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida). This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma). The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000. PMID:27408812

  5. Environmental assessment of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Jop, K.M.; Putt, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. Four areas of investigation comprising the risk assessment were (1) evaluation of environmental conditions around existing creosote-treated pilings (2) investigating effects related to restoration of pilings (3) assessing creosote migration into surrounding environment, one year after pile-driving and (4) confirmation of creosote toxicity in laboratory studies. Biological and chemical evaluation of the impact of creosote-treated pilings was conducted on surface sheen, water column and sediment samples collected at Moss Landing Harbor. Water samples (surface sheen, water column and sediment pore water) were evaluated using short-term chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediment samples were evaluated with 10-day sediment toxicity tests with Ampelisca abdita. Samples of surface, column water and sediment were analyzed for the constituents of creosote by GC mass spectrometry. In addition, a sample of neat material used to preserve treated pilings represented a reference for the polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Verification of organism response and analyses of field collected samples was performed by conducting 10-day A. abdita sediment and 7-day M. bahia elutriate exposures with creosote applied to clean sediment collected at Moss Landing, Evaluations were also performed to determine the effects of photoinduced toxicity on test organisms exposed to PAHs. The biological and analytical results of the field and laboratory exposures are being used to evaluate and determine risk of creosote-treated pilings on the marine environment.

  6. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulation by Larrea nitida on MCF-7 Cell Proliferation and Immature Rat Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hye-Na; Jeong, Si-Yeon; Bae, Gyu-Un; Chang, Minsun; Zhang, Dongwei; Liu, Xiyuan; Pei, Yihua; Chin, Young-Won; Lee, Joongku; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Song, Yun Seon

    2014-01-01

    Larrea nitida is a plant that belongs to the Zygophyllaceae family and is widely used in South America to treat inflammatory diseases, tumors and menstrual pain. However, its pharmacological activity remains unclear. In this study we evaluated the property of selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) of Larrea nitida extracts (LNE) as a phytoestrogen that can mimic, modulate or disrupt the actions of endogenous estrogens, depending on the tissue and relative amount of other SERMs. To investigate the property of SERM of LNE, we performed MCF-7 cell proliferation assays, estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase reporter gene assay, human estrogen receptor (hER) binding assays and in vivo uterotrophic assay. To gain insight into the active principles, we performed a bioassay-guided analysis of LNE employing solvents of various polarities and using classical column chromatography, which yielded 16 fractions (LNs). LNE showed high binding affinities for hERα and hERβ with IC50 values of 1.20 ×10−7 g/ml and 1.00×10−7 g/ml, respectively. LNE induced 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation, however, it reduced the proliferation in the presence of E2. Furthermore, LNE had an atrophic effect in the uterus of immature rats through reducing the expression level of progesterone receptor (PR) proteins. LN08 and LN10 had more potent affinities for binding on hER α and β than other fractions. Our results indicate that LNE had higher binding affinities for hERβ than hERα, and showed SERM properties in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and the rat uterus. LNE may be useful for the treatment of estrogen-related conditions, such as female cancers and menopause. PMID:25143815

  7. Bush Impact on Schools to Outlive Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    George W. Bush entered the White House determined to change federal education policy. In his first year as the president, Bush forged a bipartisan consensus around the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which he signed into law on January 8, 2002. For the first time, states receiving federal K-12 education funding would be required to hold districts…

  8. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  9. Bush to Obama: Education in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch-Brioso, Karen; Dervarics, Charles; Powell, Tracie; Roach, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    President Bush's education legacy is inexorably tied to the No Child Left Behind Act, the comprehensive K-12 reform law he signed in January 2002. The law has drawn praise for requiring schools to show specific progress in educating minority and low-income children or face sanctions for failing to do so. But critics say the Bush administration…

  10. Fine Line on Schools for Bush, Kerry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.; Davis, Michelle R.

    2004-01-01

    There's no doubt that President George W. Bush and Senator John Kerry, the two major-party candidates in the hard-fought presidential contest, part company on some education issues. President Bush, for instance, backs private school vouchers while Senator Kerry wants to see bigger spending increases for schools. This article discusses how much…

  11. Cadmium in Jamaican Bush Teas

    PubMed Central

    Hoo Fung, LA; Rattray, VR; Lalor, GC

    2014-01-01

    Samples of Jamaican plants used as bush teas were collected from households in high soil-cadmium (Cd) areas of central Jamaica and analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry for total cadmium and for cadmium extractable with a hot water brew as prepared for human consumption to determine their contribution to dietary cadmium exposure. The concentrations ranged from < 0.03 to 6.85 μg/g for total Cd, between 1 and 15% of which was extracted with a hot water brew. One cup (200 ml) of the teas examined was found to contain < 0.04–1.18 μg of Cd and would contribute 0.1 – 0.3 μg of Cd to a person's dietary intake. This is significantly below the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 7 μg Cd/kg body weight established by the World Health Organization (WHO). While this suggests that bush tea consumption does not contribute significantly to the PTWI, some of the teas examined exceed the WHO recommendation of less than 0.3 mg/kg Cd for medicinal plants. PMID:25303189

  12. Cadmium in jamaican bush teas.

    PubMed

    Hoo Fung, L A; Rattray, V R; Lalor, G C

    2014-01-01

    Samples of Jamaican plants used as bush teas were collected from households in high soil-cadmium (Cd) areas of central Jamaica and analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry for total cadmium and for cadmium extractable with a hot water brew as prepared for human consumption to determine their contribution to dietary cadmium exposure. The concentrations ranged from < 0.03 to 6.85 µg/g for total Cd, between 1 and 15% of which was extracted with a hot water brew. One cup (200 ml) of the teas examined was found to contain < 0.04-1.18 µg of Cd and would contribute 0.1-0.3 µg of Cd to a person's dietary intake. This is significantly below the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 7 µg Cd/kg body weight established by the World Health Organization (WHO). While this suggests that bush tea consumption does not contribute significantly to the PTWI, some of the teas examined exceed the WHO recommendation of less than 0.3 mg/kg Cd for medicinal plants. PMID:25303189

  13. Vannevar Bush: Fifty Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-12-01

    It is ironic that the 50th anniversary year of Vannevar Bush's Report to President Truman entitled "Science the Endless Frontier", which put into motion the eminently successful current system of education of scientists in this country occurs at a time when serious questions are being asked about the usefulness of that very system. Bush viewed his proposal to establish a national research foundation (later to be called the National Science Foundation) as a "social compact." Judgment of scientific merit would be delegated to expert peers in return for scientific progress, which would ultimately benefit the nation in terms of scientific needs--military security, economic productivity, and enhanced quality of life. Bush wanted the funding of basic research intertwined with training, and preferred to use universities for this purpose rather than industrial or national labs. Bush viewed college and university scientists as teachers and investigators. He believed university-based research would uniquely encourage and engage the next generation of scientists as no other institutional arrangement could. Bush did not trust industry's commitment to basic research, an instinct that proved prophetic. The academic reserve of scientists (PhD's in training and postdoctoral students) that existed before World War II, and upon which the United States could draw for its needs, which were primarily associated with defense efforts, was probably one of the defining factors in Bush's suggested strategy. Currently, that reserve of talent has gotten so large that it is the obvious throttle in the pipeline slowing the continued development of the university research enterprise. Since 1977, the rate at which we have trained new scientists exceeds an average of 4% annually. Since 1987, the "science work force"--PhD's--has grown at three times the rate of the general labor supply. Temporary positions for postdoctoral scientists have grown even faster (over 5% per year since 1989). To compound

  14. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function. PMID:16643959

  15. Environmental assessment of the compounds from creosote-treated pilings in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jop, K.M.; Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Wade, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. The chemical composition of creosote is critical to its fate and effects in the environment. Therefore, a multiple-stage methodology utilizing column gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector was used for the identification and quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in neat creosote and environmental samples. The risk assessment of 46 PAHs (water soluble fraction) in the marine environment was based on bioaccumulation studies with caged mussels Mytilus californianus and a testing program with the surface sheen, water column, sediment elutriate, pore waters and bulk sediment. Water samples were evaluated using 7-day chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediments were evaluated with 10-day tests with Ampelisca abdita. Testing program included exposure to normal and UV fluorescent lights. The results of this environmental assessment program allow to characterize the extent and magnitude of toxicity of PAHs released from creosote treated pilings and the risk associated with using creosote in marine environment.

  16. Enhancement of bioremediation of a creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. PAHs, neutral and non-polar organic compounds, consist of two or more fused benzene rings which are generated from industrial activities such as creosote wood treating, gas manufacturing, coke making, coal tar refining, petroleum refining, and aluminum smelting. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAHs contaminated soil, can be enhanced by the use of surfactant. In this study a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, was investigated. Abiotic soil desorption experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of release of selected PAH compounds from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Respirometric experiments were also conducted to evaluate the effect of nonionic surfactant on biodegradation. The N-Con system respirometer was used to monitor the oxygen uptake by the microorganisms. The abiotic experiments results indicated that the addition of surfactant to soil/water systems increases the desorption of PAH compounds. The increase in PAHs availability to the microorganisms produced an increase in oxygen uptake.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Mobility Bushing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project will send a six-wheeled rover to Mars in 2009. The rover will carry a scientific payload designed to search for organic molecules on the Martian surface during its primary mission. This paper describes the development and testing of a bonded film lubricated bushing system to be used in the mobility system of the rover. The MSL Rover Mobility System contains several pivots that are tightly constrained with respect to mass and volume. These pivots are also exposed to relatively low temperatures (-135 C) during operation. The combination of these constraints led the mobility team to consider the use of solid film lubricated metallic bushings and dry running polymeric bushings in several flight pivot applications. A test program was developed to mitigate the risk associated with using these materials in critical pivots on the MSL vehicle. The program was designed to characterize bushing friction and wear performance over the expected operational temperature range (-135 C to +70 C). Seven different bushing material / lubricant combinations were evaluated to aid in the selection of the final flight pivot bushing material / lubricant combination.

  18. Effects of Cecropia pachystachya and Larrea divaricata aqueous extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, M C; Grondona, E; Zunino, P M; Ponce, A A

    2010-07-01

    Our studies were performed to investigate the effects of the aqueous extracts of Cecropia pachystachya and Larrea divaricata. These plants are used in folkloric medicine in infusion and were administered orally (0.76 g/kg) to male Albino Swiss mice for 16 days, on drink intake, organ weight/body weight (OW/BW x 100) ratio, histology, broqueoalveolar fluid (BALF) and elevated plus-maze (EPM). Feeding as well as body weight were unaffected by the consumption of these extracts. There were no signs of toxicity in BALF, morbidity or mortality during the study. C. pachystachya caused an increase in relative kidney OW/BW (p

  19. Validating bioindicators of PAH effects in fish: Evaluating responsiveness to creosote exposure in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, K.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Gensemer, R.W.; Van Der Kraak, G.J.; Day, K.E.; Servos, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    While studies involving controlled exposures to PAHs have typically studied the effects of exposure to individual compounds, PAHs are usually present in the environment in complex mixtures. Some of these (eg. creosote) have been widely used and present potential risks to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of the current research is to evaluate whether population effects visible in fish at high creosote concentrations would be reflected in biomarker responses at lower concentrations. Goldfish (Carassius auratus) were exposed to five levels of creosote contamination in microcosms containing a simple community structure (including macroinvertebrates and macrophytes). Preliminary results have shown that changes in P450 induction, bile fluorescence, and levels of reproductive hormones are visible at lower concentrations than population effects such as increased mortality, reduced secondary sexual characteristics, and reduced fecundity.

  20. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute

    PubMed Central

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-01-01

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable. PMID:26019530

  1. Oxidative stress modulation by Rosmarinus officinalis in creosote-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Abbady, Ehab A; Baghdadi, Hoda H

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar is a significant product generated from coal pyrolysis. Coal tar can be utilized as raw materials for various industries. It is also a type of raw material from which phenols, naphthalenes, and anthracene can be extracted. The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of coal tar creosote to induce oxidative stress and biochemical perturbations in rat liver and the role of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) in ameliorating its toxic effects. Male Wister Albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of seven each, group I served as control; group II treated with rosemary (10 mL of water extract/kg BW for 21 days), group III received coal tar creosote (200 mg/4 mL olive oil/kg BW for 3 days), and group IV treated with both rosemary and coal tar creosote. The administration of coal tar creosote significantly caused elevation in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduction in the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). A significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content was also observed. Liver aminotransferases aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] and alkaline phosphatase (AlP) were significantly decreased while lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was increased. Rosemary pretreatment to coal tar creosote-treated rats decreased LPO level and normalized GPx, GR, SOD, CAT, and GST activities, while GSH content was increased. Also, liver AST, ALT, AlP, and LDH were maintained near normal level due to rosemary treatment. In conclusion, rosemary has beneficial effects and could be able to antagonize coal tar creosote toxicity. PMID:25044495

  2. Technology Goes Bush: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Learning in a Bush Kinder Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Jennifer; Grogan, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    A "bush kinder" is the Australian equivalent of a European forest kindergarten. Although it is not usual for technology to be used in the type of program, the authors suggest that mobile technologies can be used creatively and sensitively to support learning in the bush kinder context. This paper describes an ethnographical case study…

  3. Identifying multiple timescale rainfall controls on Mojave Desert ecohydrology using an integrated data and modeling approach for Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal; Bedford, David R.; Miller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The perennial shrub Larrea tridentata is widely successful in North American warm deserts but is also susceptible to climatic perturbations. Understanding its response to rainfall variability requires consideration of multiple timescales. We examine intra-annual to multi-year relationships using model simulations of soil moisture and vegetation growth over 50 years in the Mojave National Preserve in southeastern California (USA). Ecohydrological model parameters are conditioned on field and remote sensing data using an ensemble Kalman filter. Although no specific periodicities were detected in the rainfall record, simulated leaf-area-index exhibits multi-year dynamics that are driven by multi-year (∼3-years) rains, but with up to a 1-year delay in peak response. Within a multi-year period, Larrea tridentata is more sensitive to winter rains than summer. In the most active part of the root zone (above ∼80 cm), >1-year average soil moisture drives vegetation growth, but monthly average soil moisture is controlled by root uptake. Moisture inputs reach the lower part of the root zone (below ∼80 cm) infrequently, but once there they can persist over a year to help sustain plant growth. Parameter estimates highlight efficient plant physiological properties facilitating persistent growth and high soil hydraulic conductivity allowing deep soil moisture stores. We show that soil moisture as an ecological indicator is complicated by bidirectional interactions with vegetation that depend on timescale and depth. Under changing climate, Larrea tridentata will likely be relatively resilient to shorter-term moisture variability but will exhibit higher sensitivity to shifts in seasonal to multi-year moisture inputs.

  4. Identifying multiple time scale rainfall controls on Mojave Desert ecohydrology using an integrated data and modeling approach for Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal; Bedford, David R.; Miller, David M.

    2015-06-01

    The perennial shrub Larrea tridentata is widely successful in North American warm deserts but is also susceptible to climatic perturbations. Understanding its response to rainfall variability requires consideration of multiple time scales. We examine intra-annual to multiyear relationships using model simulations of soil moisture and vegetation growth over 50 years in the Mojave National Preserve in southeastern California (USA). Ecohydrological model parameters are conditioned on field and remote sensing data using an ensemble Kalman filter. Although no specific periodicities were detected in the rainfall record, simulated leaf-area-index exhibits multiyear dynamics that are driven by multiyear (˜3 years) rains, but with up to a 1 year delay in peak response. Within a multiyear period, Larrea tridentata is more sensitive to winter rains than summer. In the most active part of the root zone (above ˜80 cm), >1 year average soil moisture drives vegetation growth, but monthly average soil moisture is controlled by root uptake. Moisture inputs reach the lower part of the root zone (below ˜80 cm) infrequently, but once there they can persist over a year to help sustain plant growth. Parameter estimates highlight efficient plant physiological properties facilitating persistent growth and high soil hydraulic conductivity allowing deep soil moisture stores. We show that soil moisture as an ecological indicator is complicated by bidirectional interactions with vegetation that depend on time scale and depth. Under changing climate, Larrea tridentata will likely be relatively resilient to shorter-term moisture variability but will exhibit higher sensitivity to shifts in seasonal to multiyear moisture inputs.

  5. Electrical bushing for a superconductor element

    DOEpatents

    Mirebeau, Pierre; Lallouet, Nicolas; Delplace, Sebastien; Lapierre, Regis

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical bushing serving to make a connection at ambient temperature to a superconductor element situated in an enclosure at cryogenic temperature. The electrical bushing passes successively through an enclosure at intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and cryogenic temperature, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, and it comprises a central electrical conductor surrounded by an electrically insulating sheath. According to the invention, an electrically conductive screen connected to ground potential surrounds the insulating sheath over a section that extends from the end of the bushing that is in contact with the enclosure at cryogenic temperature at least as far as the junction between the enclosure at intermediate temperature and the enclosure at ambient temperature. The invention is more particularly applicable to making a connection to a superconductor cable.

  6. REMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH WOOD-TREATMENT CHEMICALS (PCP AND CREOSOTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PCP and creosote PAHs are found in most of the contaminated soils at wood-treatment sites. The treatment methods currently being used for such soils include soil washing, incineration, and biotreatment. Soil washing involves removal of the hazardous chemicals from soils ...

  7. ACTION OF A FLUORANTHENE-UTILIZING BACTERIAL COMMUNITY OF POLYCYLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON COMPONENTS OF CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultures enriched by serial transfer through a mineral salts medium containing fluoranthene were used to establish a stable, 7-membered bacterial community from a sandy soil highly contaminated with coal-tar creosote. his community exhibited an ability to utilize fluoranthene as ...

  8. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGUS PHANEROCHAETE SORDIDA TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with creosote was performed at a wood-treating facility in south central Mississippi in the autumn of 1991. The effects of solid-phase bioremediation with Phanerochaete sordid...

  9. STRATEGY USING BIOREACTORS AND SPECIALLY SELECTED MICROORGANISMS FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATED WITH CREOSOTE AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage, continuous-flow, sequential inoculation bioreactor strategy for the bioremediation of ground water contaminated with creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) was evaluated at the bench- and pilot-scale levels. erformance of continually stirred tank reactors (CSTR) using ...

  10. FIELD EVALUATION OF LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGI TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. he study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal tr...

  11. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC NEOPLASMS IN THE MUMMICHOG (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high prevalence of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms occurred in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia. otal of 20 neoplasms occurred in a group of about 1 100 fish evaluated histologically. f 240 adult fish collected d...

  12. Inhibition of Acetoclastic Methanogenesis in Crude Oil- and Creosote-Contaminated Groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater was studied. The crude oil and water-soluble components of creosote contributed to the inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was much more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At a crude oil-contaminated site, numbers of acetoclastic methanogens found close to crude oil were 100 times fewer than those of hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens. In laboratory toxicity assays, crude oil collected from the site inhibited methane production from acetate but not from formate or hydrogen. Toxicity assays with aqueous creosote extract completely inhibited acetate utilization over the range of tested dilutions but only mildly affected formate and hydrogen utilization. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity would result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  13. The effect of creosote on vitellogenin production in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherry, J.P.; Whyte, J.J.; Karrow, N.A.; Gamble, A.; Boerman, H.J.; Bol, N.C.; Dixon, D.G.; Solomon, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a broader investigation into the effects of creosote treatments on the aquatic biota in pond microcosms, we examined the possible implications for vitellogenin (Vtg) production in Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout (RT)]. Vtg is the precursor of egg yolk protein and has emerged as a useful biomarker of exposure to estrogenic substances. Our a priori intent was to assess the ability of the creosote treatments (nominal cresoste concentrations were 0, 3, and 10 ??l/L immediately after the last subsurface addition) to induce estrogenic responses in RT. The data showed no evidence of an estrogenic response in the treated fish. During the course of the experiment, however, the fish matured and began to produce Vtg, probably in response to endogenous estrogen. A posteriori analysis of the Vtg data from the maturing fish showed that after 28 days, the plasma Vtg concentrations were about 15-fold lower in fish from the creosote-treated microcosms compared with fish from the reference microcosm. Although the experiment design does not permit mechanistic insights, our observation suggests that exposure of female fish to PAH mixtures such as creosote can impair the production of Vtg with possible health implications for embryos and larvae. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  14. Electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil: laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Suni, Sonja; Malinen, Essi; Kosonen, Jarmo; Silvennoinen, Hannu; Romantschuk, Martin

    2007-02-15

    Creosote is a toxic and carcinogenic substance used in wood impregnation. Approximately 1,200 sites in Finland are contaminated with creosote. This study examined the possibility of enhancing bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil with a combination of electric heating and infiltration and electrokinetic introduction of oxygenated, nutrient-rich liquid. Preliminary tests were performed in the laboratory, and a pilot test was conducted in situ at a creosote-contaminated former wood impregnation plant in Eastern Finland. Wood preservation practices at the plant were discontinued in 1989, but the soil and the groundwater in the area are still highly contaminated. The laboratory tests were mainly performed as a methodological test aiming for upscaling. The soils used in these tests were a highly polluted soil from a marsh next to the impregnation plant and a less polluted soil near the base of the impregnation building. The laboratory test showed that the relative degradation was significantly higher in high initial contaminant concentrations than with low initial concentrations. During the first 7 weeks, PAH-concentrations decreased by 68% in the marsh soil compared with a 51% reduction in the building soil. The field test was performed to a ca. 100 m3 soil section next to the former impregnation building. Nutrient and oxygen levels in the soils were elevated by hydraulic and electrokinetic pumping of urea and phosphate amended, aerated water into the soil. The DC current introduced into the soil raised the temperature from the ambient ca. 6 degrees C up to between 16 and 50 degrees C. Total PAH concentrations decreased by 50-80% during 3 months of treatment while mineral oil concentrations decreased approximately 30%. Electrokinetically enhanced in situ - bioremediation, which also significantly raised the soil temperature, proved to be a promising method to remediate creosote-contaminated soils. PMID:17365294

  15. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of Creosote degradation process under isothermal experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Janković, Bojan Ž; Janković, Marija M

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal degradation process of commercial Creosote was analyzed by the thermogravimetric (TG) technique in a nitrogen atmosphere, at four different operating temperatures (230, 250, 270 and 290°C). The kinetic triplet [Ea , A and f(α)] and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH (≠), ΔS (≠)and ΔG (≠)) for investigated Creosote samples were calculated. It was found that two-parameter autocatalytic Šesták-Berggren (SB) kinetic model best describes the process, but in the form of accommodation function with phenomenological character. Applying the multiplicative factor, the true value of activation energy (E (true) a ) was calculated. The experimental density distribution function of the apparent activation energy values was evaluated from isoconversional kinetic analysis. Based of the characteristic shape of distribution curve, it was concluded that the isothermal degradation of Creosote represents a complex physico-chemical process, given the chemical structure of the studied system. It is assumed that the considered process probably includes primary and secondary (autocatalytic) pyrolysis reactions, together with various decomposition reactions and radicals recombination pathways. The objective of the presented work is the proof of principle of the pyrolysis-based thermo-chemical conversion technologies for the production of value-added chemicals from the complex organic compounds, which even include chemical contaminants (such as PAHs). Also, the present work allows us that by using a unified kinetic approach we can obtain a significant physico-chemical characteristics of the tested system, which can then be used in the procedure for the separation of organics from creosote-treated woods and creosote-contaminated soils. The significance of this research is to identify the global kinetic behavior of some target contaminant compounds for pyrolysis, which are primarily PAHs. PMID:23705620

  16. Bush to Start NCLB Push in Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Making college more affordable, raising the minimum wage, and other domestic items were at the top of Democrats' agenda during their meeting at Capitol Hill. President Bush made clear that reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act is one of the priorities. To mark the fifth anniversary of his signing the measure into law on January 8, 2007, the…

  17. Obama Echoes Bush on Education Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama campaigned on a message of change, but when it comes to K-12 education, he appears to be walking in the policy footsteps of his recent predecessors, including George W. Bush. Obama is sounding themes of accountability based on standards and assessments. He is delivering tough talk on teacher quality, including a call for…

  18. Bush and Gore Focus on Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Lottie L.

    2000-01-01

    In the 2000 presidential race, education seems a top priority for Vice-President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W. Bush. Although both candidates are promising billions of federal-aid dollars to raise standards, many believe they are ignoring factors such as student motivation and funding inequities. (MLH)

  19. 2005 Budget Drops below Bush Request

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education will see its smallest budget increase in nearly a decade under the catchall spending plan approved by the Republican-controlled Congress in a lame-duck session. For the first time since President Bush entered office, the budget will fall short of his overall request for education funding. The final fiscal 2005…

  20. The Invasive Buddleja Daviddi (Butterfly Bush)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buddleja davidii Franchet (Synonym. Buddleia davidii; common name butterfly bush) is a perennial, semi-deciduous, multi-stemmed shrub that is resident in gardens and disturbed areas. Since its introduction to the United Kingdom from China in the late 1800s, B. davidii has become...

  1. Bush Budget Would Boost NCLB Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2007-01-01

    This article reports that President Bush's fiscal 2008 budget request for reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act is being criticized by two key congressional Democrats as they believe that the plan falls short of what schools need to get on track to meet the measure's ambitious achievement goals. Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Sen. Edward…

  2. HEPATOBLASTOMAS IN THE MUMMICHOG, FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS (L.), FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENT: A HISTOLOGIC, ULTRASTRUCTURAL AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed histologic and ultrastructural description of two cases of hepatoblastoma, a primitive liver cell neoplasm, is provided from mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus(L.), inhabiting a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia, USA. Both neoplasms were multifo...

  3. Bioaccumulation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by the clam, Rangia cuneata, in the vicinity of a creosote spill

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeon, I.R.; Ferrario, J.B.; Byrne, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    During 1980-81, as part of NOAA/US Coast Guard initiative, the authors participated in an environmental study of a creosote spill into Bayou Bonfouca at the American Creosote Works Plant (ACWP) site at Slidell, Louisiana. The objectives for the study were: (1) to determined the nature and extent of creosote contamination at the site and in the bayou, and (2) to evaluate through biomonitoring the bioavailability and human health implications of creosote derived PAHs in the bayou and the estuarine system into which Bayou Bonfouca flows. So dramatic were their findings that their data was used in part by state and federal agencies to bring about in 1982, the inclusion of the Bayou Bonfouca site on the National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites that pose a threat to public health and the environment. This is a report of their findings on the biomonitoring of their study.

  4. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  5. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Fisher, Mark; Muth, Allan

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  6. Inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a series of studies of methanogenic processes in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated aquifers indicated that acetoctastic methanogenesis is inhibited near non-aqueous sources. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At that site, acetoclastic methanogens were < 2/g within or near the oil where hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens were 10-100/g. The geochemical effect of this toxic inhibition was the buildup of low molecular weight volatile acids, particularly acetate. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity will result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  7. Groups praise, criticize Bush Transition choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    As the administration of George W. Bush takes hold in the White House, transition plans gradually are coming into focus for many federal agencies that deal with geoscience issues. Congressional confirmation hearings already have been held for cabinet secretary nominees—including Gale Norton, the controversial figure named to head the Department of the Interior. Bush transition team members have fanned out to visit a number of agencies, and interest groups have lined up to either criticize or praise various appointment decisions that affect geoscience issues.Among cabinet nominees, New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman has received mixed reviews as nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency and is widely viewed as a moderate on environmental issues. Spencer Abraham, nominated to lead the Department of Energy co-sponsored a bill to abolish the department in 1999 while he represented Michigan in the Senate. However, there has not been a groundswell of political energy expended to try to challenge his nomination.

  8. Action of a Fluoranthene-Utilizing Bacterial Community on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Components of Creosote

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J. G.; Chapman, P. J.; Pritchard, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cultures enriched by serial transfer through a mineral salts medium containing fluoranthene were used to establish a stable, seven-member bacterial community from a sandy soil highly contaminated with coal tar creosote. This community exhibited an ability to utilize fluoranthene as the sole carbon source for growth, as demonstrated by increases in protein concentration and changes in absorption spectra when grown on fluoranthene in liquid culture. Biotransformation of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was verified by demonstrating their disappearance from an artificial PAH mixture by capillary gas chromatography. When grown on fluoranthene as the sole carbon source and subsequently exposed to fluoranthene plus 16 additional PAHs typical of those found in creosote, this community transformed all PAHs present in this defined mixture. After 3 days of incubation, 13 of the original 17 PAH components were degraded to levels below the limit of detection (10 ng/liter). Continued incubation resulted in extensive degradation of the remaining four compounds. The ability of this community to utilize a high-molecular-weight PAH as the sole carbon source, in conjunction with its ability to transform a diverse array of PAHs, suggests that it may be of value in the bioremediation of environments contaminated with PAHs, such as those impacted by creosote. PMID:16348069

  9. Altered enzyme expression in a population of creosote-resistant mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    SciTech Connect

    Van-Veld, P.; Armknecht, S.; Cooper, P.; Vogelbein, W.

    1995-12-31

    A population of mummichog in the Elizabeth River, Virginia inhabit a site severely contaminated with creosote. Although adult fish develop cancer, all life stages are resistant to the acute effects of creosote-contaminated sediments. Creosote is a complex mixture of PAHs, N,S,O-heterocyclics and phenols. The site is also contaminated with other organic contaminants and metals. Studies are underway to identify possible resistance mechanisms in this population. Cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) is the major enzyme involved in activation of PAHs and also contributes to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This enzyme is depressed in liver of resistant fish and unresponsive to CYP1A inducers. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are major cytosolic proteins involved in diverse detoxification mechanisms. GST levels and activity are clearly elevated in the resistant population. Monoclonal antibody to purified mummichog GST recognizes a form that is elevated approximately six-fold in the resistant fish relative to reference fish. This form appears to be a major cytosolic protein in the resistance population. P-glycoprotein, an efflux pump for diverse xenobiotics, is abundantly expressed on the canalicular surface of hepatocytes and over expressed in advanced hepatic lesions. The pattern of enzyme expression observed in the resistant population is similar to that observed in multidrug-resistant cell lines.

  10. Assessing the impact of fire on the spatial distribution of Larrea tridentata in the Sonoran Desert, USA.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Ramirez, Andres; Mudrak, Erika L; Caragea, Petrutza C; Holzapfel, Claus; Moloney, Kirk A

    2015-06-01

    In southwestern American deserts, fire has been historically uncommon because of insufficient continuity of fuel for spreading. However, deserts have been invaded by exotic species that now connect the empty space between shrubs to carry fire. We hypothesized that fire would change the spatial distribution of surviving Larrea tridentata shrubs. We established two study plots, one each in a burned and unburned area, and recorded location and living status of all shrubs. We performed univariate and bivariate point pattern analyses to characterize the impact of fire on the overall distribution of shrubs. Additionally, we used a simple wildfire model to determine how close we could come to reconstructing the observed spatial pattern of living and dead shrubs. We found a hyper-dispersed pattern of shrubs at finer scales and a random pattern at broader scales for both the unburned plot and for the living and dead shrubs combined in the burned plot, the latter providing an approximation of the pre-burn distribution of shrubs. After fire, living shrubs showed a clustered pattern at scales >2.5 m, whereas dead shrubs were randomly distributed, indicating that fire caused a change in the spatial pattern of the surviving shrubs. The fire model was able to partially reconstruct the spatial pattern of Larrea, but created a more clustered distribution for both living and dead shrubs. Our study reinforces the key role of fire in altering landscapes that had not been habituated to fire, and suggests the existence of potential cascading effects across the entire plant community. PMID:25561171

  11. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, 1937 SMOKE HOUSE - Colonel John Young Kilpatrick House & Outbuildings, Bridgeport Road (County Road 37), Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  12. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1937 LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SMOKE HOUSE. - Dr. William Hughes House & Outbuildings, Hughes Creek vicinity, Aliceville, Pickens County, AL

  13. 28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 OLD SLAVE QUARTERS AND KITCHEN - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  14. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 VIEW ON INTERMEDIATE STAIRWAY - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  15. 31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 FRONT VIEW OF BUILDING, FACES NORTH - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  16. 39. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 21, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 21, 1935 CLOSE- UP OF FRONT DOOR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  17. 45. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1935 DOOR DETAILS ON GROUND FLOOR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  18. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nghikembua, Matti; Maul, Jude E.; Marker, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  19. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, J. S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, A.; Nghikembua, M.; Maul, J. E.; Marker, L.

    2015-12-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1936 DENNY'S TOWER, COMPANY F IN BACKGROUND - University of Alabama, Denny's Tower, University Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, 1935 VIEW SHOWING PLOT - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  2. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, 1934 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. CLOSE-UP OF VAULTS - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  3. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. SECTION OF FENCE AROUND LOT - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  4. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, 1934 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. FRONT (WEST), NORTH SIDE - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  5. Bush Research Budget again Focuses on Physical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey; Hebel, Sara

    2007-01-01

    This article presents compelling reasons why President George W. Bush decided to double federal funds for agencies supporting physical-science research. The biggest beneficiaries of Mr. Bush's plan for 2008 would be the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Those agencies, together with the National…

  6. Bush Has Own View of Promoting Civil Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses President Bush's own view of promoting civil rights. Mr. Bush has sought to redefine the discussion of civil rights in education. Instead of focusing on racial integration in public schools, for instance, the president has emphasized the achievement gap between minority and white students. He has spoken of school choice as a…

  7. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the grazing value of the land and hence the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil at a chronose...

  8. Bush Keeps Math-Science Plan on Bunsen Burner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    President Bush continued his campaign to get schools to focus more on mathematics and science education with a visit to a middle school in Rockville, Maryland, where students study robotics and work with NASA scientists. President Bush toured the school with Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings as part of his initiative to emphasize math and…

  9. Emanuel Goldberg, Electronic Document Retrieval, and Vannevar Bush's Memex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the concept of the Memex, an imaginary information retrieval machine proposed by Vannevar Bush in 1945. The technological background of the Memex and of other visions of that period are examined with special reference to Emanuel Goldberg, inventor of a microfilm selector using a photoelectric cell. Bush's work is reassessed in this…

  10. Bush's Legacy in Higher Education: A Matter of Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul; Field, Kelly; Hebel, Sara

    2008-01-01

    President Bush is leaving the White House with a mixed record on higher education. His administration catapulted conversations about holding colleges more accountable for their performance into the national spotlight, and it pressed for some increases in federal spending on student aid and research. At the same time, Mr. Bush faced criticism from…

  11. Bush Test Proposal for High Schoolers Joins Wider Trend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.; Richard, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how President's Bush's proposals to expand educational accountability from the elementary and middle grades to high schools would mean more testing for teenagers, individual student plans to promote achievement, and financial incentives for teachers to help students meet their goals. Mr. Bush's campaign proposals, unveiled…

  12. Rebound of a coal tar creosote plume following partial source zone treatment with permanganate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, N. R.; Fraser, M. J.; Lamarche, C.; Barker, J. F.; Forsey, S. P.

    2008-11-01

    The long-term management of dissolved plumes originating from a coal tar creosote source is a technical challenge. For some sites stabilization of the source may be the best practical solution to decrease the contaminant mass loading to the plume and associated off-site migration. At the bench-scale, the deposition of manganese oxides, a permanganate reaction byproduct, has been shown to cause pore plugging and the formation of a manganese oxide layer adjacent to the non-aqueous phase liquid creosote which reduces post-treatment mass transfer and hence mass loading from the source. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of partial permanganate treatment to reduce the ability of a coal tar creosote source zone to generate a multi-component plume at the pilot-scale over both the short-term (weeks to months) and the long-term (years) at a site where there is > 10 years of comprehensive synoptic plume baseline data available. A series of preliminary bench-scale experiments were conducted to support this pilot-scale investigation. The results from the bench-scale experiments indicated that if sufficient mass removal of the reactive compounds is achieved then the effective solubility, aqueous concentration and rate of mass removal of the more abundant non-reactive coal tar creosote compounds such as biphenyl and dibenzofuran can be increased. Manganese oxide formation and deposition caused an order-of-magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Approximately 125 kg of permanganate were delivered into the pilot-scale source zone over 35 days, and based on mass balance estimates < 10% of the initial reactive coal tar creosote mass in the source zone was oxidized. Mass discharge estimated at a down-gradient fence line indicated > 35% reduction for all monitored compounds except for biphenyl, dibenzofuran and fluoranthene 150 days after treatment, which is consistent with the bench-scale experimental results. Pre- and post-treatment soil core data

  13. Distribution and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons within experimental microcosms treated with creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings

    SciTech Connect

    Bestari, K.T.J.; Solomon, K.R.; Steele, T.S.; Sibley, P.K.; Robinson, R.D.; Day, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    Temporal changes in the concentration and relative composition of 15 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, sediment, and polyvinylchloride (PVC) strips were assessed to evaluate the fate of creosote leached from impregnated wood pilings in aquatic environments. The study consisted of single microcosms containing one of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 6 creosote-impregnated pilings and two microcosms containing untreated pilings. Quantitative analyses of PAHs were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a fluorescence detector. For each treatment, total PAHs ({Sigma} PAH) in water increased rapidly up to 7 d posttreatment yielding a clear dose-dependant concentration gradient ranging from 7.3 to 97.2 {micro}g/L. Total PAHs declined exponentially after 7 d and was reduced close to background concentrations by the end of the study. No increase in {Sigma} PAH was observed in sediments at any treatment, nor was there any relationship between sediment PAHs and distance from each piling cluster. However, a slight increase in PAHs was observed on PVC liner strips that exhibited a concentration gradient similar to that in water. The PVC-bound {Sigma} PAH ranged from 0.3 to 2.4 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} and 0.2 to 2.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} at 31 and 58 d posttreatment, respectively. Based on these data, the authors estimated a rate loss of creosote from the pilings of approximately 50 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}/d. The low concentration of PAHs on the PVC, along with the absence of accumulation of PAHs in sediments, suggests that creosote was lost primarily from water via degradative pathways such as photolysis and microbial decomposition and adsorption onto PVC. The rapid loss of creosote from water in conjunction with the slow rate of leaching from the pilings suggests that risks associated with the use of creosote-impregnated pilings in aquatic environments may be minimal.

  14. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites. PMID:25105905

  15. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-10-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites. PMID:25105905

  16. Multiple myeloma and engine exhausts, fresh wood, and creosote: a case-referent study

    SciTech Connect

    Flodin, U.; Fredriksson, M.; Persson, B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for multiple myeloma was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 131 cases and 431 randomized referents, all alive. Information on exposure was obtained with questionnaires mailed to the subjects. An analysis of the material by means of the Miettinen confounder score technique resulted in a few rate ratios significantly exceeding unity--namely, occupational exposure to engine exhausts, creosote, and fresh wood. In view of other studies that suggest ionizing radiation as a risk factor, it was somewhat surprising that low-level gamma radiation from background exposure was less common among the cases than the referents.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): American Creosote Works, TN. (First Remedial Action), December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-05

    The American Creosote Works (ACW) site is located immediately southwest of Jackson, in central Madison County, Tennessee. ACW conducted wood-preserving operations using both creosote and PCP from the early 1930s until December 1981. Untreated process waste water and potential contaminated storm water runoff were discharged directly into Central Creek until 1973, at which time a levee was constructed to retain surface water runoff. The soil borrow pits used for the levee construction became sludge storage lagoons. A waste water treatment system was installed onsite during 1974 and 1975 and operated until 1981. The selected remedial action for the site includes consolidation and incineration of sludges in the vicinity of the buildings and tanks; on- or offsite incineration of the oils and sludges from the tanks; treatment of tanked process liquids onsite using a sand filter, filter press, and carbon adsorption unit, followed by discharge to a surface stream; decontamination and offsite disposal of site structures; construction of a flood-protection dike; deed restrictions and site fencing; and site stabilization including monitoring onsite water levels behind the dikes and pumping, treating (as needed), and discharging impounded water pending a final remedy.

  18. The effects of freezing and thawing on the aqueous availability of creosote contamination in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bevel, A.; Hrudey, S.; Dudas, M.; Sego, D.

    1996-11-01

    A variety of methods have been tested in attempts to remediate contaminated sites. Fine-grained soils are extremely problematic to remediate, due to the high adsorption capacity of the fine soil particles and the trapping effect of soil particle micropores. It is well documented that freezing of soil causes particle restructuring and reorganization, with different pore structures found after freezing. Some factors affecting restructuring include soil moisture content, freezing rate, freezing end-point temperature, and number of freezing cycles. This poster presents an experiment that determines if freezing creosote contaminated soil improves accessibility of the creosote, by measuring aqueous phase contaminant dissolution. This method was selected since water is the most common solvent in naturally occurring systems, and water represents a worst-case scenario since many contaminants have low aqueous solubilities. Freezing is carried out under controlled laboratory conditions. Variables examined include moisture content, freezing rate, and soil contamination level. If contaminant availability is increased through soil freezing, remediation becomes an easier task in fine grained soils.

  19. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  20. DELTA-13C VALUES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) COLLECTED FROM TWO CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater samples were collected from the American Creosote Works (ACW) Superfund site in Pensacola, Florida in June and September 1994. Sampling wells were located along a transect leading away from the most contaminated area. PAHs were extracted from the groundwater samples w...

  1. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: PILOT-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF A SLURRY-PHASE BIOLOGICAL REACTOR FOR CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a pilot-scale test of a slurry-phase biological reactor for treatment of creosote-contaminated soil. he technology used was a reactor system in which an aqueous slurry of soil was mixed with appropriate nutrients and seeded with microorganisms to enhance the...

  2. Shape Optimization of Rubber Bushing Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design rubber bushing at desired level of stiffness characteristics in order to achieve the ride quality of the vehicle. A differential evolution algorithm based approach is developed to optimize the rubber bushing through integrating a finite element code running in batch mode to compute the objective function values for each generation. Two case studies were given to illustrate the application of proposed approach. Optimum shape parameters of 2D bushing model were determined by shape optimization using differential evolution algorithm. PMID:25276848

  3. Development of conical silicone rubber bushings to replace porcelain on SF{sub 6} circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.B.; Orbeck, T.; Moal, E.

    1994-12-31

    A unique design of a composite polymer bushing is introduced and evaluated. A comprehensive test program defined the mechanical and electrical performance of a conical silicone polymer composite bushing. This evaluation also included aging and pollution tests to assess the long-term stability of the new design. Results show that the composite bushing offers technical and safety benefits over conventional porcelain bushings.

  4. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 9, 1937 INTERIOR VIEW OF N. W. CORNER SMOKE HOUSE - Kenworthy Hall, State Highway 14 (Greensboro Road), Marion, Perry County, AL

  5. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, 1937 SMOKE HOUSE. WEST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE - Sellers-Henderson House & Smokehouse, State Route 28, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, 1936 LOOKING SOUTH AT PART OF OLD KITCHEN. SERVANT'S HOUSE ON LEFT, SMOKE HOUSE ON RIGHT - C. W. Dunlap House, 237 Wilson Avenue, Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  7. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 25, 1935 FRONT (WEST) AND NORTH SIDE OF SMOKE HOUSE - J. O. Banks House & Smokehouse, Springfield Avenue & Pickens Street, Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  8. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 12, 1935 OLD SLAVE HOUSE, SMOKE HOUSE IN REAR - Greenlawn, U.S. Highway 431 (Memorial Parkway), Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1937 LOOKING EAST AT SMOKE HOUSE AND COOK'S HOME. - Ingleside, House & Outbuildings, Second Street (State Highway 14), Aliceville, Pickens County, AL

  10. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 7, 1936 SMOKE HOUSE AND WELL AT REAR OF HOME - Samuel M. Peck House, Eighteenth Street & Thirtieth Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  11. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 5, 1935 MANTEL IN N. W. ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge William Harrison Walker House, 309 East Clinton Street, Athens, Limestone County, AL

  12. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, 1935 A LARGE SYRUP TROUGH IN S. W. ROOM OF BASEMENT - Forks of Cypress, Savannah Road (Jackson Road), Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  13. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 9, 1935 OLD SLAVE QUARTERS, KITCHEN AND DRIVERS ROOM, FACES S. - Shackelford-McCrary-Otts House, 901 Centreville Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  14. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  15. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (FRONT) OF OLD MUSIC BUILDING - Eutaw Female Academy, Main Street & Wilson Avenue (moved from original site), Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  16. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, 1935 CORNICE IN CORNER OF REAR PARLOR - MUSIC ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  17. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, 1935 CLOSE UP OF CORNICE IN REAR PARLOR (MUSIC ROOM), N. E. ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  18. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, 1935 LOOKING UP AT CORNICE IN REAR PARLOR - MUSIC ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  19. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 SOUTH WALL OF DINING ROOM SHOWING MANTEL AND DOORS - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  20. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL IN EAST WALL OF NORTH EAST FRONT ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  1. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL AND WINDOW IN EAST WALL OF NORTH EAST ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  2. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL ON WEST WALL OF NORTH WEST BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1936 FRONT (SOUTH), AND EAST SIDE OF SECOND HOUSE - Taylor-Cunningham House (second), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  4. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 CEILING CENTER IN PARLOR, N.E. ROOM - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 GENERAL VIEW OF STAIR TREATMENT IN HALL - WEST SIDE - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF STAIR BASE AND DOOR, FIRST FLOOR FRONT HALL - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  7. 26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 HORSE STILE BLOCK + HITCHING POSTS IN FRONT OF HOUSE - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1935 FRONT (SOUTH) AND EAST SIDE, SHOWING OLD SLAVE KITCHEN IN REAR OF 1ST HOUSE - Taylor-Cunningham House (first), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  9. 31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 STONE CHIMNEY ON W. END OF OUTHOUSES - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  10. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 FIREPLACE IN KITCHEN, WEST SIDE OF SLAVE HOUSE - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  11. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 DOOR DETAIL IN S. WALL OF S. W. ROOM (BEDROOM), FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  12. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ENTRANCE (NORTH) - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1935 REAR (NORTH) AND WEST SIDE OF 1ST HOUSE - Taylor-Cunningham House (first), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 VIEW OF STAIRS ON W. SIDE OF HALL, FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  15. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 DOOR IN W. WALL OF N. E. FRONT ROOM (PARLOR) LEADING INTO HALL. - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  16. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 FIREPLACE IN PARLOR, N. E. ROOM - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  17. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 STAIR BASE AND DOOR TO LIVING ROOM IN W. WALL OF HALL (FRONT) - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  18. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 SLIDING DOORS IN S. WALL BETWEEN N. E. AND S. E. PARLORS, FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1936 WEST SIDE OF SECOND HOUSE, KITCHEN AT REAR - Taylor-Cunningham House (second), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  20. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 BASE OF MAIN STAIR ON W. SIDE OF FRONT HALL, FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  1. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ENTRANCE - NORTH - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  2. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 WINDOW IN N. WALL OF N. W. FRONT ROOM (LIVING ROOM), FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  3. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1936 MANTEL IN S. E. ROOM. DOWN STAIRS OF SECOND HOUSE - Taylor-Cunningham House (second), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  4. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 WINDOW IN N. WALL OF N. E. FRONT ROOM (PARLOR), FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  5. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 25, 1935 FIREPLACE IN UPPER BED ROOM (N.E.) - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  6. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1936 MANTEL IN S. W. DOWN STAIRS ROOM OF 2nd HOUSE - Taylor-Cunningham House (second), Bellevue Road, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  7. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 MAIN STAIRS ON W. WALL OF REAR HALL, FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) FRONT AND SIDE VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) FRONT VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) SIDE VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 WALL AROUND REAR YARD OF BANK (SERPENTINE WALL) - State Bank of Alabama, Decatur Branch, Bank Street & Wilson Avenue, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  12. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 26, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 26, 1937 ENTRANCE FROM SUN PARLOR IN CROSS HALL, ALSO STAIRWAY - Governor Robert Lindsay House, U.S. Highway 72, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  13. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, 1935 VIEW FROM HALL ON 2nd FLOOR SHOWING SUN PARLOR - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  14. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 12, 1936 PLAQUE (IN CHURCH) TO MEMORY OF WILLIAM C. THOMPSON AND WIFE - Methodist Church, State Highway 25, Dayton, Marengo County, AL

  15. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 CLOSE-UP SHOWING DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE FROM BALCONY - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  16. 34. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 21, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 21, 1935 CLOSE- UP OF WINDOW-JAM TREATMENT - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 13, 1936 CLOSE-UP OF NORTH ELEVATION (FRONT) - Dr. John H. Drish House, 2300 Seventeenth Street, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  18. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF EXTERIOR VIEW OF TYPICAL PORTICO WINDOW - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  19. 27. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1935 WINDOW DETAIL IN SIDE ON GROUND FLOOR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  20. 26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1935 MANTEL IN S. E. ROOM, GROUND FLOOR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  1. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1935 DETAIL OF REAR S. E. GROUND FLOOR WINDOW - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, 1935 VIEW FROM FRONT DOOR TOWARDS LONG T AT REAR, SHOWING PART OF LIVING ROOM & DINING ROOM - Lee Haven, County Road 21, Livingston, Sumter County, AL

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 14, 1937 CLOSE-UP DETAIL OF NORTH EAST CORNER - Doctor Wilkins House, State Highways 14 & 86 vicinity, Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  4. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, 1937 MANTEL ON WEST WALL IN LIVING ROOM - Sellers-Henderson House & Smokehouse, State Route 28, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, 1936 NORTH WEST CORNER OF ROOM ON SECOND FLOOR SHOWING WINDOW AND MANTEL - Strawberry Hill Plantation, U.S. Route 43, Forkland, Greene County, AL

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 REAR (SOUTH) AND WEST SIDE, SHOWING OLD VAULT AT REAR OF COURT HOUSE - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  7. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 VIEW ON MAIN FLOOR, TOWARD N. W. - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  8. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 VIEW ON SECOND FLOOR, TOWARD S.E. - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  9. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 CLOSE UP OF FRONT, (NORTH) AND EAST SIDE OF BLDG. - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  10. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 FRONT, NORTH WEST, ROOM ON BASEMENT FLOOR - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  11. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 13, 1935 VIEW ON BASEMENT FLOOR AT FRONT OF BUILDING - Old Marengo County Courthouse, Cahaba Avenue & Mobile Street, Linden, Marengo County, AL

  12. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 27, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 27, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF CEILING TREATMENT S.E. CORNER OF PARLOR - Montgomery-Jones-Whitaker House, County Road 4 (Reynolds Mill Road), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  13. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 2, 1937 LOOKING EAST IN GIRL'S DORMITORY, FOURTH FLOOR - East Alabama Masonic Female Institute, 205 East South Street, Talladega, Talladega County, AL

  14. 47. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 SLAVE CABIN #1 (WESTERNMOST) IN SHEETS, CABIN AT WEST SIDE OF PLOT, FACES EAST, GIRL'S DORMITORY IN REAR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  15. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW INTO LIVING ROOM SHOWING MANTEL - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  16. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW THROUGH DOUBLE SLIDING DOORS INTO DINING ROOM - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL ON NORTH WALL OF DINING ROOM - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  18. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF MAIN ENTRANCE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  19. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL ON SOUTH WALL OF PARLOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  20. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 SERVANT'S HOUSE AND GARAGE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ELEVATION FROM SOUTH SIDE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  2. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 LOOKING SOUTH WEST AT OLD STABLE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  3. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 REAR (WEST) AND NORTH SIDE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  4. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 FRONT (EAST) AND SOUTH ELEVATION - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  5. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 LOOKING NORTH IN CROSS HALL, SECOND FLOOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  6. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 GENERAL VIEW OF REAR OF MAIN HALL - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  7. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 FRONT OF ENTRANCE HALL (GENERAL VIEW) - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  8. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW IN FRONT OF MAIN HALL, SECOND FLOOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  9. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 EAST END OF HALL, SECOND FLOOR (GENERAL VIEW) - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ENTRANCE PORTICO - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 FRONT (WEST) ELEVATION FROM SOUTH WEST - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  12. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 PILASTER AND COLUMNS ON NORTH END BALCONY - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 MANTEL ON SOUTH WALL OF PARLOR - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  14. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 13, 1937 STAIR ON SOUTH WALL OF HALL - Ferguson-Long House, Chopitoulas Street (State Highway 14), Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  15. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 20, 1934. BRICK WALL, WAS ONCE USED AS A COW LOT - Jemison-van de Graaf-Burchfield House, 1305 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  16. 28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, 1935 OLD- TIME KITCHEN, WEST SIDE (NOW GARAGE), SLAVES CABIN No. 3 IN SHEETS, E SIDE OF YARD - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  17. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 4, 1937 OLD TIME TOOLS USED IN ANTI-BELLUM TIMES, TUSCUMBIA VICINITY. - Carl Rand House, 501 East Third Street, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  18. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, 1935 REAR VIEW, SHOWING SMALL OLD-TIME WINDOW OF SLAVE HOUSE - Forks of Cypress, Savannah Road (Jackson Road), Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  19. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. CLOSE-UP OF N. W. SIDE - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  20. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. VIEW OF N. SIDE LOOKING W. - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  1. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. VIEW OF RIVER FROM LOT (W) - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, 1934 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. EAST ENTRANCE GATE TO BURIAL LOT - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 CLOSE-UP VIEW OF GATE TO ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  4. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 22, 1936 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. CLOSE-UP OF VAULTS AT N. END - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  5. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, 1936 NORTH AND EAST WALL IN PARLOR SHOWING MANTEL, DOOR AND WINDOW - McDowell House, State Road 221, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  6. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, 1936 SOUTH WEST CORNER OF HALL SHOWING STAIR BASE, DOORS AND CORNICE - McDowell House, State Road 221, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  7. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 27, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 27, 1936 CLOSE-UP OF COLUMNS AT N. E. CORNER OF PORTICO - Stone-Young-Baggett House, County Road 54 (Old Selma Road), Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  8. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 5, 1936 STAIR IN SOUTH END OF CROSS-HALL, FIRST FLOOR - Alfred Battle Home, Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  9. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 12, 1936 DETAIL OF COLUMN CAP, S. W. CORNER PORTICO - Dearing-Bagby House, 421 Queen City Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  10. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 13, 1936 CORNICE IN N. W. FRONT ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Dr. John H. Drish House, 2300 Seventeenth Street, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL