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Sample records for crgd targeting vectors

  1. Targeted gene delivery by polyplex micelles with crowded PEG palisade and cRGD moiety for systemic treatment of pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhishen; Chen, Qixian; Osada, Kensuke; Liu, Xueying; Tockary, Theofilus A; Uchida, Satoshi; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Ishii, Takehiko; Nomoto, Takahiro; Toh, Kazuko; Matsumoto, Yu; Oba, Makoto; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Adequate retention in systemic circulation is the preliminary requirement for systemic gene delivery to afford high bioavailability into the targeted site. Polyplex micelle formulated through self-assembly of oppositely-charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-polycation block copolymer and plasmid DNA has gained tempting perspective upon its advantageous core-shell architecture, where outer hydrophilic PEG shell offers superior stealth behaviors. Aiming to promote these potential characters toward systemic applications, we strategically introduced hydrophobic cholesteryl moiety at the ω-terminus of block copolymer, anticipating to promote not only the stability of polyplex structure but also the tethered PEG crowdedness. Moreover, Mw of PEG in the PEGylated polyplex micelle was elongated up to 20 kDa for expecting further enhancement in PEG crowdedness. Furthermore, cyclic RGD peptide as ligand molecule to integrin receptors was installed at the distal end of PEG in order for facilitating targeted delivery to the tumor site as well as promoting cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking behaviors. Thus constructed cRGD conjugated polyplex micelle with the elevated PEG shielding was challenged to a modeled intractable pancreatic cancer in mice, achieving potent tumor growth suppression by efficient gene expression of antiangiogenic protein (sFlt-1) at the tumor site. PMID:24439417

  2. Enhanced tumor targeting of cRGD peptide-conjugated albumin nanoparticles in the BxPC-3 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinzhe; Song, Yunlong; Di, Yang; He, Hang; Fu, Deliang; Jin, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The emerging albumin nanoparticle brings new hope for the delivery of antitumor drugs. However, a lack of robust tumor targeting greatly limits its application. In this paper, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic-conjugated, gemcitabine-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs) were successfully prepared, characterized, and tested in vitro in the BxPC-3 cell line. Initially, 4-N-myristoyl-gemcitabine (Gem-C14) was formed by conjugating myristoyl to the 4-amino group of gemcitabine. Then, cRGD-HSA was synthesized using sulfosuccinimidyl-(4-N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC) cross-linkers. Finally, cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs were formulated based on the nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) technology. The resulting NPs were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading efficiency. In vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies were conducted to compare Gem-HSA-NPs and cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs exhibited an average particle size of 160 ± 23 nm. The encapsulation rate and drug loading rate were approximately 83 ± 5.6% and 11 ± 4.2%, respectively. In vitro, the cRGD-anchored NPs exhibited a significantly greater affinity for the BxPC-3 cells compared to non-targeted NPs and free drug. The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs also showed the strongest inhibitory effect in the BxPC-3 cells among all the analyzed groups. The improved efficacy of cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in the BxPC-3 cell line warrants further in vivo investigations. PMID:27515795

  3. Enhanced tumor targeting of cRGD peptide-conjugated albumin nanoparticles in the BxPC-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinzhe; Song, Yunlong; Di, Yang; He, Hang; Fu, Deliang; Jin, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The emerging albumin nanoparticle brings new hope for the delivery of antitumor drugs. However, a lack of robust tumor targeting greatly limits its application. In this paper, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic-conjugated, gemcitabine-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs) were successfully prepared, characterized, and tested in vitro in the BxPC-3 cell line. Initially, 4-N-myristoyl-gemcitabine (Gem-C14) was formed by conjugating myristoyl to the 4-amino group of gemcitabine. Then, cRGD-HSA was synthesized using sulfosuccinimidyl-(4-N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC) cross-linkers. Finally, cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs were formulated based on the nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) technology. The resulting NPs were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading efficiency. In vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies were conducted to compare Gem-HSA-NPs and cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs exhibited an average particle size of 160 ± 23 nm. The encapsulation rate and drug loading rate were approximately 83 ± 5.6% and 11 ± 4.2%, respectively. In vitro, the cRGD-anchored NPs exhibited a significantly greater affinity for the BxPC-3 cells compared to non-targeted NPs and free drug. The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs also showed the strongest inhibitory effect in the BxPC-3 cells among all the analyzed groups. The improved efficacy of cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in the BxPC-3 cell line warrants further in vivo investigations. PMID:27515795

  4. Strategies for targeting lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Szécsi, Judit; Cosset, Francois-Loîc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2008-12-01

    Vectors derived from retroviruses such as lentiviruses and onco-retroviruses are probably among the most suitable tools to achieve a long-term gene transfer since they allow stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses (MLV) since in contrast to the latter they can transduce non-proliferating target cells. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer approaches in vivo. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to upgrade lentiviral vectors for tissue or cell targeting and which have potential for in vivo gene delivery. In this overview we distinguish between three types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies (Fig 1): 1) targeting of vectors at the level of vector-cell entry through lentiviral vector surface modifications; 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue specific promoters into lentiviral vectors; 3) a novel microRNA technology that rather than targeting the 'right' cells will 'detarget' transgene expression from non-target cells while achieving high expression in the target-cell. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value for several gene therapy approaches but combining these three layers of transgene expression control will offer tools to really overcome several drawbacks in the field such as side-effect of off-target expression, clearance of transgene modified cells by immune response to the transgene and lack of biosecurity and efficiency in in vivo approaches. PMID:19075628

  5. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  6. Lentiviral Vectors for Immune Cells Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Steven; Tai, April; Wang, Pin

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles suitable for delivering long-term transgene expression in various cell types. Engineering lentiviral vectors to have the capacity to transduce specific cell types is of great interest to advance the translation of lentiviral vectors towards the clinic. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to target lentiviral vectors to cells of the immune system. In this overview we distinguish between two types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies: 1) targeting of the vectors to specific cells by lentiviral vector surface modifications, and 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue-specific promoters to drive transgene expression. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value but ultimately combining these approaches may help reduce the effects of off-target expression and improve the efficiency and saftey of lentiviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:20085508

  7. Classification SAR targets with support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lanying

    2007-02-01

    With the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, automatic target recognition (ATR) is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we proposed a 3-class target classification system in SAR images. The system is based on invariant wavelet moments and support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. It is a two-stage approach. The first stage is to extract and select a small set of wavelet invariant moment features to indicate target images. The wavelet invariant moments take both advantages of the wavelet inherent property of multi-resolution analysis and moment invariants quality of invariant to translation, scaling changes and rotation. The second stage is classification of targets with SVM algorithm. SVM is based on the principle of structural risk minimization (SRM), which has been shown better than the principle of empirical risk minimization (ERM) which is used by many conventional networks. To test the performance and efficiency of the proposed method, we performed experiments on invariant wavelet moments, different kernel functions, 2-class identification, and 3-class identification. Test results show that wavelet invariant moments indicate the target effectively; linear kernel function achieves better results than other kernel functions, and SVM classification approach performs better than conventional nearest distance approach.

  8. Radar target identification using probabilistic classification vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, I.

    2016-05-01

    Radar target identification using probabilistic vector machines is investigated and tested using real radar data collected in a compact range for commercial aircraft models. Unlike relevance vector machines (RVM) that utilize zero-mean Gaussian prior for every weight for both negative and positive classes and are thus vulnerable to questionable (deceptive) vectors, probabilistic vector machines [2], alternatively, use nonnegative priors for the positive class and vice versa. This paper compares the performance of these machines with other target identification tools, and highlights scenarios where classification via a probabilistic vector machine is more plausible. The problem addressed in this paper is a M-ary target classification problem and is implemented as a set of pairwise comparisons between all competing hypotheses.

  9. Conjugation of cRGD Peptide to Chlorophyll-a Based Photosensitizer (HPPH) Alters its Pharmacokinetics with Enhanced Tumor-Imaging and Photosensitizing (PDT) Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Avinash; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Pandey, Suresh K.; Dubey, Shipra; Zheng, Xiang; Liu, Ting-Hsiu; Shibata, Masayuki; Missert, Joseph; Morgan, Janet; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2011-01-01

    The αvβ3 integrin receptor plays an important role in human metastasis and tumor-induced angiogenesis. Cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD) peptide represents a selective αvβ3 integrin ligand that has been extensively used for research, therapy, and diagnosis of neoangiogenesis. For developing photosensitizers with enhanced PDT efficacy, we here report the synthesis of a series of bifunctional agents in which the 3-(1′-hexyloxyethyl)-3-devinylpyropheophorbide-a (HPPH), a chlorophyll-based photosensitizer was conjugated to cRGD and the related analogs. The cell uptake, in vitro PDT efficacy of the conjugates were studied in αvβ3 integrin overexpressing U87 and 4T1 cell lines whereas the in vivo PDT efficacy and fluorescence-imaging potential of the conjugates were compared with the corresponding non-conjugated photosensitizer HPPH in 4T1 tumors. Compared to HPPH, the HPPH-cRGD conjugate in which the arginine and aspartic acid moieties were available for binding to two subunits of αvβ3 integrin showed faster clearance, enhanced tumor-imaging and PDT efficacy at 2–4 h post-injection. Molecular modeling studies also confirmed that the presence of HPPH moiety in HPPH-cRGD conjugate does not interfere with specific recognition of cRGD by αvβ3 integrin. Compared to U87 and 4T1 cells the HPPH-cRGD showed significantly low photosensitizing efficacy in A431 (αvβ3 negative) tumor cells, suggesting possible target-specificity of the conjugate. PMID:21702452

  10. Strategies for targeting primate neural circuits with viral vectors.

    PubMed

    El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Ni, Amy M; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how the brain works requires understanding how different types of neurons contribute to circuit function and organism behavior. Progress on this front has been accelerated by optogenetics and chemogenetics, which provide an unprecedented level of control over distinct neuronal types in small animals. In primates, however, targeting specific types of neurons with these tools remains challenging. In this review, we discuss existing and emerging strategies for directing genetic manipulations to targeted neurons in the adult primate central nervous system. We review the literature on viral vectors for gene delivery to neurons, focusing on adeno-associated viral vectors and lentiviral vectors, their tropism for different cell types, and prospects for new variants with improved efficacy and selectivity. We discuss two projection targeting approaches for probing neural circuits: anterograde projection targeting and retrograde transport of viral vectors. We conclude with an analysis of cell type-specific promoters and other nucleotide sequences that can be used in viral vectors to target neuronal types at the transcriptional level. PMID:27052579

  11. Gold Nanorods Conjugated with Doxorubicin and cRGD for Combined Anticancer Drug Delivery and PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuling; Hong, Hao; Matson, Vyara Z.; Javadi, Alireza; Xu, Wenjin; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo; Steeber, Douglas A.; Gong, Shaoqin

    2012-01-01

    A multifunctional gold nanorod (GNR)-based nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumors was developed and characterized. An anti-cancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)) was covalently conjugated onto PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) GNR nanocarriers via a hydrazone bond to achieve pH-sensitive controlled drug release. Tumor-targeting ligands (i.e., the cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys) peptides, cRGD) and 64Cu-chelators (i.e., 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N''-triacetic acid (NOTA)) were conjugated onto the distal ends of the PEG arms to achieve active tumor-targeting and PET imaging, respectively. Based on flow cytometry analysis, cRGD-conjugated nanocarriers (i.e., GNR-DOX-cRGD) exhibited a higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity than non-targeted ones (i.e., GNR-DOX) in vitro. However, GNR-DOX-cRGD and GNR-DOX nanocarriers had similar in vivo biodistribution according to in vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies. Due to the unique optical properties of GNRs, this multifunctional GNR-based nanoplatform can potentially be optimized for combined cancer therapies (chemotherapy and photothermal therapy) and multimodality imaging (PET, optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT), etc.). PMID:22916075

  12. Two-photon uncageable enzyme inhibitors bearing targeting vectors.

    PubMed

    Anstaett, Philipp; Pierroz, Vanessa; Ferrari, Stefano; Gasser, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The activity of two cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme inhibitors, Celecoxib and Lumiracoxib, could be suppressed by coupling to photo-labile protecting groups, so-called photocages. These groups could be further functionalized with a peptide targeting vector for specific cellular delivery. The enzyme inhibition potential of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors could be regained upon two-photon excitation with tissue-transparent near-IR light at 800 nm. PMID:26314377

  13. SVM based target classification using RCS feature vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufler, Travis D.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Dogaru, Traian

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the application of SVM (Support Vector Machines) for the classification of stationary human targets and indoor clutter via spectral features. Applying Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) techniques allows us to examine the radar cross section (RCS) of humans and indoor clutter objects by utilizing different types of computer models. FDTD allows for the spectral characteristics to be acquired over a wide range of frequencies, polarizations, aspect angles, and materials. The acquired target and clutter RCS spectral characteristics are then investigated in terms of their potential for target classification using SVMs. Based upon variables such as frequency and polarization, a SVM classifier can be trained to classify unknown targets as a human or clutter. Furthermore, the application of feature selection is applied to the spectral characteristics to determine the SVM classification accuracy of a reduced dataset. Classification accuracies of nearly 90% are achieved using radial and polynomial kernels.

  14. Multimerization of cRGD peptides by click chemistry: synthetic strategies, chemical limitations, and influence on biological properties.

    PubMed

    Wängler, Carmen; Maschauer, Simone; Prante, Olaf; Schäfer, Martin; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bartenstein, Peter; Eisenhut, Michael; Wängler, Björn

    2010-10-18

    Integrin α(ν)β(3) is overexpressed on endothelial cells of growing vessels as well as on several tumor types, and so integrin-binding radiolabeled cyclic RGD pentapeptides have attracted increasing interest for in vivo imaging of α(ν)β(3) integrin expression by positron emission tomography (PET). Of the cRGD derivatives available for imaging applications, systems comprising multiple cRGD moieties have recently been shown to exhibit highly favorable properties in relation to monomers. To assess the synthetic limits of the cRGD-multimerization approach and thus the maximum multimer size achievable by using different efficient conjugation reactions, we prepared a variety of multimers that were further investigated in vitro with regard to their avidities to integrin α(ν)β(3.) The synthesized peptide multimers containing increasing numbers of cRGD moieties on PAMAM dendrimer scaffolds were prepared by different click chemistry coupling strategies. A cRGD hexadecimer was the largest construct that could be synthesized under optimized reaction conditions, thus identifying the current synthetic limitations for cRGD multimerization. The obtained multimeric systems were conjugated to a new DOTA-based chelator developed for the derivatization of sterically demanding structures and successfully labeled with (68)Ga for a potential in vivo application. The evaluated multimers showed very high avidities-increasing with the number of cRGD moieties-in in vitro studies on immobilized α(ν)β(3) integrin and U87MG cells, of up to 131- and 124-fold, respectively, relative to the underivatized monomer. PMID:20827791

  15. Library screening and receptor-directed targeting of gammaretroviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mazari, Peter M; Roth, Monica J

    2013-01-01

    Gene- and cell-based therapies hold great potential for the advancement of the personalized medicine movement. Gene therapy vectors have made dramatic leaps forward since their inception. Retroviral-based vectors were the first to gain clinical attention and still offer the best hope for the long-term correction of many disorders. The fear of nonspecific transduction makes targeting a necessary feature for most clinical applications. However, this remains a difficult feature to optimize, with specificity often coming at the expense of efficiency. The aim of this article is to discuss the various methods employed to retarget retroviral entry. Our focus will lie on the modification of gammaretroviral envelope proteins with an in-depth discussion of the creation and screening of envelope libraries. PMID:23252496

  16. Endothelial cell-targeted pVEGF165 polyplex plays a pivotal role in inhibiting intimal thickening after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shouqin; Cao, Duanwen; Zou, Haijuan; Bai, Feng; Wang, Zhongjuan; Pan, Shirong; Feng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression can inhibit intimal thickening after vascular injury. However, the lack of efficient gene delivery systems leads to insufficient VEGF expression, which prevents its application in gene therapy. In the present study, to improve the delivery of the plasmid vector with the VEGF gene (pVEGF165) to the injured vessel wall, we explored the potentially important difference between endothelial cell-targeted and nontargeted polymeric carriers. The αvβ3 integrin is overexpressed on activated endothelial cells but not on normal quiescent vessels. In this study, CDG2-cRGD, synthesized by conjugating an αvβ3 integrin-binding cyclic arginylglycylaspartic acid (cRGD) peptide with the Generation 2 polycation polyamidoamine (PAMAMG2)-g-cyclodextrin (termed as CDG2), was developed as a targetable carrier. It was observed that the specific integrin–ligand interactions greatly enhanced cellular internalization of CDG2-cRGD in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which are notoriously difficult to transfect. Consequently, HUVECs were found to show remarkably high levels of VEGF165 expression induced by the CDG2-cRGD polyplex. Interestingly, VEGF165 overexpression in vivo was more complex than that in vitro, and in vivo assays demonstrated that the stimulus response to balloon injury in arteries could obviously upregulate VEGF165 expression in the saline-treated group, although it was not enough to prevent intimal thickening. In gene-transfected groups, intravascular delivery of pVEGF165 with the CDG2-cRGD polyplex into rabbits after vascular injury resulted in a significant inhibition of intimal thickening at 4 weeks, whereas the low therapeutic efficacy in the nontargeted CDG2-treated group was only comparable to that in the saline-treated group. It is becoming clear that the conflicting results of VEGF165 gene therapy in two gene-transfected groups are reflective of the pivotal role of the c

  17. Current Advances and Future Challenges in Adenoviral Vector Biology and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on Adenoviral (Ad) vectors have enormous potential for the treatment of both hereditary and acquired disease. Detailed structural analysis of the Ad virion, combined with functional studies has broadened our knowledge of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host cells/tissues and substantial achievement has been made towards a thorough understanding of the biology of Ad vectors. The widespread use of Ad vectors for clinical gene therapy is compromised by their inherent immunogenicity. The generation of safer and more effective Ad vectors, targeted to the site of disease, has therefore become a great ambition in the field of Ad vector development. This review provides a synopsis of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host systems and summarizes the many innovative approaches towards achieving Ad vector targeting. PMID:17584037

  18. The molecular basis of multiple vector insertion by gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P; Baker, M D

    1999-01-01

    Gene targeting using sequence insertion vectors generally results in integration of one copy of the targeting vector generating a tandem duplication of the cognate chromosomal region of homology. However, occasionally the target locus is found to contain >1 copy of the integrated vector. The mechanism by which the latter recombinants arise is not known. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis by which multiple vectors become integrated at the chromosomal immunoglobulin mu locus in a murine hybridoma. To accomplish this, specially designed insertion vectors were constructed that included six diagnostic restriction enzyme markers in the Cmu region of homology to the target chromosomal mu locus. This enabled contributions by the vector-borne and chromosomal Cmu sequences at the recombinant locus to be ascertained. Targeted recombinants were isolated and analyzed to determine the number of vector copies integrated at the chromosomal immunoglobulin mu locus. Targeted recombinants identified as bearing >1 copy of the integrated vector resulted from a Cmu triplication formed by two vector copies in tandem. Examination of the fate of the Cmu region markers suggested that this class of recombinant was generated predominantly, if not exclusively, by two targeted vector integration events, each involving insertion of a single copy of the vector. Both vector insertion events into the chromosomal mu locus were consistent with the double-strand-break repair mechanism of homologous recombination. We interpret our results, taken together, to mean that a proportion of recipient cells is in a predetermined state that is amenable to targeted but not random vector integration. PMID:10049930

  19. Expression-independent gene trap vectors for random and targeted mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Anestis; Tzouanacou, Elena; Rahman, Afifah; Colby, Douglas; Axton, Richard; Chambers, Ian; Wilson, Valerie; Forrester, Lesley; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Promoterless gene trap vectors have been widely used for high-efficiency gene targeting and random mutagenesis in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unfortunately, such vectors are only effective for genes expressed in ES cells and this has prompted the development of expression-independent vectors. These polyadenylation (poly A) trap vectors employ a splice donor to capture an endogenous gene's polyadenylation sequence and provide transcript stability. However, the spectrum of mutations generated by these vectors appears largely restricted to the last intron of target loci due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) making them unsuitable for gene targeting applications. Here, we present novel poly A trap vectors that overcome the effect of NMD and also employ RNA instability sequences to improve splicing efficiency. The set of random insertions generated with these vectors show a significantly reduced insertional bias and the vectors can be targeted directly to a 5′ intron. We also show that this relative positional independence is linked to the human β-actin promoter and is most likely a result of its transcriptional activity in ES cells. Taken together our data indicate that these vectors are an effective tool for insertional mutagenesis that can be used for either gene trapping or gene targeting. PMID:19692586

  20. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  1. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay. PMID:27317182

  2. A series of conditional shuttle vectors for targeted genomic integration in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Patel, Michael T.; Gartenberg, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to repair exposed DNA ends by homologous recombination has long been used by experimentalists to assemble plasmids from DNA fragments in vivo. While this approach works well for engineering extrachromosomal vectors, it is not well suited to the generation, recovery and reuse of integrative vectors. Here, we describe the creation of a series of conditional centromeric shuttle vectors, termed pXR vectors, that can be used for both plasmid assembly in vivo and targeted genomic integration. The defining feature of pXR vectors is that the DNA segment bearing the centromere and origin of replication, termed CEN/ARS, is flanked by a pair of loxP sites. Passaging the vectors through bacteria that express Cre recombinase reduces the loxP-CEN/ARS-loxP module to a single loxP site, thereby eliminating the ability to replicate autonomously in yeast. Each vector also contains a selectable marker gene, as well as a fragment of the HO locus, which permits targeted integration at a neutral genomic site. The pXR vectors provide a convenient and robust method to assemble DNAs for targeted genomic modifications. PMID:25736914

  3. Reductionism and complexity in nanoparticle-vectored drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Florence, Alexander T

    2012-07-20

    This paper briefly discusses reductionism as a process for dissecting the complexities of drug targeting mediated by nanoparticulate carriers. While reductionism has been said to have been a drawback to enhanced appreciation and understanding of complex biological systems, it is concluded here that the dissection of the individual stages of the procession from injection to final destination in specific targets in a living complex organism is essential. It should allow a decrease in the empiricism from laudable and inventive efforts to achieve high levels of drug delivery to specific diseased targets such as tumours. At the stage of development of the field there have perhaps been fewer than desirable detailed experimental or theoretical investigations of these individual stages. However, there are frequently analogies in the literature from which to draw at least tentative conclusions about the physics, physical chemistry and biology which underpin the processes involved. PMID:22100439

  4. The research and application of visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine in target tracking field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuantao; Xu, Weihong; Kuang, Fangjun; Gao, Shangbing

    2013-01-01

    The efficient target tracking algorithm researches have become current research focus of intelligent robots. The main problems of target tracking process in mobile robot face environmental uncertainty. They are very difficult to estimate the target states, illumination change, target shape changes, complex backgrounds, and other factors and all affect the occlusion in tracking robustness. To further improve the target tracking's accuracy and reliability, we present a novel target tracking algorithm to use visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine (ASVM). Furthermore, the paper's algorithm has been based on the mixture saliency of image features. These features include color, brightness, and sport feature. The execution process used visual saliency features and those common characteristics have been expressed as the target's saliency. Numerous experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and timeliness of the proposed target tracking algorithm in video sequences where the target objects undergo large changes in pose, scale, and illumination. PMID:24363779

  5. Targeting renal epithelial channels for the control of insect vectors

    PubMed Central

    Beyenbach, Klaus W; Yu, Yasong; Piermarini, Peter M; Denton, Jerod

    2015-01-01

    Three small molecules were identified in high throughput screens that 1) block renal inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels of Aedes aegypti expressed in HEK cells and Xenopus oocytes, 2) inhibit the secretion of KCl but not NaCl in isolated Malpighian tubules, and after injection into the hemolymph, 3) inhibit KCl excretion in vivo, and 4) render mosquitoes flightless or dead within 24h. Some mosquitoes had swollen abdomens at death consistent with renal failure. VU625, the most potent and promising small molecule for development as mosquitocide, inhibits AeKir1-mediated currents with an IC50 less than 100 nM. It is highly selective for AeKir1 over mammalian Kir channels, and it affects only 3 of 68 mammalian membrane proteins. These results document 1) renal failure as a new mode-of-action for mosquitocide development, 2) renal Kir channels as molecular target for inducing renal failure, and 3) the promise of the discovery and development of new species-specific insecticides. PMID:26716074

  6. Targeting the Central Nervous System with Herpes Simplex Virus / Sleeping Beauty Hybrid Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Suresh; Bowers, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The pursuits of sustainable treatments for diseases and disorders that afflict the central nervous system (CNS) have proven challenging for the field of viral vector-based gene therapy. However, recent advances in viral vector technology coupled with efficient delivery methods have opened up new avenues that show promise at the preclinical testing stage. The development of the Herpes Simplex Virus/Sleeping Beauty (HSV/SB) hybrid vector represents such an advance for devising treatments targeting the CNS with its potential for stably integrating large transgenomic segments of DNA within the genomes of transduced cells. In utero administration of this hybrid vector into the embryonic mouse brain has revealed the capacity for widespread transgene dissemination due to the targeting of a neuronal precursor cell population. This unique feature has provided the means to stably express a transgene throughout the brain for prolonged periods, which is a prerequisite for the treatment of progressive CNS disorders. In this review we provide a comprehensive breakdown of the characteristics of the HSV/SB vector system and how it can be efficiently employed in the derivation of CNS-targeted gene therapeutic strategies. PMID:21711226

  7. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases. PMID:24955893

  8. Non-targeted effects of virus-induced gene silencing vectors on host endogenous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Enikő; Pesti, Réka; Taller, Dénes; Havelda, Zoltán; Várallyay, Éva

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) uses recombinant viruses to study gene function; however, the effect of the virus vector itself on the gene expression of the host is not always considered. In our work, we investigated non-targeted gene expression changes of the host in order to see how often these changes appear. Effects of various VIGS vector infections were analysed by monitoring gene expression levels of housekeeping genes by Northern blot analysis in four different hosts. We found that non-targeted changes happens very often. More importantly, these non-targeted effects can cause drastic changes in the gene-expression pattern of host genes that are usually used as references in these studies. We have also found that in a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS, the presence of foreign sequences in the cloning site of the vector can also have a non-targeted effect, and even the use of an internal control can lead to unpredicted changes. Our results show that although VIGS is a very powerful technique, the VIGS vector, as a pathogen of the host, can cause unwanted changes in its gene-expression pattern, highlighting the importance of careful selection of both the genes to be tested and those to be used as references in the planned experiments. PMID:27283101

  9. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnik, Karoline; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon; Knapp, Elzbieta; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth; Rosenfellner, Doris; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Hohenadl, Christine . E-mail: christine.hohenadl@vu-wien.ac.at

    2006-05-25

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours.

  10. Design and synthesis of dual-ligand modified chitosan as a liver targeting vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houxiang; Li, Min; Wan, Tao; Zheng, Qichang; Cheng, Mingrong; Huang, Shiqi; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Vector plays an important role in hepatic targeted drug delivery system. In this study, a novel material as a liver targeting vector, dual-ligand modified chitosan (GCGA) composed of chitosan (CTS), glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and lactobionic acid (LA), was designed and synthesized by an orthogonal experiment with two-step synthesis under mild conditions. The synthesized final product was characterized and confirmed by FTIR and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, and DS of GA and LA in CTS were measured to be 13.77 and 16.74 mol% using (1)H-NMR, respectively. The cytotoxicity of CTS and GCGA was concentration dependent which was inverse proportion to the cell viability by MTT assay using L929 cell line, and inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) was 0.2 mg/ml for GCGA. The in vitro targeting efficiency and the in vitro cellular uptake were investigated. Compared with CTS NPs and GA-CTS NPs, GCGA NPs showed good cell specificity to BEL-7402 cells via the dual-ligand-receptor-mediated recognition, leading to a higher affinity to BEL-7402 cells. The results suggested that GCGA described here has the potential to be used as an effective vector for hepatic targeted drug therapy. PMID:22105225

  11. Vector insert-targeted integrative antisense expression system for plasmid stabilization.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jeremy M; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2011-01-01

    Some DNA vaccine and gene therapy vector-encoded transgenes are toxic to the E. coli plasmid production host resulting in poor production yields. For plasmid products undergoing clinical evaluation, sequence modification to eliminate toxicity is undesirable because an altered vector is a new chemical entity. We hypothesized that: (1) insert-encoded toxicity is mediated by unintended expression of a toxic insert-encoded protein from spurious bacterial promoters; and (2) that toxicity could be eliminated with antisense RNA-mediated translation inhibition. We developed the pINT PR PL vector, a chromosomally integrable RNA expression vector, and utilized it to express insert-complementary (anti-insert) RNA from a single defined site in the bacterial chromosome. Anti-insert RNA eliminated leaky fluorescent protein expression from a target plasmid. A toxic retroviral gag pol helper plasmid produced in a gag pol anti-insert strain had fourfold improved plasmid fermentation yields. Plasmid fermentation yields were also fourfold improved when a DNA vaccine plasmid containing a toxic Influenza serotype H1 hemagglutinin transgene was grown in an H1 sense strand anti-insert production strain, suggesting that in this case toxicity was mediated by an antisense alternative reading frame-encoded peptide. This anti-insert chromosomal RNA expression technology is a general approach to improve production yields with plasmid-based vectors that encode toxic transgenes, or toxic alternative frame peptides. PMID:20607625

  12. Subcloning plus insertion (SPI)--a novel recombineering method for the rapid construction of gene targeting vectors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a 'targeting' vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4 kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors. PMID:25590226

  13. Biophysical characterization of an integrin-targeted lipopolyplex gene delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Mustapa, M Firouz Mohd; Bell, Paul C; Hurley, Christopher A; Nicol, Alastair; Guénin, Erwann; Sarkar, Supti; Writer, Michele J; Barker, Susie E; Wong, John B; Pilkington-Miksa, Michael A; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Shamlou, Parviz Ayazi; Hailes, Helen C; Hart, Stephen L; Zicha, Daniel; Tabor, Alethea B

    2007-11-13

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors now show good therapeutic potential: however, detailed characterization of the composition and macromolecular organization of such particles remains a challenge. This paper describes experiments to elucidate the structure of a ternary, targeted, lipopolyplex synthetic vector, the LID complex. This consists of a lipid component, Lipofectin (L) (1:1 DOTMA:DOPE), plasmid DNA (D), and a dual-function, cationic peptide component (I) containing DNA condensation and integrin-targeting sequences. Fluorophore-labeled lipid, peptide, and DNA components were used to formulate the vector, and the stoichiometry of the particles was established by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The size of the complex was measured by FCS, and the sizes of LID, L, LD, and ID complexes were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Fluorescence quenching experiments and freeze-fracture electron microscopy were then used to demonstrate the arrangement of the lipid, peptide, and DNA components within the complex. These experiments showed that the cationic portion of the peptide, I, interacts with the plasmid DNA, resulting in a tightly condensed DNA-peptide inner core; this is surrounded by a disordered lipid layer, from which the integrin-targeting sequence of the peptide partially protrudes. PMID:17935306

  14. CD19 and CD20 Targeted Vectors Induce Minimal Activation of Resting B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Michael; Cosset, François-Loic; Verhoeyen, Els; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are an important cell population of the immune system. However, until recently it was not possible to transduce resting B lymphocytes with retro- or lentiviral vectors, making them unsusceptible for genetic manipulations by these vectors. Lately, we demonstrated that lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with modified measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin, responsible for receptor recognition, and fusion protein were able to overcome this transduction block. They use either the natural MV receptors, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), for cell entry (MV-LV) or the vector particles were further modified to selectively enter via the CD20 molecule, which is exclusively expressed on B lymphocytes (CD20-LV). It has been shown previously that transduction by MV-LV does not induce B lymphocyte activation. However, if this is also true for CD20-LV is still unknown. Here, we generated a vector specific for another B lymphocyte marker, CD19, and compared its ability to transduce resting B lymphocytes with CD20-LV. The vector (CD19ds-LV) was able to stably transduce unstimulated B lymphocytes, albeit with a reduced efficiency of about 10% compared to CD20-LV, which transduced about 30% of the cells. Since CD20 as well as CD19 are closely linked to the B lymphocyte activation pathway, we investigated if engagement of CD20 or CD19 molecules by the vector particles induces activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes. Although, activation of B lymphocytes often involves calcium influx, we did not detect elevated calcium levels. However, the activation marker CD71 was substantially up-regulated upon CD20-LV transduction and most importantly, B lymphocytes transduced with CD20-LV or CD19ds-LV entered the G1b phase of cell cycle, whereas untransduced or MV-LV transduced B lymphocytes remained in G0. Hence, CD20 and CD19 targeting vectors induce activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes, which most likely renders them susceptible for lentiviral

  15. A protocol for construction of gene targeting vectors and generation of homologous recombinant ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The completion of human and mouse genome sequencing has confronted us with huge amount of data sequences that certainly need decades and many generations of scientists to be reasonably interpreted and assigned to physiological functions, and subsequently fruitfully translated into medical application. A means to assess the function of genes provides gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that enables to introduce site-specific modifications in the mouse genome, and analyze their physiological consequences. Gene targeting enables almost any type of genetic modifications of interest, ranging from gene insertion (e.g. insertion of human-specific genes or reporter genes), gene disruption, point mutations, short and long range deletions, inversions. Site-specific modification into the genome of ES cells can be reached by homologous recombination using targeting vectors. Here, we describe a protocol to generate targeting constructs and homologous recombinant ES cells. PMID:23996269

  16. Establishment of a novel therapeutic vector targeting the trigeminal ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Pan, Shi-Yin; Song, Jin-Xin; Liu, Xian-Ning; An, Na; Zheng, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Background In the pathogenesis of herpes simplex keratitis, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection begins in corneal epithelium cells and then progresses through the sensory nerve endings and finally travels up forward to the trigeminal ganglion (TG), where it remains as latent virus. The available anti-HSV therapies do not completely suppress the recurrence of active HSV-1 infection. The aim of this study was to establish a novel replication-defective (rd) HSV-1 (rdHSV) vector (rdHSV-interferon gamma [IFNγ]) that could effectively target the TG. Methods Recombinant HSV-1 virus was inserted into a shuttle plasmid carrying IFNγ to establish the rdHSV-IFNγ vector. Safety was evaluated in vitro by 50% cellular cytotoxicity in transfected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in vivo by Kaplan–Meier survival estimate and infection rate. Wistar rats were immunized with rdHSV-IFNγ to evaluate the TG targeting efficiency. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assays were used to evaluate IFNγ mRNA and protein expression and rdHSV-IFNγ localization. Results The rdHSV-IFNγ vector was successfully constructed and showed high in vitro safety and overall survival and a corneal infection rate similar to that of control rats immunized with saline (control group; P>0.05). Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry assays confirmed IFNγ expression and effective TG targeting on days 14 and 21, which increased with postimmunization time. Moreover, IFNγ was expressed sufficiently in the TG tissues. Conclusion The rdHSV-IFNγ can act as an effective gene transporting vector that carries the therapeutic genes to the TG and triggers its expression. PMID:26893545

  17. A targeted change-detection procedure by combining change vector analysis and post-classification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Su; Chen, Dongmei; Yu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    In remote sensing, conventional supervised change-detection methods usually require effective training data for multiple change types. This paper introduces a more flexible and efficient procedure that seeks to identify only the changes that users are interested in, here after referred to as "targeted change detection". Based on a one-class classifier "Support Vector Domain Description (SVDD)", a novel algorithm named "Three-layer SVDD Fusion (TLSF)" is developed specially for targeted change detection. The proposed algorithm combines one-class classification generated from change vector maps, as well as before- and after-change images in order to get a more reliable detecting result. In addition, this paper introduces a detailed workflow for implementing this algorithm. This workflow has been applied to two case studies with different practical monitoring objectives: urban expansion and forest fire assessment. The experiment results of these two case studies show that the overall accuracy of our proposed algorithm is superior (Kappa statistics are 86.3% and 87.8% for Case 1 and 2, respectively), compared to applying SVDD to change vector analysis and post-classification comparison.

  18. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  19. Extraction of polarization observables in vector-meson photoproduction using a polarized target at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.

    2016-05-01

    Baryon spectroscopy is an indispensable tool for investigating the nature of strong interaction within baryons. The study of vector-meson photoproduction is expected to improve our understanding of the properties of known baryon resonances and also immensely aid in discovering new higher-mass resonances. Polarization observables, in addition to unpolarized cross sections, are required to identify the contributing resonances to these reactions with minimal ambiguities. Preliminary results from the FROST experiment on beam-polarization observables in γ →p →→p ω as well as γ →p →→p π+π- using a linearly-polarized beam and a transversely-polarized FROzen Spin butanol Target will be presented. The latter reaction will provide important information on N* to (broad) ρ vector-meson decay modes, which is difficult to extract directly from the data.

  20. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  2. Targeted gene transfer to lymphocytes using murine leukaemia virus vectors pseudotyped with spleen necrosis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Engelstädter, M; Buchholz, C J; Bobkova, M; Steidl, S; Merget-Millitzer, H; Willemsen, R A; Stitz, J; Cichutek, K

    2001-08-01

    In contrast to murine leukaemia virus (MLV)-derived vector systems, vector particles derived from the avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV) have been successfully targeted to subsets of human cells by envelope modification with antibody fragments (scFv). However, an in vivo application of the SNV vector system in gene transfer protocols is hampered by its lack of resistance against human complement. To overcome this limitation we established pseudotyping of MLV vector particles produced in human packaging cell lines with the SNV envelope (Env) protein. Three variants of SNV Env proteins differing in the length of their cytoplasmic domains were all efficiently incorporated into MLV core particles. These pseudotype particles infected the SNV permissive cell line D17 at titers of up to 10(5) IU/ml. A stable packaging cell line (MS4) of human origin released MLV(SNV) pseudotype vectors that were resistant against human complement inactivation. To redirect their tropism to human T cells, MS4 cells were transfected with the expression gene encoding the scFv 7A5 in fusion with the transmembrane domain (TM) of the SNV Env protein, previously shown to retarget SNV vector particles to human lymphocytes. MLV(SNV-7A5)-vector particles released from these cells were selectively infectious for human T cell lines. The data provide a proof of principle for targeting MLV-derived vectors to subpopulations of human cells through pseudotyping with SNV targeting envelopes. PMID:11509952

  3. In silico models for predicting vector control chemicals targeting Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Devillers, J.; Lagneau, C.; Lattes, A.; Garrigues, J.C.; Clémenté, M.M.; Yébakima, A.

    2014-01-01

    Human arboviral diseases have emerged or re-emerged in numerous countries worldwide due to a number of factors including the lack of progress in vaccine development, lack of drugs, insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, climate changes, societal behaviours, and economical constraints. Thus, Aedes aegypti is the main vector of the yellow fever and dengue fever flaviviruses and is also responsible for several recent outbreaks of the chikungunya alphavirus. As for the other mosquito species, the A. aegypti control relies heavily on the use of insecticides. However, because of increasing resistance to the different families of insecticides, reduction of Aedes populations is becoming increasingly difficult. Despite the unquestionable utility of insecticides in fighting mosquito populations, there are very few new insecticides developed and commercialized for vector control. This is because the high cost of the discovery of an insecticide is not counterbalanced by the ‘low profitability’ of the vector control market. Fortunately, the use of quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modelling allows the reduction of time and cost in the discovery of new chemical structures potentially active against mosquitoes. In this context, the goal of the present study was to review all the existing QSAR models on A. aegypti. The homology and pharmacophore models were also reviewed. Specific attention was paid to show the variety of targets investigated in Aedes in relation to the physiology and ecology of the mosquito as well as the diversity of the chemical structures which have been proposed, encompassing man-made and natural substances. PMID:25275884

  4. Polyethylenimine as a promising vector for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Surendra

    2012-05-01

    Recent discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) technology for gene therapy has triggered explosive research efforts towards development of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as therapeutic modality for gene silencing. Owing to its large molecular weight (~13 kDa), polyanionic nature (~40 negative phosphate groups) and rapid enzymatic degradation, delivery of siRNA remains an unresolved issue. Hence, there arises a need of an appropriate delivery vector to overcome the intrinsic, poor intracellular uptake and limited in vitro and in vivo stability. Amongst the various non-viral delivery vectors, the application of polymeric vectors such as polyethylenimine (PEI) or its derivatives has attracted much attention due to its high transfection efficiency and ease of manipulation. PEI has been extensively investigated for DNA delivery, only recently this polymer has been employed for siRNA delivery. This review will focus on studies done on PEI to deliver siRNA, with emphasis on the targeted, self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles with promising potential to evolve as therapeutic tool in gene therapy. PMID:22432843

  5. Retrograde adenoviral vector targeting of nociresponsive pontospinal noradrenergic neurons in the rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howorth, Patrick W; Teschemacher, Anja G; Pickering, Anthony E

    2009-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn receives a dense innervation of noradrenaline-containing fibers that originate from pontine neurons in the A5, locus coeruleus (LC), and A7 cell groups. These pontospinal neurons are believed to constitute a component of the endogenous analgesic system. We used an adenoviral vector with a catecholaminergic-selective promoter (AVV-PRS) to retrogradely label the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the lumbar (L4–L5) dorsal horn with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP). Retrogradely labeled neurons (145 ± 12, n = 14) were found in A5-12%, LC-80% and A7-8% after injection of AVV-PRS-EGFP to the dorsal horn of L4–L5. These neurons were immunopositive for dopamine β-hydroxylase, indicating that they were catecholaminergic. Retrograde labeling was optimal 7 days after injection, persisted for over 4 weeks, and was dependent on viral vector titer. The spinal topography of the noradrenergic projection was examined using EGFP- and mRFP-expressing adenoviral vectors. Pontospinal neurons provide bilateral innervation of the cord and there was little overlap in the distribution of neurons projecting to the cervical and lumbar regions. The axonal arbor of the pontospinal neurons was visualized with GFP immunocytochemistry to show projections to the inferior olive, cerebellum, thalamus, and cortex but not to the hippocampus or caudate putamen. Formalin testing evoked c-fos expression in these pontospinal neurons, suggesting that they were nociresponsive (A5-21%, LC-16%, and A7-26%, n = 8). Thus, we have developed a viral vector-based strategy to selectively, retrogradely target the pontospinal noradrenergic neurons that are likely to be involved in the descending control of nociception. PMID:19003793

  6. Targeting cells with single vectors using multiple-feature Boolean logic.

    PubMed

    Fenno, Lief E; Mattis, Joanna; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Hyun, Minsuk; Lee, Soo Yeun; He, Miao; Tucciarone, Jason; Selimbeyoglu, Aslihan; Berndt, Andre; Grosenick, Logan; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Bernstein, Hannah; Swanson, Haley; Perry, Chelsey; Diester, Ilka; Boyce, Frederick M; Bass, Caroline E; Neve, Rachael; Huang, Z Josh; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-07-01

    Precisely defining the roles of specific cell types is an intriguing frontier in the study of intact biological systems and has stimulated the rapid development of genetically encoded tools for observation and control. However, targeting these tools with adequate specificity remains challenging: most cell types are best defined by the intersection of two or more features such as active promoter elements, location and connectivity. Here we have combined engineered introns with specific recombinases to achieve expression of genetically encoded tools that is conditional upon multiple cell-type features, using Boolean logical operations all governed by a single versatile vector. We used this approach to target intersectionally specified populations of inhibitory interneurons in mammalian hippocampus and neurons of the ventral tegmental area defined by both genetic and wiring properties. This flexible and modular approach may expand the application of genetically encoded interventional and observational tools for intact-systems biology. PMID:24908100

  7. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  8. Construction of a pIX-modified Adenovirus Vector Able to Effectively Bind to Nanoantibodies for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Garas, M N; Tillib, S V; Zubkova, O V; Rogozhin, V N; Ivanova, T I; Vasilev, L A; Logunov, D Yu; Shmarov, M M; Tutykhina, I L; Esmagambetov, I B; Gribova, I Yu; Bandelyuk, A S; Naroditsky, B S; Gintsburg, A L

    2014-04-01

    Current targeting strategies for genetic vectors imply the creation of a specific vector for every targeted receptor, which is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, the development of a universal vector system whose surface can specifically bind molecules to provide efficient targeting is of particular interest. In this study, we propose a new approach in creating targeted vectors based on the genome of human adenovirus serotype 5 carrying the modified gene of the capsid protein pIX (Ad5-EGFP-pIX-ER): recombinant pseudoadenoviral nanoparticles (RPANs). The surfaces of such RPANs are able to bind properly modified chimeric nanoantibodies that specifically recognize a particular target antigen (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)) with high affinity. The efficient binding of nanoantibodies (aCEA-RE) to the RPAN capsid surfaces has been demonstrated by ELISA. The ability of the constructed vector to deliver target genes has been confirmed by experiments with the tumor cell lines A549 and Lim1215 expressing CEA. It has been shown that Ad5-EGFP-pIX-ER carrying aCEA-RE on its surface penetrates into the tumor cell lines A549 and Lim1215 via the CAR-independent pathway three times more efficiently than unmodified RPAN and Ad5-EGFP-pIX-ER without nanoantibodies on the capsid surface. Thus, RPAN Ad5-EGFP-pIX-ER is a universal platform that may be useful for targeted gene delivery in specific cells due to "nanoantibody-modified RPAN" binding. PMID:25093116

  9. Characterization of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Vector Constructed to Target the cMet Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Hany I; Coleman, David T; Cardelli, James A; Mathis, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cMet receptor is a homodimer with tyrosine kinase activity. Upon stimulation with its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the receptor mediates wide physiologic actions. The HGF-cMet signaling pathway is dysregulated in many cancers, which makes cMet an important target for novel therapeutic interventions. Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have been used for the past three decades as a promising therapeutic approach for a wide array of neoplastic diseases. To date, achieving cancer-specific replication of oncolytic Ads has been accomplished by either viral genome deletions or by incorporating tumor selective promoters. To achieve novel specificity of oncolytic Ad infection of cancer cells that overexpress cMet, we inserted the HGF NK2 sequence, corresponding to a competitive antagonist of HGF binding to the cMet receptor, into the Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) fiber gene. The resulting vector, Ad5-pIX-RFP-FF/NK2, was rescued, amplified in HEK293 cells, and characterized. Binding specificity and viral infectivity were tested in various cancer cell lines that express varying levels of cMet and hCAR (the Ad5 receptor). We found that Ad5-pIX-RFP-FF/NK2 demonstrated binding specificity to the cMet receptor. In addition, there was enhanced viral infectivity and virus replication compared with a non-targeted Ad vector. Although NK2 weakly induces cMet receptor activation, our results showed no receptor phosphorylation in the context of an oncolytic Ad virus. In summary, these results suggest that an oncolytic Ad retargeted to the cMet receptor is a promising vector for developing a novel cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26866014

  10. An Improved Systematic Approach to Predicting Transcription Factor Target Genes Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Song; Youn, Eunseog; Lee, Joohyun; Maas, Stephan J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological prediction of transcription factor binding sites and their corresponding transcription factor target genes (TFTGs) makes great contribution to understanding the gene regulatory networks. However, these approaches are based on laborious and time-consuming biological experiments. Numerous computational approaches have shown great potential to circumvent laborious biological methods. However, the majority of these algorithms provide limited performances and fail to consider the structural property of the datasets. We proposed a refined systematic computational approach for predicting TFTGs. Based on previous work done on identifying auxin response factor target genes from Arabidopsis thaliana co-expression data, we adopted a novel reverse-complementary distance-sensitive n-gram profile algorithm. This algorithm converts each upstream sub-sequence into a high-dimensional vector data point and transforms the prediction task into a classification problem using support vector machine-based classifier. Our approach showed significant improvement compared to other computational methods based on the area under curve value of the receiver operating characteristic curve using 10-fold cross validation. In addition, in the light of the highly skewed structure of the dataset, we also evaluated other metrics and their associated curves, such as precision-recall curves and cost curves, which provided highly satisfactory results. PMID:24743548

  11. Preferential Targeting of Disseminated Liver Tumors Using a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Della Peruta, Marco; Badar, Adam; Rosales, Cecilia; Chokshi, Shilpa; Kia, Azadeh; Nathwani, Devhrut; Galante, Eva; Yan, Ran; Arstad, Erik; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Williams, Roger; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel selectively targeting gene delivery approach has been developed for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a leading cause of cancer mortality whose prognosis remains poor. We combine the strong liver tropism of serotype-8 capsid-pseudotyped adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV8) with a liver-specific promoter (HLP) and microRNA-122a (miR-122a)-mediated posttranscriptional regulation. Systemic administration of our AAV8 construct resulted in preferential transduction of the liver and encouragingly of HCC at heterotopic sites, a finding that could be exploited to target disseminated disease. Tumor selectivity was enhanced by inclusion of miR-122a-binding sequences (ssAAV8-HLP-TK-122aT4) in the expression cassette, resulting in abrogation of transgene expression in normal murine liver but not in HCC. Systemic administration of our tumor-selective vector encoding herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene resulted in a sevenfold reduction in HCC growth in a syngeneic murine model without toxicity. In summary, we have developed a systemically deliverable gene transfer approach that enables high-level expression of therapeutic genes in HCC but not normal tissues, thus improving the prospects of safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC. PMID:25569358

  12. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. W.; Liu, G.; Hong, R. Y.; Li, H. Z.; Li, Y. G.; Wei, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  13. Target product profile choices for intra-domiciliary malaria vector control pesticide products: repel or kill?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The most common pesticide products for controlling malaria-transmitting mosquitoes combine two distinct modes of action: 1) conventional insecticidal activity which kills mosquitoes exposed to the pesticide and 2) deterrence of mosquitoes away from protected humans. While deterrence enhances personal or household protection of long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual sprays, it may also attenuate or even reverse communal protection if it diverts mosquitoes to non-users rather than killing them outright. Methods A process-explicit model of malaria transmission is described which captures the sequential interaction between deterrent and toxic actions of vector control pesticides and accounts for the distinctive impacts of toxic activities which kill mosquitoes before or after they have fed upon the occupant of a covered house or sleeping space. Results Increasing deterrency increases personal protection but consistently reduces communal protection because deterrent sub-lethal exposure inevitably reduces the proportion subsequently exposed to higher lethal doses. If the high coverage targets of the World Health Organization are achieved, purely toxic products with no deterrence are predicted to generally provide superior protection to non-users and even users, especially where vectors feed exclusively on humans and a substantial amount of transmission occurs outdoors. Remarkably, this is even the case if that product confers no personal protection and only kills mosquitoes after they have fed. Conclusions Products with purely mosquito-toxic profiles may, therefore, be preferable for programmes with universal coverage targets, rather than those with equivalent toxicity but which also have higher deterrence. However, if purely mosquito-toxic products confer little personal protection because they do not deter mosquitoes and only kill them after they have fed, then they will require aggressive "catch up" campaigns, with behaviour change communication

  14. Sequential targeting of CFTR by BAC vectors generates a novel pig model of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Klymiuk, N; Mundhenk, L; Kraehe, K; Wuensch, A; Plog, S; Emrich, D; Langenmayer, M C; Stehr, M; Holzinger, A; Kröner, C; Richter, A; Kessler, B; Kurome, M; Eddicks, M; Nagashima, H; Heinritzi, K; Gruber, A D; Wolf, E

    2012-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disease in Caucasians and is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. The disease is incurable and medical treatment is limited to the amelioration of symptoms or secondary complications. A comprehensive understanding of the disease mechanisms and the development of novel treatment options require appropriate animal models. Existing CF mouse models fail to reflect important aspects of human CF. We thus generated a CF pig model by inactivating the CFTR gene in primary porcine cells by sequential targeting using modified bacterial artificial chromosome vectors. These cells were then used to generate homozygous CFTR mutant piglets by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The homozygous CFTR mutants lack CFTR protein expression and display severe malformations in the intestine, respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and male reproductive tract. These phenotypic abnormalities closely resemble both the human CF pathology as well as alterations observed in a recently published CF pig model which was generated by a different gene targeting strategy. Our new CF pig model underlines the value of the CFTR-deficient pig for gaining new insight into the disease mechanisms of CF and for the development and evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. This model will furthermore increase the availability of CF pigs to the scientific community. PMID:22170306

  15. Using Support Vector Machine Ensembles for Target Audience Classification on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Siaw Ling; Chiong, Raymond; Cornforth, David

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount and diversity of the content shared on social media can pose a challenge for any business wanting to use it to identify potential customers. In this paper, our aim is to investigate the use of both unsupervised and supervised learning methods for target audience classification on Twitter with minimal annotation efforts. Topic domains were automatically discovered from contents shared by followers of an account owner using Twitter Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). A Support Vector Machine (SVM) ensemble was then trained using contents from different account owners of the various topic domains identified by Twitter LDA. Experimental results show that the methods presented are able to successfully identify a target audience with high accuracy. In addition, we show that using a statistical inference approach such as bootstrapping in over-sampling, instead of using random sampling, to construct training datasets can achieve a better classifier in an SVM ensemble. We conclude that such an ensemble system can take advantage of data diversity, which enables real-world applications for differentiating prospective customers from the general audience, leading to business advantage in the crowded social media space. PMID:25874768

  16. Development of the Nanobody display technology to target lentiviral vectors to antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, C; De Groeve, K; Dingemans, J; Van Lint, S; Robays, L; Heirman, C; Reiser, J; Zhang, X-Y; Thielemans, K; De Baetselier, P; Raes, G; Breckpot, K

    2012-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) provide unique opportunities for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies, as they transduce a variety of cells in situ, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Engineering LVs to specifically transduce APCs is required to promote their translation towards the clinic. We report on the Nanobody (Nb) display technology to target LVs to dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. This innovative approach exploits the budding mechanism of LVs to incorporate an APC-specific Nb and a binding-defective, fusion-competent form of VSV.G in the viral envelope. In addition to production of high titer LVs, we demonstrated selective, Nb-dependent transduction of mouse DCs and macrophages both in vitro and in situ. Moreover, this strategy was translated to a human model in which selective transduction of in vitro generated or lymph node (LN)-derived DCs and macrophages, was demonstrated. In conclusion, the Nb display technology is an attractive approach to generate LVs targeted to specific cell types. PMID:22241177

  17. Using support vector machine ensembles for target audience classification on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Lo, Siaw Ling; Chiong, Raymond; Cornforth, David

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount and diversity of the content shared on social media can pose a challenge for any business wanting to use it to identify potential customers. In this paper, our aim is to investigate the use of both unsupervised and supervised learning methods for target audience classification on Twitter with minimal annotation efforts. Topic domains were automatically discovered from contents shared by followers of an account owner using Twitter Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). A Support Vector Machine (SVM) ensemble was then trained using contents from different account owners of the various topic domains identified by Twitter LDA. Experimental results show that the methods presented are able to successfully identify a target audience with high accuracy. In addition, we show that using a statistical inference approach such as bootstrapping in over-sampling, instead of using random sampling, to construct training datasets can achieve a better classifier in an SVM ensemble. We conclude that such an ensemble system can take advantage of data diversity, which enables real-world applications for differentiating prospective customers from the general audience, leading to business advantage in the crowded social media space. PMID:25874768

  18. Application of support vector machine-based ranking strategies to search for target-selective compounds.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Geppert, Hanna; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM)-based selectivity searching has recently been introduced to identify compounds in virtual screening libraries that are not only active for a target protein, but also selective for this target over a closely related member of the same protein family. In simulated virtual screening calculations, SVM-based strategies termed preference ranking and one-versus-all ranking were successfully applied to rank a database and enrich high-ranking positions with selective compounds while removing nonselective molecules from high ranks. In contrast to the original SVM approach developed for binary classification, these strategies enable learning from more than two classes, considering that distinguishing between selective, promiscuously active, and inactive compounds gives rise to a three-class prediction problem. In this chapter, we describe the extension of the one-versus-all strategy to four training classes. Furthermore, we present an adaptation of the preference ranking strategy that leads to higher recall of selective compounds than previously investigated approaches and is applicable in situations where the removal of nonselective compounds from high-ranking positions is not required. PMID:20838983

  19. Specific Targeting of Human Interleukin (IL)-13 Receptor α2-Positive Cells with Lentiviral Vectors Displaying IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Wu; Marino, Michael P.; Suzuki, Akiko; Joshi, Bharat; Husain, Syed R.; Maisner, Andrea; Galanis, Evanthia; Puri, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The ability to selectively and efficiently target transgene delivery to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. Lentiviral vectors have several advantages that make them attractive as gene delivery vehicles and their tropism can be altered through pseudotyping, allowing transgene delivery to specific populations of cells. The human interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) is uniquely overexpressed in many different human tumors, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined whether IL-13Rα2-positive tumor cells can be specifically targeted with lentiviral vector pseudotypes containing a truncated fusion (F) protein derived from measles virus (MV) and a tail-truncated and receptor-blind MV hemagglutinin (H) protein bearing IL-13 at the C terminus. The retargeted lentiviral vector efficiently transduced cells that express high levels of IL-13Rα2, but not cells expressing low levels of IL-13Rα2 in vitro. In vivo, it specifically targeted IL-13Rα2-positive glioma cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice in the context of subcutaneous and intracranial glioma models. Similar lentiviral vectors may be developed for targeting other tumors expressing specific cell surface receptors. PMID:22612657

  20. Vaccines delivered by integration-deficient lentiviral vectors targeting dendritic cells induces strong antigen-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biliang; Dai, Bingbing; Wang, Pin

    2010-01-01

    We report a study of an integration-deficient lentiviral vector (IDLV) enveloped with a Sindbis virus glycoprotein mutant (SVGmu) capable of selectively binding to dendritic cells (DCs) for its potential as a vaccine carrier. The in vitro assays showed that the D64V point mutation in the catalytic domain of HIV-1 integrase efficiently inhibited the integration of the transgene upon vector transduction, while the targeting specificity of the vector to preferentially transduce and mediate durable expression in DCs was maintained. Substantial immune responses in C57BL/6 mice and complete protection against a challenge with the C57BL/6 thymoma EG.7 tumor expressing a delivered ovalbumin (OVA) antigen in mice have been achieved through the direct injection of the DC-directed IDLV encoding OVA. Thus, this DC-directed IDLV system represents a promising and efficient vector platform with remarkably improved safety for the future development of DC-based immunotherapy. PMID:20709004

  1. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  2. Clustered Integrin Ligands as a Novel Approach for the Targeting of Non-Viral Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Quinn Kwan Tai

    Gene transfer or gene delivery is described as the process in which foreign DNA is introduced into cells. Over the years, gene delivery has gained the attention of many researchers and has been developed as powerful tools for use in biotechnology and medicine. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, such advances in technology allowed for the identification of diseases ranging from hereditary disorders to acquired ones (cancer) which were thought to be incurable. Gene therapy provides the means necessary to treat or eliminate genetic diseases from its origin, unlike traditional medicine which only treat symptoms. With ongoing clinical trials for gene therapy increasing, the greatest difficulty still lies in developing safe systems which can target cells of interest to provide efficient delivery. Nature, over millions of years of evolution, has provided an example of one of the most efficient delivery systems: viruses. Although the use of viruses for gene delivery has been well studied, the safety issues involving immunogenicity, insertional mutagenesis, high cost, and poor reproducibility has provided problems for their clinical application. From understanding viruses, we gain insight to designing new systems for non-viral gene delivery. One of these techniques utilized by adenoviruses is the clustering of ligands on its surface through the use of a protein called a penton base. Through the use of nanotechnology we can mimic this basic concept in non-viral gene delivery systems. This dissertation research is focused on developing and applying a novel system for displaying the integrin binding ligand (RGD) in a constrained manner to form a clustered integrin ligand binding platform to be used to enhance the targeting and efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors. Peptide mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles provides a suitable surface for ligand clustering. A relationship between the peptide ratios in the reaction solution used to form these

  3. Targeting Sindbis virus-based vectors to Fc receptor-positive cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Klimstra, William B.; Williams, Jacqueline C.; Ryman, Kate D.; Heidner, Hans W. . E-mail: hans.heidner@utsa.edu

    2005-07-20

    Some viruses display enhanced infection for Fc receptor (FcR)-positive cell types when complexed with virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig). This process has been termed antibody-dependent enhancement of viral infection (ADE). We reasoned that the mechanism of ADE could be exploited and adapted to target alphavirus-based vectors to FcR-positive cell types. Towards this goal, recombinant Sindbis viruses were constructed that express 1 to 4 immunoglobulin-binding domains of protein L (PpL) as N-terminal extensions of the E2 glycoprotein. PpL is a bacterial protein that binds the variable region of antibody kappa light chains from a range of mammalian species. The recombinant viruses incorporated PpL/E2 fusion proteins into the virion structure and recapitulated the species-specific Ig-binding phenotypes of native PpL. Virions reacted with non-immune serum or purified IgG displayed enhanced binding and ADE for several species-matched FcR-positive murine and human cell lines. ADE required virus expression of a functional PpL Ig-binding domain, and appeared to be Fc{gamma}R-mediated. Specifically, ADE did not occur with Fc{gamma}R-negative cells, did not require active complement proteins, and did not occur on Fc{gamma}R-positive murine cell lines when virions were bound by murine IgG-derived F(ab'){sub 2} fragments.

  4. Evaluation of CD46 re-targeted adenoviral vectors for clinical ovarian cancer intraperitoneal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hulin-Curtis, S L; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Jones, R; Hanna, L; Chester, J D; Parker, A L

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer accounts for >140 000 deaths globally each year. Typically, disease is asymptomatic until an advanced, incurable stage. Although response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is frequently observed, resistance to conventional platinum-based therapies develop rapidly. Improved treatments are therefore urgently required. Virotherapy offers great potential for ovarian cancer, where the application of local, intraperitoneal delivery circumvents some of the limitations of intravenous strategies. To develop effective, adenovirus (Ad)-based platforms for ovarian cancer, we profiled the fluid and cellular components of patient ascites for factors known to influence adenoviral transduction. Levels of factor X (FX) and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in ascitic fluid were quantified and tumor cells were assessed for the expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and CD46. We show that clinical ascites contains significant levels of FX but consistently high CD46 expression. We therefore evaluated in vitro the relative transduction of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) by Ad5 (via CAR) and Ad5 pseudotyped with the fiber of Ad35 (Ad5T*F35++) via CD46. Ad5T*F35++ achieved significantly increased transduction in comparison to Ad5 (P<0.001), independent of FX and nAb levels. We therefore propose selective transduction of CD46 over-expressing EOCs using re-targeted, Ad35-pseudotyped Ad vectors may represent a promising virotherapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:27229159

  5. Target localization in wireless sensor networks using online semi-supervised support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaehyun; Kim, H Jin

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has been successfully used for target localization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) due to its accurate and robust estimation against highly nonlinear and noisy sensor measurement. For efficient and adaptive learning, this paper introduces online semi-supervised support vector regression (OSS-SVR). The first advantage of the proposed algorithm is that, based on semi-supervised learning framework, it can reduce the requirement on the amount of the labeled training data, maintaining accurate estimation. Second, with an extension to online learning, the proposed OSS-SVR automatically tracks changes of the system to be learned, such as varied noise characteristics. We compare the proposed algorithm with semi-supervised manifold learning, an online Gaussian process and online semi-supervised colocalization. The algorithms are evaluated for estimating the unknown location of a mobile robot in a WSN. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate under the smaller amount of labeled training data and is robust to varying noise. Moreover, the suggested algorithm performs fast computation, maintaining the best localization performance in comparison with the other methods. PMID:26024420

  6. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26280081

  7. Targeting arthropod subolesin/akirin for the development of a universal vaccine for control of vector infestations and pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Canales, Mario; Villar, Margarita; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Kocan, Katherine M; Galindo, Ruth C; Almazán, Consuelo; Blouin, Edmour F

    2011-09-01

    Diseases caused by arthropod-borne pathogens greatly impact on human and animal health. Recent research has provided evidence that tick protective antigens can be used for development of vaccines with the dual target of controlling arthropod infestations and reducing their vector capacity for pathogens. As reviewed herein, protective antigens such as subolesin/akirin, which are highly conserved across vector species, show promise for use in development of a universal vaccine for the control of arthropod infestations and the reduction of pathogen transmission. However, further research is needed in critical areas towards achieving this goal. PMID:21561715

  8. Estimating dengue vector abundance in the wet and dry season: implications for targeted vector control in urban and peri-urban Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Khin Thet; Arunachalam, Natarajan; Tana, Susilowati; Espino, Fe; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Abeyewickreme, W; Hapangama, Dilini; Tyagi, Brij Kishore; Htun, Pe Than; Koyadun, Surachart; Kroeger, Axel; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Petzold, Max

    2012-01-01

    Background Research has shown that the classical Stegomyia indices (or “larval indices”) of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti reflect the absence or presence of the vector but do not provide accurate measures of adult mosquito density. In contrast, pupal indices as collected in pupal productivity surveys are a much better proxy indicator for adult vector abundance. However, it is unknown when it is most optimal to conduct pupal productivity surveys, in the wet or in the dry season or in both, to inform control services about the most productive water container types and if this pattern varies among different ecological settings. Methods A multi-country study in randomly selected twelve to twenty urban and peri-urban neighborhoods (“clusters”) of six Asian countries, in which all water holding containers were examined for larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti during the dry season and the wet season and their productivity was characterized by water container types. In addition, meteorological data and information on reported dengue cases were collected. Findings The study reconfirmed the association between rainfall and dengue cases (“dengue season”) and underlined the importance of determining through pupal productivity surveys the “most productive containers types”, responsible for the majority (>70%) of adult dengue vectors. The variety of productive container types was greater during the wet than during the dry season, but included practically all container types productive in the dry season. Container types producing pupae were usually different from those infested by larvae indicating that containers with larval infestations do not necessarily foster pupal development and thus the production of adult Aedes mosquitoes. Conclusion Pupal productivity surveys conducted during the wet season will identify almost all of the most productive container types for both the dry and wet seasons and will therefore facilitate cost-effective targeted interventions

  9. Co-Development of Diagnostic Vectors to Support Targeted Therapies and Theranostics: Essential Tools in Personalized Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; O’Shannessy, Daniel J.; Albone, Earl; Grasso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    potentially improving the therapeutic activity of novel, target-specific therapies that may otherwise have off-target toxicities or less efficacy in cells exhibiting certain pathways. Here, we discuss the use of co-developing diagnostic-targeting vectors to identify patients whose malignant tissue can specifically uptake a targeted anti-cancer drug vector prior to treatment. Using this system, a patient can be predetermined in real-time as to whether or not their tumor(s) can specifically uptake a drug-linked diagnostic vector, thus inferring the uptake of a similar vector linked to an anti-cancer agent. If tumor-specific uptake is observed, then the patient may be suitable for drug-linked vector therapy and have a higher likelihood of clinical benefit while patients with no tumor uptake should consider other therapeutic options. This approach offers complementary opportunities to rapidly develop broad tumor-specific agents for use in personalized medicine. PMID:24982846

  10. Computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target positions on EPID cine images in stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Anai, Shigeo; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Terashima, Hiromi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target position on electronic portal imaging device (EPID) cine images in a treatment without implanted markers. Our proposed method was based on a template matching technique with cross-correlation coefficient between a reference portal (RP) image and each consecutive portal (CP) image acquired by the EPID. EPID images with 512×384 pixels (pixel size:0.56 mm) were acquired in a cine mode at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame/sec by using an energy of 4, 6, or 10MV on linear accelerators. The displacement vector of the target on each cine image was determined from the position in which took the maximum cross-correlation value between the RP image and each CP image. We applied our method to EPID cine images of a lung phantom with a tumor model simulating respiratory motion, and 5 cases with a non-small cell lung cancer and one case of metastasis. For validation of our proposed method, displacement vectors of a target position calculated by our method were compared with those determined manually by two radiation oncologists. As a result, for lung phantom images, target displacements by our method correlated well with those by the oncologists (r=0.972 - 0.994). Correlation values for 4 cases ranged from 0.854 to 0.991, but the values for the other two cases were 0.609 and 0.644. This preliminary result suggested that our method may be useful for monitoring of displacement vectors of target positions without implanted markers in stereotactic radiotherapy.

  11. BET-independent MLV-based Vectors Target Away From Promoters and Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    El Ashkar, Sara; De Rijck, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Madlala, Paradise; Cermakova, Katerina; Debyser, Zeger; Gijsbers, Rik

    2014-01-01

    Stable integration in the host genome renders murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived vectors attractive tools for gene therapy. Adverse events in otherwise successful clinical trials caused by proto-oncogene activation due to vector integration hamper their application. MLV and MLV-based vectors integrate near strong enhancers, active promoters, and transcription start sites (TSS) through specific interaction of MLV integrase (IN) with the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins, accounting for insertional mutagenesis. We identified a BET-interaction motif in the C-terminal tail of MLV IN conserved among gammaretroviruses. By deletion of this motif or a single point mutation (INW390A), BET-independent MLV (BinMLV) were engineered. BinMLV vectors carrying INW390A integrate at wild-type efficiency, with an integration profile that no longer correlates with BET chromatin distribution nor with the traditional markers of MLV integration. In particular, BinMLV vector integration associated less with oncogene TSS compared to the MLV vectors currently used in clinical trials. Together, these findings open perspectives to increase the biosafety of gammaretroviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25072693

  12. A Hypoxia-Responsive Glial Cell–Specific Gene Therapy Vector for Targeting Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Manas R.; Prentice, Howard M.; Dorey, C. Kathleen; Blanks, Janet C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Müller cells, the major glial cell in the retina, play a significant role in retinal neovascularization in response to tissue hypoxia. We previously designed and tested a vector using a hypoxia-responsive domain and a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter to drive green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in Müller cells in the murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). This study compares the efficacy of regulated and unregulated Müller cell delivery of endostatin in preventing neovascularization in the OIR model. Methods. Endostatin cDNA was cloned into plasmids with hypoxia-regulated GFAP or unregulated GFAP promoters, and packaged into self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 2 vectors (scAAV2). Before placement in hyperoxia on postnatal day (P)7, mice were given intravitreal injections of regulated or unregulated scAAV2, capsid, or PBS. Five days after return to room air, on P17, neovascular and avascular areas, as well as expression of the transgene and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), were compared in OIR animals treated with a vector, capsid, or PBS. Results. The hypoxia-regulated, glial-specific, vector-expressing endostatin reduced neovascularization by 93% and reduced the central vaso-obliteration area by 90%, matching the results with the unregulated GFAP-Endo vector. Retinas treated with the regulated endostatin vector expressed substantial amounts of endostatin protein, and significantly reduced VEGF protein. Endostatin production from the regulated vector was undetectable in retinas with undamaged vasculature. Conclusions. These findings suggest that the hypoxia-regulated, glial cell–specific vector expressing endostatin may be useful for treatment of neovascularization in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25377223

  13. Photoreceptor-targeted gene delivery using intravitreally administered AAV vectors in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Sledge, DG; Boye, SL; Boye, SE; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic transgenes to retinal photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has traditionally required subretinal injection. Recently, photoreceptor transduction efficiency following intravitreal injection (IVT) has improved in rodent models through use of capsid-mutant AAV vectors; but remains limited in large animal models. Thickness of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in large animals is thought to impair retinal penetration by AAV. Our study compared two newly developed AAV vectors containing multiple capsid amino acid substitutions following IVT in dogs. The ability of two promoter constructs to restrict reporter transgene expression to photoreceptors was also evaluated. AAV vectors containing the interphotoreceptor-binding protein (IRBP) promoter drove expression exclusively in rod and cone photoreceptors, with transduction efficiencies of ~ 4% of cones and 2% of rods. Notably, in the central region containing the cone-rich visual streak, 15.6% of cones were transduced. Significant regional variation existed, with lower transduction efficiencies in the temporal regions of all eyes. This variation did not correlate with ILM thickness. Vectors carrying a cone-specific promoter failed to transduce a quantifiable percentage of cone photoreceptors. The newly developed AAV vectors containing the IRBP promoter were capable of producing photoreceptor-specific transgene expression following IVT in the dog. PMID:26467396

  14. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded ‘all-in-one’ lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Chenglong; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Li, Shengting; Uldbjerg, Niels; Luo, Yonglun; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et al., 2014a), we showed the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZFN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology-driven mechanism into safe loci. This insertion mechanism is driven by time-restricted exposure of treated cells to ZFNs. We show targeted gene integration in human stem cells, including CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Notably, targeted insertions are identified in 89% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded ‘all-in-one’ IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell-based gene therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12213.001 PMID:27278774

  15. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Chenglong; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Li, Shengting; Uldbjerg, Niels; Luo, Yonglun; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et al., 2014a), we showed the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZFN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology-driven mechanism into safe loci. This insertion mechanism is driven by time-restricted exposure of treated cells to ZFNs. We show targeted gene integration in human stem cells, including CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Notably, targeted insertions are identified in 89% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded 'all-in-one' IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27278774

  16. Peptide-Mediated Tumor Targeting by a Degradable Nano Gene Delivery Vector Based on Pluronic-Modified Polyethylenimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaoyong; Zhan, Shuyu; Fan, Wei; Ding, Xueying; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Yinghua; Huang, Yueyan; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Rubing; Li, Mingjuan; Xu, Ningyin; Zheng, Yongxia; Ding, Baoyue

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered to be a promising non-viral gene delivery vector. To solve the toxicity versus efficacy and tumor-targeting challenges of PEI used as gene delivery vector, we constructed a novel non-viral vector DR5-TAT-modified Pluronic-PEI (Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT), which was based on the attachment of low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) to the amphiphilic polymer Pluronic to prepare Pluronic-modified LMW-PEI (Pluronic-PEI). This was then conjugated to a multifunctional peptide containing a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT) and a synthetic peptide that would bind to DR5—a receptor that is overexpressed in cancer cells. The vector showed controlled degradation, favorable DNA condensation and protection performance. The Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes at an N/P ratio of 15:1 were spherical nanoparticles of 122 ± 11.6 nm and a zeta potential of about 22 ± 2.8 mV. In vitro biological characterization results indicated that Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes had a higher specificity for the DR5 receptor and were taken up more efficiently by tumor cells than normal cells, compared to complexes formed with PEI 25 kDa or Pluronic-PEI. Thus, the novel complexes showed much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells and higher gene transfection efficiency in tumor cells than that exhibited by PEI 25 kDa and Pluronic-PEI. In summary, our novel, degradable non-viral tumor-targeting vector is a promising candidate for use in gene therapy.

  17. Peptide-Mediated Tumor Targeting by a Degradable Nano Gene Delivery Vector Based on Pluronic-Modified Polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoyong; Zhan, Shuyu; Fan, Wei; Ding, Xueying; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Yinghua; Huang, Yueyan; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Rubing; Li, Mingjuan; Xu, Ningyin; Zheng, Yongxia; Ding, Baoyue

    2016-12-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered to be a promising non-viral gene delivery vector. To solve the toxicity versus efficacy and tumor-targeting challenges of PEI used as gene delivery vector, we constructed a novel non-viral vector DR5-TAT-modified Pluronic-PEI (Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT), which was based on the attachment of low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) to the amphiphilic polymer Pluronic to prepare Pluronic-modified LMW-PEI (Pluronic-PEI). This was then conjugated to a multifunctional peptide containing a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT) and a synthetic peptide that would bind to DR5-a receptor that is overexpressed in cancer cells. The vector showed controlled degradation, favorable DNA condensation and protection performance. The Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes at an N/P ratio of 15:1 were spherical nanoparticles of 122 ± 11.6 nm and a zeta potential of about 22 ± 2.8 mV. In vitro biological characterization results indicated that Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes had a higher specificity for the DR5 receptor and were taken up more efficiently by tumor cells than normal cells, compared to complexes formed with PEI 25 kDa or Pluronic-PEI. Thus, the novel complexes showed much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells and higher gene transfection efficiency in tumor cells than that exhibited by PEI 25 kDa and Pluronic-PEI. In summary, our novel, degradable non-viral tumor-targeting vector is a promising candidate for use in gene therapy. PMID:26932761

  18. A single-plasmid vector for transgene amplification using short hairpin RNA targeting the 3'-UTR of amplifiable dhfr.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Young; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Hong Weon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2015-12-01

    Gene amplification using dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr) and methotrexate (MTX) is widely used for recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and is typically conducted in DHFR-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Generation of DHFR-deficient cells can be achieved by an expression vector incorporating short hairpin RNA (shRNA) that targets the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of endogenous dhfr. Thus, shRNAs were designed to target the 3'-UTR of endogenous dhfr, and shRNA-2 efficiently down-regulated dhfr expression in CHO-K1 cells. A single gene copy of shRNA-2 also decreased the translational level of DHFR by 80% in Flp-In CHO cells. shRNA-2 was then incorporated into a plasmid vector expressing human erythropoietin (EPO) and an exogenous DHFR to develop EPO-producing cells in the Flp-In system. The specific EPO productivity (q EPO) was enhanced by stepwise increments of MTX concentration, and differences in the amplification rate were observed in Flp-In CHO cells that expressed shRNA-2. In addition, the q EPO increased by more than 2.5-fold in the presence of 500 nM MTX. The mRNA expression level and gene copy numbers of dhfr were correlated with increased productivity in the cells, which is influenced by inhibition of endogenous dhfr. This study reveals that an expression vector including shRNA that targets the 3'-UTR of endogenous dhfr can enhance the transgene amplification rate and productivity by generating DHFR-deficient cells. This approach may be applied for amplifying the foreign gene in wild-type cell lines as a versatile single-plasmid vector. PMID:26245680

  19. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents. PMID:22064367

  20. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Knippertz, Ilka; Deinzer, Andrea; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B' core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based "modular promoter" system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B' core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  1. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  2. Highly efficient transient gene expression and gene targeting in primate embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Mitsui, Kaoru; Aizawa, Emi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Kawase, Eihachiro; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are regarded as a potentially unlimited source of cellular materials for regenerative medicine. For biological studies and clinical applications using primate ES cells, the development of a general strategy to obtain efficient gene delivery and genetic manipulation, especially gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR), would be of paramount importance. However, unlike mouse ES (mES) cells, efficient strategies for transient gene delivery and HR in hES cells have not been established. Here, we report that helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAdVs) were able to transfer genes in hES and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) ES (cES) cells efficiently. Without losing the undifferentiated state of the ES cells, transient gene transfer efficiency was ≈100%. Using HDAdVs with homology arms, approximately one out of 10 chromosomal integrations of the vector was via HR, whereas the rate was only ≈1% with other gene delivery methods. Furthermore, in combination with negative selection, ≈45% of chromosomal integrations of the vector were targeted integrations, indicating that HDAdVs would be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation in hES cells and potentially in other types of human stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:18768795

  3. Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors as a Delivery Platform for Targeted Modification of Adenosine Deaminase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V; Hollis, Roger P; Kuftinec, Gabriela; Senadheera, Shantha; Chan, Rebecca; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) for transient delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and donor templates for site-specific modification of the human adenosine deaminase (hADA) gene. Initially, we constructed IDLVs carrying ZFN monomers (Single-IDLVs) and found them to be able to deliver their gene-editing payload to K562 cells successfully upon cotransduction, with minimal cytotoxicity. To simplify delivery, we designed an IDLV construct to deliver both ZFN monomers from the same vector (Double-IDLV). However, this construct in its original state was prone to rearrangements of the vector genome, resulting in greatly reduced functionality; this was due to recombination between highly similar ZFN monomers arranged in tandem. We modified the Double-IDLV constructs to reduce recombination and restored simultaneous delivery of both ZFNs. We also tested an IDLV construct for delivery of donor templates and demonstrated its efficacy for gene modification. In summary, we highlighted the importance of modifying vector design for co-delivery of highly similar sequences inherent to genome-editing nucleases, and demonstrated significant improvement in the use of IDLVs for delivery of ZFNs and donor templates for genome modification. PMID:23857176

  4. Analytical derivation of distortion constraints and their verification in a learning vector quantization-based target recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Razzaque, Mohammad A.

    2005-06-01

    We obtain a novel analytical derivation for distortion-related constraints in a neural network- (NN)-based automatic target recognition (ATR) system. We obtain two types of constraints for a realistic ATR system implementation involving 4-f correlator architecture. The first constraint determines the relative size between the input objects and input correlation filters. The second constraint dictates the limits on amount of rotation, translation, and scale of input objects for system implementation. We exploit these constraints in recognition of targets varying in rotation, translation, scale, occlusion, and the combination of all of these distortions using a learning vector quantization (LVQ) NN. We present the simulation verification of the constraints using both the gray-scale images and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Moving and Stationary Target Recognition (MSTAR) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with different depression and pose angles.

  5. Alleviation of off-target effects from vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivered RNA decoys

    PubMed Central

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Grosse, Stefanie; Rupp, Daniel; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Grimm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous RNAi triggers such as shRNAs ideally exert their activities exclusively via the antisense strand that binds and silences designated target mRNAs. However, in principle, the sense strand also possesses silencing capacity that may contribute to adverse RNAi side effects including off-target gene regulation. Here, we address this concern with a novel strategy that reduces sense strand activity of vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivery of inhibitory tough decoy (TuD) RNAs. Using various shRNAs for proof of concept, we validate that coexpression of TuDs can sequester and inactivate shRNA sense strands in human cells selectively without affecting desired antisense activities from the same shRNAs. Moreover, we show how coexpressed TuDs can alleviate shRNA-mediated perturbation of global gene expression by specifically de-repressing off-target transcripts carrying seed matches to the shRNA sense strand. Our combination of shRNA and TuD in a single bicistronic gene transfer vector derived from Adeno-associated virus (AAV) enables a wide range of applications, including gene therapies. To this end, we engineered our constructs in a modular fashion and identified simple hairpin design rules permitting adaptation to preexisting or new shRNAs. Finally, we demonstrate the power of our vectors for combinatorial RNAi strategies by showing robust suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an AAV expressing a bifunctional TuD against an anti-HCV shRNA sense strand and an HCV-related cellular miRNA. The data and tools reported here represent an important step toward the next generation of RNAi triggers with increased specificity and thus ultimately safety in humans. PMID:26170322

  6. Alleviation of off-target effects from vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivered RNA decoys.

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Grosse, Stefanie; Rupp, Daniel; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Grimm, Dirk

    2015-07-28

    Exogenous RNAi triggers such as shRNAs ideally exert their activities exclusively via the antisense strand that binds and silences designated target mRNAs. However, in principle, the sense strand also possesses silencing capacity that may contribute to adverse RNAi side effects including off-target gene regulation. Here, we address this concern with a novel strategy that reduces sense strand activity of vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivery of inhibitory tough decoy (TuD) RNAs. Using various shRNAs for proof of concept, we validate that coexpression of TuDs can sequester and inactivate shRNA sense strands in human cells selectively without affecting desired antisense activities from the same shRNAs. Moreover, we show how coexpressed TuDs can alleviate shRNA-mediated perturbation of global gene expression by specifically de-repressing off-target transcripts carrying seed matches to the shRNA sense strand. Our combination of shRNA and TuD in a single bicistronic gene transfer vector derived from Adeno-associated virus (AAV) enables a wide range of applications, including gene therapies. To this end, we engineered our constructs in a modular fashion and identified simple hairpin design rules permitting adaptation to preexisting or new shRNAs. Finally, we demonstrate the power of our vectors for combinatorial RNAi strategies by showing robust suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an AAV expressing a bifunctional TuD against an anti-HCV shRNA sense strand and an HCV-related cellular miRNA. The data and tools reported here represent an important step toward the next generation of RNAi triggers with increased specificity and thus ultimately safety in humans. PMID:26170322

  7. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Melvin Y.; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality. PMID:26239654

  8. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Melvin Y; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality. PMID:26239654

  9. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  10. Singular vector based targeted observations of chemical constituents: description and first application of the EURAD-IM-SVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goris, N.; Elbern, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of the large dimensional chemical state of the atmosphere provide only sparse snapshots of the state of the system due to their typically insufficient temporal and spatial density. In order to optimize the measurement configurations despite those limitations, the present work describes the identification of sensitive states of the chemical system as optimal target areas for adaptive observations. For this purpose, the technique of singular vector analysis (SVA), which has been proved effective for targeted observations in numerical weather predication, is implemented into the chemical transport model EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) yielding the EURAD-IM-SVA. Besides initial values, emissions are investigated as critical simulation controlling targeting variables. For both variants, singular vectors are applied to determine the optimal placement for observations and moreover to quantify which chemical compounds have to be observed with preference. Based on measurements of the airship based ZEPTER-2 campaign, the EURAD-IM-SVA has been evaluated by conducting a comprehensive set of model runs involving different initial states and simulation lengths. Since the considered cases are restricted in terms of considered chemical compounds and selected areas, they allow for a retracing of the results and a confirmation of their correctness. Our analysis shows that the optimal placement for observations of chemical species is not entirely determined by mere transport and mixing processes. Rather, a combination of initial chemical concentrations, chemical conversions, and meteorological processes determine the influence of chemical compounds and regions. We furthermore demonstrate that the optimal placement of observations of emission strengths is highly dependent on the location of emission sources and that the benefit of including emissions as target variables outperforms the value of initial value optimisation with growing

  11. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kahori; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tomita, Kyoko; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Shin-Ichiro; Katayama, Kazufumi; Tachibana, Masashi; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad) genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a-targeted sequences into the 3'-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a-mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses. PMID:26015975

  12. MAC-T cells as a tool to evaluate lentiviral vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk.

    PubMed

    Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel; Adona, Paulo R; Ohashi, Otavio M; Meirelles, Flávio V; Wheeler, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Prior to generating transgenic animals for bioreactors, it is important to evaluate the vector constructed to avoid poor protein expression. Mammary epithelial cells cultured in vitro have been proposed as a model to reproduce the biology of the mammary gland. In the present work, three lentiviral vectors were constructed for the human growth hormone (GH), interleukin 2 (IL2), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3) genes driven by the bovine β-casein promoter. The lentiviruses were used to transduce mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), and the transformed cells were cultured on polystyrene in culture medium with and without prolactin. The gene expression of transgenes was evaluated by PCR using cDNA, and recombinant protein expression was evaluated by Western-blotting using concentrated medium and cellular extracts. The gene expression, of the three introduced genes, was detected in both induced and non induced MAC-T cells. The human GH protein was detected in the concentrated medium, whereas CSF3 was detected in the cellular extract. Apparently, the cellular extract is more appropriate than the concentrated medium to detect recombinant protein, principally because concentrated medium has a high concentration of bovine serum albumin. The results suggest that MAC-T cells may be a good system to evaluate vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk. PMID:25380466

  13. Dengue vector management using insecticide treated materials and targeted interventions on productive breeding-sites in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In view of the epidemiological expansion of dengue worldwide and the availability of new tools and strategies particularly for controlling the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti, an intervention study was set up to test the efficacy, cost and feasibility of a combined approach of insecticide treated materials (ITMs) alone and in combination with appropriate targeted interventions of the most productive vector breeding-sites. Methods The study was conducted as a cluster randomized community trial using “reduction of the vector population” as the main outcome variable. The trial had two arms: 10 intervention clusters (neighborhoods) and 10 control clusters in the town of Poptun Guatemala. Activities included entomological assessments (characteristics of breeding-sites, pupal productivity, Stegomyia indices) at baseline, 6 weeks after the first intervention (coverage of window and exterior doorways made of PermaNet 2.0 netting, factory treated with deltamethrin at 55 mg/m2, and of 200 L drums with similar treated material) and 6 weeks after the second intervention (combination of treated materials and other suitable interventions targeting productive breeding-sites i.e larviciding with Temephos, elimination etc.). The second intervention took place 17 months after the first intervention. The insecticide residual activity and the insecticidal content were also studied at different intervals. Additionally, information about demographic characteristics, cost of the intervention, coverage of houses protected and satisfaction in the population with the interventions was collected. Results At baseline (during the dry season) a variety of productive container types for Aedes pupae were identified: various container types holding >20 L, 200 L drums, washbasins and buckets (producing 83.7% of all pupae). After covering 100% of windows and exterior doorways and a small number of drums (where the commercial cover could be fixed) in 970 study households, tropical

  14. Production of lentiviral vectors with enhanced efficiency to target dendritic cells by attenuating mannosidase activity of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting immune cells that interact with T cells and have been widely studied for vaccine applications. To achieve this, DCs can be manipulated by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to express antigens to stimulate the desired antigen-specific T cell response, which gives this approach great potential to fight diseases such as cancers, HIV, and autoimmune diseases. Previously we showed that LVs enveloped with an engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein (SVGmu) could target DCs through a specific interaction with DC-SIGN, a surface molecule predominantly expressed by DCs. We hypothesized that SVGmu interacts with DC-SIGN in a mannose-dependent manner, and that an increase in high-mannose structures on the glycoprotein surface could result in higher targeting efficiencies of LVs towards DCs. It is known that 1-deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) can inhibit mannosidase, which is an enzyme that removes high-mannose structures during the glycosylation process. Thus, we investigated the possibility of generating LVs with enhanced capability to modify DCs by supplying DMJ during vector production. Results Through western blot analysis and binding tests, we were able to infer that binding of SVGmu to DC-SIGN is directly related to amount of high-mannose structures on SVGmu. We also found that the titer for the LV (FUGW/SVGmu) produced with DMJ against 293T.DCSIGN, a human cell line expressing the human DC-SIGN atnibody, was over four times higher than that of vector produced without DMJ. In addition, transduction of a human DC cell line, MUTZ-3, yielded a higher transduction efficiency for the LV produced with DMJ. Conclusion We conclude that LVs produced under conditions with inhibited mannosidase activity can effectively modify cells displaying the DC-specific marker DC-SIGN. This study offers evidence to support the utilization of DMJ in producing LVs that are enhanced carriers for the development of DC-directed vaccines. PMID:21276219

  15. Engineered glycated amino dendritic polymers as specific nonviral gene delivery vectors targeting the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Morales-Portillo, Arturo; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael

    2014-06-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in diabetes or angiogenesis in tumors. Under pathological conditions, RAGE is overexpressed and upon ligand binding and internalization stimulates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation. In this work, amino dendritic polymers PEI 25 kDa and alkylated derivatives of PAMAM-G2 were engineered by the nonenzymatic Maillard glycation reaction to generate novel AGE-containing gene delivery vectors targeting the RAGE. The glycated dendritic polymers were easily prepared and retained the capability to bind and protect DNA from endonucleases. Furthermore, while glycation decreased the transfection efficiency of the dendriplexes in CHO-k1 cells which do not express RAGE, glycated dendriplexes acted as efficient transfection reagents in CHO-k1 cells which stably express recombinant RAGE. In addition, preincubation with BSA-AGEs, a natural ligand of the RAGE, or dansyl cadaverine, an inhibitor of the RAGE internalization, blocked transfection, confirming their specificity toward RAGE. The results were confirmed in NRK and RAW264.7 cell lines, which naturally express the receptor. The glycated compounds retain their transfection efficiency in the presence of serum and promote in vivo transfection in a mouse model. Accordingly, RAGE is a suitable molecular target for the development of site-directed engineered glycated nonviral gene vectors. PMID:24852962

  16. Split vector systems for ultra-targeted gene delivery: a contrivance to achieve ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Tightly controlled spatial localisation of therapeutic gene delivery is essential to maximize the benefits of somatic gene therapy in vivo and to reduce its undesired effects on the 'bystander' cell populations, most importantly germline cells. Indeed, complete ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy can only be achieved with ultra-targeted gene delivery, which excludes the risk of inadvertent germline gene transfer. Thus, it is desired to supplement existing strategies of physical focusing and biological (cell-specific) targeting of gene delivery with an additional principle for the rigid control over spread of gene transfer within the body. In this paper I advance the concept of 'combinatorial' targeting of therapeutic gene transfer in vivo. I hypothesize that it is possible to engineer complex gene delivery vector systems consisting of several components, each one of them capable of independent spread within the human body but incapable of independent facilitation of gene transfer. As the gene delivery augmented by such split vector systems would be reliant on the simultaneous availability of all the vector system components at a predetermined body site, it is envisaged that higher order reaction kinetics required for the assembly of the functional gene transfer configuration would sharpen spatial localisation of gene transfer via curtailing the blurring effect of the vector spread within the body. A particular implementation of such split vector system could be obtained through supplementing a viral therapeutic gene vector with a separate auxiliary vector carrying a non-integrative and non-replicative form of a gene (e.g., mRNA) coding for a cellular receptor of the therapeutic vector component. Gene-transfer-enabling components of the vector system, which would be delivered separately from the vector component loaded with the therapeutic gene cargo, could also be cell-membrane-insertion-proficient receptors, elements of artificial transmembrane channels

  17. A CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system targeting female reproduction in the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Andrew; Galizi, Roberto; Kyrou, Kyros; Simoni, Alekos; Siniscalchi, Carla; Katsanos, Dimitris; Gribble, Matthew; Baker, Dean; Marois, Eric; Russell, Steven; Burt, Austin; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Gene drive systems that enable super-Mendelian inheritance of a transgene have the potential to modify insect populations over a timeframe of a few years. We describe CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease constructs that function as gene drive systems in Anopheles gambiae, the main vector for malaria. We identified three genes (AGAP005958, AGAP011377 and AGAP007280) that confer a recessive female-sterility phenotype upon disruption, and inserted into each locus CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive constructs designed to target and edit each gene. For each targeted locus we observed a strong gene drive at the molecular level, with transmission rates to progeny of 91.4 to 99.6%. Population modeling and cage experiments indicate that a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting one of these loci, AGAP007280, meets the minimum requirement for a gene drive targeting female reproduction in an insect population. These findings could expedite the development of gene drives to suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support malaria transmission. PMID:26641531

  18. A CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Drive System Targeting Female Reproduction in the Malaria Mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Andrew; Galizi, Roberto; Kyrou, Kyros; Simoni, Alekos; Siniscalchi, Carla; Katsanos, Dimitris; Gribble, Matthew; Baker, Dean; Marois, Eric; Russell, Steven; Burt, Austin; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Gene-drive systems that enable super-Mendelian inheritance of a transgene have the potential to modify insect populations over a timeframe of a few years [AU please provide a real estimate, this seems vague]. We describe CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease constructs that function as gene-drive systems in Anopheles gambiae, the main vector for malaria [AU:OK?]. We identified three genes (AGAP005958, AGAP011377 and AGAP007280) that confer a recessive female sterility phenotype upon disruption, and inserted into each locus CRISPR-Cas9 gene-drive constructs designed to target and edit each gene [AU:OK?]. For each locus targeted we observed strong gene drive at the molecular level, with transmission rates to progeny of 91 to 99.6%. Population modelling and cage experiments indicate that a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting one of these loci, AGAP007280, meets the minimum requirement for a gene drive targeting female reproduction in an insect population. These findings could expedite the development of gene drives to control suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support malaria transmission. PMID:26641531

  19. [MicroRNA Target Prediction Based on Support Vector Machine Ensemble Classification Algorithm of Under-sampling Technique].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiru; Hong, Wenxue

    2016-02-01

    Considering the low accuracy of prediction in the positive samples and poor overall classification effects caused by unbalanced sample data of MicroRNA (miRNA) target, we proposes a support vector machine (SVM)-integration of under-sampling and weight (IUSM) algorithm in this paper, an under-sampling based on the ensemble learning algorithm. The algorithm adopts SVM as learning algorithm and AdaBoost as integration framework, and embeds clustering-based under-sampling into the iterative process, aiming at reducing the degree of unbalanced distribution of positive and negative samples. Meanwhile, in the process of adaptive weight adjustment of the samples, the SVM-IUSM algorithm eliminates the abnormal ones in negative samples with robust sample weights smoothing mechanism so as to avoid over-learning. Finally, the prediction of miRNA target integrated classifier is achieved with the combination of multiple weak classifiers through the voting mechanism. The experiment revealed that the SVM-IUSW, compared with other algorithms on unbalanced dataset collection, could not only improve the accuracy of positive targets and the overall effect of classification, but also enhance the generalization ability of miRNA target classifier. PMID:27382743

  20. Targeting the Immune System to Fight Cancer Using Chemical Receptor Homing Vectors Carrying Polyinosine/Cytosine (PolyIC).

    PubMed

    Levitzki, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, polyinosine/cytosine (polyIC), into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA-binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-1), and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1) recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2) The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3) The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4) The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which can be a small molecule, a single chain antibody, or an affibody

  1. Targeting the Immune System to Fight Cancer Using Chemical Receptor Homing Vectors Carrying Polyinosine/Cytosine (PolyIC)

    PubMed Central

    Levitzki, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, polyinosine/cytosine (polyIC), into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA-binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-1), and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1) recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2) The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3) The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4) The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which can be a small molecule, a single chain antibody, or an affibody

  2. Virological and Preclinical Characterization of a Dendritic Cell Targeting, Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vector for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Odegard, Jared M.; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Tareen, Semih U.; Campbell, David J.; Flynn, Patrick A.; Nicolai, Christopher J.; Slough, Megan M.; Vin, Chintan D.; McGowan, Patrick J.; Nelson, Lisa T.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Robbins, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential antigen-presenting cells for the initiation of cytotoxic T-cell responses and therefore attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. We have developed an integration-deficient lentiviral vector termed ID-VP02 that is designed to deliver antigen-encoding nucleic acids selectively to human DCs in vivo. ID-VP02 utilizes a genetically and glycobiologically engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein to target human DCs through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) and also binds to the homologue murine receptor SIGNR1. Specificity of ID-VP02 for antigen-presenting cells in the mouse was confirmed through biodistribution studies showing that following subcutaneous administration, transgene expression was only detectable at the injection site and the draining lymph node. A single immunization with ID-VP02 induced a high level of antigen-specific, polyfunctional effector and memory CD8 T-cell responses that fully protected against vaccinia virus challenge. Upon homologous readministration, ID-VP02 induced a level of high-quality secondary effector and memory cells characterized by stable polyfunctionality and expression of IL-7Rα. Importantly, a single injection of ID-VP02 also induced robust cytotoxic responses against an endogenous rejection antigen of CT26 colon carcinoma cells and conferred both prophylactic and therapeutic antitumor efficacy. ID-VP02 is the first lentiviral vector which combines integration deficiency with DC targeting and is currently being investigated in a phase I trial in cancer patients. PMID:25658613

  3. Targeted gene delivery to human airway epithelial cells with synthetic vectors incorporating novel targeting peptides selected by phage display.

    PubMed

    Writer, Michele J; Marshall, Barry; Pilkington-Miksa, Michael A; Barker, Susie E; Jacobsen, Marianne; Kritz, Angelika; Bell, Paul C; Lester, Douglas H; Tabor, Alethea B; Hailes, Helen C; Klein, Nigel; Hart, Stephen L

    2004-05-01

    Human airway epithelial cell targeting peptides were identified by biopanning on 1HAEo-cells, a well characterised epithelial cell line. Bound phage were recovered after three rounds of binding, high stringency washing and elution, leading to the production of an enriched phage peptide population. DNA sequencing of 56 clones revealed 14 unique sequences. Subsequent binding analysis revealed that 13 of these peptides bound 1HAEo-cells with high affinity. Three peptides, SERSMNF, YGLPHKF and PSGAARA were represented at high frequency. Three clearly defined families of peptide were identified on the basis of sequence motifs including (R/K)SM, L(P/Q)HK and PSG(A/T)ARA. Two peptides, LPHKSMP and LQHKSMP contained two motifs. Further detailed sequence analysis by comparison of peptide sequences with the SWISSPROT protein database revealed that some of the peptides closely resembled the cell binding proteins of viral and bacterial pathogens including Herpes Simplex Virus, rotavirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and rhinovirus, the latter two being respiratory pathogens, as well as peptide YGLPHKF having similarity to a protein of unknown function from the respiratory pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Peptides were incorporated into gene delivery formulations with the cationic lipid Lipofectin and plasmid DNA and shown to confer a high degree of transfection efficiency and specificity in 1HAEo-cells. Improved transfection efficiency and specificity was also observed in human endothelial cells, fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Therefore, on the basis of clone frequency after biopanning, cell binding affinity, peptide sequence conservation and pathogenic similarity, we have identified 3 novel peptide families and 5 specific peptides that have the potential for gene transfer to respiratory epithelium in vivo as well as providing useful in vitro transfection reagents for primary human cell types of scientific and commercial interest. PMID:15506167

  4. CREDVW-Linked Polymeric Micelles As a Targeting Gene Transfer Vector for Selective Transfection and Proliferation of Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xuefang; Li, Qian; Lv, Juan; Yu, Li; Ren, Xiangkui; Zhang, Li; Feng, Yakai; Zhang, Wencheng

    2015-06-10

    Nowadays, gene transfer technology has been widely used to promote endothelialization of artificial vascular grafts. However, the lack of gene vectors with low cytotoxicity and targeting function still remains a pressing challenge. Herein, polyethylenimine (PEI, 1.8 kDa or 10 kDa) was conjugated to an amphiphilic and biodegradable diblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-b-PLGA) to prepare mPEG-b-PLGA-g-PEI copolymers with the aim to develop gene vectors with low cytotoxicity while high transfection efficiency. The micelles were prepared from mPEG-b-PLGA-g-PEI copolymers by self-assembly method. Furthermore, Cys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Trp (CREDVW) peptide was linked to micelle surface to enable the micelles with special recognition for endothelial cells (ECs). In addition, pEGFP-ZNF580 plasmids were condensed into these CREDVW-linked micelles to enhance the proliferation of ECs. These CREDVW-linked micelle/pEGFP-ZNF580 complexes exhibited low cytotoxicity by MTT assay. The cell transfection results demonstrated that pEGFP-ZNF580 could be transferred into ECs efficiently by these micelles. The results of Western blot analysis showed that the relative ZNF580 protein level in transfected ECs increased to 76.9%. The rapid migration of transfected ECs can be verified by wound healing assay. These results indicated that CREDVW-linked micelles could be a suitable gene transfer vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, which has great potential for rapid endothelialization of artificial blood vessels. PMID:26011845

  5. Measurement of the vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ for the. pi. d. -->. 2p reaction with a polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.R.; Bolger, J.; Boschitz, E.; Mathie, E.L.; Proebstle, G.; Meyer, M.; Vogler, F.; Mango, S.

    1982-06-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured in the ..pi..d..-->..2p reaction using a vector polarized deuteron target. The data consist of an angular distribution of iT/sub 11/ at T/sub ..pi../ = 256 MeV, and a four point excitation function of iT/sub 11/ taken at a center of mass angle of 55/sup 0/. The angular distribution has been fit with associated Legendre polynomials.

  6. Microglia-specific targeting by novel capsid-modified AAV6 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Awilda M; Cruz, Pedro E; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Strickland, Michael R; Siemienski, Zoe; Pardo, Meghan; Schob, Keri-Lyn; Li, Andrew; Aslanidi, George V; Srivastava, Arun; Golde, Todd E; Chakrabarty, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) have been widely used in gene therapy applications for central nervous system diseases. Though rAAV can efficiently target neurons and astrocytes in mouse brains, microglia, the immune cells of the brain, are refractile to rAAV. To identify AAV capsids with microglia-specific transduction properties, we initially screened the most commonly used serotypes, AAV1–9 and rh10, on primary mouse microglia cultures. While these capsids were not permissive, we then tested the microglial targeting properties of a newly characterized set of modified rAAV6 capsid variants with high tropism for monocytes. Indeed, these newly characterized rAAV6 capsid variants, specially a triply mutated Y731F/Y705F/T492V form, carrying a self-complementary genome and microglia-specific promoters (F4/80 or CD68) could efficiently and selectively transduce microglia in vitro. Delivery of these constructs in mice brains resulted in microglia-specific expression of green fluorescent protein, albeit at modest levels. We further show that CD68 promoter–driven expression of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, using this capsid variant leads to increased astrogliosis in the brains of wild-type mice. Our study describes the first instance of AAV-targeted microglial gene expression leading to functional modulation of the innate immune system in mice brains. This provides the rationale for utilizing these unique capsid/promoter combinations for microglia-specific gene targeting for modeling or functional studies. PMID:27308302

  7. Classification of a target analyte in solid mixtures using principal component analysis, support vector machines, and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Howley, Tom; Ryder, Alan G.; Leger, Marc N.; Madden, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of illicit materials using Raman spectroscopy is of widespread interest for law enforcement and healthcare applications. One of the difficulties faced when analysing illicit mixtures is the fact that the narcotic can be mixed with many different cutting agents. This obviously complicates the development of quantitative analytical methods. In this work we demonstrate some preliminary efforts to try and account for the wide variety of potential cutting agents, by discrimination between the target substance and a wide range of excipients. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation) was employed to analyse 217 samples, a number of them consisting of a target analyte (acetaminophen) mixed with excipients of different concentrations by weight. The excipients used were sugars (maltose, glucose, lactose, sorbitol), inorganic materials (talcum powder, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium sulphate), and food products (caffeine, flour). The spectral data collected was subjected to a number of pre-treatment statistical methods including first derivative and normalisation transformations, to make the data more suitable for analysis. Various methods were then used to discriminate the target analytes, these included Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Support Vector Machines.

  8. Method for concentrating and purifying recombinant autonomous parvovirus vectors designed for tumour-cell-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Avalosse, B; Dupont, F; Spegelaere, P; Mine, N; Burny, A

    1996-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted the use of parvoviruses as potential vectors for tumour-cell-targeted gene therapy. The oncotropic properties of the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp) suggest that this virus might be a useful vehicle for introducing selectively therapeutic genes, e.g. lymphokine or suicide genes, into tumour cells and preferentially expressing them. But the low titre of recombinant virus stocks (10(5)-10(6) infectious units per ml) and their high level of contamination by cell proteins make it practically impossible to evaluate their efficacy in in vivo systems. A technique is described for producing cellular contaminant-free stocks of recombinant virus particles, with titres up to 5 x 10(8) IU/ml. PMID:9002076

  9. Bioconjugated PLGA-4-arm-PEG branched polymeric nanoparticles as novel tumor targeting carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Hu, Rui; Wu, Fang; Zhao, Lingling; Law, Wing-Cheung; Zhao, Weiwei; Ji, Wei; Liu, Liwei; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we have developed a novel carrier, micelle-type bioconjugated PLGA-4-arm-PEG branched polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), for the detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer. These NPs contained 4-arm-PEG as corona, and PLGA as core, the particle surface was conjugated with cyclo(arginine-glycine-aspartate) (cRGD) as ligand for in vivo tumor targeting. The hydrodynamic size of the NPs was determined to be 150-180 nm and the critical micellar concentration (CMC) was estimated to be 10.5 mg l - 1. Our in vitro study shows that these NPs by themselves had negligible cytotoxicity to human pancreatic cancer (Panc-1) and human glioblastoma (U87) cell lines. Near infrared (NIR) microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that the cRGD conjugated PLGA-4-arm-PEG polymeric NPs were taken up more efficiently by U87MG glioma cells, over-expressing the αvβ3 integrin, when compared with the non-targeted NPs. Whole body imaging showed that the cRGD conjugated PLGA-4-arm-PEG branched polymeric NPs had the highest accumulation in the pancreatic tumor site of mice at 48 h post-injection. Physical, hematological, and pathological assays indicated low in vivo toxicity of this NP formulation. These studies on the ability of these bioconjugated PLGA-4-arm-PEG polymeric NPs suggest that the prepared polymeric NPs may serve as a promising platform for detection and targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Intraosseous Delivery of Lentiviral Vectors Targeting Factor VIII Expression in Platelets Corrects Murine Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage-Sca1+c-Kit+ hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency. PMID:25655313

  11. RGD-functionalized spherulites as targeted vectors captured by adherent cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chenevier, P; Delord, B; Amédée, J; Bareille, R; Ichas, F; Roux, D

    2002-12-16

    Spherulites are multilamellar vesicles consisting of concentric shells that can encapsulate small organic molecules or macromolecules. We investigate the possibility of targeting neutral spherulites to adherent culture cells by functionalizing their surface with RGD-containing ligands. The strength and specificity of association of RGD spherulites with several cell lines (EAhy 926 endothelial cell line, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human osteoprogenitor (HOP) primary cells) was studied, and the molecular interaction of RGD spherulites with the EAhy 926 cell surface was investigated. We show that, after binding to cells, spherulites are internalized. PMID:12431780

  12. Computational identification of novel microRNAs and their targets in the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Remya; Kumar, Vinod; Ananth, Vivek; Singh, Shailja; Nair, Achuthsankar S; Dhar, Pawan K

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs are a ~22 nucleotide small non-coding RNAs found in animals, plants and viruses. They regulate key cellular processes by enhancing, degrading or silencing protein coding targets. Currently most of the data on miRNA is available from Drosophila . Given their important post-transcriptional role in several organisms, there is a need to understand the miRNA mediated processes in normal and abnormal conditions. Here we report four novel microRNAs ast - mir - 2502, ast - mir - 2559, ast - mir - 3868 and ast - mir - 9891 in Anopheles stephensi identified from a set of 3,052 transcriptome sequences, showing average minimum free energy of -31.8 kcal/mol of duplex formation with mRNA indicating their functional relevance. Phylogenetic study shows conservation of sequence signatures within the Class Insecta. Furthermore, 26 potential targets of these four miRNAs have been predicted that play an important role in the mosquito life-cycle. This work leads to novel leads and experimental possibilities for improved understanding of gene regulatory processes in mosquito. PMID:25972985

  13. Effects of specific antisera targeting peritrophic matrix-associated proteins in the sand fly vector Phlebotomus papatasi.

    PubMed

    Malta, Juliana; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Weng, Ju-Lin; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Munford, Maximiliano Luis; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    In many hematophagous insects, the peritrophic matrix (PM) is formed soon after a blood meal (PBM) to compartmentalize the food bolus. The PM is an important component of vector competence, functioning as a barrier to the development of many pathogens including parasites of the genus Leishmania transmitted by sand flies. PM morphology and permeability are associated with the proteins that are part of the PM scaffolding, including several peritrophins, and chitin fibers. Here, we assessed the effects of specific antisera targeting proteins thought to be an integral part of the PM scaffolding and its process of maturation and degradation. Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies were fed with red blood cells reconstituted with antisera targeting the chitinase PpChit1, and the peritrophin PpPer2. Sand fly midguts were dissected at different time points and processed for light microscopy (LM), confocal and transmission electron (TEM) microscopies (24, 42-46, 48 and 72h PBM), scanning electron (SEM) (48h PBM) and atomic force (AFM) (30h PBM) microscopies. TEM and WGA-FITC staining indicate PM degradation was significantly delayed following feeding of flies on anti-PpChit1. AFM analysis at 30h PBM point to an increase in roughness' amplitude of the PM of flies that fed on either anti-PpChit1 or anti-PpPer2. Collective, our data suggest that antibodies targeting PM-associated proteins affects the kinetics of PM maturation, delaying its degradation and disruption and are potential targets on transmission-blocking vaccines strategies. PMID:27012717

  14. Development of tissue-targeting hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector for successful delivery of therapeutic gene to mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Masako; Tamai, Katsuto; Saga, Kotaro; Yamazaki, Takehiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Shimbo, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Nimura, Keisuke; Nishifuji, Koji; Amagai, Masayuki; Uitto, Jouni; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-10-01

    We report a novel strategy for constructing a tissue-targeting hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus) envelope vector (HVJ-E), and its application in gene therapy of a mouse model of genetic skin disease. Chimeric genes encoding viral F protein and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed on the basis of various deletion mutants. The product of one chimeric gene, containing signal peptide, transmembrane domain, and the cytoplasmic tail of F protein, was transported to the cell surface and incorporated into new viruses released from HVJ-infected LLC-MK2 cells. For tissue targeting, in the preceding construct GFP was replaced with single-chain antibody (scFv) against mouse desmoglein 3 (mDsg3), a desmosomal cadherin found in basal layer keratinocytes of the skin. HVJ encoding scFv-F chimeric protein bound to mDsg3-coated plates much more efficiently than did wild-type HVJ. When chimeric HVJ was injected into a skin blister of a mouse model of epidermolysis bullosa, in which defective expression of type VII collagen results in a failure to secure epidermis to the underlying dermis, viral F protein expression was detected in most of the basal keratinocytes. Furthermore, chimeric HVJ-E introduced type VII collagen expression more efficiently compared with wild-type HVJ in basal keratinocytes of type VII collagen-deficient mouse skin, resulting in efficient amelioration of the genetic defect. Thus, a novel tissue-targeting HVJ-E could be used to successfully target epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17892442

  15. Magnetic Microbubbles: Magnetically Targeted and Ultrasound-Triggered Vectors for Gene Delivery in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaskou, Dialechti; Pradhan, Pallab; Bergemann, Christian; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hensel, Karin; Schmitz, Georg; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2010-12-01

    Based on the concept of magnetofection, we prepared lipid shell microbubbles loaded with highly positively charged iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles through electrostatic and matrix affinity interactions. These magnetic microbubbles showed strong ultrasound contrast. When the magnetic microbubbles were mixed with plasmid DNA encoding a reporter gene, gene delivery to HeLa cells was achieved only when ultrasound was applied. Gene transfer efficiency strongly depended on the application of a gradient magnetic field. Treatment of HeLa cells with the microbubbles and ultrasound resulted in strong concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects, whereas ultrasound alone, lipid microbubbles alone, magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic microbubbles alone did not significantly affect cell viability. These magnetic microbubbles could be used as magnetically targeted diagnostic agents for real-time ultrasound imaging or for cancer therapy, therapy of vascular thrombosis and gene therapy.

  16. Evaluation of a combinatorial RNAi lentivirus vector targeting foot-and-mouth disease virus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOXI; ZHENG, HAIXUE; XU, MINJUN; ZHOU, YU; LI, XIANGPING; YANG, FAN; LIU, QINGYOU; SHI, DESHUN

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, which leads to serious economical losses. FMDV is not adequately controlled by vaccination or biosecurity measures. To generate genetically modified FMDV-resistant animals, a combinatorial expression cassette producing three short hairpin (sh) RNAs was constructed using the lentivirus (LV) vector, LV-3shRNA. The three shRNAs were expressed under the regulation of DNA polymerase III promoters from a buffalo and a bovine source, with one targeted to the non-structural protein 3B, and the other two targeted to the viral polymerase protein 3D of FMDV, respectively. The role of LV-3shRNA in the inhibition of the replication of FMDV was determined in BHK-21 cells and in suckling mice. The results revealed that LV-3shRNA reduced viral growth 3-fold (24 h post-infection) when the cells were challenged with 107-times the tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)/ml of O serotype FMDV. The suckling mice pretreated with LV-3shRNA were completely protected on administration of 5-times the dose of FMDV otherwise sufficient to kill 50% of the experimental animals (LD50). These results demonstrated that the LV-mediated dual expression of three FMDV-specific shRNAs provided a novel strategy towards combating FMDV, which facilitates the permanent introduction of novel disease-resistance traits into the buffalo and bovine genomes in the future. PMID:26323462

  17. Self-Immolative Polycations as Gene Delivery Vectors and Prodrugs Targeting Polyamine Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polycations are explored as carriers to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids. Polycations are conventionally pharmacological inert with the sole function of delivering therapeutic cargo. This study reports synthesis of a self-immolative polycation (DSS-BEN) based on a polyamine analogue drug N1,N11-bisethylnorspermine (BENSpm). The polycation was designed to function dually as a gene delivery carrier and a prodrug targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism in cancer. Using a combination of NMR and HPLC, we confirm that the self-immolative polycation undergoes intracellular degradation into the parent drug BENSpm. The released BENSpm depletes cellular levels of spermidine and spermine and upregulates polyamine catabolic enzymes spermine/spermidine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and spermine oxidase (SMO). The synthesized polycations form polyplexes with DNA and facilitate efficient transfection. Taking advantage of the ability of BENSpm to sensitize cancer cells to TNFα-induced apoptosis, we show that DSS-BEN enhances the cell killing activity of TNFα gene therapy. The reported findings validate DSS-BEN as a dual-function delivery system that can deliver a therapeutic gene and improve the outcome of gene therapy as a result of the intracellular degradation of DSS-BEN to BENSpm and the subsequent beneficial effect of BENSpm on dysregulated polyamine metabolism in cancer. PMID:25153488

  18. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electronmore » beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.« less

  19. An Electron Fixed Target Experiment to Search for a New Vector Boson A' Decaying to e+e-

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-06-11

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling {alpha}' {approx}> 6 x 10{sup -8} {alpha} to electrons ({alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}) in the mass range 65 MeV < m{sub A'} < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the 'dark photon' A' with the photon - one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model - and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e{sup +}e{sup -} spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of {approx} 1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a {approx} 1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be {approx} 10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to {alpha}'/{alpha} one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

  20. Integration profile of retroviral vector in gene therapy treated patients is cell-specific according to gene expression and chromatin conformation of target cell

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, Luca; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Pellin, Danilo; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Brigida, Immacolata; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Di Serio, Clelia; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of genomic distribution of retroviral vectors is a powerful tool to monitor ‘vector-on-host’ effects in gene therapy (GT) trials but also provides crucial information about ‘host-on-vector’ influences based on the target cell genetic and epigenetic state. We had the unique occasion to compare the insertional profile of the same therapeutic moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector in the context of the adenosine deaminase-severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) genetic background in two GT trials based on infusions of transduced mature lymphocytes (peripheral blood lymphocytes, PBL) or a single infusion of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC). We found that vector insertions are cell-specific according to the differential expression profile of target cells, favouring, in PBL-GT, genes involved in immune system and T-cell functions/pathways as well as T-cell DNase hypersensitive sites, differently from HSC-GT. Chromatin conformations and histone modifications influenced integration preferences but we discovered that only H3K27me3 was cell-specifically disfavoured, thus representing a key epigenetic determinant of cell-type dependent insertion distribution. Our study shows that MLV vector insertional profile is cell-specific according to the genetic/chromatin state of the target cell both in vitro and in vivo in patients several years after GT. PMID:21243617

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of PAMAM Dendrimer Based Multifunctional Nanodevices for targeting αvβ3 Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Wojciech G.; Kariapper, Muhammed S. T.; Nair, Bindu M.; Tan, Wei; Hutson, Alan; Balogh, Lajos P.; Khan, Mohamed K.

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized a stable and clinically relevant nanodevice (cRGD-BT-ND; ND for short) that exhibits superior binding to the biologic target αvβ3 integrins, when either compared to the same free cRGD peptide or to the biotinylated nanodevice without covalently attached peptides (BT-ND). Selective targeting of αvβ3 integrins was achieved by coupling cyclic cRGD peptides to the nanodevice (ND) surface, while biotin groups (BT) were used for amplified detection of bound cRGD-BT-ND by anti-biotin antibody or avidin linked to horseradish peroxidase after binding. The synthesis involved the following steps: the amino terminated ethylenediamine core generation 5 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM_E5.NH2) dendrimer was first partially acetylated, then biotinylated, residual primary amine termini were converted to succinamic acid groups (SAH), some of which finally were conjugated with cRGD peptide residues through the amino group of the lysine side chain. The starting material and all derivatives were extensively characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), potentiometric acid-base titration, MALDI-TOF and NMR. Cytotoxicity of all dendrimer derivatives was examined in B16F10 melanoma cell cultures using the XTT colorimetric assay for cellular viability. Binding of nanodevices to the biological target was determined using plates coated with human αvβ3 integrin and αvβ3 receptor expressing human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs). The PAMAM_E5.(NHAc)72(NHBT)8(NHSAH)35(NHSA-cRGD)4 nanodevice is non-toxic within physiologic concentration ranges and specifically binds to the αvβ3 integrins, apparently much stronger than the cyclic cRGD peptide itself. PMID:17566976

  2. Pulmonary Targeting of Adeno-associated Viral Vectors by Next-generation Sequencing-guided Screening of Random Capsid Displayed Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Körbelin, Jakob; Sieber, Timo; Michelfelder, Stefan; Lunding, Lars; Spies, Elmar; Hunger, Agnes; Alawi, Malik; Rapti, Kleopatra; Indenbirken, Daniela; Müller, Oliver J; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Trepel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Vectors mediating strong, durable, and tissue-specific transgene expression are mandatory for safe and effective gene therapy. In settings requiring systemic vector administration, the availability of suited vectors is extremely limited. Here, we present a strategy to select vectors with true specificity for a target tissue from random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV) by screening the library under circulation conditions in a murine model. Guiding the in vivo screening by next-generation sequencing, we were able to monitor the selection kinetics and to determine the right time point to discontinue the screening process. The establishment of different rating scores enabled us to identify the most specifically enriched AAV capsid candidates. As proof of concept, a capsid variant was selected that specifically and very efficiently delivers genes to the endothelium of the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous administration. This technical approach of selecting target-specific vectors in vivo is applicable to any given tissue of interest and therefore has broad implications in translational research and medicine. PMID:27018516

  3. Chemical composition, toxicity and non-target effects of Pinus kesiya essential oil: An eco-friendly and novel larvicide against malaria, dengue and lymphatic filariasis mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are vectors of important parasites and pathogens causing death, poverty and social disability worldwide, with special reference to tropical and subtropical countries. The overuse of synthetic insecticides to control mosquito vectors lead to resistance, adverse environmental effects and high operational costs. Therefore, the development of eco-friendly control tools is an important public health challenge. In this study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of Pinus kesiya leaf essential oil (EO) was evaluated against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and the lymphatic filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The chemical composition of the EO was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. GC-MS revealed that the P. kesiya EO contained 18 compounds. Major constituents were α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene and germacrene D. In acute toxicity assays, the EO showed significant toxicity against early third-stage larvae of An. stephensi, Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus, with LC50 values of 52, 57, and 62µg/ml, respectively. Notably, the EO was safer towards several aquatic non-target organisms Anisops bouvieri, Diplonychus indicus and Gambusia affinis, with LC50 values ranging from 4135 to 8390µg/ml. Overall, this research adds basic knowledge to develop newer and safer natural larvicides from Pinaceae plants against malaria, dengue and filariasis mosquito vectors. PMID:26995063

  4. Mosquitocidal properties of IgG targeting the glutamate-gated chloride channel in three mosquito disease vectors (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacob I.; Gray, Meg; Foy, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) is a highly sensitive insecticide target of the avermectin class of insecticides. As an alternative to using chemical insecticides to kill mosquitoes, we tested the effects of purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting the extracellular domain of GluCl from Anopheles gambiae (AgGluCl) on the survivorship of three key mosquito disease vectors: Anopheles gambiae s.s., Aedes aegypti and Culex tarsalis. When administered through a single blood meal, anti-AgGluCl IgG reduced the survivorship of A. gambiae in a dose-dependent manner (LC50: 2.82 mg ml−1, range 2.68–2.96 mg ml−1) but not A. aegypti or C. tarsalis. We previously demonstrated that AgGluCl is only located in tissues of the head and thorax of A. gambiae. To verify that AgGluCl IgG is affecting target antigens found outside the midgut, we injected it directly into the hemocoel via intrathoracic injection. A single, physiologically relevant concentration of anti-AgGluCl IgG injected into the hemocoel equally reduced mosquito survivorship of all three species. To test whether anti-AgGluCl IgG was entering the hemocoel of each of these mosquitoes, we fed mosquitoes a blood meal containing anti-AgGluCl IgG and subsequently extracted their hemolymph. We only detected IgG in the hemolymph of A. gambiae, suggesting that resistance of A. aegypti and C. tarsalis to anti-AgGluCl IgG found in blood meals is due to deficient IgG translocation across the midgut. We predicted that anti-AgGluCl IgG's mode of action is by antagonizing GluCl activity. To test this hypothesis, we fed A. gambiae blood meals containing anti-AgGluCl IgG and the GluCl agonist ivermectin (IVM). Anti-AgGluCl IgG attenuated the mosquitocidal effects of IVM, suggesting that anti-AgGluCl IgG antagonizes IVM-induced activation of GluCl. Lastly, we stained adult, female A. aegypti and C. tarsalis for GluCl expression. Neuronal GluCl expression in these mosquitoes was similar to previously

  5. Construction of interference vector targeting Ep-CAM gene and its effects on colorectal cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanmei; Zhou, Fengqiang; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Lei; Xu, Hong; Guo, Huiguang

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior study indicates that abnormal protein expression and functional changes in the development and progression of colorectal cancer is related to gene expression. The aim of this study was to construct an interference plasmid targeting the Ep-CAM gene and to investigate its effects on the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. Methods In this study, HT-29 and HCT-116 colorectal cancer cell lines were selected as cell models. The double-stranded micro (mi)RNA oligo was inserted into the pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR vector, which is an expression of miRNA. Lipofectamine™ 2000 was used to transfer plasmid into the empty plasmid group (transfected pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR-neg) and the interference group (transfected pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR-Ep-CAM-1), respectively. Meanwhile, the nontransferred HT-29 and HCT-116 acts as the blank control group. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the transfection efficiency. Western blot was used to detect Ep-CAM protein expression. The cell proliferation in each group was detected by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results The results indicated that the Ep-CAM messenger (m)RNA expression in the interference group was lower significantly compared with that of the empty plasmid group and control group (P<0.01). Western blot analysis results showed that Ep-CAM protein expression was significantly lower in interference group compared with that of the empty plasmid group and the control group (P<0.01). MTT assay results demonstrated that the proliferation ability of cells in the interference group was significantly inhibited compared with the two other groups (P<0.05). Conclusion Silencing of Ep-CAM can significantly inhibit the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26028961

  6. Enhancing chemosensitivity in oral squamous cell carcinoma by lentivirus vector-mediated RNA interference targeting EGFR and MRP2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Ju; Chen, Shiuan-Yin; Lovel, Ronald; Ku, Yi-Chu; Lai, Yi-Hui; Hung, Chiao-Ling; Li, Yu-Fen; Lu, Yin-Che; Tai, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is the eighth most common type of cancer among men worldwide, with an age-standardized rate of 6.3 per 100,000, and is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated mortality among men in Taiwan. Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) are two of the most frequently utilized chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of oral cancer. Although oral cancer patients initially benefit from chemotherapy with these drugs, they may develop resistance to them, which worsens their prognosis and reduces survival rates. It has been reported that increased levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) induce drug resistance in numerous types of human cancer. Therefore, the present study employed lentivirus vector-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) in order to target the genes encoding EGFR and MRP2 in the oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line OC2. It was observed that RNAi-mediated downregulation of EGFR or MRP2 increased the sensitivity to 5-FU and cisplatin in OC2 cells. Downregulation of EGFR resulted in significant suppression of OC2 tumor growth following 5-FU administration. However, simultaneous downregulation of the two genes did not further suppress the tumor growth, indicating that MRP2 does not have a significant role in the chemosensitivity of EGFR-downregulated cells to 5-FU. In contrast, downregulation of MRP2 was demonstrated to significantly enhance the therapeutic effects of cisplatin in EGFR-downregulated OC2 tumors. The observation that the expression of MRP2 was positively correlated with the level of cisplatin resistance in cells suggests that RNAi-mediated downregulation of MRP2 may be applicable as a therapeutic approach toward reversing MRP2-dependent cisplatin resistance in oral cancer. PMID:27602148

  7. One-pot fabrication of silver nanocrystals using Nicandra physalodes: A novel route for mosquito vector control with moderate toxicity on non-target water bugs.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Khater, Hanem F; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) as vectors for important diseases and parasites causing millions of deaths every year. The use of synthetic pesticides against Culicidae leads to resistance and environmental concerns. Therefore, eco-friendly control tools are a priority. In this research, Nicandra physalodes-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was conducted, in order to control larval populations of three important mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Biofabricated Ag NPs were characterized using UV-vis spectrophotometry, XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM analyses. Ag NPs were highly toxic against the three mosquito vectors. Maximum efficacy was detected against A. stephensi (LC50=12.39μg/mL), followed by Ae. aegypti (LC50=13.61μg/mL) and Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=14.79μg/mL). Interestingly, Ag NPs were safer for the non-target aquatic organism Diplonychus indicus sharing the same aquatic habitats of mosquito larvae. LC50 and LC90 values were 1032.81 and 19,076.59μg/mL, respectively. Overall, our results highlight that N. physalodes-fabricated Ag NPs are a promising for development of eco-friendly larvicides against mosquito vectors, with negligible toxicity against non-target aquatic water bugs. PMID:27473981

  8. The synergistic effect of folate and RGD dual ligand of nanographene oxide on tumor targeting and photothermal therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol; Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-11-01

    Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a co-operative effect of individual ligands. In this study, a dual ligand targeting nanographene oxide (nGO) was developed by non-covalent interaction with folate and cRGD functionalized pluronic, which allowed precise control of ligand number on the nGO surface and ensured stability under physiological conditions. The tumor targeting abilities of single and dual ligand decorated nGOs were evaluated in vitro by using KB cells, over-expressing folate and integrin αvβ3 receptors. In vitro cellular uptake analysis by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed enhanced uptake of dual ligand modified nGO compared to any of the single ligand modified nGOs. The cellular uptake of dual targeted cRGD-FA-nGO was increased by 1.9 and 2.4 folds compared to single targeted cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution experiment in a mouse xenograft model also confirmed the synergistic targeting effect of cRGD and folate dual functionalized nGO. A significantly higher tumor accumulation of cRGD-FA-nGO was observed compared to cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO. The higher tumor accumulation of dual targeted nGO resulted in complete ablation of tumor tissue through an enhanced photothermal effect by NIR laser irradiation. Therefore, co-functionalization of a nanoparticle by cRGD and folate is a potentially useful way to enhance the tumor targeting efficacy.Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a

  9. Targeted therapy via oral administration of attenuated Salmonella expression plasmid-vectored Stat3-shRNA cures orthotopically transplanted mouse HCC.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Guo, B; Jia, H; Ji, K; Sun, Y; Li, Y; Zhao, T; Gao, L; Meng, Y; Kalvakolanu, D V; Kopecko, D J; Zhao, X; Zhang, L; Xu, D

    2012-06-01

    The development of RNA interference-based cancer gene therapies has been delayed due to the lack of effective tumor-targeting delivery systems. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a natural tropism for solid tumors. We report here the use of attenuated S. Typhimurium as a vector to deliver shRNA directly into tumor cells. Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key transcription factor involved in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and metastasis. In this study, attenuated S. Typhimurium was capable of delivering shRNA-expressing vectors to the targeted cancer cells and inducing RNA interference in vivo. More importantly, a single oral dose of attenuated S. Typhimurium carrying shRNA-expressing vectors targeting Stat3 induced remarkably delayed and reduced HCC (in 70% of mice). Cancer in these cured mice did not recur over 2 years following treatment. These data demonstrated that RNA interference combined with Salmonella as a delivery system may offer a novel clinical approach for cancer gene therapy. PMID:22555509

  10. Analysis of Children's Perception of Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease through Drawings: Opportunities for Targeted Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Yevstigneyeva, Violetta; Camara-Mejia, Javier; Dumonteil, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease affecting about 10 million people, mostly in the Americas, and transmitted mainly by triatomine bugs. Insect vector control with indoor residual insecticides and the promotion of housing improvement is the main control intervention. The success of such interventions relies on their acceptance and appropriation by communities, which depends on their knowledge and perceptions of both the disease and the vector. In this study, we investigated school-aged children's knowledge and perception on triatomine vectors and Chagas disease to further understand how communities view this vector and the disease in Yucatan, Mexico. Methodology/Principal findings We performed an analysis of children's drawings on the theme of triatomines and their house in several rural villages, to explore in an open-ended manner their views, understanding and misconceptions. A total of 261 drawings were collected from children ages 6–12 from four villages. We found that children are very familiar with triatomine vectors, and know very well many aspects of their biology and ecology, and in particular their blood-feeding habits. On the other hand, their drawings suggest that the role of triatomines as vectors of a chronic and severe cardiac disease is less understood, and the main perceived health threat appears limited to the bite itself, as previously observed in adults. Conclusions/Significance These results have important implications for the specific design of future education materials and campaigns, and for the promotion of the inclusion of children in raising Chagas disease awareness in these endemic communities. PMID:25275321

  11. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  12. Proposal of Path Following and Arrival Judgement Methods Using Target Vector for Teleoperation of a Mobile Robot on Uneven Ground by Image Pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Sho; Maeyama, Shoichi

    Rescue robots have been actively developed since Hanshin-Awaji (Kobe) Earthquake. Recently, the rescue robot to reduce the risk of the secondary disaster on NBC terror and critical accident is also developed. For such a background, the development project of mobile RT system in the collapsed is started. This research also participates in this project. It is useful to use the image pointing for the control interface of the rescue robot because it can control the robot by the simple operation. However, the conventional method cannot work on a rough terrain. In this research, we propose the system which controls the robot to arrive the target position on the rough terrain. It is constructed the methods which put the destination into the vector, and control the 3D localizated robot to follow the vector. Finally, the proposed system is evaluated through experiments by remote control of a mobile robot in slope and cofirmed the feasibility.

  13. Preclinical Assessment of Viral Vectored and Protein Vaccines Targeting the Duffy-Binding Protein Region II of Plasmodium Vivax

    PubMed Central

    de Cassan, Simone C.; Shakri, A. Rushdi; Llewellyn, David; Elias, Sean C.; Cho, Jee Sun; Goodman, Anna L.; Jin, Jing; Douglas, Alexander D.; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, François H.; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has largely focused on Plasmodium falciparum; however, a reawakening to the importance of Plasmodium vivax has spurred efforts to develop vaccines against this difficult to treat and at times severe form of relapsing malaria, which constitutes a significant proportion of human malaria cases worldwide. The almost complete dependence of P. vivax red blood cell invasion on the interaction of the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein region II (PvDBP_RII) with the human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) makes this antigen an attractive vaccine candidate against blood-stage P. vivax. Here, we generated both preclinical and clinically compatible adenoviral and poxviral vectored vaccine candidates expressing the Salvador I allele of PvDBP_RII – including human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5), chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors. We report on the antibody and T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines in mice or rabbits, either used alone in a viral vectored prime-boost regime or in “mixed-modality” adenovirus prime – protein-in-­adjuvant boost regimes (using a recombinant PvDBP_RII protein antigen formulated in Montanide®ISA720 or Abisco®100 adjuvants). Antibodies induced by these regimes were found to bind to native parasite antigen from P. vivax infected Thai patients and were capable of inhibiting the binding of PvDBP_RII to its receptor DARC using an in vitro binding inhibition assay. In recent years, recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors have been quickly translated into human clinical trials for numerous antigens from P. falciparum as well as a growing number of other pathogens. The vectors reported here are immunogenic in small animals, elicit antibodies against PvDBP_RII, and have recently entered clinical trials, which will provide the first assessment of the safety and immunogenicity of the PvDBP_RII antigen in humans. PMID:26217340

  14. The Nontoxic Cell Cycle Modulator Indirubin Augments Transduction of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors and Zinc-Finger Nuclease-Mediated Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shamim H.; Bobis-Wozowicz, Sylwia; Chatterjee, Debanjana; Gellhaus, Katharina; Pars, Kaweh; Heilbronn, Regine; Jacobs, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Parameters that regulate or affect the cell cycle or the DNA repair choice between non-homologous end-joining and homology-directed repair (HDR) are excellent targets to enhance therapeutic gene targeting. Here, we have evaluated the impact of five cell-cycle modulating drugs on targeted genome engineering mediated by DNA double-strand break (DSB)-inducing nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). For a side-by-side comparison, we have established four reporter cell lines by integrating a mutated EGFP gene into either three transformed human cell lines or primary umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs). After treatment with different cytostatic drugs, cells were transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that encode a nuclease or a repair donor to rescue EGFP expression through DSB-induced HDR. We show that transient cell-cycle arrest increased AAV transduction and AAV-mediated HDR up to six-fold in human cell lines and ten-fold in UC-MSCs, respectively. Targeted gene correction was observed in up to 34% of transduced cells. Both the absolute and the relative gene-targeting frequencies were dependent on the cell type, the cytostatic drug, the vector dose, and the nuclease. Treatment of cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor indirubin-3′-monoxime was especially promising as this compound combined high stimulatory effects with minimal cytotoxicity. In conclusion, indirubin-3′-monoxime significantly improved AAV transduction and the efficiency of AAV/ZFN-mediated gene targeting and may thus represent a promising compound to enhance DSB-mediated genome engineering in human stem cells, such as UC-MSCs, which hold great promise for future clinical applications. PMID:23072634

  15. Immune response to recombinant adenovirus in humans: capsid components from viral input are targets for vector-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Molinier-Frenkel, V; Gahery-Segard, H; Mehtali, M; Le Boulaire, C; Ribault, S; Boulanger, P; Tursz, T; Guillet, J G; Farace, F

    2000-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 10(9) PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218-2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8(+) CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  16. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8+ CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  17. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for e-vectorp-vector{yields}ep{pi}{sup 0} in the nucleon resonance region above the {delta}(1232)

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, A. S.; Burkert, V. D.; Avakian, H.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Carman, D. S.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Ito, M. M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Laget, J. M.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Nozar, M.; Sapunenko, V.

    2008-10-15

    The exclusive channel p-vectore-vector,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q{sup 2} range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV{sup 2} at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the {pi}{sup 0} and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P{sub 11} and the N(1535)S{sub 11} and N(1520)D{sub 13} states.

  18. Tumor-Specific Targeting With Modified Sindbis Viral Vectors: Evaluation with Optical Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Lars; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Torosjan, Armen; Levin, Brandi; Longo, Valerie A.; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Zanzonico, Pat; Meruelo, Daniel; Daniel, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sindbis virus (SINV) infect tumor cells specifically and systemically throughout the body. Sindbis vectors are capable of expressing high levels of transduced suicide genes and thus efficiently produce enzymes for prodrug conversion in infected tumor cells. The ability to monitor suicide gene expression levels and viral load in patients, after administration of the vectors, would significantly enhance this tumor-specific therapeutic option. Procedures The tumor specificity of SINV is mediated by the 67-kDa laminin receptor (LR). We probed different cancer cell lines for their LR expression and, to determine the specific role of LR-expression in the infection cycle, used different molecular imaging strategies, such as bioluminescence, fluorescence molecular tomography, and positron emission tomography, to evaluate SINV-mediated infection in vitro and in vivo. Results All cancer cell lines showed a marked expression of LR. The infection rates of the SINV particles, however, differed significantly among the cell lines. Conclusion We used novel molecular imaging techniques to visualize vector delivery to different neoplatic cells. SINV infection rates proofed to be not solely dependent on cellular LR expression. Further studies need to evaluate the herein discussed ways of cellular infection and viral replication. PMID:22847302

  19. Long-lasting insecticide-treated house screens and targeted treatment of productive breeding-sites for dengue vector control in Acapulco, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Che-Mendoza, Azael; Guillermo-May, Guillermo; Herrera-Bojórquez, Josué; Barrera-Pérez, Mario; Dzul-Manzanilla, Felipe; Gutierrez-Castro, Cipriano; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Sánchez-Tejeda, Gustavo; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Ranson, Hilary; Lenhart, Audrey; Sommerfeld, Johannes; McCall, Philip J.; Kroeger, Axel; Manrique-Saide, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-lasting insecticidal net screens (LLIS) fitted to domestic windows and doors in combination with targeted treatment (TT) of the most productive Aedes aegypti breeding sites were evaluated for their impact on dengue vector indices in a cluster-randomised trial in Mexico between 2011 and 2013. Methods Sequentially over 2 years, LLIS and TT were deployed in 10 treatment clusters (100 houses/cluster) and followed up over 24 months. Cross-sectional surveys quantified infestations of adult mosquitoes, immature stages at baseline (pre-intervention) and in four post-intervention samples at 6-monthly intervals. Identical surveys were carried out in 10 control clusters that received no treatment. Results LLIS clusters had significantly lower infestations compared to control clusters at 5 and 12 months after installation, as measured by adult (male and female) and pupal-based vector indices. After addition of TT to the intervention houses in intervention clusters, indices remained significantly lower in the treated clusters until 18 (immature and adult stage indices) and 24 months (adult indices only) post-intervention. Conclusions These safe, simple affordable vector control tools were well-accepted by study participants and are potentially suitable in many regions at risk from dengue worldwide. PMID:25604761

  20. Plant microRNA-Target Interaction Identification Model Based on the Integration of Prediction Tools and Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jun; Shi, Lin; Luan, Yushi

    2014-01-01

    Background Confident identification of microRNA-target interactions is significant for studying the function of microRNA (miRNA). Although some computational miRNA target prediction methods have been proposed for plants, results of various methods tend to be inconsistent and usually lead to more false positive. To address these issues, we developed an integrated model for identifying plant miRNA–target interactions. Results Three online miRNA target prediction toolkits and machine learning algorithms were integrated to identify and analyze Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA-target interactions. Principle component analysis (PCA) feature extraction and self-training technology were introduced to improve the performance. Results showed that the proposed model outperformed the previously existing methods. The results were validated by using degradome sequencing supported Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA-target interactions. The proposed model constructed on Arabidopsis thaliana was run over Oryza sativa and Vitis vinifera to demonstrate that our model is effective for other plant species. Conclusions The integrated model of online predictors and local PCA-SVM classifier gained credible and high quality miRNA-target interactions. The supervised learning algorithm of PCA-SVM classifier was employed in plant miRNA target identification for the first time. Its performance can be substantially improved if more experimentally proved training samples are provided. PMID:25051153

  1. Targeting the Midgut Secreted PpChit1 Reduces Leishmania major Development in Its Natural Vector, the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Sharma, Narinder K.; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Background During its developmental cycle within the sand fly vector, Leishmania must survive an early proteolytic attack, escape the peritrophic matrix, and then adhere to the midgut epithelia in order to prevent excretion with remnants of the blood meal. These three steps are critical for the establishment of an infection within the vector and are linked to interactions controlling species-specific vector competence. PpChit1 is a midgut-specific chitinase from Phlebotomus papatasi presumably involved in maturation and degradation of the peritrophic matrix. Sand fly midgut chitinases, such as PpChit1, whether acting independently or in a synergistic manner with Leishmania-secreted chitinase, possibly play a role in the Leishmania escape from the endoperitrophic space. Thus, we predicted that silencing of sand fly chitinase will lead to reduction or elimination of Leishmania within the gut of the sand fly vector. Methodology/Principal Findings We used injection of dsRNA to induce knock down of PpChit1 transcripts (dsPpChit1) and assessed the effect on protein levels post blood meal (PBM) and on Leishmania major development within P. papatasi. Injection of dsPpChit1 led to a significant reduction of PpChit1 transcripts from 24 hours to 96 hours PBM. More importantly, dsPpChit1 led to a significant reduction in protein levels and in the number of Le. major present in the midgut of infected P. papatasi following a infective blood meal. Conclusion/Significance Our data supports targeting PpChit1 as a potential transmission blocking vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis. PMID:21152058

  2. Integrated vector management targeting Anopheles darlingi populations decreases malaria incidence in an unstable transmission area, in the rural Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on vector behaviour should be conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of vector control measures on malaria protection in endemic areas of Latin America, where P. vivax predominates. This work aims to investigate the fauna of anopheline mosquitoes and verify the impact of integrated vector management in two colonization projects in the Careiro Municipality, Western Brazilian Amazon. Methods Four mosquitoes’ captures were carried out from August 2008 to March 2010, with an interval of six months between each collection. Since September 2009 a large programme to reduce the burden of malaria has started in the two communities by distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) and intensification of indoor residual spraying (IRS). Human biting rates (HBRs), entomological inoculation rates (EIRs), malaria incidence rate (MIR) and Plasmodium carrier’s prevalence were used as outcomes to estimate the impact of the control measures. Results A total of 3,189 anophelines were collected, belonging to 13 species. Anopheles darlingi was the predominant species in the period (42.6%), followed by Anopheles albitarsis (38.4%). An. darlingi HBRs showed a notable decreasing trend from the start to the end of the study. Conversely, An. albitarsis increased its contribution to overall HBRs throughout the study. For An. darlingi there was a significant positive correlation between HBRs and MIR (p = 0.002). Anopheles albitarsis HBRs showed a significant negative correlation with the corresponding MIR (p = 0.045). EIR from total anophelines and from An. darlingi and An. albitarsis presented decreasing patterns in the successive collections. Four species of anophelines (An. darlingi, An. albitarsis, Anopheles braziliensis and Anopheles nuneztovari) were naturally infected with Plasmodium, albeit at very low infection rates. There were a decrease in the MIR for both vivax and falciparum malaria and in the prevalence of Plasmodium vivax and

  3. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  4. One-pot biogenic fabrication of silver nanocrystals using Quisqualis indica: Effectiveness on malaria and Zika virus mosquito vectors, and impact on non-target aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Vijayan, Periasamy; Kadaikunnan, Shine; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Currently, mosquito vector control is facing a number of key challenges, including the rapid development of resistance to synthetic pesticides and the recent spread of aggressive arbovirus outbreaks. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is currently considered an environmental friendly alternative to the employ of pyrethroids, carbamates and microbial agents (e.g. Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis), since AgNPs are easy to produce, effective and stable in the aquatic environment. However, their biophysical features showed wide variations according to the botanical agent using for the green synthesis, outlining the importance of screening local floral resources used as reducing and stabilizing agents. In this study, we focused on the biophysical properties and the mosquitocidal action of Quisqualis indica-fabricated AgNPs. AgNPs were characterized using spectroscopic (UV, FTIR, XRD) and microscopic (AFM, SEM, TEM and EDX) techniques. AFM, SEM and TEM confirmed the synthesis of poly-dispersed AgNPs with spherical shape and size ranging from 1 to 30nm. XRD shed light on the crystalline structure of these AgNPs. The acute toxicity of Quisqualis indica extract and AgNPs was evaluated against malaria, arbovirus, and filariasis vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, as well as on three important non-target aquatic organisms. The Q. indica leaf extract showed moderate larvicidal effectiveness on Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=220.42), Ae. aegypti (LC50=203.63) and An. stephensi (LC50=185.98). Q. indica-fabricated AgNPs showed high toxicity against Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=14.63), Ae. aegypti (LC50=13.55) and An. stephensi (LC50=12.52), respectively. Notably, Q. indica-synthesized AgNPs were moderately toxic to non-target aquatic mosquito predators Anisops bouvieri (LC50=653.05μg/mL), Diplonychus indicus (LC50=860.94μg/mL) and Gambusia affinis (LC50=2183.16μg/mL), if compared to the targeted mosquitoes. Overall, the

  5. AB115. Effects of target gene expression on ex vivo differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells transfected by lentiviral vector with PDE5 of short hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Heng-Jun; Yan, Weixin; Chen, Jun; Gao, Xin; Zhuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of PDE5 in ex vivo differentiation of gene-modified BM-MSCs using the lentiviral vector containing silencing target gene PDE5 of shRNA. Methods SD rat bone marrow-derived MSCs were separated, cultured and purified in vitro by Percoll density gradient centrifugation combined with adherent culture. The third passage rat BM-MSCs were obtained, and were identified by cell surface markers with flow cytometry (FCM). The lentiviral vector carrying silencing target gene PDE5 of shRNA was constructed and then transfected into the third passage rat BM-MSCs. The gene-modified rat BM-MSCs were induced to differentiate into smooth muscle-like cells exposed to VEGF and b-FGF media in vitro. The proliferative ability of these cells was tested by cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8). Smooth muscle-like cells differentiation was assessed by immunofluorescence and then subjected to immunocytochemistry for specific markers of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis for PDE5 gene expression in differentiated smooth muscle-like cells were carried out. Results After the conducted lentiviral vector containing PDE5-shRNA was transfected into rat BM-MSCs, the expression of EGFP was detected at 24 h and it became the strongest at 72 h, which FCM showed the transfection efficiency was 91.3% at this time. The EGFP expression rates of rat BM-MSCs transfected with PDE5-shRNA at 3 d, 7 d, 14 d after transduction were 91.3%, 86.1%, and 82.7%, respectively. There was still visible green fluorescence at 28 d after transfection. The gene-modified rat BM-MSCs with PDE5-shRNA were successfully induced to differentiate into smooth muscle-like cells. Transduction of the lentiviral vector PDE5-shRNA into rat BM-MSCs led to down-regulation of PDE5. The expression of PDE5 was reduced 67.2% by PDE5-shRNA compared with the control lentiviral vector. The proliferative property of rat BM-MSCs did not

  6. Targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons in the rat brain by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles that contain either a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C-GDNF or a gC-BDNF protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Sun, Mei; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into neurons has potential for both studying neuronal physiology and for developing gene therapy treatments for specific neurological conditions. Due to the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, cell-type-specific recombinant gene expression is required for many potential applications of neuronal gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell-type-specific expression are to use a cell-type-specific promoter to control recombinant gene expression or to modify a virus vector particle to target gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer to multiple peripheral cell types has been described, but targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron in the brain has yet to be reported. Targeted gene transfer approaches with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors have focused on modifying glycoprotein C (gC) to remove the heparin binding domain and add a binding activity for a specific protein on the cell surface. This study was designed to develop HSV-1 vectors that target gene transfer to cells that contain receptors for either glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), such as nigrostriatal neurons. We isolated chimeric gC-GDNF or chimeric gC-BDNF constructs, and the resulting proteins were incorporated into HSV-1 virus particles. We performed helper virus-free HSV-1 vector packaging in the presence of each chimeric protein. The resulting vector stocks supported 2.2- to 5.0-fold targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons in the rat brain, compared to vector particles that contained wild-type (wt) gC. Gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons by vector particles that contained chimeric gC-BDNF was reduced by preincubation with an anti-BDNF antibody. Targeted gene transfer to neurons that contain specific neurotrophic factor receptors may benefit specific physiological and gene therapy studies. PMID:15993510

  7. Targeted transgene insertion into the CHO cell genome using Cre recombinase-incorporating integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Takuya; Huang, Shuohao; Imanishi, Suguru; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2016-07-01

    Retroviral vectors have served as efficient gene delivery tools in various biotechnology fields. However, viral DNA is randomly inserted into the genome, which can cause problems, such as insertional mutagenesis and gene silencing. Previously, we reported a site-specific gene integration system, in which a transgene is integrated into a predetermined chromosomal locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using integrase-defective retroviral vectors (IDRVs) and Cre recombinase. In this system, a Cre expression plasmid is transfected into founder cells before retroviral transduction. In practical applications of site-specific gene modification such as for hard-to-transfect cells or for in vivo gene delivery, both the transgene and the Cre protein into retroviral virions should be encapsulate. Here, we generated novel hybrid IDRVs in which viral genome and enzymatically active Cre can be delivered (Cre-IDRVs). Cre-IDRVs encoding marker genes, neomycin resistance and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), flanked by wild-type and mutated loxP sites were produced using an expression plasmid for a chimeric protein of Cre and retroviral gag-pol. After analyzing the incorporation of the Cre protein into retroviral virions by Western blotting, the Cre-IDRV was infected into founder CHO cells, in which marker genes (hygromycin resistance and red fluorescent protein) flanked with corresponding loxP sites are introduced into the genome. G418-resistant colonies expressing GFP appeared and the site-specific integration of the transgene into the expected chromosomal site was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Moreover, when Cre-IDRV carried a gene expression unit for a recombinant antibody, the recombinant cells in which the antibody expression cassette was integrated in a site-specific manner were generated and the cells produced the recombinant antibody. This method may provide a promising tool to perform site-specific gene modification according to Cre

  8. Viral Vector Based Improvement of Optic Nerve Regeneration: Characterization of Individual Axons’ Growth Patterns and Synaptogenesis in a Visual Target

    PubMed Central

    Yungher, Benjamin J.; Luo, Xueting; Salgueiro, Yadira; Blackmore, Murray G.; Park, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Lack of axon growth ability in the central nervous system poses a major barrier to achieving functional connectivity after injury. Thus, a non-transgenic regenerative approach to reinnervating targets has important implications in clinical and research settings. Previous studies using knockout (KO) mice have demonstrated long distance axon regeneration. Using an optic nerve injury model, here we evaluate the efficacy of viral, RNAi and pharmacological approaches that target the PTEN and STAT3 pathways to improve long distance axon regeneration in wild type (WT) mice. Our data show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PTEN (shPTEN) enhances retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration after crush injury. However, compared to the previous data in PTEN KO mice, AAV-shRNA results in a lesser degree of regeneration, likely due to incomplete gene silencing inherent to RNAi. In comparison, an extensive enhancement in regeneration is seen when AAV-shPTEN is coupled to AAV encoding ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and to a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analogue, allowing axons to travel long distances and reach their target. We apply whole tissue imaging that facilitates three-dimensional visualization of single regenerating axons and document heterogeneous terminal patterns in the targets. This shows that some axonal populations generate extensive arbors and make synapses with the target neurons. Collectively, we show a combinatorial viral RNAi and pharmacological strategy that improves long distance regeneration in WT animals and provide single fiber projection data that indicates a degree of preservation of target recognition. PMID:26005861

  9. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR1-containing neurons in rat neocortex by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles containing a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C--Staphylococcus A protein

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, and especially the forebrain, cell type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell type-specific expression are using a cell type-specific promoter or targeting gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors modifies glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which binds to many cell types, with a binding activity for a specific cell surface protein. We previously reported targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons using chimeric gC--glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or gC--brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to cells that express the cognate receptor for either neurotrophic factor. Thus, a general strategy for targeting gene transfer to many different types of neurons is desirable. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer has been developed for targeting specific virus vectors to specific peripheral cell types; a specific vector particle protein is modified to contain the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. Here, we report antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of HSV-1 vectors to a specific type of forebrain neuron. We constructed a chimeric gC--ZZ protein, and showed this protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds Ig G. Complexes of these vector particles and an antibody to the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit supported targeted gene transfer to NR1-containing neocortical neurons in the rat brain, with long-term (2 months) expression. PMID:20599821

  10. Singular vector-based targeted observations of chemical constituents: description and first application of the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goris, N.; Elbern, H.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the large-dimensional chemical state of the atmosphere provide only sparse snapshots of the state of the system due to their typically insufficient temporal and spatial density. In order to optimize the measurement configurations despite those limitations, the present work describes the identification of sensitive states of the chemical system as optimal target areas for adaptive observations. For this purpose, the technique of singular vector analysis (SVA), which has proven effective for targeted observations in numerical weather prediction, is implemented in the EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) chemical transport model, yielding the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0. Besides initial values, emissions are investigated as critical simulation controlling targeting variables. For both variants, singular vectors are applied to determine the optimal placement for observations and moreover to quantify which chemical compounds have to be observed with preference. Based on measurements of the airship based ZEPTER-2 campaign, the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0 has been evaluated by conducting a comprehensive set of model runs involving different initial states and simulation lengths. For the sake of brevity, we concentrate our attention on the following chemical compounds, O3, NO, NO2, HCHO, CO, HONO, and OH, and focus on their influence on selected O3 profiles. Our analysis shows that the optimal placement for observations of chemical species is not entirely determined by mere transport and mixing processes. Rather, a combination of initial chemical concentrations, chemical conversions, and meteorological processes determines the influence of chemical compounds and regions. We furthermore demonstrate that the optimal placement of observations of emission strengths is highly dependent on the location of emission sources and that the benefit of including emissions as target variables outperforms the value of initial value optimization with growing

  11. Multi-functional self-fluorescent unimolecular micelles for tumor-targeted drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojun; Wang, Liwei; Cordie, Travis; Vokoun, Corinne; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-04-01

    A novel type of self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle nanoparticle (NP) formed by multi-arm star amphiphilic block copolymer, Boltron® H40 (H40, a 4th generation hyperbranched polymer)-biodegradable photo-luminescent polymer (BPLP)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated with cRGD peptide (i.e., H40-BPLP-PEG-cRGD) was designed, synthesized, and characterized. The hydrophobic BPLP segment was self-fluorescent, thereby making the unimolecular micelle NP self-fluorescent. cRGD peptides, which can effectively target αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumor neovasculature and tumor cells, were selectively conjugated onto the surface of the micelles to offer active tumor-targeting ability. This unique self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle exhibited excellent photostability and low cytotoxicity, making it an attractive bioimaging probe for NP tracking for a variety of microscopy techniques including fluorescent microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and two-photon microscopy. Moreover, this self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle NP also demonstrated excellent stability in aqueous solutions due to its covalent nature, high drug loading level, pH-controlled drug release, and passive and active tumor-targeting abilities, thereby making it a promising nanoplatform for targeted cancer theranostics. PMID:25682159

  12. Multi-Functional Self-Fluorescent Unimolecular Micelles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery and Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guojun; Wang, Liwei; Cordie, Travis; Vokoun, Corinne; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle nanoparticle (NP) formed by multi-arm star amphiphilic block copolymer, Boltron® H40 (H40, a 4th generation hyperbranched polymer)-biodegradable photo-luminescent polymer (BPLP)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated with cRGD peptide (i.e., H40-BPLP-PEG-cRGD) was designed, synthesized, and characterized. The hydrophobic BPLP segment was self-fluorescent, thereby making the unimolecular micelle NP self-fluorescent. cRGD peptides, which can effectively target αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumor neovasculature and tumor cells, were selectively conjugated onto the surface of the micelles to offer active tumor-targeting ability. This unique self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle exhibited excellent photostability and low cytotoxicity, making it an attractive bioimaging probe for NP tracking for a variety of microscopy techniques including fluorescent microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and two-photon microscopy. Moreover, this self-fluorescent unimolecular micelle NP also demonstrated excellent stability in aqueous solutions due to its covalent nature, high drug loading level, pH-controlled drug release, and passive and active tumor-targeting abilities, thereby making it a promising nanoplatform for targeted cancer theranostics. PMID:25682159

  13. A potential peptide vector that allows targeted delivery of a desired fusion protein into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI QING; YANG, JUN; HONG, MIN; GAO, CHANG E.; DONG, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of breast cancer has been primarily hampered by a lack of tumor specificity in treatments. One potential way to improve targeting specificity is to develop novel vectors that specifically bind to and are internalized by tumor cells. Through a phage display library, an 11-L-amino acid peptide, PI (sequence, CASPSGALRSC), was selected. PI was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and named PI-FITC. Subsequently, the specific affinity of PI-FITC to MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and other cancer cell lines was observed by confocal microscopy. Our previous study established that PI-FITC also shows affinity to Calu-1 human lung carcinoma cells and major histocompatibility complex class I antigen molecules; therefore, the cytomembrane proteins of the cell lines were analyzed to determine those that were common to the two cell lines and may be associated with transmembrane transduction. To further test the delivery ability of PI to MDA-MB-231 cells, PI-glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was constructed and the internalization of this fusion protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that PI exhibited specific affinity to MDA-MB-231 cells. Use of membrane transport inhibitors indicated that macropinocytosis and caveolin-mediated endocytosis may be involved in the endocytosis of PI. In addition, 11 membrane proteins common to MDA-MB-231 and Calu-1 may be associated with transmembrane transduction. In summary, PI was able to deliver PI-GST into MDA-MB-231 cells. Thus, PI could be modified to be a potential vector, and may contribute to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies for breast cancer. PMID:27313722

  14. Development of a screening tool to assess the temporal risk of pesticides leaching to groundwater using the source, target, vector approach. An Irish case study for shallow groundwater.

    PubMed

    Labite, Herve E; Cummins, Enda

    2015-03-01

    During this study, a groundwater screening tool was developed to assess the temporal risk of groundwater contamination from the use of pesticides. It is based on a source, vector, target approach. The method utilised in this study uses a semi-quantitative probabilistic risk assessment where the input parameters were classified and assigned a relative score from 1 to 5 (i.e. 1 = no risk and 5 = high risk). The model was parameterised by using national data and calibrated with 2 years of national pesticide groundwater monitoring data. After calibration, two specific sites were selected for model validation. Based on the presence of the source, vector and target, the evaluation indicated that the temporal risk is site specific (i.e. May to December for the country model, June to September for the Oak Park site and September for the Castledockrell site). A sensitivity analysis performed on the national scale revealed that the groundwater vulnerability category (gv), the clay content (cc%), the persistence of pesticides in soil (DT50) and the rainfall represented by wet day (wd) were the most important parameters that affected model predictions (correlation coefficients of 0.54, -0.39, 0.35 and 0.31, respectively), highlighting the importance of soil hydrogeological conditions, soil type and rainfall in influencing water model predictions. The model developed can help to identify the temporal risk from pesticides to groundwater and guide regulators in highlighting at-risk periods, therefore allowing more focused monitoring programmes. PMID:25663403

  15. DsRNA-mediated targeting of ribosomal transcripts RPS6 and RPL26 induces long-lasting and significant reductions in fecundity of the vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Estep, A S; Sanscrainte, N D; Becnel, J J

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal transcripts produce critical proteins that are involved in most cellular production processes. Targeting ribosomal transcripts has produced mortality in mites and ticks but the effect of ribosomal transcript knockdown has not been thoroughly examined in mosquitoes. We examine the effects of triggers targeting four ribosomal proteins (RP) transcripts. Although no significant mortality was observed after dsRNA microinjection and subsequent blood feeding, significant contrasts were observed on fecundity. Triggers targeting RPS6 and RPL26 effectively reduced gene expression but more importantly, reduced reproductive output by more than 96% and 91% at the first oviposition while triggers targeting RPL1 and RPS2 did not cause a reduction although gene expression was reduced. Significantly reduced fecundity continued through a second oviposition cycle in dsRPS6 and dsRPL26 cohorts, although the effect was not as strong. Relative gene expression levels confirmed specific transcript knockdown up to 20days post-injection in mosquitoes that did not oviposit or produced reduced clutch sizes. Dissections at 36h post-blood meal indicated defects in oocyte provisioning. The strong phenotype produced by dsRPS6 allowed us to examine the effects in various tissues as well as the dose response, trigger format, delivery method and trigger specificity in Aedes aegypti. Strong knockdown was observed in the abdomen and the ovaries. Greater than 50ng of dsRPS6 significantly reduced fecundity but not when delivered in a sugar meal or as an siRNA. Similar bioassays with mutated dsRPS6 triggers indicates that up to three mismatches per possible siRNA are still effective in reducing fecundity. These studies indicate that while active and effective triggers can be developed for vector species, the lack of an efficient delivery method is the biggest barrier to use as a potential control method. PMID:27180677

  16. Target-specific support vector machine scoring in structure-based virtual screening: computational validation, in vitro testing in kinases, and effects on lung cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liwei; Khanna, May; Jo, Inha; Wang, Fang; Ashpole, Nicole M; Hudmon, Andy; Meroueh, Samy O

    2011-04-25

    We assess the performance of our previously reported structure-based support vector machine target-specific scoring function across 41 targets, 40 among them from the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD). The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic plots (ROC-AUC) revealed that scoring with SVM-SP resulted in consistently better enrichment over all target families, outperforming Glide and other scoring functions, most notably among kinases. In addition, SVM-SP performance showed little variation among protein classes, exhibited excellent performance in a test case using a homology model, and in some cases showed high enrichment even with few structures used to train a model. We put SVM-SP to the test by virtual screening 1125 compounds against two kinases, EGFR and CaMKII. Among the top 25 EGFR compounds, three compounds (1-3) inhibited kinase activity in vitro with IC₅₀ of 58, 2, and 10 μM. In cell cultures, compounds 1-3 inhibited nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (H1299) cancer cell proliferation with similar IC₅₀ values for compound 3. For CaMKII, one compound inhibited kinase activity in a dose-dependent manner among 20 tested with an IC₅₀ of 48 μM. These results are encouraging given that our in-house library consists of compounds that emerged from virtual screening of other targets with pockets that are different from typical ATP binding sites found in kinases. In light of the importance of kinases in chemical biology, these findings could have implications in future efforts to identify chemical probes of kinases within the human kinome. PMID:21438548

  17. Cellular Targeting of Engineered Heterologous Antigens Is a Determinant Factor for Bovine Herpesvirus 4-Based Vaccine Vector Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Taddei, Simone; Sartori, Chiara; Bonomini, Sabrina; Cavirani, Sandro; Cabassi, Clotilde S.; Flammini, Cesidio F.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, an apathogenic strain of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome and expressing a chimeric peptide (gE2/gD) as a secreted form was described. Recombinant virus-inoculated animals produced antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) gE2 and BoHV-1 gD. However, neutralizing antibodies were produced only against BVDV, not against BoHV-1. In the present work a recombinant BoHV-4 expressing a membrane-linked form of gE2/gD chimeric peptide was constructed, and inoculated rabbits produced serum-neutralizing antibodies against both BVDV and BoHV-1. Protein cell sorting and targeting are a very important issue when immunodominant antigens are engineered for recombinant virus vaccine development. PMID:19793901

  18. Study on galactose-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lysine) as novel gene vector for targeting hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-mei; Zhang, Xuan; Zhong, Nv-qi; Pan, Shi-rong

    2012-01-01

    A non-viral gene-delivery system has been used to deliver plasmid DNA into specific cell types because of its safety and ease of manufacture. Receptor-mediated gene transfer is currently a promising gene-delivery technique. To specifically target genes to asialoglycoprotein receptor of hepatocytes, a galactose moiety was combined into the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-terminal end by reductive coupling using lactose and sodium cyanoborohydride. A synthesis method of conjugating poly(L-lysine) (PLL) derivatives with terminally galactose-graft-PEG was developed using ring-opening polymerization of N(ε)-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine-N(α)-carboxyan-hydride (Z-Lys-NCA) initiated onto galactose graft amine-terminated PEG (galactose-PEG-NH₂) as a macro-initiator. The synthesis was characterized with ¹H-, ¹³C-NMR, IR and UV spectroscopy, and all of them successfully verified the formation of the co-polymers. The gel-retardation assay of the complexes between galactose-PEG-PLL and plasmid DNA indicated that these polymeric gene carriers demonstrated the potent ability to condense plasmid DNA electrostatically as well as PLL. The particle size and zeta potential of polymer/DNA complexes were measured, and their cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in different cells were evaluated. The results indicate that galactose-PEG-PLL can form a complex with plasmid DNA and serve as an effective gene-delivery carrier with lower cytotoxicity compared to that of PLL. Transfection experiments clearly showed that galactose-PEG-PLL effectively delivered DNA into hepatoma cells in vitro. Such data demonstrates that galactose and its complex with plasmid DNA may serve as a safe and effective gene-transfer system targeting hepatocytes. PMID:21375808

  19. Identification of potential stroke targets by lentiviral vector mediated overexpression of HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha in a primary neuronal model of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ralph, G S; Parham, S; Lee, S R; Beard, G L; Craigon, M H; Ward, N; White, J R; Barber, R D; Rayner, W; Kingsman, S M; Mundy, C R; Mazarakis, N D; Krige, D

    2004-02-01

    The identification of genes differentially regulated by ischemia will lead to an improved understanding of cell death pathways such as those involved in the neuronal loss observed following a stroke. Furthermore, the characterization of such pathways could facilitate the identification of novel targets for stroke therapy. We have used a novel approach to amplify differential gene expression patterns in a primary neuronal model of stroke by employing a lentiviral vector system to specifically bias the transcriptional activation of hypoxically regulated genes. Overexpression of the hypoxia-induced transcription factor subunits HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha elevated hypoxia-mediated transcription of many known HIF-regulated genes well above control levels. Furthermore, many potentially novel HIF-regulated genes were discovered that were not previously identified as hypoxically regulated. Most of the novel genes identified were activated by a combination of HIF-2 alpha overexpression and hypoxic insult. These included several genes with particular importance in cell survival pathways and of potential therapeutic value. Hypoxic induction of HIF-2 alpha may therefore be a critical factor in mediating protective responses against ischemic injury. Further investigation of the genes identified in this study may provide increased understanding of the neuronal response to hypoxia and may uncover novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cerebral ischemia. PMID:14747751

  20. Dopamine-dependent neurodegeneration in rats induced by viral vector-mediated overexpression of the parkin target protein, CDCrel-1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhizhong; Ferger, Boris; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Vogel, Denise; Furler, Sven; Osinde, Maribel; Feldon, Joram; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to autosomal-recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). Parkin functions as a ubiquitin protein ligase in the degradation of several proteins, including the neuron-specific septin CDCrel-1. AR-JP-associated parkin mutations inhibit ubiquitination and degradation of CDCrel-1 and other parkin target proteins. Here we show that recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated CDCrel-1 gene transfer to the substantia nigra of rats results in a rapid onset (6-10 days) of nigral and striatal CDCrel-1 expression that is followed by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a decline of the striatal dopamine levels. In contrast, neurons of the globus pallidus are spared from CDCrel-1 toxicity. Furthermore, CDCrel-1 inhibits the release of dopamine from stably-transfected PC12 cells, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine synthesis in rats prevents CDCrel-1-induced nigral neurodegeneration. These results show that CDCrel-1 overexpression exerts dopamine-dependent neurotoxicity and suggest that inhibition of dopamine secretion by CDCrel-1 may contribute to the development of AR-JP. PMID:14530399

  1. SU-E-J-115: Correlation of Displacement Vector Fields Calculated by Deformable Image Registration Algorithms with Motion Parameters of CT Images with Well-Defined Targets and Controlled-Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskowiak, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I; Alsbou, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate correlation of displacement vector fields (DVF) calculated by deformable image registration algorithms with motion parameters in helical axial and cone-beam CT images with motion artifacts. Methods: A mobile thorax phantom with well-known targets with different sizes that were made from water-equivalent material and inserted in foam to simulate lung lesions. The thorax phantom was imaged with helical, axial and cone-beam CT. The phantom was moved with a cyclic motion with different motion amplitudes and frequencies along the superior-inferior direction. Different deformable image registration algorithms including demons, fast demons, Horn-Shunck and iterative-optical-flow from the DIRART software were used to deform CT images for the phantom with different motion patterns. The CT images of the mobile phantom were deformed to CT images of the stationary phantom. Results: The values of displacement vectors calculated by deformable image registration algorithm correlated strongly with motion amplitude where large displacement vectors were calculated for CT images with large motion amplitudes. For example, the maximal displacement vectors were nearly equal to the motion amplitudes (5mm, 10mm or 20mm) at interfaces between the mobile targets lung tissue, while the minimal displacement vectors were nearly equal to negative the motion amplitudes. The maximal and minimal displacement vectors matched with edges of the blurred targets along the Z-axis (motion-direction), while DVF’s were small in the other directions. This indicates that the blurred edges by phantom motion were shifted largely to match with the actual target edge. These shifts were nearly equal to the motion amplitude. Conclusions: The DVF from deformable-image registration algorithms correlated well with motion amplitude of well-defined mobile targets. This can be used to extract motion parameters such as amplitude. However, as motion amplitudes increased, image artifacts increased

  2. Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle targeting demonstrates a requirement for single-minded during larval and pupal olfactory system development of the vector mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Essentially nothing is known about the genetic regulation of olfactory system development in vector mosquitoes, which use olfactory cues to detect blood meal hosts. Studies in Drosophila melanogaster have identified a regulatory matrix of transcription factors that controls pupal/adult odorant receptor (OR) gene expression in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). However, it is unclear if transcription factors that function in the D. melanogaster regulatory matrix are required for OR expression in mosquitoes. Furthermore, the regulation of OR expression during development of the larval olfactory system, which is far less complex than that of pupae/adults, is not well understood in any insect, including D. melanogaster. Here, we examine the regulation of OR expression in the developing larval olfactory system of Aedes aegypti, the dengue vector mosquito. Results A. aegypti bears orthologs of eight transcription factors that regulate OR expression in D. melanogaster pupae/adults. These transcription factors are expressed in A. aegypti larval antennal sensory neurons, and consensus binding sites for these transcription factors reside in the 5’ flanking regions of A. aegypti OR genes. Consensus binding sites for Single-minded (Sim) are located adjacent to over half the A. aegypti OR genes, suggesting that this transcription factor functions as a major regulator of mosquito OR expression. To functionally test this hypothesis, chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were used to target sim during larval olfactory development. These experiments demonstrated that Sim positively regulates expression of a large subset of OR genes, including orco, the obligate co-receptor in the assembly and function of heteromeric OR/Orco complexes. Decreased innervation of the antennal lobe was also noted in sim knockdown larvae. These OR expression and antennal lobe defects correlated with a larval odorant tracking behavioral defect. OR expression and antennal lobe defects were also

  3. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    SciTech Connect

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

  4. Carbon and silver nanoparticles in the fight against the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus: genotoxicity and impact on behavioral traits of non-target aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Nataraj, Devaraj; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Sujitha, Vasu; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandirasekar, Ramachandran; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Suresh, Udaiyan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Paulpandi, Manickam; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Wei, Hui; Syuhei, Ban; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. The Culex genus, with special reference to Culex quinquefasciatus, comprises the most common vectors of filariasis across urban and semi-urban areas of Asia. In recent years, important efforts have been conducted to propose green-synthesized nanoparticles as a valuable alternative to synthetic insecticides. However, the mosquitocidal potential of carbon nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this study, the larvicidal and pupicidal activity of carbon nanoparticle (CNP) and silver nanoparticle (AgNP) was tested against Cx. quinquefasciatus. UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, and Raman analysis confirmed the rapid and cheap synthesis of carbon and silver nanoparticles. In laboratory assays, LC50 (lethal concentration that kills 50 % of the exposed organisms) values ranged from 8.752 ppm (first-instar larvae) to 18.676 ppm (pupae) for silver nanoparticles and from 6.373 ppm (first-instar larvae) to 14.849 ppm (pupae) for carbon nanoparticles. The predation efficiency of the water bug Lethocerus indicus after a single treatment with low doses of silver and carbon nanoparticles was not reduced. Moderate evidence of genotoxic effects induced by exposure to carbon nanoparticles was found on non-target goldfish, Carassius auratus. Lastly, the plant extract used for silver nanosynthesis was tested for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activity. Overall, our results pointed out that AgNP and CNP can be a candidate for effective tools to reduce larval and pupal populations of filariasis vectors, with reduced genotoxicity and impact on behavioral traits of other aquatic organisms sharing the same ecological

  5. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by the polyamine-vectorized anti-cancer drug F14512 targeting topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Brel, Viviane; Annereau, Jean-Philippe; Vispé, Stéphane; Kruczynski, Anna; Bailly, Christian; Guilbaud, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The polyamines transport system (PTS) is usually enhanced in cancer cells and can be exploited to deliver anticancer drugs. The spermine-conjugated epipodophyllotoxin derivative F14512 is a topoisomerase II poison that exploits the PTS to target preferentially tumor cells. F14512 has been characterized as a potent anticancer drug candidate and is currently in phase 1 clinical trials. Here we have analyzed the mechanisms of cell death induced by F14512, compared to the parent drug etoposide lacking the polyamine tail. F14512 proved to be >30-fold more cytotoxic than etoposide against A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells and triggers less but unrecoverable DNA damages. The cytotoxic action of F14512 is extremely rapid (within 3 h) and does not lead to a marked accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, unlike etoposide. Interestingly, A549 cells treated with F14512 were less prone to undergo apoptosis (neither caspases-dependent nor caspases-independent pathways) or autophagy but preferentially entered into senescence. Drug-induced senescence was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by an increased β-galactosidase activity, both by cytochemical staining and by flow cytometry. A morphological analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous multi-lamellar and vesicular bodies and large electron-lucent (methuosis-like) vacuoles in F14512-treated cell samples. The mechanism of drug-induced cell death is thus distinct for F14512 compared to etoposide, and this difference may account for their distinct pharmacological profiles and the markedly superior activity of F14512 in vivo. This study suggests that senescence markers should be considered as potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers of F14512 antitumor activity. PMID:21924246

  6. Intravitreal delivery of a novel AAV vector targets ON bipolar cells and restores visual function in a mouse model of complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Scalabrino, Miranda L; Boye, Sanford L; Fransen, Kathryn M H; Noel, Jennifer M; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; De Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Gregg, Ronald G; McCall, Maureen A; Peachey, Neal S; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) effectively targets therapeutic genes to photoreceptors, pigment epithelia, Müller glia and ganglion cells of the retina. To date, no one has shown the ability to correct, with gene replacement, an inherent defect in bipolar cells (BCs), the excitatory interneurons of the retina. Targeting BCs with gene replacement has been difficult primarily due to the relative inaccessibility of BCs to standard AAV vectors. This approach would be useful for restoration of vision in patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1), where signaling through the ON BCs is eliminated due to mutations in their G-protein-coupled cascade genes. For example, the majority of CSNB1 patients carry a mutation in nyctalopin (NYX), which encodes a protein essential for proper localization of the TRPM1 cation channel required for ON BC light-evoked depolarization. As a group, CSNB1 patients have a normal electroretinogram (ERG) a-wave, indicative of photoreceptor function, but lack a b-wave due to defects in ON BC signaling. Despite retinal dysfunction, the retinas of CSNB1 patients do not degenerate. The Nyx(nob) mouse model of CSNB1 faithfully mimics this phenotype. Here, we show that intravitreally injected, rationally designed AAV2(quadY-F+T-V) containing a novel 'Ple155' promoter drives either GFP or YFP_Nyx in postnatal Nyx(nob) mice. In treated Nyx(nob) retina, robust and targeted Nyx transgene expression in ON BCs partially restored the ERG b-wave and, at the cellular level, signaling in ON BCs. Our results support the potential for gene delivery to BCs and gene replacement therapy in human CSNB1. PMID:26310623

  7. Integrin-targeting thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for combined cancer imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mi Kyung; Park, Jinho; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Jon, Sangyong

    2010-10-01

    We report multifunctional nanoparticles that are capable of cancer targeting and simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy. The nanoparticles are composed of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide ligand bioconjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) that enable loading of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox). The cyclic RGD-conjugated TCL-SPION (cRGD_TCL-SPION) had a mean hydrodynamic size of 34 ± 8 nm with approximately 0.39 wt% of cyclic RGD attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. The cRGD_TCL-SPION exhibited preferential binding towards target cancer cells (U87MG, integrin αvβ3 +) when analyzed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. When Dox was loaded onto the polymeric coating layers of cRGD_TCL-SPION via ionic interaction, the resulting Dox-loaded cRGD_TCL-SPION (Dox@cRGD_TCL-SPION) showed much higher cytotoxicity in U87MG cells than Dox@TCL-SPION lacking cRGD (IC50 value of 0.02 µM versus 0.12 µM). These results suggest that Dox@cRGD_TCL-SPION has potential for use as an integrin-targeted, combined imaging and therapeutic agent.

  8. Enhanced nigrostriatal neuron-specific, long-term expression by using neural-specific promoters in combination with targeted gene transfer by modified helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Geller, Alfred I

    2008-01-01

    Background Direct gene transfer into neurons has potential for developing gene therapy treatments for specific neurological conditions, and for elucidating neuronal physiology. Due to the complex cellular composition of specific brain areas, neuronal type-specific recombinant gene expression is required for many potential applications of neuronal gene transfer. One approach is to target gene transfer to a specific type of neuron. We developed modified Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) particles that contain chimeric glycoprotein C (gC) – glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) proteins. HSV-1 vector particles containing either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF target gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons, which contain specific receptors for GDNF or BDNF. A second approach to achieve neuronal type-specific expression is to use a cell type-specific promoter, and we have used the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter to restrict expression to catecholaminergic neurons or a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to restrict expression to neurons, and both of these promoters support long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors. To both improve nigrostriatal-neuron specific expression, and to establish that targeted gene transfer can be followed by long-term expression, we performed targeted gene transfer with vectors that support long-term, neuronal-specific expression. Results Helper virus-free HSV-1 vector packaging was performed using either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF and vectors that contain either the TH promoter or the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. Vector stocks were injected into the midbrain proximal to the substantia nigra, and the rats were sacrificed at either 4 days or 1 month after gene transfer. Immunofluorescent costaining was performed to detect both recombinant gene products and nigrostriatal neurons. The combination of targeted gene transfer with neuronal-specific promoters improved nigrostriatal

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi: specific detection of parasites by PCR in infected humans and vectors using a set of primers (BP1/BP2) targeted to a nuclear DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Silber, A M; Búa, J; Porcel, B M; Segura, E L; Ruiz, A M

    1997-03-01

    In the present work we evaluate Trypanosoma cruzi DNA detection by PCR using the nuclear oligonucleotides BP1/BP2 as primers. These primers are targeted to the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region for the flagellar protein F29. An amplification product of BP1/BP2 is a DNA band 692 bp long. Titration assays were performed to evaluate the minimum amount of parasite DNA that can be detected by this assay, resulting in 10 fg (equivalent to about 1/20 of the genome). The assay was also performed using T. cruzi DNA from different strains, clones, and human-derived isolates obtaining, in all cases, amplification products. No DNA amplification was observed when the PCR was performed using DNA from Leishmania braziliensis, but when T. rangeli DNA was used, a 615-bp-long fragment was amplified. Under appropriate gel conditions T. cruzi and T. rangeli DNA amplicons could be differentiated. When both conventional xenodiagnosis and PCR detection of parasite DNA in the feces of insect vectors fed with blood from infected patients were compared, 10 of 20 samples were positive by both techniques. However, 2 other samples with positive serology were also positive by PCR. When PCR was performed on blood samples from infected and uninfected individuals, 62 of 65 serologically positive human samples amplified the BP1/BP2 692-bp T. cruzi DNA fragment (sensitivity >95%). The 3 negative samples were positive when Southern blot hybridization was performed using the radiolabeled PCR amplification product as probe (sensitivity 100%). PMID:9085919

  10. Participatory mapping of target areas to enable operational larval source management to suppress malaria vector mosquitoes in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Dongus, Stefan; Nyika, Dickson; Kannady, Khadija; Mtasiwa, Deo; Mshinda, Hassan; Fillinger, Ulrike; Drescher, Axel W; Tanner, Marcel; Castro, Marcia C; Killeen, Gerry F

    2007-01-01

    Background Half of the population of Africa will soon live in towns and cities where it can be protected from malaria by controlling aquatic stages of mosquitoes. Rigorous but affordable and scaleable methods for mapping and managing mosquito habitats are required to enable effective larval control in urban Africa. Methods A simple community-based mapping procedure that requires no electronic devices in the field was developed to facilitate routine larval surveillance in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The mapping procedure included (1) community-based development of sketch maps and (2) verification of sketch maps through technical teams using laminated aerial photographs in the field which were later digitized and analysed using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Results Three urban wards of Dar es Salaam were comprehensively mapped, covering an area of 16.8 km2. Over thirty percent of this area were not included in preliminary community-based sketch mapping, mostly because they were areas that do not appear on local government residential lists. The use of aerial photographs and basic GIS allowed rapid identification and inclusion of these key areas, as well as more equal distribution of the workload of malaria control field staff. Conclusion The procedure developed enables complete coverage of targeted areas with larval control through comprehensive spatial coverage with community-derived sketch maps. The procedure is practical, affordable, and requires minimal technical skills. This approach can be readily integrated into malaria vector control programmes, scaled up to towns and cities all over Tanzania and adapted to urban settings elsewhere in Africa. PMID:17784963

  11. Treatment of hypophosphatasia by muscle-directed expression of bone-targeted alkaline phosphatase via self-complementary AAV8 vector

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura-Takahashi, Aki; Miyake, Koichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hirai, Yukihiko; Iijima, Osamu; Miyake, Noriko; Adachi, Kumi; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Noguchi, Taku; Abe, Shinichi; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose Luis; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited disease caused by genetic mutations in the gene encoding tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). This results in defects in bone and tooth mineralization. We recently demonstrated that TNALP-deficient (Akp2−/−) mice, which mimic the phenotype of the severe infantile form of HPP, can be treated by intravenous injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing bone-targeted TNALP with deca-aspartates at the C-terminus (TNALP-D10) driven by the tissue-nonspecific CAG promoter. To develop a safer and more clinically applicable transduction strategy for HPP gene therapy, we constructed a self-complementary type 8 AAV (scAAV8) vector that expresses TNALP-D10 via the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter (scAAV8-MCK-TNALP-D10) and examined the efficacy of muscle-directed gene therapy. When scAAV8-MCK-TNALP-D10 was injected into the bilateral quadriceps of neonatal Akp2−/− mice, the treated mice grew well and survived for more than 3 months, with a healthy appearance and normal locomotion. Improved bone architecture, but limited elongation of the long bone, was demonstrated on X-ray images. Micro-CT analysis showed hypomineralization and abnormal architecture of the trabecular bone in the epiphysis. These results suggest that rAAV-mediated, muscle-specific expression of TNALP-D10 represents a safe and practical option to treat the severe infantile form of HPP. PMID:26904710

  12. Silencing of hepatitis C virus replication by a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles containing a shRNA targeted to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES).

    PubMed

    Torrecilla, Josune; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Apaolaza, Paola S; Berzal-Herranz, Beatriz; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    Gene silencing mediated by RNAi has gained increasing interest as an alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases such as refractory hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this work we have designed and evaluated a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) bearing hyaluronic acid, protamine and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA74) targeted to the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) of the HCV. The vector was able to inhibit the expression of the HCV IRES in Huh-7 cells, with the inhibition level dependent on the shRNA74 to SLN ratio and on the shRNA74 dose added to the culture cells. The nanocarrier was also able to inhibit the replication in human hepatoma cells supporting a subgenomic HCV replicon (Huh-7 NS3-3'). The vector was quickly and efficiently internalized by the cells, and endocytosis was the most productive uptake mechanism for silencing. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and to a lesser extent caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis were identified as endocytic mechanisms involved in the cell uptake. Internalization via the CD44 receptor was also involved, although this entry route seems to be less productive for silencing than endocytosis. The vector did not induce either hemolysis or agglutination of red cells in vitro, which was indicative of good biocompatibility. In summary, we have shown for the first time the ability of a non-viral SLN-based vector to silence a HCV replicon. PMID:27451369

  13. Vector Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Vector addition is an important skill for introductory physics students to master. For years, I have used a fun example to introduce vector addition in my introductory physics classes based on one with which my high school physics teacher piqued my interest many years ago.

  14. The relative magnitude of transgene-specific adaptive immune responses induced by human and chimpanzee adenovirus vectors differs between laboratory animals and a target species.

    PubMed

    Dicks, Matthew D J; Guzman, Efrain; Spencer, Alexandra J; Gilbert, Sarah C; Charleston, Bryan; Hill, Adrian V S; Cottingham, Matthew G

    2015-02-25

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors generated from new viral serotypes are routinely screened in pre-clinical laboratory animal models to identify the most immunogenic and efficacious candidates for further evaluation in clinical human and veterinary settings. Here, we show that studies in a laboratory species do not necessarily predict the hierarchy of vector performance in other mammals. In mice, after intramuscular immunization, HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) based vectors elicited cellular and humoral adaptive responses of higher magnitudes compared to the chimpanzee adenovirus vectors ChAdOx1 and AdC68 from species Human adenovirus E. After HAdV-5 vaccination, transgene specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cell responses reached peak magnitude later than after ChAdOx1 and AdC68 vaccination, and exhibited a slower contraction to a memory phenotype. In cattle, cellular and humoral immune responses were at least equivalent, if not higher, in magnitude after ChAdOx1 vaccination compared to HAdV-5. Though we have not tested protective efficacy in a disease model, these findings have important implications for the selection of candidate vectors for further evaluation. We propose that vaccines based on ChAdOx1 or other Human adenovirus E serotypes could be at least as immunogenic as current licensed bovine vaccines based on HAdV-5. PMID:25629523

  15. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  16. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  17. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  18. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  19. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  20. Innovative technologies targeting vector populations to mitigate the risk of exposure to leishmaniasis and protect deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are blood feeders and vectors of significant public health importance because they transmit Leishmania spp., which cause leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East suffer from sand fly bites and are at risk of contract...

  1. Targeted gene transfer into ependymal cells through intraventricular injection of AAV1 vector and long-term enzyme replacement via the CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Miyake, Koichi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been shown to ameliorate neurological symptoms in model animals with neuropathic metabolic disorders. Gene therapy via the CSF offers a means to achieve a long-term sustainable supply of therapeutic proteins within the central nervous system (CNS) by setting up a continuous source of transgenic products. In the present study, a serotype 1 adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector was injected into a lateral cerebral ventricle in adult mice to transduce the gene encoding human lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (hASA) into the cells of the CNS. Widespread transduction and stable expression of hASA in the choroid plexus and ependymal cells was observed throughout the ventricles for more than 1 year after vector injection. Although humoral immunity to hASA developed after 6 weeks, which diminished the hASA levels detected in CSF from AAV1-injected mice, hASA levels in CSF were maintained for at least 12 weeks when the mice were tolerized to hASA prior of vector injection. Our results suggest that the cells lining the ventricles could potentially serve as a biological reservoir for long-term continuous secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the CSF following intracerebroventricular injection of an AAV1 vector. PMID:24981028

  2. Innovative technologies targeting vector populations to mitigate the risk of exposure to leishmaniasis and protect deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are blood feeders and vectors of significant public health importance because they transmit Leishmania spp., which cause leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East suffer from sand fly bites and are at risk of contracti...

  3. Evaluation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB)—barrier for control of vector and nuisance mosquitoes and its effect on non-target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Qualls, Whitney A.; Müller, Günter C.; Revay, Edita E.; Allan, Sandra A.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Beier, John C.; Smith, Michal L.; Scott, Jodi M.; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D.; Hausmann, Axel; Yefremova, Zoya A.; Xue, Rui-De

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) with the active ingredient eugenol, an Environmental Protection Agency exempt compound, was evaluated against vector and nuisance mosquitoes in both laboratory and field studies. In the laboratory, eugenol combined in attractive sugar bait (ASB) solution provided high levels of mortality for Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Field studies demonstrated significant control: > 70% reduction for Aedes atlanticus, Ae. infirmatus, and Culex nigripalpus and > 50% reduction for An. crucians, Uranotaenia sapphirina, Culiseta melanura, and Cx. erraticus three weeks post ATSB application. Furthermore, non-target feeding of six insect orders, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, and Orthoptera, was evaluated in the field after application of a dyed-ASB to flowering and non-flowering vegetation. ASB feeding (staining) was determined by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. The potential impact of ATSB on non-targets, applied on green non-flowering vegetation was low for all non-target groups (0.9%). However, application of the ASB to flowering vegetation resulted in significant staining of the non-target insect orders. This highlights the need for application guidelines to reduce non-target effects. No mortality was observed in laboratory studies with predatory non-targets, spiders, praying mantis, or ground beetles, after feeding for three days on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB. Overall, our laboratory and field studies support the use of eugenol as an active ingredient for controlling important vector and nuisance mosquitoes when used as an ATSB toxin. This is the first study demonstrating effective control of anophelines in non-arid environments which suggest that even in highly competitive sugar rich environments this method could be used for control of malaria in Latin American countries. PMID:24361724

  4. Evaluation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB)-Barrier for control of vector and nuisance mosquitoes and its effect on non-target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Günter C; Revay, Edita E; Allan, Sandra A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Beier, John C; Smith, Michal L; Scott, Jodi M; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Hausmann, Axel; Yefremova, Zoya A; Xue, Rui-De

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) with the active ingredient eugenol, an Environmental Protection Agency exempt compound, was evaluated against vector and nuisance mosquitoes in both laboratory and field studies. In the laboratory, eugenol combined in attractive sugar bait (ASB) solution provided high levels of mortality for Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Field studies demonstrated significant control: >70% reduction for Aedes atlanticus, Aedes. infirmatus, and Culex nigripalpus and >50% reduction for Anopheles crucians, Uranotaenia sapphirina, Culiseta melanura, and Culex erraticus three weeks post ATSB application. Furthermore, non-target feeding of six insect orders, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, and Orthoptera, was evaluated in the field after application of a dyed-ASB to flowering and non-flowering vegetation. ASB feeding (staining) was determined by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. The potential impact of ATSB on non-targets, applied on green non-flowering vegetation was low for all non-target groups (0.9%). However, application of the ASB to flowering vegetation resulted in significant staining of the non-target insect orders. This highlights the need for application guidelines to reduce non-target effects. No mortality was observed in laboratory studies with predatory non-targets, spiders, praying mantis, or ground beetles, after feeding for three days on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB. Overall, our laboratory and field studies support the use of eugenol as an active ingredient for controlling important vector and nuisance mosquitoes when used as an ATSB toxin. This is the first study demonstrating effective control of anophelines in non-arid environments which suggest that even in highly competitive sugar rich environments this method could be used for control of malaria in Latin American countries. PMID:24361724

  5. Zinc Finger Nuclease-Expressing Baculoviral Vectors Mediate Targeted Genome Integration of Reprogramming Factor Genes to Facilitate the Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Rui-Zhe; Tay, Felix Chang; Goh, Sal-Lee; Lau, Cia-Hin; Zhu, Haibao; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Liang, Qingle; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Li, Zhendong; Tay, Johan Chin-Kang; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Integrative gene transfer using retroviruses to express reprogramming factors displays high efficiency in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the value of the method is limited because of the concern over mutagenesis associated with random insertion of transgenes. Site-specific integration into a preselected locus by engineered zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology provides a potential way to overcome the problem. Here, we report the successful reprogramming of human fibroblasts into a state of pluripotency by baculoviral transduction-mediated, site-specific integration of OKSM (Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-myc) transcription factor genes into the AAVS1 locus in human chromosome 19. Two nonintegrative baculoviral vectors were used for cotransduction, one expressing ZFNs and another as a donor vector encoding the four transcription factors. iPSC colonies were obtained at a high efficiency of 12% (the mean value of eight individual experiments). All characterized iPSC clones carried the transgenic cassette only at the ZFN-specified AAVS1 locus. We further demonstrated that when the donor cassette was flanked by heterospecific loxP sequences, the reprogramming genes in iPSCs could be replaced by another transgene using a baculoviral vector-based Cre recombinase-mediated cassette exchange system, thereby producing iPSCs free of exogenous reprogramming factors. Although the use of nonintegrating methods to generate iPSCs is rapidly becoming a standard approach, methods based on site-specific integration of reprogramming factor genes as reported here hold the potential for efficient generation of genetically amenable iPSCs suitable for future gene therapy applications. PMID:24167318

  6. Intravenous Delivery of HIV-Based Lentiviral Vectors Preferentially Transduces F4/80+ and Ly-6C+ Cells in Spleen, Important Target Cells in Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van den Brand, Ben T.; Vermeij, Eline A.; Waterborg, Claire E. J.; Arntz, Onno J.; Kracht, Michael; Bennink, Miranda B.; van den Berg, Wim B.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) play an important role in arthritis and APC specific gene therapeutic targeting will enable intracellular modulation of cell activity. Viral mediated overexpression is a potent approach to achieve adequate transgene expression levels and lentivirus (LV) is useful for sustained expression in target cells. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of lentiviral mediated targeting of APCs in experimental arthritis. Third generation VSV-G pseudotyped self-inactivating (SIN)-LV were injected intravenously and spleen cells were analyzed with flow cytometry for green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene expression and cell surface markers. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by immunization with bovine collagen type II in complete Freund's adjuvant. Effect on inflammation was monitored macroscopically and T-cell subsets in spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry. Synovium from arthritic knee joints were analyzed for proinflammatory cytokine expression. Lentiviruses injected via the tail vein preferentially infected the spleen and transduction peaks at day 10. A dose escalating study showed that 8% of all spleen cells were targeted and further analysis showed that predominantly Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells in spleen were targeted by the LV. To study the feasibility of blocking TAK1-dependent pathways by this approach, a catalytically inactive mutant of TAK1 (TAK1-K63W) was overexpressed during CIA. LV-TAK1-K63W significantly reduced incidence and arthritis severity macroscopically. Further histological analysis showed a significant decrease in bone erosion in LV-TAK1-K63W treated animals. Moreover, systemic Th17 levels were decreased by LV-TAK1-K63W treatment in addition to diminished IL-6 and KC production in inflamed synovium. In conclusion, systemically delivered LV efficiently targets monocytes and macrophages in spleen that are involved in autoimmune arthritis. Moreover, this study confirms efficacy of TAK1 targeting in arthritis. This

  7. Expression of a flower-specific Myb protein in leaf cells using a viral vector causes ectopic activation of a target promoter.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, R W; Baulcombe, D C; Bevan, M

    1995-07-18

    The promoter of the bean PAL2 gene (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; EC 4.3.1.5) is a model for studies of tissue-restricted gene expression in plants. Petal epidermis is one of the tissues in which this promoter is activated in tobacco. Previous work suggested that a major factor establishing the pattern of PAL2 expression in tobacco petals is the tissue distribution of a protein closely related to Myb305, which is a Myb-like transcriptional activator from snapdragon. In the present work, we show that Myb305 expression in tobacco leaves causes ectopic activation of the PAL2 promoter. To achieve Myb305 expression in planta, a viral expression vector was used. This approach combines the utility of transient assays with the possibility of direct biochemical detection of the introduced factor and may have wider application for studying the function of plant transcription factors. PMID:7624340

  8. Viral vector-based improvement of optic nerve regeneration: characterization of individual axons' growth patterns and synaptogenesis in a visual target.

    PubMed

    Yungher, B J; Luo, X; Salgueiro, Y; Blackmore, M G; Park, K K

    2015-10-01

    Lack of axon growth ability in the central nervous system poses a major barrier to achieving functional connectivity after injury. Thus, a non-transgenic regenerative approach to reinnervating targets has important implications in clinical and research settings. Previous studies using knockout (KO) mice have demonstrated long-distance axon regeneration. Using an optic nerve injury model, here we evaluate the efficacy of viral, RNA interference (RNAi) and pharmacological approaches that target the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 pathways to improve long-distance axon regeneration in wild-type mice. Our data show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PTEN (shPTEN) enhances retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration after crush injury. However, compared with the previous data in PTEN KO mice, AAV-shRNA results in a lesser degree of regeneration, likely due to incomplete gene silencing inherent to RNAi. In comparison, an extensive enhancement in regeneration is seen when AAV-shPTEN is coupled to AAV encoding ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and to a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analog, allowing axons to travel long distances and reach their target. We apply whole-tissue imaging that facilitates three-dimensional visualization of single regenerating axons and document heterogeneous terminal patterns in the targets. This shows that some axonal populations generate extensive arbors and make synapses with the target neurons. Collectively, we show a combinatorial viral RNAi and pharmacological strategy that improves long-distance regeneration in wild-type animals and provide single fiber projection data that indicates a degree of preservation of target recognition. PMID:26005861

  9. Multimodality Imaging with Silica-Based Targeted Nanoparticle Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Jason S. Lewis

    2012-04-09

    Objectives: To synthesize and characterize a C-Dot silica-based nanoparticle containing 'clickable' groups for the subsequent attachment of targeting moieties (e.g., peptides) and multiple contrast agents (e.g., radionuclides with high specific activity) [1,2]. These new constructs will be tested in suitable tumor models in vitro and in vivo to ensure maintenance of target-specificity and high specific activity. Methods: Cy5 dye molecules are cross-linked to a silica precursor which is reacted to form a dye-rich core particle. This core is then encapsulated in a layer of pure silica to create the core-shell C-Dot (Figure 1) [2]. A 'click' chemistry approach has been used to functionalize the silica shell with radionuclides conferring high contrast and specific activity (e.g. 64Cu and 89Zr) and peptides for tumor targeting (e.g. cRGD and octreotate) [3]. Based on the selective Diels-Alder reaction between tetrazine and norbornene, the reaction is bioorthogonal, highyielding, rapid, and water-compatible. This radiolabeling approach has already been employed successfully with both short peptides (e.g. octreotate) and antibodies (e.g. trastuzumab) as model systems for the ultimate labeling of the nanoparticles [1]. Results: PEGylated C-Dots with a Cy5 core and labeled with tetrazine have been synthesized (d = 55 nm, zeta potential = -3 mV) reliably and reproducibly and have been shown to be stable under physiological conditions for up to 1 month. Characterization of the nanoparticles revealed that the immobilized Cy5 dye within the C-Dots exhibited fluorescence intensities over twice that of the fluorophore alone. The nanoparticles were successfully radiolabeled with Cu-64. Efforts toward the conjugation of targeting peptides (e.g. cRGD) are underway. In vitro stability, specificity, and uptake studies as well as in vivo imaging and biodistribution investigations will be presented. Conclusions: C-Dot silica-based nanoparticles offer a robust, versatile, and multi

  10. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  11. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  12. In vitro analysis of a primary, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to avian leukosis virus (ALV), using target cells expressing MHC class I cDNA inserted into a recombinant ALV vector.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Fulton, J E; Hunt, H D

    1995-10-01

    The interaction between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is an important component of the host's resistance to viral infections and tumor formation. In this study, an avian leukosis virus (ALV) vector system, RCASBP, expressing MHC chicken class I (B-F) cDNA was used to develop target cells expressing the chicken class I glycoproteins complexed with ALV antigens on the cell surface. Peripheral blood from chickens inoculated with ALV was shown to contain antigen-specific, MHC-restricted, CD8+ effector CTLs, using a 51Cr release assay utilizing the RCASBP B-F target cells. The stimulated effector cells were also predominantly alpha beta T-cell receptor-positive (TCR2) T cells. The CTL response varied between two haplotypes of chickens which differed in their response to Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-induced tumors. Chickens with the B21 haplotype which regress RSV-induced tumors showed maximal cytolytic activity, while chickens with the B13 haplotype which do not regress RSV-induced tumors had minimal to no cytolytic activity. In addition to assessing the CTL response to ALV, the creation of MHC-specific immortal target cell lines will be extremely useful in evaluating CTL responses to other viral disease in chickens. PMID:7666545

  13. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Copper-64 Radiolabeled [DUPA-6-Ahx-(NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], a Novel Bivalent Targeting Vector Having Affinity for Two Distinct Biomarkers (GRPr/PSMA) of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bandari, Rajendra Prasad; Jiang, Zongrun; Reynolds, Tamila Stott; Bernskoetter, Nicole E.; Szczodroski, Ashley F.; Bassuner, Kurt J.; Kirkpatrick, Daniel L.; Rold, Tammy L.; Sieckman, Gary L.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Connors, James P.; Smith, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are two identifying biomarkers expressed in very high numbers on prostate cancer cells and could serve as a useful tool for molecular targeting and diagnosis of disease via positron-emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to produce the multipurpose, bivalent [DUPA-6-Ahx-(64Cu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] radioligand for prostate cancer imaging, where DUPA = 2-[3-(1,3-Bis-tertbutoxycarbonylpropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid, a small-molecule, PSMA-targeting probe, 6Ahx = 6-aminohexanoic acid, 5-Ava = 5-aminovaleric acid, NODAGA = [2-(4,7-biscarboxymethyl)-1,4,7-(triazonan-1-yl)pentanedioic acid] (a derivative of NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)), and BBN(7-14)NH2 = bombesin or BBN, a GRPr-specific peptide targeting probe. Methods The PSMA/GRPr dual targeting ligand precursor [DUPA-6-Ahx-K-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], was synthesized by solid-phase and manual peptide synthesis, after which NODAGA was added via manual conjugation to the ε-amine of lysine (K). The new bivalent GRPr/PSMA targeting vector was purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and metallated with 64CuCl2 and natCuCl2. The receptor binding affinity was evaluated in human, prostate, PC-3 (GRPr-positive) and LNCaP (PSMA-positive) cells and the tumor-targeting efficacy determined in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) and athymic nude mice bearing PC-3 and LNCaP tumors. Whole-body maximum intensity microPET/CT images of PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice were obtained 18 h post-injection (p.i.). Results Competitive binding assays in PC-3 and LNCaP cells indicated high receptor binding affinity for the [DUPA-6-Ahx-(natCu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] conjugate. MicroPET scintigraphy in PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice indicated that xenografted tumors were visible at 18 h p.i. with collateral

  14. Mediterranean essential oils as effective weapons against the West Nile vector Culex pipiens and the Echinostoma intermediate host Physella acuta: what happens around? An acute toxicity survey on non-target mayflies.

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni; Bedini, Stefano; Flamini, Guido; Cosci, Francesca; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Amira, Smain; Benchikh, Fatima; Laouer, Hocine; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Conti, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) represent a threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for important pathogens, including malaria, yellow fever, dengue and West Nile. Second to malaria as the world's most widespread parasitic disease, infection by trematodes is a devastating public health problem. In this study, we proposed two essential oils from plants cultivated in Mediterranean regions as effective chemicals against mosquitoes and freshwater snails vectors of Echinostoma trematodes. Chemical composition of essential oils from Achillea millefolium (Asteraceae) and Haplophyllum tuberculatum (Rutaceae) was investigated. Acute toxicity was evaluated against larvae of the West Nile vector Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) and the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Mollusca: Physidae), an important intermediate host of many parasites, including Echinostoma revolutum (Echinostomidae). Acute toxicity of essential oils was assessed also on a non-target aquatic organism, the mayfly Cloeon dipterum (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae). Achillea millefolium and H. tuberculatum essentials oils were mainly composed by oxygenated monoterpenes (59.3 and 71.0 % of the whole oil, respectively). Chrysanthenone and borneol were the two major constituents of Achillea millefolium essential oil (24.1 and 14.2 %, respectively). Major compounds of H. tuberculatum essential oil were cis-p-menth-2-en-1-ol and trans-p-menth-2-en-1-ol (22.9 and 16.1 %, respectively). In acute toxicity assays, C. pipiens LC50 was 154.190 and 175.268 ppm for Achillea millefolium and H. tuberculatum, respectively. P. acuta LC50 was 112.911 and 73.695 ppm for Achillea millefolium and H. tuberculatum, respectively, while the same values were 198.116 and 280.265 ppm for C. dipterum. Relative median potency analysis showed that both tested essential oils were more toxic to P. acuta over C. dipterum. This research adds knowledge on plant-borne chemicals toxic against invertebrates of medical

  15. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  16. A method to assess target gene involvement in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo using lentiviral vectors expressing shRNA.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Wayne; Vakana, Eliza; Wyss, Lisa V; Swearingen, Michelle L; Stewart, Julie; Stancato, Louis; Tate, Courtney M

    2014-01-01

    Current methods to study angiogenesis in cancer growth and development can be difficult and costly, requiring extensive use of in vivo methodologies. Here, we utilized an in vitro adipocyte derived stem cell and endothelial colony forming cell (ADSC/ECFC) co-culture system to investigate the effect of lentiviral-driven shRNA knockdown of target genes compared to a non-targeting shRNA control on cord formation using High Content Imaging. Cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the VEGF receptor VEGFR2 in VEGF-driven cord formation and the FGF receptor FGFR1 in basic FGF (bFGF)-driven cord formation. In addition, cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), a protein with known positive effects on angiogenesis and blood vessel stabilization in VEGF- and bFGF-driven cord formation. Lentiviral shRNA also demonstrated utility for stable knockdown of VEGFR2 and FOXO1 in ECFCs, allowing for interrogation of protein knockdown effects on in vivo neoangiogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. In addition to interrogating the effect of gene knockdown in endothelial cells, we utilized lentiviral shRNA to knockdown specificity protein 1 (SP1), a transcription factor involved in the expression of VEGF, in U-87 MG tumor cells to demonstrate the ability to analyze angiogenesis in vitro in a tumor-driven transwell cord formation system and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A significant reduction in tumor-driven cord formation, VEGF secretion, and in vivo tumor angiogenesis was observed upon SP1 knockdown. Therefore, evaluation of target gene knockdown effects in the in vitro co-culture cord formation assay in the ADSC/ECFC co-culture, ECFCs alone, and in tumor cells translated directly to in vivo results, indicating the in vitro method as a robust, cost-effective and efficient in vitro surrogate assay to investigate target gene involvement in endothelial or tumor cell function in

  17. Spatially targeting Culex quinquefasciatus aquatic habitats on modified land cover for implementing an Integrated Vector Management (IVM) program in three villages within the Mwea Rice Scheme, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Benjamin G; Shililu, Josephat; Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Muriu, Simon M; Funes, Jose; Githure, John; Regens, James L; Novak, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    limited control resources could be concentrated to reduce vector larval abundance. PMID:16684354

  18. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies. PMID:27076309

  19. ChAd63-MVA–vectored Blood-stage Malaria Vaccines Targeting MSP1 and AMA1: Assessment of Efficacy Against Mosquito Bite Challenge in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Susanne H; Duncan, Christopher JA; Elias, Sean C; Choudhary, Prateek; Biswas, Sumi; Halstead, Fenella D; Collins, Katharine A; Edwards, Nick J; Douglas, Alexander D; Anagnostou, Nicholas A; Ewer, Katie J; Havelock, Tom; Mahungu, Tabitha; Bliss, Carly M; Miura, Kazutoyo; Poulton, Ian D; Lillie, Patrick J; Antrobus, Richard D; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Gantlett, Katherine; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Long, Carole A; Sinden, Robert E; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lawrie, Alison M; Doherty, Tom; Faust, Saul N; Nicosia, Alfredo; Hill, Adrian VS; Draper, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    The induction of cellular immunity, in conjunction with antibodies, may be essential for vaccines to protect against blood-stage infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have shown that prime-boost delivery of P. falciparum blood-stage antigens by chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) followed by the attenuated orthopoxvirus MVA is safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. Here, we report on vaccine efficacy against controlled human malaria infection delivered by mosquito bites. The blood-stage malaria vaccines were administered alone, or together (MSP1+AMA1), or with a pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine candidate (MSP1+ME-TRAP). In this first human use of coadministered ChAd63-MVA regimes, we demonstrate immune interference whereby responses against merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are dominant over apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and ME-TRAP. We also show that induction of strong cellular immunity against MSP1 and AMA1 is safe, but does not impact on parasite growth rates in the blood. In a subset of vaccinated volunteers, a delay in time to diagnosis was observed and sterilizing protection was observed in one volunteer coimmunized with MSP1+AMA1—results consistent with vaccine-induced pre-erythrocytic, rather than blood-stage, immunity. These data call into question the utility of T cell-inducing blood-stage malaria vaccines and suggest that the focus should remain on high-titer antibody induction against susceptible antigen targets. PMID:23089736

  20. Vector Acoustics, Vector Sensors, and 3D Underwater Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2007-12-01

    Vector acoustic data has two more dimensions of information than pressure data and may allow for 3D underwater imaging with much less data than with hydrophone data. The vector acoustic sensors measures the particle motions due to passing sound waves and, in conjunction with a collocated hydrophone, the direction of travel of the sound waves. When using a controlled source with known source and sensor locations, the reflection points of the sound field can be determined with a simple trigonometric calculation. I demonstrate this concept with an experiment that used an accelerometer based vector acoustic sensor in a water tank with a short-pulse source and passive scattering targets. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer and a matched hydrophone. The sound source was a standard transducer driven by a short 7 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. Several floats were placed in the tank as acoustic targets at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case is only two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the two targets, the tank walls, the tank bottom, and the water surface were imaged. A directional ambiguity inherent to vector sensors is removed by using collocated hydrophone data. Although this experiment was in a very simple environment, it suggests that 3-D seismic surveys may be achieved with vector sensors using the same logistics as a 2-D survey that uses conventional hydrophones. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.

  1. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  2. Foamy virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D W; Miller, A D

    1996-01-01

    Human foamy virus (HFV) is a retrovirus of the spumavirus family. We have constructed vectors based on HFV that encode neomycin phosphotransferase and alkaline phosphatase. These vectors are able to transduce a wide variety of vertebrate cells by integration of the vector genome. Unlike vectors based on murine leukemia virus, HFV vectors are not inactivated by human serum, and they transduce stationary-phase cultures more efficiently than murine leukemia virus vectors. These properties, as well as their large packaging capacity, make HFV vectors promising gene transfer vehicles. PMID:8523528

  3. Viral vectors for vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense. PMID:23858400

  4. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  5. Surface-engineering of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-02-01

    Vectors derived from retroviridae offer particularly flexible properties in gene transfer applications given the numerous possible associations of various viral surface glycoproteins (determining cell tropism) with different types of retroviral cores (determining genome replication and integration). Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) that cannot transduce non-proliferating target cells. Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system and their host range. There are however important gene transfer restrictions to some non-proliferative tissues or cell types and recent studies have shown that progenitor hematopoietic stem cells in G(0), non-activated primary blood lymphocytes or monocytes were not transducible by lentiviral vectors. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer applications in vivo. Several innovative approaches have been explored to overcome such problems that have given rise to novel concepts in the field and have provided promising results in preliminary evaluations in vivo. Here we review the different approaches explored to upgrade lentiviral vectors, aiming at developing vectors suitable for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:14978753

  6. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  7. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  8. Gateway®-compatible plant transformation vectors.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Mark A; Harwood, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    Studies in functional genomics and crop improvement programs often rely on the introduction and expression of transgenes in plants. There are two essential components required for in planta transgene expression, a plasmid vector on which the transgene sequence is carried and a delivery system capable of transferring the vector to the target cells. Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation and the binary plasmid vector system is the preferred method of transgene delivery. The cloning technologies used for DNA manipulation underpin many of these studies. Increased demand for efficient high-throughput transformation systems is driving forward improvements in gene cloning techniques. This chapter gives an overview of Gateway(®)-compatible binary vectors for use in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation systems. It describes a fast, efficient, and robust cloning protocol for the production of an over-expression binary vector using Gateway(®) recombinational cloning. PMID:25300827

  9. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  10. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  11. Restart 68000 vector remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, J.

    1984-05-03

    The circuit described allows power-on-reset (POR) vector fetch from ROM for a 68000 microprocessor. It offers programmability of exception vectors, including the restart vector. This method eliminates the need for high-resolution, address-decoder peripheral circuitry.

  12. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  13. A targeted nanoglobular contrast agent from host-guest self-assembly for MR cancer molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Han, Zhen; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical application of nanoparticular Gd(III) based contrast agents for tumor molecular MRI has been hindered by safety concerns associated with prolonged tissue retention, although they can produce strong tumor enhancement. In this study, a targeted well-defined cyclodextrin-based nanoglobular contrast agent was developed through self-assembly driven by host-guest interactions for safe and effective cancer molecular MRI. Multiple β-cyclodextrins attached POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) nanoglobule was used as host molecule. Adamantane-modified macrocyclic Gd(III) contrast agent, cRGD (cyclic RGDfK peptide) targeting ligand and fluorescent probe was used as guest molecules. The targeted host-guest nanoglobular contrast agent cRGD-POSS-βCD-(DOTA-Gd) specifically bond to αvβ3 integrin in malignant 4T1 breast tumor and provided greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding non-targeted agent. The agent also provided significant fluorescence signal in tumor tissue. The histological analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed its specific and effective targeting to αvβ3 integrin. The targeted imaging agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular MR and fluorescent imaging. PMID:26874280

  14. Imaging marine geophysical environments with vector acoustics.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Dennis

    2006-09-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine geoacoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones enables one to acquire three-dimensional (3D) survey data with instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the sound wave direction directly without the cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that had a well-controlled environment with a few targets. Using vector acoustic data from a single line of sources, the three-dimensional tank environment was imaged by directly locating the source and all reflectors. PMID:17004497

  15. Hard Exclusive Vector Meson Leptoproduction At HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Golembiovskaya, M.

    2011-07-15

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg collected a set of data on hard exclusive vector meson ({rho}{sup 0}{phi},{omega}) leptoproduction using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized lepton beam of HERA accelerator and longitudinally or transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets. Measurements of exclusive vector meson production provide access to the structure of the nucleon since the process can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). An overview of the HERMES results on exclusive vector mesons production is presented.

  16. Biosafety Features of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3′ untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis. PMID:23311447

  17. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  18. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25804479

  19. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  20. Symbolic computer vector analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A MACSYMA program is described which performs symbolic vector algebra and vector calculus. The program can combine and simplify symbolic expressions including dot products and cross products, together with the gradient, divergence, curl, and Laplacian operators. The distribution of these operators over sums or products is under user control, as are various other expansions, including expansion into components in any specific orthogonal coordinate system. There is also a capability for deriving the scalar or vector potential of a vector field. Examples include derivation of the partial differential equations describing fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics, for 12 different classic orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.

  1. Evaluation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB)-barrier for control of vector and nuisance mosquitoes and its effect on non-target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and the field with the Environmental Protection Agency exempt active ingredient eugenol against vector and nuisance mosquitoes. In the laboratory, eugenol combined in attractive sugar bait (ASB) solution provided high...

  2. Optimum instantaneous impulsive orbital injection to attain a specified asymptotic velocity vector.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    A nalysis of the necessary conditions of Battin for instantaneous orbital injection, with consideration of the uniqueness of his solution, and of the further problem which arises in the degenerate case when radius vector and asymptotic vector are separated by 180 deg. It is shown that when the angular separation between radius vector and asymptotic velocity vector satisfies theta not equal to 180 deg, there are precisely two insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of the target asymptotic velocity vector, one yielding posigrade, the other retrograde motion. When theta equals to 180 deg, there is a family of insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of a specified asymptotic velocity vector with a unique insertion-velocity vector for every arbitrary orientation of a target unit angular momentum vector.

  3. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  4. Paramagnetic hollow silica nanospheres for in vivo targeted ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    An, Lu; Hu, He; Du, Jing; Wei, Jie; Wang, Li; Yang, Hong; Wu, Dongmei; Shi, Haili; Li, Fenghua; Yang, Shiping

    2014-07-01

    A series of hollow silica nanospheres (HSNSs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 400 nm were synthesized and used for primary ultrasound imaging (US) efficiency assessment. The 400 nm HSNSs were chosen as platform for conjugation with Gd-DTPA and cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid c(RGD) peptide to construct US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modal contrast agents (CAs): [HSNSs@(DTPA-Gd)-RGD]. The obtained CAs displayed good physiological stability, low cytotoxicity and negligible hemolytic activity in vitro. Furthermore, the passive accumulation and active-targeting of the HSNSs in the tumor site of mice was demonstrated by US and MR imaging, respectively. The qualitative and quantitative biodistribution of the HSNSs showed that they mainly accumulated in the tissues of liver, lung, tumor after intravenous administration and then be excreted from feces. In addition, histological, hematological, blood and biochemical analysis were used to further study toxicity of the HSNSs, and all results indicated that there were no covert toxicity of HSNSs in mice after long exposure times. Findings from this study indicated that the silica-based paramagnetic HSNSs can be used as a platform for long-term targeted imaging and therapy studies safely in vivo. PMID:24703718

  5. Viral vectors and delivery strategies for CNS gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Woodard, Kenton T; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to provide a broad overview of the targets, challenges and potential for gene therapy in the CNS, citing specific examples. There are a broad range of therapeutic targets, with very different requirements for a suitable viral vector. By utilizing different vector tropisms, novel routes of administration and engineered promoter control, transgenes can be targeted to specific therapeutic applications. Viral vectors have proven efficacious in preclinical models for several disease applications, spurring several clinical trials. While the field has pushed the limits of existing adeno-associated virus-based vectors, a next generation of vectors based on rational engineering of viral capsids should expand the application of gene therapy to be more effective in specific therapeutic applications. PMID:22833965

  6. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  7. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  8. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  9. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  10. Viral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer have been investigated with renewed vigour, perhaps catalyzed by the clinical successes seen with monoclonal antibody and cytokine based therapies. The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in multiple cancer types has enabled the development of targeted immunotherapies and allayed some of the safety concerns associated with the induction of deleterious autoimmune reactions. In addition to the TAA or therapeutic gene, the antigen delivery system is equally as important for the development of a successful cancer vaccine. One approach to induce a potent and targeted antitumor response is to use viruses to deliver the TAA to cells of the immune system. A diverse array of oncolytic viruses and recombinant viral vectors encoding numerous therapeutic genes or TAAs have been tested in pre-clinical studies and produced results which, in some cases, justify their clinical development as potential cancer immunotherapies. Within the last 5-10 years, many such recombinant vectors have made the transition from pre-clinical research to clinical development and it is these, which are given most weight in this review. PMID:16146772

  11. cRGD-Modified Benzimidazole-based pH-Responsive Nanoparticles for Enhanced Tumor Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjian; Liu, Qian; Yang, Cuihong; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Yumin; Huang, Pingsheng; Zhou, Junhui; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    Finding a smart cancer drug delivery carrier with long blood circulation, enhanced cancer targeting, and quick drug release in tumors is critical for efficient cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we design a cRGD-polycarboxybetaine methacrylate-b-polybenzimidazole methacrylate (cRGD-PCB-b-PBBMZ) copolymer to self-assemble into smart drug-loaded nanoparticles (cRGD-PCM NPs) which can target αvβ3 integrin overexpressed cancer tissue by cRGD peptide unit and release drug quickly in cancer cells by protonation of benzimidazole groups. The outer PCB layer can resist protein adhesion, and there are only about 10% of proteins in mouse serum adhered to the surface of PCM NPs. With the pKa value of 5.08 of the benzimidazole units, DOX can be released from NPs in pH 5.0 PBS. cRGD-PCM NPs can bring more DOX into HepG2 cells than nontargeting PCM NPs, and there has high DOX release rate in HepG2 cells because of the protonation of benzimidazole groups in endosome and lysosome. MTT assay verifies that higher cellular uptake of DOX causes higher cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the results of ex vivo imaging studies confirm that cRGD-PCM/DOX NPs can successfully deliver DOX into tumor tissue from the injection site. Therefore, the multifunctional cRGD-PCM NPs show great potential as novel nanocarriers for targeting cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27058429

  12. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  13. A safe, simple and efficient doxorubicin prodrug hybrid micelle for overcoming tumor multidrug resistance and targeting delivery.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuling; Yin, Mingxing; Hu, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Xiangting; Sun, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Tan, Songwei; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-08-10

    A pH-sensitive prodrug, TPGS-CHN-DOX, was introduced by conjugating anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), onto d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) via a cleavable Schiff base linkage. The prodrug was mixed with a PEGylated lipid to form a simple but multifunctional hybrid micelle system, which can realize high drug loading capability and biocompatibility, extended blood circulation time, inhibited drug resistance in cancer cells, improved therapeutic response, reduced side effects, and easy functionalities for targeting delivery. The hybrid micelles exhibited in vitro pH-sensitive drug release, enhanced cellular uptake and strengthened cytotoxicity on both drug-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 and resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. P-glycoprotein functional inhibition and mitochondria-associated cell apoptosis induced by TPGS were thought to play an important role in overcoming the multidrug resistance. As a result, the hybrid micelles demonstrated good anticancer efficacy in MCF-7/ADR xenograft model. Additionally, after modifying with a tumor-specific targeting peptic ligand, cRGD, the tumor growth/metastasis inhibition was further evidenced in integrin receptor overexpressed melanoma cancer B16F10 and even murine hepatocarcinoma H22 models. This TPGS-based pH-sensitive prodrug provides a safe and "Molecular economical" way in the rational design of prodrugs for overcoming multidrug resistance and targeting delivery, which can improve the potency for clinical use. PMID:27264552

  14. Dual targeting luminescent gold nanoclusters for tumor imaging and deep tissue therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Bowen; Cai, Songhua; Wang, Peng; Peng, Shuwen; Sheng, Yuanzhi; He, Yuanyuan; Gu, Yueqing; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    Dual targeting towards both extracellular and intracellular receptors specific to tumor is a significant approach for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In the present study, a novel nano-platform (AuNC-cRGD-Apt) with dual targeting function was initially established by conjugating gold nanocluster (AuNC) with cyclic RGD (cRGD) that is specific to αvβ3integrins over-expressed on the surface of tumor tissues and aptamer AS1411 (Apt) that is of high affinity to nucleolin over-expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of tumor cells. Then, AuNC-cRGD-Apt was further functionalized with near infrared (NIR) fluorescence dye (MPA), giving a NIR fluorescent dual-targeting probe AuNC-MPA-cRGD-Apt. AuNC-MPA-cRGD-Apt displays low cytotoxicity and favorable tumor-targeting capability at both in vitro and in vivo level, suggesting its clinical potential for tumor imaging. Additionally, Doxorubicin (DOX), a widely used clinical chemotherapeutic drug that kill cancer cells by intercalating DNA in cellular nucleus, was immobilized onto AuNC-cRGD-Apt forming a pro-drug, AuNC-DOX-cRGD-Apt. The enhanced tumor affinity, deep tumor penetration and improved anti-tumor activity of this pro-drug were demonstrated in different tumor cell lines, tumor spheroid and tumor-bearing mouse models. Results in this study suggest not only the prospect of non-toxic AuNC modified with two targeting ligands for tumor targeted imaging, but also confirm the promising future of dual targeting AuNC as a core for the design of prodrug in the field of cancer therapy. PMID:27236844

  15. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  16. Issues in acoustic vector-sensor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Malcolm Alistair

    This dissertation examines the ability of acoustic vector sensors to solve the passive direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and 3-D localization problems. These sensors measure the three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity vector, as well as the acoustic pressure, at one location. By preserving directional information that is present in the structure of the velocity field, they gain a number of advantages over traditional arrays of scalar sensors, such as hydrophones and microphones. We compute and examine, through the Cramér-Rao bound and beam-forming based methods, the ability of arrays of acoustic vector sensors to estimate direction. We first consider the case of an array in free space then extend these results to account for the presence of a reflecting boundary, such as the seabed or a vessel's hull, located near the array. Next, we derive expressions for the noise correlation structure induced by various ambient noise fields, isotropic and anisotropic, at an acoustic vector sensor array, and use them to examine its localization performance. We then propose a decentralized processing scheme to rapidly locate a wideband target in three dimensions. Finally, we present a general framework for the analysis of errors associated with the estimation of a vector, or system of vectors, that has geometrical interpretations in terms of length, angle, etc. The framework is employed throughout the thesis.

  17. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  18. Light Vector Mesons in the Nuclear Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Michael; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Weygand, Dennis; Djalali, Chaden; Tur, Clarisse; Mosel, Ulrich; Muehlich, Pascal; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Carnahan, Bryan; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dickson, Richard; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Li, Ji; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Williams, Michael; Wolin, Elliott; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-07-01

    The light vector mesons ($\\rho$, $\\omega$, and $\\phi$) were produced in deuterium, carbon, titanium, and iron targets in a search for possible in-medium modifications to the properties of the $\\rho$ meson at normal nuclear densities and zero temperature. The vector mesons were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) via their decays to $e^{+}e^{-}$. The rare leptonic decay was chosen to reduce final-state interactions. A combinatorial background was subtracted from the invariant mass spectra using a well-established event-mixing technique. The $\\rho$ meson mass spectrum was extracted after the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ signals were removed in a nearly model-independent way. Comparisons were made between the $\\rho$ mass spectra from the heavy targets ($A > 2$) with the mass spectrum extracted from the deuterium target. With respect to the $\\rho$-meson mass, we obtain a small shift compatible with zero. Also, we measure widths consistent with standard nuclear many-body eff

  19. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  20. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  1. Emergence and Prevalence of Human Vector-Borne Diseases in Sink Vector Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rascalou, Guilhem; Pontier, Dominique; Menu, Frédéric; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a major public health concern in most tropical and subtropical areas, and an emerging threat for more developed countries. Our understanding of the ecology, evolution and control of these diseases relies predominantly on theory and data on pathogen transmission in large self-sustaining ‘source’ populations of vectors representative of highly endemic areas. However, there are numerous places where environmental conditions are less favourable to vector populations, but where immigration allows them to persist. We built an epidemiological model to investigate the dynamics of six major human vector borne-diseases in such non self-sustaining ‘sink’ vector populations. The model was parameterized through a review of the literature, and we performed extensive sensitivity analysis to look at the emergence and prevalence of the pathogen that could be encountered in these populations. Despite the low vector abundance in typical sink populations, all six human diseases were able to spread in 15–55% of cases after accidental introduction. The rate of spread was much more strongly influenced by vector longevity, immigration and feeding rates, than by transmission and virulence of the pathogen. Prevalence in humans remained lower than 5% for dengue, leishmaniasis and Japanese encephalitis, but substantially higher for diseases with longer duration of infection; malaria and the American and African trypanosomiasis. Vector-related parameters were again the key factors, although their influence was lower than on pathogen emergence. Our results emphasize the need for ecology and evolution to be thought in the context of metapopulations made of a mosaic of sink and source habitats, and to design vector control program not only targeting areas of high vector density, but working at a larger spatial scale. PMID:22629337

  2. Gammaretroviral vectors: biology, technology and application.

    PubMed

    Maetzig, Tobias; Galla, Melanie; Baum, Christopher; Schambach, Axel

    2011-06-01

    Retroviruses are evolutionary optimized gene carriers that have naturally adapted to their hosts to efficiently deliver their nucleic acids into the target cell chromatin, thereby overcoming natural cellular barriers. Here we will review-starting with a deeper look into retroviral biology-how Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV), a simple gammaretrovirus, can be converted into an efficient vehicle of genetic therapeutics. Furthermore, we will describe how more rational vector backbones can be designed and how these so-called self-inactivating vectors can be pseudotyped and produced. Finally, we will provide an overview on existing clinical trials and how biosafety can be improved. PMID:21994751

  3. Genetic labeling of both the axons of transduced, glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal cortex and their postsynaptic neurons in other neocortical areas by Herpes Simplex Virus vectors that coexpress an axon-targeted ß-galactosidase and wheat germ agglutinin from a vesicular glutamate transporter-1 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Cao, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal circuits comprise the foundation for neuronal physiology and synaptic plasticity, and thus for consequent behaviors and learning, but our knowledge of neocortical circuits is incomplete. Mapping neocortical circuits is a challenging problem because these circuits contain large numbers of neurons, a high density of synapses, and numerous classes and subclasses of neurons that form many different types of synapses. Expression of specific genetic tracers in small numbers of specific subclasses of neocortical neurons has potential to map neocortical circuits. Suitable genetic tracers have been established in neurons in subcortical areas, but application to neocortical circuits has been limited. Enabling this approach, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) plasmid (amplicon) vectors can transduce small numbers of neurons in a specific neocortical area. Further, expression of a particular genetic tracer can be restricted to specific subclasses of neurons; in particular, the vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) promoter supports expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. Here, we show that expression of an axon-targeted ß-galactosidase (ß-gal) from such vectors supports mapping specific commissural and associative projections of the transduced neurons in POR cortex. Further, coexpression of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and an axon-targeted ß-gal supports mapping both specific projections of the transduced neurons and identifying specific postsynaptic neurons for the transduced neurons. The neocortical circuit mapping capabilities developed here may support mapping specific neocortical circuits that have critical roles in cognitive learning. PMID:20849834

  4. Tumor-targeted in vivo gene silencing via systemic delivery of cRGD-conjugated siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Wei; Samarsky, Dmitry; Liu, Li; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Guangzu; Wu, Ping; Zuo, Xialin; Deng, Houliang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Zhuomin; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lingfeng; Qiu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Qiyi; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Biliang; Ji, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    RNAi technology is taking strong position among the key therapeutic modalities, with dozens of siRNA-based programs entering and successfully progressing through clinical stages of drug development. To further explore potentials of RNAi technology as therapeutics, we engineered and tested VEGFR2 siRNA molecules specifically targeted to tumors through covalently conjugated cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Lys[PEG-MAL]) (cRGD) peptide, known to bind αvβ3 integrin receptors. cRGD-siRNAs were demonstrated to specifically enter and silence targeted genes in cultured αvβ3 positive human cells (HUVEC). Microinjection of zebrafish blastocysts with VEGFR2 cRGD-siRNA resulted in specific inhibition of blood vessel growth. In tumor-bearing mice, intravenously injected cRGD-siRNA molecules generated no innate immune response and bio-distributed to tumor tissues. Continuous systemic delivery of two different VEGFR2 cRGD-siRNAs resulted in down-regulation of corresponding mRNA (55 and 45%) and protein (65 and 45%) in tumors, as well as in overall reduction of tumor volume (90 and 70%). These findings demonstrate strong potential of cRGD-siRNA molecules as anti-tumor therapy. PMID:25223783

  5. Feature clustering in direct eigen-vector data reduction using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasati, Vahid R.; Gao, Wenhue

    2012-06-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been used in a variety of applications like feature extraction for classification, data compression and dimensionality reduction. Often, a small set of principal components are sufficient to capture the largest variations in the data. As a result, the eigen-values of the data covariance matrix with the lowest magnitude are ignored (along with their corresponding eigen-vectors) and the remaining eigenvectors are used for a 'coarse' representation of the data. It is well known that this process of choosing a few principal components naturally induces a loss in information from a signal reconstruction standpoint. We propose a new technique to represent the data in terms of a new set of basis vectors where the high-frequency detail is preserved, at the expense of a 'feature-scale blurring'. In other words, the 'blurring' that occurs due to possible colinearities in the bases vectors is relative to the eigen-features' scales; this is inherently different from a systematic blurring function. Instead of thresholding the eigen-values, we retain all eigen-values, and apply thresholds on the components of each eigen-vector separately. The resulting basis vectors can no longer be interpreted as eigenvectors and will, in general, lose their orthogonality properties, but offer benefits in terms of preserving detail that is crucial for classification tasks. We test the merits of this new basis representation for magnitude synthetic aperture radar (SAR) Automatic Target Recognition (ATR). A feature vector is obtained by projecting a SAR image onto the aforementioned basis. Decision engines such as support vector machines (SVMs) are trained on example feature vectors per class and ultimately used to recognize the target class in real-time. Experimental validation are performed on the MSTAR database and involve comparisons against a PCA based ATR algorithm.

  6. Eco-friendly drugs from the marine environment: spongeweed-synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly effective on Plasmodium falciparum and its vector Anopheles stephensi, with little non-target effects on predatory copepods.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wang, Lan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Roni, Mathath; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Mosquitoes act as vectors of devastating pathogens and parasites, representing a key threat for millions of humans and animals worldwide. The control of mosquito-borne diseases is facing a number of crucial challenges, including the emergence of artemisinin and chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium parasites, as well as the presence of mosquito vectors resistant to synthetic and microbial pesticides. Therefore, eco-friendly tools are urgently required. Here, a synergic approach relying to nanotechnologies and biological control strategies is proposed. The marine environment is an outstanding reservoir of bioactive natural products, which have many applications against pests, parasites, and pathogens. We proposed a novel method of seaweed-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the spongeweed Codium tomentosum, acting as a reducing and capping agent. AgNP were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In mosquitocidal assays, the 50 % lethal concentration (LC50) of C. tomentosum extract against Anopheles stephensi ranged from 255.1 (larva I) to 487.1 ppm (pupa). LC50 of C. tomentosum-synthesized AgNP ranged from 18.1 (larva I) to 40.7 ppm (pupa). In laboratory, the predation efficiency of Mesocyclops aspericornis copepods against A. stephensi larvae was 81, 65, 17, and 9 % (I, II, III, and IV instar, respectively). In AgNP contaminated environment, predation was not affected; 83, 66, 19, and 11 % (I, II, III, and IV). The anti-plasmodial activity of C. tomentosum extract and spongeweed-synthesized AgNP was evaluated against CQ-resistant (CQ-r) and CQ-sensitive (CQ-s) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC50) of C. tomentosum were 51.34 μg/ml (CQ-s) and 65.17 μg/ml (CQ-r); C. tomentosum-synthesized AgNP achieved IC50 of 72.45 μg/ml (CQ-s) and 76.08

  7. Vector WIMP miracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Seto, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin-one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the Higgs mass is often predicted to be 120-125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of Higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this Letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  8. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  9. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  10. Malaria vector species in Colombia - A review

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Lerma, James; Solarte, Yezid A; Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria Isabel; Quiñones, Martha L; Ruiz-López, Freddy; Wilkerson, Richard C; González, Ranulfo

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a comprehensive review of the literature on the vectorial importance of the major Anopheles malaria vectors in Colombia. We provide basic information on the geographical distribution, altitudinal range, immature habitats, adult behaviour, feeding preferences and anthropophily, endophily and infectivity rates. We additionally review information on the life cycle, longevity and population fluctuation of Colombian Anopheles species. Emphasis was placed on the primary vectors that have been epidemiologically incriminated in malaria transmission: Anopheles darlingi, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles nuneztovari. The role of a selection of local, regional or secondary vectors (e.g., Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and Anopheles neivai) is also discussed. We highlight the importance of combining biological, morphological and molecular data for the correct taxonomical determination of a given species, particularly for members of the species complexes. We likewise emphasise the importance of studying the bionomics of primary and secondary vectors along with an examination of the local conditions affecting the transmission of malaria. The presence and spread of the major vectors and the emergence of secondary species capable of transmitting human Plasmodia are of great interest. When selecting control measures, the anopheline diversity in the region must be considered. Variation in macroclimate conditions over a species’ geographical range must be well understood and targeted to plan effective control measures based on the population dynamics of the local Anopheles species. PMID:21881778