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Sample records for cric ancillary study

  1. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  2. CKD in Hispanics: Baseline Characteristics From the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Go, Alan; Lora, Claudia M.; Ackerson, Lynn; Cohan, Janet; Kusek, John; Mercado, Alejandro; Ojo, Akinlolu; Ricardo, Ana C.; Rosen, Leigh; Tao, Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics. We compared baseline characteristics of Hispanic participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies with non-Hispanic CRIC participants. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Setting and Participants Participants were aged 21–74 years with CKD using age-based glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at enrollment into the CRIC/H-CRIC Studies. H-CRIC included Hispanics recruited at the University of Illinois from 2005–2008 while CRIC included Hispanics and non-Hispanics recruited at seven clinical centers from 2003–2007. Factor Race/ethnicity Outcomes Blood pressure, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, CKD-associated complications Measurements Demographic characteristics, laboratory data, blood pressure, and medications were assessed using standard techniques and protocols Results Among H-CRIC/ CRIC participants, 497 were Hispanic, 1650 non-Hispanic Black, and 1638 non-Hispanic White. Low income and educational attainment were nearly twice as prevalent in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanics (p<0.01). Hispanics had self-reported diabetes (67%) more frequently than non-Hispanic Blacks (51%) and Whites (40%) (p<0.01). Blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg was more common in Hispanics (62%) compared with Blacks (57%) and Whites (35%) (p<0.05), and abnormalities in hematologic, metabolic, and bone metabolism parameters were more prevalent in Hispanics (p<0.05), even after stratifying by entry eGFR. Hispanics had the lowest receipt of ACE inhibitor/ARB among high-risk subgroups, including participants with diabetes, proteinuria, and blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR (ml/min/m2) was lower in Hispanics (39.6) than in Blacks (43.7) and Whites (46.2), while median proteinuria was higher in Hispanics (0.72 g/d) than in Blacks (0.24 g/d) and Whites (0.12 g/d) (p<0.01). Limitations Generalizability; observed

  3. The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Design and Methods.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Harold I; Appel, Lawrence J; Chertow, Glenn M; Cifelli, Denise; Cizman, Borut; Daugirdas, John; Fink, Jeffrey C; Franklin-Becker, Eunice D; Go, Alan S; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Hostetter, Tom; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Jamerson, Kenneth; Joffe, Marshall; Kusek, John W; Landis, J Richard; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Mohler, Emile R; Muntner, Paul; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R; Wright, Jackson T

    2003-07-01

    Insights into end-stage renal disease have emerged from many investigations but less is known about the epidemiology of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) and its relationship to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for progression of CRI and CVD among CRI patients and develop models to identify high-risk subgroups, informing future treatment trials, and increasing application of preventive therapies. CRIC will enroll approximately 3000 individuals at seven sites and follow participants for up to 5 yr. CRIC will include a racially and ethnically diverse group of adults aged 21 to 74 yr with a broad spectrum of renal disease severity, half of whom have diagnosed diabetes mellitus. CRIC will exclude subjects with polycystic kidney disease and those on active immunosuppression for glomerulonephritis. Subjects will undergo extensive clinical evaluation at baseline and at annual clinic visits and via telephone at 6 mo intervals. Data on quality of life, dietary assessment, physical activity, health behaviors, depression, cognitive function, health care resource utilization, as well as blood and urine specimens will be collected annually. (125)I-iothalamate clearances and CVD evaluations including a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram, an echocardiogram, and coronary electron beam or spiral CT will be performed serially. Analyses planned in CRIC will provide important information on potential risk factors for progressive CRI and CVD. Insights from CRIC should lead to the formulation of hypotheses regarding therapy that will serve as the basis for targeted interventional trials focused on reducing the burden of CRI and CVD. PMID:12819321

  4. Estimating GFR Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Yang, Wei; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Joffe, Marshall M.; Leonard, Mary B.; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; Greene, Tom; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kao, Patricia; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Lash, James P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the best measure of kidney function, but repeated assessment is not feasible in most research studies. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 1,433 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (i.e., the GFR subcohort) to derive an internal GFR estimating equation using a split sample approach. Setting & Participants Adults from 7 US metropolitan areas with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease; 48% had diabetes and 37% were black. Index Test CRIC GFR estimating equation Reference Test or Outcome Urinary 125I-iothalamate clearance testing (measured GFR) Other Measurements Laboratory measures including serum creatinine and cystatin C, and anthropometrics Results In the validation dataset, the model that included serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, age, gender, and race was the most parsimonious and similarly predictive of mGFR compared to a model additionally including bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle, CRIC clinical center, and 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion. Specifically, the root mean square errors for the separate model were 0.207 vs. 0.202, respectively. The performance of the CRIC GFR estimating equation was most accurate among the subgroups of younger participants, men, non-blacks, non-Hispanics, those without diabetes, those with body mass index <30 kg/m2, those with higher 24-hour urine creatinine excretion, those with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and those with higher mGFR. Limitations Urinary clearance of 125I-iothalamate is an imperfect measure of true GFR; cystatin C is not standardized to certified reference material; lack of external validation; small sample sizes limit analyses of subgroup-specific predictors. Conclusions The CRIC GFR estimating equation predicts measured GFR accurately in the CRIC cohort using serum creatinine and cystatin C, age, gender, and race. Its performance was best among younger and healthier

  5. Factors Associated With Depressive Symptoms and Use of Antidepressant Medications Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Xie, Dawei; Jordan, Neil; Kop, Willem J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Kusek, John W.; Ford, Virginia; Rosen, Leigh K.; Strauss, Louise; Teal, Valerie L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Powe, Neil R.; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are correlated with poor health outcomes in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence, severity, and treatment of depressive symptoms and potential risk factors, including level of kidney function, in diverse populations with CKD have not been well studied. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Settings and Participants Participants at enrollment into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies. CRIC enrolled Hispanics and non-Hispanics at seven centers from 2003-2007, and H-CRIC enrolled Hispanics at the University of Illinois from 2005-2008. Measurement Depressive symptoms measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Predictors Demographic and clinical factors Outcomes Elevated depressive symptoms (BDI >= 11) and antidepressant medication use Results Among 3853 participants, 28.5% had evidence of elevated depressive symptoms and 18.2% were using antidepressant medications; 30.8% of persons with elevated depressive symptoms were using antidepressants. The prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms varied by level of kidney function: 25.2% among participants with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73m2, and 35.1% of those with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2. Lower eGFR (OR per 10 ml/min/1.73m2 decrease, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16), Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12-2.45), and non-Hispanic black race (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74) were each associated with increased odds of elevated depressive symptoms after controlling for other factors. In regression analyses incorporating BDI score, while female sex was associated with a greater odds of antidepressant use, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Hispanic black race, and higher levels of urine albumin were associated with decreased odds of antidepressant use (p<0.05 for each). Limitations Absence of clinical diagnosis of depression and use of non-pharmacologic treatments Conclusions Although elevated depressive symptoms were common in individuals with CKD, use of

  6. Urinary Creatinine Excretion, Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis, and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dawei; Anderson, Amanda H.; Leonard, Mary B.; Reese, Peter P.; Delafontaine, Patrice; Horwitz, Edward; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Navaneethan, Sankar; Ojo, Akinlolu; Porter, Anna C.; Sondheimer, James H.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Townsend, Raymond R.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Previous studies in chronic disease states have demonstrated an association between lower urinary creatinine excretion (UCr) and increased mortality, a finding presumed to reflect the effect of low muscle mass on clinical outcomes. Little is known about the relationship between UCr and other measures of body composition in terms of the ability to predict outcomes of interest. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC), the relationship between UCr, fat free mass (FFM) as estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and (in a subpopulation) whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessment of appendicular lean mass were characterized. The associations of UCr and FFM with mortality and ESRD were compared using Cox proportional hazards models. Results A total of 3604 CRIC participants (91% of the full CRIC cohort) with both a baseline UCr and FFM measurement were included; of these, 232 had contemporaneous dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements. Participants were recruited between July 2003 and March 2007. UCr and FFM were modestly correlated (rho=0.50; P<0.001), while FFM and appendicular lean mass were highly correlated (rho=0.91; P<0.001). Higher urinary urea nitrogen, black race, younger age, and lower serum cystatin C level were all significantly associated with higher UCr. Over a median (interquartile range) of 4.2 (3.1–5.0) years of follow-up, 336 (9.3%) participants died and 510 (14.2%) reached ESRD. Lower UCr was associated with death and ESRD even after adjustment for FFM (adjusted hazard ratio for death per 1 SD higher level of UCr, 0.63 [95% confidence interval, 0.56 to 0.72]; adjusted hazard ratio for ESRD per 1 SD higher level of UCr, 0.70 [95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.75]). Conclusions Among a cohort of individuals with CKD, lower UCr is associated with death and ESRD independent of FFM as assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. PMID

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Mitral Annular Calcification in Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd alamir, Moshrik; Radulescu, Vlad; Goyfman, Michael; Mohler, Emile R; Gao, Yan Lin; Budoff, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk factors for mitral annular calcification (MAC) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrate significant overlap in the general population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether there are independent relationships between MAC and demographics, traditional and novel CVD risk factors using cardiac CT in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) in a cross-sectional study. Methods A sample of 2070 subjects underwent coronary calcium scanning during the CRIC study. Data were obtained for each participant at time of scan. Subjects were dichotomized into the presence and absence of MAC. Differences in baseline demographic and transitional risk factor data were evaluated across groups. Covariates used in multivariable adjustment were age, gender, BMI, HDL, LDL, lipid lowering medications, smoking status, family history of heart attack, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, phosphate, PTH, albuminuria, and calcium. Results Our study consisted of 2070 subjects, of which 331 had MAC (prevalence of 16.0%). The mean MAC score was 511.98 (SD 1368.76). Age and white race remained independently associated with presence of MAC. Decreased GFR was also a risk factor. African American and Hispanic race, as well as former smoking status were protective against MAC. In multivariable adjusted analyses, the remaining covariates were not significantly associated with MAC. Among renal covariates, elevated phosphate was significant. Conclusion In the CRIC population, presence of MAC was independently associated with age, Caucasian race, decreased GFR, and elevated phosphate. These results are suggested by mechanisms of dysregulation of inflammation, hormones, and electrolytes in subjects with renal disease. PMID:26188533

  9. DNA methylation profile associated with rapid decline in kidney function: findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Maria R.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold I.; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Guzman, Nicolas J.; Ramezani, Ali; Susztak, Katalin; Herman, James G.; Cope, Leslie; Harmon, Brennan; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Lash, James P.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms may be important in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We studied the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern associated with rapid loss of kidney function using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 K BeadChip in 40 Chronic Renal Insufficiency (CRIC) study participants (n = 3939) with the highest and lowest rates of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results The mean eGFR slope was 2.2 (1.4) and −5.1 (1.2) mL/min/1.73 m2 in the stable kidney function group and the rapid progression group, respectively. CpG islands in NPHP4, IQSEC1 and TCF3 were hypermethylated to a larger extent in subjects with stable kidney function (P-values of 7.8E−05 to 9.5E−05). These genes are involved in pathways known to promote the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis. Other CKD-related genes that were differentially methylated are NOS3, NFKBIL2, CLU, NFKBIB, TGFB3 and TGFBI, which are involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways (P-values of 4.5E−03 to 0.046). Pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that gene networks related to cell signaling, carbohydrate metabolism and human behavior are epigenetically regulated in CKD. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications may be important in determining the rate of loss of kidney function in patients with established CKD. PMID:24516231

  10. Relationship of Estimated GFR and Coronary Artery Calcification in the (CRIC) Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P.; Mohler, Emile R.; Lash, Jim; Yang, Wei; Rosen, Leigh; Glenn, Melanie; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. Although individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased mortality risk, the incidence, prevalence, and prognosis of CAC in CKD is not well-understood. Study Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting and Participants Analysis of 1,908 participants who underwent coronary calcium scanning as part of the multi-ethnic CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Predictor Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) computed using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation, stratified by race, sex and diabetic status. eGFR was treated as a continous variable and a categorical variable compared to the reference range of >60 ml/min/1.73 m2 Measurements CAC detected using CT scans using either an Imatron C-300 electron beam computed tomography scanner or multi-detector CT scanner. CAC was computed using the Agatston score, as a categorical variable. Analyses were performed using ordinal logistic regression. Results We found a strong and graded relationship between lower eGFR and increasing CAC. In unadjusted models, ORs increased from 1.68 (95% CI, 1.23–2.31) for eGFR from 50–59 to 2.82 (95% CI, 2.06–3.85) for eGFR of <30. Multivariable adjustment only partially attenuated the results (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.07–2.20) for eGFR<30. Limitations Use of eGFR rather than measured GFR. Conclusions We demonstrated a graded relationship between severity of CKD and CAC, independent of traditional risk factors. These findings supports recent guidelines that state that if vascular calcification is present, it should be considered as a complementary component to be included in the decision making required for individualizing treatment of CKD. PMID:21783289

  11. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Baseline Characteristics and Associations with Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Go, Alan S.; Appel, Lawrence J.; He, Jiang; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.; Xie, Dawei; Cifelli, Denise; Cohan, Janet; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Narva, Andrew; Robinson, Nancy; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with CKD. We examined baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Seven clinical centers recruited adults who were aged 21 to 74 yr and had CKD using age-based estimated GFR (eGFR) inclusion criteria. At baseline, blood and urine specimens were collected and information regarding health behaviors, diet, quality of life, and functional status was obtained. GFR was measured using radiolabeled iothalamate in one third of participants. Results: A total of 3612 participants were enrolled with mean age ± SD of 58.2 ± 11.0 yr; 46% were women, and 47% had diabetes. Overall, 45% were non-Hispanic white, 46% were non-Hispanic black, and 5% were Hispanic. Eighty-six percent reported hypertension, 22% coronary disease, and 10% heart failure. Mean body mass index was 32.1 ± 7.9 kg/m2, and 47% had a BP >130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR was 43.4 ± 13.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and median (interquartile range) protein excretion was 0.17 g/24 h (0.07 to 0.81 g/24 h). Lower eGFR was associated with older age, lower socioeconomic and educational level, cigarette smoking, self-reported CVD, peripheral arterial disease, and elevated BP. Conclusions: Lower level of eGFR was associated with a greater burden of CVD as well as lower socioeconomic and educational status. Long-term follow-up of participants will provide critical insights into the epidemiology of CKD and its relationship to adverse outcomes. PMID:19541818

  12. Interleukin-6 Is a Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Amdur, Richard L.; Mukherjee, Monica; Go, Alan; Barrows, Ian R.; Ramezani, Ali; Shoji, Jun; Reilly, Muredach P.; Gnanaraj, Joseph; Deo, Raj; Roas, Sylvia; Keane, Martin; Master, Steve; Teal, Valerie; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Peter; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Tracy, Cynthia M.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we examined the association between inflammation and AF in 3,762 adults with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. AF was determined at baseline by self-report and electrocardiogram (ECG). Plasma concentrations of interleukin(IL)-1, IL-1 Receptor antagonist, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor-β, high sensitivity C-Reactive protein, and fibrinogen, measured at baseline. At baseline, 642 subjects had history of AF, but only 44 had AF in ECG recording. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, 108 subjects developed new-onset AF. There was no significant association between inflammatory biomarkers and past history of AF. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, laboratory values, echocardiographic variables, and medication use, plasma IL-6 level was significantly associated with presence of AF at baseline (Odds ratio [OR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.14; P = 0.001) and new-onset AF (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.53; P = 0.03). To summarize, plasma IL-6 level is an independent and consistent predictor of AF in patients with CKD. PMID:26840403

  13. Time-updated systolic blood pressure and the progression of chronic kidney disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda H; Yang, Wei; Townsend, Raymond R; Pan, Qiang; Chertow, Glenn M; Kusek, John W; Charleston, Jeanne; He, Jiang; Kallem, RadhaKrishna; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) is often inadequately controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous reports of the longitudinal association between achieved level of BP and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have not incorporated time-updated BP with appropriate adjustment for known confounders. Objective To assess the association between baseline and time-updated systolic BP (SBP) with the progression of CKD. Design Observational, prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00304148) Setting Seven US clinical centers Patients Participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (N=3,708) followed for a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 5.7 (4.6, 6.7) years Measurements The mean of three seated SBP measurements were used as the visit-specific SBP. SBP was time-updated as the mean of that visit and all prior visits. Outcomes were ESRD and the composite renal endpoint of ESRD (dialysis or transplantation) or halving of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses investigating baseline and time-updated SBP utilized traditional Cox proportional hazards models and marginal structural models, respectively. Results SBP was ≥130 mmHg at all study visits in 19.2% of participants, and ≥140 mmHg in 10.6%. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for ESRD among participants with SBP 130–139 mmHg, compared to SBP <120 mmHg, was 1.46 (1.13–1.88) using only baseline data, and was 2.37 (1.48–3.80) using all available time-updated data. Among those with SBP ≥140 mmHg, corresponding hazard ratios were 1.46 (1.18–1.88) and 3.37 (2.26–5.03), respectively. Limitations SBP was measured once annually, and the CRIC Study cohort is not a random sample. Conclusions Among participants in the CRIC Study, time-updated SBP over 130 mmHg was more strongly associated with progression of CKD than analyses based on baseline SBP. Funding The CRIC Study is funded under cooperative agreements from the National Institute of

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Left Ventricular Function and Structure from CKD to ESRD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Martin; Delafontaine, Patrice; Dries, Daniel; Foster, Elyse; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Go, Alan S.; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Rahman, Mahboob; Tao, Kaixiang; Wright, Jackson T.; Xie, Dawei; Hsu,, Chi-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Abnormal left ventricular structure and function are associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes among patients with CKD and ESRD. A better understanding of changes in left ventricular mass and ejection fraction during the transition from CKD to ESRD may provide important insights to opportunities to improve cardiac outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a longitudinal study of a subset of participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort who were enrolled from 2003 to 2007 and followed through January of 2011. Participants were included if they had serial echocardiograms performed at advanced CKD (defined as estimated GFR<20 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and again after ESRD (defined as need for hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis). Results A total of 190 participants (44% female, 66% black) had echocardiograms during advanced CKD and after ESRD. Mean (SD) estimated GFR at advanced CKD was 16.9 (3.5) ml/min per 1.73 m2. Mean (SD) time between the advanced CKD echocardiogram and ESRD echocardiogram was 2.0 (1.0) years. There was no significant change in left ventricular mass index (62.3–59.5 g/m2.7, P=0.10) between advanced CKD and ESRD; however, ejection fraction significantly decreased (53%–50%, P=0.002). Interactions for age, race, dialysis modality, and diabetes status were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Mean left ventricular mass index did not change significantly from advanced CKD to ESRD; however, ejection fraction declined during this transition period. Although left ventricular mass index is fixed by advanced stages of CKD, ejection fraction decline during more advanced stages of CKD may be an important contributor to cardiovascular disease and mortality after dialysis. PMID:23411431

  15. STS ancillary equipment study. User reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plough, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A record of what is currently known about STS ancillary equipment is presented in this user-oriented design so that a potential user may evaluate whether he could use the described ancillary equipment or if he would need to design and fabricate a payload-unique item. References that the user can use to obtain additional details and requirements to aid in his evaluation and decision are included.

  16. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Jeffrey C.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Barrows, Ian R.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Wolman, Melanie; Patel, Samir S.; Keane, Martin G.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function. Methods Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, high-sensitivity C-Reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen and serum albumin were measured in 3,939 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. Echocardiography was performed according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and interpreted at a centralized core laboratory. Results LVH, systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction were present in 52.3%, 11.8% and 76.3% of the study subjects, respectively. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetic status, current smoking status, systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin- creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate, hs-CRP (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.16, 1.37], p<0.001), IL-1RA (1.23 [1.13, 1.34], p<0.0001), IL-6 (1.25 [1.14, 1.36], p<0.001) and TNF-α (1.14 [1.04, 1.25], p = 0.004) were associated with LVH. The odds for systolic dysfunction were greater for subjects with elevated levels of hs-CRP (1.32 [1.18, 1.48], p<0.001) and IL-6 (1.34 [1.21, 1.49], p<0.001). Only hs-CRP was associated with diastolic dysfunction (1.14 [1.04, 1.26], p = 0.005). Conclusion In patients with CKD, elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 are associated with LVH and systolic dysfunction. PMID:25909952

  17. Ancillary study management systems: a review of needs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The valuable clinical data, specimens, and assay results collected during a primary clinical trial or observational study can enable researchers to answer additional, pressing questions with relatively small investments in new measurements. However, management of such follow-on, “ancillary” studies is complex. It requires coordinating across institutions, sites, repositories, and approval boards, as well as distributing, integrating, and analyzing diverse data types. General-purpose software systems that simplify the management of ancillary studies have not yet been explored in the research literature. Methods We have identified requirements for ancillary study management primarily as part of our ongoing work with a number of large research consortia. These organizations include the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI), the Immune Tolerance Network (ITN), the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN), the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP), and the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD). We also consulted with researchers at a range of other disease research organizations regarding their workflows and data management strategies. Lastly, to enhance breadth, we reviewed process documents for ancillary study management from other organizations. Results By exploring characteristics of ancillary studies, we identify differentiating requirements and scenarios for ancillary study management systems (ASMSs). Distinguishing characteristics of ancillary studies may include the collection of additional measurements (particularly new analyses of existing specimens); the initiation of studies by investigators unaffiliated with the original study; cross-protocol data pooling and analysis; pre-existing participant consent; and pre-existing data context and provenance. For an ASMS to address these characteristics, it would need to address both operational requirements (e.g., allocating existing specimens) and data management requirements

  18. Classroom Utilization of Ancillary Personnel: Delivery Systems for Mainstreaming in Elementary Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockoff, Edward

    1979-01-01

    Proposes in-service training on the utilization of ancillary personnel (special education teacher, school nurse, hearing and speech clinician, guidance counselor) in assisting the social studies teacher with the mainstreamed student. Outlines how ancillary personnel may aid in preparing students for entrance into the regular classroom, developing…

  19. Do Ancillary Studies Aid Detection and Classification of Barrett Esophagus?

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2016-08-01

    Barrett esophagus is a preneoplastic condition defined by the presence of intestinal metaplasia (ie, goblet cells) in an endoscopically apparent columnar-lined esophagus. Dysplasia is the most important risk factor for cancer development among patients with Barrett esophagus; approximately 6% of patients with high-grade dysplasia progress to adenocarcinoma within 1 year. Surgical pathologists are generally expected to address 2 clinical concerns when evaluating mucosal biopsy samples from patients with suspected Barrett esophagus; they should note the presence, or absence, of goblet cells and comment on the grade of dysplasia when it is identified. Biopsy samples from patients with Barrett esophagus are categorized as negative for dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia, or positive for dysplasia; in the latter situation, the severity of dysplasia is classified as low or high grade. Several histochemical stains, immunohistochemical stains, and molecular techniques can be used to facilitate detection of goblet cells and classify dysplasia in patients with Barrett esophagus, although their added value to routine morphologic assessment is not entirely clear. The purpose of this review is to discuss the state of the art regarding application of ancillary studies to esophageal samples from patients with a columnar-lined esophagus. PMID:27096258

  20. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study: Sample, Design, and Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Linda C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Isasi, Carmen; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Youngblood, Marston E.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study aims to examine associations between sociocultural and psychosocial factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos. The conceptual framework is based on the Reserve Capacity and Lifespan Biopsychosocial Models, which emphasize multiple risk and protective pathways underlying socioeconomic and ethnic influences in health. This study describes the rationale, participants, and procedures for the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Design and Setting The Sociocultural Ancillary Study to the HCHS/SOL is a cross-sectional cohort study with future opportunities for prospective investigation. Participants Participants were 5,313 adults, aged 18-74 years, of self-identified Hispanic/Latino descent and representing multiple Hispanic/Latino background groups, recruited from the Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA. Intervention Participants completed an interview-administered sociocultural assessment battery within 9 months of their HCHS/SOL clinical baseline exam. Outcome Measures The primary outcomes are CVD and the metabolic syndrome and its component risk factors. Results The Sociocultural Ancillary Study sample is broadly representative of the HCHS/SOL cohort. Weighted demographics are: 55% male, 56% 18-44 years, 44% 45 years and older, and 37% Mexican, 20% Cuban, 16% Puerto Rican, 12% Dominican, 8% Central American, and 5% South American descent. Conclusions By testing theoretically driven hypotheses concerning sociocultural and psychosocial factors in CVD, the Sociocultural Ancillary Study seeks to inform future prevention and intervention efforts for U.S. Hispanic/Latinos. PMID:24620452

  1. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 3: MMU ancillary support equipment and attachment concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU) ancillary support equipment and attachment concepts is presented. The major objectives of the study are defined as: (1) identifying MMU applications which would supplement space shuttle safety and effectiveness, (2) to define general MMU performance and control requirements to satisfy candidate shuttle applications, (3) to develop concepts for attaching MMUs to various worksites and equipment, and (4) to identify requirements and develop concepts for MMU ancillary equipment.

  2. Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M; Bansal, Nisha; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leonard, Mary B; Keane, Martin G; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R; Shlipak, Michael G; Feldman, Harold I

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that elevated aldosterone concentrations are an independent risk factor for death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Limited studies, however, have evaluated systematically the association between serum aldosterone and adverse events in the setting of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the association between serum aldosterone and death and end-stage renal disease in 3866 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. We also evaluated the association between aldosterone and incident congestive heart failure and atherosclerotic events in participants without baseline cardiovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate independent associations between elevated aldosterone concentrations and each outcome. Interactions were hypothesized and explored between aldosterone and sex, race, and the use of loop diuretics and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors. During a median follow-up period of 5.4 years, 587 participants died, 743 developed end-stage renal disease, 187 developed congestive heart failure, and 177 experienced an atherosclerotic event. Aldosterone concentrations (per SD of the log-transformed aldosterone) were not an independent risk factor for death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.12), end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.17), or atherosclerotic events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.18). Aldosterone was associated with congestive heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.35). Among participants with chronic kidney disease, higher aldosterone concentrations were independently associated with the development of congestive heart failure but not for death, end-stage renal disease, or atherosclerotic events. Further studies should evaluate whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may reduce adverse events in individuals with

  3. Selected inflammatory imitators of mycosis fungoides: histologic features and utility of ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Arps, David P; Chen, Stephanie; Fullen, Douglas R; Hristov, Alexandra C

    2014-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous lymphoma; however, it remains a significant diagnostic challenge, in part because of the overlap with several inflammatory dermatoses. Despite advances in immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics, false-positive, false-negative, and indeterminate diagnoses are not uncommon. In most cases, the overall balance of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features must be considered carefully because there are few sensitive and specific clues to the diagnosis. Moreover, an appropriate clinical presentation is essential to the diagnosis and helps to favor or exclude inflammatory/reactive processes. Herein, we discuss 3 important inflammatory dermatoses that may closely simulate mycosis fungoides, and we review the use of ancillary studies in these challenging cases. PMID:25268195

  4. Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids: An ancillary study of the Childhood Asthma Management Program clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Bender, Bruce G.; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Adkinson, N. Franklin; Zeiger, Robert S.; Wise, Robert A.; Bilderback, Andrew L.; Rand, Cynthia S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Information comparing subjective and objective measurements of adherence to study medications and the effects of adherence on treatment-related differences in asthma clinical trials are limited. Objective We sought to compare subjective and objective measurements of children’s adherence to inhaled corticosteroids or placebo and to determine whether adherence to study medications modified treatment-related differences in outcomes. Methods In an ancillary study conducted in 3 of 8 Childhood Asthma Management Program Clinical Centers, adherence was assessed by using self-reported and objective data in 5- to 12-year-old children with mild or moderate asthma who were randomly assigned to 200 μg of inhaled budesonide twice per day (n = 84) or placebo (n = 56) for 4 years. The κ statistic was used to evaluate agreement between self-reported adherence (daily diary cards) and objectively measured adherence (number of doses left in study inhalers). Multivariable analyses were used to determine whether adherence to study treatment modified treatment-related differences in outcomes. Results Adherence of less than 80% was seen in 75% of 140 children when adherence was measured objectively but only in 6% of children when measured by means of self-report. There was poor agreement between objective and subjective measurements of adherence of at least 80% (κ = 0.00; 95% CI, −0.05 to 0.04); self-reported adherence over the 4-year period generally overestimated objectively measured adherence (93.6% vs 60.8%, P < .0001). There was little evidence to indicate that adherence modified treatment-related differences in outcomes. Conclusion Researchers should use objective rather than self-reported adherence data to identify clinical trial participants with low levels of adherence to study treatment. PMID:22104610

  5. Cardiovascular Fat, Menopause, and Sex Hormones in Women: The SWAN Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Kelly J.; Janssen, Imke; Hanley, Carrie; Budoff, Matthew J.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Powell, Lynda H.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cardiovascular risk increases in women after menopause. Mounting evidence demonstrates a role of cardiovascular fat (CF) in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, but no research has examined CF in relation to sex hormones or menopausal status in women. Objective: The objective was to determine the relationship between CF depots, menopausal status, and endogenous sex hormones. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs were used. Setting: The setting included the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart and Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study. Participants: A total of 456 women (mean age, 50.75 y); 62% premenopausal/early perimenopausal, and 38% late peri-/postmenopausal. Intervention: Menopausal status, endogenous sex hormones measured simultaneously with CF volumes, and circulating estradiol available 4.80 years (median) before CF measures. Main Outcome Measures: Volumes of CF (epicardial adipose tissue [EAT], paracardial adipose tissue [PAT], total heart adipose tissue [TAT = EAT + PAT], and aortic perivascular adipose tissue [PVAT]). Results: In final models, late peri-/postmenopausal women had 9.88% more EAT, 20.72% more PAT, and 11.69% more TAT volumes than pre-/early perimenopausal women (P < .05). PVAT was not associated with menopausal status. In final models, lower estradiol concentrations were associated with greater volumes of PAT and TAT (P < .05). Women with the greatest reduction in estradiol since baseline had greater volumes of PAT compared to women with the least reduction (P = .02). Conclusions: Late peri-/postmenopausal women have greater volumes of heart fat compared with pre-/early perimenopausal women independent of age, obesity, and other covariates. Endogenous sex hormones are associated with CF. Perhaps CF plays a role in the higher risk of coronary heart disease reported in women after menopause. PMID:26176800

  6. Prevalence and Correlates of Perceived Ethnic Discrimination in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Morales, Leticia; Roesch, Scott C.; Gallo, Linda C.; Emory, Kristen T.; Molina, Kristine M.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Penedo, Frank J.; Navas-Nacher, Elena L.; Teng, Yanping; Deng, Yu; Isasi, Carmen R.; Schneiderman, Neil; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies examining perceived ethnic discrimination in Latinos of diverse background groups are limited. This study examined prevalence and correlates of discrimination in a diverse sample of U.S. Latinos (N=5,291) from the multi-site Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) and HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The sample permitted an examination of differences across seven groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South American, and Other/Multiple Background). Most participants (79.5%) reported lifetime discrimination exposure and prevalence rates ranged from 64.9% to 98% across groups. Structural Equation Models (SEM) indicated that after adjusting for sociodemographic covariates most group differences in reports of discrimination were eliminated. However, Cubans reported the lowest levels of discrimination, overall among all groups. Furthermore, regional effects were more important than group effects. Participants from Chicago reported the highest levels of discrimination in comparison to other regions. Group differences among Latinos appear to be primarily a function of sociodemographic differences in education, income, and acculturation. In addition, differences in exposure to discrimination may be tied to variables associated with both immigration patterns and integration to U.S. culture. Results highlight the importance of considering historical context and the intersection of discrimination and immigration when evaluating the mental health of Latinos. PMID:26491624

  7. STS users study (study 2.2). Volume 3: Ancillary equipment study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. I.

    1975-01-01

    The multi-mission support equipment (MMSE) applicable to six payloads is studied. Tables indicate individual satellite projects to which each MMSE is applicable, and which equipments are applicable to multiple payload configurations when more than one project's payload would be flown on the STS. An estimate of the first date on which interface definition information needed by a payload project are also shown.

  8. Cell blocks in cytopathology: a review of preparative methods, utility in diagnosis and role in ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Mathur, S R; Iyer, V K

    2014-12-01

    The cell block (CB) is a routine procedure in cytopathology that has gained importance because of its pivotal role in diagnosis and ancillary studies. There is no precise review in the published literature that deals with the various methods of preparation of CB, its utility in diagnosis, immunocytochemistry (ICC) or molecular testing, and its drawbacks. An extensive literature search on CB in cytology using internet search engines was performed for this review employing the following keywords: cell block, cytoblock, cytology, cytopathology, methods, preparation, fixatives, diagnostic yield, ancillary and molecular studies. Ever since its introduction more than a century ago, the CB technique has undergone numerous modifications to improve the quality of the procedure; however, the overall principle remains the same in each method. CBs can be prepared from virtually all varieties of cytological samples. In today's era of personalized medicine, cytological specimens, including CBs, augment the utility of cytological samples in analysing the molecular alterations as effectively as surgical biopsies or resection specimens. With the availability of molecular targeted therapy for many cancers, a large number of recent studies have used cytological material or CBs for molecular characterization. The various techniques of CB preparation with different fixatives, their advantages and limitations, and issues of diagnostic yield are discussed in this review. PMID:25113785

  9. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  10. MSM in HIV-prevention trials are sexual partners with each other: An ancillary study to the EXPLORE intervention.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A; Benet, Dana Jones; Manseau, Marc W; DeSousa, Nancy; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV seroconversion among men who have sex with men (MSM). The present ancillary study enrolled 345 EXPLORE participants at one study site (Boston) and assessed high-risk sexual behavior with other EXPLORE participants. It also assessed sexual intentions across other EXPLORE participants, HIV-negative individuals, and unknown HIV serostatus partners. Thirty-one percent reported having sex with another EXPLORE participant: 27% unprotected receptive oral sex with ejaculation (UO), 30% unprotected insertive anal sex (UIA), and 34% reported unprotected receptive anal sex (URA). Significant relationships between intentions to engage in UO, UIA, and URA, and type of partner emerged with intentions to engage in UO, UIA, and URA higher in HIV-negative partners, other EXPLORE participants, and unknown-HIV serostatus partners. Future HIV-prevention studies recruiting MSM at increased sexual risk of HIV infection should address participants potentially becoming sexual partners with each other. PMID:16331532

  11. Ancillary Benefits for Caregivers of Children with Asthma Participating in an Environmental Intervention Study to Alleviate Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kubzansky, Laura D.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2009-01-01

    Providing care for children with asthma can be demanding and time-intensive with far-reaching effects on caregivers’ lives. Studies have documented childhood asthma symptom reductions and improved asthma-related quality of life (AQOL) with indoor allergen-reducing environmental interventions. Few such studies, however, have considered ancillary benefits to caregivers or other family members. Ancillary benefits could be derived from child health improvements and reduced caregiving burden or from factors such as improved living environments or social support that often accompanies intensive residential intervention efforts. As part of the Boston Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI), a longitudinal single-cohort intervention study of asthmatic children, we examined trends in caregivers’ quality of life related to their child’s asthma (caregiver AQOL) using monthly Juniper Caregiver Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ) for 32 primary caregivers to 42 asthmatic children aged 4 to 17 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to examine caregiver AQOL trends and their relationship to the child’s AQOL, then to consider additional predictors of caregiver AQOL. Caregiver AQLQ improved significantly over the course of the study with overall improvements significantly correlated with child AQOL (p = 0.005). However, caregiver AQOL improved most in the months before environmental interventions, while children’s AQOL improved most in the months following. Time trends in caregiver AQOL, controlling for child AQOL, were not explained by available social support or caregiver stress measures. Our findings suggest potential participation effects not adequately captured by standard measures. Future environmental intervention studies should more formally consider social support and participation effects for both children and caregivers PMID:19184446

  12. Ancillary benefits for caregivers of children with asthma participating in an environmental intervention study to alleviate asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Jane E; Kubzansky, Laura D; Spengler, John D; Levy, Jonathan I

    2009-03-01

    Providing care for children with asthma can be demanding and time-intensive with far-reaching effects on caregivers' lives. Studies have documented childhood asthma symptom reductions and improved asthma-related quality of life (AQOL) with indoor allergen-reducing environmental interventions. Few such studies, however, have considered ancillary benefits to caregivers or other family members. Ancillary benefits could be derived from child health improvements and reduced caregiving burden or from factors such as improved living environments or social support that often accompanies intensive residential intervention efforts. As part of the Boston Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI), a longitudinal single-cohort intervention study of asthmatic children, we examined trends in caregivers' quality of life related to their child's asthma (caregiver AQOL) using monthly Juniper Caregiver Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ) for 32 primary caregivers to 42 asthmatic children aged 4 to 17 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to examine caregiver AQOL trends and their relationship to the child's AQOL, then to consider additional predictors of caregiver AQOL. Caregiver AQLQ improved significantly over the course of the study with overall improvements significantly correlated with child AQOL (p = 0.005). However, caregiver AQOL improved most in the months before environmental interventions, while children's AQOL improved most in the months following. Time trends in caregiver AQOL, controlling for child AQOL, were not explained by available social support or caregiver stress measures. Our findings suggest potential participation effects not adequately captured by standard measures. Future environmental intervention studies should more formally consider social support and participation effects for both children and caregivers. PMID:19184446

  13. Macular Pigment Imaging in AREDS2 Participants: An Ancillary Study of AREDS2 Subjects Enrolled at the Moran Eye Center

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Paul S.; Ahmed, Faisal; Liu, Aihua; Allman, Susan; Sheng, Xiaoming; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor; Gellermann, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) is a randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to determine whether supplementation with 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin per day can slow the rate of progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although some biomarkers of response to carotenoid supplementation such as serum concentrations are part of the AREDS2 protocol, measurement of carotenoid concentrations in the eye and other tissues is not. In this approved ancillary study, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), macular pigment distributions, and skin carotenoid levels at enrollment and at each annual visit were measured to assess baseline carotenoid status and to monitor response to assigned interventions. Methods. All subjects enrolled at the Moran Eye Center had MPOD and macular pigment spatial distributions measured by dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging and total skin carotenoids measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy. Results. Baseline MPOD in enrolled subjects was unusually high relative to an age-matched control group that did not consume carotenoid supplements regularly, consistent with the high rate of habitual lutein and zeaxanthin consumption in Utah AREDS2 subjects prior to enrollment. MPOD did not correlate with serum or skin carotenoid measurements. Conclusions. Useful information is provided through this ancillary study on the ocular carotenoid status of AREDS2 participants in the target tissue of lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation: The macula. When treatment assignments are unmasked at the conclusion of the study, unique tissue-based insights will be provided on the progression of AMD in response to long-term, high-dose carotenoid supplementation versus diet alone. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00345176.) PMID:22879423

  14. Finisher hog production in the Southeastern United States: Ancillary measurements derived from the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robarge, W. P.; Lee, S.; Walker, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of emissions of gases and fine particulate matter from swine animal feeding operations (AFOs) in the southeastern US have typically been confined to relatively short periods (days to several weeks) and have generally focused on waste lagoons. Access to swine animal housing units and other ancillary information has been limited. The National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS) provided a unique opportunity to characterize emissions from swine housing units for an extended period of time (~ 2 years), and allowed access to ancillary measurements regarding nutrient flows (feed amounts and composition), manure dynamics, animal inventories, water usage and farm management. Presented here is a summary of the observations made for a NAEMS finisher site (NC3B) selected as being representative of swine production in the southeastern US. Finisher hogs are raised in rotations (~ 140 days) with a target market weight of 123 kg/hog. Among the population during a rotation (700-800 hogs/barn) the actual growth rate varies with a series of “grade-outs” of market-weight hogs starting ~ 110 days from initial load-in. Derivation of the standing live-weight in the barns during a rotation therefore requires use of a growth model and summation over several different “populations” of hogs within a single barn. Up to 5 different feed formulations are fed during a rotation with %N content ranging from (3.4 to 2.2% N; total feed consumed 181,000 kg/barn). Across 4 complete rotations, N consumed was ~50 g N per hog/day. Of this amount, we estimate ~ 60% is excreted as fecal matter and urine. The TAN (NH3 + NH4+) content of the shallow pits is consistently higher (1880 ±390 mg TAN/L) than that found in the anaerobic lagoon (800 ±70 mg TAN/L), except immediately after recharge following pit-pull (pH of the two liquids was similar). The presence of a recalcitrant layer of sludge in the shallow pits (liquid height = 20 cm; sludge depth = 5-10 cm; TAN = 2500 mg N/L; total

  15. Ancillary services market in California

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T.; Marnay, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Liew, L.; Khavkin, M.

    1999-07-01

    This report includes sections on the following topics: (1) California restructured electricity system overview; (2) Reliability criteria; (3) Design of the California ISO ancillary services market; (4) Operation of ancillary services markets; (5) Ancillary services markets redesign; and (6) Conclusions.

  16. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-Based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-06-01

    A methodology for the study of cloud droplet activation based on the measurements performed with ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidars and ancillary remote sensors collected at CNR-IMAA observatory, Potenza, South Italy, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin warm clouds. Thin clouds are often also optically thin: this allows the cloud top detection and the full profiling of cloud layers using ground-based Raman lidar. Moreover, broken clouds are inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure in order to study the variability of optical properties and water vapor content in the transition from cloudy regions to cloudless regions close to the cloud boundaries. A statistical study of this variability leads to identify threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. These values can be used to evaluate and improve parameterizations of droplet activation within numerical models. A statistical study of the co-located Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between droplet vertical velocities measured at the cloud base and the aerosol effective radius observed in the cloud-free regions of the broken clouds are found.

  17. Chronic Stress, Inflammation, and Glucose Regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    McCurley, Jessica L.; Mills, Paul J.; Roesch, Scott C.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M.; Penedo, Frank J.; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)-Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β=.09, p<0.01), post load glucose (β=.07, p<0.05), and HbA1c levels (β=.08, p<0.01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  18. Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    McCurley, Jessica L; Mills, Paul J; Roesch, Scott C; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Isasi, Carmen R; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p < .01), postload glucose (β = .07, p < .05), and HbA1c levels (β = .08, p < .01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  19. N-Heterocyclic olefins as ancillary ligands in catalysis: a study of their behaviour in transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; García, Nestor; Jaseer, E A; Munárriz, Julen; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Polo, Victor; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    The Ir(i) complexes [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 and [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, NHO(PPh2) = 1,3-bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)ethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline) and NHO(OMe) = 1,3-bis(2-(methoxyethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline), both featuring an N-heterocyclic olefin ligand (NHO), have been tested in the transfer hydrogenation reaction; this representing the first example of the use of NHOs as ancillary ligands in catalysis. The pre-catalyst [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 has shown excellent activities in the transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines using (i)PrOH as a hydrogen source, while [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] decomposes throughout the reaction to give low yields of the hydrogenated product. Addition of one or two equivalents of a phosphine ligand to the latter avoids catalyst decomposition and significantly improves the reaction yields. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by means of stoichiometric studies and theoretical calculations. The formation of the active species ([Ir(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))((i)PrO)]) has been proposed to occur via isopropoxide coordination and concomitant COD dissociation. Moreover, throughout the catalytic cycle the NHO moiety behaves as a hemilabile ligand, thus allowing the catalyst to adopt stable square planar geometries in the transition states, which reduces the energetic barrier of the process. PMID:27472896

  20. Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

    2010-12-03

    The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

  1. Associations of Structural and Functional Social Support with Diabetes Prevalence in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Linda C.; Fortmann, Addie L.; McCurley, Jessica L.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Penedo, Frank J.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Gouskova, Natalia; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Schneiderman, Neil; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little research has examined associations of social support with diabetes (or other physical health outcomes) in Hispanics, who are at elevated risk. Purpose We examined associations between social support and diabetes prevalence in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods Participants were 5181 adults, 18–74 years old, representing diverse Hispanic backgrounds, who underwent baseline exam with fasting blood draw, oral glucose tolerance test, medication review, sociodemographic assessment, and sociocultural exam with functional and structural social support measures. Results In adjusted analyses, one standard deviation higher structural and functional social support related to 16% and 15% lower odds, respectively, of having diabetes. Structural and functional support were related to both previously diagnosed diabetes (OR = .84 and .88, respectively) and newly recognized diabetes prevalence (OR = .84 and .83, respectively). Conclusions Higher functional and structural social support are associated with lower diabetes prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos. PMID:25107504

  2. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  3. (abstract) Towards Ancillary Data Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's SPICE information system for archiving, distributing, and accessing spacecraft navigation, orientation, and other ancillary data is described. A proposal is made for the further evolution of this concept to an internationally useful standard, to be.

  4. Impact of Ancillary Subunits on Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Xu, Xianghua; Roepke, Torsten K.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels generate the outward K+ ion currents that constitute the primary force in ventricular repolarization. Kv channels comprise tetramers of pore-forming α subunits and, in probably the majority of cases in vivo, ancillary or β subunits that help define the properties of the Kv current generated. Ancillary subunits can be broadly categorized as cytoplasmic or transmembrane, and can modify Kv channel trafficking, conductance, gating, ion selectivity, regulation and pharmacology. Because of their often profound effects on Kv channel function, studies of the molecular correlates of ventricular repolarization must take into account ancillary subunits as well as α subunits. Cytoplasmic ancillary subunits include the Kvβ subunits, which regulate a range of Kv channels and may link channel gating to redox potential; and the KChIPs, which appear most often associated with Kv4 subfamily channels that generate the ventricular Ito current. Transmembrane ancillary subunits include the MinK-related proteins (MiRPs) encoded by KCNE genes, which modulate members of most Kv α subunit subfamilies; and the putative 12-transmembrane domain KCR1 protein which modulates hERG. In some cases, such as the ventricular IKs channel complex, it is well-established that the KCNQ1 α subunit must co-assemble with the MinK (KCNE1) single transmembrane domain ancillary subunit for recapitulation of the characteristic, unusually slowly-activating IKs current. In other cases it is not so clear-cut, and in particular the roles of the other MinK-related proteins (MiRPs 1–4) in regulating cardiac Kv channels such as KCNQ1 and hERG in vivo are under debate. MiRP1 alters hERG function and pharmacology, and inherited MiRP1 mutations are associated with inherited and acquired arrhythmias, but controversy exists over the native role of MiRP1 in regulating hERG (and therefore ventricular IKr) in vivo. Some ancillary subunits may exhibit varied expression to shape

  5. The Relationship Between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Nuclear Cataract in the Carotenoid Age-Related Eye Study (CAREDS), an Ancillary Study of the Women's Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Prethy; Millen, Amy E.; Meyers, Kristin J.; Liu, Zhe; Voland, Rickie; Sondel, Sheri; Tinker, Lesley; Wallace, Robert B.; Blodi, Barbara A.; Binkley, Neil; Sarto, Gloria; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin; Mares, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and nuclear cataract among participants of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study (OS). Methods. Nuclear cataract was assessed from slit lamp photographs (2001–2004) taken 6 years after collecting serum analyzed for 25(OH)D levels at WHI baseline (1994–1998) in 1278 CAREDS participants age 50 to 79 years. Multivariate (age, iris color, smoking, pulse pressure) odds ratios (ORs) for nuclear cataract (nuclear opacities > level 4 or cataract extraction) by quintiles of serum 25(OH)D were estimated using logistic regression. Results. No significant association was observed between serum 25(OH)D and nuclear cataract among women of all ages (age-adjusted OR [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.97 [0.65–1.45]). However, there was a significant age interaction (P for interaction = 0.04). There were no significant associations in the women 70 years or older. In women younger than 70 years, we observed an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and nuclear cataract (multivariate adjusted ORs [95% CI] 0.54 [0.29–0.99] and 0.66 [0.36–1.20] for quintiles 4 and 5 vs. 1, respectively; P = 0.03). Further adjustment for 25(OH)D determinants (body mass index, vitamin D intake, and UVB exposure) attenuated this association. Conclusions. Serum 25(OH)D levels were unrelated to nuclear opacities in this study sample. However, exploratory analyses suggest a protective association in women younger than 70 years. Further investigations of the relationship between vitamin D and nuclear lens opacities are warranted. PMID:26132781

  6. 18 CFR 35.40 - Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ancillary services. 35... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.40 Ancillary services. A Seller may make sales of ancillary services at market-based rates only if it has...

  7. Glycemic Control among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos with Diabetes from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study: Do Structural and Functional Social Support Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Fortmann, Addie L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Corsino, Leonor; Schneiderman, Neil; Daviglus, Martha L.; Teng, Yanping; Giachello, Aida; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Gallo, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Social support is one potential source of health-related resiliency in Hispanics with diabetes. Purpose This study examined relationships of structural (i.e., social integration) and functional (i.e., perceived) social support with glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin; HbA1c) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Hispanics (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods This study included 766 men and women representing multiple Hispanic ethnic backgrounds, aged 18-74 years, with diagnosed diabetes who completed fasting blood draw, medication review, and measures of sociodemographic factors, medical history, structural support (Cohen Social Network Index), and functional support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12). Results After adjusting for sociodemographic covariates and medication, a one standard deviation increase in functional support was related to an 0.18 % higher HbA1c (p = 0.04). A similar trend was observed for structural support; however, this effect was non-significant in adjusted models. Conclusion Greater functional support was associated with poorer glycemic control in Hispanics. PMID:25107503

  8. Organochlorine compounds and trace elements in fish tissue and ancillary data for the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames river basins study unit, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coles, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine compounds and trace elements were assayed in fish tissue collected from the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames River Basins Study Unit, 1992-94. These data were collected to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds and trace elements in the study unit. Ancillary data included are land-use categories by percentage of the sampling-site basins and the size, gender, and age of the individual fish collected for this study. Concentrations of 28 organochlorine compounds in composited whole fish samples were measured at 32 sites, and concentrations of 22 trace elements in composited fish liver samples were measured at 14 of the 32 sites. Most frequently detected organochlorines were DDT related compounds at 31 sites, total PCBs at 28 sites, and chlordane related compounds at 25 sites. Concentrations of total PCBs in fish tissue were generally higher at the large river sites than at the smaller tributary sites. Concentrations of chlordane-related compounds in fish tissue were higher at sites from more urbanized basins than at sites from predominately agriculture and forested basins. Concentrations of the DDT related compounds were undifferentiated among sites comprising different land uses. Trace elements detected at all 14 sites included boron, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and zinc. Trace elements detected at 10 or more sites included arsenic, mercury, silver, strontium, and vanadium. Antimony, beryllium, and uranium were not detected at any site.

  9. Physician ancillary services: fad or fashion? Part 2.

    PubMed

    Reiboldt, John

    2006-01-01

    Ancillary services are quite fashionable in today's medical practice, but perhaps you've wondered if they were only a fad. If you're considering adding services to increase your revenue, you're not too late; this trend seems here to stay. Doing your homework and due diligence is key to the success of your ancillary business. Before introducing a service into your practice or investing in an ancillary venture, make sure that you get off on sound footing. Major investments call for experienced consulting and tapping into financial, operational, and legal specialists to address specific needs. Part 1 defined ancillary services and addressed performing the feasibility study and writing the business plan. In this second part, legal and regulatory issues, financing arrangements, opening, and operational and ongoing management elements critical to success are all explored. PMID:16562521

  10. Physician ancillary services: fad or fashion? Part 1.

    PubMed

    Reiboldt, John

    2005-01-01

    Ancillary services are quite fashionable in today's medical practice, but perhaps you've wondered if they are only a fad. If you're considering adding services to increase your revenue, you're not too late; this trend seems here to stay. Doing your homework and due diligence is key to the success of your ancillary service. Before introducing a service into your practice or investing in an ancillary venture, make sure that you get off on sound footing. Major investments call for experienced consulting and tapping into financial, operational, and legal specialists to address specific needs. Part 1 of this two-part article defines ancillary services and addresses the following topics: performing the feasibility study; writing the business plan; and addressing the legal and regulatory issues. Part 2 will discuss financing arrangements, opening, operational, and ongoing management elements critical to success. PMID:16471393

  11. How to perform a feasibility study and market analysis to determine if an ancillary service makes sense.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A feasibility study, as the name implies, is a study of the viability of a business venture. The study is an analysis of the market potential of the new products or services to be offered and investigates the primary issues related to the new business. This article discusses the elements that are essential for a valid feasibility study. PMID:18061763

  12. Options for pricing ancillary services in a deregulated power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Hatim Yahya

    2001-07-01

    GENCOs in restructured systems are compensated for selling energy in the market. In a restructured market, a mechanism is required to entice participants in the market to provide ancillary services and to ensure adequate compensation that would guarantee its economic viability. The ISO controls the dispatch of generation, manages the reliability of the transmission grid, provides open access to the transmission, buys and provides ancillary services as required, coordinates day-ahead, hour-ahead schedules and performs real time balancing of load and generation, settles real time imbalances and ancillary services sales and purchases. The ISO, also, administers congestion management protocols for the transmission grid. Since the ISO does not own any generating units it must ensure that there is enough reserves for maintaining reliability according to FERC regulations, and sufficient unloaded generating capacity for balancing services in a real-time market. The ISO could meet these requirements by creating a competitive market for ancillary services, which are metered and remain unbundled to provide an accurate compensation for each supplier and cost to each consumer, In this study, we give an overview for restructuring and ancillary services in a restructured power marketplace. Also, we discuss the effect of GENCOs' actions in the competitive energy and ancillary service markets. In addition, we propose an auction market design for hedging ancillary service costs in California market. Furthermore, we show how to include the n-1 and voltage contingencies in security constrained unit commitment. Finally, we present two approaches for GENCOs' unit commitment in a restructured power market; one is based on game theory and the other is based on market price forecasting. In each of the two GENCOs' unit commitment approaches, we discuss the GENCOs' optimal bidding strategies in energy and ancillary service markets to maximize the GENCOs' profit.

  13. Validation of interpersonal support evaluation list-12 (ISEL-12) scores among English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanics/Latinos from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Merz, Erin L; Roesch, Scott C; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Penedo, Frank J; Llabre, Maria M; Weitzman, Orit B; Navas-Nacher, Elena L; Perreira, Krista M; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Ponguta, Liliana A; Johnson, Timothy P; Gallo, Linda C

    2014-06-01

    The Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12 (ISEL-12; Cohen, Mermelstein, Kamarck, & Hoberman, 1985) is broadly employed as a short-form measure of the traditional ISEL, which measures functional (i.e., perceived) social support. The ISEL-12 can be scored by summing the items to create an overall social support score; three subscale scores representing appraisal, belonging, and tangible social support have also been proposed. Despite extensive use, studies of the psychometric properties of ISEL-12 scores have been limited, particularly among Hispanics/Latinos, the largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the United States. The current study investigated the reliability and structural and convergent validity of ISEL-12 scores using data from 5,313 Hispanics/Latinos who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants completed measures in English or Spanish and identified their ancestry as Dominican, Central American, Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American. Cronbach's alphas suggested adequate internal consistency for the total score for all languages and ancestry groups; coefficients for the subscale scores were not acceptable. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the one-factor and three-factor models fit the data equally well. Results from multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported a similar one-factor structure with equivalent response patterns and variances between language groups and ancestry groups. Convergent validity analyses suggested that the total social support score related to scores of social network integration, life engagement, perceived stress, and negative affect (depression, anxiety) in the expected directions. PMID:24320763

  14. Trajectories of Preparation for Future Care among First-Degree Relatives of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: An Ancillary Study of ADAPT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Wingyun; Sorensen, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the longitudinal patterns of Preparation for Future Care (PFC), defined as Awareness, Avoidance, Gathering Information, Decision Making, and Concrete Plans, in first-degree relatives of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Design and Methods: Eight time points across 6.5 years from a subsample of adults aged 70 years…

  15. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  16. Association of Childhood Economic Hardship with Adult Height and Adult Adiposity among Hispanics/Latinos. The HCHS/SOL Socio-Cultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Isasi, Carmen R.; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Penedo, Frank J.; Perreira, Krista M.; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one’s family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0–12, 13–18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics. PMID:26919283

  17. Association of Childhood Economic Hardship with Adult Height and Adult Adiposity among Hispanics/Latinos. The HCHS/SOL Socio-Cultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carmen R; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M; Kaplan, Robert C; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A; Penedo, Frank J; Perreira, Krista M; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one's family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0-12, 13-18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics. PMID:26919283

  18. Donor Age and Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss 5 Years after Successful Corneal Transplantation: Specular Microscopy Ancillary Study Results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether endothelial cell loss 5 years after successful corneal transplantation is related to the age of the donor. Design Multicenter, prospective, double-masked clinical trial. Participants Three hundred forty-seven subjects participating in the Cornea Donor Study who had not experienced graft failure 5 years after corneal transplantation for a moderate-risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema). Testing Specular microscopic images of donor corneas obtained before surgery and postoperatively at 6 months, 12 months, and then annually through 5 years were submitted to a central reading center to measure endothelial cell density (ECD). Main Outcome Measure Endothelial cell density at 5 years. Results At 5 years, there was a substantial decrease in ECD from baseline for all donor ages. Subjects who received a cornea from a donor 12 to 65 years old experienced a median cell loss of 69% in the study eye, resulting in a 5-year median ECD of 824 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 613–1342), whereas subjects who received a cornea from a donor 66 to 75 years old experienced a cell loss of 75%, resulting in a median 5-year ECD of 654 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 538–986) (P [adjusted for baseline ECD] = 0.04). Statistically, there was a weak negative association between ECD and donor age analyzed as a continuous variable (r [adjusted for baseline ECD] = −0.19; 95% confidence interval, −0.29 to −0.08). Conclusions Endothelial cell loss is substantial in the 5 years after corneal transplantation. There is a slight association between cell loss and donor age. This finding emphasizes the importance of longer-term follow-up of this cohort to determine if this relationship affects graft survival. PMID:18387408

  19. Timing of Complementary Food Introduction and Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary STUDY (SNAS)

    PubMed Central

    Crume, Tessa L.; Crandell, Jamie; Norris, Jill M.; Dabelea, Dana; Fangman, Mary T.; Pettitt, David J.; Dolan, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; O'Connor, Rebecca; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5-month earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared to those who were not (9.0 ± 0.2 vs. 9.5 ± 0.1; p=0.02), independent of HLA-risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA-risk status found that children with a high risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age of diagnosis=9.3 ± 0.1, 9.1 ± 0.1 and 9.6 ± 0.2 for introduction at ≤ 6 months, between 7 and 11 months, and ≤12 months, respectively; p=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA-risk status. PMID:25117987

  20. Timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH nutrition ancillary study (SNAS).

    PubMed

    Crume, T L; Crandell, J; Norris, J M; Dabelea, D; Fangman, M T; Pettitt, D J; Dolan, L; Rodriguez, B L; O'Connor, R; Mayer-Davis, E J

    2014-11-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5 months earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared with those who were not (9.0±0.2 vs 9.5±0.1; P=0.02) independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA risk status found that children with a high-risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age at diagnosis=9.3±0.1, 9.1±0.1 and 9.6±0.2 for introduction at ⩽6 months, between 7 and 11 months and ⩾12 months, respectively; P=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate the onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA risk status. PMID:25117987

  1. Cardiovascular Phenotype in Patients with Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction with or without Diabetes: A RELAX Trial Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; Mann, Douglas L.; McNulty, Steven; Semigran, Marc J.; Lewis, Gregory D.; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Joseph, Susan M.; Vader, Justin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background RELAX was a multicenter randomized trial of sildenafil versus placebo in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) with rigorous entry criteria and extensive phenotypic characterization of participants. Objectives To characterize clinical features, exercise capacity, and outcomes in patients with HFpEF with or without diabetes and gain insight into contributing pathophysiologic mechanisms. Methods RELAX enrolled 216 stable outpatients with heart failure, EF ≥50%, elevated natriuretic peptide or intracardiac pressures, and reduced exercise capacity. Prospectively collected data included echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, a comprehensive biomarker panel, exercise testing, and clinical events over 6 months. Results Compared with non-diabetics (n=123), diabetic (n=93) HFpEF patients were younger, more obese, more often male, and had a higher prevalence of hypertension, renal dysfunction, pulmonary disease, and vascular disease (p<0.05 for all). Uric acid, C-reactive protein, galectin-3, carboxy-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I, and endothelin-1 levels were higher in diabetics (p<0.05 for all). Diabetic patients had more ventricular hypertrophy but systolic and diastolic ventricular function parameters were similar in diabetics and non-diabetics except for a trend toward higher filling pressures (E/e′) in diabetics. Diabetics had worse maximal (peak oxygen uptake) and submaximal (6-minute walk distance) exercise capacity (p<0.01 for both). Diabetic patients were more likely to have been hospitalized for HF in the year prior to study entry (47% vs 28%, p=0.004) and had a higher incidence of cardiac or renal hospitalization at 6 months after enrollment (23.7% vs 4.9%, p<0.001). Conclusions HFpEF patients with diabetes are at increased risk of hospitalization and have reduced exercise capacity. Multi-morbidity, impaired chronotropic reserve, left ventricular hypertrophy and activation of inflammatory, pro

  2. Ancillary Services Provided from DER

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.B.

    2005-12-21

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation. They are effective at starting and then producing full-load power within a few seconds. The distribution system is aging and transmission system development has not kept up with the growth in load and generation. The nation's transmission system is stressed with heavy power flows over long distances, and many areas are experiencing problems in providing the power quality needed to satisfy customers. Thus, a new market for DER is beginning to emerge. DER can alleviate the burden on the distribution system by providing ancillary services while providing a cost adjustment for the DER owner. This report describes 10 types of ancillary services that distributed generation (DG) can provide to the distribution system. Of these 10 services the feasibility, control strategy, effectiveness, and cost benefits are all analyzed as in the context of a future utility-power market. In this market, services will be provided at a local level that will benefit the customer, the distribution utility, and the transmission company.

  3. Medical Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations: The Relationship-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nate W

    2016-06-01

    In this article, I provide a new account of the basis of medical researchers' ancillary care obligations. Ancillary care in medical research, or medical care that research participants need but that is not required for the validity or safety of a study or to redress research injuries, is a topic that has drawn increasing attention in research ethics over the last ten years. My view, the relationship-based approach, improves on the main existing theory, Richardson and Belsky's 'partial-entrustment model', by avoiding its problematic restriction on the scope of health needs for which researchers could be obligated to provide ancillary care. Instead, it grounds ancillary care obligations in a wide range of morally relevant features of the researcher-participant relationship, including the level of engagement between researchers and participants, and weighs these factors against each other. I argue that the level of engagement, that is, the duration and intensity of interactions, between researchers and participants matters for ancillary care because of its connection to the meaningfulness of a relationship, and I suggest that other morally relevant features can be grounded in researchers' role obligations. PMID:26424512

  4. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in all wholesale electricity markets.

  5. The Role of Stress in Understanding Differences in Sedentary Behavior in Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Elizabeth; Strizich, Garrett; Gallo, Linda; Marshall, Simon J.; Merchant, Gina C.; Murillo, Rosenda; Penedo, Frank J.; Salazar, Christian; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Shaw, Benjamin A.; Isasi, Carmen R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic stress and/or lifetime traumatic stress can create a self-reinforcing cycle of unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating and sedentary behavior, that can lead to further increases in stress. This study examined the relationship between stress and sedentary behavior in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 4244) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods Stress was measured as the number of ongoing difficulties lasting 6 months or more and as lifetime exposure to traumatic events. Sedentary behavior was measured by self-report and with accelerometer. Multivariable regression models examined associations of stress measures with time spent in sedentary behaviors adjusting by potential confounders. Results Those who reported more than one chronic stressor spent, on average, 8 to 10 additional minutes per day in objectively measured sedentary activities (P < .05), whereas those with more than one lifetime traumatic stressor spent (after we adjusted for confounders) 10 to 14 additional minutes in sedentary activities (P < .01) compared with those who did not report any stressors. Statistical interactions between the 2 stress measures and age or sex were not significant. Conclusion Interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors might consider incorporating stress reduction into their approaches. PMID:26181079

  6. Comparison of Self-Reported Sleep Duration With Actigraphy: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Hu, Frank B; Redline, Susan; Rosner, Bernard; Alcantara, Carmela; Cai, Jianwen; Hall, Martica H; Loredo, Jose S; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramos, Alberto R; Reid, Kathryn J; Shah, Neomi A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C; Wang, Rui; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-03-15

    Most studies of sleep and health outcomes rely on self-reported sleep duration, although correlation with objective measures is poor. In this study, we defined sociodemographic and sleep characteristics associated with misreporting and assessed whether accounting for these factors better explains variation in objective sleep duration among 2,086 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos who completed more than 5 nights of wrist actigraphy and reported habitual bed/wake times from 2010 to 2013. Using linear regression, we examined self-report as a predictor of actigraphy-assessed sleep duration. Mean amount of time spent asleep was 7.85 (standard deviation, 1.12) hours by self-report and 6.74 (standard deviation, 1.02) hours by actigraphy; correlation between them was 0.43. For each additional hour of self-reported sleep, actigraphy time spent asleep increased by 20 minutes (95% confidence interval: 19, 22). Correlations between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep were lower with male sex, younger age, sleep efficiency <85%, and night-to-night variability in sleep duration ≥1.5 hours. Adding sociodemographic and sleep factors to self-reports increased the proportion of variance explained in actigraphy-assessed sleep slightly (18%-32%). In this large validation study including Hispanics/Latinos, we demonstrated a moderate correlation between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep. The performance of self-reports varied by demographic and sleep measures but not by Hispanic subgroup. PMID:26940117

  7. Legal issues affecting ancillaries and orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Glaser, David M

    2008-01-01

    The federal and state governments have imposed significant regulations on health care generally and on ancillary services in particular. This article focuses on how state and federal laws shape the ability of an orthopedic physician to offer ancillary services, whether as an individual, through a group practice, or as part of a joint venture. It focuses on how the Stark law, the Medicare anti-kickback statute, state anti-kickback, fee-splitting provisions, certificate of need laws, and various Medicare billing and supervision requirements impact the provision of ancillary services. It also briefly discusses how physicians should prepare for and respond to government investigations. PMID:18061773

  8. 78 FR 41941 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR12-265 Ancillary Studies in Kidney Disease and Complications... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special, Emphasis Panel; CRIC Ancillary...

  9. Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

    2007-04-06

    In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

  10. Reconsidering the measurement of ancillary service performance.

    PubMed

    Griffin, D T; Rauscher, J A

    1987-08-01

    Prospective payment reimbursement systems have forced hospitals to review their costs more carefully. The result of the increased emphasis on costs is that many hospitals use costs, rather than margin, to judge the performance of ancillary services. However, arbitrary selection of performance measures for ancillary services can result in managerial decisions contrary to hospital objectives. Managerial accounting systems provide models which assist in the development of performance measures for ancillary services. Selection of appropriate performance measures provides managers with the incentive to pursue goals congruent with those of the hospital overall. This article reviews the design and implementation of managerial accounting systems, and considers the impact of prospective payment systems and proposed changes in capital reimbursement on this process. PMID:10317937

  11. 30 CFR 250.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Ancillary... surveys; or (c) Studies that model potential oil and hazardous substance spills, drilling muds...

  12. Physician variations and the ancillary costs of neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed Central

    Perlstein, P H; Atherton, H D; Donovan, E F; Richardson, D K; Kotagal, U R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine to what degree attending physicians contribute to cost variations in the care of ventilator-dependent newborns. DATA SOURCES: Clinical data were merged with hospital financial data describing daily ancillary care costs during the first two weeks of life for 132 extremely low-birthweight newborns. In addition, each patient's chart was reviewed and illness severity graded using both SNAP and CRIB scores. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort of infants with birth weights of less than 1,001 grams and respiratory distress syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation in the first day of life. From birth up to two weeks of life, each received care directed by only one of 11 faculty neonatologists in a single university hospital. Data were analyzed stratified by these physicians. t-Test, ANOVA, and chi-square were used to assess bivariate data. For continuous data, log linear regressions were used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After controlling for illness severity, when stratified by physicians, there were significant variances in the costs of ancillary resources for the study infants (p < .0001). Twenty-nine percent of the variance was attributable to whether or not the hospital day included the use of a ventilator. Physician identity explained only 5.6 percent (p < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: Physician identity was significant but explained less than 6 percent of the total variance in ancillary costs. Whether or not a ventilator was used during care was far more important. We conclude that for very sick babies during the first two weeks of care, reducing variations in ancillary services utilization among neonatologists will yield only modest savings. PMID:9240282

  13. 18 CFR 35.40 - Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....40 Section 35.40 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT FILING OF RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.40...

  14. Optimal generator bidding strategies for power and ancillary services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morinec, Allen G.

    As the electric power industry transitions to a deregulated market, power transactions are made upon price rather than cost. Generator companies are interested in maximizing their profits rather than overall system efficiency. A method to equitably compensate generation providers for real power, and ancillary services such as reactive power and spinning reserve, will ensure a competitive market with an adequate number of suppliers. Optimizing the generation product mix during bidding is necessary to maximize a generator company's profits. The objective of this research work is to determine and formulate appropriate optimal bidding strategies for a generation company in both the energy and ancillary services markets. These strategies should incorporate the capability curves of their generators as constraints to define the optimal product mix and price offered in the day-ahead and real time spot markets. In order to achieve such a goal, a two-player model was composed to simulate market auctions for power generation. A dynamic game methodology was developed to identify Nash Equilibria and Mixed-Strategy Nash Equilibria solutions as optimal generation bidding strategies for two-player non-cooperative variable-sum matrix games with incomplete information. These games integrated the generation product mix of real power, reactive power, and spinning reserve with the generators's capability curves as constraints. The research includes simulations of market auctions, where strategies were tested for generators with different unit constraints, costs, types of competitors, strategies, and demand levels. Studies on the capability of large hydrogen cooled synchronous generators were utilized to derive useful equations that define the exact shape of the capability curve from the intersections of the arcs defined by the centers and radial vectors of the rotor, stator, and steady-state stability limits. The available reactive reserve and spinning reserve were calculated given a

  15. Ocular screening adherence across Hispanic/Latino heritage groups with diabetes: results from the Ocular SOL ancillary to the Miami site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Stacey L; McClure, Laura A; Zheng, D Diane; Lam, Byron L; Arheart, Kristopher L; Joslin, Charlotte E; Talavera, Gregory A; Lee, David J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of ocular screening adherence among select Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Research design and methods Data were obtained through an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Miami site). Participants included Hispanics/Latinos aged 40+ years who underwent a baseline examination/risk factor assessment (2008–2011) and then completed a survey on vision health/knowledge (conducted October 2011–September 2013; sample n=1235; diabetic subsample=264). The dependent variable was having a dilated eye examination within the past 12 months. Covariate candidate selection for entry into sequential multivariable logistic regression models was guided by Anderson's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Results Participants aged 65+ were more likely to have dilated eye examinations (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.22 to 5.60) compared with those aged 40–54 years. Participants less likely to have dilated examinations had a high school degree or general educational development (GED) (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.96, compared to no degree) and those currently uninsured or never insured ((OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.83) and (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.51)) compared to those currently insured. Participants who heard or saw something about eye health from two or more sources (eg, media outlets, doctor's office, relatives/friends) compared to those who reported no sources in the past 12 months were more likely to have a dilated eye examination (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.26 to 6.28). Conclusions Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with low screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Health promotion strategies stressing the importance of annual dilated eye examinations and increasing sources of information on eye health are other potential strategies to increase screening uptake in Hispanics

  16. SKIN WRINKLES AND RIGIDITY IN EARLY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN VARY BY RACE/ETHNICITY: BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SKIN ANCILLARY STUDY OF THE KEEPS TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Erin; Pal, Lubna; Altun, Tugba; Madankumar, Rajeevi; Freeman, Ruth; Amin, Hussein; Harman, Mitch; Santoro, Nanette; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To characterize skin wrinkles and rigidity in recently menopausal women. Design Baseline assessment of participants prior to randomization to study drug. Setting Multicenter trial, university medical centers. Patients Recently menopausal participants enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Interventions Skin wrinkles were assessed at 11 locations on the face and neck using the Lemperle wrinkle scale. Skin rigidity was assessed at the forehead and cheek using a durometer. Outcome Skin wrinkles and rigidity were compared among race/ethnic groups. Skin wrinkles and rigidity were correlated with age, time since menopause, weight, and BMI. Results In early menopausal women, wrinkles, but not skin rigidity, vary significantly among races (p=0.0003), where Black women have the lowest wrinkle scores. In White women, chronological age was significantly correlated with worsening skin wrinkles, but not with rigidity(p<0.001). Skin rigidity correlated with increasing length of time since menopause, however only in the White subgroup (p<0.01). In the combined study group, increasing weight was associated with less skin wrinkling (p<0.05). Conclusions Skin characteristics of recently menopausal women are not well studied. Ethnic differences in skin characteristics are widely accepted, but poorly described. In recently menopausal women not using hormone therapy (HT), significant racial differences in skin wrinkling and rigidity exist. Continued study of the KEEPS population will provide evidence of the effects of HT on the skin aging process in early menopausal women. PMID:20971461

  17. Perspective: A Critical Look at the Ancillary Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2: Nutrition and Cognitive Function Results in Older Individuals with Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Billy R; Renzi-Hammond, Lisa M

    2016-05-01

    A large body of literature suggests that the dietary carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid are related to improved cognitive function across the life span. A recent report by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) group appears to contradict the general findings of others in the field. In this review, we look critically at the methods, study designs, and analysis techniques used in the larger body of literature and compare them with the recent AREDS reports. PMID:27184270

  18. ProEx™ C is a useful ancillary study for grading anal intraepithelial neoplasia alone and in combination with other biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brent K; Mohanty, Sambit K; Wu, Julie M; Bose, Shikha; Walts, Ann E

    2016-03-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a precursor to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Histologic evaluation is hampered by intra- and interobserver variability. Various biomarkers have been investigated to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnosis and grading, but interpretation can be challenging. ProEx™ C is an antibody cocktail for proteins upregulated in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This study investigated ProEx™ C's role alone and with p16 and Ki-67 in the diagnosis and grading of AIN. Sixty-seven anal tissue samples (22 AIN I, 25 AIN II/III, and 20 non-dysplastic) were stained for ProEx™ C, Ki-67, and p16. Staining patterns were recorded and correlated with morphologic diagnoses. Considering AIN II/III vs I, full-thickness ProEx™ C staining was more frequent in AIN II/III (p = 0.0373), and showed the highest sensitivity of the biomarkers. In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity was lower, but specificity for AIN II/III rose to 83%. For differentiating non-dysplasia from AIN I, negative ProEx™ C staining correlated with non-dysplasia (p < 0.0001) and had the highest sensitivity (90%). In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity dropped to 80%, but specificity was high (96%). ProEx™ C is useful for diagnosing and grading AIN, performing as well or better than other markers at identifying AIN II/III and non-dysplastic epithelium. PMID:26590011

  19. Women's Health Initiative diet intervention did not increase macular pigment optical density in an ancillary study of a subsample of the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Suzen M; Voland, Rick; Sarto, Gloria E; Gobel, Vicki L; Streicher, Sharyn L; Mares, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of long-term (>8 y), low-fat, high-fruit and -vegetable diets on levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in the macula of the retina, as indicated by the OD of macular pigment. Macular pigment OD, measured by heterochromatic flicker photometry, was compared in women aged 60-87 y, who, 7-18 mo earlier (median 12 mo), had been in the dietary modification intervention (n = 158) or comparison (n = 236) groups of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) at the Madison, WI site for a mean of 8.5 y. Women in the intervention group ate more fruits and vegetables (mean +/- SEM) (6.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.2 servings/d; P < 0.0001) and had higher intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin from foods and supplements (2.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.1 +/- 0.1 mg/d; P = 0.0003) than the comparison group. However, macular pigment density did not differ between the intervention (0.36 +/- 0.02 OD units) and comparison (0.35 +/- 0.01 OD units) groups. It tended to be higher (11%; P = 0.11) in women consuming lutein and zeaxanthin in the highest compared with the lowest quintile (median 6.4 vs. 1.1 mg/d). The increase in fruit and vegetable intake among dietary modification participants of this WHI subsample was not of sufficient magnitude to alter the mean density of retinal carotenoids, given other existing dietary conditions in this sample. PMID:19587126

  20. Sexual relationships outside primary partnerships and abstinence are associated with lower adherence and adherence gaps: data from the Partners PrEP Ancillary Adherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Kintu, Alexander; Hankinson, Susan E.; Balasubramanian, Raji; Ertel, Karen; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Bangsberg, David R.; Haberer, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of sexual relationships on levels and patterns of adherence to medication for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV. Methods We enrolled 1,147 HIV-negative individuals in long-term serodiscordant relationships at three sites in Uganda from the Partners PrEP Study- a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir. We used generalized estimation equations to assess the effects of sexual relationships on low adherence (<80%) and on gaps in adherence. Results Fifty-three percent were male, 51% were 18-34 years and 24% were polygamous. Participants who reported sex in the past month with someone other than their primary partner and with <100% condom use were more than twice as likely to have low adherence (aOR 2.48, 95% CI: 1.70-3.62) compared to those who had sex with only their primary partners and 100% condom use. Using the same reference group, those who abstained from sex in the previous month had 30% increased odds of low adherence (aOR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.05-1.62), and participants in non-polygamous marriages who reported sex with both their primary and other partners and <100% condom use were almost twice as likely to be low adherers (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.01-3.08). At least one 72-hour gap in adherence was seen in 598 participants (54.7%); 23.2% had at least one one-week gap. Conclusions Risk of low overall adherence was higher in participants who reported sex outside primary partnerships and suboptimal condom use, as well as in those who abstained from sex. Adherence gaps were common, potentially creating risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:25942457

  1. Agreement of single- and multi-frequency Bioimpedance Measurements in hemodialysis patients: An Ancillary Study of the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raimann, Jochen G.; Abbas, Samer R.; Liu, Li; Zhu, Fansan; Larive, Brett; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W.; Kaysen, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is well established to assess body composition. Agreements between single- and multi-frequency bioimpedance (SF-BIA, MF-BIS) assessments in subjects undergoing 6 or 3 times per week hemodialysis (HD) were analyzed. Methods Total body water (TBW), intra- and extracellular fluid (ICF, ECF) of subjects enrolled in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial (www.clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00264758) were measured with a Hydra 4200 at baseline (BL) and at 5 months (M5). Volumes were computed using SF (at 50 kHz) and MF approaches. Agreement was assessed by means of Linear Regression and Bland-Altman analysis and treatment effects by T-Test. Results 35 subjects (17 on the more frequent regimen, 26 male, 20 blacks, 48±9 years, pre-HD weight 84±19 kg) were studied. Assessments with SF-BIA and MF-BIS correlated significantly at BL and M5 in both arms. No proportional errors, but systematic biases over the entire range of values were found at BL and M5. Agreement did not differ between subjects randomized to either HD treatment arm at both time points. MF-BIS appears to have better precision than SF-BIA allowing the observation of a significant treatment effect by the intervention [−1.5 (95% CI −2.5 to −0.5) L] on ECF, not found for ECF SF-BIA. Precision also affected the statistical power of the SF-BIA data in the current analysis. Conclusion Both methods showed agreement without significant proportional errors regardless of HD frequency and can be used for longitudinal analyses. SF-BIA has lower precision which needs thorough consideration in the design of future trials with similar outcomes. PMID:25402657

  2. Increasing productivity in dental practice: the role of ancillary personnel.

    PubMed

    Guay, Albert H; Lazar, Vickie

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry has achieved substantial improvements in productivity which have the effect of making more care available at reasonable cost. Data are presented documenting trends in productivity. These are analyzed with respect to number of dentists, hours worked by dentists, and the use of ancillary personal in dental offices. There is strong evidence linking increased productivity to the use of ancillary personnel. The history of creation, recognition, and integration of ancillary personnel into dental practice is also presented. PMID:22856048

  3. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of InternationalExperience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we examine the arrangements for andexperiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in fiveelectricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordicmarket, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objectivein undertaking this review of international experience was to identifyspecific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads toeffectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hopethat this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S.and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments areneeded to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in allwholesale electricity markets.

  4. 10 CFR 205.288 - Interim and ancillary orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim and ancillary orders. 205.288 Section 205.288 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Special Procedures for Distribution of Refunds § 205.288 Interim and ancillary orders. The Director of the Office of Hearings...

  5. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  6. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  7. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  8. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  9. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  10. An integrated LANDSAT/ancillary data classification of desert rangeland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K. P.; Ridd, M. K.; Merola, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Range inventorying methods using LANDSAT MSS data, coupled with ancillary data were examined. The study area encompassed nearly 20,000 acres in Rush Valley, Utah. The vegetation is predominately desert shrub and annual grasses, with some annual forbs. Three LANDSAT scenes were evaluated using a Kauth-Thomas brightness/greenness data transformation (May, June, and August dates). The data was classified using a four-band maximum-likelihood classifier. A print map was taken into the field to determine the relationship between print symbols and vegetation. It was determined that classification confusion could be greatly reduced by incorporating geomorphic units and soil texture (coarse vs fine) into the classification. Spectral data, geomorphic units, and soil texture were combined in a GIS format to produce a final vegetation map identifying 12 vegetation types.

  11. Comparing Patients’ Opinions on the Hospital Discharge Process Collected With a Self-Reported Questionnaire Completed Via the Internet or Through a Telephone Survey: An Ancillary Study of the SENTIPAT Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carrat, Fabrice; Hejblum, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital discharge, a critical stage in the hospital-to-home transition of patient care, is a complex process with potential dysfunctions having an impact on patients’ health on their return home. No study has yet reported the feasibility and usefulness of an information system that would directly collect and transmit, via the Internet, volunteer patients’ opinions on their satisfaction concerning the organization of hospital discharge. Objective Our primary objective was to compare patients’ opinions on the discharge process collected with 2 different methods: self-questionnaire completed on a dedicated website versus a telephone interview. The secondary goal was to estimate patient satisfaction. Methods We created a questionnaire to examine hospital discharge according to 3 dimensions: discharge logistics organization, preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and patients’ impressions at the time of discharge. A satisfaction score (between 0 and 1) for each of those dimensions and an associated total score were calculated. Taking advantage of the randomized SENTIPAT trial that questioned patients recruited at hospital discharge about the evolution of their health after returning home and randomly assigned them to complete a self-questionnaire directly online or during a telephone interview, we conducted an ancillary study comparing satisfaction with the organization of hospital discharge for these 2 patient groups. The questionnaire was proposed to 1141 patients included in the trial who were hospitalized for ≥2 days, among whom 867 eligible patients had access to the Internet at home and were randomized to the Internet or telephone group. Results Of the 1141 patients included, 755 (66.17%) completed the questionnaire. The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (P<.001), but their total satisfaction scores did not (P=.08) nor did the satisfaction subscores

  12. Evaluation report: dialysis and ancillary equipment.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    As part of the continuing programme of evaluation of medical equipment sponsored by the UK Health Departments, the evaluation of dialysis and ancillary equipment is being carried out within the University of Sheffield, under the direction of Professor M. M. Black. 'Health Equipment Information' Number 148, published in December 1985, carries full reports on the Cobe Centry 2Rx haemodialysis system with double blood pump module (DBPM), the Lucas Medical 2100 haemodialysis system, and the Permutit Series 8 water softener. It also contains summaries of full reports on the Organon-Teknika Sorbsystem and Cordis-Dow Seratron haemodialysis systems, and the Gordonsal RD500 and Elga Mediro D water softeners, which were published in 'HEI' 136. Readers should note that the Cordis Seratron and Lucas 2100 models are no longer available in the UK. Extracts of the evaluations of the Cobe Centry 2Rx + DBPM and the Permutit Series B models, together with summaries and overall comparisons, are given below. 'HEI' (ISSN 0261-0736) is free to NHS staff and 5.00 pounds/copy to others. Editorial enquiries to DHSS Scientific and Technical Branch, 14 Russell Square, London WC1B 5EP. PMID:3735384

  13. ETINDE. Improving the role of a methodological approach and ancillary ethnoarchaeological data application for place vulnerability and resilience to a multi-hazard environment: Mt. Cameroon volcano case study [MIA-VITA project -FP7-ENV-2007-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Kouokam, Emmanuel; Mbe Akoko, Robert; Peppoloni, Silvia; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Thierry, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The FP7 MIA-VITA [Mitigate and assess risk from volcanic impact on terrain and human activities] project has been designed to address multidisciplinary aspects of volcanic threat assessment and management from prevention to crisis management recovery. In the socio-economic analysis carried out at Mt. Cameroon Bakweri and Bakossi ethnic groups, ancillary ethnoarchaeological information has been included to point out the cultural interaction between the volcano and its residents. In 2009-2011, ethnoanthropological surveys and interviews for data collection were carried out at Buea, Limbe, West Coast, Tiko and Muyuka sub-divisions adjacent to Mt. Cameroon. One of the outstanding, results from the Bakweri and Bakossi cultural tradition study: natural hazards are managed and produced by supernatural forces, as: Epasa Moto, God of the Mountain (Mt. Cameroon volcano) and Nyango Na Nwana , Goddess of the sea (Gulf of Guinea). In the case of Mount Cameroon, people may seek the spirit or gods of the mountain before farming, hunting and most recently the undertaking of the Mount Cameroon annual race are done. The spirit of this mountain must be seek to avert or stop a volcanic eruption because the eruption is attributed to the anger of the spirit. Among the Northern Bakweri, the association of spirits with the mountain could also be explained in terms of the importance of the mountain to the people. Most of their farming and hunting is done on the Mountain. Some forest products, for instance, wood for building and furniture is obtained from the forest of the mountain; this implies that the people rely on the Mountain for food, game and architecture/furniture etc. In addition, the eruption of the mountain is something which affects the people. It does not only destroy property, it frustrates people and takes away human lives when it occurs. Because of this economic importance of the Mountain and its unexpected and unwanted eruption, the tendency is to believe that it has some

  14. Level 2 Ancillary Products and Datasets Algorithm Theoretical Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D.; Abdou, W.; Gordon, H.; Kahn, R.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Martonchik, J.; McDonald, D.; McMuldroch, S.; Myneni, R.; West, R.

    1999-01-01

    This Algorithm Theoretical Basis (ATB) document describes the algorithms used to generate the parameters of certain ancillary products and datasets used during Level 2 processing of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MIST) data.

  15. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF ANCILLARY STRUCTURES ASSOCIATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF ANCILLARY STRUCTURES ASSOCIATED WITH AND SURROUNDING BUILDING 3210. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Elevated Water Tower, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. Load Participation in Ancillary Services System from An Operator Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Don; Petri, Mark C.

    2011-10-25

    Ancillary services as defined by FERC (Order 888) distinguished by response time, duration, frequency. Met when DR has capability to balance supply and demand; and LMP payment to DR is cost effective.

  17. Ancillary Data Services of NASA's Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.

    1994-01-01

    JPL's Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) has primary responsibility for design and implementation of the SPICE ancillary information system, supporting a wide range of space science mission design, observation planning and data analysis functions/activities. NAIF also serves as the geometry and ancillary data node of the Planetary Data System (PDS). As part of the PDS, NAIF archives SPICE and other ancillary data produced by flight projects. NAIF then distributes these data, and associated data access software and high-level tools, to researchers funded by NASA's Office of Space Science. Support for a broader user community is also offered to the extent resources permit. This paper describes the SPICE system and customer support offered by NAIF.

  18. Ancillary-service details: Dynamic scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic scheduling (DS) is the electronic transfer from one control area to another of the time-varying electricity consumption associated with a load or the time-varying electricity production associated with a generator. Although electric utilities have been using this technique for at least two decades, its use is growing in popularity and importance. This growth is a consequence of the major changes under way in US bulk-power markets, in particular efforts to unbundle generation from transmission and to increase competition among generation providers. DS can promote competition and increase choices. It allows consumers to purchase certain services from entities outside their physical-host area and it allows generators to sell certain services to entities other than their physical host. These services include regulation (following minute-to-minute variations in load) and operating reserves, among others. Such an increase in the number of possible suppliers and customers should encourage innovation and reduce the costs and prices of providing electricity services. The purpose of the project reported here was to collect and analyze data on utility experiences with DS. Chapter 2 provides additional details and examples of the definitions of DS. Chapter 3 explains why DS might be an attractive service that customers and generators, as well as transmission providers, might wan to use. Chapter 4 presents some of the many current DS examples the authors uncovered in their interviews. Chapter 5 discusses the costs and cost-effectiveness of DS. Chapter 6 explains what they believe can and cannot be electronically moved from one control area to another, primarily in terms of the six ancillary services that FERC defined in Order 888. Chapter 7 discusses the need for additional research on DS.

  19. Ancillary human health benefits of improved air quality resulting from climate change mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michelle L; Davis, Devra L; Cifuentes, Luis A; Krupnick, Alan J; Morgenstern, Richard D; Thurston, George D

    2008-01-01

    Background Greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation policies can provide ancillary benefits in terms of short-term improvements in air quality and associated health benefits. Several studies have analyzed the ancillary impacts of GHG policies for a variety of locations, pollutants, and policies. In this paper we review the existing evidence on ancillary health benefits relating to air pollution from various GHG strategies and provide a framework for such analysis. Methods We evaluate techniques used in different stages of such research for estimation of: (1) changes in air pollutant concentrations; (2) avoided adverse health endpoints; and (3) economic valuation of health consequences. The limitations and merits of various methods are examined. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for ancillary benefits analysis and related research gaps in the relevant disciplines. Results We found that to date most assessments have focused their analysis more heavily on one aspect of the framework (e.g., economic analysis). While a wide range of methods was applied to various policies and regions, results from multiple studies provide strong evidence that the short-term public health and economic benefits of ancillary benefits related to GHG mitigation strategies are substantial. Further, results of these analyses are likely to be underestimates because there are a number of important unquantified health and economic endpoints. Conclusion Remaining challenges include integrating the understanding of the relative toxicity of particulate matter by components or sources, developing better estimates of public health and environmental impacts on selected sub-populations, and devising new methods for evaluating heretofore unquantified and non-monetized benefits. PMID:18671873

  20. Survey of U.S. Ancillary Services Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi; Levin, Todd; Conzelmann, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    In addition to providing energy to end-consumers, power system operators are also responsible for ensuring system reliability. To this end, power markets maintain an array of ancillary services to ensure it is always possible to balance the supply and demand for energy in real-time. A subset of these ancillary services are commonly procured through market-based mechanisms: namely, Regulation, Spinning, and Non-spinning Reserves.

  1. Influence of Ancillary Ligands in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, Babak; Shahroosvand, Hashem; Graetzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-08-24

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have motivated many researchers to develop various sensitizers with tailored properties involving anchoring and ancillary ligands. Ancillary ligands carry favorable light-harvesting abilities and are therefore crucial in determining the overall power conversion efficiencies. The use of ancillary ligands having aliphatic chains and/or π-extended aromatic units decreases charge recombination and permits the collection of a large fraction of sunlight. This review aims to provide insight into the relationship between ancillary ligand structure and DSSC properties, which can further guide the function-oriented design and synthesis of different sensitizers for DSSCs. This review outlines how the new and rapidly expanding class of chelating ancillary ligands bearing 2,2'-bipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, carbene, dipyridylamine, pyridyl-benzimidazole, pyridyl-azolate, and other aromatic ligands provides a conduit for potentially enhancing the performance and stability of DSSCs. Finally, these classes of Ru polypyridyl complexes have gained increasing interest for feasible large-scale commercialization of DSSCs due to their more favorable light-harvesting abilities and long-term thermal and chemical stabilities compared with other conventional sensitizers. Therefore, the main idea is to inspire readers to explore new avenues in the design of new sensitizers for DSSCs based on different ancillary ligands. PMID:27479482

  2. Market and policy barriers for demand response providing ancillary services in U.S. markets

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; MacDonald, Jason; Goldman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    This study provides an examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators. In order to help illustrate the differences in barriers among various wholesale market designs and their constituent retail environments, four regions were chosen to use as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.

  3. Cohort Profile: Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary health services.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Katrina C; Salters, Kate; Forrest, Jamie I; Palmer, Alexis K; Wang, Hong; O'Brien, Nadia; Parashar, Surita; Cescon, Angela M; Samji, Hasina; Montaner, Julio Sg; Hogg, Robert S

    2013-08-01

    The Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary health services (LISA) study is a cohort of people living with HIV/AIDS who have ever accessed anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in British Columbia, Canada. The LISA study was developed to better understand the outcomes of people living with HIV with respect to supportive services use, socio-demographic factors and quality of life. Between July 2007 and January 2010, 1000 participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire that included questions concerning medical history, substance use, social and medical support services, food and housing security and other social determinants of health characteristics. Of the 1000 participants, 917 were successfully linked to longitudinal clinical data through the provincial Drug Treatment Program. Within the LISA cohort, 27% of the participants are female, the median age is 39 years and 32% identify as Aboriginal. Knowledge translation activities for LISA include the creation of plain language summaries, internet resources and arts-based engagement activities such as Photovoice. PMID:22461127

  4. Commercial Building Loads Providing Ancillary Services in PJM

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Jason; Kiliccote, Sila; Boch, Jim; Chen, Jonathan; Nawy, Robert

    2014-06-27

    The adoption of low carbon energy technologies such as variable renewable energy and electric vehicles, coupled with the efficacy of energy efficiency to reduce traditional base load has increased the uncertainty inherent in the net load shape. Handling this variability with slower, traditional resources leads to inefficient system dispatch, and in some cases may compromise reliability. Grid operators are looking to future energy technologies, such as automated demand response (DR), to provide capacity-based reliability services as the need for these services increase. While DR resources are expected to have the flexibility characteristics operators are looking for, demonstrations are necessary to build confidence in their capabilities. Additionally, building owners are uncertain of the monetary value and operational burden of providing these services. To address this, the present study demonstrates the ability of demand response resources providing two ancillary services in the PJM territory, synchronous reserve and regulation, using an OpenADR 2.0b signaling architecture. The loads under control include HVAC and lighting at a big box retail store and variable frequency fan loads. The study examines performance characteristics of the resource: the speed of response, communications latencies in the architecture, and accuracy of response. It also examines the frequency and duration of events and the value in the marketplace which can be used to examine if the opportunity is sufficient to entice building owners to participate.

  5. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Jaafar S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin–eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  6. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  7. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  8. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  9. Weak Ligand-Field Effect from Ancillary Ligands on Enhancing Single-Ion Magnet Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2016-08-26

    A series of bis-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-supported Dy complexes containing different ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. Magnetic studies showed that 1 Dy [Cp*2 DyCl(THF)], 1 Dy' [Cp*2 DyCl2 K(THF)]n , 2 Dy [Cp*2 DyBr(THF)], 3 Dy [Cp*2 DyI(THF)] and 4 Dy [Cp*2 DyTp] (Tp=hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) were single-ion magnets (SIMs). The 1D dysprosium chain 1 Dy' exhibited a hysteresis at up to 5 K. Furthermore, 3 Dy featured the highest energy barrier (419 cm(-1) ) among the complexes. The effects of ancillary ligands on single-ion magnetic properties were studied by experimental, ab initio calculations and electrostatic analysis methods in detail. These results demonstrated that the QTM rate was strongly dependent on the ancillary ligands and that a weak equatorial ligand field could be beneficial for constructing Dy-SIMs. PMID:27417884

  10. Staff working in ancillary departments at a tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India: How healthy are they?

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanya, Bhavya; Nisha, Catherin; Ramesh, Naveen; Joseph, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ancillary health services are those supplemental services other than room, board, and medical/nursing services provided to hospital patients in the course of care. Ancillary department staff forms an integral part in the smooth functioning of a hospital. There is a need to focus on the health of these individuals to ensure their well-being and in turn, productivity at the workplace. Objective: To study the morbidity profile of the staff working at ancillary departments of a tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: We conducted our study in a 1,200-bedded tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Annual medical checkup (AMC) for all the staff working at the ancillary departments has been started in recent years and is provided free of cost and during working hours. A total of 150 employees from ancillary departments underwent AMC in the year 2013. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. Spearman's correlation and Chi-square test were used. Results: Of the 150 employees, the majority was male (72%); the mean age was 38 ± 11 years. The most common morbidities were diabetes mellitus (11%), hypertension (10.6%), musculoskeletal disorders (9.3%), surgical problems (8.6%, hemorrhoids, varicose veins), and dental caries (6.6%). On stool microscopy, 12% of the dietary workers showed ova/cyst. There was a significant positive correlation between age and the number of chronic morbidities (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Lifestyle disorders such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension were the major morbidities among the staff in the ancillary departments of the hospital. We ensured regular follow-up, adherence to medication, and lifestyle modifications in terms of diet and exercise. PMID:27390479

  11. VITAL-Bone Health: rationale and design of two ancillary studies evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or omega-3 fatty acid supplements on incident fractures and bone health outcomes in the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Yue, Amy Y.; Copeland, Trisha; Cook, Nancy R.; Buring, Julie E.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Although vitamin D is widely used to promote skeletal health, definitive data on benefits and risks of supplemental vitamin D alone on bone are lacking. Results from large, randomized controlled trials in the general population are sparse. Data on the effects of supplemental omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) on bone are also limited. Design The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the role of vitamin D3 (2000 IU/d) and omega-3 FA (1 g/d) supplements in reducing risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease among U.S. men aged ≥50 and women aged ≥55. To comprehensively test effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on skeletal health, the VITAL: Effects on Fractures ancillary study is determining the effects of these supplements on incident fractures among 25,875 participants enrolled in the parent trial. Study investigators adjudicate fractures through detailed review of medical records and radiological images (hip and femur). In a complementary ancillary, VITAL: Effects on Structure and Architecture is determining the effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone with detailed phenotyping during in-person visits. Comprehensive assessments of bone density, turnover, structure/architecture, body composition, and physical performance are being performed at baseline and 2 years post-randomization. Conclusion Results from these studies will clarify the relationship between supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone health outcomes, and inform clinical care and public health guidelines on the use of supplemental vitamin D for the primary prevention of fractures in women and men. PMID:25623291

  12. Financial Report of Ontario Universities 1995-96. Ancillary Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This supplementary volume has been compiled from submissions prepared by each of the provincially assisted universities and federated and affiliated colleges of Ontario (Canada). The information in this volume provides further details concerning sources of revenue and types of expenses as reported for various ancillary operations. These include…

  13. Fundamental design issues in markets for ancillary services

    SciTech Connect

    Rebours, Yann; Kirschen, Daniel; Trotignon, Marc

    2007-07-15

    While ancillary services are an essential feature of electricity markets, the designs of markets for these services have known ad hoc evolutions. A comprehensive approach is needed, requiring the solving of nine fundamental issues to create the most efficient markets. (author)

  14. 76 FR 41726 - Reporting Ancillary Airline Passenger Revenues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... reservations, transportation of unaccompanied minors, pet transportation, third-party services such as hotel..., delay or loss of wheelchairs or scooters transported in the aircraft cargo would be minimal for carriers... and Loss Elements * * * * * Schedule P-9 Statement of Ancillary Revenues (a) Section 24 Profit...

  15. The Production and Archiving of Navigation and Ancillary Data for the Galileo Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Clarke, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Mission to Jupiter is using the SPICE formats developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility, a node of the Planetary Data System, to archive its navigation and ancillary data.

  16. Associations between age-related nuclear cataract and lutein and zeaxanthin in the diet and serum in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between lutein and zeaxanthin in the diet and serum and prevalence of age-related nuclear cataract in older women. Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study participants aged 50 y+, at 3 sites, who reported high (above the 78th percentile...

  17. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5/1.6 GHz and 1.6/2.4 GHz... interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5/1.6 GHz and 1.6/2.4 GHz bands. If harmful interference is caused to other services by ancillary MSS ATC operations,...

  18. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2 GHz bands. If harmful interference is caused to other services by ancillary MSS... related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and...

  19. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5/1.6 GHz and 1.6/2.4 GHz... interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5/1.6 GHz and 1.6/2.4 GHz bands. If harmful interference is caused to other services by ancillary MSS ATC operations,...

  20. Association between dietary fats and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative123

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Niyati; Voland, Rickie P.; Moeller, Suzen M.; Blodi, Barbara A.; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Chappell, Richard J.; Wallace, Robert B.; Mares, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Evaluating relationships of amount and type of dietary fat to intermediate AMD. Design Women, ages 50–79, from the Women’s Health Initiative-Observational Study, with high and low lutein intakes, were recruited into the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS). Fat intake in 1994–1998 was estimated using food frequency questionnaires. AMD was assessed in 2001–2004 from stereoscopic fundus photographs. Results Intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fats (ω-6 and ω-3 PUFA), which were highly correlated (r=0.8), were associated with higher prevalence of intermediate AMD. Significant age-interactions were noted for associations with total fat, monounsaturated and saturated fat (p= 0.01–0.02). In women <75 years (n=1,325), diets high in total fat (% energy) were associated with increased prevalence of AMD (OR (95% CI) for quintile five vs. one = 1.73 (1.02–2.7; p-trend=0.10); the association was reversed in older women. Monounsaturated fat (MUFA) intakes in quintiles three through five vs. one were associated with lower prevalence of AMD in the whole population. Conclusions Overall associations of dietary fat to AMD differed by type of fat and, often, by age in this cohort. These findings contribute insights about sources of inconsistencies of fat to AMD in epidemiological studies. PMID:19901214

  1. Unanticipated Consequences: Thinking About Ancillary Benefits and Costs of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, James A.

    2005-03-31

    Recently there has been interest in the “ancillary benefits” of potential policies to address climate change. Ancillary benefits occur whenever a policy to address climate change also results in a reduction in some conventional pollutant. Framing the problem in terms of ancillary benefits is too narrow. In general implementation of any policy can have consequences for unpriced environmental externalities that extend beyond the original target of the policy. These ancillary consequences can be either positive, negative, or mixed. This is the inevitable implication of undertaking policy in a non-linear world. In this essay we explore some of the ancillary benefits and costs of addressing climate change.

  2. Quantum computation mediated by ancillary qudits and spin coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Dooley, Shane; Kendon, Viv

    2015-01-01

    Models of universal quantum computation in which the required interactions between register (computational) qubits are mediated by some ancillary system are highly relevant to experimental realizations of a quantum computer. We introduce such a universal model that employs a d -dimensional ancillary qudit. The ancilla-register interactions take the form of controlled displacements operators, with a displacement operator defined on the periodic and discrete lattice phase space of a qudit. We show that these interactions can implement controlled phase gates on the register by utilizing geometric phases that are created when closed loops are traversed in this phase space. The extra degrees of freedom of the ancilla can be harnessed to reduce the number of operations required for certain gate sequences. In particular, we see that the computational advantages of the quantum bus (qubus) architecture, which employs a field-mode ancilla, are also applicable to this model. We then explore an alternative ancilla-mediated model which employs a spin ensemble as the ancillary system and again the interactions with the register qubits are via controlled displacement operators, with a displacement operator defined on the Bloch sphere phase space of the spin coherent states of the ensemble. We discuss the computational advantages of this model and its relationship with the qubus architecture.

  3. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) - Ancillary Eye Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Heart Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hypertension; Diabetic Retinopathy; Macular Degeneration; Diabetes Mellitus

  4. Inhaled hyaluronic acid as ancillary treatment in children with bacterial acute rhinopharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, A; Capasso, M; Avvisati, F; Varricchio, A M; De Lucia, A; Brunese, F P; Ciprandi, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinopharyngitis (ARP) is the most common upper respiratory infection in children and represents a social problem for both the pharmaco-economic impact and a burden for the family. Topical antibiotic therapy is usually effective in bacterial ARP, but ancillary treatment might improve its efficacy. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a promising molecule that has been recently proposed in upper respiratory disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ancillary HA treatment in children with bacterial ARP. Globally, 51 children (27 males, mean age 5.9 ± 2.1 years) with bacterial ARP were enrolled in the study. At baseline, children were randomly assigned to the treatment with: 125 mg of thiamphenicol diluted in 4 mL of saline isotonic solution twice daily (group A) or with 125 mg of thiamphenicol plus 4 ml of sodium hyaluronate 0.2% plus xylitol 5% (Aluneb, Sakura Italia) twice daily (group B) administered by the nasal device Rinowash (Airliquide Medical System, Italy) and connected to an aerosol nebulizer with pneumatic compressor (1.5 bar per 5 L/min) Nebula (Airliquide Medical System, Italy), for 10 days. sVAS, nasopharyngeal spotting, neutrophils and bacteria were assessed at baseline and after the treatment. Both treatments induced significant reduction of symptom perception, spotting, neutrophil and bacteria count. However, thiamphenicol plus HA was able to significantly induce a greater effect on sVAS (p=0.006), neutrophil count (p=0.01), and bacteria count (p=0.0003) than thiamphenicol alone. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that intranasal HA, as ancillary treatment, may be able to improve topical antibiotic efficacy in children with bacterial ARP. PMID:25316142

  5. Identifying children in need of ancillary and enabling services: a population approach.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Ruth E; Farel, Anita M

    2003-12-01

    Children with chronic or disabling conditions use health, education and social services at a higher rate than their healthy peers. Estimates of the number of children in need of these specialized services are widely varied and often depend on categorical definitions that do not account for either the diversity or commonality of their experiences. Developing methods for identifying the population in need of services, particularly children likely to use long-term ancillary (audiology, occupational, physical or speech therapy, or social work) and/or enabling services (special equipment, personal care assistance, respite care, transportation, or environmental modifications), is essential for effective policy and program implementation. This study examines several recent attempts to operationalize definitions of children with chronic conditions using a noncategorical classification approach. Particular emphasis is placed on the subgroup of children identified as having functional limitations. Proposed operational definitions of children with functional limitations are compared using data from the 1994-1995 Disability Supplement to the US National Health Interview Survey. Estimates of the number of children reported to be using ancillary and enabling services are generated and compared across operational definitions of functional limitation as well as by the number, severity, and type (i.e. mobility, self-care, communication/sensory, social cognition/learning ability) of limitation. Depending on the operational definition selected, 9-14% of US community-dwelling children are estimated to have functional limitations. Among children with limitations, 26-30% regularly use ancillary services and 11-14% use enabling services. The strengths, limitations, and potential applications for each operational definition are discussed. PMID:14512235

  6. Ancillary procedures necessary for translational research in experimental craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al Rakan, Mohammed; Shores, Jaimie T.; Bonawitz, Steve; Santiago, Gabriel; Christensen, Joani M.; Grant, Gerald; Murphy, Ryan J.; Basafa, Ehsan; Armand, Mehran; Otovic, Pete; Eller, Sue; Brandacher, Gerald; Gordon, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Swine are often regarded as having analogous facial skeletons to humans and therefore serve as an ideal animal model for translational investigation. However, there's a dearth of literature describing the pertinent ancillary procedures required for craniomaxillofacial research. With this in mind, our objective was to evaluate all necessary procedures required for peri-operative management and animal safety related to experimental craniomaxillofacial surgical procedures such as orthotopic, maxillofacial transplantation. Methods Miniature swine (n=9) were used to investigate peri-operative airway management, methods for providing nutrition, and long-dwelling intravenous access. Flap perfusion using near-infrared laser angiography and facial nerve assessment with EMG were explored. Results Bivona(R) tracheostomy was deemed appropriate versus Shiley since soft, wire-reinforced tubing reduced the incidence of tracheal necrosis. PEG tube, as opposed to esophagostomy, provided a reliable route for post-operative feeding. Femoral venous access with dorsal tunneling proved to be an ideal option being far from pertinent neck vessels. Laser angiography was beneficial for real-time evaluation of graft perfusion. Facial EMG techniques for tracing capture were found most optimal using percutaneous leads near the oral commissure. Experience shows that ancillary procedures are critical and malpositioning of devices may lead to irreversible sequelae with premature animal death. Conclusion Face-jaw-teeth transplantation in swine is a complicated procedure which demands special attention to airway, feeding, and intravascular access. It is critical that each ancillary procedure be performed by a dedicated team familiar with relevant anatomy and protocol. Emphasis should be placed on secure skin-level fixation for all tube/lines to minimize risk of dislodgement. A reliable veterinarian team is invaluable and critical for long-term success. PMID:25377964

  7. 19. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS THE ANCILLARY BUILDINGS. FROM LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS THE ANCILLARY BUILDINGS. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT BACKGROUND, RETORT BUILDING, STORAGE, SMELTER BUILDING, GARAGE. THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE VANNER ROOM IS IN THE FOREGROUND AND LEFT. A 2000 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN IS IN THE FOREGROUND CENTER. THEIR USE OF THE SHED TO THE REAR OF THE AUTOMOBILE IS UNCERTAIN, ALTHOUGH IT IS CONNECTED TO THE MILL AT THE BASE OF THE WEST SIDE OF THE AMALGAMATING PANS ROOM. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  8. The APOGEE Low-Mass Star Ancillary Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Cullen; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Terrien, Ryan; Crepp, Justin R.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Allende-Prieto, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    As a high-resolution, near-infrared, fiber-fed instrument, APOGEE presents a unique opportunity to obtain multi-epoch radial velocity measurements of a large number of low-mass stars. These observations will reveal unseen companions, improving our understanding of stellar multiplicity at the bottom of the Main Sequence, and may even identify candidate sub-stellar companions. These same data contains an unprecedented wealth of information about the kinematics, rotation, and metallicities of these stars. I will describe the status of our Ancillary Science program, and ongoing efforts to get the best possible radial velocity precision from the APOGEE data.

  9. Demand Response Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind an solar power generation. However, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado test system. We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating

  10. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements ancillary systems SSDR 1.5.6

    SciTech Connect

    Spann, J.; Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Ancillary Systems, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  11. Immunohistochemistry and other ancillary techniques in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2014-05-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) encompasses entities ranging from ubiquitous hydatidiform moles to rare neoplastic gestational trophoblastic tumors. In practice, the histological diagnosis of GTD continues to have significant diagnostic inaccuracy with marked inter- and intra-observer variability, even among expert pathologists. Studies in correlation with genotypic evidence have confirmed a lack of accuracy in diagnosis of hydatidiform moles using histology alone. Applications of new immunohistochemical markers and molecular techniques have significantly enhanced the diagnostic precision of various GTDs in recent years. p57 Immunohistochemistry is a highly useful marker in confirming complete hydatidiform mole. PCR-based DNA genotyping has emerged as a powerful diagnostic measure to precisely classify both complete and partial hydatidiform moles. With acquisition of molecular diagnostic capabilities at most medical centers, these ancillary techniques have been increasingly integrated into the routine diagnostic workup of GTD. We propose an algorithmic approach combining histology and these ancillary tests to provide the best diagnostic practice possible. Under this algorithm, all cases with histological suspicion for complete mole are subject to p57 immunohistochemical confirmation, and all cases with histological suspicion for partial mole undergo DNA genotyping workup. Beyond hydatidiform mole, recognition of gestational trophoblastic tumors requires a high index of suspicion and application of immunohistochemical markers of trophoblast is helpful to accurately diagnose these rare tumors. PMID:24907943

  12. Prevalence, Correlates, and Prognosis of Peripheral Artery Disease in Rural Ecuador—Rationale, Protocol, and Phase I Results of a Population-Based Survey: An Atahualpa Project-Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Sedler, Mark J.; Mera, Robertino M.; Castillo, Pablo R.; Cusick, Elizabeth H.; Gruen, Jadry A.; Phelan, Kelsie J.; Del Brutto, Victor J.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Brown, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Little is known on the prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in developing countries. Study design. Population-based study in Atahualpa. In Phase I, the Edinburgh claudication questionnaire (ECQ) was used for detection of suspected symptomatic PAD; persons with a negative ECQ but a pulse pressure ≥65 mmHg were suspected of asymptomatic PAD. In Phase II, the ankle-brachial index will be used to test reliability of screening instruments and to determine PAD prevalence. In Phase III, participants will be followed up to estimate the relevance of PAD as a predictor of vascular outcomes. Results. During Phase I, 665 Atahualpa residents aged ≥40 years were enrolled (mean age: 59.5 ± 12.6 years, 58% women). A poor cardiovascular health status was noticed in 464 (70%) persons of which 27 (4%) had a stroke and 14 (2%) had ischemic heart disease. Forty-four subjects (7%) had suspected symptomatic PAD and 170 (26%) had suspected asymptomatic PAD. Individuals with suspected PAD were older, more often women, and had a worse cardiovascular profile than those with nonsuspected PAD. Conclusions. Prevalence of suspected PAD in this underserved population is high. Subsequent phases of this study will determine whether prompt detection of PAD is useful to reduce the incidence of catastrophic vascular diseases in the region. PMID:25389500

  13. 76 FR 55890 - Cancellation of Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Ancillary Facilities for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Record of Decision (ROD) (72 FR 7964; February 22, 2007), DOE announced its selection of Richton... some of the ancillary facilities associated with the Richton site: the raw water intake structure, oil... new locations for the ancillary facilities associated with the Richton site (73 FR 11895; March...

  14. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Ancillary Activities § 550.207 What...

  15. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2... harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the...

  16. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2... harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the...

  17. 10 CFR 205.199G - Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders. 205.199G... Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders. The Director of the Office of Hearings and Appeals or his... to FERC to be amended or withdrawn after it has been filed or to be filed within a time...

  18. 10 CFR 205.199G - Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders. 205.199G... Extension of time; Interim and Ancillary Orders. The Director of the Office of Hearings and Appeals or his... to FERC to be amended or withdrawn after it has been filed or to be filed within a time...

  19. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  20. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  1. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  2. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  3. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  4. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  5. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  6. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  7. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued under part 25 of the...” for purpose of this subpart of the rules. (b) For the purpose of this subpart, a Mobile...

  8. Analysis of wind power ancillary services characteristics with German 250-MW wind data

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, B.

    1999-12-09

    With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, power fluctuations have become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the US, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. This paper analyzes wind power in the context of ancillary services, using data from a German 250 Megawatt Wind project.

  9. Attitude of ancillary personnel faced with living kidney donation in a hospital with a living donor kidney transplant program.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Ramírez, Pablo; del Mar Rodríguez, María; Martínez, Lewa; Montoya, Mariano Jeime; Lucas, Dolores; Alcaraz, Jesús; Parrilla, Pascual

    2007-02-15

    Hospital ancillary workers' opinion has credibility among the general public because they work on behalf of a hospital. The objective of this study is to analyze the attitude of ancillary employees toward living kidney donation and the variables that influence such attitude. A random sample of ancillary personnel (n=401) was taken and stratified according to type of service in a transplant hospital. Attitude was evaluated using a survey, which was completed anonymously and self-administered. The completion rate was 94% (n=377). Most (85%) are in favor of related living kidney donation, 7% against, and the 8% undecided. The multivariate analysis found that the variables with more weight affecting attitude are: 1) female sex (odds ratio [OR]=3.75); 2) a respondent's lack of concern about the possible "mutilation" of the body after donation (OR=3.65); 3) a respondent's belief in the possibility of needing a future transplant (OR=2.66); and 4) a respondent's willingness to receive a donated living kidney (OR=10.51). PMID:17297409

  10. Map of risks for the implementation of radio-frequency identification: application of ancillaries in the University Hospital Jean Verdier.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2010-01-01

    Ancillaries are surgical instruments, such as orthopedical instruments set for reconstruction of knee (a mounting arm...) used to implant or extract prosthesis. Their management involves the departments of sterilization and surgery as well as the suppliers. Such a long circuit exposes the instruments to potential risk hazards like a lack of traceability as the suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. In order to reduce the risk of errors we will propose the implementation of radio-frequency identification (RFID) to trace the ancillaries during each step of the supply chain. The objective of our study is to analyze and to map the risks associated with RFID implementation. A preliminary analysis of risks (APR) is conducted to map out the hazards for the implementation of RFID. The APR identifies 162 scenarios with a maximum risk connected to environment and technology. To reduce the risks identified, 22 courses of action are proposed, such as audits, training, and internal controls. For each action, a procedure has been designed and evaluated. This preliminary analysis of risks allows targeting the potential dangers for the RFID implementation applied to ancillaries and reduces them significantly. PMID:20187581

  11. Effective Ancillary Services Market Designs on High Wind Power Penetration Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Navid, N.; Smith, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power. Ancillary services markets have been developed in many of the restructured power system regions throughout the world. Ancillary services include the services that support the provision of energy to support power system reliability. The ancillary services markets are tied tightly to the design of the energy market and to the physics of the system and therefore careful consideration of power system economics and engineering must be considered in their design. This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power.

  12. Candidate Gene Association Study of Coronary Artery Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jane F; Matthews, Gregory J; Townsend, Raymond R; Raj, Dominic S; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Budoff, Matthew; Fischer, Michael J; Rosas, Sylvia E; Kanthety, Radhika; Rahman, Mahboob; Master, Stephen R; Qasim, Atif; Li, Mingyao; Mehta, Nehal N.; Shen, Haiqing; Mitchell, Braxton D; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ho, Weang Kee; Young, Robin; Rasheed, Asif; Danesh, John; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Flack, John; Go, Alan S; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Wright, Jackson T; Saleheen, Danish; Feldman, Harold I; Rader, Daniel J; Foulkes, Andrea S; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify loci for coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Background CKD is associated with increased CAC and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) but the mechanisms remain poorly defined. Genetic studies of CAC in CKD may provide a useful strategy for identifying novel pathways in CHD. Methods We performed a candidate gene study (~2,100 genes; ~50,000 SNPs) of CAC within the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (n=1,509; 57% European, 43% African ancestry). SNPs with preliminary evidence of association with CAC in CRIC were examined for association with CAC in PennCAC (n=2,560) and Amish Family Calcification Study (AFCS; n=784) samples. SNPs with suggestive replication were further analyzed for association with myocardial infarction (MI) in the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction study (PROMIS) (n=14,885). Results Of 268 SNPs reaching P <5×10−4 for CAC in CRIC, 28 SNPs in 23 loci had nominal support (P <0.05 and in same direction) for CAC in PennCAC or AFCS. Besides chr9p21 and COL4A1, known loci for CHD, these included SNPs having reported GWAS association with hypertension (e.g., ATP2B1). In PROMIS, four of the 23 suggestive CAC loci (chr9p21, COL4A1, ATP2B1 and ABCA4) had significant associations with MI consistent with their direction of effect on CAC. Conclusions We identified several loci associated with CAC in CKD that also relate to MI in a general population sample. CKD imparts a high risk of CHD and may provide a useful setting for discovery of novel CHD genes and pathways. PMID:23727086

  13. Transactive Control and Coordination of Distributed Assets for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Somani, Abhishek; Pratt, Robert G.; Widergren, Steven E.; Chassin, David P.

    2013-09-18

    The need to diversify energy supplies, the need to mitigate energy-related environmental impact, and the entry of electric vehicles in large numbers present challenges and opportunities to power system professionals. Wind and solar power provide many benefits, and to reap the benefits the resulting increased variability—forecasted as well as unforecasted—should be addressed. Demand resources are receiving increasing attention as one means of providing the grid balancing services. Control and coordination of a large number (~millions) of distributed smart grid assets requires innovative approaches. One such is transactive control and coordination (TC2)—a distributed, agent-based incentive and control system. The TC2 paradigm is to create a market system with the following characteristics: • Participation should be entirely voluntary. • The participant decides at what price s/he is willing to participate. • The bids and responses are automated. Such an approach has been developed and demonstrated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for energy markets. It is the purpose of this project to develop a similar approach for ancillary services. In this report, the following ancillary services are considered: • spinning reserve • ramping • regulation. These services are to be provided by the following devices: • refrigerators • water heaters • clothes dryers • variable speed drives. The important results are summarized below: The regulation signal can be divided into an energy-neutral high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency component is particularly well suited for demand resources. The low frequency component, which carries energy non-neutrality, can be handled by a combination of generators and demand resources. An explicit method for such a separation is obtained from an exponentially weighted moving average filter. Causal filters (i.e., filters that process only present and past values of a signal

  14. 78 FR 46177 - Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric Storage...-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric Storage... services. \\6\\ Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for...

  15. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  16. Stable Blue Phosphorescence Iridium(III) Cyclometalated Complexes Prompted by Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Ancillary Ligand.

    PubMed

    Yi, Seungjun; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Cho, Yang-Jin; Lee, Jiwon; Choi, Tae-Sup; Cho, Dae Won; Pac, Chyongjin; Han, Won-Sik; Son, Ho-Jin; Kang, Sang Ook

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of the stability of blue phosphorescent dopant material is one of the key factors for real application of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this study, we found that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in an ancillary ligand from a heteroleptic Ir(III) complex can play an important role in the stability of blue phosphorescence. To rationalize the role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, a series of Ir(III) complexes is designed and prepared: Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OH) (1a), Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OMe) (1b), Ir(ppy)2(pic-OH) (2a), and Ir(ppy)2(pic-OMe) (2b). The emission lifetime of Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OH) (1a) (τem = 3.19 μs) in dichloromethane solution was found to be significantly longer than that of Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OMe) (1b) (τem = 0.94 μs), because of a substantial difference in the nonradiative decay rate (knr = 0.28 × 10(5) s(-1) for (1a) vs 2.99 × 10(5) s(-1) for (1b)). These results were attributed to the intramolecular OH···O═C hydrogen bond of the 3-hydroxy-picolinato ligand. Finally, device lifetime was significantly improved when 1a was used as the dopant compared to FIrpic, a well-known blue dopant. Device III (1a as dopant) achieved an operational lifetime of 34.3 h for an initial luminance of 400 nits compared to that of device IV (FIrpic as dopant), a value of 20.1 h, indicating that the intramolecular hydrogen bond in ancillary ligand is playing an important role in device stability. PMID:26991672

  17. TECHNOLOGY NEEDS AND STATUS ON CLOSURE OF DOE RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK ANCILLARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H; Sharon Marra, S; Christine Langton, C

    2009-01-21

    This paper summarizes the current state of art of sampling, characterizing, retrieving, transferring and treating the incidental waste and stabilizing the void space in tank ancillary systems and the needs involved with closure of these systems. The overall effort for closing tank and ancillary systems is very large and is in the initial stages of being addressed in a systematic manner. It was recognized in doing this effort, that gaps in both technology and material application for characterization and removal of residual waste and closure of ancillary systems would be identified. Great efficiencies are to be gained by defining the technology need areas early in the closure process and providing recommendations for technical programs to improve the closure strategies. Therefore, this paper will not only summarize the state of closure of ancillary systems but also provide recommendations to address the technology gaps identified in this assessment.

  18. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for SMAP Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P.; Podest, E.; Njoku, E.

    2011-01-01

    Algorithms being developed for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission require a variety of both static and ancillary data. The selection of the most appropriate source for each ancillary data parameter is driven by a number of considerations, including accuracy, latency, availability, and consistency across all SMAP products and with SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). It is anticipated that initial selection of all ancillary datasets, which are needed for ongoing algorithm development activities on the SMAP algorithm testbed at JPL, will be completed within the year. These datasets will be updated as new or improved sources become available, and all selections and changes will be documented for the benefit of the user community. Wise choices in ancillary data will help to enable SMAP to provide new global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state at the targeted accuracy necessary to tackle hydrologically-relevant societal issues.

  19. 21 CFR 830.340 - Voluntary submission of ancillary device identification information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Identification Database § 830.340 Voluntary submission of ancillary device identification information. (a) You may not submit any information to the Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID) other...

  20. Extending NASA's SPICE ancillary information system to meet future mission needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Elson, L.; Semenov, B.; Turner, F.; Wright, E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the architecture, capabilities, characteristics and uses of the current SPICE ancillary information system, and then outlines plans and ideas for how this system can be extended to meet future space mission requirements.

  1. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process-based approach has been taken to calculate A(sub g) and R using satellite and ancillary data. A(sub g) has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as

  2. Evaluation of freely available ancillary data used for detailed soil mapping in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel-Rosa, Alessandro; Anjos, Lúcia; Vasques, Gustavo; Heuvelink, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is one of the world's largest food producers, and is home of both largest rainforest and largest supply of renewable fresh water on Earth. However, it lacks detailed soil information in extensive areas of the country. The best soil map covering the entire country was published at a scale of 1:5,000,000. Termination of governmental support for systematic soil mapping in the 1980's made detailed soil mapping of the whole country a very difficult task to accomplish. Nowadays, due to new user-driven demands (e.g. precision agriculture), most detailed soil maps are produced for small size areas. Many of them rely on as is freely available ancillary data, although their accuracy is usually not reported or unknown. Results from a validation exercise that we performed using ground control points from a small hilly catchment (20 km²) in Southern Brazil (-53.7995ºE, -29.6355ºN) indicate that most freely available ancillary data needs some type of correction before use. Georeferenced and orthorectified RapidEye imagery (recently acquired by the Brazilian government) has a horizontal accuracy (root-mean-square error, RMSE) of 37 m, which is worse than the value published in the metadata (32 m). Like any remote sensing imagery, RapidEye imagery needs to be correctly registered before its use for soil mapping. Topographic maps produced by the Brazilian Army and derived geological maps (scale of 1:25,000) have a horizontal accuracy of 65 m, which is more than four times the maximum value allowed by Brazilian legislation (15 m). Worse results were found for geological maps derived from 1:50,000 topographic maps (RMSE = 147 m), for which the maximum allowed value is 30 m. In most cases positional errors are of systematic origin and can be easily corrected (e.g., affine transformation). ASTER GDEM has many holes and is very noisy, making it of little use in the studied area. TOPODATA, which is SRTM kriged from originally 3 to 1 arc-second by the Brazilian National

  3. Combining satellite data with ancillary data to produce a refined land-use/land-cover map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages Study Unit, a current map of land use and land cover is needed to gain a better understanding of how land use and land cover may influence water quality. Satellite data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper provides a means to map and measure the type and amount of various land-cover types across the Study Unit and can be easily updated as changes occur in the landscape or in water quality. Translating these land cover categories to land use, however, requires the use of other thematic maps or ancillary data layers, such as wetland inventories, population data, or road networks. This report describes a process of (1) using satellite imagery to produce a land-cover map for the Fox/Wolf River basin, a portion of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages NAWQA Study Unit and (2) improving the satellite-derived land-cover map by using other thematic maps. The multiple data layers are processed in a geographic information system (GIS), and the combination provides more information than individual sources alone.

  4. Using remote sensing and ancillary data to extend airborne electromagnetic resistivity surveys for regional permafrost interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastick, N.; Wylie, B. K.; Minsley, B. J.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Ji, L.; Walvoord, M. A.; Smith, B. D.; Abraham, J. D.; Rose, J.

    2011-12-01

    landsat, and the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) using band 7. The regression tree models were applied to a 6-scene landsat mosaic and ancillary data to make estimates of electrical resistivity at 0-1m and 0-2.6m depths for the entirety of Yukon Flats. Further studies will assess relationships between mapped surface resistivity and depth to permafrost measured in the field.

  5. Interaction of Ruthenium(II)-dipyridophenazine Complexes with CT-DNA: Effects of the Polythioether Ancillary Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Madureira, João; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Drew, Michael G. B.; de Jesus, Júlio Pedrosa; Félix, Vitor

    2001-01-01

    The complexes [Ru([9]aneS3)(dppz)Cl]Cl 1 and [Ru([12]aneS4)(dppz)]Cl2 2 ([9]aneS3 = 1,4,7- trithiaciclononane and [12]aneS4 = 1,4,7,10-tetrathiaciclododecane) were synthesised and fully characterised. These complexes belong to a small family of dipyridophenazine complexes with non-polypyridyl ancillary ligands . Interaction studies of these complexes with CT-DNA (UV/Vis titrations, steady-state emission and thermal denaturation) revealed their high affinity for DNA . Intercalation constants determined by UV/Vis titrations are of the same order of magnitude (106) as other dppz metallointercalators, namely [Ru(II)(bpy)2dppz]S2+. Differences between l and2 were identified by steady-state emission and thermal denaturation studies . Emission results are in accordance with structural data, which indicate how geometric distortions and different donor and/or acceptor ligand abilities affect luminescence. The possibility of noncovalent interactions between ancillary ligands and nucleobases by van der Waals contacts and H-bridges is discussed . Furthermore, complex l undergoes aquation under intra-cellular conditions and an equilibrium with the aquated form l' is attained . This behaviour may increase the diversity of available interaction modes. PMID:18475986

  6. Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 to CO using Rhenium Bipyridine Platforms Containing Ancillary Phenyl or BODIPY Moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Gabriel; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing of solar energy to drive the reduction of carbon dioxide to fuels requires the development of efficient catalysts that absorb sunlight. In this work, we detail the synthesis, electrochemistry and photophysical properties of a set of homologous fac-ReI(CO)3 complexes containing either an ancillary phenyl (8) or BODIPY (12) substituent. These studies demonstrate that both the electronic properties of the rhenium center and BODIPY chromophore are maintained for these systems. Photolysis studies demonstrate that both assemblies 8 and 12 are competent catalysts for the photochemical reduction of CO2 to CO in DMF using triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial reductant. Both these systems display TOFs for photocatalytic CO production upon irradiation with light ( ex 400 nm) of ~5 hr 1 with TON values of approximately 20. Although structural and photophysical measurements demonstrate that electronic coupling between the BODIPY and fac-ReI(CO)3 units is limited for complex 12, this work clearly shows that the photoactive BODIPY moiety is tolerated during catalysis and does not interfere with the observed photochemistry. When taken together, these results provide a clear roadmap for the development of advanced rhenium bipyridine complexes bearing ancillary BODIPY groups for the efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 using visible light.

  7. Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 to CO using Rhenium Bipyridine Platforms Containing Ancillary Phenyl or BODIPY Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Gabriel A.; Pistner, Allen J.; Yap, Glenn P.A.; Lutterman, Daniel A.; Rosenthal, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing of solar energy to drive the reduction of carbon dioxide to fuels requires the development of efficient catalysts that absorb sunlight. In this work, we detail the synthesis, electrochemistry and photophysical properties of a set of homologous fac-ReI(CO)3 complexes containing either an ancillary phenyl (8) or BODIPY (12) substituent. These studies demonstrate that both the electronic properties of the rhenium center and BODIPY chromophore are maintained for these complexes. Photolysis studies demonstrate that both assemblies 8 and 12 are competent catalysts for the photochemical reduction of CO2 to CO in DMF using triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial reductant. Both compounds 8 and 12 display TOFs for photocatalytic CO production upon irradiation with light (λex ≥ 400 nm) of ~5 hr−1 with TON values of approximately 20. Although structural and photophysical measurements demonstrate that electronic coupling between the BODIPY and fac-ReI(CO)3 units is limited for complex 12, this work clearly shows that the photoactive BODIPY moiety is tolerated during catalysis and does not interfere with the observed photochemistry. When taken together, these results provide a clear roadmap for the development of advanced rhenium bipyridine complexes bearing ancillary BODIPY groups for the efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 using visible light. PMID:24015374

  8. Integrated Stormwater Management in Los Angeles, California: Best Management Practices and Evaluation of Ancillary Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Low Impact Development (LID) have been the primary tools to address quantitative and qualitative surface runoff impacts. The City of Los Angeles (City) is evaluating plans for individual Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) pollutants in each of its major watersheds. However, it has yet to be studied if implementing individual BMP projects will adequately address water quality objectives for receiving (downstream) water bodies, such as Ballona Creek, Ballona Estuary and the Santa Monica Bay. In addition, there is significant uncertainty surrounding potential ancillary benefits (flood reduction, water supply, green space, etc.) from BMP/LID implementation. This presentation will overview our work with the City evaluating the influence of BMPs and LIDs in improving water quality at the watershed scale as well as quantifying other hydrologic benefits. Multiple BMP scenarios are considered to identify various pathways toward improved receiving water body quality in Ballona Creek and Dominquez watersheds. Specific study objectives are to: 1) identify suites of BMP scenarios which can lead to TMDL compliance, 2) quantify the multiple benefits provided by BMPs beyond their primary water quality improvement purpose, and 3) evaluate the success of using existing software for watershed-scale BMP modeling. Our goal is to provide realistic, implementable pathways that can be used by stakeholders to help plan for future education, outreach and capital improvement programs as well as determine feasible pollutant reduction objectives.

  9. Catalytic water oxidation by mononuclear Ru complexes with an anionic ancillary ligand.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianpeng; Inge, A Ken; Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Licheng

    2013-03-01

    Mononuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalysts containing anionic ancillary ligands have shown promising catalytic efficiency and intriguing properties. However, their insolubility in water restricts a detailed mechanism investigation. In order to overcome this disadvantage, complexes [Ru(II)(bpc)(bpy)OH2](+) (1(+), bpc = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-carboxylate, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(II)(bpc)(pic)3](+) (2(+), pic = 4-picoline) were prepared and fully characterized, which features an anionic tridentate ligand and has enough solubility for spectroscopic study in water. Using Ce(IV) as an electron acceptor, both complexes are able to catalyze O2-evolving reaction with an impressive rate constant. On the basis of the electrochemical and kinetic studies, a water nucleophilic attack pathway was proposed as the dominant catalytic cycle of the catalytic water oxidation by 1(+), within which several intermediates were detected by MS. Meanwhile, an auxiliary pathway that is related to the concentration of Ce(IV) was also revealed. The effect of anionic ligand regarding catalytic water oxidation was discussed explicitly in comparison with previously reported mononuclear Ru catalysts carrying neutral tridentate ligands, for example, 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (tpy). When 2(+) was oxidized to the trivalent state, one of its picoline ligands dissociated from the Ru center. The rate constant of picoline dissociation was evaluated from time-resolved UV-vis spectra. PMID:23409776

  10. A hybrid-systems approach to spin squeezing using a highly dissipative ancillary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Shane; Yukawa, Emi; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Knee, George C.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2016-05-01

    Squeezed states of spin systems are an important entangled resource for quantum technologies, particularly quantum metrology and sensing. Here we consider the generation of spin squeezed states by interacting the spins with a dissipative ancillary system. We show that spin squeezing can be generated in this model by two different mechanisms: one-axis twisting (OAT) and driven collective relaxation (DCR). We can interpolate between the two mechanisms by simply adjusting the detuning between the dissipative ancillary system and the spin system. Interestingly, we find that for both mechanisms, ancillary system dissipation need not be considered an imperfection in our model, but plays a positive role in spin squeezing. To assess the feasibility of spin squeezing we consider two different implementations with superconducting circuits. We conclude that it is experimentally feasible to generate a squeezed state of hundreds of spins either by OAT or by DCR.

  11. Ancillary services in the health care industry: is Six Sigma reasonable?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Peter A S; Hendrickson, Julie A W; Dernbach, Allison J; Secord, Ann R; Parker, John C; Favata, Michael A; Puckett, Michael L

    2003-01-01

    Within the naval medical center construct, the disparate disciplines encompassed within ancillary services lend themselves to formal quality analysis and process improvement. This analysis uses the Six Sigma approach. Error rates were investigated and calculated for various processes within ancillary services at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. These were translated into the common metric of defects per million opportunities (DPMO). DPMO rates vary between 21.5 and 420,000. These correspond to Sigma values from 1.7 to approaching 6. Rates vary with biological complexity of the system and the degree of automation available. Some ancillary services translate well into a Six Sigma schema. Systems with high potential patient risk if performed poorly and those amenable to second checking and computer oversight may be candidates for such optimization. This should be undertaken in a local environment conducive to individual error reporting, and in a corporate environment with the will and funding to support the transition. PMID:12593375

  12. Effects of ancillary ligands on selectivity of protein labeling with platinum(II) chloro complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xia-Ying.

    1990-02-01

    Potassium (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylato)chloroplatinate(II) was synthesized. The molecular structure of the complex in (n-Bu){sub 4}N(Pt(dipic)Cl){center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O was determined by x-ray crystallography. The (Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} is essentially planar and contains a Pt(II) atom, a tridentate dipicolinate dianion ligand, and a unidentate Cl{sup {minus}} ligand. The bis(bidentate) complex trans-(Pt(dipic){sub 2}){sup 2{minus}} was also observed by {sup 1}H NMR. A red gel-like substance was observed when the yellow aqueous solution of K(Pt(dipic)Cl) was cooled or concentrated. The K(Pt(dipic)Cl) molecules form stacks in the solid state and gel-like substance but remain monomeric over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. The reactivity and selectivity of(Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} toward cytochromes c from horse and tuna were studied. The new transition-metal reagent is specific for methionine residues. Di(2-pyridyl-{beta}-ethyl)sulfidochloroplatinum(II) chloride dihydrate was also synthesized. This complex labels histidine and methionine residues in cytochrome c. The ancillary ligands in these platinum(II) complexes clearly determine the selectivity of protein labeling. 106 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and properties of copper(I) complexes with bis(diphenylphosphino)-ferrocene ancillary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfang; Zhang, Songlin; Ding, Yuqiang

    2012-06-01

    Three copper(I) complexes (2-4) containing dppf ancillary ligand (dppf = bis(diphenylphosphino)-ferrocene) were synthesized when chloride-bridged copper(I) complex 1 reacted with acetanilide and characterized by IR, element analysis and NMR spectrum. And the crystal structures of complexes 2 and 4 have been determined by X-ray diffraction method. Complex 2, an acetate-bridged copper(I) complex, was obtained under N2 atmosphere in un-dried solvent; the acetate ion came from the hydrolysis reaction of acetanilide due to residual water in solvent. Acetanilide was deprotonated and coordinated with the copper(I) centre to form a copper(I) amidate complex 3 when reacted in pre-dried solvent. In addition, a known complex 4, the oxidation product of dppf, was isolated from the same reaction system when reacted in air atmosphere. CV and TG experiments were carried out to check the electron transfer properties and thermal stabilities of complexes 2-3. Finally, the arylation reaction of complex 3 with iodobenzene was performed to study the reaction mechanism of copper(I) catalyzed Goldberg reaction.

  14. Disaggregating census data for population mapping using random forests with remotely-sensed and ancillary data.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Forrest R; Gaughan, Andrea E; Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are vital for measuring impacts of population growth, monitoring human-environment interactions and for planning and policy development. Many methods are used to disaggregate census data and predict population densities for finer scale, gridded population data sets. We present a new semi-automated dasymetric modeling approach that incorporates detailed census and ancillary data in a flexible, "Random Forest" estimation technique. We outline the combination of widely available, remotely-sensed and geospatial data that contribute to the modeled dasymetric weights and then use the Random Forest model to generate a gridded prediction of population density at ~100 m spatial resolution. This prediction layer is then used as the weighting surface to perform dasymetric redistribution of the census counts at a country level. As a case study we compare the new algorithm and its products for three countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya) with other common gridded population data production methodologies. We discuss the advantages of the new method and increases over the accuracy and flexibility of those previous approaches. Finally, we outline how this algorithm will be extended to provide freely-available gridded population data sets for Africa, Asia and Latin America. PMID:25689585

  15. Disaggregating Census Data for Population Mapping Using Random Forests with Remotely-Sensed and Ancillary Data

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Forrest R.; Gaughan, Andrea E.; Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are vital for measuring impacts of population growth, monitoring human-environment interactions and for planning and policy development. Many methods are used to disaggregate census data and predict population densities for finer scale, gridded population data sets. We present a new semi-automated dasymetric modeling approach that incorporates detailed census and ancillary data in a flexible, “Random Forest” estimation technique. We outline the combination of widely available, remotely-sensed and geospatial data that contribute to the modeled dasymetric weights and then use the Random Forest model to generate a gridded prediction of population density at ~100 m spatial resolution. This prediction layer is then used as the weighting surface to perform dasymetric redistribution of the census counts at a country level. As a case study we compare the new algorithm and its products for three countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya) with other common gridded population data production methodologies. We discuss the advantages of the new method and increases over the accuracy and flexibility of those previous approaches. Finally, we outline how this algorithm will be extended to provide freely-available gridded population data sets for Africa, Asia and Latin America. PMID:25689585

  16. Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data for San Francisco Bay, California, March to November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Ota, Allan Y.; Harmon, J.G.; Shay, J.M.; Adorado, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data were collected during 1987 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Effects Monitoring Program in San Francisco Bay, California. Data were collected during five cruises at 2-month intervals from March through November. Benthic macrofauna for identification of species and sediment for size analysis were sampled at eight stations. Ancillary data, which consisted of salinity, temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and suspended sediment, were collected at 12 stations. Salinity and temperature were measured at three stations that coincided with continuous water quality monitors. Abundances and geographical distributions of a newly introduced species of clam were measured. (USGS)

  17. 77 FR 40413 - Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Organized Wholesale Energy Markets, Order No. 745, 76 FR 16658 (Mar. 24, 2011), FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,322... 101 Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric... 101 Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New...

  18. Improving the Quality of Ability Estimates through Multidimensional Scoring and Incorporation of Ancillary Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    For one reason or another, various sources of information, namely, ancillary variables and correlational structure of the latent abilities, which are usually available in most testing situations, are ignored in ability estimation. A general model that incorporates these sources of information is proposed in this article. The model has a general…

  19. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen sulfide (H2S) releases....

  20. 30 CFR 250.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 250.207 Section 250.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT... spills, drilling muds and cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen...

  1. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen sulfide (H2S) releases....

  2. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  3. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  4. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  5. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  6. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  7. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #15: WORKSHOP ON ANCILLARY BENEFITS AND COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Global Change Research Program is co-sponsoring a three-day workshop to examine possible ancillary benefits of climate change adaptation and mitigation policies. The goals of the workshop are: (1)to establish a common basis of understanding about the conceptual and empiric...

  8. Risk Management: Supporting the District's Ancillary Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldmann, Steve; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The everyday operations of a school district depend on a network of people, including students, teachers, staff, and administrators. However, the ancillary services staff are really responsible for making the school day run smoothly. They are often the first employees that students see in the morning, either on the school bus or in the cafeteria,…

  9. Advanced technology for ancillary coal cleaning operations. Technical progress report, September--December, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The work under contract number DE-AC22-87PC97881 is devoted to experimental research and development to investigate the feasibility of novel ancillary coal-cleaning technologies that offer a potential for reduced capital and operating costs. The ancilliary operations that are specifically addressed in this work include pulse enhanced drying, fines reconstitution by extrusion, and hydraulic wave comminution.

  10. Regulatory issues associated with closure of the Hanford AX Tank Farm ancillary equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1998-09-02

    Liquid mixed, high-level radioactive waste has been stored in underground single-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. After retrieval of the waste from the single-shell tanks, the DOE will proceed with closure of the tank farm. The 241-AX Tank Farm includes four one-million gallon single-shell tanks in addition to sluice lines, transfer lines, ventilation headers, risers, pits, cribs, catch tanks, buildings, well and associated buried piping. This equipment is classified as ancillary equipment. This document addresses the requirements for regulatory close of the ancillary equipment in the Hanford Site 241-AX Tank Farm. The options identified for physical closure of the ancillary equipment include disposal in place, disposal in place after treatment, excavation and disposal on site in an empty single-shell tank, and excavation and disposal outside the AX Tank Farm. The document addresses the background of the Hanford Site and ancillary equipment in the AX Tank Farm, regulations for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively contaminated equipment, requirements for the cleanup and disposal of radioactive wastes, cleanup and disposal requirements governing hazardous and mixed waste, and regulatory requirements and issues associated with each of the four physical closure options. This investigation was conducted by the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during Fiscal Year 1998 for the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project.

  11. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers {[Zn(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n1, {[Co(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n2, {[Cd(acty)2(bipy)H2O]·H2O}n3, and {[Cd(acty)(bpe)2(Ac)]·6H2O}n4 (bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated.

  12. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Redox Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teesdale, Justin; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Ma, Yingzhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a noninnocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M 1s 1 at an applied potential of 2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that are not typically observed for fac- ReI(CO)3 complexes.

  13. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Moieties.

    PubMed

    Teesdale, Justin J; Pistner, Allen J; Yap, Glenn P A; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-04-15

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-Re(I)(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the Re(I/0) couple, and three ligand based reductions - two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a non-innocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M(-1)s(-1) at an applied potential of -2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that precludes efficient CO2 reduction and are distinct from those that are typically observed for fac-Re(I)(CO)3 complexes. PMID:25395735

  14. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Teesdale, Justin J.; Pistner, Allen J.; Yap, Glenn P.A.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Lutterman, Daniel A.; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions – two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a non-innocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M−1s−1 at an applied potential of −2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that precludes efficient CO2 reduction and are distinct from those that are typically observed for fac-ReI(CO)3 complexes. PMID:25395735

  15. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes with hydrophobic ancillary ligand as Aβ aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nilima A; Ramteke, Shefali N; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Kulkarni, Prasad P; Jani, Vinod; Sonawane, Uddhavesh B; Joshi, Rajendra R; Joshi, Bimba; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis, spectral and electrochemical characterization of the complexes of the type [Ru(NN)2(txbg)](2+) where NN is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (2), dipyrido [3,2-d:2',3f] quinoxaline (dpq) (3), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) (4) which incorporate the tetra-xylene bipyridine glycoluril (txbg) as the ancillary ligand are described in detail. Crystal structures of ligand txbg and complex 2 were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results indicated that at micromolar concentration all complexes exhibit significant potential of Aβ aggregation inhibition, while the ligand txbg displayed weak activity towards Aβ aggregation. Complex 1 showed relatively low inhibition (70%) while complexes 2-4 inhibited nearly 100% Aβ aggregation after 240 h of incubation. The similar potential of complexes 2-4 and absence of any trend in their activity with the planarity of polypyridyl ligands suggests there is no marked effect of planarity of coligands on their inhibitory potential. Further studies on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition indicated very weak activity of these complexes against AChE. Detailed interactions of Aβ with both ligand and complex 2 have been studied by molecular modeling. Complex 2 showed interactions involving all three polypyridyl ligands with hydrophobic region of Aβ. Furthermore, the toxicity of these complexes towards human neuroblastoma cells was evaluated by MTT assay and except complex 4, the complexes displayed very low toxicity. PMID:27406812

  16. Diode-pumped ytterbium-doped phosphate and tungstate regenerative amplifiers and ancillary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsiao-Hua

    This thesis focuses on the development of directly diode- pumped solid-state regenerative laser amplifiers. Our purpose is to build a compact, simple, reliable, and economical subpicosecond laser system by employing a direct diode-pumping scheme for real-world applications such as medical surgeries and micromachining. Ytterbium- doped phosphate glass (QX/Yb) and ytterbium-doped tungstate crystals (Yb:KYW and Yb:KGW) are used as the amplifier gain media, and their laser properties are discussed and compared with other ytterbium-doped materials. The same oscillator, stretcher, and compressor are used with each amplifier presented. Both end- and side-pumping configurations are implemented and compared wherever possible. Typically, an end-pumped laser has a higher efficiency, whereas a side-pumped laser has a simpler, and thus more compact setup. To improve the efficiency of a side-pumped laser, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel pumping scheme with the QX/Yb, amplifier. To match the elliptical beam from the pump diodes, we have designed and built cavities with an elliptical fundamental mode by using cylindrical optics. Millijoule, subpicosecond pulses have been produced from our QX/Yb regenerative amplifier using the proposed pumping scheme and an elliptic-mode cavity. The diode- pumped ytterbium-doped tungstate regenerative amplifiers in this thesis produced subpicosecond pulses with at least tens of microjoules of pulse energy at a kHz repetition rate, also using a cavity with an elliptical fundamental mode. A self-starting Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KYW oscillator directly pumped by diodes and a low- repetition-rate Yb:KGW regenerative amplifier pumped by a flashlamp-pumped Ti:sapphire laser are also presented as ancillary studies.

  17. The new Heavy-ion MCP-based Ancillary Detector DANTE for the CLARA-PRISMA Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Della Vedova, F.; Fioretto, E.; Marginean, N.; Napoli, D. R.; Orlandi, R.; Pokrovsky, I.; Sahin, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Brambilla, S.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.

    2006-08-14

    The CLARA-PRISMA setup is a powerful tool for spectroscopic studies of neutron-rich nuclei produced in multi-nucleon transfer and deep-inelastic reactions. It combines the large acceptance spectrometer PRISMA with the {gamma}-ray array CLARA. At present, the ancillary heavy-ion detector DANTE, based on Micro-Channel Plates to be installed at the CLARA-PRISMA setup, is being constructed at LNL. DANTE will open the possibility of measuring {gamma}-{gamma} Doppler-corrected coincidences for the events outside the acceptance of PRISMA. In this presentation, it is described the heavy-ion detector DANTE, as well as the performances of the first prototype.

  18. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-15

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers ([Zn(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}1, ([Co(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}2, ([Cd(acty){sub 2}(bipy)H{sub 2}O]·H{sub 2}O){sub n}3, and ([Cd(acty)(bpe){sub 2}(Ac)]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n}4 (bipy=4,4′-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four new homochiral coordination polymers were prepared and structurally characterized, which investigate the influence of the ancillary ligands and metal ions on the design and synthesis of coordination polymers. Display Omitted - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that the chiral coordination polymers prepared with N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The alkalescent acetyl oxygen atom is difficult to participate in coordination but it is happened in the N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The ancillary ligands (4,4′-bipy and bpe) are present in an unusual coordination modes, monodentate decorating ligands in 1, 2 and 4. • Structure comparative analyses results indicate that the

  19. Organizational boundaries of medical practice: the case of physician ownership of ancillary services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Physician ownership of in-office ancillary services (IOASs) has come under increasing scrutiny. Advocates of argue that IOASs allow physicians to supervise the quality and coordination of care. Critics have argued that IOASs create financial incentives for physicians to increase ancillary service volume. In this paper we develop a conceptual framework to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with physician ownership of IOASs. There is some evidence supporting the existence of scope and transaction economies in IOASs. Improvement in flow and continuity of care are likely to generate scope economies and improvements in quality monitoring and reductions in consumer transaction costs are likely to generate transaction economies. Other factors include the capture of upstream and downstream profits, but these incentives are likely to be small compared to scope and transaction economies. Policy debates on the merits of IOASs should include an explicit assessment of these tradeoffs. This research was supported in part by funding from the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). PMID:22828324

  20. Summary of the 1993 ASHG ancillary meeting recent research on chromosome 4p syndromes and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrooks, L.L.; Breg, W.R.; Hayden, M.R.

    1995-02-13

    The following is a summary of presentations given during an ancillary meeting to the 1993 American Society of Human Genetics Meeting in New Orleans, LA. This ancillary meeting, entitled Recent Research on Chromosome 4p Syndromes and Genes, reviewed the history of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), the natural history of patients with WHS, and the smallest region of deletion associated with the WHS. The proximal 4p deletion syndrome and the duplication 4p syndrome were also described and advice was offered regarding detection of chromosome 4p deletions, duplications, and rearrangements. The current status of the physical map of chromosome 4p with emphasis on the genes that map to the 4p16 region was presented along with a preliminary phenotypic map of 4p16. The goal of this format was to provide a comprehensive review of the clinical presentations, diagnostic capabilities, and genetic mapping advances involving chromosome 4p.

  1. Ancillary qubit spectroscopy of vacua in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Jared; Baksic, Alexandre; Nagy, David; Manucharyan, Vladimir E; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    We investigate theoretically how the spectroscopy of an ancillary qubit can probe cavity (circuit) QED ground states containing photons. We consider three classes of systems (Dicke, Tavis-Cummings, and Hopfield-like models), where nontrivial vacua are the result of ultrastrong coupling between N two-level systems and a single-mode bosonic field. An ancillary qubit detuned with respect to the boson frequency is shown to reveal distinct spectral signatures depending on the type of vacua. In particular, the Lamb shift of the ancilla is sensitive to both ground state photon population and correlations. Backaction of the ancilla on the cavity ground state is investigated, taking into account the dissipation via a consistent master equation for the ultrastrong coupling regime. The conditions for high-fidelity measurements are determined. PMID:26001000

  2. Defining extreme wildland fires using geospatial and ancillary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannom, K. O.; Tinkham, W.; Smith, A. M.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Newingham, B. A.; Hall, T. E.; Morgan, P.; Strand, E. K.; Paveglio, T. B.; Anderson, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Mega-fires, conflagrations, extreme, and catastrophic are descriptors interchangeably used to increasingly describe fires in recent decades in the US and globally. It is necessary to have consistent, meaningful, and quantitative metrics to define these perceived 'extreme' fires, given studies predict an increased frequency of large and intense wildfires in many ecosystems as a response to climate change. This study explored four metrics to describe both widespread fire years and potentially extreme individual fires derived from a case study of wildland fires from 1984-2009 in the northwestern United States. A combination of percentile-based thresholds was used for each of the metrics to define individual fires as extreme events. We identified both widespread fire years and individual fires as potentially extreme during 1984-2009 across a 91.2 million-ha area in the northwestern United States. The metrics included distributions of fire size, fire duration, burn severity, and distance to the wildland urban interface. Widespread fire years for the study region included 1988, 2000, 2006, and 2007. When considering the intersection of all four metrics using distributions at the 90th percentile, less than 1.5% of all fires were identified as potentially extreme fires. At the more stringent 95th and 99th percentiles, this percentage reduced to less than 0.5% and 0.05% respectively.

  3. Improved Sea Surface Salinity Retrievals using Ancillary data for Aquarius Ocean Roughness Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.; Hejazin, Y.; Rabollii, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D sea surface salinity (SSS) measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is a combined L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which derives SSS from ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) measurements. This paper deals with a method of improving AQ SSS by making a making an ocean roughness brightness temperature correction (ΔTbr). The ΔTbr is derived using several ancillary data sources of surface wind measurements, namely; NOAA numerical weather model - Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS), WindSat ocean vector wind, and the CONAE Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The basis of the correction is the excess (warming) brightness temperature that is produced when the ocean is roughened by the surface wind. We model the increase in L-band Tb as a function of wind speed and direction relative to the antenna azimuth look direction. Our radiative transfer model by El-Nimri [2010] has been tuned to actual AQ ocean surface Tb's with corresponding surface wind vector. Using this ocean emissivity model and the ancillary wind vector, we derive the roughness correction, ΔTbr, which is applied to the AQ measured ocean surface Tb before retrieving SSS. Finally the effect of ΔTbr is evaluated by computing the difference between the HYCOM ocean salinity model and the AQ retrievals. These differences are cross correlated with the ancillary surface wind vector to assess the effectiveness of the roughness correction. Finally, we compare our ΔTbr with the AQ scatterometer derived ΔTbr. We compare the similarities and differenced versus the ancillary surface wind speed. S. El-Nimri et al., 2010, "An improved C-band ocean surface emissivity model at hurricane force wind speeds over a wide range of earth incidence angles," IEEE Geosci. Rem. Sens. Letters, vol. 7, NO. 4, October.

  4. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2012-06-14

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  5. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  6. Distributed Smart Grid Asset Control Strategies for Providing Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Moya, Christian; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2013-10-30

    implementing real load control programs. The promise of autonomous, Grid Friendly™ response by smart appliances in the form of under-frequency load shedding was demonstrated in the GridWise Olympic Peninsula Demonstration in 2006. Each controller monitored the power grid voltage signal and requested that electrical load be shed by its appliance whenever electric power-grid frequency fell below 59.95 Hz. The controllers and their appliances responded reliably to each shallow under-frequency event, which was an average of one event per day and shed their loads for the durations of these events. Another objective of this project was to perform extensive simulation studies to investigate the impact of a population of Grid Friendly™ Appliances (GFAs) on the bulk power system frequency stability. The GFAs considered in this report are represented as demonstration units with water heaters individually modeled.

  7. The effect of spatial scale and ancillary datasets on the evaluations of EO soil moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubkova, Marcela; Hegyova, Alena; Bloeschl, Guenter; van Dijk, Albert; Fernàndez Prieto, Diego

    2013-04-01

    With this presentation we follow up on the results of our previous paper that assessed the quality of the ASAR GM 1 km soil moisture product with the use of AWRA-L landscape hydrological model at 1 km scale. In that paper we concluded that that RMSE and R can be predicted with use of the error assessment of ASAR GM solely. The goal of this presentation is to study a) if and how do the results of the absolute and relative evaluation measures change with spatial scale, b) if the conclusion introduced in the previous paper holds independent of scale, and c) where do the differences between different relative and absolute evaluation measures stem from. The continental average absolute evaluation measures over Australia ranged between 2.65 % (Error Propagation (EP)) and 8.44 % (RMSE) of saturated soil moisture. The relative evaluation measures spanned from 0.39 (Spearman Correlation coefficient (RS) when computed with AWRA-L SSM) to 0.57 (RS when computed with GLDAS dataset). Clearly, the results varied between different absolute and different relative evaluation techniques and were as well influenced by the selection of the ancillary dataset. As expected, RS and R corresponded and demonstrated significantly different spatial patterns to any of the absolute measures. Surprisingly, however, the spatial patterns of the EP significantly differed from RMSE at 5 km scale. This is in contrary result to the similar analyses performed at 1 km scale (Doubková et al., 2012) and suggests that the selection of spatial scale has an important impact on the evaluation results. The findings and suggestions originating from the discussion are transferable to other satellite-derived soil moisture data. Of special interest is its transfer to data from the planned Sentinel-1 SAR sensor that shares similar technical characteristics but has an improved retrieval error comparable to the ASAR GM sensor. The operationally available medium resolution soil moisture from Sentinel-1 with a well

  8. Opportunities for ice storage to provide ancillary services to power grids incorporating wind turbine generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Christopher

    Power generation using wind turbines increases the electrical system balancing, regulation and ramp rate requirements due to the minute to minute variability in wind speed and the difficulty in accurately forecasting wind speeds. The addition of thermal energy storage, such as ice storage, to a building's space cooling equipment increases the operational flexibility of the equipment by allowing the owner to choose when the chiller is run. The ability of the building owner to increase the power demand from the chiller (e.g. make ice) or to decrease the power demand (e.g. melt ice) to provide electrical system ancillary services was evaluated.

  9. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  10. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, David K

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  11. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Vennin, Claire; Herrmann, David; Lucas, Morghan C; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  12. Estimating the distribution of snow depth via artificial neural networks combined with MODIS snow cover area and ancillary topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jinliang; Huang, Chunlin

    2016-04-01

    Accurately estimate the distribution of snow depth (SD) is particularly difficult in mountainous environments given the complex topography, strong seasonal transition, and scarce observations. Passive microwave snow depth retrievals are too coarse to resolve small-scale terrain-induced variability; Optical sensors have the ability to determine the snow coverage extent at higher spatial resolution but not SD. By taking advantage of long time moderate-resolution optical sensors (MODIS) fractional snow cover (FSC) data series, the cubic spline interpolation algorithm is used to fill in data gaps caused by clouds in MODIS FSC Products. An innovative method based on multilayer feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) is presented to generate SD at a 500 m spatial resolution. This is trained with back propagation to learn the relationship between SD and FSC, Latitude and longitude, and ancillary topographic (e.g. elevation, slope, aspect) data. In this study, daily snow depth observations at 42 meteorological stationsare chosen to examine the proposed method during 2004 to 2005 snow seasons (from 1 November 2004 to 31 March 2005, 151 days) in northern Xinjiang Province, China. Among them, FSC, Latitude and longitude, and ancillary topographic data extracted from 35 sites are used as input information, and corresponding ground-based SD observations are used as desired output of ANN, thus a total of 151*35 samples are included in the ANN training set; Corresponding data from other 7 sites are used as independent test sample set (151*7 samples) to test the generalization ability of the ANN. Preliminary experimental results are very encouraging compared with the traditional multiple regression method. The performance evaluation results shows that the ANN derived SD have much higher coefficient of determination (R2) and lower root-mean-square error (RMSE), with R2 of 0.89 and 0.88, RMSE of 0.07 and 0.08, the mean absolute error of 2.3 and 2.3 cm for training and test

  13. Influence of Ancillary Ligands and Isomerism on the Luminescence of Bis-cyclometalated Platinum(IV) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Juliá, Fabio; García-Legaz, María-Dulce; Bautista, Delia; González-Herrero, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and photophysical properties of a wide variety of bis-cyclometalated Pt(IV) complexes featuring a C2-symmetrical or unsymmetrical {Pt(ppy)2} unit (sym or unsym complexes, respectively; ppy = C-deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine) and different ancillary ligands are reported. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = OTf(-), OAc(-)) were obtained by chloride abstraction from sym-[Pt(ppy)2Cl2] using the corresponding AgX salts, and the triflate derivative was employed to obtain homologous complexes with X = F(-), Br(-), I(-), trifluoroacetate (TFA(-)). Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)X] (X = OTf(-), F(-)) were prepared by reacting unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)Cl] with AgOTf or AgF, respectively, and the triflate derivative was employed as precursor for the synthesis of the homologues with X = Br(-), I(-), or TFA(-) through its reaction with the appropriate anionic ligands. The previously reported complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), TFA(-)) are included in the photophysical study to assess the influence of the arrangement of the cyclometalated ligands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on selected derivatives were performed for a better interpretation of the observed excited-state properties. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (except X = I(-)) exhibit phosphorescent emissions in fluid solutions at 298 K arising from essentially (3)LC(ppy) excited states, which are very similar in shape and energy. However, their efficiencies are heavily dependent on the nature of the ancillary ligands, which affect the energy of deactivating ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) or ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states. The fluoride derivative sym-[Pt(ppy)2F2] shows the highest quantum yield of this series (Φ = 0.398), mainly because the relatively high metal-to-ligand charge transfer admixture in its emitting state leads to a high radiative rate constant. Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] emit from (3)LC(ppy) states in frozen

  14. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  15. Organizational boundaries of medical practice: the case of physician ownership of ancillary services.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John E; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Scheibling, Cara M; Jeffers, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Physician ownership of in-office ancillary services (IOASs) has come under increasing scrutiny. Advocates of argue that IOASs allow physicians to supervise the quality and coordination of care. Critics have argued that IOASs create financial incentives for physicians to increase ancillary service volume. In this paper we develop a conceptual framework to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with physician ownership of IOASs. There is some evidence supporting the existence of scope and transaction economies in IOASs. Improvement in flow and continuity of care are likely to generate scope economies and improvements in quality monitoring and reductions in consumer transaction costs are likely to generate transaction economies. Other factors include the capture of upstream and downstream profits, but these incentives are likely to be small compared to scope and transaction economies. Policy debates on the merits of IOASs should include an explicit assessment of these tradeoffs.This research was supported in part by funding from the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). PMID:22828324

  16. Complementation for an essential ancillary nonstructural protein function across parvovirus genera

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses encode a small number of ancillary proteins that differ substantially between genera. Within the genus Protoparvovirus, minute virus of mice (MVM) encodes three isoforms of its ancillary protein NS2, while human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), in the genus Bocaparvovirus, encodes an NP1 protein that is unrelated in primary sequence to MVM NS2. To search for functional overlap between NS2 and NP1, we generated murine A9 cell populations that inducibly express HBoV1 NP1. These were used to test whether NP1 expression could complement specific defects resulting from depletion of MVM NS2 isoforms. NP1 induction had little impact on cell viability or cell cycle progression in uninfected cells, and was unable to complement late defects in MVM virion production associated with low NS2 levels. However, NP1 did relocate to MVM replication centers, and supports both the normal expansion of these foci and overcomes the early paralysis of DNA replication in NS2-null infections. PMID:25194919

  17. Access to Emissions Distributions and Related Ancillary Data through the ECCAD database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darras, Sabine; Enriquez, Edgar; Granier, Claire; Liousse, Catherine; Boulanger, Damien; Fontaine, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The ECCAD database (Emissions of atmospheric Compounds and Compilation of Ancillary Data) provides a user-friendly access to global and regional surface emissions for a large set of chemical compounds and ancillary data (land use, active fires, burned areas, population,etc). The emissions inventories are time series gridded data at spatial resolution from 1x1 to 0.1x0.1 degrees. ECCAD is the emissions database of the GEIA (Global Emissions InitiAtive) project and a sub-project of the French Atmospheric Data Center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). ECCAD has currently more than 2200 users originating from more than 80 countries. The project benefits from this large international community of users to expand the number of emission datasets made available. ECCAD provides detailed metadata for each of the datasets and various tools for data visualization, for computing global and regional totals and for interactive spatial and temporal analysis. The data can be downloaded as interoperable NetCDF CF-compliant files, i.e. the data are compatible with many other client interfaces. The presentation will provide information on the datasets available within ECCAD, as well as examples of the analysis work that can be done online through the website: http://eccad.aeris-data.fr.

  18. Ancillary therapy of intranasal T-LysYal® for patients with allergic, non-allergic, and mixed rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Taliente, S; Fiorella, M L; Quaranta, N; Ciancio, G; Russo, C; Mola, P; Ciofalo, A; Zambetti, G; Caruso Armone, A; Cantone, E; Ciprandi, G

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is caused by an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction. Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is characterized by a non-IgE-mediated pathogenesis. Frequently, patients have the two disorders associated: such as mixed rhinitis (MR). Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a fundamental component of the human connective tissue. HA may exert anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating activities. Recently, an intranasal HA formulation was proposed: a supramolecular system containing lysine hyaluronate, thymine and sodium chloride (T-LysYal®). This randomized study investigated whether intranasal T-LysYal® (rinoLysYal®, Farmigea, Italy) was able to reduce symptom severity, endoscopic features, and nasal cytology in 89 patients (48 males and 41 females, mean age 36.3±7.1 years) with AR, NAR, and MR. Patients were treated with intranasal T-LysYal® or isotonic saline solution as adjunctive therapy to nasal corticosteroid and oral antihistamine for 4 weeks. Patients were visited at baseline, after treatment and after 4-week follow-up. Intranasal T-LysYal® treatment significantly reduced the quote of patients with symptoms, endoscopic features, and inflammatory cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that intranasal T-LysYal® is able, as ancillary therapy, to significantly improve patients with AR, NAR, and MR, and its effect is long lasting. PMID:27049100

  19. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    decoupled and assumed to be fixed during the reactive power dispatch procedures; however, the effect of reactive power on real power is considered in the model by calculating the required reduction in real power output of a generator due to an increase in its reactive power supply. In this case, real power generation is allowed to be rescheduled, within given limits, from the already dispatched levels obtained from the energy market clearing process. The proposed dispatch model achieves the main objective of an ISO in a competitive electricity market, which is to provide the required reactive power support from generators at least cost while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed reactive power procurement and dispatch models capture both the technical and economic aspects of power system operation in competitive electricity markets; however, from an optimization point of view, these models represent non-convex mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) problems due to the presence of binary variables associated with the different regions of reactive power operation in a synchronous generator. Such MINLP optimization problems are difficult to solve, especially for an actual power system. A novel Generator Reactive Power Classification (GRPC) algorithm is proposed in this thesis to address this issue, with the advantage of iteratively solving the optimization models as a series of non-linear programming (NLP) sub-problems. The proposed reactive power procurement and dispatch models are implemented and tested on the CIGRE 32-bus system, with several case studies that represent different practical operating scenarios. The developed models are also compared with other approaches for reactive power provision, and the results demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed model. The results clearly reveal the main features of the proposed models for optimal provision of reactive power ancillary service, in order to suit the requirements of

  20. Planck intermediate results. XXIII. Galactic plane emission components derived from Planck with ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Strong, A. W.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-08-01

    Planck data when combined with ancillary data provide a unique opportunity to separate the diffuse emission components of the inner Galaxy. The purpose of the paper is to elucidate the morphology of the various emission components in the strong star-formation region lying inside the solar radius and to clarify the relationship between the various components. The region of the Galactic plane covered is l = 300° → 0° → 60° wherestar-formation is highest and the emission is strong enough to make meaningful component separation. The latitude widths in this longitude range lie between 1° and 2°, which correspond to FWHM z-widths of 100-200 pc at a typical distance of 6 kpc. The four emission components studied here are synchrotron, free-free, anomalous microwave emission (AME), and thermal (vibrational) dust emission. These components are identified by constructing spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at positions along the Galactic plane using the wide frequency coverage of Planck (28.4-857 GHz) in combination with low-frequency radio data at 0.408-2.3 GHz plus WMAP data at 23-94 GHz, along with far-infrared (FIR) data from COBE-DIRBE and IRAS. The free-free component is determined from radio recombination line (RRL) data. AME is found to be comparable in brightness to the free-free emission on the Galactic plane in the frequency range 20-40 GHz with a width in latitude similar to that of the thermal dust; it comprises 45 ± 1% of the total 28.4 GHz emission in the longitude range l = 300° → 0° → 60°. The free-free component is the narrowest, reflecting the fact that it is produced by current star-formation as traced by the narrow distribution of OB stars. It is the dominant emission on the plane between 60 and 100 GHz. RRLs from this ionized gas are used to assess its distance, leading to a free-free z-width of FWHM ≈ 100 pc. The narrow synchrotron component has a low-frequency brightness spectral index βsynch ≈ -2.7 that is similar to the broad

  1. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  2. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for Conceptual SMAP Mission Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Podest, E.

    2011-01-01

    The planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond [1]. Scheduled to launch late in 2014, the proposed SMAP mission would provide high resolution and frequent revisit global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state, utilizing enhanced Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation approaches to collect new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth's surface. The SMAP instrument design incorporates an L-band radar (3 km) and an L band radiometer (40 km) sharing a single 6-meter rotating mesh antenna to provide measurements of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state [2]. These observations would (1) improve our understanding of linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, (2) benefit many application areas including numerical weather and climate prediction, flood and drought monitoring, agricultural productivity, human health, and national security, (3) help to address priority questions on climate change, and (4) potentially provide continuity with brightness temperature and soil moisture measurements from ESA's SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) and NASA's Aquarius missions. In the planned SMAP mission prelaunch time frame, baseline algorithms are being developed for generating (1) soil moisture products both from radiometer measurements on a 36 km grid and from combined radar/radiometer measurements on a 9 km grid, and (2) freeze/thaw products from radar measurements on a 3 km grid. These retrieval algorithms need a variety of global ancillary data, both static and dynamic, to run the retrieval models, constrain the retrievals, and provide flags for indicating retrieval quality. The choice of which ancillary dataset to use for a particular SMAP product would be based on a number of factors

  3. Engaging with research ethics in central Francophone Africa: reflections on a workshop about ancillary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research ethics is predominantly taught and practiced in Anglophone countries, particularly those in North America and Western Europe. Initiatives to build research ethics capacity in developing countries must attempt to avoid imposing foreign frameworks and engage with ethical issues in research that are locally relevant. This article describes the process and outcomes of a capacity-building workshop that took place in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo in the summer of 2011. Although the workshop focused on a specific ethical theme – the responsibilities of researchers to provide health-related care to their research participants – we argue that the structure of the workshop offers a useful method for engaging with research ethics in general, and the theme of ancillary care encourages a broad perspective on research ethics that is highly pertinent in low-income countries. The workshop follows an interactive, locally driven model that could be fruitfully replicated in similar settings. PMID:22866822

  4. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  5. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  6. Territorial user rights for fisheries as ancillary instruments for marine coastal conservation in Chile.

    PubMed

    Gelcich, Stefan; Fernández, Miriam; Godoy, Natalio; Canepa, Antonio; Prado, Luis; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Territorial user rights for fisheries have been advocated as a way to achieve sustainable resource management. However, few researchers have empirically assessed their potential as ancillary marine conservation instruments by comparing them to no-take marine protected areas. In kelp (Lessonia trabeculata) forests of central Chile, we compared species richness, density, and biomass of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes among territorial-user-right areas with low-level and high-level enforcement, no-take marine protected areas, and open-access areas in 42 100-m subtidal transects. We also assessed structural complexity of the kelp forest and substratum composition. Multivariate randomized permutation tests indicated macroinvertebrate and reef fish communities associated with the different access regimes differed significantly. Substratum composition and structural complexity of kelp forest did not differ among access regimes. Univariate analyses showed species richness, biomass, and density of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes were greater in highly enforced territorial-user-right areas and no-take marine protected areas than in open-access areas. Densities of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes of economic importance were not significantly different between highly enforced territorial-user-right and no-take marine protected areas. Densities of economically important macroinvertebrates in areas with low-level enforcement were significantly lower than those in areas with high-level enforcement and no-take marine protected areas but were significantly higher than in areas with open access. Territorial-user-right areas could be important ancillary conservation instruments if they are well enforced. PMID:22971114

  7. 47 CFR 25.254 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1610-1626.5 MHz/2483.5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of this standard can be inspected at the Federal Communications... MHz/2483.5-2500 MHz bands. (a) An applicant for an ancillary terrestrial component in these bands must... resolution bandwidth of one kilohertz or equivalent. (b) An applicant for an ancillary terrestrial...

  8. 75 FR 63167 - San Diego Gas and Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission San Diego Gas and Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary... Power Exchange; Investigation of Practices of the California Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange Corporation; Notice of Filing October 6, 2010. Take notice that on October 6,...

  9. 75 FR 22125 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... Ancillary Services by Public Utilities; Notice of New Docket Prefix ``LA'' for Land Acquisition Reports and Guidelines for Filing Under Order No. 697-C April 20, 2010. Notice is hereby given that a new docket prefix... will now receive a new prefix ``LA'' as part of its designated docket number and will be...

  10. Improving Space-borne Radiometer Soil Moisture Retrievals with Alternative Aggregation Rules for Ancillary Parameters in Highly Heterogeneous Vegetated Areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retrieving soil moisture from space-borne microwave radiometer observations often requires ancillary parameters such as surface vegetation opacity or vegetation water content. The conventional approach for deriving representative footprint-scale values of these parameters is to simply average the co...

  11. Development of a solid polymer electrolyte electrolysis cell module and ancillary components for a breadboard water electrolysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology in a water electrolysis system along with ancillary components to generate oxygen and hydrogen for a manned space station application are considered. Standard commercial components are utilized wherever possible. Presented are the results of investigations, surveys, tests, conclusions and recommendations for future development efforts.

  12. When No Bilingual Examiner Is Available: Exploring the Use of Ancillary Examiners as a Viable Testing Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noland, Ramona M.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable and valid assessment of individuals who are English language learners (ELL) has presented a dilemma to psychologists, and school psychologists in particular, as it is complicated by the small number of professionals qualified to serve as bilingual examiners. Some psychologists use ancillary examiners during testing when no bilingual…

  13. Monitoring basin-scale land cover changes in Kagera Basin of Lake Victoria using ancillary data and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasige, John E.; Groen, Thomas A.; Smaling, Eric; Jetten, Victor

    2013-04-01

    The Kagera Basin is a high value ecosystem in the Lake Victoria watershed because of the hydrological and food services it provides. The basin has faced large scale human induced land use and land cover changes (LUCC), but quantitative data is to date lacking. A combination of ancillary data and satellite imagery were interpreted to construct LUCC dynamics for the last century. This study is an initial step towards assessing the impact of LUCC on sustainable agriculture and water quality in the watershed. The results show that large trends of LUCC have rapidly occurred over the last 100 years. The most dominant LUCC processes were gains in farmland areas (not detectable in 1901 to 60% in 2010) and a net reduction in dense forest (7% to 2.6%), woodlands (51% to 6.9%) and savannas (35% to 19.6%) between 1901 and 2010. Forest degradation rapidly occurred during 1974 and 1995 but the forest re-grew between 1995 and 2010 due to forest conservation efforts. Afforestation efforts have resulted in plantation forest increases between 1995 and 2010. The rates of LUCC observed are higher than those reported in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) and other parts of the world. This is one of the few studies in SSA at a basin scale that combines multi-source spatio-temporal data on land cover to enable long-term quantification of land cover changes. In the discussion we address future research needs for the area based on the results of this study. These research needs include quantifying the impacts of land cover change on nutrient and sediment dynamics, soil organic carbon stocks, and changes in biodiversity.

  14. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, A. J.; Fei, T.; Strons, P. S.; Papadias, D. D.; Hoffman, E. A.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Connaway, H. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis

  15. Ancillary therapies to enhance success of non-invasive modes of respiratory support - Approaches to delivery room use of surfactant and caffeine?

    PubMed

    Kribs, Angela; Hummler, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    During recent decades, non-invasive respiratory support has become popular for treating neonates with respiratory failure. Several prospective randomized controlled trials have been performed to compare use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation and surfactant therapy. Systematic reviews of these studies suggest that routine CPAP at delivery is efficacious in decreasing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), death, or both. This led to the recommendation to consider CPAP to avoid endotracheal intubation. As surfactant therapy is known to reduce BPD and death, several ways to combine CPAP with surfactant have been described. With the increasing use of CPAP immediately after birth, the early use of caffeine to stimulate respiration has become a point of discussion. This review focuses on different modes of surfactant application during CPAP and on the early use of caffeine as ancillary therapies to enhance CPAP success. PMID:26936187

  16. Automated ancillary cancer history classification for mesothelioma patients from free-text clinical reports

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Chapman, Wendy W.; DeFries, Shawn J.; Becich, Michael J.; Chapman, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical records are often unstructured, free-text documents that create information extraction challenges and costs. Healthcare delivery and research organizations, such as the National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank, require the aggregation of both structured and unstructured data types. Natural language processing offers techniques for automatically extracting information from unstructured, free-text documents. Methods: Five hundred and eight history and physical reports from mesothelioma patients were split into development (208) and test sets (300). A reference standard was developed and each report was annotated by experts with regard to the patient’s personal history of ancillary cancer and family history of any cancer. The Hx application was developed to process reports, extract relevant features, perform reference resolution and classify them with regard to cancer history. Two methods, Dynamic-Window and ConText, for extracting information were evaluated. Hx’s classification responses using each of the two methods were measured against the reference standard. The average Cohen’s weighted kappa served as the human benchmark in evaluating the system. Results: Hx had a high overall accuracy, with each method, scoring 96.2%. F-measures using the Dynamic-Window and ConText methods were 91.8% and 91.6%, which were comparable to the human benchmark of 92.8%. For the personal history classification, Dynamic-Window scored highest with 89.2% and for the family history classification, ConText scored highest with 97.6%, in which both methods were comparable to the human benchmark of 88.3% and 97.2%, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated an automated application’s performance in classifying a mesothelioma patient’s personal and family history of cancer from clinical reports. To do so, the Hx application must process reports, identify cancer concepts, distinguish the known mesothelioma from ancillary cancers, recognize negation, perform reference

  17. Using ancillary information to improve hypocenter estimation: Bayesian single event location (BSEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and tested an algorithm, Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL), for estimating the location of a seismic event. The main driver for our research is the inadequate representation of ancillary information in the hypocenter estimation procedure. The added benefit is that we have also addressed instability issues often encountered with historical NLR solvers (e.g., non-convergence or seismically infeasible results). BSEL differs from established nonlinear regression techniques by using a Bayesian prior probability density function (prior PDF) to incorporate ancillary physical basis constraints about event location. P-wave arrival times from seismic events are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a prior PDF (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds from surface wave observations. This PDF is constructed from a Rayleigh wave depth excitation eigenfunction that is based on the observed minimum period from a spectrogram analysis and estimated near-source elastic parameters. For example, if the surface wave is an Rg phase, it potentially provides a strong constraint for depth, which has important implications for remote monitoring of nuclear explosions. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with events that demonstrate its congruity with established hypocenter estimation methods and its application potential. The BSEL method is applied to three events: (1) A shallow Mw 4 earthquake that occurred near Bardwell, KY on June 6, 2003, (2) the Mw 5.6 earthquake of July 26, 2005 that occurred near Dillon, MT, and (3) a deep Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred off the coast of Japan on April 22, 1980. A strong Rg was observed from the Bardwell, KY earthquake that places very strong constraints on depth and origin time. No Rg was observed for the Dillon, MT earthquake, but we used the minimum observed period of a Rayleigh wave (7 seconds) to reduce the depth and origin time uncertainty. Because the Japan

  18. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    PubMed

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)--to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review. PMID:26784651

  19. Analysis of the Effects of a Flexible Ramping Ancillary Service Product on Power System Operations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik

    2015-10-19

    The recent increased interest in utilizing variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and solar in power systems has motivated investigations into new operating procedures. Although these resources provide desirable value to a system (e.g., no fuel costs or emissions), interconnecting them provides unique challenges. Their variable, non-controllable nature in particular requires significant attention, because it directly results in increased power system variability and uncertainty. One way to handle this is via new operating reserve schemes. Operating reserves provide upward and downward generation and ramping capacity to counteract uncertainty and variability prior to their realization. For instance, uncertainty and variability in real-time dispatch can be accounted for in the hour-ahead unit commitment. New operating reserve methodologies that specifically account for the increased variability and uncertainty caused by VG are currently being investigated and developed by academia and industry. This paper examines one method inspired by the new operating reserve product being proposed by the California Independent System Operator. The method is based on examining the potential ramping requirements at any given time and enforcing those requirements via a reserve demand curve in the market-clearing optimization as an additional ancillary service product.

  20. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-In J; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K(+) channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  1. star Miner: A suit of classifiers for spatial, temporal, ancillary, and remote sensing data mining

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Shekhar, Shashi; Burk, Thomas E; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Thematic classification of multi-spectral remotely sensed imagery for large geographic regions requires complex algorithms and feature selection techniques. Traditional statistical classifiers rely exclusively on spectral characteristics, but thematic classes are often spectrally overlapping. The spectral response distributions of thematic classes are dependent on many factors including terrain, slope, aspect, soil type, and atmospheric conditions present during the image acquisition. With the availability of geo-spatial databases, it is possible to exploit the knowledge derived from these ancillary geo-spatial databases to improve the classification accuracies. However, it is not easy to incorporate this additional knowledge into traditional statistical classification methods. On the other hand, knowledge-based and neural network classifiers can readily incorporate these spatial databases, but these systems are often complex to train and their accuracy is only slightly better than statistical classifiers. In this paper we present a new suit of classifiers developed through NASA funding, which addresses many of these problems and provide a framework for mining multi-spectral and temporal remote sensing images guided by geo-spatial databases.

  2. Producing Alaska interim land cover maps from Landsat digital and ancillary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick-Lins, Katherine; Doughty, Eileen Flanagan; Shasby, Mark; Loveland, Thomas R.; Benjamin, Susan

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a research program to produce 1:250,000-scale land cover maps of Alaska using digital Landsat multispectral scanner data and ancillary data and to evaluate the potential of establishing a statewide land cover mapping program using this approach. The geometrically corrected and resampled Landsat pixel data are registered to a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, along with arc-second digital elevation model data used as an aid in the final computer classification. Areas summaries of the land cover classes are extracted by merging the Landsat digital classification files with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Public Land Survey digital file. Registration of the digital land cover data is verified and control points are identified so that a laser plotter can products screened film separate for printing the classification data at map scale directly from the digital file. The final land cover classification is retained both as a color map at 1:250,000 scale registered to the U.S. Geological Survey base map, with area summaries by township and range on the reverse, and as a digital file where it may be used as a category in a geographic information system.

  3. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-in J.; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K+ channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  4. Usefulness of ancillary methods for diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy in thyroid pathology.

    PubMed

    Bozec, A; Ilie, M; Lassalle, S; Hofman, V; Benaim, G; Long, E; Santini, J; Hofman, P

    2013-01-01

    The development of molecular analyses for thyroid pathologies is on going. These analyses provide new diagnostic tools with the aim of accurately distinguishing malignant and benign thyroid tumors. They are particularly useful as most of them can be done preoperatively on thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy samples. Furthermore, molecular biomarkers may play a promising role since they are able to predict the prognosis of patients with thyroid tumors. Moreover, identification of molecular markers as well as a better understanding of thyroid carcinogenesis will help develop innovative targeted therapies, particularly in patients with metastatic iodo-resistant thyroid carcinoma. To date, four types of somatic genetic alterations are known to hold potential interest for the diagnosis and/or prognosis of follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinomas: BRAF and RAS mutations, and RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ rearrangements. Other recent molecular biomarkers have been investigated in thyroid oncology, in particular different microRNA signatures. This review describes the different aspects of ancillary methods, including those bassed on molecular biology, that are of current interest for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinomas. PMID:23298138

  5. Incorporating residential AC load control into ancillary service markets: Measurement and settlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Josh L.; Sullivan, Michael J.; Berghman, Dries; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-05-01

    Many pre-existing air conditioner load control programs can provide valuable operational flexibility but have not been incorporated into electricity ancillary service markets or grid operations. Multiple demonstrations have shown that residential air conditioner (AC) response can deliver resources quickly and can provide contingency reserves. A key policy hurdle to be overcome before AC load control can be fully incorporated into markets is how to balance the accuracy, cost, and complexity of methods available for the settlement of load curtailment. Overcoming this hurdle requires a means for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction estimation approaches in an unbiased manner. This paper applies such a method to compare the accuracy of approaches varying in cost and complexity ? including regression analysis, load matching and control group approaches ? using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. We recommend a practical approach for settlement, relying on an annually updated set of tables, with pre-calculated reduction estimates. These tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day, simplifying settlement and providing a solution to the policy problem presented in this paper.

  6. Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-06-01

    Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

  7. Workshop on environmental assessment. [Regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.C.

    1982-07-01

    Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs.

  8. Current perspectives on the use of ancillary materials for the manufacture of cellular therapies.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Jennifer; Csontos, Lynn; Clarke, Dominic; Bonyhadi, Mark; Zylberberg, Claudia; McNiece, Ian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bell, Rosemarie; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Continued growth in the cell therapy industry and commercialization of cell therapies that successfully advance through clinical trials has led to increased awareness around the need for specialized and complex materials utilized in their manufacture. Ancillary materials (AMs) are components or reagents used during the manufacture of cell therapy products but are not intended to be part of the final products. Commonly, there are limitations in the availability of clinical-grade reagents used as AMs. Furthermore, AMs may affect the efficacy of the cell product and subsequent safety of the cell therapy for the patient. As such, AMs must be carefully selected and appropriately qualified during the cell therapy development process. However, the ongoing evolution of cell therapy research, limited number of clinical trials and registered cell therapy products results in the current absence of specific regulations governing the composition, compliance, and qualification of AMs often leads to confusion by suppliers and users in this field. Here we provide an overview and interpretation of the existing global framework surrounding AM use and investigate some common misunderstandings within the industry, with the aim of facilitating the appropriate selection and qualification of AMs. The key message we wish to emphasize is that in order to most effectively mitigate risk around cell therapy development and patient safety, users must work with their suppliers and regulators to qualify each AM to assess source, purity, identity, safety, and suitability in a given application. PMID:26596503

  9. Electric industry restructuring, ancillary services, and the potential impact on wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.; Parsons, B.; Porter, K.

    1997-12-31

    The new competitive electric power environment raises increased challenges for wind power. The DOE and EPRI wind programs have dealt extensively with the traditional vertically integrated utility planning and operating environment in which the host utility owns the generation (or purchases the power) and provides dispatch and transmission services. Under this traditional environment, 1794 MW of wind power, principally in California, have been successfully integrated into the U.S. electric power system. Another 4200 MW are installed elsewhere in the world. As issues have arisen, such as intermittency and voltage regulation, they have been successfully addressed with accepted power system procedures and practices. For an intermittent, non-dispatchable resource such as wind, new regulatory rules affecting power transmission services, raise questions about which ancillary services wind plants will be able to sell, which they will be required to purchase, and what the economic impacts will be on individual wind projects. This paper begins to look at issues of concern to wind in a restructured electric industry. The paper first briefly looks at the range of unbundled services and comments on their unique significance to wind. To illustrate the concerns that arise with restructuring, the paper then takes a more detailed look at a single service: regulation. Finally, the paper takes a brief look at technologies and strategies that could improve the competitive position of wind.

  10. Established and emerging ancillary techniques in management of microbial keratitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Robaei, Dana; Carnt, Nicole; Watson, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening condition and an ocular emergency, because of the potential for rapid progression. Intensive topical antimicrobials are the mainstay and the gold standard of treatment for microbial keratitis. However, despite appropriate diagnosis and therapy, treatment failure is still common, and can result in significant morbidity due to corneal perforation and/or scarring. For this reason, clinicians continue to seek novel treatment techniques in order to expand the armamentarium of tools available to manage microbial keratitis, and in doing so improve clinical outcomes. In this review, we examine the evidence for some established, as well as a few emerging ancillary techniques used to manage microbial keratitis. These include topical corticosteroids, corneal collagen cross-linking, intrastromal antimicrobials, amniotic membrane transplantation and miscellaneous other techniques. Of these, collagen cross-linking shows some promise for selected cases of infectious keratitis, although more research in the area is required before it is accepted as mainstream treatment for this potentially blinding condition. PMID:26888977

  11. The SPICE concept - An approach to providing geometric and other ancillary information needed for interpretation of data returned from space science instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Navigation Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF), acting under the direction of NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications, and with substantial participation of the planetary science community, is designing and implementing an ancillary data system - called SPICE - to assist scientists in planning and interpreting scientific observations taken from spaceborne instruments. The principal objective of the implemented SPICE system is that it will hold the essential geometric and related ancillary information needed to recover the full value of science instrument data, and that it will facilitate correlations of individual instrument datasets with data obtained from other instruments on the same or other spacecraft.

  12. California residential indoor air quality study. Volume 3. Ancillary and exploratory analyses. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.L.; Colome, S.D.; Tian, Y.

    1995-10-01

    The topics covered in this report are: describe the relationship between measured benzene, toluene, NO2, and radon concentrations with building characteristics, appliance factors, meteorological conditions, other measured pollutants, geographical locations, and sampling parameters; extrapolate the measured CO distributions from the three service territories to the entire State of California; develop a mass balance model to predict CO concentrations from air exchange rate, home volume and cooking/heating type; and explore the relationship among CO concentrations, measured benzene levels, and smoking behaviors.

  13. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  14. CT and MR Imaging Diagnosis and Staging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Part II. Extracellular Agents, Hepatobiliary Agents, and Ancillary Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Jeong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging play critical roles in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The second article of this two-part review discusses basic concepts of diagnosis and staging, reviews the diagnostic performance of CT and MR imaging with extracellular contrast agents and of MR imaging with hepatobiliary contrast agents, and examines in depth the major and ancillary imaging features used in the diagnosis and characterization of HCC. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25247563

  15. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  16. Using Ancillary Information to Reduce Sample Size in Discovery Sampling and the Effects of Measurement Error

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M

    2005-08-18

    big sample size might bust the budget, or the number seems intuitively excessive. To reduce the sample size, you can increase the tolerable number of defectives, the ''10'' in the preceding example, or back off on the confidence level, say from 95% to 90%. Auditors also frequently bump up the sample size as a safety factor. They know that something can go wrong. For example, they might find out that the measurements or inspections were subject to errors. Unless the auditors know exactly how measurement error affects sample size, they might be forced to give up the safety factor. Clients often choose to ''live dangerously'' (without a compelling argument to the contrary) to save money. Thus, sometimes the auditor finds that ''you just can't get there from here'', because the goals of the audit and the resources available are inherently in conflict. For discovery audits, there is a way out of this apparent conundrum. It turns out that the classical method of confidence intervals uses an implicit and very conservative assumption. We will see that this assumption is too pessimistic and too conservative in the context of a discovery audit. If we abandon this assumption and use ancillary information about the inventory, then we can significantly reduce the sample size required to achieve the desired confidence level. We will see exactly how the classical method ignores this ancillary information and misses the opportunity for an efficient audit. In the following sections, we first review the standard approach using confidence intervals. Then we present a method that incorporates the ancillary information about the inventory to design a very efficient discovery audit. We also provide results on how measurement errors affect the audit, and how exactly how much the sample size must be modified to compensate for these errors. Finally, we state asymptotic formulas that provide useful approximations for large inventories. It is suggested that the reader review the glossary of

  17. Structural, Spectroscopic, And Theoretical Elucidation of a Redox-Active Pincer-Type Ancillary Applied in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, D.; Mossin, S.; Basuli, F.; Huffman, J.C.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.

    2009-05-11

    Pincer-type ligands are believed to be very robust scaffolds that can support multifarious functionalities as well as highly reactive metal motifs applied in organometallic chemistry, especially in the realm of catalysis. In this paper, we describe the redox and, therefore, noninnocent behavior of a PNP (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) pincer ancillary bound to nickel. A combination of structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques suggests that this type of framework can house an electron hole when coordinated to Ni(II).

  18. Ancillary benefits of reduced air pollution in the US from moderate greenhouse gas mitigation policies in the electricity sector.

    SciTech Connect

    Burtraw, D.; Krupnick, A.; Palmer, K.; Paul, A.; Toman, M.; Bloyd, C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Resources for the Future

    2003-05-01

    Actions to slow atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases also would reduce conventional air pollutants yielding 'ancillary' benefits that tend to accrue locally and in the near-term. Using a detailed electricity model linked to an integrated assessment framework to value changes in human health, we find a tax of $25 per metric ton of carbon emissions would yield NO{sub x}-related health benefits of about $8 per metric ton of carbon reduced in the year 2010 (1997 dollars). Additional savings of $4-$7 accrue from reduced investment in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} abatement in order to comply with emission caps. Total ancillary benefits of a $25 carbon tax are $12-$14, which appear to justify the costs of a $25 tax, although marginal benefits are less than marginal costs. At a tax of $75, greater total benefits are achieved but the value per ton of carbon reductions remains roughly constant at about $12.

  19. On combining multi-normalization and ancillary measures for the optimal score level fusion of fingerprint and voice biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed Anzar, Sharafudeen Thaha; Sathidevi, Puthumangalathu Savithri

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have considered the utility of multi-normalization and ancillary measures, for the optimal score level fusion of fingerprint and voice biometrics. An efficient matching score preprocessing technique based on multi-normalization is employed for improving the performance of the multimodal system, under various noise conditions. Ancillary measures derived from the feature space and the score space are used in addition to the matching score vectors, for weighing the modalities, based on their relative degradation. Reliability (dispersion) and the separability (inter-/intra-class distance and d-prime statistics) measures under various noise conditions are estimated from the individual modalities, during the training/validation stage. The `best integration weights' are then computed by algebraically combining these measures using the weighted sum rule. The computed integration weights are then optimized against the recognition accuracy using techniques such as grid search, genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization. The experimental results show that, the proposed biometric solution leads to considerable improvement in the recognition performance even under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions and reduces the false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR), making the system useful for security as well as forensic applications.

  20. The business of medicine: how to overcome financial obstacles and secure financing for your private practice and ancillary services business.

    PubMed

    Nayor, David

    2012-01-01

    Doctors across the country who operate private medical practices are facing increasing financial obstacles, namely shrinking income as a result of rising costs and lower reimbursements. In addition, as hospitals have become overburdened many physicians have opened up private surgical centers; magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanning facilities; pathology labs; colonoscopy/endoscopy suites; lithotripsy centers; and other medical businesses typically performed within the hospital. Moreover, many doctors seek loans to purchase existing practices or for their capital contribution in medical partnerships. The past decade has thus seen a significant increase in the number of doctors taking out small business loans. Indeed, banks view the healthcare industry as a large growth market. This article includes practical information, advice, and resources to help doctors to secure bank financing for their practices, ancillary services business, real estate, and equipment on the best possible market terms. PMID:22920034

  1. Prediction of spatial soil property information from ancillary sensor data using ordinary linear regression: Model derivations, residual assumptions and model validation tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geospatial measurements of ancillary sensor data, such as bulk soil electrical conductivity or remotely sensed imagery data, are commonly used to characterize spatial variation in soil or crop properties. Geostatistical techniques like kriging with external drift or regression kriging are often use...

  2. A fully automatic tool to perform accurate flood mapping by merging remote sensing imagery and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addabbo, Annarita; Refice, Alberto; Lovergine, Francesco; Pasquariello, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most frequent and expansive natural hazard. High-resolution flood mapping is an essential step in the monitoring and prevention of inundation hazard, both to gain insight into the processes involved in the generation of flooding events, and from the practical point of view of the precise assessment of inundated areas. Remote sensing data are recognized to be useful in this respect, thanks to the high resolution and regular revisit schedules of state-of-the-art satellites, moreover offering a synoptic overview of the extent of flooding. In particular, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data present several favorable characteristics for flood mapping, such as their relative insensitivity to the meteorological conditions during acquisitions, as well as the possibility of acquiring independently of solar illumination, thanks to the active nature of the radar sensors [1]. However, flood scenarios are typical examples of complex situations in which different factors have to be considered to provide accurate and robust interpretation of the situation on the ground: the presence of many land cover types, each one with a particular signature in presence of flood, requires modelling the behavior of different objects in the scene in order to associate them to flood or no flood conditions [2]. Generally, the fusion of multi-temporal, multi-sensor, multi-resolution and/or multi-platform Earth observation image data, together with other ancillary information, seems to have a key role in the pursuit of a consistent interpretation of complex scenes. In the case of flooding, distance from the river, terrain elevation, hydrologic information or some combination thereof can add useful information to remote sensing data. Suitable methods, able to manage and merge different kind of data, are so particularly needed. In this work, a fully automatic tool, based on Bayesian Networks (BNs) [3] and able to perform data fusion, is presented. It supplies flood maps

  3. Optimal policies for simultaneous energy consumption and ancillary service provision for flexible loads under stochastic prices and no capacity reservation constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Mahdi; Baldick, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Flexible loads, i.e. the loads whose power trajectory is not bound to a specific one, constitute a sizable portion of current and future electric demand. This flexibility can be used to improve the performance of the grid, should the right incentives be in place. In this paper, we consider the optimal decision making problem faced by a flexible load, demanding a certain amount of energy over its availability period, subject to rate constraints. The load is also capable of providing ancillary services (AS) by decreasing or increasing its consumption in response to signals from the independent system operator (ISO). Under arbitrarily distributed and correlated Markovian energy and AS prices, we obtain the optimal policy for minimising expected total cost, which includes cost of energy and benefits from AS provision, assuming no capacity reservation requirement for AS provision. We also prove that the optimal policy has a multi-threshold form and can be computed, stored and operated efficiently. We further study the effectiveness of our proposed optimal policy and its impact on the grid. We show that, while optimal simultaneous consumption and AS provision under real-time stochastic prices are achievable with acceptable computational burden, the impact of adopting such real-time pricing schemes on the network might not be as good as suggested by the majority of the existing literature. In fact, we show that such price responsive loads are likely to induce peak-to-average ratios much more than what is observed in the current distribution networks and adversely affect the grid.

  4. Bis-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes bearing ancillary guanidinate ligands. Synthesis, structure, and highly efficient electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Rai, Virendra Kumar; Nishiura, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Masanori; Zhao, Shanshan; Liu, Yu; Hou, Zhaomin

    2012-01-16

    We report the synthesis, structure, and photophysical and electroluminescent (EL) properties of a series of heteroleptic bis(pyridylphenyl)iridium(III) complexes with various ancillary guanidinate ligands. The reaction of the bis(pyridylphenyl)iridium(III) chloride [(ppy)(2)Ir(μ-Cl)](2) with the lithium salt of various guanidine ligands Li{(N(i)Pr)(2)C(NR(1)R(2))} at 80 °C gave in 60-80% yield the corresponding heteroleptic bis(pyridylphenyl)/guanidinate iridium(III) complexes having a general formula of [(ppy)(2)Ir{(N(i)Pr)(2)C(NR(1)R(2))}], where NR(1)R(2) = NPh(2) (1), N(C(6)H(4)(t)Bu-4)(2) (2), carbazolyl (3), 3,6-bis(tert-butyl)carbazolyl (4), N(C(6)H(4))(2)S (5), N(C(6)H(4))(2)O (6), indolyl (7), NEt(2) (8), N(i)Pr(2) (9), N(i)Bu(2) (10), and N(SiMe(3))(2) (11). These heteroleptic cyclometalated (C^N) iridium(III) complexes showed intense absorption bands in the UV region assignable to π-π* transitions and weaker metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions extending to the visible region. These complexes also showed intense emissions at room temperature. Their photoluminescence spectra were influenced to some extent by the ancillary guanidinate ligands, giving λ(max) values in the range of 528-560 nm with quantum yields (Φ) of 0.16-0.37 and lifetimes of 0.61-1.43 μs. Organic light-emitting diodes were fabricated by the use of these complexes as dopants in various concentrations (5-100%) in a N,N'-dicarbazolylbiphenyl host. High current efficiency (η(c); up to 137.4 cd/A) and power efficiency (η(p); up to 45.7 lm/W) were observed under appropriate conditions. Their high EL efficiency may result from efficient trapping and radiative relaxation of the excitons formed in the EL process. Because of the steric hindrance of the guanidinate ligands, no significant intermolecular interaction was observed in these complexes, thus leading to the reduction of self-quenching and triplet-triplet annihilation at high currents. The EL emission color could be changed

  5. Mapping vegetation of a wetland ecosystem by fuzzy classification of optical and microwave satellite images supported by various ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Krystyna; Dabrowska-Zielinska, Katarzyna; Gruszczynska, Maryla; Hoscilo, Agata

    2003-03-01

    An approach to classification of satellite images aimed at vegetation mapping in a wetland ecosystem has been presented. The wetlands of the Biebrza Valley located in the NE part of Poland has been chosen as a site of interest. The difficulty of using satellite images for the classification of a wetland land cover lies in the strong variability of the hydration state of such ecosystem in time. Satellite images acquired by optical or microwave sensors depend heavily on the current water level which often masks the most interesting long-time scale features of vegetation. Therefore the images have to be interpreted in the context of various ancillary data related to the investigated site. In the case of Biebrza Valley the most useful information was obtained from the soil and hydration maps as well as from the old vegetation maps. The object oriented classification approach applied in eCognition software enabled simultaneous use of satellite images together with the additional thematic data. Some supplementary knowledge concerning possible plant cover changes was also introduced into the process of classification. The accuracy of the classification was assessed versus ground-truth data and results of visual interpretation of aerial photos. The achieved accuracy depends on the type of vegetation community in question and is better for forest or shrubs than for meadows.

  6. Engineering evaluation cost analysis for the 100-B/C area ancillary facilities at the 108-F Building

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted a removal site evaluation of selected facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site in accordance with CERCLA and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.410. The scope of the evaluation included the aboveground portions of the 108-F Biology Laboratory in the 100-F Area and all inactive ancillary buildings and structures in the 100-B/C Area, excluding the reactor building and the river outfall. Based on the evaluation, RL determined that hazardous substances in the 108-F Biology Laboratory and five of the 100-B/C Area facilities may present a potential threat to human health or the environment, and that a non-time critical removal action at these facilities is warranted. This determination was documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) approval memorandum. The EE/CA approval memorandum is the basis on which to proceed with the performance of an EE/CA to determine the appropriate removal action. This report presents the results of the EE/CA for removal alternatives for final disposition of these six facilities. The EE/CA was conducted pursuant to the requirements of CERCLA and 40 CFR 300.415 and is intended to aid RL and the EPA in selecting a preferred removal action.

  7. Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept of tidal and ancillary domains

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, T.

    1996-12-31

    In a parallel publication (Finkelstein, 1996), a new analysis of the ideal loss-less Stirling Cycle Machine was presented based upon the concept of overlapping Tidal and Ancillary domains. This has led to the definition of the following two dimensionless parameters: (1) the specific performance {Pi} for the unified measure of output for engines, refrigerators and heat pumps, and (2) the Tidal Compression Ratio {Kappa}, which is akin to the Compression Ratio in internal combustion machines and uniquely defines the operational characteristics of any Stirling Cycle Machine. An analysis to replace the alternative traditional Schmidt equation was presented and a new expression for the general performance of practical Stirling engines was derived from the first principles. An analytical optimization of the volumes of the three internal heat exchangers was also included. In this present paper, which is an extension of the above analysis, these new equations for the performance are utilized for an analytical optimization of the phase angles. It is shown that the optimum phase lead of the expansion space and the optimum phase lag of the compression space for an ideal isothermal machine is precisely {pi}/4 for all possible machines. This is independent of the previous conclusion that the pressure vector should have a zero phase lag or lead.

  8. Amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (slc6a19) and ancillary protein: impact on function.

    PubMed

    Margheritis, Eleonora; Imperiali, Francesca Guia; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Vollero, Alessandra; Terova, Genciana; Rimoldi, Simona; Girardello, Rossana; Bossi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Amino acids play an important role in the metabolism of all organisms. Their epithelial re-absorption is due to specific transport proteins, such as B(0)AT1, a Na(+)-coupled neutral amino acid symporter belonging to the solute carrier 6 family. Here, a recently cloned fish orthologue, from the intestine of Salmo salar, was electrophysiologically characterized with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, in Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing the transporter. Substrate specificity, apparent affinities and the ionic dependence of the transport mechanism were determined in the presence of specific collectrin. Results demonstrated that like the human, but differently from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) orthologue, salmon B(0)AT1 needs to be associated with partner proteins to be correctly expressed at the oocyte plasma membrane. Cloning of sea bass collectrin and comparison of membrane expression and functionality of the B(0)AT1 orthologue transporters allowed a deeper investigation on the role of their interactions. The parameters acquired by electrophysiological and immunolocalization experiments in the mammalian and fish transporters contributed to highlight the dynamic of relations and impacts on transport function of the ancillary proteins. The comparative characterization of the physiological parameters of amino acid transporters with auxiliary proteins can help the comprehension of the regulatory mechanism of essential nutrient absorption. PMID:27255547

  9. Reducing costs of managing and accessing navigation and ancillary data by relying on the extensive capabilities of NASA's spice system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenov, Boris V.; Acton, Charles H., Jr.; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Elson, Lee S.; Wright, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    The SPICE system of navigation and ancillary data possesses a number of traits that make its use in modern space missions of all types highly cost efficient. The core of the system is a software library providing API interfaces for storing and retrieving such data as trajectories, orientations, time conversions, and instrument geometry parameters. Applications used at any stage of a mission life cycle can call SPICE APIs to access this data and compute geometric quantities required for observation planning, engineering assessment and science data analysis. SPICE is implemented in three different languages, supported on 20+ computer environments, and distributed with complete source code and documentation. It includes capabilities that are extensively tested by everyday use in many active projects and are applicable to all types of space missions - flyby, orbiters, observatories, landers and rovers. While a customer's initial SPICE adaptation for the first mission or experiment requires a modest effort, this initial effort pays off because adaptation for subsequent missions/experiments is just a small fraction of the initial investment, with the majority of tools based on SPICE requiring no or very minor changes.

  10. A quantum algorithm for obtaining the lowest eigenstate of a Hamiltonian assisted with an ancillary qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Chang-Woo; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum algorithm to obtain the lowest eigenstate of any Hamiltonian simulated by a quantum computer. The proposed algorithm begins with an arbitrary initial state of the simulated system. A finite series of transforms is iteratively applied to the initial state assisted with an ancillary qubit. The fraction of the lowest eigenstate in the initial state is then amplified up to 1. We prove that our algorithm can faithfully work for any arbitrary Hamiltonian in the theoretical analysis. Numerical analyses are also carried out. We firstly provide a numerical proof-of-principle demonstration with a simple Hamiltonian in order to compare our scheme with the so-called "Demon-like algorithmic cooling (DLAC)", recently proposed in Xu (Nat Photonics 8:113, 2014). The result shows a good agreement with our theoretical analysis, exhibiting the comparable behavior to the best `cooling' with the DLAC method. We then consider a random Hamiltonian model for further analysis of our algorithm. By numerical simulations, we show that the total number of iterations is proportional to , where is the difference between the two lowest eigenvalues and is an error defined as the probability that the finally obtained system state is in an unexpected (i.e., not the lowest) eigenstate.

  11. Modelling Aṣṭādhyāyī: An Approach Based on the Methodology of Ancillary Disciplines (Vedāṅga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anand

    This article proposes a general model based on the common methodological approach of the ancillary disciplines (Vedāṅga) associated with the Vedas taking examples from Śikṣā, Chandas, Vyākaraṇa and Prātiśā khya texts. It develops and elaborates this model further to represent the contents and processes of Aṣṭādhyāyī. Certain key features are added to my earlier modelling of Pāṇinian system of Sanskrit grammar. This includes broader coverage of the Pāṇinian meta-language, mechanism for automatic application of rules and positioning the grammatical system within the procedural complexes of ancillary disciplines.

  12. Rewards and Liabilities of Presentation Software as an Ancillary Tool: Prison or Paradise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins-Sayre, Wendy; Hopkins, Sonya; Mohundro, Sarah; Sayre, Ward

    This study is presented as an exploratory research effort regarding students' perceptions of PowerPoint presentations used by college instructors in a basic Fundamentals of Public Speaking course. Data were collected to determine the outcomes in four primary areas: General Questions about PowerPoint use; Perceived Effectiveness of PowerPoint;…

  13. Effect of Ancillary Ligand on Electronic Structure as Probed by 51V Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for Vanadium-o-Dioxolene Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova-Zapata, Olga; Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Hou, Guangjin; Quinn, Laurence L.; Li, Mingyue; Yehl, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    A series of vanadium(V) complexes with o-dioxolene (catecholato) ligands and an ancillary ligand, (N-(salicylideneaminato)ethylenediamine) (hensal), were investigated using 51V solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy (51V MAS NMR) to assess the local environment of the vanadium(V). The solid-state 51V NMR parameters of vanadium(V) complexes with a related potentially tetradentate ancillary ligand (N-salicylidene-N′-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine) (h2shed) were previously shown to be associated with the size of the HOMO-LUMO gap in the complex, and as such provide insights on the interaction between metal ion and ligand (P. B. Chatterjee, et al., Inorg. Chem 50 (2011) 9794). Our results show that the modification of the ancillary ligand does not impact the observed trend between complexes ranging from catechols with electron rich to electron poor substituents. However, the ancillary ligand does impact the size of the HOMO-LUMO separation in the parent complex and thus the solid-state vanadium NMR chemical shift of the unsubstituted vanadium complex. For these complexes significant changes observed in the isotropic shifts and more modest changes detected in the CQ reflect the electronic changes in the complex as the catechol is varied. However, no obvious trend was observed in the chemical shift anisotropies (δσ and ησ) with the variation in the catechol. The electronic changes in the coordination environment of the vanadium can be described using solid-state 51V NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24353476

  14. MicroRNA-200 Family Profile: A Promising Ancillary Tool for Accurate Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xie, Botao; Li, Hao; Shen, Jihong; Chen, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in the world and great interests have been paid to discover accurate and noninvasive methods for cancer diagnosis. The value of microRNA-200 (miRNA-200, miR-200) family has been revealed in many studies. However, the results from various studies were inconsistent, and thus a meta-analysis was designed and performed to assess the overall value of miRNA200 in cancer diagnosis. Relevant studies were searched electronically from the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Keyword combined with “miR-200,” “cancer,” and “diagnosis” in any fields was used for searching relevant studies. Then, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and partial AUC were calculated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity among individual studies was also explored by subgroup analyses. A total of 28 studies from 18 articles with an overall sample size of 3676 subjects (2097 patients and 1579 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) are 0.709 (95% CI: 0.657–0.755) and 0.667 (95% CI: 0.617–0.713), respectively. Additionally, AUC and partial AUC for the pooled data is 0.735 and 0.627, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed that using miRNA-200 family for cancer diagnosis is more effective in white than in Asian ethnic groups. In addition, cancer diagnosis by miRNA using circulating specimen is more effective than that using noncirculating specimen. Finally, miRNA is more accurate in diagnosing endometrial cancer than other types of cancer, and some miRNA family members (miR-200b and miR-429) have superior diagnostic accuracy than other miR-200 family members. In conclusion, the profiling of miRNA-200 family is likely to be a valuable tool in cancer detection and diagnosis. PMID:26618619

  15. Evidence of ancillary trigeminal innervation of levator palpebrae in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, A M; Dong, C C; Harries, A M; Patel, A; Honey, C R; Patel, M S

    2014-02-01

    The cranial synkineses are a group of disorders encompassing a variety of involuntary co-contractions of the facial, masticatory, or extraocular muscles that occur during a particular volitional movement. The neuroanatomical pathways for synkineses largely remain undefined. Our studies explored a normal synkinesis long observed in the general population - that of jaw opening during efforts to open the eyelids widely. To document this phenomenon, we observed 186 consecutive participants inserting or removing contact lenses to identify jaw opening. Seeking electrophysiological evidence, in a second study we enrolled individuals undergoing vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm, without a history of jaw-winking, ptosis, or strabismus, to record any motor responses in levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) upon stimulation of the trigeminal motor root. Stimulus was applied to the trigeminal motor root while an electrode in levator recorded the response. We found that 37 participants (20%) opened their mouth partially or fully during contact lens manipulation. In the second study, contraction of LPS with trigeminal motor stimulation was documented in two of six patients, both undergoing surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We speculate these results might provide evidence of an endogenous synkinesis, indicating that trigeminal-derived innervation of levator could exist in a significant minority of the general population. Our observations demonstrate plasticity in the human cranial nerve innervation pattern and may have implications for treating Marcus Gunn jaw-winking. PMID:24120706

  16. Estimating primary productivity of tropical oil palm in Malaysia using remote sensing technique and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Tan, K. P.; Cracknell, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    The amount of carbon sequestration by vegetation can be estimated using vegetation productivity. At present, there is a knowledge gap in oil palm net primary productivity (NPP) at a regional scale. Therefore, in this study NPP of oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia was estimated using remote sensing based light use efficiency (LUE) model with inputs from local meteorological data, upscaled leaf area index/fractional photosynthetically active radiation (LAI/fPAR) derived using UK-DMC 2 satellite data and a constant maximum LUE value from the literature. NPP values estimated from the model was then compared and validated with NPP estimated using allometric equations developed by Corley and Tinker (2003), Henson (2003) and Syahrinudin (2005) with diameter at breast height, age and the height of the oil palm trees collected from three estates in Peninsular Malaysia. Results of this study show that oil palm NPP derived using a light use efficiency model increases with respect to the age of oil palm trees, and it stabilises after ten years old. The mean value of oil palm NPP at 118 plots as derived using the LUE model is 968.72 g C m-2 year-1 and this is 188% - 273% higher than the NPP derived from the allometric equations. The estimated oil palm NPP of young oil palm trees is lower compared to mature oil palm trees (<10 years old), as young oil palm trees contribute to lower oil palm LAI and therefore fPAR, which is an important variable in the LUE model. In contrast, it is noted that oil palm NPP decreases with respect to the age of oil palm trees as estimated using the allomeric equations. It was found in this study that LUE models could not capture NPP variation of oil palm trees if LAI/fPAR is used. On the other hand, tree height and DBH are found to be important variables that can capture changes in oil palm NPP as a function of age.

  17. Ancillary care in South African HIV vaccine trials: addressing needs, drafting protocols, and engaging community.

    PubMed

    Slack, Catherine M

    2014-02-01

    There has been debate about sponsor-investigator ethical responsibilities to address participants' medical needs in trials in resource-constrained contexts. Certain ethical guidelines make detailed recommendations. This study explored whether ethical guideline recommendations for care in HIV vaccine trials were being met, and whether stakeholders were facing difficulties addressed by guidelines. It sampled key stakeholders involved in two trials across five sites in South Africa, and reviewed relevant documentation. It concluded that sites were largely meeting guideline recommendations for addressing needs, with some exceeding these. Recommendations for writing protocols were only partially achieved. Recommendations for engaging participating community were mostly met, except for "moral negotiation" recommendations. Suggestions are made to strengthen practices, and to improve guidelines so they address empirical concerns. PMID:24572086

  18. Diagnostic potential of ancillary molecular testing in differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Deniwar, Ahmed; Friedlander, Paul; Aslam, Rizwan; Kandil, Emad

    2015-03-01

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology, being the mainstay to diagnose thyroid nodules, does not provide definitive results in a subset of patients. The use of molecular markers testing has been described as a useful aid in differentiation of thyroid nodules that present with an indeterminate cytodiagnosis. Molecular tests, such as the Afirma gene classifier, mutational assay and immunohistochemical markers have been increasingly used to further increase the accuracy and defer unnecessary surgeries for benign thyroid nodules. However, in light of the current literature, their emerging roles in clinical practice are limited due to financial and technical limitations. Nevertheless, their synergistic implementation can predict the risk of malignancy and yield an accurate diagnosis. This review discusses the clinical utility of various molecular tests done on FNA indeterminate nodules to avoid diagnostic thyroidectomies and warrant the need of future multi-Institutional studies. PMID:25750270

  19. [Value of ancillary testing in the diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorder in adults].

    PubMed

    Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in adults with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) who seek general psychiatric services for various psychiatric problems. The diagnosis of PDD requires the careful collection of information about the patient's developmental history. A structured diagnostic interview is useful and should be performed, but has limitations now. The clinical value of the measurement of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Autism-Spectrum Quotient Japanese Version, and the Pervasive Developmental Disorders Autism Society Japan Rating Scale was demonstrated by a questionnaire survey that the authors conducted in 2010. These additional tests are useful if interpreted with caution. For example, a discrepancy between the performance intelligence quotient (IQ) and the verbal IQ in the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale does not by itself diagnose PDD. We examined whether the Japanese version of the National Adult Reading Test (Japanese Adult Reading Test; JART), a valid scale for evaluating pre-morbid IQ in patients with schizophrenia, and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) are useful for discriminating between PDD and schizophrenia. Sixteen patients with adult PDD and 16 patients with schizophrenia matched for age, education and sex participated in this study. In addition, the two groups were matched for JART and the Global Assessment of Functioning scores. All subjects were scored on the JART and WAIS-R after giving informed consent for the study. The result was that significant diagnosis-by-IQ examination interactions were found (F [1, 30]=10.049, P=0.003). Also, the WAIS-R scores of the PDD group were higher than those of the schizophrenia group (P=0.002) when the two groups were matched for JART. In conclusion, the comparison of IQ in the PDD group and in the schizophrenia group by JART and WAIS-R might be an easy and useful method for helping to discriminate between PDD and schizophrenia. In addition, the

  20. The otic gasbladder as an ancillary auditory structure in a mormyrid fish.

    PubMed

    Yan, H Y; Curtsinger, W S

    2000-06-01

    Mormyrid fishes use acoustic signals for long-distance communication and a weakly electric field for short-distance interaction. Mormyrids are unique in having an otic gasbladder attached directly to the saccule on each side of the inner ear. Karl von Frisch (1938) hypothesized that the tightly coupled otic gasbladder might aid mormyrid hearing. Using the mormyrid fish (Brienomyrus brachyistius), this study manipulated gas in the otic gasbladder to test this hypothesis and histological sections were made to examine the anatomical relationship between the gasbladder and inner ear. The hearing sensitivity curves (audiograms) were obtained with the auditory brainstem response protocol. Audiograms were obtained from normal fish and from fish in which gas was withdrawn from either one or two otic gasbladders. Removal of gas from one otic gasbladder did not result in a significant change in either hearing ability or acoustically evoked brainwaves as compared to the control fish. Bilateral deflation of the otic gasbladders led to significant threshold changes. Histological sections revealed a particularly close coupling between the otic gasbladder and the saccule chamber. These results support von Frisch's hypothesis that the otic gasbladders of mormyrids assist in underwater sound detection. PMID:10947242

  1. The anti-Candida activity by Ancillary Proteins of an Enterococcus faecium strain

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Utpal; Chalasani, Ajay G.; Shekh, M. Raeesh

    2015-01-01

    An antimycotic activity toward seven strains of Candida albicans was demonstrated erstwhile by a wild-type Enterococcus faecium isolated from a penguin rookery of the Antarctic region. In the present study the antimicrobial principle was purified by ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography and further was analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. In the purification steps, the dialyzed concentrate and ion exchange fractions inhibited C. albicans MTCC 3958, 183, and SC 5314. However, the gel filtration purified fractions inhibited MTCC 3958 and 183. The data obtained from the LC-ESI-MS/MS indicate that the antimicrobial activity of the anti-Candida protein produced by E. faecium is facilitated by Sag A/Bb for the binding of the indicator organism's cell membrane. Partial N-terminal sequence revealed 12 N-terminal amino acid residues and its analysis shown that it belongs to the LysM motif. The nucleotide sequence of PCR-amplified product could detect 574 nucleotides of the LysM gene responsible for binding to chitin of the cell wall of Candida sp. PMID:26005434

  2. Ground Reference and Ancillary Data Validation of Freeze-Thaw State Products of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oseguera, B.; Pinales, J. C.; McDonald, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    The freeze-thaw state of the landscape is a good indicator of growing season length, metabolic activity, root and soil respiration, and biogeochemical cycling in high latitude regions like Alaska. The increase in biological productivity and hydrological activity that comes with the arrival of the summer snow- and ice-free period can be estimated by microwave remote sensing systems because of the rise in the dielectric constant during the thawed period, which registers as marked shifts in the time series progression acquired by these data. Our study involves the comparison of high-frequency microwave remote sensing data, such as NASA's QuikSCAT sensor, with daily records of meteorological variables from the National Climatic Data Center's Global Historical Climatology Network (NCDC GHCN-Daily) and Natural Resources Conservation Service's Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) network. These variables include soil temperature profiles, snowfall, and snow depth. A change detection algorithm was used to classify the microwave time series data as frozen or thawed. The station data were then utilized to validate the accuracy of the algorithm's product.

  3. Evolution of Catalytic Stereoselective Olefin Metathesis: From Ancillary Transformation to Purveyor of Stereochemical Identity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous significant advances in catalytic olefin metathesis (OM) during the past two decades. Such progress has transformed this important set of reactions to strategically pivotal processes that generate stereochemical identity while delivering molecules that cannot be easily prepared by alternative routes. In this Perspective, an analysis of the origin of the inception of bidentate benzylidene ligands for Ru-based OM catalysts is first presented. This is followed by an overview of the intellectual basis that culminated in the development of Mo-based diolates and stereogenic-at-Ru complexes for enantioselective OM. The principles accrued from the study of the latter Ru carbenes and Mo alkylidenes and utilized in the design of stereogenic-at-Mo, -W, and -Ru species applicable to enantioselective and Z-selective OM are then discussed. The influence of the recently introduced catalytic OM protocols on the design of synthesis routes leading to complex organic molecules is probed. The impact of a better understanding of the mechanistic nuances of OM toward the discovery of stereoselective catalysts is reviewed as well. PMID:24720633

  4. Design of Os(II) -based sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells: influence of heterocyclic ancillaries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fa-Chun; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Planells, Miquel; Robertson, Neil; Padhy, Harihara; Du, Bo-Sian; Chi, Yun; Yang, Po-Fan; Lin, Hao-Wu; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-08-01

    A series of Os(II) sensitizers (TFOS-x, in which x=1, 2, or 3) with a single 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-dipyridine (H2 dcbpy) anchor and two chelating 2-pyridyl (or 2-pyrimidyl) triazolate ancillaries was successfully prepared. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis showed that the core geometry of the Os(II) -based sensitizers consisted of one H2 dcbpy unit and two eclipsed cis-triazolate fragments; this was notably different from the Ru(II) -based counterparts, in which the azolate (both pyrazolate and triazolate) fragments are located at the mutual trans-positions. The basic properties were extensively probed by using spectroscopic and electrochemical methods as well as time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. Fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was then attempted by using the I(-) /I3 (-) -based electrolyte solution. One such DSC device, which utilized TFOS-2 as the sensitizer, showed promising performance characteristics with a short-circuit current density (JSC ) of 15.7 mA cm(-2) , an open-circuit voltage of 610 mV, a fill factor of 0.63, and a power conversion efficiency of 6.08 % under AM 1.5G simulated one-sun irradiation. Importantly, adequate incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency performances were observed for all TFOS derivatives over the wide spectral region of 450 to 950 nm, showing a panchromatic light harvesting capability that extended into the near-infrared regime. Our results underlined a feasible strategy for maximizing JSC and increasing the efficiency of DSCs. PMID:23843354

  5. microRNA in situ hybridization for miR-211 detection as an ancillary test in melanoma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Horwich, Michael; Wu, Rong; Levinson, Shauna; Gandhi, Manoj; Makkar, Hanspaul; Kristjansson, Arni; Chang, Mary; Dadras, Soheil S

    2016-05-01

    Some melanocytic tumors can be histologically ambiguous causing diagnostic difficulty, which could lead to overtreatment of benign lesions with an unwarranted psychological distress or undertreatment of malignant cancers. Previously, we demonstrated that significantly decreased miR-211 expression in melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi could accurately discriminate malignant from benign tumors. Herein we show microRNA in situ hybridization for fluorescent detection of miR-211, suitable for paraffin-embedded tissues in 109 primary melanocytic tumors. miR-211 expression was significantly lower in melanomas vs nevi (P<0.0001), and receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.862) accurately discriminated melanomas from nevi with 90% sensitivity and 86.2% specificity. Qualitatively, all dysplastic nevi expressed miR-211 at high (86%) and low (14%) levels, independent of the degree of nuclear atypia. All 35 melanocytic tumors with Spitz morphology expressed miR-211 independent of morphological classification, where clinical follow-up of these patients showed no recurrence at the site or metastasis in mean and median of 3 (ranging 2-5) years. Moreover, a decision tree learning analysis selected age and miR-211 miRNA in situ hybridization as the predictive variables for benign or malignant outcome in 88 patients correctly classified 92% (81 out of 88) of cases as proven by receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.9029). These results support miR-211 as a leading miRNA candidate for melanoma diagnosis and miRNA in situ hybridization as a uniquely uncomplicated ancillary test. PMID:26916074

  6. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Thomas L.; Cataneo, Renee N.; Lebauer, Cassie; Mundada, Mayur; Pass, Harvey I.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Rom, William N.; Vallières, Eric

    2015-01-01

    separate independent cohort, in a blinded replicated study. Combining breath biomarkers with chest CT could potentially improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00639067 PMID:26698306

  7. Modelling decisions to undergo genetic testing for susceptibility to common health conditions: an ancillary study of the Multiplex Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wade, Christopher H; Shiloh, Shoshana; Woolford, Samuel W; Roberts, J Scott; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Marteau, Theresa M; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2012-01-01

    New genetic tests reveal risks for multiple conditions simultaneously, although little is understood about the psychological factors that affect testing uptake. We assessed a conceptual model called the multiplex genetic testing model (MGTM) using structural equation modelling. The MGTM delineates worry, perceived severity, perceived risk, response efficacy and attitudes towards testing as predictors of intentions and behaviour. Participants were 270 healthy insured adults aged 25-40 from the Multiplex Initiative conducted within a health care system in Detroit, MI, USA. Participants were offered a genetic test that assessed risk for eight common health conditions. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that worry, perceived risk and severity clustered into two disease domains: cancer or metabolic conditions. Only perceived severity of metabolic conditions was correlated with general response efficacy (β = 0.13, p<0.05), which predicted general attitudes towards testing (β = 0.24, p<0.01). Consistent with our hypothesised model, attitudes towards testing were the strongest predictors of intentions to undergo testing (β = 0.49, p<0.01), which in turn predicted testing uptake (OR 17.7, β = 0.97, p<0.01). The MGTM explained a striking 48% of the variance in intentions and 94% of the variation in uptake. These findings support use of the MGTM to explain psychological predictors of testing for multiple health conditions. PMID:21660870

  8. Prehospital digital photography and automated image transmission in an emergency medical service – an ancillary retrospective analysis of a prospective controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Still picture transmission was performed using a telemedicine system in an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) during a prospective, controlled trial. In this ancillary, retrospective study the quality and content of the transmitted pictures and the possible influences of this application on prehospital time requirements were investigated. Methods A digital camera was used with a telemedicine system enabling encrypted audio and data transmission between an ambulance and a remotely located physician. By default, images were compressed (jpeg, 640 x 480 pixels). On occasion, this compression was deactivated (3648 x 2736 pixels). Two independent investigators assessed all transmitted pictures according to predefined criteria. In cases of different ratings, a third investigator had final decision competence. Patient characteristics and time intervals were extracted from the EMS protocol sheets and dispatch centre reports. Results Overall 314 pictures (mean 2.77 ± 2.42 pictures/mission) were transmitted during 113 missions (group 1). Pictures were not taken for 151 missions (group 2). Regarding picture quality, the content of 240 (76.4%) pictures was clearly identifiable; 45 (14.3%) pictures were considered “limited quality” and 29 (9.2%) pictures were deemed “not useful” due to not/hardly identifiable content. For pictures with file compression (n = 84 missions) and without (n = 17 missions), the content was clearly identifiable in 74% and 97% of the pictures, respectively (p = 0.003). Medical reports (n = 98, 32.8%), medication lists (n = 49, 16.4%) and 12-lead ECGs (n = 28, 9.4%) were most frequently photographed. The patient characteristics of group 1 vs. 2 were as follows: median age – 72.5 vs. 56.5 years, p = 0.001; frequency of acute coronary syndrome – 24/113 vs. 15/151, p = 0.014. The NACA scores and gender distribution were comparable. Median on-scene times were longer with picture transmission (26 vs. 22

  9. Compilation, quality control, analysis, and summary of discrete suspended-sediment and ancillary data in the United States, 1901-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Glysson, G. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Human-induced and natural changes to the transport of sediment and sediment-associated constituents can degrade aquatic ecosystems and limit human uses of streams and rivers. The lack of a dedicated, easily accessible, quality-controlled database of sediment and ancillary data has made it difficult to identify sediment-related water-quality impairments and has limited understanding of how human actions affect suspended-sediment concentrations and transport. The purpose of this report is to describe the creation of a quality-controlled U.S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment database, provide guidance for its use, and summarize characteristics of suspended-sediment data through 2010. The database is provided as an online application at http://cida.usgs.gov/sediment to allow users to view, filter, and retrieve available suspended-sediment and ancillary data. A data recovery, filtration, and quality-control process was performed to expand the availability, representativeness, and utility of existing suspended-sediment data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in the United States before January 1, 2011. Information on streamflow condition, sediment grain size, and upstream landscape condition were matched to sediment data and sediment-sampling sites to place data in context with factors that may influence sediment transport. Suspended-sediment and selected ancillary data are presented from across the United States with respect to time, streamflow, and landscape condition. Examples of potential uses of this database for identifying sediment-related impairments, assessing trends, and designing new data collection activities are provided. This report and database can support local and national-level decision making, project planning, and data mining activities related to the transport of suspended-sediment and sediment-associated constituents.

  10. Peer-to-Peer Consultations: Ancillary Services Peer Exchange with India: Experience from South Africa, Europe & the United States (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    In support of national and subnational decision makers, the 21st Century Power Partnership regularly works with country partners to organize peer-to-peer consultations on critical issues. In March 2014, 21CPP collaborated with the Regulatory Assistance Project - India to host two peer-to-peer exchanges among experts from India, South Africa, Europe, and the United States to discuss the provision of ancillary services, particularly in the context of added variability and uncertainty from renewable energy. This factsheet provides a high level summary of the peer-to-peer consultation.

  11. Chemosynthetic ecosystems studies interim report

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, I.R.; Schroeder, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    The report details the status of the studies in the following areas: geological studies, geochemical processes, community structure, growth studies, megafauna, and various ancillary studies associated with the Studies. The report describes the methods and equipment used during the field program, the data sets and samples collected, and the analyses and interpretations of the present findings.

  12. Effect of electron-donor ancillary ligands on the heteroleptic ruthenium complexes: synthesis, characterization, and application in high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Chao; Kong, Fan-Tai; Liu, Xue-Peng; Guo, Fu-Ling; Zhou, Li; Ding, Yong; Li, Zhao-Qian; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2016-04-20

    Three heteroleptic ruthenium complexes, , and , with sulfur- or oxygen-containing electron-donor, phenylpyridine-based ancillary ligands, are synthesized. The influence of the different electron donors-the acyclic electron donors methylthio and methoxyl, and the cyclic electron donor methylenedioxy-on the photophysical and electrochemical behavior in dye sensitizers and photovoltaic performance in DSSCs are investigated. Compared to the conventional dye , all the dyes demonstrate superior performance in the form of molar absorptivity, photocurrent density (JSC) and conversion efficiency (η). The DSSCs based on and , with only a two-atom change in the acyclic electron donor, exhibit analogous photovoltaic performance (9.28% for and 9.32% for ). The highest photocurrent density (19.06 mA cm(-2)) and conversion efficiency (9.74%) are recorded for , which contains the cyclic electron donor. Transient absorption (TAS) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements are carried out to investigate the sensitizers' regeneration and the behavior of excited electron decay kinetics. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is operated to explain the charge recombination and the electron lifetime. These consequences reveal substantial dependences on the different configurations of the electron-donor ancillary ligands. PMID:27053153

  13. Vehicle Ancillary Load Reduction Project Close-Out Report: An Overview of the Task and a Compilation of the Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Farrington, R.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of fuel used for climate control in U.S. vehicles reduces the fuel economy of more than 200 million light-duty conventional vehicles and thus affects U.S. energy security. Researchers at the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimated that the United States consumes about 7 billion gallons of fuel per year for air-conditioning (A/C) light-duty vehicles. Using a variety of tools, NREL researchers developed innovative techniques and technologies to reduce the amount of fuel needed for these vehicles' ancillary loads. For example, they found that the A/C cooling capacity of 5.7 kW in a Cadillac STS could be reduced by 30% while maintaining a cooldown performance of 30 minutes. A simulation showed that reducing the A/C load by 30% decreased A/C fuel consumption by 26%. Other simulations supported the great potential for improving fuel economy by using new technologies and techniques developed to reduce ancillary loads.

  14. Investigation of techniques for inventorying forested regions. Volume 2: Forestry information system requirements and joint use of remotely sensed and ancillary data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Cicone, R. C.; Malila, W. A.; Crist, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Effects of terrain topography in mountainous forested regions on LANDSAT signals and classifier training were found to be significant. The aspect of sloping terrain relative to the sun's azimuth was the major cause of variability. A relative insolation factor could be defined which, in a single variable, represents the joint effects of slope and aspect and solar geometry on irradiance. Forest canopy reflectances were bound, both through simulation, and empirically, to have nondiffuse reflectance characteristics. Training procedures could be improved by stratifying in the space of ancillary variables and training in each stratum. Application of the Tasselled-Cap transformation for LANDSAT data acquired over forested terrain could provide a viable technique for data compression and convenient physical interpretations.

  15. Configuration Control in the Synthesis of Homo- and Heteroleptic Bis(oxazolinylphenolato/thiazolinylphenolato) Chelate Ligand Complexes of Oxorhenium(V): Isomer Effect on Ancillary Ligand Exchange Dynamics and Implications for Perchlorate Reduction Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyong; Wu, Dimao; Su, Xiaoge; Han, Mengwei; Kimura, Susana Y; Gray, Danielle L; Shapley, John R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    This study develops synthetic strategies for N,N-trans and N,N-cis Re(O)(LO-N)2Cl complexes and investigates the effects of the coordination spheres and ligand structures on ancillary ligand exchange dynamics and catalytic perchlorate reduction activities of the corresponding [Re(O)(LO-N)2](+) cations. The 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-oxazoline (Hhoz) and 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-thiazoline (Hhtz) ligands are used to prepare homoleptic N,N-trans and N,N-cis isomers of both Re(O)(hoz)2Cl and Re(O)(htz)2Cl and one heteroleptic N,N-trans Re(O)(hoz)(htz)Cl. Selection of hoz/htz ligands determines the preferred isomeric coordination sphere, and the use of substituted pyridine bases with varying degrees of steric hindrance during complex synthesis controls the rate of isomer interconversion. The five corresponding [Re(O)(LO-N)2](+) cations exhibit a wide range of solvent exchange rates (1.4 to 24,000 s(-1) at 25 °C) and different LO-N movement patterns, as influenced by the coordination sphere of Re (trans/cis), the noncoordinating heteroatom on LO-N ligands (O/S), and the combination of the two LO-N ligands (homoleptic/heteroleptic). Ligand exchange dynamics also correlate with the activity of catalytic reduction of aqueous ClO4(-) by H2 when the Re(O)(LO-N)2Cl complexes are immobilized onto Pd/C. Findings from this study provide novel synthetic strategies and mechanistic insights for innovations in catalytic, environmental, and biomedical research. PMID:26894635

  16. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  17. Fixed costs of providing ancillary services from power plants: Reactive supply and voltage control, regulation and frequency response, operating reserve--spinning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.; Kure-Jensen, J.

    1998-12-01

    This report describes methodologies to determine the fixed costs for a steam cycle generating unit to participate in Reactive Supply and Voltage Control (RS-VC), Regulation and Frequency Response (RFR), and Operating Reserve-Spinning (ORS) services. It is intended for use by a Generator of electricity who is planning to offer these ancillary services in a competitive market. The methodology is based on common steam power plant engineering and economic principles. Reactive supply and voltage control provides reactive supply through changes to generator reactive output to maintain acceptable transmission system voltages and facilitate electricity transfers and provides the ability to continually adjust transmission system voltage in response to system changes. Regulation and frequency response service include all rapid load changes whether their purpose is to meet the instantaneous load demand, to balance control area supply resources with load, or to maintain frequency. Spinning reserve is provided by generating units that are on-line and loaded at less than maximum output. They are available to serve load immediately in an unexpected contingency such as an unplanned outage of a generating unit.

  18. 75 FR 66110 - Guidelines for Use of Stored Specimens and Access to Ancillary Data and Proposed Cost Schedule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP) ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Division of... national Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP). The CPP is a large, prospective cohort study, conducted by... data management. Samples will only be provided to approved projects upon receipt of evidence...

  19. USE OF GIS AND ANCILLARY VARIABLES TO PREDICT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE LEVELS AT UNMONITORED LOCATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a GIS-based regression spatial method, known as land-use regression (LUR) modeling, to estimate ambient air pollution exposures used in the EPA El Paso Children's Health Study. Passive measurements of select volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxi...

  20. Chronological evaluation of urban growth and area expansion in Aguascalientes, Mexico using remotely sensed and ancillary mapped data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falquier, Leticia G.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Pelletier, Ramona E.

    1990-01-01

    The study describes some efforts to assist the mapping procedure of Mexican towns and cities by focusing on the analysis of urban changes that have occurred in the city of Aguascalientes. To evaluate urban growth trends in Aguascalientes, historic maps of land cover, aerial photography, and SPOT data were reviewed between the period of 1857 and 1988 to determine urban boundaries. Additional analyses focused on identifying the extent and pattern of growth in reference to urban development plans initiated in 1978, and on assessing the impact of relocating people and industry after the Mexico City earthquake. Results from the study indicate a steady growth in areal expansion and population in the Aguascalientes area between 1978 and 1988.

  1. Designing ancillary ligands for heteroleptic/homoleptic zinc complex formation: synthesis, structures and application in ROP of lactides.

    PubMed

    Jędrzkiewicz, D; Ejfler, J; Gulia, N; John, Ł; Szafert, S

    2015-08-14

    Synthesis and characterization of a series of new amino-phenol/naphthol ligands (L(1,2)-H) have been developed and their respective zinc complexes ( 1 and 2-Zn ) have been synthesized. The molecular structures of L(1)-H and 1, 2-Zn were explored in detail by NMR, single-crystal X-ray studies and DFT calculations, which confirmed the existence of complexes as stabile dimers both in a solution and in the solid state. All complexes mediate the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactide highly efficiently, at room temperature, in a controlled fashion. The influence of the architecture of the ligand on the desired homo/heteroleptic complex formation, as well as the relationship between the initiator design and the catalytic activity have been investigated. PMID:26150026

  2. An analysis of cropland mask choice and ancillary data for annual corn yield forecasting using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Campbell, James B.; Taff, Gregory N.; Zheng, Baojuan

    2015-06-01

    The Midwestern United States is one of the world's most important corn-producing regions. Monitoring and forecasting of corn yields in this intensive agricultural region are important activities to support food security, commodity markets, bioenergy industries, and formation of national policies. This study aims to develop forecasting models that have the capability to provide mid-season prediction of county-level corn yields for the entire Midwestern United States. We used multi-temporal MODIS NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) 16-day composite data as the primary input, with digital elevation model (DEM) and parameter-elevation relationships on independent slopes model (PRISM) climate data as additional inputs. The DEM and PRISM data, along with three types of cropland masks were tested and compared to evaluate their impacts on model predictive accuracy. Our results suggested that the use of general cropland masks (e.g., summer crop or cultivated crops) generated similar results compared with use of an annual corn-specific mask. Leave-one-year-out cross-validation resulted in an average R2 of 0.75 and RMSE value of 1.10 t/ha. Using a DEM as an additional model input slightly improved performance, while inclusion of PRISM climate data appeared not to be important for our regional corn-yield model. Furthermore, our model has potential for real-time/early prediction. Our corn yield esitmates are available as early as late July, which is an improvement upon previous corn-yield prediction models. In addition to annual corn yield forecasting, we examined model uncertainties through spatial and temporal analysis of the model's predictive error distribution. The magnitude of predictive error (by county) appears to be associated with the spatial patterns of corn fields in the study area.

  3. TBI Patient, Injury, Therapy, and Ancillary Treatments Associated with Outcomes at Discharge and 9 Months Post-discharge

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Susan D.; Corrigan, John D.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Bogner, Jennifer; Barrett, Ryan S.; Giuffrida, Clare G.; Ryser, David K.; Cooper, Kelli; Carroll, Deborah M.; Deutscher, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of patient and injury characteristics, inpatient rehabilitation therapy activities, and neurotropic medications with outcomes at discharge and 9 months post-discharge for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) Design Prospective, longitudinal observational study Setting 10 inpatient rehabilitation centers (9 US, 1 Canada) Participants Consecutive patients (n=2130) enrolled between 2008 and 2011, admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after an index TBI injury Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Rehabilitation length of stay, discharge to home, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge and 9 months post-discharge Results The admission FIM Cognitive score was used to create 5 relatively homogeneous subgroups for subsequent analysis of treatment outcomes. Within each subgroup, significant associations were found between outcomes and patient and injury characteristics, time spent in therapy activities, and medications used. Patient and injury characteristics explained on average 35.7% of the variation in discharge outcomes and 22.3% in 9-month outcomes. Adding time spent and level of effort in therapy activities, as well as percent of stay using specific medications, explained approximately 20.0% more variation for discharge outcomes and 12.9% for 9-month outcomes. After patient, injury, and treatment characteristics were used to predict outcomes, center differences added only approximately 1.9% additional variance explained. Conclusions At discharge, greater effort during therapy sessions, time spent in more complex therapy activities, and use of specific medications were associated with better outcomes for patients in all admission FIM Cognitive subgroups. At 9 months post-discharge, similar but less pervasive associations were observed for therapy activities, but not classes of medications. Further research is warranted to examine more specific combinations of therapy activities and medications that

  4. Identifying sources of ozone to three rural locations in Nevada, USA, using ancillary gas pollutants, aerosol chemistry, and mercury.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Fine, Rebekka; Pierce, Ashley M; Gustin, Mae S

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) is a secondary air pollutant of long standing and increasing concern for environmental and human health, and as such, the US Environmental Protection Agency will revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppbv to ≤ 70 ppbv. Long term measurements at the Great Basin National Park (GBNP) indicate that O3 in remote areas of Nevada will exceed a revised standard. As part of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative, measurements of O3 and other air pollutants were made at 3 remote sites between February 2012 and March 2014, GBNP, Paradise Valley (PAVA), and Echo Peak (ECHO). Exceptionally high concentrations of each air pollutant were defined relative to each site as mixing ratios that exceeded the 90th percentile of all hourly data. Case studies were analyzed for all periods during which mean daily O3 exceeded the 90th percentile concurrently with a maximum 8-h average (MDA8) O3 that was "exceptionally high" for the site (65 ppbv at PAVA, 70 ppbv at ECHO and GBNP), and of potential regulatory significance. An MDA8 ≥ 65 ppbv occurred only five times at PAVA, whereas this occurred on 49 and 65 days at GBNP and ECHO, respectively. The overall correlation between O3 and other pollutants was poor, consistent with the large distance from significant primary emission sources. Mean CO at these locations exceeded concentrations reported for background sites in 2000. Trajectory residence time calculations and air pollutant concentrations indicate that exceedances at GBNP and ECHO were promoted by air masses originating from multiple sources, including wildfires, transport of pollution from southern California and the marine boundary layer, and transport of Asian pollution plumes. Results indicate that the State of Nevada will exceed a revised O3 standard due to sources that are beyond their control. PMID:25957787

  5. MCT4 surpasses the prognostic relevance of the ancillary protein CD147 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nies, Anne T.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Scharpf, Marcus; Fend, Falko; Kruck, Stephan; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147/BSG) is a transmembrane glycoprotein mediating oncogenic processes partly through its role as binding partner for monocarboxylate transporter MCT4/SLC16A3. As demonstrated for MCT4, CD147 is proposed to be associated with progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic relevance of CD147 in comparison to MCT4/SLC16A3 expression and DNA methylation. Methods CD147 protein expression was assessed in two independent ccRCC-cohorts (n = 186, n = 59) by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays and subsequent manual as well as automated software-supported scoring (Tissue Studio, Definien sAG). Epigenetic regulation of CD147 was investigated using RNAseq and DNA methylation data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. These results were validated in our cohort. Relevance of prognostic models for cancer-specific survival, comprising CD147 and MCT4 expression or SLC16A3 DNA methylation, was compared using chi-square statistics. Results CD147 protein expression generated with Tissue Studio correlated significantly with those from manual scoring (P < 0.0001, rS = 0.85), indicating feasibility of software-based evaluation exemplarily for the membrane protein CD147 in ccRCC. Association of CD147 expression with patient outcome differed between cohorts. DNA methylation in the CD147/BSG promoter was not associated with expression. Comparison of prognostic relevance of CD147/BSG and MCT4/SLC16A3, showed higher significance for MCT4 expression and superior prognostic power for DNA methylation at specific CpG-sites in the SLC16A3 promoter (e.g. CD147 protein: P = 0.7780, Harrell's c-index = 53.7% vs. DNA methylation: P = 0.0076, Harrell's c-index = 80.0%). Conclusions Prognostic significance of CD147 protein expression could not surpass that of MCT4, especially of SLC16A3 DNA methylation, corroborating the role of MCT4 as prognostic biomarker for ccRCC. PMID:26384346

  6. STS users study (study 2.2). Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. I.

    1975-01-01

    The space transportation system (STS) and ancillary equipment user studies are presented. Space shuttle data and planning requirements needed by the STS user are discussed along with the potential for common usage of multi-mission support equipment by the military and other aerospace personnel.

  7. Ancillary data acquisition for LACIE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, B. E.; Patterson, R. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The design, implementation, and operational functions of the three phases of LACIE supported the data needs of all other elements of the project and required several types of data in addition to LANDSAT multispectral digital data. The nonelectronic data base consisted of statistical data, printed reports, periodicals, ground observed data received from intensive test sites and operational segments, and full-frame multispectral scanner CIR photographs. The following data were collected for the test sites in the United States and Canada: land use inventories, periodic crop observations, solar radiometer measurements, rainfall, and wheat yield for selected fields.

  8. Evaluation of multiple ancillary therapies used in combination with an antimicrobial in newly received high-risk calves treated for bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B K; Step, D L; Maxwell, C L; Wagner, J J; Richards, C J; Krehbiel, C R

    2015-07-01

    Ancillary therapy (ANC) is commonly provided in conjunction with an antimicrobial when treating calves for suspected bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in an attempt to improve the response to a suspected BRD challenge. The first experiment evaluated the effects of 3 ANC in combination with an antimicrobial in high-risk calves treated for BRD during a 56-d receiving period. Newly received crossbred steers (n = 516; initial BW = 217 ± 20 kg) were monitored by trained personnel for clinical signs of BRD. Calves that met antimicrobial treatment criteria (n = 320) were then randomly assigned to experimental ANC treatment (80 steers/experimental ANC treatment): intravenous flunixin meglumine injection (NSAID), intranasal viral vaccination (VACC), intramuscular vitamin C injection (VITC), or no ANC (NOAC). Animal served as the experimental unit for all variables except DMI and G:F (pen served as the experimental unit for DMI and G:F). Within calves treated 3 times for BRD, those receiving NOAC had lower (P < 0.01) clinical severity scores (severity scores ranged from 0 to 4 on the basis of observed clinical signs and severity) and heavier (P = 0.01) BW than those receiving NSAID, VACC, or VITC at the time of third treatment. Between the second and third BRD treatments, calves receiving NOAC had decreased (P < 0.01) daily BW loss (−0.13 kg ADG) compared with those receiving NSAID, VACC, or VITC (−1.30, −1.90, and −1.41 kg ADG, respectively). There were no differences in rectal temperature, combined mortalities and removals, or overall performance among the experimental ANC treatments. Overall, morbidity and mortality attributed to BRD across treatments were 66.5% and 13.2%, respectively. After the receiving period, a subset of calves (n = 126) were allocated to finishing pens to evaluate the effects ANC administration on finishing performance, carcass characteristics, and lung scores at harvest. Ultrasound estimates, BW, and visual appraisal were used to target a

  9. Impact of percutaneous coronary intervention on biomarker levels in patients in the subacute phase following myocardial infarction: the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) biomarker ancillary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) Biomarker substudy was to evaluate the impact of infarct related artery (IRA) revascularization on serial levels of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and dynamics of other biomarkers related to left ventricular remodeling, fibrosis and angiogenesis. Methods Patients were eligible for OAT-Biomarker based on the main OAT criteria. Of 70 patients (age 60.8 ± 8.8, 25% women) enrolled in the substudy, 37 were randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 33 to optimal medical therapy alone. Baseline serum samples were obtained prior to OAT randomization with follow up samples taken at one year. The primary outcome was percent change of NT-proBNP from baseline to 1 year. The secondary outcomes were respective changes of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), and Galectin-3. Results Paired (baseline and one-year) serum samples were obtained in 62 subjects. Baseline median NT-proBNP level was 944.8 (455.3, 1533) ng/L and decreased by 69% during follow-up (p < 0.0001). Baseline MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.034, and p = 0.027 respectively), while MMP-9 level decreased from baseline (p = 0.038). Levels of VEGF and Galectin-3 remained stable at one year (p = NS for both). No impact of IRA revascularization on any biomarker dynamics were noted. Conclusions There were significant changes in measured biomarkers related to LV remodeling, stress, and fibrosis following MI between 0 and 12 month. Establishing infarct vessel patency utilizing stenting 24 hours-28 days post MI did not however influence the biomarkers’ release. PMID:24156746

  10. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26711738

  11. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: V. The 2014 Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Paul A; Kitko, Carrie L; Elad, Sharon; Flowers, Mary E D; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C; Halter, Jörg P; Hoodin, Flora; Johnston, Laura; Lawitschka, Anita; McDonald, George B; Opipari, Anthony W; Savani, Bipin N; Schultz, Kirk R; Smith, Sean R; Syrjala, Karen L; Treister, Nathaniel; Vogelsang, Georgia B; Williams, Kirsten M; Pavletic, Steven Z; Martin, Paul J; Lee, Stephanie J; Couriel, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    The 2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus paper presented recommendations by the Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group to support clinical research trials in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Topics covered in that inaugural effort included the prevention and management of infections and common complications of chronic GVHD, as well as recommendations for patient education and appropriate follow-up. Given the new literature that has emerged during the past 8 years, we made further organ-specific refinements to these guidelines. Minimum frequencies are suggested for monitoring key parameters relevant to chronic GVHD during systemic immunosuppressive therapy and, thereafter, referral to existing late effects consensus guidelines is advised. Using the framework of the prior consensus, the 2014 NIH recommendations are organized by organ or other relevant systems and graded according to the strength and quality of supporting evidence. PMID:25838185

  12. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: V. The 2014 Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Paul A.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Elad, Sharon; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C.; Halter, Jörg P.; Hoodin, Flora; Johnston, Laura; Lawitschka, Anita; McDonald, George B.; Opipari, Anthony W.; Savani, Bipin N.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Smith, Sean R.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Treister, Nathaniel; Vogelsang, Georgia B.; Williams, Kirsten M.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Martin, Paul J.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Couriel, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus paper presented recommendations by the Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group to support clinical research trials in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Topics covered in that inaugural effort included the prevention and management of infections and common complications of chronic GVHD, as well as recommendations for patient education and appropriate follow-up. Given the new literature that has emerged during the past 8 years, we made further organ-specific refinements to these guidelines. Minimum frequencies are suggested for monitoring key parameters relevant to chronic GVHD during systemic immunosuppressive therapy and, thereafter, referral to existing late effects consensus guidelines is advised. Using the framework of the prior consensus, the 2014 NIH recommendations are organized by organ or other relevant systems and graded according to the strength and quality of supporting evidence. PMID:25838185

  13. A Study of the Functions Performed by Coordinators in the Saddleback Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Hugh W.

    In light of an increased need for assistance in supporting various aspects of the Saddleback Community College District's instructional programs and ancillary services, a study was conducted to obtain quantitative information concerning the functions performed by coordinators of programs and services at Saddleback College's two campuses. The study…

  14. Evaluation of new and established age-related macular degeneration susceptibility genes in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess whether established and newly reported genetic variants, independent of known lifestyle factors, are associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Genetic Ancillary Study. This is a multice...

  15. Total Mercury, Methylmercury, Methylmercury Production Potential, and Ancillary Streambed-Sediment and Pore-Water Data for Selected Streams in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Florida, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Lutz, Michelle A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Aiken, George R.; Orem, William H.; Hall, Britt D.; DeWild, John F.; Brigham, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems is an issue of national concern, affecting both wildlife and human health. Detailed information on mercury cycling and food-web bioaccumulation in stream settings and the factors that control these processes is currently limited. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) conducted detailed studies from 2002 to 2006 on various media to enhance process-level understanding of mercury contamination, biogeochemical cycling, and trophic transfer. Eight streams were sampled for this study: two streams in Oregon, and three streams each in Wisconsin and Florida. Streambed-sediment and pore-water samples were collected between February 2003 and September 2004. This report summarizes the suite of geochemical and microbial constituents measured, the analytical methods used, and provides the raw data in electronic form for both bed-sediment and pore-water media associated with this study.

  16. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and progression to diabetes in patients at risk for diabetes: an ancillary analysis in the diabetes prevention program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. The research design and methods were a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multi-center trial co...

  17. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular understanding of the role which the surface oxide layer of the adherend plays in titanium bonding is studied. The effects of Ti6-4 adherends pretreatment, bonding conditions, and thermal aging of the lap shear specimens were studied. The use of the SEM/EDAX and ESCA techniques to study surface morphology and surface composition was emphasized. In addition, contact angles and both infrared and visible reflection spectroscopy were used in ancillary studies.

  18. Annual Crop Type Classification of the U.S. Great Plains for 2000 - 2011: An Application of Classification Tree Modeling using Remote Sensing and Ancillary Environmental Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, D. M.; Wylie, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase spatial and temporal availability of crop classification data using reliable source data that have the potential of being applied on local, regional, national, and global levels. This study implemented classification tree modeling to map annual crop types throughout the U.S. Great Plains from 2000 - 2011. Classification tree modeling has been shown in numerous studies to be an effective tool for developing classification models. In this study, nearly 18 million crop observation points, derived from annual U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) Cropland Data Layers (CDLs), were used in the training, development, and validation of a classification tree crop type model (CTM). Each observation point was further defined by weekly Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) readings, annual climatic conditions, soil conditions, and a number of other biogeophysical environmental characteristics. The CTM accounted for the most prevalent crop types in the area, including, corn, soybeans, winter wheat, spring wheat, cotton, sorghum, and alfalfa. Other crops that did not fit into any of these classes were identified and grouped into a miscellaneous class. An 87% success rate was achieved on the classification of 1.8 million observation points (10% of total observation points) that were withheld from training. The CTM was applied to create annual crop maps of the U.S. Great Plains for 2000 - 2011 at a spatial resolution of 250 meters. Product validation was performed by comparing county acreage derived from the modeled crop maps and county acreage data from the USDA NASS Survey Program for each crop type and each year. Greater than 15,000 county records from 2001 - 2010 were compared with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.87.

  19. Wetland mapping and flood extent monitoring using optical and radar remotely sensed data and ancillary topographical data in the Zhalong National Natural Reserve, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Xiaodong; Zang, Shuying; Zhang, Yuhong; Liu, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Information regarding the spatial extent and inundation state in the internationally important Wetlands as designated by Ramsar Convention is important to a series of research questions including wetland ecosystem functioning and services, water management and habitat suitability assessment. This study develops an expedient digital mapping technique using optical remotely sensed imagery of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), ENVISAT ASAR active radar C-band imagery, and topographical indices derived from topographic maps. All data inputs were resampled to a common 30 m resolution grid. An ensemble classifiers based on trees (random forest) procedure was employed to produce a final map of per-grid cell wetland probability map. This study also provides a general approach to delineate the extent of flooding builds upon documented relationships between fields measured inundation state and SAR data response on each vegetation types. The current study indicated that multi-source data (i.e. optical, radar and topography) are useful in the characterization of freshwater marshes and their inundation state. This analysis constitutes a necessary step towards improved herbaceous wetland monitoring and provides ecologists and managers with vital information that is related to ecology and hydrology in a wetland area.

  20. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  1. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S.; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K.; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  2. Performance of STICS model to predict rainfed corn evapotranspiration and biomass evaluated for 6 years between 1995 and 2006 using daily aggregated eddy covariance fluxes and ancillary measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattey, Elizabeth; Jégo, Guillaume; Bourgeois, Gaétan

    2010-05-01

    Verifying the performance of process-based crop growth models to predict evapotranspiration and crop biomass is a key component of the adaptation of agricultural crop production to climate variations. STICS, developed by INRA, was part of the models selected by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to be implemented for environmental assessment studies on climate variations, because of its built-in ability to assimilate biophysical descriptors such as LAI derived from satellite imagery and its open architecture. The model prediction of shoot biomass was calibrated using destructive biomass measurements over one season, by adjusting six cultivar parameters and three generic plant parameters to define two grain corn cultivars adapted to the 1000-km long Mixedwood Plains ecozone. Its performance was then evaluated using a database of 40 years-sites of corn destructive biomass and yield. In this study we evaluate the temporal response of STICS evapotranspiration and biomass accumulation predictions against estimates using daily aggregated eddy covariance fluxes. The flux tower was located in an experimental farm south of Ottawa and measurements carried out over corn fields in 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2006. Daytime and nighttime fluxes were QC/QA and gap-filled separately. Soil respiration was partitioned to calculate the corn net daily CO2 uptake, which was converted into dry biomass. Out of the six growing seasons, three (1995, 1998, 2002) had water stress periods during corn grain filling. Year 2000 was cool and wet, while 1996 had heat and rainfall distributed evenly over the season and 2006 had a wet spring. STICS can predict evapotranspiration using either crop coefficients, when wind speed and air moisture are not available, or resistance. The first approach provided higher prediction for all the years than the resistance approach and the flux measurements. The dynamic of evapotranspiration prediction of STICS was very good for the growing seasons without

  3. Time-Series analysis of MODIS NDVI data along with ancillary data for Land use/Land cover mapping of Uttarakhand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patakamuri, S. K.; Agrawal, S.; Krishnaveni, M.

    2014-12-01

    Land use and land cover plays an important role in biogeochemical cycles, global climate and seasonal changes. Mapping land use and land cover at various spatial and temporal scales is thus required. Reliable and up to date land use/land cover data is of prime importance for Uttarakhand, which houses twelve national parks and wildlife sanctuaries and also has a vast potential in tourism sector. The research is aimed at mapping the land use/land cover for Uttarakhand state of India using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the year 2010. The study also incorporated smoothening of time-series plots using filtering techniques, which helped in identifying phenological characteristics of various land cover types. Multi temporal Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for the year 2010 was used for mapping the Land use/land cover at 250m coarse resolution. A total of 23 images covering a single year were layer stacked and 150 clusters were generated using unsupervised classification (ISODATA) on the yearly composite. To identify different types of land cover classes, the temporal pattern (or) phenological information observed from the MODIS (MOD13Q1) NDVI, elevation data from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), MODIS water mask (MOD44W), Nighttime Lights Time Series data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data were used. Final map product is generated by adopting hybrid classification approach, which resulted in detailed and accurate land use and land cover map.

  4. Final report and archive of the swath bathymetry and ancillary data collected in the Puerto Rico Trench region in 2002 and 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Danforth, William W.; Polloni, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 and 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), conducted three exploration cruises that mapped for the first time the morphology of the entire tectonic plate boundary stretching from the Dominican Republic in the west to the Lesser Antilles in the east, a distance of approximately 700 kilometers (430 miles). Observations from these three exploration cruises, coupled with computer modeling and published Global Positioning System (GPS) results and earthquake focal mechanisms, have provided new information that is changing the evaluation of the seismic and tsunami hazard from this plate boundary. The observations collected during these cruises also contributed to the basic understanding of the mechanisms that govern plate tectonics, in this case, the creation of the island of Puerto Rico and the deep trench north of it. Results of the sea floor mapping have been an important component of the study of tsunami and earthquake hazards to the northeastern Caribbean and the U.S. Atlantic coast off the United States.

  5. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Ancillary Pilin Subunit of the Streptococcus suis srtF Cluster Result in Pili Formed by the Major Subunit Only

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; la Cruz Domínguez-Punaro, María de; Lecours, Marie-Pier; Montpetit, Diane; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Pili have been shown to contribute to the virulence of different Gram-positive pathogenic species. Among other critical steps of bacterial pathogenesis, these structures participate in adherence to host cells, colonization and systemic virulence. Recently, the presence of at least four discrete gene clusters encoding putative pili has been revealed in the major swine pathogen and emerging zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis. However, pili production by this species has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the functionality of one of these pili clusters, known as the srtF pilus cluster, by the construction of mutant strains for each of the four genes of the cluster as well as by the generation of antibodies against the putative pilin subunits. Results revealed that the S. suis serotype 2 strain P1/7, as well as several other highly virulent invasive S. suis serotype 2 isolates express pili from this cluster. However, in most cases tested, and as a result of nonsense mutations at the 5′ end of the gene encoding the minor pilin subunit (a putative adhesin), pili were formed by the major pilin subunit only. We then evaluated the role these pili play in S. suis virulence. Abolishment of the expression of srtF cluster-encoded pili did not result in impaired interactions of S. suis with porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, non-piliated mutants were as virulent as the wild type strain when evaluated in a murine model of S. suis sepsis. Our results show that srtF cluster-encoded, S. suis pili are atypical compared to other Gram-positive pili. In addition, since the highly virulent strains under investigation are unlikely to produce other pili, our results suggest that pili might be dispensable for critical steps of the S. suis pathogenesis of infection. PMID:20052283

  6. Influence of multi-source and multi-temporal remotely sensed and ancillary data on the accuracy of random forest classification of wetlands in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corcoran, Jennifer M.; Knight, Joseph F.; Gallant, Alisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Wetland mapping at the landscape scale using remotely sensed data requires both affordable data and an efficient accurate classification method. Random forest classification offers several advantages over traditional land cover classification techniques, including a bootstrapping technique to generate robust estimations of outliers in the training data, as well as the capability of measuring classification confidence. Though the random forest classifier can generate complex decision trees with a multitude of input data and still not run a high risk of over fitting, there is a great need to reduce computational and operational costs by including only key input data sets without sacrificing a significant level of accuracy. Our main questions for this study site in Northern Minnesota were: (1) how does classification accuracy and confidence of mapping wetlands compare using different remote sensing platforms and sets of input data; (2) what are the key input variables for accurate differentiation of upland, water, and wetlands, including wetland type; and (3) which datasets and seasonal imagery yield the best accuracy for wetland classification. Our results show the key input variables include terrain (elevation and curvature) and soils descriptors (hydric), along with an assortment of remotely sensed data collected in the spring (satellite visible, near infrared, and thermal bands; satellite normalized vegetation index and Tasseled Cap greenness and wetness; and horizontal-horizontal (HH) and horizontal-vertical (HV) polarization using L-band satellite radar). We undertook this exploratory analysis to inform decisions by natural resource managers charged with monitoring wetland ecosystems and to aid in designing a system for consistent operational mapping of wetlands across landscapes similar to those found in Northern Minnesota.

  7. Sterically less-hindered half-titanocene(IV) phenoxides: ancillary-ligand effect on mono-, bis-, and tris(2-alkyl-/arylphenoxy) titanium(IV) chloride complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kwan; Kim, Beom-Jun; Son, Ho-Jin; Hahn, Jong Sok; Cheong, Minserk; Mitoraj, Mariusz; Srebro, Monika; Piekoś, Łukasz; Michalak, Artur; Kang, Sang Ook

    2010-05-17

    A series of mono-, bis-, and tris(phenoxy)-titanium(IV) chlorides of the type [Cp*Ti(2-R-PhO)(n)Cl(3-n)] (n=1-3; Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) was prepared, in which R=Me, iPr, tBu, and Ph. The formation of each mono-, bis-, and tris(2-alkyl-/arylphenoxy) series was authenticated by structural studies on representative examples of the phenyl series including [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)Cl(2)] (1 PhCl2), [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)(2)Cl] (2 PhCl), and [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)(3)] (3 Ph). The metal-coordination geometry of each compound is best described as pseudotetrahedral with the Cp* ring and the 2-Ph-PhO and chloride ligands occupying three leg positions in a piano-stool geometry. The mean Ti-O distances, observed with an increasing number of 2-Ph-PhO groups, are 1.784(3), 1.802(4), and 1.799(3) A for 1 PhCl2, 2 PhCl, and 3 Ph, respectively. All four alkyl/aryl series with Me, iPr, tBu, and Ph substituents were tested for ethylene homopolymerization after activation with Ph(3)C(+)[B(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) and modified methyaluminoxane (7% aluminum in isopar E; mMAO-7) at 140 degrees C. The phenyl series showed much higher catalytic activity, which ranged from 43.2 and 65.4 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1), than the Me, iPr, and tBu series (19.2 and 36.6 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1)). Among the phenyl series, the bis(phenoxide) complex of 2 PhCl showed the highest activity of 65.4 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1). Therefore, the catalyst precursors of the phenyl series were examined by treating them with a variety of alkylating reagents, such as trimethylaluminum (TMA), triisobutylaluminum (TIBA), and methylaluminoxane (MAO). In all cases, 2 PhCl produced the most catalytically active alkylated species, [Cp*Ti(2-Ph--PhO)MeCl]. This enhancement was further supported by DFT calculations based on the simplified model with TMA. PMID:20391583

  8. Synthesis, structure, magnetism and nuclease activity of tetranuclear copper(II) phosphonates contatining ancillary 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar, V.; Azhakar, R.; Senapati, T.; Thilagar, P.; Gosh, S.; Verma, S.; Boomishankar, R.; Steiner, A.; Kogerler, P.

    2008-01-07

    The reaction of cyclohexylphosphonic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}), anhydrous CuCl{sub 2} and 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) in the presence of triethylamine followed by a metathesis reaction with KNO{sub 3} afforded [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-Cl){sub 2}({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1). In an analogous reaction involving Cu(OAc){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, the complex [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(2,2-bpy){sub 4}](CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} (2) has been isolated. The three-component reaction involving Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, cyclohexylphosphonic acid and 2,2{prime}-bipyridine in the presence of triethylamine afforded the tetranuclear assembly [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-OH)({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(2,2{prime}-bpy){sub 4} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (3). Replacing 2,2{prime}-bipyridine with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) in the above reaction resulted in [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-OH)({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(phen){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (4). In all the copper(II) phosphonates (1-4) the two phosphonate ions bridge the four copper(II) ions in a capping coordination action. Each phosphonate ion bridges four copper(II) ions in a {micro}{sub 4}, coordination mode or 4.211 of the Harris notation. Variable-temperature magnetic studies on 1-4 reveal that all four complexes exhibit moderately strong intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling. The DNA cleavage activity of complexes 1-4 is also described. Compounds 1 and 3 were able to completely convert the supercoiled pBR322 DNA form I to nick form II without any co-oxidant. In contrast, 50% conversion occurred with 2 and 40% with 4. In the presence of magnesium monoperoxyphthalate all four compounds achieved rapid conversion of form I to form II.

  9. Ancillary-service details: operating reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1997-11-01

    Operating reserves are the front lines in the defense of bulk-power systems against major generation and transmission outages. Operating reserves are provided by generating units that can increase their output rapidly to restore the system to generation/load balance after a major disturbance occurs. Dramatic changes are under way in the U.S. electricity sector, in particular the unbundling of generation from transmission and the increasingly competitive nature of bulk-power markets. Therefore, it is important to revisit the industry`s definitions of, procurement of, and payment for operating reserves. The procedures traditionally used by vertically integrated utilities may not serve the needs of an increasingly fragmented and competitive electricity industry. This report examines the past and current functions of, as well as the national and regional requirements for, operating reserves. We examine the data and analysis that support minimum-operating-reserve requirements. We obtained data on the number and severity of generator outages for three large U.S. electrical systems, including a power pool, a regional reliability council, and a utility. These limited data sets show a range of 15 to 40 major (>500 MW) outages a year for systems ranging in size from 20, 000 MW to 48,000 MW of peak demand. Finally, we discuss several emerging issues related to the underlying technical support for minimum operating-reserve requirements, alternative ways to pay for these reserves, the data needed to support the analysis of these requirements, and the mix of functions that are currently included within operating reserves.

  10. therapy services: from ancillary to necessary.

    PubMed

    Britt, John

    2016-05-01

    Physical and occupational therapy and speech language pathology services are assuming an increasingly important role as healthcare providers transition to value-based care. Finance leaders can support the efforts of therapy leaders by working with them to: Determine priorities regarding level of care. Establish appropriate staffing and productivity metrics. Promote accurate and thorough charge-capture efforts. Broaden the referral base for therapy services PMID:27382706

  11. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  12. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  13. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  14. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  15. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  16. Competitive ancillary service procurement in California

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Khavkin, Mark

    2000-01-01

    California has undertaken a major restructuring of its electricity utility sector. Most electricity is now sold in open markets operated by the PX and other entities. Bilateral contracting among some market participants is also permitted. A group of independent generating companies bids into these markets together with out of state resources. In addition to these markets, CAISO operates markets for both imbalance energy and AS, a quite unusual feature of the California system. These markets were initially quite chaotic and were rife with market power problems. However, various reforms have now created a system that functions well. During the restructuring process, special provisions were made to protect public purpose programs, including renewable generation.

  17. Study of nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralithar, S.; Gamma spectroscopy Group in IUAC

    2013-04-01

    Studies of nuclear structure have fascinated physicists and was pursued for decades actively. Nuclear structure evolves as a function of proton and neutron ratio, energy and spin pumped into system. To facilitate nuclear structure study at high spin, a host of facilities were developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi and was used by users across this country for last twenty years. The tools developed, from Gamma detector array (GDA) with ancillary devices, to Indian National Gamma array (INGA) are presented with few physics cases.

  18. Use of ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) Data to Study Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing

    2012-12-19

    General goals: 1) Facilitating the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Ancillary Facility (AAF) in China in 2008, 2) Processing, retrieving, improving and analyzing observation data from ground-based, air-borne and space-borne instruments; 3) Conducting a series of studies to gain insights into the direct and indirect effects of these aerosols on radiation, clouds, and precipitation using both

  19. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 1: MMU applications analysis and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU'S) to the space shuttle program are identified and described. The applications analyses included studies of the shuttle orbiter, orbiter subsystems, and both Sortie and Automated Payloads. Based on practicable MMU applications, general performance and control requirements for shuttle supporting maneuvering units are defined and compared to units evaluated on Skylab. The results of the MMU applications analyses and the general MMU performance and control requirements are presented. To describe a versatile utility-type maneuvering unit, conceptual designs of MMU support subsystems and ancillary equipment were prepared. Concepts for attaching and securing the MMU crewman to various vehicles, structure configurations, and rescue systems were developed. Concepts for ancillary provisions are reported.

  20. On-board multispectral classification study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewalt, D.

    1979-01-01

    The factors relating to onboard multispectral classification were investigated. The functions implemented in ground-based processing systems for current Earth observation sensors were reviewed. The Multispectral Scanner, Thematic Mapper, Return Beam Vidicon, and Heat Capacity Mapper were studied. The concept of classification was reviewed and extended from the ground-based image processing functions to an onboard system capable of multispectral classification. Eight different onboard configurations, each with varying amounts of ground-spacecraft interaction, were evaluated. Each configuration was evaluated in terms of turnaround time, onboard processing and storage requirements, geometric and classification accuracy, onboard complexity, and ancillary data required from the ground.

  1. ASPREE Cancer Endpoints Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The ASPREE Cancer Endpoint Study (ACES), an ancillary study of the ASPirin in the Prevention of Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Study, will allow for the examination of the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (100 mg) compared to placebo, on specific DNA biomarkers and selected specific incident and recurrent cancer and metastases. The establishment of this ACES biobank will allow for the exploration of DNA-related molecular mechanisms of aspirin's protective effect against cancer, cancer associated mortality and metastases, using blood or saliva DNA specimens, urine, and tumor tissue. |

  2. Mood and menopause: findings from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Bromberger, Joyce T; Kravitz, Howard M

    2011-09-01

    Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from depressive symptoms/disorder. Research has focused on physiologic and psychosocial differences between men and women; an important target of study has been periods of reproductive changes. Controversy has existed regarding the extent to which the menopausal transition or postmenopause increases the risk for depressive symptoms/disorders. This paper presents findings from analyses of data from the SWAN study and an ancillary study on mental health. We found that risk for high depressive symptoms and disorder is greater during and possibly after the menopausal transition. Other factors contribute to risk for depression. PMID:21961723

  3. Outcomes of cytopathology studies presented at national pathology meetings.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, M C; Wojcik, E M

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors influence the final publication status of cytopathology studies presented at national meetings. Abstracts involving cytopathology material were obtained from the following journals: Modern Pathology (volume 11, 1998), Acta Cytologica (volume 42, 1998), and the American Journal of Clinical Pathology (volumes 109 and 110, 1998). Using the National Library of Medicine Website, each abstract was searched by author and topic to determine if the study was published as a peer-reviewed article. The following parameters were evaluated: meeting where the abstract was presented, type of institution where the research was based, type of material used in the study, and application of ancillary techniques used in the study. The subsequent published articles were evaluated for journal and time to publication. Out of 257 studies presented in 1998, 85 (33%) were published in peer-reviewed journals by May 2000. The majority of papers were published in Diagnostic Cytopathology (n = 21), Acta Cytologica (n = 15), and Cancer (n = 18). The mean time for publication was 12.8 mo. The highest percentage of published studies was presented at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) meeting (50% of presented abstracts), followed by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) (28%) and American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) (17%) meetings. Ancillary techniques were applied in 40 of 85 (47%) published studies, 27 of 85 (32%) articles focused on morphology, and 18 of 85 (21%) papers covered other topics (e.g., quality assurance (QA), cost, and role of cytology). In nonpublished studies (n = 172), special techniques were the main focus in 40%, morphology in 25%, and other topics in 35% of abstracts. The great majority (97%) of published studies were from academic institutions. Gynecological and nongynecological material were roughly equally covered in published and nonpublished studies. Only a relatively small

  4. Computational study of silica-supported transition metal fragments for Kubas-type hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Skipper, Claire V J; Hamaed, Ahmad; Antonelli, David M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2010-12-01

    To verify the role of the Kubas interaction in transition metal grafted mesoporous silicas, and to rationalize unusual rising enthalpy trends with surface coverage by hydrogen in these systems, computational studies have been performed. Thus, the interaction of H2 with the titanium centers in molecular models for experimentally characterized mesoporous silica-based H2 absorption materials has been studied quantum chemically using gradient corrected density functional theory. The interaction between the titanium and the H2 molecules is found to be of a synergic, Kubas type, and a maximum of four H2 molecules can be bound to each titanium, in good agreement with previous experiments. The average Ti-H2 interaction energies in molecules incorporating benzyl ancillary ligands (models of the experimental systems) increase as the number of bound H2 units increases from two to four, in agreement with the experimental observation that the H2 adsorption enthalpy increases as the number of adsorbed H2 molecules increases. The Ti-H2 interaction is shown to be greater when the titanium is bound to ancillary ligands, which are poor π-acceptors, and when the ancillary ligand causes the least steric hindrance to the metal. Extension of the target systems to vanadium and chromium shows that, for molecules containing hydride ancillary ligands, a good relationship is found between the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals of the molecular fragments, which interact with incoming H2 molecules, and the strength of the M-H2 interaction. For the benzyl systems, both the differences in M-H2 interaction energies and the energy differences in frontier orbital energies are smaller than those in the hydrides, such that conclusions based on frontier orbital energies are less robust than for the hydride systems. Because of the high enthalpies predicted for organometallic fragments containing hydride ligands, and the low affinity of Cr(III) for hydrogen in this study, these features may

  5. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  6. AX Tank farm process impacts study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-03-18

    This study provides facility and process concepts and costs for partial decontamination of the most heavily contaminated debris from the demolition of the four AX tanks and ancillary equipment items. This debris would likely be classified as high-level and/or remote handle TRU waste based on source and radiological inventory. A process flow sheet was developed to treat contaminated metal wastes such as pipes and tank liners as well as contaminated concrete and the residual waste and grout left in the tanks after final waste retrieval. The treated solid waste is prepared for delivery to either the ERDF or the Low-Level waste burial grounds. Liquid waste products are delivered to the private vitrification contractor for further treatment and storage. This is one of several reports prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to develop retrieval performance criteria for tank farms.

  7. Structure and NIR-luminescence of ytterbium(III) beta-diketonate complexes with 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline ancillary ligand: assessment of chain length and fluorination impact.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S; Lavín, Victor; Martín, Inocencio R; Lahoz, Fernando; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Silva, Manuela Ramos; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Seven new tris(β-diketonear-nate)ytterbium(III) complexes with the general formula [Yb(β-diketonate)3(5NO2phen)] (where the β-diketone is either 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione, 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-furyl)-1,3-butanedione, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione, 1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexanedione, 1,1,1,5,5,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-2,4-heptanedione, 2,4-hexanedione or 2,6-dimethyl-3,5-heptanedione, and 5NO2phen = 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray structures have been determined for three fluorinated complexes and ground state geometries of the other four complexes have been predicted using the Sparkle/PM6 model. These experimental structures and those designed by semi-empirical models reveal octacoordination around the Yb(3+) ion. Photoluminescence studies and lifetime measurements show that the increase in the fluorinated β-diketonate chain length is associated with a decrease in Yb(3+) luminescence intensity of the (2)F5/2→(2)F7/2 transition at around 980 nm and the (2)F5/2 excited state lifetime, while the ligand lifetime value remains almost unaffected. Finally, fluorination of the ligands is only advised when the complexes are to be used for co-doping with isostructural Er(3+) complexes for optical amplifiers, since it leads to a slight decrease in luminescence intensity for the same β-diketonate chain length. PMID:23900403

  8. A kinetic study of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT)-mediated S-nitrosoglutathione catabolism.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Valeria; Tacito, Alessia; Paolicchi, Aldo; Barsacchi, Renata; Franzini, Maria; Baldassini, Riccardo; Vecoli, Cecilia; Pompella, Alfonso; Bramanti, Emilia

    2009-01-15

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor compound which has been postulated to be involved in transport of NO in vivo. It is known that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is one of the enzymes involved in the enzyme-mediated decomposition of GSNO, but no kinetics studies of the reaction GSNO-GGT are reported in literature. In this study we directly investigated the kinetics of GGT with respect to GSNO as a substrate and glycyl-glycine (GG) as acceptor co-substrate by spectrophotometry at 334 nm. GGT hydrolyses the gamma-glutamyl moiety of GSNO to give S-nitroso-cysteinylglycine (CGNO) and gamma-glutamyl-GG. However, as both the substrate GSNO and the first product CGNO absorb at 334 nm, we optimized an ancillary reaction coupled to the enzymatic reaction, based on the copper-mediated decomposition of CGNO yielding oxidized cysteinyl-glycine and NO. The ancillary reaction allowed us to study directly the GSNO/GGT kinetics by following the decrease of the characteristic absorbance of nitrosothiols at 334 nm. A K(m) of GGT for GSNO of 0.398+/-31 mM was thus found, comparable with K(m) values reported for other gamma-glutamyl substrates of GGT. PMID:19000649

  9. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for which the following special services have been purchased: Domestic Certified MailTM service, domestic Delivery ConfirmationTM service, domestic and inbound international Registered MailTM service, domestic Collect On Delivery, domestic electronic Return Receipt, and domestic Signature...

  10. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Tuohy, A.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Brooks, D.

    2012-05-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. This article discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  11. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  12. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  13. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  14. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  15. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  16. Poetry: An Ancillary Technique in Couples Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, Nicholas; Prescott, Barbara Unger

    1981-01-01

    The use of poetry in couples' groups is suggested to facilitate group process and break down resistance. Techniques include the use of reactions to a poem or song, the construction of poems, and the development of images. Poetry can help clients express feelings and examine communication patterns. (Author)

  17. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  18. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 24 hours after the time of the recorded delivery-related scan performed by the Postal Service on mail... scans. (2) For domestic electronic Address Correction Service, the service standard for the electronic... after the time of the scan of the mailpiece by the Postal Automated Redirection System. (b) For...

  19. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 24 hours after the time of the recorded delivery-related scan performed by the Postal Service on mail... scans. (2) For domestic electronic Address Correction Service, the service standard for the electronic... after the time of the scan of the mailpiece by the Postal Automated Redirection System. (b) For...

  20. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 24 hours after the time of the recorded delivery-related scan performed by the Postal Service on mail... scans. (2) For domestic electronic Address Correction Service, the service standard for the electronic... after the time of the scan of the mailpiece by the Postal Automated Redirection System. (b) For...

  1. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 24 hours after the time of the recorded delivery-related scan performed by the Postal Service on mail... scans. (2) For domestic electronic Address Correction Service, the service standard for the electronic... after the time of the scan of the mailpiece by the Postal Automated Redirection System. (b) For...

  2. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  3. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  4. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  5. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  6. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  7. Enhancing VELMA's Watershed Delineation and Performance with Ancillary Stream Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    VELMA (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) is a hydro-ecological landscape disturbance model developed to predict the effectiveness of alternative green infrastructure scenarios for protecting water quality, and also to estimate potential ecosystem service co-b...

  8. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  9. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  10. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  11. 77 FR 25105 - Reporting of Ancillary Airline Passenger Revenues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... wheelchairs and scooters used by passengers with disabilities. See 76 FR 41726. You may review comments to...? Issued in Washington, DC, on April 23, 2012. Pat Hu, Director, Bureau of Transportation...

  12. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative services... interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  13. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Global surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative... (the interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  14. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Global surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative... (the interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  15. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative services... interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  16. Integration of access control and ancillary information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Ahrens, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    The DOE has identified the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ARGUS system as the standard entry control system for the DOE Complex. ARGUS integrates several key functions, specifically, badging, entry control, and verification of clearance status. Not all sites need or can afford an ARGUS system. Such sites are therefore limited to commercial equipment which provide ARGUS like features. In this project an alternative way to integrate commercial equipment into an integrated system to include badging, access control, property control, and automated verification of clearance status has been investigated. Such a system would provide smaller sites the same functionality as is provided by ARGUS. Further, it would allow sites to fully participate in the DOE`s concept of Complex wide access control. This multi-year task is comprised of three phases. Phase 1, system requirements and definitions, and phase 2, software and hardware development, were completed during fiscal year 1994. This report covers these two phases and the demonstration system which resulted. Phase three would employ the demonstration system to evaluate system performance, identify operational limits and to integrate additional features. The demonstration system includes a badging station, a database server, a managers workstation, an entry control system, and a property protection system. The functions have been integrated through the use of custom interfaces and operator screens which greatly increase ease of use.

  17. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Global surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative... (the interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  18. ANCILLARY SCIENTISTS SYMPOSIUM: GENETIC TECHNOLOGY APPLIED TO POULTRY PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although classical genetics has significantly contributed to animal agriculture such as the gain in animal productivity, breeding efficiency, and selection of desirable biological traits, the advances in molecular genetics, including DNA cloning, sequencing, genotyping, and DNA microarray technology...

  19. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 13: Case studies for SeaWiFS calibration and validation, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Mcclain, Charles R.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Fraser, Robert S.; Firestone, James K.; Schieber, Brian D.; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Sullivan, Cornelius W.

    1994-01-01

    Although the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Calibration and Validation Program relies on the scientific community for the collection of bio-optical and atmospheric correction data as well as for algorithm development, it does have the responsibility for evaluating and comparing the algorithms and for ensuring that the algorithms are properly implemented within the SeaWiFS Data Processing System. This report consists of a series of sensitivity and algorithm (bio-optical, atmospheric correction, and quality control) studies based on Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and historical ancillary data undertaken to assist in the development of SeaWiFS specific applications needed for the proper execution of that responsibility. The topics presented are as follows: (1) CZCS bio-optical algorithm comparison, (2) SeaWiFS ozone data analysis study, (3) SeaWiFS pressure and oxygen absorption study, (4) pixel-by-pixel pressure and ozone correction study for ocean color imagery, (5) CZCS overlapping scenes study, (6) a comparison of CZCS and in situ pigment concentrations in the Southern Ocean, (7) the generation of ancillary data climatologies, (8) CZCS sensor ringing mask comparison, and (9) sun glint flag sensitivity study.

  20. Dietary approaches for bone health: lessons from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Shivani; Mangano, Kelsey M; McLean, Robert R; Hannan, Marian T; Kiel, Douglas P

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by systemic impairment of bone mass, strength, and microarchitecture, resulting in increased risk for fragility fracture, disability, loss of independence and even death. Adequate nutrition is important in achieving and maintaining optimal bone mass, as well as preventing this debilitating disease. It is widely accepted that adequate calcium and vitamin D intake are necessary for good bone health; however, nutritional benefits to bone go beyond these two nutrients. This review article will provide updated information on all nutrients and foods now understood to alter bone health. Specifically, this paper will focus on related research from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study, an ancillary study of the Framingham Heart Study, with data on more than five thousand adult men and women. PMID:26045228

  1. The Application of Classification and Regression Trees for the Triage of Women for Referral to Colposcopy and the Estimation of Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Study Based on 1625 Cases with Incomplete Data from Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsou, Efrossyni; Chrelias, Charalampos; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Valasoulis, George; Kyrgiou, Maria; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Nowadays numerous ancillary techniques detecting HPV DNA and mRNA compete with cytology; however no perfect test exists; in this study we evaluated classification and regression trees (CARTs) for the production of triage rules and estimate the risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in cases with ASCUS+ in cytology. Study Design. We used 1625 cases. In contrast to other approaches we used missing data to increase the data volume, obtain more accurate results, and simulate real conditions in the everyday practice of gynecologic clinics and laboratories. The proposed CART was based on the cytological result, HPV DNA typing, HPV mRNA detection based on NASBA and flow cytometry, p16 immunocytochemical expression, and finally age and parous status. Results. Algorithms useful for the triage of women were produced; gynecologists could apply these in conjunction with available examination results and conclude to an estimation of the risk for a woman to harbor CIN expressed as a probability. Conclusions. The most important test was the cytological examination; however the CART handled cases with inadequate cytological outcome and increased the diagnostic accuracy by exploiting the results of ancillary techniques even if there were inadequate missing data. The CART performance was better than any other single test involved in this study. PMID:26339651

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-H-6:2, 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:3, 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils; The 118-H-6:3 Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils; the 100-H-9, 100-H-10, and 100-H-13 French Drains; the 100-H-11 and 100-H-12 Expansion Box French Drains; and the 100-H-14 and 100-H-31 Surface Contamination Zones

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-06-29

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of removal actions for the 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils (subsite 118-H-6:2); 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils (118-H-6:3); and Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils. This CVP also documents remedial actions for the following seven additional waste sties: French Drain C (100-H-9), French Drain D (100-H-10), Expansion Box French Drain E (100-H-11), Expansion Box French Drain F (100-H-12), French Drain G (100-H-13), Surface Contamination Zone H (100-H-14), and the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Surface Contamination Zone (100-H-31).

  3. A novel smartphone ophthalmic imaging adapter: User feasibility studies in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Cassie A; Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev R; Jais, Alexandre; Myung, David J; Chang, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To evaluate the ability of ancillary health staff to use a novel smartphone imaging adapter system (EyeGo, now known as Paxos Scope) to capture images of sufficient quality to exclude emergent eye findings. Secondary aims were to assess user and patient experiences during image acquisition, interuser reproducibility, and subjective image quality. Materials and Methods: The system captures images using a macro lens and an indirect ophthalmoscopy lens coupled with an iPhone 5S. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 229 consecutive patients presenting to L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. Primary outcome measure was mean photographic quality (FOTO-ED study 1–5 scale, 5 best). 210 patients and eight users completed surveys assessing comfort and ease of use. For 46 patients, two users imaged the same patient's eyes sequentially. For 182 patients, photos taken with the EyeGo system were compared to images taken by existing clinic cameras: a BX 900 slit-lamp with a Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera and an FF 450 plus Fundus Camera with VISUPAC™ Digital Imaging System. Images were graded post hoc by a reviewer blinded to diagnosis. Results: Nine users acquired 719 useable images and 253 videos of 229 patients. Mean image quality was ≥ 4.0/5.0 (able to exclude subtle findings) for all users. 8/8 users and 189/210 patients surveyed were comfortable with the EyeGo device on a 5-point Likert scale. For 21 patients imaged with the anterior adapter by two users, a weighted κ of 0.597 (95% confidence interval: 0.389–0.806) indicated moderate reproducibility. High level of agreement between EyeGo and existing clinic cameras (92.6% anterior, 84.4% posterior) was found. Conclusion: The novel, ophthalmic imaging system is easily learned by ancillary eye care providers, well tolerated by patients, and captures high-quality images of eye findings. PMID:27146928

  4. Diagnostic studies of the HxOy-NxOy-O3 photochemical system using data from NASA GTE field expeditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The research effort supported in part by the subject grant focused on three related topics. Our major effort was concentrated on the analysis of data gathered during GTE field expeditions. Ancillary efforts were directed at: the development and application of a Global Chemical Transport Model for the study of the atmospheric reactive nitrogen budget; the development and application of a one-dimensional, time dependent cloud model for the study of the impact of in-cloud aqueous phase chemistry on the atmospheric sulfur budget; and mechanistic studies of the chemical processes involved in dry deposition of ozone to vegetative surfaces. In the sections below, we briefly summarize the central conclusions of each of these efforts. These discussions are followed by a listing of the papers completed during the granting period and the graduate students supported by funds from the grant. Reprints and preprints of all papers completed with support from the grant are attached as appendices.

  5. Reconnaissance Study of Water Quality in the Mining-Affected Aries River Basin, Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Tindall, James A.; Sardan, Daniel; Fey, David L.; Poputa, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Aries River basin of western Romania has been subject to mining activities as far back as Roman times. Present mining activities are associated with the extraction and processing of various metals including Au, Cu, Pb, and Zn. To understand the effects of these mining activities on the environment, this study focused on three objectives: (1) establish a baseline set of physical parameters, and water- and sediment-associated concentrations of metals in river-valley floors and floodplains; (2) establish a baseline set of physical and chemical measurements of pore water and sediment in tailings; and (3) provide training in sediment and water sampling to personnel in the National Agency for Mineral Resources and the Rosia Poieni Mine. This report summarizes basin findings of physical parameters and chemistry (sediment and water), and ancillary data collected during the low-flow synoptic sampling of May 2006.

  6. Sensitivity studies for space-based measurement of atmospheric total column carbon dioxide by reflected sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S Randolph

    2004-02-01

    The feasibility of making space-based carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon-cycle studies is explored. With the proposed detection method, we use absorption of reflected sunlight near 1.58 microm. The results indicate that the small (degrees 1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable provided that an adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable. Modification of the sunlight path by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could, however, lead to systematic errors in the CO2 column retrieval; therefore ancillary aerosol and cloud data are important to reduce errors. Precise measurement of surface pressure and good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile are also required. PMID:14960086

  7. Comparative study of ultrasonography and oral cholecystography in evaluation of gallbladder and biliary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Paul, Y; Sarin, N K; Dhiman, D S; Kaushik, N K

    1991-07-01

    50 cases, aged between 14-60 years, clinically suspected of gall-bladder and biliary tract diseases were evaluated by ultrasonography and oral cholecystography. Ultrasound with a preliminary radiograph of gallbladder region, proved to be more sensitive and reliable procedure than oral cholecystography. Besides providing ancillary information regarding adjacent anatomic structures, it also guided the surgeon to decide preoperatively about the mode of surgery to be employed. Further, from the present study it can be fairly concluded that ultrasound should be used as the primary screening technique for evaluating gallbladder and biliary tract diseases, after plain skiagram of the gallbladder region, since it is non-invasive, more sensitive than OCG and is devoid of use of contrast media and its toxicity. PMID:1797657

  8. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

    2008-01-17

    There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

  9. High Plains Regional Ground-water Study web site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    Now available on the Internet is a web site for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program- High Plains Regional Ground-Water Study. The purpose of the web site is to provide public access to a wide variety of information on the USGS investigation of the ground-water resources within the High Plains aquifer system. Typical pages on the web site include the following: descriptions of the High Plains NAWQA, the National NAWQA Program, the study-area setting, current and past activities, significant findings, chemical and ancillary data (which can be downloaded), listing and access to publications, links to other sites about the High Plains area, and links to other web sites studying High Plains ground-water resources. The High Plains aquifer is a regional aquifer system that underlies 174,000 square miles in parts of eight States (Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming). Because the study area is so large, the Internet is an ideal way to provide project data and information on a near real-time basis. The web site will be a collection of living documents where project data and information are updated as it becomes available throughout the life of the project. If you have an interest in the High Plains area, you can check this site periodically to learn how the High Plains NAWQA activities are progressing over time and access new data and publications as they become available.

  10. In vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen by using high-resolution microendoscopy system under endoscopic ultrasound guidance: A preliminary study using a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Shin, Dongsuk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Coghlan, Lezlee; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful to obtain specimens from lesions underlying deep parts of the liver and spleen. However, the development of novel ancillary techniques must be explored to reduce the number of needle passes and potential adverse effects during this procedure. We conducted an animal study using a swine to demonstrate technical feasibility of in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the high-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) system under EUS guidance. We successfully performed the study. No significant acute adverse events occurred during the procedure. The HRME system could obtain clear images representing cytology-level morphology of spleen and liver. Hence, it is found out that in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the HRME system under EUS guidance is technically feasible. PMID:27503155

  11. The Role of Postmortem Studies in Pneumonia Etiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Bunthi, Charatdao; Wonodi, Chizoba B.; Morpeth, Susan C.; Molyneux, Catherine S.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Levine, Orin S.; Murdoch, David R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of etiology in severe pneumonia remains a challenging area. Postmortem lung tissue potentially increases the sensitivity of investigations for identification of causative pathogens in fatal cases of pneumonia and can confirm antemortem microbiological diagnoses. Tissue sampling allows assessment of histological patterns of disease and ancillary immunohistochemical or molecular diagnostic techniques. It may also enhance the recognition of noninfectious conditions that clinically simulate acute pneumonia. Biobanking of lung tissue or postmortem culture isolates offers opportunities for new pathogen discovery and research into host-pathogen interactions. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study proposes a percutaneous needle biopsy approach to obtain postmortem samples, rather than a full open autopsy. This has the advantage of greater acceptability to relatives, but risks greater sampling error. Both approaches may be susceptible to microbiological contamination or pathogen degradation. However, previous autopsy studies have confirmed the value of histological examination in revealing unsuspected pathogens and influencing clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of future pneumonia cases. PMID:22403232

  12. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) laser studies. Volume 1: Laser environmental impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The environmental impact of space to Earth power transmission using space borne laser subsystems is emphasized. A laser system is defined, estimates of relevant efficiencies for laser power generation and atmospheric transmission are developed, and a comparison is made to a microwave system. Ancillary issues, such as laser beam spreading, safety and security, mass and volume estimates and technology growth are considered.

  13. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  14. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Input Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, B.; Orwig, K.; McCaa, J. R.; Harrold, S.; Draxl, C.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.

    2013-12-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States, such as the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), and Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS), perform detailed simulations of the power system to determine the impact of high wind and solar energy penetrations on power systems operations. Some of the specific aspects examined include: infrastructure requirements, impacts on grid operations and conventional generators, ancillary service requirements, as well as the benefits of geographic diversity and forecasting. These studies require geographically broad and temporally consistent wind and solar power production input datasets that realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of wind and solar power plant production, and are time-synchronous with load profiles. The original western and eastern wind datasets were generated independently for 2004-2006 using numerical weather prediction (NWP) models run on a ~2 km grid with 10-minute resolution. Each utilized its own site selection process to augment existing wind plants with simulated sites of high development potential. The original dataset also included day-ahead simulated forecasts. These datasets were the first of their kind and many lessons were learned from their development. For example, the modeling approach used generated periodic false ramps that later had to be removed due to unrealistic impacts on ancillary service requirements. For several years, stakeholders have been requesting an updated dataset that: 1) covers more recent years; 2) spans four or more years to better evaluate interannual variability; 3) uses improved methods to minimize false ramps and spatial seams; 4) better incorporates solar power production inputs; and 5) is more easily accessible. To address these needs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Solar Programs have funded two

  15. The development of the geographic image cognition approach on studying land degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Yongqi; Liu, Aixia; He, Ting; Lv, Chunyan

    2010-04-01

    For the extraction of land degradation information we should use not only information on climate, soil, vegetation, physiognomy, land use and its productivities, but also the knowledge and methodologies of geosciences. It is of importance to study some conceptual issues about geographic image cognition (GEOIC) on studying land degradation. The study is to discuss some conceptual issues and the theoretical background of the approach of geographic image cognition (GEOIC) on studying land degradation for building its methodological framework. Some issues concerning the approach of GEOIC on studying land degradation, especially the factors of impacting human's visual cognition, were discussed. The results indicated that the GEOIC is the objectification cognition on remote sensing images and multi-source information using geo-knowledge. As an integrated approach, it is the extension of the methodology of OBIA. The key objective of the GEOIC on studying land degradation is to simulate the function and process of the visual interpretation by experts, and extract spatial features, spatial object and spatial pattern of land degradation under the cognition mode of feature-object-pattern from remote sensing images and multi-source information. The methodology of the GEOIC is realized through the segmentation of geo-objects or meaningful image objects using remote sensing information, geographic information, vegetation, soil, and other ancillary information with geosciences knowledge and intelligence.

  16. Rationale and Design of the Echocardiographic Study of Hispanics / Latinos (ECHO-SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Dharod, Ajay; Allison, Matthew A.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Hurwitz, Barry; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Kitzman, Dalane; Gillam, Linda; Spevack, Daniel; Dadhania, Rupal; Langdon, Sarah; Kaplan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Information regarding the prevalence and determinants of cardiac structure and function (systolic and diastolic) among the various Hispanic background groups in the United States is limited. Methods and Results The Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL) ancillary study recruited 1,824 participants through a stratified-sampling process representative of the population-based Hispanic Communities Health StudyStudy of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) across four sites (Bronx, NY; Chicago, Ill; San Diego, Calif; Miami, Fla). The HCHS-SOL baseline cohort did not include an echo exam. ECHO-SOL added the echocardiographic assessment of cardiac structure and function to an array of existing HCHS-SOL baseline clinical, psychosocial, and socioeconomic data and provides sufficient statistical power for comparisons among the Hispanic subgroups. Standard two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography protocol, including M-mode, spectral, color and tissue Doppler study was performed. The main objectives were to: 1) characterize cardiac structure and function and its determinants among Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups; and 2) determine the contributions of specific psychosocial factors (acculturation and familismo) to cardiac structure and function among Hispanics. Conclusion We describe the design, methods and rationale of currently the largest and most comprehensive study of cardiac structure and function exclusively among US Hispanics. ECHO-SOL aims to enhance our understanding of Hispanic cardiovascular health as well as help untangle the relative importance of Hispanic subgroup heterogeneity and sociocultural factors on cardiac structure and function. (Ethn Dis. 2015;25[2]:180–186) PMID:26118146

  17. Sleep and risk for high blood pressure and hypertension in midlife women: the SWAN (Study of Women’s Health across the Nation) Sleep Study

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Karen A.; Chang, Yuefang; Kravitz, Howard M.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Owens, Jane F.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Hall, Martica H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inadequate self-reported sleep is related to high blood pressure (BP). Our study investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between poor sleep measured by in-home polysomnography (PSG) and BP. Methods Midlife participants (132 black, 164 white, and 59 Chinese) were from the SWAN (Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation) ancillary sleep study. In-home PSG measured sleep apnea, duration, efficiency, and electroencephalogram (EEG) total delta and beta power during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Women subsequently were followed annually for 4.5 (1–7) years for BP and hypertensive status (>140/90 mmHg or use of antihypertensive medication). Covariates were age, race, site, and educational attainment, with time-varying covariates of BP medications, body mass index, diabetes mellitus (DM), cigarette smoking, and menopausal status. Results Sleep duration and efficiency were unrelated to BP cross-sectionally or longitudinally in multivariate models. Women with higher total beta power were more likely to be hypertensive at the time of the sleep study; women with lower total delta power were more likely to show increases in diastolic BP (DBP) and to be at risk for incident hypertension across follow-up. Conclusions Low NREM delta power may be a risk factor for future hypertension. Quantitative EEG measures are worthy of future investigations of hypertension risk. PMID:24360982

  18. Overview of receptor-based source apportionment studies for speciated atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.; Xu, X.; Zhang, L.

    2015-07-01

    Receptor-based source apportionment studies of speciated atmospheric mercury are not only concerned with source contributions but also with the influence of transport, transformation, and deposition processes on speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations at receptor locations. Previous studies applied multivariate receptor models including principal components analysis and positive matrix factorization, and back trajectory receptor models including potential source contribution function, gridded frequency distributions, and concentration-back trajectory models. Combustion sources (e.g., coal combustion, biomass burning, and vehicular, industrial and waste incineration emissions), crustal/soil dust, and chemical and physical processes, such as gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) oxidation reactions, boundary layer mixing, and GEM flux from surfaces were inferred from the multivariate studies, which were predominantly conducted at receptor sites in Canada and the US. Back trajectory receptor models revealed potential impacts of large industrial areas such as the Ohio River valley in the US and throughout China, metal smelters, mercury evasion from the ocean and the Great Lakes, and free troposphere transport on receptor measurements. Input data and model parameters specific to atmospheric mercury receptor models are summarized and model strengths and weaknesses are also discussed. Multivariate models are suitable for receptor locations with intensive air monitoring because they require long-term collocated and simultaneous measurements of speciated atmospheric Hg and ancillary pollutants. The multivariate models provide more insight about the types of Hg emission sources and Hg processes that could affect speciated atmospheric Hg at a receptor location, whereas back trajectory receptor models are mainly ideal for identifying potential regional Hg source locations impacting elevated Hg concentrations. Interpretation of the multivariate model output to sources can be

  19. The Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study of the Elderly: A description of methods

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Nicole E.; Percac-Lima, Sanja; Kurlinski, Laura A.; Thomas, Julia C.; Landry, Paige M.; Campbell, Braidie; Latham, Nancy; Ni, Pengsheng; Jette, Alan; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the methods of a longitudinal cohort study among older adults with preclinical disability. The study aims to address the lack of evidence guiding mobility rehabilitation for older adults by identifying those impairments and impairment combinations that are most responsible for mobility decline and disability progression over 2 years of follow up. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Metropolitan based healthcare system in the US Participants Community dwelling primary care patients ≥ 65 years (N=430), with self-reported modification of mobility tasks due to underlying health conditions. Interventions: Not Applicable Main Outcome Measures Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) (primary outcome), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and 400 meter walk test (secondary outcomes) Results Among 7403 primary care patients identified as being potentially eligible for participation, 430 were enrolled. Participants have a mean age of 76.5 years, are 68% women and have on average 4.2 chronic conditions. Mean LLFDI scores are 55.5 for Function and 68.9 and 52.3 for the Disability Limitation and Frequency domains, respectively. Conclusions Completion of our study aims will inform development of primary care-based rehabilitative strategies to prevent disability. Additionally, data generated in this investigation can also serve as a vital resource for ancillary studies addressing important questions in rehabilitative science relevant to geriatric care. PMID:22989700

  20. Analysis of ABCG2 and other urate transporters in uric acid homeostasis in chronic kidney disease: potential role of remote sensing and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin L.; Wu, Wei; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Jeff, Janina; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD), altered extra-renal urate handling may be necessary to regulate plasma uric acid. The Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Nigam S. What do drug transporters really do? Nat Rev Drug Discov 2015; 14: 29–44) suggests that multispecific solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in different tissues are part of an inter-organ communication system that maintains levels of urate and other metabolites after organ injury. Methods Data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; n = 3598) were used to study associations between serum uric acid and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the following uric acid transporters: ABCG2 (BRCP), SLC22A6 (OAT1), SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A10 (OAT5), SLC22A11 (OAT4), SLC22A12 (URAT1), SLC22A13 (OAT10), SLC17A1-A3 (NPTs), SLC2A9 (GLUT9), ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCC4 (MRP4). Regression models, controlling for principal components age, gender and renal function, were run separately for those of European (EA) and African ancestry (AA), and P-values corrected for multiple comparisons. A twin cohort with participants of EA and normal renal function was used for comparison. Results Among those of EA in CRIC, statistically significant signals were observed for SNPs in ABCG2 (rs4148157; beta-coefficient = 0.68; P = 4.78E-13) and SNPs in SLC2A9 (rs13125646; beta-coefficient = −0.30; P = 1.06E-5). Among those of AA, the strongest (but not statistically significant) signals were observed for SNPs in SLC2A9, followed by SNPs in ABCG2. In the twin study (normal renal function), only SNPs in SLC2A9 were significant (rs4481233; beta-coefficient=−0.45; P = 7.0E-6). In CRIC, weaker associations were also found for SLC17A3 (NPT4) and gender-specific associations found for SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A11 (OAT4), and ABCC4 (MRP4). Conclusions In patients of EA with CKD (CRIC cohort), we found striking associations between uric acid and SNPs on ABCG2, a key transporter

  1. Aortic Pulse Pressure Is Associated With Carotid IMT in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

    PubMed Central

    DeLoach, S.S.; Appel, L.J.; Chen, J.; Joffe, M.M.; Gadegbeku, C.A.; Mohler, E.R.; Parsa, A.; Perumal, K.; Rafey, M.A.; Steigerwalt, S.P.; Teal, V.; Townsend, R.R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a disproportionate risk of cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to assess the association between two noninvasive measures of cardiovascular risk, pulse wave analysis (PWA), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), in a cohort of CKD patients enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Methods Three hundred and sixty-seven subjects with CKD enrolled in the CRIC study at the University of Pennsylvania site (mean age 59.9 years, blood pressure 129/74 mm Hg, estimated glomerular filtration rate 48 ml/min/1.73 m2, IMT 0.8 mm) had both carotid IMT and PWA measurements. Carotid ultrasound was also used to determine the presence of plaque. PWA was used to determine augmentation index (AI), amplification ratio (AMPR), aortic pulse pressure (C_PP), and central aortic systolic pressure (C_SP). Results IMT was significantly associated with all PWA-derived measures. However, on multivariable linear regression analysis, only AMPR (regression coefficient −0.072, P = 0.006), C_PP (regression coefficient 0.0025, P < 0.001), and C_SP (regression coefficient 0.0017, P < 0.001) remained significantly associated with IMT. The prevalence of carotid plaque in the cohort was 59%. Of the PWA-derived measures, only C_PP was significantly associated with the presence of carotid plaque (P < 0.001). Conclusions PWA-derived measures are associated with carotid IMT and plaque in the CKD. Of these measures, C_PP was most associated with carotid IMT and plaque. PMID:19779470

  2. Prediction of true test scores from observed item scores and ancillary data.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Yao, Lili; Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-05-01

    In many educational tests which involve constructed responses, a traditional test score is obtained by adding together item scores obtained through holistic scoring by trained human raters. For example, this practice was used until 2008 in the case of GRE(®) General Analytical Writing and until 2009 in the case of TOEFL(®) iBT Writing. With use of natural language processing, it is possible to obtain additional information concerning item responses from computer programs such as e-rater(®). In addition, available information relevant to examinee performance may include scores on related tests. We suggest application of standard results from classical test theory to the available data to obtain best linear predictors of true traditional test scores. In performing such analysis, we require estimation of variances and covariances of measurement errors, a task which can be quite difficult in the case of tests with limited numbers of items and with multiple measurements per item. As a consequence, a new estimation method is suggested based on samples of examinees who have taken an assessment more than once. Such samples are typically not random samples of the general population of examinees, so that we apply statistical adjustment methods to obtain the needed estimated variances and covariances of measurement errors. To examine practical implications of the suggested methods of analysis, applications are made to GRE General Analytical Writing and TOEFL iBT Writing. Results obtained indicate that substantial improvements are possible both in terms of reliability of scoring and in terms of assessment reliability. PMID:25773314

  3. Augmenting watershed model calibration with incorporation of ancillary data sources and qualitative soft data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed simulation models can be calibrated using “hard data” such as temporal streamflow observations; however, users may find upon examination of detailed outputs that some of the calibrated models may not reflect summative actual watershed behavior. Thus, it is necessary to use “soft data” (i....

  4. 30 CFR 250.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  5. TPZ: photometric redshift PDFs and ancillary information by using prediction trees and random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process, has become increasingly important. In this paper, we present a new, publicly available, parallel, machine learning algorithm that generates photometric redshift PDFs by using prediction trees and random forest techniques, which we have named TPZ.1 This new algorithm incorporates measurement errors into the calculation while also dealing efficiently with missing values in the data. In addition, our implementation of this algorithm provides supplementary information regarding the data being analysed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used to construct the PDF, and a robust identification of outliers. This extra information can be used to optimally target new spectroscopic observations and to improve the overall efficacy of the redshift estimation. We have tested TPZ on galaxy samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample and from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe-2 (DEEP2) survey, obtaining excellent results in each case. We also have tested our implementation by participating in the PHAT1 project, which is a blind photometric redshift contest, finding that TPZ performs comparable to if not better than other empirical photometric redshift algorithms. Finally, we discuss the various parameters that control the operation of TPZ, the specific limitations of this approach and an application of photometric redshift PDFs.

  6. Cysteine cathepsins and cystatins: from ancillary tasks to prominent status in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Lalmanach, Gilles; Saidi, Ahlame; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Lecaille, Fabien; Kasabova, Mariana

    2015-02-01

    Human cysteine cathepsins (family C1, clan CA) have long been regarded as ubiquitous household enzymes, primarily involved in the recycling and degradation of proteins in lysosomes. This opinion has changed considerably during recent decades, however, with the demonstration of their involvement in various physiological processes. A growing body of evidence supports the theory that cathepsins play specific functions in lung homeostasis and pathophysiological events such as asthma, lung fibrosis (including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (embracing emphysema and chronic bronchitis), silicosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia or tumor invasion. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the current knowledge of the role of these enzymes in the lung. Particular attention has been paid to the understanding of the role of these proteases and their natural inhibitors, cystatins (family I25, clan IH), in TGF-β1-driven fibrotic processes with an emphasis on lung fibrosis. PMID:25178906

  7. Combining multispectral and ancillary data in remote sensing using interval-valued probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Swain, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a method for classifying multisource data in remote sensing and geographic information systems using interval-valued probabilities. In this method, each data source is considered as an information source which provides a body of statistical evidence. In order to integrate information obtained from multiple data sources, the method adopts Dempster's rule for combining multiple bodies of evidence. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken to illustrate the use of the method in a supervised ground-cover classification on multispectral data combined with digital elevation data. They demonstrate the ability of the method in capturing information provided by inexact and incomplete evidence when there are not enough training samples to estimate statistical parameters.

  8. Monitoring landscape change for LANDFIRE using multi-temporal satellite imagery and ancillary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogelmann, James E.; Kost, Jay R.; Tolk, Brian; Howard, Stephen M.; Short, Karen; Chen, Xuexia; Huang, Chengquan; Pabst, Kari; Rollins, Matthew G.

    2011-01-01

    LANDFIRE is a large interagency project designed to provide nationwide spatial data for fire management applications. As part of the effort, many 2000 vintage Landsat Thematic Mapper and Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus data sets were used in conjunction with a large volume of field information to generate detailed vegetation type and structure data sets for the entire United States. In order to keep these data sets current and relevant to resource managers, there was strong need to develop an approach for updating these products. We are using three different approaches for these purposes. These include: 1) updating using Landsat-derived historic and current fire burn information derived from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project; 2) incorporating vegetation disturbance information derived from time series Landsat data analysis using the Vegetation Change Tracker; and 3) developing data products that capture subtle intra-state disturbance such as those related to insects and disease using either Landsat or the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). While no one single approach provides all of the land cover change and update information required, we believe that a combination of all three captures most of the disturbance conditions taking place that have relevance to the fire community.

  9. Challenging nickel-catalysed amine arylations enabled by tailored ancillary ligand design.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Christopher M; MacQueen, Preston M; Rotta-Loria, Nicolas L; Sawatzky, Ryan S; Borzenko, Andrey; Chisholm, Alicia J; Hargreaves, Breanna K V; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Stradiotto, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed C(sp(2))-N cross-coupling (that is, Buchwald-Hartwig amination) is employed widely in synthetic chemistry, including in the pharmaceutical industry, for the synthesis of (hetero)aniline derivatives. However, the cost and relative scarcity of palladium provides motivation for the development of alternative, more Earth-abundant catalysts for such transformations. Here we disclose an operationally simple and air-stable ligand/nickel(II) pre-catalyst that accommodates the broadest combination of C(sp(2))-N coupling partners reported to date for any single nickel catalyst, without the need for a precious-metal co-catalyst. Key to the unprecedented performance of this pre-catalyst is the application of the new, sterically demanding yet electron-poor bisphosphine PAd-DalPhos. Featured are the first reports of nickel-catalysed room temperature reactions involving challenging primary alkylamine and ammonia reaction partners employing an unprecedented scope of electrophiles, including transformations involving sought-after (hetero)aryl mesylates for which no capable catalyst system is known. PMID:27004442

  10. Hydrologic remediation for the Deepwater Horizon incident drove ancillary primary production increase in coastal swamps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Johnson, Darren; Roberts, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    As coastal wetlands subside worldwide, there is an urgency to understand the hydrologic drivers and dynamics of plant production and peat accretion. One incidental test of the effects of high rates of discharge on forested wetland production occurred in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, in which all diversions in Louisiana were operated at or near their maximum discharge level for an extended period to keep offshore oil from threatened coastal wetlands. Davis Pond Diversion was operated at six times the normal discharge levels for almost 4 months, so that Taxodium distichum swamps downstream of the diversion experienced greater inundation and lower salinity. After this remediation event in 2010, above-ground litter production increased by 2.7 times of production levels in 2007–2011. Biomass of the leaf and reproductive tissues of several species increased; wood litter was minimal and did not change during this period. Root production decreased in 2010 but subsequently returned to pre-remediation values in 2011. Both litter and root production remained high in the second growing season after hydrologic remediation. Annual tree growth (circumference increment) was not significantly altered by the remediation. The potential of freshwater pulses for regulating tidal swamp production is further supported by observations of higher T. distichum growth in lower salinity and/or pulsed environments across the U.S. Gulf Coast. Usage of freshwater pulses to manage altered estuaries deserves further consideration, particularly because the timing and duration of such pulses could influence both primary production and peat accretion.

  11. Ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation on-line low cost sulfur and ash analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.

    1991-07-01

    A program of design, fabrication, and field testing of an on-line sulfur and ash analyzer was undertaken by The Babcock Wilcox Company. The analyzer is intended for use on coal slurry streams such as those found at coal cleaning facilities. The analyzer design consists of a sample preparation and delivery system (SPAD) and an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The program consisted of the following major tasks: Selection and screening of delivery systems; Design of the analyzer system; Fabrication of SPAD system; Field testing of the SPAD system; and Laboratory ICP testing of field collected samples. The field testing was conducted at CQ Inc., (Homer City, Pa. pilot plant). Testing was completed without taking the ICP to the field, since the analysis of coal slurry by ICP had been demonstrated during the delivery system screening tests and the field tests were aimed primarily at demonstrating the performance of the SPAD system. Although the ICP was not deployed to the field, the subsequent laboratory testing of field collected samples simulated the performance of the entire system. 16 refs., 103 figs., 38 tabs.

  12. Ancillary ligand-free copper catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with NH2NH2.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jesse L; Jazzar, Rodolphe; Melaimi, Mohand; Bertrand, Guy

    2016-02-14

    An efficient and selective Cu-catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with parent hydrazine is reported. The methodology tolerates a broad range of functional groups, allows for the synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical azines, and can be extended to hydrazine derivatives and amines. PMID:26757745

  13. SPDF Ancillary Services and Technologies Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B. T.; Hills, H. K.; Johnson, R. C.; Kovalick, T. J.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H. A.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D. A.; Yurow, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The primary data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) now or soon to be supporting direct and correlative analysis of MMS survey and burst science data products are discussed in the McGuire et.al. paper "SPDF Data and Orbit Services Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data." This present paper will review additional services and elements of the SPDF program relevant to SPDF's support of MMS and SPDF's broader long-term role as an active heliophysics final archive. Specific topics include - Additional detail on options and APIs for accessing data in SPDF; - Status and plans for the Common Data Format (CDF) and ISTP/SPDF metadata standard, including extension of the metadata standard to planned science data in netCDF from the upcoming GOLD and ICON missions; - Future missions to be supported by SPDF; - Overview and status of MMS and other data descriptions in the Heliophysics Data Portal (HDP)/Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) - Status and plans for the OMNI database and services, as baseline solar wind data for interpreting magnetospheric data such as that of MMS; - An overview of SPDF's ingest and archiving architecture, including our ongoing effort to bring online legacy heliophysics data originally archived at NSSDC. All SPDF data and services are available from the SPDF home page at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov .

  14. Endometrial stromal tumours of the uterus: a practical approach using conventional morphology and ancillary techniques

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patricia; Oliva, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Endometrial stromal tumours (ESTs) are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Often, the greatest challenge is to distinguish between the different subtypes of these tumours. Furthermore, a handful of new or relatively new entities have been described in the literature, which may cause problems in the differential diagnosis; highly cellular leiomyoma is the most common. In addition, new antibodies have been developed to help in the distinction of ESTs from their mimics, as there are prognostic and therapeutic implications. A practical approach is provided for the diagnosis of ESTs on the basis of systematic assessment of histological and immunohistochemical parameters, and recent developments related to these tumours are highlighted. PMID:17347285

  15. Titanium(IV) catalysts with ancillary imino-spiroketonato ligands: synthesis, structure and olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuguo; Lobkovsky, Emil B; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2015-07-21

    New titanium(IV) complexes having two bidentate β-iminoethyl-spiro[4,5]decan-6-onato ligands with various N-aryl substituents have been synthesized. X-ray crystal structure analysis reveals that these titanium complexes all exhibit a C2-symmetric conformation with a distorted octahedral geometry, although the specific orientation of the ligands around the titanium center varies with the identity of the N-aryl moiety. Upon activation with methylaluminoxane (MAO), these complexes catalyze the polymerization of ethylene and propylene. In the case of ethylene, most complexes exhibit the characteristics of a living polymerization between 0 °C and 25 °C, producing polyethylenes with narrow molecular weight distributions and number average molecular weights up to 100,000 g/mol. Depending on the N-aryl substituents, polymerizations of propylene result in products with tacticity ranging from slightly syndiotactic to slightly isotactic. PMID:25984908

  16. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of incidental trading activities for portfolio management purposes; and (3) Are limited to risk... governing body of the dealer and included in the internal risk management control system for the dealer... portfolio management securities activities. 240.3b-15 Section 240.3b-15 Commodity and Securities...

  17. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of incidental trading activities for portfolio management purposes; and (3) Are limited to risk... governing body of the dealer and included in the internal risk management control system for the dealer... portfolio management securities activities. 240.3b-15 Section 240.3b-15 Commodity and Securities...

  18. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of incidental trading activities for portfolio management purposes; and (3) Are limited to risk... governing body of the dealer and included in the internal risk management control system for the dealer... portfolio management securities activities. 240.3b-15 Section 240.3b-15 Commodity and Securities...

  19. Challenging nickel-catalysed amine arylations enabled by tailored ancillary ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Christopher M.; MacQueen, Preston M.; Rotta-Loria, Nicolas L.; Sawatzky, Ryan S.; Borzenko, Andrey; Chisholm, Alicia J.; Hargreaves, Breanna K. V.; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J.; Stradiotto, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed C(sp2)–N cross-coupling (that is, Buchwald–Hartwig amination) is employed widely in synthetic chemistry, including in the pharmaceutical industry, for the synthesis of (hetero)aniline derivatives. However, the cost and relative scarcity of palladium provides motivation for the development of alternative, more Earth-abundant catalysts for such transformations. Here we disclose an operationally simple and air-stable ligand/nickel(II) pre-catalyst that accommodates the broadest combination of C(sp2)–N coupling partners reported to date for any single nickel catalyst, without the need for a precious-metal co-catalyst. Key to the unprecedented performance of this pre-catalyst is the application of the new, sterically demanding yet electron-poor bisphosphine PAd-DalPhos. Featured are the first reports of nickel-catalysed room temperature reactions involving challenging primary alkylamine and ammonia reaction partners employing an unprecedented scope of electrophiles, including transformations involving sought-after (hetero)aryl mesylates for which no capable catalyst system is known. PMID:27004442

  20. 47 CFR 25.149 - Application requirements for ancillary terrestrial components in Mobile-Satellite Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MSS ATC systems shall maintain an in-orbit spare satellite. (ii) Operational GSO MSS ATC systems shall maintain a spare satellite on the ground within one year of commencing operations and launch it into...

  1. Ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation on-line low cost sulfur and ash analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the testing to be performed on field collected coal slurry samples by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy). A total of 20 samples (8 from an Upper Freeport coal and 12 from an Oklahoma coal) are to be analyzed in triplicate for the elements S, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, and Mg. For each of the two coal slurry types (Upper Freeport and Oklahoma), a container of slurry labeled calibration'' has been prepared. These calibration slurries may be used to get the system tuned'' (note that the volume of the field collected slurries is relatively small and cannot be used to tune'' the system). The calibration slurries were made from the slurry collected from the drain from the second sampling stage during the field testing.

  2. [Radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities]. Monthly technical progress report, 1 April--28 April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Tehnical progress achieved during this period on radioisotope thermoelectric generators is described under the following tasks: engineering support, safety analysis, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication/assembly/test, RTG shipping/launch support, design/review/mission applications, and project management/quality assurance/reliability.

  3. Unusually Efficient Pyridine Photodissociation from Ru(II) Complexes with Sterically Bulky Bidentate Ancillary Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of steric bulk to the bidentate ligand in [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(py)]2+ (1; tpy = 2,2′:2′,6″-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine; py = pyridine) to provide [Ru(tpy)(Me2bpy)(py)]2+ (2; Me2bpy = 6,6′-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine) and [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)]2+ (3; biq = 2,2′-biquinoline) facilitates photoinduced dissociation of pyridine with visible light. Upon irradiation of 2 and 3 in CH3CN (λirr = 500 nm), ligand exchange occurs to produce the corresponding [Ru(tpy)(NN)(NCCH3)]2+ (NN = Me2bpy, biq) complex with quantum yields, Φ500, of 0.16(1) and 0.033(1) for 2 and 3, respectively. These values represent an increase in efficiency of the reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude as compared to that of 1, Φ500 < 0.0001, under similar experimental conditions. The photolysis of 2 and 3 in H2O with low energy light to produce [Ru(tpy)(NN)(OH2)]2+ (NN = Me2bpy, biq) also proceeds rapidly (λirr > 590 nm). Complexes 1–3 are stable in the dark in both CH3CN and H2O under similar experimental conditions. X-ray crystal structures and theoretical calculations highlight significant distortion of the planes of the bidentate ligands in 2 and 3 relative to that of 1. The crystallographic dihedral angles defined by the bidentate ligand, Me2bpy in 2 and biq in 3, and the tpy ligand were determined to be 67.87° and 61.89°, respectively, whereas only a small distortion from the octahedral geometry is observed between bpy and tpy in 1, 83.34°. The steric bulk afforded by Me2bpy and biq also result in major distortions of the pyridine ligand in 2 and 3, respectively, relative to 1, which are believed to weaken its σ-bonding and π-back-bonding to the metal and play a crucial role in the efficiency of the photoinduced ligand exchange. The ability of 2 and 3 to undergo ligand exchange with λirr > 590 nm makes them potential candidates to build photochemotherapeutic agents for the delivery of drugs with pyridine binding groups. PMID:25027458

  4. Incorporating ancillary data into the inversion of airborne time-domain electromagnetic data for hydrogeological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapia, Vincenzo; Oldenborger, Greg A.; Viezzoli, Andrea; Marchetti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (HTEM) surveys often suffer from significant inaccuracies in the early-time or near-surface data—a problem that can lead to errors in the inverse model or limited near-surface resolution in the event that early time gates are removed. We present an example illustrating the use of seismic data to constrain the model recovered from an HTEM survey over the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer in Manitoba, Canada. The incorporation of seismic reflection surfaces results in improved near-surface resistivity in addition to a more continuous bedrock interface with a sharper contact. The seismic constraints reduce uncertainty in the resistivity values of the overlying layers, although no a priori information is added directly to those layers. Subsequently, we use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and borehole data to verify the constrained HTEM models. Treating the ERT and borehole logs as reference information, we perform an iterative time-shift calibration of the HTEM soundings to achieve regional-scale consistency between the recovered HTEM models and the reference information. Given the relatively small time-shifts employed, this calibration procedure most significantly affects the early-time data and brings the first useable time gate to a time earlier than the nominal first gate after ramp off. Although time shifts are small, changes in the model are observed from the near-surface to depths of 100 m. Calibration is combined with seismic constraints to achieve a model with the greatest level of consistency between data sets and, thus, the greatest degree of confidence. For the Spiritwood buried valley, calibrated and constrained models reveal more structure in the valley-fill sediments and increased continuity of the bedrock contact.

  5. Mechanistic elucidation of linker and ancillary ligand substitution reactions in Pt(II) dinuclear complexes.

    PubMed

    Ongoma, Peter O; Jaganyi, Deogratius

    2013-02-28

    The rate of substitution of aqua ligands by three nucleophiles, thiourea (TU), N,N-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and N,N,N,N-tetramethylthiourea (TMTU), for the complexes [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,3-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,3pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,5-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,5pzn) and [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,6-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,6pzn) was investigated under pseudo first-order conditions as a function of concentration and temperature by stopped-flow and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The reaction proceeded in three consecutive steps; each step follows first order kinetics with respect to each complex and nucleophile. The pseudo first-order rate constants, k(obs(1/2/3)), for sequential substitution of the aqua ligands and subsequent displacement of the linker obeyed the rate law: k(obs(1/2/3)) = k((1/2/3))[nucleophile]. The steric hindrance properties of the pyrazine-bridging ligand control the overall reaction pattern. The order of reactivity of the complexes is 2,3pzn ≈ 2,5pzn < 2,6pzn < pzn. The difference in reactivity attributed to the steric crowding at the Pt(II) centre imposed by the methyl groups reduces the lability of the aqua complexes. The order of reactivity of the nucleophiles decreases with the increase in steric demand TU > DMTU > TMTU. 1H and 195Pt NMR spectroscopic results confirmed the observed dissociation of the bridging ligand from the metal centre of the cis-dinuclear complexes and its derivatives in the third step. The dissociation process is accelerated by the introduction of the steric effect on the linker in conjunction with the increased ligand field strength imparted by additional thiourea ligands at each metal centre. The large negative entropy of activation ΔS(≠) values in all cases support an associative substitution mechanism. PMID:23223554

  6. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of incidental trading activities for portfolio management purposes; and (3) Are limited to risk... governing body of the dealer and included in the internal risk management control system for the dealer... portfolio management securities activities. 240.3b-15 Section 240.3b-15 Commodity and Securities...

  7. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of incidental trading activities for portfolio management purposes; and (3) Are limited to risk... governing body of the dealer and included in the internal risk management control system for the dealer... portfolio management securities activities. 240.3b-15 Section 240.3b-15 Commodity and Securities...

  8. Ancillary benefits for climate change mitigation and air pollution control in the world's motor vehicle fleets.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    The global motor vehicle population has grown very rapidly in the past half century and is expected to continue to grow rapidly for the next several decades, especially in developing countries. As a result, vehicles are a major source of urban air pollution in many cities and are the fastest-growing source of greenhouse emissions. Strategies exist to reduce both problems, but many countries emphasize one over the other rather than pursuing strategies that reduce both concerns. Using diesel as an example, this article illustrates that it is now possible not only to reduce carbon dioxide with the increased use of diesel vehicles but also to improve urban air pollution. Doing so requires both stringent emissions regulations and clean fuels. Several principles contained in the Bellagio Memorandum are highlighted as guides for policy makers. PMID:18173380

  9. Annual peak streamflow and ancillary data for small watersheds in central and western Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.; Asquith, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of annual peak-streamflow frequency are needed for flood-plain management, assessment of flood risk, and design of structures, such as roads, bridges, culverts, dams, and levees. Regional regression equations have been developed and are used extensively to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged sites in natural (unregulated and rural or nonurbanized) watersheds in Texas (Asquith and Slade, 1997; Asquith and Thompson, 2008; Asquith and Roussel, 2009). The most recent regional regression equations were developed by using data from 638 Texas streamflow-gaging stations throughout the State with eight or more years of data by using drainage area, channel slope, and mean annual precipitation as predictor variables (Asquith and Roussel, 2009). However, because of a lack of sufficient historical streamflow data from small, rural watersheds in certain parts of the State (central and western), substantial uncertainity exists when using the regional regression equations for the purpose of estimating annual peak-streamflow frequency.

  10. Industrial Use of Distributed Generation in Real-Time Energy and Ancillary Service Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.

    2001-10-24

    Industrial consumers of energy now have the opportunity to participate directly in electricity generation. This report seeks to give the reader (1) insights into the various types of generation services that distributed generation (DG) units could provide, (2) a mechanism to evaluate the economics of using DG, (3) an overview of the status of DG deployment in selected states, and (4) a summary of the communication technologies involved with DG and what testing activities are needed to encourage industrial application of DG. Section 1 provides details on electricity markets and the types of services that can be offered. Subsequent sections in the report address the technical requirements for participating in such markets, the economic decision process that an industrial energy user should go through in evaluating distributed generation, the status of current deployment efforts, and the requirements for test-bed or field demonstration projects.

  11. NASA Glenn Research Center's Fuel Cell Stack, Ancillary and System Test and Development Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia L.; Prokopius, Kevin P.; Becks, Larry A.; Burger, Thomas H.; Dick, Joseph F.; Rodriguez, George; Bremenour, Frank; Long, Zedock

    2011-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a fully operational fuel cell test and evaluation laboratory is available which is capable of evaluating fuel cell components and systems for future NASA missions. Components and subsystems of various types can be operated and monitored under a variety of conditions utilizing different reactants. This fuel cell facility can test the effectiveness of various component and system designs to meet NASA's needs.

  12. Summary of Mercury Compatibility Issues for the Spallation Neutron Source Target Containment and Ancillary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2003-04-08

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the primary results of the Hg compatibility research in support of the SNS target. In the absence of possible synergisms resulting from beam/irradiation effects, wetting of 316L/316LN stainless steel under SNS conditions by the Hg target is expected to be very limited. As a result, significant interactions such as dissolution, mass transfer, and embrittlement affecting general compatibility are not anticipated. A wide range of experiments on 316L/316LN stainless steel, including thermal convection and pumped loops, confirmed low corrosion/penetration rates in Hg up to 305 C and little or no wetting or mass transfer below about 250 C. A variety of standard mechanical tests comparing behavior of 316L in air and Hg revealed limited wetting and no degradation of mechanical properties such as reduced elongation or development of brittle fracture features. Preliminary fatigue tests indicated a negative effect (reduced cycles to failure and intergranular cracking) at very high loads for 316LN, but little or no effect at more modest loading. Annealed 316LN was found to be somewhat susceptible to cavitation-erosion damage, but significant improvement was realized with a kolsterizing surface treatment or coldworking the material. Within the scope of these test conditions, no compatibility-limited operations were identified for type 316L/316LN stainless steel (and variations thereof) as the Hg target containment material. More limited compatibility data on other materials are also reported.

  13. Case Study of Mixed-Phase to Ice Precipitation in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Bennartz, R.; Kulie, M.; Shupe, M.; Turner, D. D.; Walden, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Data from the ICECAPS instrument suite at Summit Station, Greenland are utilized to observe cloud and atmospheric properties over the Greenland Ice Sheet. This study focuses on identifying and analyzing case studies of rapid transitions from mixed-phase clouds and precipitation to ice hydrometeors. Reflectivity values and Doppler velocities from the ICECAPS MilliMeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) in conjunction with ancillary meteorological data are used as input to combined microphysical and microwave radiative transfer simulation system. This modeling system depends on the frozen hydrometeor habits, snow water content, amount and distribution of supercooled water droplets, surface emissivity, and other environmental parameters. Simulated multi-frequency brightness temperatures derived from the model are compared to MicroWave Radiometer (MWR) observations under transition conditions, and sensitivities to model inputs are explored. These closure studies, between active and passive microwave instruments, will lead to a better understanding of the characteristic cloud microphysical and environmental conditions that determine mixed-phase to ice transitions in Arctic clouds.

  14. Endogenous KCNE Subunits Govern Kv2.1 K+ Channel Activation Kinetics in Xenopus Oocyte Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Earl; Roepke, Torsten K.; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    Kv2.1 is a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel that generates delayed rectifier currents in mammalian heart and brain. The biophysical properties of Kv2.1 and other ion channels have been characterized by functional expression in heterologous systems, and most commonly in Xenopus laevis oocytes. A number of previous oocyte-based studies of mammalian potassium channels have revealed expression-level-dependent changes in channel properties, leading to the suggestion that endogenous oocyte factors regulate channel gating. Here, we show that endogenous oocyte potassium channel KCNE ancillary subunits xMinK and xMiRP2 slow the activation of oocyte-expressed mammalian Kv2.1 channels two-to-fourfold. This produces a sigmoidal relationship between Kv2.1 current density and activation rate in oocyte-based two-electrode voltage clamp studies. The effect of endogenous xMiRP2 and xMinK on Kv2.1 activation is diluted at high Kv2.1 expression levels, or by RNAi knockdown of either endogenous subunit. RNAi knockdown of both xMiRP2 and xMinK eliminates the correlation between Kv2.1 expression level and activation kinetics. The data demonstrate a molecular basis for expression-level-dependent changes in Kv channel gating observed in heterologous expression studies. PMID:16326911

  15. Photochemical studies of the Eastern Caribbean: An introductory overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, R.G.; Milne, P.J. ); Zafiriou, O.C. )

    1993-02-15

    This special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research reports a multi-investigator study of a number of sunlight-initiated photoprocesses taking place in the varied biogeochemical and oceanographic environment found in the tropical Eastern Caribbean and Orinoco River delta in the spring and fall of 1988. Principal conceptual themes that were addressed by the program included (1) the characterization of the role of dissolved organic matter as the main chromophore initiating photoprocesses in surface seawater, (2) the determination of the fluxes and pathways of reactants and transient species involved in oxygen photoredox chemistry, and (3) the continuing development of chemical mapping strategies, including observing and modelling reactive phototransient distribution in terms of their sources, mixing, and fates. Ancillary supporting studies included observation of water mass tracers, dissolved trace gases, atmospheric components, nutrients and the geochemistry of estuarine mixing processes in an important continental margin. The observational and mechanistic investigations reported here feature a number of novel or improved methods allied with some advanced underway sampling, sensing and computing facilities that were implemented aboard the R/V Columbus Iselin. Results from the study showed large-scale ([approximately]1,000 km) seasonal variations in surface water photoreactivity, optical and biooptical characteristics over much of the Caribbean basin. These changes resulted from seasonally varying riverine inputs of organic chromophores, nutrients and suspended material. Smaller scale (10-100 km) studies carried out in the Orinoco delta and the Gulf of Paria showed that estuarine mixing processes did not affect major net removal of dissolved organic matter, consistent with the hypothesis that riverine chromophore input plays a dominant role in open-water photochemistry. 56 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Bio-Contamination Control for Spacesuit Garments - A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Korona, Adam; Orndoff, Evelyn; Ott, Mark; Poritz, Darwin

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a preliminary study to review, test, and improve upon the current state of spacesuit bio-contamination control. The study includes an evaluation of current and advanced suit materials, ground and on-orbit cleaning methods, and microbial test and analysis methods. The first aspect of this study was to identify potential anti-microbial textiles and cleaning agents, and to review current microbial test methods. The anti-microbial cleaning agent and textile market survey included a review of current commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products that could potentially be used as future space flight hardware. This review included replacements for any of the softgood layers that may become contaminated during an extravehicular activity (EVA), including the pressure bladder, liquid cooling garment, and ancillary comfort undergarment. After a series of COTS anti-microbial textiles and clean ing agents were identified, a series of four tests were conducted: (1) a stacked configuration test that was conducted in order to review how bio-contamination would propagate through the various suit layers, (2) a individual materials test that evaluated how well each softgood layer either promoted or repressed growth, (3) a cleaning agent test that evaluated the efficacy on each of the baseline bladders, and (4) an evaluation of various COTS anti-microbial textiles. All antimicrobial COTS materials tested appeared to control bacteria colony forming unit (CFU) growth better than the Thermal Comfort Undergarment (TCU) and ACES Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG)/EMU Liquid Cooling Ventilation Garment (LCVG) materials currently in use. However, a comparison of fungi CFU growth in COTS to current suit materials appeared to vary per material. All cleaning agents tested in this study appeared to inhibit the level of bacteria and fungi growth to acceptable levels for short duration tests. While several trends can be obtained from the current analysis, a series of test improvements are

  17. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  18. Incorporation of parametric factors into multilinear receptor model studies of Atlanta aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Hopke, Philip K.; Paatero, Pentti; Edgerton, Eric S.

    In prior work with simulated data, ancillary variables including time resolved wind data were utilized in a multilinear model to successfully reduce rotational ambiguity and increase the number of resolved sources. In this study, time resolved wind and other data were incorporated into a model for the analysis of real measurement data. Twenty-four hour integrated PM 2.5 (particulate matter ⩽2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) compositional data were measured in Atlanta, GA between August 1998 and August 2000 (662 samples). A two-stage model that utilized 22 elemental species, two wind variables, and three time variables was used for this analysis. The model identified nine sources: sulfate-rich secondary aerosol I (54%), gasoline exhaust (15%), diesel exhaust (11%), nitrate-rich secondary aerosol (9%), metal processing (3%), wood smoke (3%), airborne soil (2%), sulfate-rich secondary aerosol II (2%), and the mixture of a cement kiln with a carbon-rich source (0.9%). The results of this study indicate that utilizing time resolved wind measurements aids to separate diesel exhaust from gasoline vehicle exhaust. For most of the sources, well-defined directional profiles, seasonal trends, and weekend effects were obtained.

  19. Telomere length is a prognostic biomarker in elderly advanced ovarian cancer patients: a multicenter GINECO study

    PubMed Central

    Falandry, Claire; Horard, Béatrice; Bruyas, Amandine; Legouffe, Eric; Cretin, Jacques; Meunier, Jérôme; Alexandre, Jérôme; Delecroix, Valérie; Fabbro, Michel; Certain, Marie-Noëlle; Maraval-Gaget, Raymonde; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Gilson, Eric; Freyer, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Age induces a progressive decline in functional reserve and impacts cancer treatments. Telomere attrition leads to tissue senescence. We tested the hypothesis that telomere length (TL) could predict patient vulnerability and outcome with cancer treatment. Patients and methods An ancillary study in the Elderly Women GINECO Trial 3 was performed to evaluate the impact of geriatric covariates on survival in elderly advanced ovarian cancer patients receiving six cycles of carboplatin. TL was estimated from peripheral blood at inclusion using standard procedures. Results TL (in base pairs) was estimated for 109/111 patients (median 6.1 kb; range [4.5-8.3 kb]). With a cut-off of 5.77 kb, TL discriminated two patient groups, long telomere (LT) and short telomeres (ST), with significantly different treatment completion rates of 0.80 (95%CI [0.71-0.89]) and 0.59 (95%CI [0.41-0.76]), respectively (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, p=0.02). ST patients were at higher risk of serious adverse events (SAE, OR=2.7; p=0.02) and had more unplanned hospital admissions (OR=2.1; p=0.08). After adjustment on FIGO stage, TL shorter than 6 kb was a risk factor of premature death (HR=1.57; p=0.06). Conclusion This exploratory study identifies TL as predictive factor of decreased treatment completion, SAE risk, unplanned hospital admissions and OS after adjustment on FIGO stage. PMID:26638179

  20. Neuronal Organization of the Brain in the Adult Amphioxus (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): A Study With Acetylated Tubulin Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio; Becerra, Manuela; Manso, María Jesús; Anadón, Ramón

    2015-10-15

    Amphioxus (Cephalochordata) belongs to the most basal extant chordates, and knowledge of their brain organization appears to be key to deciphering the early stages of evolution of vertebrate brains. Most comprehensive studies of the organization of the central nervous system of adult amphioxus have investigated the spinal cord. Some brain populations have been characterized via neurochemistry and electron microscopy, and the overall cytoarchitecture of the brain was studied by Ekhart et al. (2003; J. Comp. Neurol. 466:319-330) with general staining methods and retrograde transport from the spinal cord. Here, the cytoarchitecture of the brain of adult amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum was reinvestigated by using acetylated tubulin immunohistochemistry, which specifically stains neurons and fibers, in combination with some ancillary methods. This method allowed reproducible staining and mapping of types of neuron, mostly in brain regions caudal to the entrance level of nerve 2, and its comparison with spinal cord populations. The brain populations studied and discussed in detail were the Retzius bipolar cells, lamellate cells, Joseph cells, various types of translumenal cells, somatic motoneurons, Rohde nucleus cells, small ventral multipolar neurons, and Edinger cells. These observations expand our knowledge of the distribution of cell types and provide additional data on the number of cells and the axonal tracts and commissural regions of the adult amphioxus brain. The results of this comprehensive study provide a framework for comparison of complex adult populations with the early brain neuronal populations revealed in developmental studies of the amphioxus. PMID:25846052

  1. Recurrent Major Depression Predicts Progression of Coronary Calcification in Healthy Women: Study of Women’s Health across the Nation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Karen A.; Chang, Yue-Fang; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Bromberger, Joyce T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms and major depression are risk factors for clinical coronary heart disease (CHD) among CHD patients and among healthy individuals. It is less clear whether depression is related to the progression of atherosclerosis prior to the onset of CHD events. Design Longitudinal cohort study Methods 149 middle-aged healthy women (113 white and 36 African American) who reported no heart disease, stroke, or diabetes were enrolled simultaneously in two ancillary studies of the Study Women’s Health across the Nation (SWAN) at the Pittsburgh site: the Mental Health Study and the SWAN Heart Study. These women were administered psychiatric interviews annually and coronary calcification computed tomography measures (CAC) on two occasions approximately 2¼ years apart. Results Women who had recurrent major depression (N = 33) had greater progression of CAC (logged difference scores) than did women with a single or no episodes, b = 0.09 (0.04), p = .01. The other significant covariates were BMI, SBP, initial CAC, and time between scans. Stratified analyses showed that the effect was obtained in those women who had any CAC at the first examination. Conclusions Recurrent major depression may be a risk factor for progression of atherosclerosis, especially in those who have at least some initial calcification. Women with a history of depression may be candidates for aggressive cardiovascular risk factor prevention therapy. PMID:20668281

  2. Mood and Menopause: Findings from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) over ten years

    PubMed Central

    Bromberger, Joyce T.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from depressive symptoms and disorder. Considerable research has focused on the physiological and psychosocial differences between men and women as sources of depression. An important target of study has been the periods of reproductive changes and events that occur at puberty, postpartum and menopause. A controversy has existed regarding the extent to which, if at all, the menopausal transition or postmenopause increases the risk for elevated depressive symptoms and/or disorders. SWAN provided an opportunity to address the issue with the largest, most representative and diverse cohort currently available for study. The current paper presents the findings from analyses conducted on data collected from the larger core SWAN study and an ancillary study on mental health begun in Pittsburgh in 1995. We found, as did four other recent longitudinal studies, that risk for high depressive symptoms and disorder is greater during and possibly after the menopausal transition. Multiple other factors contribute to risk for depression in our SWAN cohort. PMID:21961723

  3. Critical Illness Outcome Study: An Observational Study on Protocols and Mortality in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem A.; Gutteridge, David; Shahul, Sajid; Checkley, William; Sevransky, Jonathan; Martin, Greg S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many individual Intensive Care Unit (ICU) characteristics have been associated with patient outcomes, including staffing, expertise, continuity and team structure. Separately, many aspects of clinical care in ICUs have been operationalized through the development of complex treatment protocols. The United State Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS) was designed to determine whether the extent of protocol availability and use in ICUs is associated with hospital survival in a large cohort of United States ICUs. Here, we describe the study protocol and analysis plan approved by the USCIITG-CIOS Steering Committee. Methods USCIITG-CIOS is a prospective, observational, ecological multi-centered “cohort” study of mixed ICUs in the U.S. The data collected include organizational information for the ICU (e.g., protocol availability and utilization, multi-disciplinary staffing assessment) and patient level information (e.g. demographics, acute and chronic medical conditions). The primary outcome is all-cause hospital mortality, with the objective being to determine whether there is an association between protocol number and hospital mortality for ICU patients. USCIITG-CIOS is powered to detect a 3% difference in crude hospital mortality between high and low protocol use ICUs, dichotomized according to protocol number at the median. The analysis will utilize regression modeling to adjust for outcome clustering by ICU, with secondary linear analysis of protocol number and mortality and a variety of a priori planned ancillary studies. There are presently 60 ICUs participating in USCIITG-CIOS to enroll approximately 6,000 study subjects. Conclusions USCIITG-CIOS is a large multicentric study examining the effect of ICU protocol use on patient outcomes. The primary results of this study will inform our understanding of the relationship between protocol availability, use, and patient outcomes in the ICU. Moreover

  4. A Pilot Pharmacologic Biomarker Study in HLA-Haploidentical Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Sorror, Mohamed; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Eleven patients diagnosed with various hematologic malignancies receiving an HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) participated in an ancillary biomarker trial. The goal of the trial was to evaluate potential pharmacologic biomarkers pertinent to the conditioning regimen (fludarabine monophosphate (fludarabine) and cyclophosphamide (CY)) or postgrafting immunosuppression (CY and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)) in these patients. METHODS We characterized the interpatient variability of nine pharmacologic biomarkers. The biomarkers evaluated were relevant to fludarabine (i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of 2-fluoro-ara-A or F-ara-A); CY (i.e., AUCs of CY and four of its metabolites); and MMF (i.e., total mycophenolic acid (MPA) AUC, unbound MPA AUC, and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity). RESULTS Interpatient variability in the pharmacologic biomarkers was high. Among those related to HCT conditioning, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.5-fold (CY AUC) to 4.0-fold (AUC of carboxyethlphosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of CY). Among biomarkers evaluated as part of postgrafting immunosuppression, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.7-fold (CY AUC) to 4.9-fold (IMPDH area under the effect curve). There was a moderate correlation (R2=0.441) of within-patient 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide formation clearance. CONCLUSIONS Considerable interpatient variability exists in the pharmacokinetic and drug-specific biomarkers potentially relevant to clinical outcomes in HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to optimize the conditioning regimen and postgrafting immunosuppression administered to HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. PMID:23907443

  5. Are all conservatives alike? A study of the psychological correlates of cultural and economic conservatism.

    PubMed

    Crowson, H Michael

    2009-10-01

    The author addresses the question of whether cultural and economic conservatism differ among American citizens in their relation to measures of epistemic beliefs and motives, dogmatism, death-related anxiety, and the tendency to exhibit dogmatic aggression against those who hold beliefs and values that diverge from one's own. Data from this study suggest that these types of conservative attitudes exhibit different correlational patterns with the aforementioned measures. Research participants who held more culturally conservative attitudes were more likely to score higher on measures of the belief that knowledge is certain, dogmatism, need to evaluate, and fear of death. They also scored lower on need for cognition than did their less conservative counterparts. Moreover, participants who scored higher on cultural conservatism were more likely to exhibit dogmatic aggression. Economic conservatism was largely unrelated to measures of epistemic beliefs and motives, fear of death, dogmatism, and aggressiveness. Ancillary regression analyses revealed that belief that knowledge is certain and dogmatism were the strongest predictors of cultural conservatism. Cultural conservatism, fear of death, and need for structure were significant predictors of dogmatic aggression. PMID:19943397

  6. Coordinated field study for CaPE: Analysis of energy and water budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Duchon, Claude; Kanemasu, Edward T.; Smith, Eric A.; Crosson, William; Laymon, Chip; Luvall, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this hydrologic cycle study are to understand and model (1) surface energy and land-atmosphere water transfer processes, and (2) interactions between convective storms and surface energy fluxes. A surface energy budget measurement campaign was carried out by an interdisciplinary science team during the period July 8 - August 19, 1991 as part of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment (CaPE) in the vicinity of Cape Canaveral, FL. Among the research themes associated with CaPE is the remote estimation of rainfall. Thus, in addition to surface radiation and energy budget measurements, surface mesonet, special radiosonde, precipitation, high-resolution satellite (SPOT) data, geosynchronous (GOES) and polar orbiting (DMSP SSM/I, OLS; NOAA AVHRR) satellite data, and high altitude airplane data (AMPR, MAMS, HIS) were collected. Initial quality control of the seven surface flux station data sets has begun. Ancillary data sets are being collected and assembled for analysis. Browsing of GOES and radar data has begun to classify days as disturbed/undisturbed to identify the larger scale forcing of the pre-convective environment, convection storms and precipitation. The science analysis plan has been finalized and tasks assigned to various investigators.

  7. Soil, environmental, and watershed measurements in support of carbon cycling studies in northwestern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, T.G.; Harden, J.W.; Dabney, S.M.; Marion, D.A.; Alonso, C.; Sharpe, J.M.; Fries, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements including soil respiration, soil moisture, soil temperature, and carbon export in suspended sediments from small watersheds were recorded at several field sites in northwestern Mississippi in support of hillslope process studies associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's Mississippi Basin Carbon Project (MBCP). These measurements were made to provide information about carbon cycling in agricultural and forest ecosystems to understand the potential role of erosion and deposition in the sequestration of soil organic carbon in upland soils. The question of whether soil erosion and burial constitutes an important net sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide is one hypothesis that the MBCP is evaluating to better understand carbon cycling and climate change. This report contains discussion of methods used and presents data for the period December 1996 through March 1998. Included in the report are ancillary data provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research on rainfall, runoff, sediment yield, forest biomass and grain yield. Together with the data collected by the USGS these data permit the construction of carbon budgets and the calibration of models of soil organic matter dynamics and sediment transport and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established cooperative agreements with the USDA and USFS to facilitate collaborative research at research sites in northwestern Mississippi.

  8. Study plan for urban stream indicator sites of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Price, C.V.

    1997-01-01

    Urban Indicator Sites are one component of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The objectives of monitoring at the Urban Indicator Sites are to: (1) characterize stream quality from drainage basins with predominantly residential and commercial land use, and (2) determine which selected natural and human factors most strongly affect stream quality. Urban Indicator Sites will be distributed across the United States in settings with statistically different climate and in metropolitan areas that have a population of 250,000 or more. Multiple sites in the same climatic setting will have a range in population density. Ideally, Urban Indicator Sites will monitor drainage basins that have only residential and commercial land use, are 50 square kilometers or larger, are in the same physiographic setting as other Indicator Sites, have sustained flow, and overlap other NAWQA study components. Ideal drainage basins will not have industrial or agricultural land use and will not have point-source-contamination discharges. Stream quality will be characterized by collecting and analyzing samples of streamflow, bed sediment, and tissue of aquatic organisms for selected constituents. Factors affecting stream quality will be determined by statistical analysis of ancillary data associated with Urban Indicator Sites and stream-quality samples.

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering study of Pt(II) complexes displaying anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Luís A E Batista; Marques, M Paula M; Martin, Christine; Parker, Stewart F; Tomkinson, John

    2011-05-01

    The well-known platinum(II) chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin [cis-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)] and carboplatin [Pt(NH(3))(2)C(6)O(4)H(6)], as well as the analogous transplatin [trans-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)], were studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy, coupled to quantum mechanical methods, and some ancillary work with X-ray diffraction on powders. An assignment of the experimental spectra was carried out based on the calculated INS transition frequencies and intensities (at the DFT level), thereby achieving a good correspondence between the calculated and observed data. Unusually good-quality INS spectra were obtained from about 250 mg, which is the smallest sample of a hydrogenous compound for which a successful INS interpretation has been reported. The knowledge of the local configuration of this kind of complexes is essential for an accurate understanding of their activity, which will pave the way for the rational design of novel third-generation drugs comprising cisplatin- and carboplatin-like moieties. PMID:21523878

  10. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P.; Singh, Hardev; Singh, R. P.; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S.; Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Govil, I. M.; Datta, S. K.; Chatterjee, M. B.

    2014-11-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5-8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper.

  11. Liquid breathing trials and animal studies with a demand-regulated liquid breathing system.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, G D; Shaffer, T H; Dubin, S E

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results of in vivo animal tests conducted on a demand-regulated liquid breathing system are presented. When a liquid replaces gas as the medium in which oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported, several problems not typical in gas respiration occur. The increased mass and viscosity of a liquid as compared with a gas necessitate some means of mechanical assistance. The lower diffusion rates of gases in liquids as compared with gas rates places several constraints on the design of a mechanically assisted liquid breathing system. The liquid breathing system reported in this study has been designed to be demand-regulated, i.e., the animal has control over cycling the pumps which mechanically assist the circulation of an oxygenated liquid to and from the lungs. This system consists of a gas-operated diaphragm pump, demand controller, liquid regenerator with heater and gas scrubber, and ancillary equipment. A demand controller is described which obtains a control signal from an esophageal balloon catheter in the animal and governs operation of the pneumatically driven diaphragm pump. PMID:1055284

  12. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This

  13. Design of the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) to evaluate primary glomerular nephropathy by a multi-disciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Holzman, Larry; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Song, Peter; Barisoni, Laura; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kopp, Jeffrey; Lemley, Kevin V.; Nelson, Peter; Lienczewski, Chrysta; Adler, Sharon; Appel, Gerald; Cattran, Daniel; Choi, Michael; Contreras, Gabriel; Dell, Katherine; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Gibson, Keisha; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Hernandez, Joel; Hewitt, Stephen; Hingorani, Sangeeta; Hladunewich, Michelle; Hogan, Marie; Hogan, Susan; Kaskel, Frederick; Lieske, John; Meyers, Kevin E.C.; Nachman, Patrick; Nast, Cynthia; Neu, Alicia M.; Reich, Heather; Sedor, John; Sethna, Christine; Trachtman, Howard; Tuttle, Katherine; Zhdanova, Olga; Zilleruelo, Gastòn E.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) is a North American multi-center collaborative consortium established to develop a translational research infrastructure for Nephrotic Syndrome. This includes a longitudinal observational cohort study, a pilot and ancillary studies program, a training program, and a patient contact registry. NEPTUNE will enroll 450 adults and children with minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and membranous nephropathy for detailed clinical, histopathologic, and molecular phenotyping at the time of clinically-indicated renal biopsy. Initial visits will include an extensive clinical history, physical examination, collection of urine, blood and renal tissue samples, and assessments of quality of life and patient-reported outcomes. Follow-up history, physical measures, urine and blood samples, and questionnaires will be obtained every 4 months in the first year and bi-annually, thereafter. Molecular profiles and gene expression data will be linked to phenotypic, genetic, and digitalized histologic data for comprehensive analyses using systems biology approaches. Analytical strategies were designed to transform descriptive information to mechanistic disease classification for Nephrotic Syndrome and to identify clinical, histological, and genomic disease predictors. Thus, understanding the complexity of the disease pathogenesis will guide further investigation for targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:23325076

  14. Design of the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) to evaluate primary glomerular nephropathy by a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Gipson, Debbie S; Holzman, Lawrence B; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Song, Peter X K; Barisoni, Laura; Sampson, Matthew G; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Lemley, Kevin V; Nelson, Peter J; Lienczewski, Chrysta C; Adler, Sharon G; Appel, Gerald B; Cattran, Daniel C; Choi, Michael J; Contreras, Gabriel; Dell, Katherine M; Fervenza, Fernando C; Gibson, Keisha L; Greenbaum, Larry A; Hernandez, Joel D; Hewitt, Stephen M; Hingorani, Sangeeta R; Hladunewich, Michelle; Hogan, Marie C; Hogan, Susan L; Kaskel, Frederick J; Lieske, John C; Meyers, Kevin E C; Nachman, Patrick H; Nast, Cynthia C; Neu, Alicia M; Reich, Heather N; Sedor, John R; Sethna, Christine B; Trachtman, Howard; Tuttle, Katherine R; Zhdanova, Olga; Zilleruelo, Gastòn E; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) is a North American multicenter collaborative consortium established to develop a translational research infrastructure for nephrotic syndrome. This includes a longitudinal observational cohort study, a pilot and ancillary study program, a training program, and a patient contact registry. NEPTUNE will enroll 450 adults and children with minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and membranous nephropathy for detailed clinical, histopathological, and molecular phenotyping at the time of clinically indicated renal biopsy. Initial visits will include an extensive clinical history, physical examination, collection of urine, blood and renal tissue samples, and assessments of quality of life and patient-reported outcomes. Follow-up history, physical measures, urine and blood samples, and questionnaires will be obtained every 4 months in the first year and biannually, thereafter. Molecular profiles and gene expression data will be linked to phenotypic, genetic, and digitalized histological data for comprehensive analyses using systems biology approaches. Analytical strategies were designed to transform descriptive information to mechanistic disease classification for nephrotic syndrome and to identify clinical, histological, and genomic disease predictors. Thus, understanding the complexity of the disease pathogenesis will guide further investigation for targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:23325076

  15. DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUBSURFACE EXPORATORY STUDIES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    W.J. Clark

    1999-06-28

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift Starter Tunnel (to approximate ECRB Station 0+26 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas in the TS Loop. This evaluation applies to the construction, operation, and maintenance of these excavations. A more detailed description of these items is provided in Section 6.0. Testing activities are not evaluated in this DIE. Certain construction activities with respect to testing activities are evaluated; but the testing activities themselves are not evaluated. The DIE for ESF Subsurface Testing Activities (BAJ3000000-01717-2200-00011 Rev 01) (CRWMS M&O 1998a) evaluates Subsurface ESF Testing activities. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the TS Loop niches and alcove slot cuts is evaluated herein and is also discussed in CRWMS M&O 1998a. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the Busted Butte subsurface test area in support of the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test is evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1998a. Potential test-to-test interference and the waste isolation impacts of testing activities are evaluated in the ESF Subsurface Testing Activities DIE and other applicable evaluation(s) for the Job Package (JP), Test Planning Package (TPP), and/or Field Work Package (FWP). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether the Subsurface ESF TS Loop and associated excavations, including activities associated with their construction and operation, potentially impact site characterization testing or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility

  16. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  17. The Millennium Cohort Family Study: a prospective evaluation of the health and well-being of military service members and their families.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Fairbank, John A; Marmar, Charlie R; Schlenger, William

    2014-09-01

    The need to understand the impact of war on military families has never been greater than during the past decade, with more than three million military spouses and children affected by deployments to Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Understanding the impact of the recent conflicts on families is a national priority, however, most studies have examined spouses and children individually, rather than concurrently as families. The Department of Defense (DoD) has recently initiated the largest study of military families in US military history (the Millennium Cohort Family Study), which includes dyads of military service members and their spouses (n > 10,000). This study includes US military families across the globe with planned follow-up for 21+ years to evaluate the impact of military experiences on families, including both during and after military service time. This review provides a comprehensive description of this landmark study including details on the research objectives, methodology, survey instrument, ancillary data sets, and analytic plans. The Millennium Cohort Family Study offers a unique opportunity to define the challenges that military families experience, and to advance the understanding of protective and vulnerability factors for designing training and treatment programs that will benefit military families today and into the future. PMID:24912670

  18. Depressive Symptoms are Related to Progression of Coronary Calcium in Midlife Women: The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H.; Matthews, Karen A.; Cursio, John F.; Hollenberg, Steven M.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Everson-Rose, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depression and depressive symptoms are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the impact of depression on early atherogenesis is less well known, particularly in women and minorities. This study examined whether depressive symptoms are associated with progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) among women at mid-life. Methods The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal, multi-site study assessing health and psychological factors in mid-life women. An ancillary study (SWAN Heart) evaluated subclinical atherosclerosis in women who reported no history of CVD or diabetes. In 346 women, CAC was measured twice by electron beam computed tomography, an average of 2.3 years apart. Progression, defined as an increase by 10 Agatston units or more, was analyzed using relative risk regression. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Results Progression of CAC was observed in 67 women (19.1%). Each 1–SD higher CES-D score at baseline related to a 25% increased risk of CAC progression [RR 1.25, CI 1.06–1.47, p=0.007], adjusting for age, time between scans, ethnicity, education, menopausal status, and known CVD risk factors. This risk was similar to the risk induced by BMI [RR 1.31, CI 1.11–1.54, p=0.001] and systolic blood pressure [RR 1.28, CI 1.06–1.55, p=0.01]. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were independently associated with progression of CAC in this cohort of midlife women. Depressive symptoms may represent a risk factor that is potentially modifiable for early prevention of CVD in women. PMID:21641367

  19. Event-related Potential Patterns Reflect Reversed Hemispheric Activity during Visual Attention Processing in Children with Dyslexia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joong-Gu; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Eun-Jin; Leem, Hyun-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Individuals with dyslexia experience reading difficulties, whereas their other cognitive abilities seem normal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the event-related potential (ERP) patterns of children with dyslexia during a target-detection task. Methods Seventeen children with dyslexia and 18 children without this disorder participated in this study. We evaluated their writing and reading ability, symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and intelligence quotient. ERPs were recorded while participants performed a target-detection task, and the peak amplitude and latency of P100 and P300 were analyzed. The lateral asymmetry index (LAI) was calculated for each ERP component. Results The dyslexic group exhibited longer reaction times and larger P100 amplitudes than the non-dyslexic group in the right hemisphere. The P100 latency was also significantly delayed in the right hemisphere of those in the dyslexic group compared with those in the non-dyslexic group. The P300 amplitude was larger in the right hemisphere compared with left hemisphere in the dyslexic group, whereas no interhemispheric differences were observed with respect to the P300 latency. The LAI for P100 showed a significant right hemispheric dominance, whereas the LAI for P100 was significantly correlated with the accuracy of target detection in children with dyslexia. Conclusion Our results suggest that right hemispheric dominance acts as an ancillary system that compensates for poor reading in children with dyslexia. PMID:26792038

  20. 78 FR 62639 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Diabetic Nephropathy Ancillary Studies. Date: December 6, 2013... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; T2 Diabetes Ancillary Study. Date: December 16,...

  1. Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues

  2. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced

  3. Study on the automatic classification for land use/land cover in arid area based upon remotely sensed image cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai-hua; Liu, Yong; Guo, Yang-yao; Wang, Hui-lin

    2008-11-01

    Traditional classification methods based on Bayes rule only use spectral information, whereas, other characteristics such as shape, size, situation and pattern are seldom taken into account to extract land use and land cover information. A new method based on spectral, contextual and ancillary information has been proposed in this paper to address to the problem of misclassification. The study area is located in an arid area of northern China. Based on eCognition software, A TM image and a DEM was utilized in this paper to investigate the effectiveness of the image-cognition based on classification method in land use/land cover classification of arid areas. The image was first segmented into a number of objects and then classified as 22 classes based on the spectral, shape, area, spatial position, pattern and context information with the fuzzy logic rules. Finally, the classification method has been proved to be effective and produced an overall accuracy up to 85.3% and a Kappa coefficient of 84%. The classification result suggests that this method is effective and feasible to classify the main types of ground objects in the large complex and arid area for land use survey.

  4. Integration of aerial and satellite remote sensing for archaeological investigations: a case study of the Etruscan site of San Giovenale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N.; Holmgren, R.; Backe Forsberg, Y.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this research is to detect and extract traces of past human activities on the Etruscan site of San Giovenale (Blera) in Northern Lazio, Italy. Investigations have been conducted by integrating high-resolution satellite data with digital models derived from LiDAR survey and multisensory aerial prospection (traditional, thermal and near infrared pictures). The use of different sensor technologies is requested to cope with (i) different types of surface covers, i.e. vegetated and non-vegetated areas (trees, bushes, agricultural uses, etc), (ii) variety of archaeological marks (micro-relief, crop marks, etc) and (iii) different types of expected spatial/spectral feature patterns linked to past human activities (urban necropoleis, palaeorivers, etc). Field surveys enabled us to confirm remotely sensed features which were detected in both densely and sparsely vegetated areas, thus revealing a large variety of cultural transformations, ritual and infrastructural remains such as roads, tombs and water installations. Our findings clearly point out a connection between the Vignale plateau and the main acropolis (San Giovenale) as well as with the surrounding burial grounds. Our results suggest that the synergic use of multisensory/multisource data sets, including ancillary information, provides a comprehensive overview of new findings. This facilitates the interpretation of various results obtained from different sensors when studied in a larger prospective.

  5. Childhood abuse, parental warmth, and adult multisystem biological risk in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Judith E; Gruenewald, Tara L; Taylor, Shelley E; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Matthews, Karen A; Seeman, Teresa E

    2013-10-15

    Childhood abuse increases adult risk for morbidity and mortality. Less clear is how this "toxic" stress becomes embedded to influence health decades later, and whether protective factors guard against these effects. Early biological embedding is hypothesized to occur through programming of the neural circuitry that influences physiological response patterns to subsequent stress, causing wear and tear across multiple regulatory systems. To examine this hypothesis, we related reports of childhood abuse to a comprehensive 18-biomarker measure of multisystem risk and also examined whether presence of a loving parental figure buffers against the impact of childhood abuse on adult risk. A total of 756 subjects (45.8% white, 42.7% male) participated in this ancillary substudy of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Childhood stress was determined by using the Risky Families Questionnaire, a well-validated retrospective self-report scale. Linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, parental education, and oral contraceptive use found a significant positive relationship between reports of childhood abuse and multisystem health risks [B (SE) = 0.68 (0.16); P < 0.001]. Inversely, higher amounts of reported parental warmth and affection during childhood was associated with lower multisystem health risks [B (SE) = -0.40 (0.14); P < 0.005]. A significant interaction of abuse and warmth (P < 0.05) was found, such that individuals reporting low levels of love and affection and high levels of abuse in childhood had the highest multisystem risk in adulthood. PMID:24062432

  6. FY95 limited energy study for the area `a` package boiler. Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-03

    Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HSAAP) in Holston, Tennessee, manufactures explosives from raw materials. The facility comprises two separate areas designated Area `A11 and Area 11B`. Each area is served by a steam plant which produces steam for production processes, equipment operation, space heating, domestic water heating, steam tracing, and product storage heating requirements. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of alternative methods of meeting the steam requirements of the Area 11A11 industrial complex. The following items were specifically requested to be evaluated. Evaluate the use of two new gas-fired packaged boilers sized to meet the requirements of the industrial complex. The new boilers would be installed adjacent to the existing steam plant and would utilize the existing smokestacks and steam distribution system. Evaluate using the existing steam distribution system rather than locating multiple boilers at various sites. Existing steam driven chillers will be replaced with electric driven equipment. Evaluate this impact on the steam system requirements. Field survey and test two existing gas-fired packaged boilers located at the Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The two boilers were last used about 1980 and are presently laid away. The boilers are approximately the same capacity and operating characteristics as the ones at HSAAP. Relocation of the existing boilers and ancillary equipment (feedwater pumps, generators, fans, etc.) would be required as well as repairs or modifications necessary to meet current operating conditions and standards.

  7. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  8. Monitoring desertification using the integrated CA GIS and RS with AHP-derived weights: a case study of Beijing and its neighboring areas in recent 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongwen; Chen, Jianping; Li, Qing; Ding, Huoping

    2007-06-01

    This paper aims to monitor desertification evolution of different stages and assess its factors using remote sensing (RS) data and cellular automata (CA)-geographical information system (GIS) with an adaptive analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to derive weights of desertification factors. The study areas (114°E to 117°E and 39.5°to 42.2°N) are one of the important agro-pastoral transitional zone, located in Beijing and its neighboring areas, marginal desertified areas in North China. Desertification information including NDVI and desertification area were derived from the satellite images of 1987TM, 1996TM (with a resolution of 28.5), and 2006 CBERS-(with a resolution of 19.5 m) in study areas. The ancillary data in terms of meteorology, geology, 30m-DEM, hydrography can be statistical analyzed with GIS technology. A CA model based on the desertification factors with AHP-derived weights was built by AML program in ArcGIS workstation to assess the evolution of desertification in different stages (from 1987 to 1996, and from 1996 to 2006). The research results show that desertified areas was increased by 3.28% per year from 1987 to 1996, so was 0.51% per year from 1996 to 2006. Although the weights of desertification factors have some changes in different stages, the main factors including climate, NDVI, and terrain did not change except the values in study areas.

  9. Studies of transport pathways of Th, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals. Progress report, April 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Linsalata, P.

    1986-02-01

    The field study is to assess the soil-to-plant and soil-to-animal concentration factors of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 228/Th, as well as of the light rare earth elements (REE), La, Ce and Nd. Farms situated near the center of a deeply weathered alkalic intrusive known as the Pocos de Caldas (PC) plateau were selected for study because of their proximity (i.e., within a few kilometers) to what may be the largest single near-surface deposit of Th (approx.30,000 tonnes) and REE's (>100,000 tonnes) situated near the summit of a hill (the Morro do Ferro (MF)). An ancillary field study is being conducted in Orange County, New York, where a local cattleman has permitted sampling members of the herd as well as soil and feeds which are all grown on the premises. Vegetable samples and soil have also been analyzed from five additional farms in Orange County, NY. 64 refs., 25 figs., 45 tabs.

  10. Role of Haematological Changes in Predicting Occurrence of Leishmaniasis- A Study in Kumaon Region of Uttarakhand

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Prabhat; Chachra, Upasna; Singh, Paramjeet; Thapliyal, Naveen; Rawat, Vinita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A number of cases of Leishmaniasis have been reported from non-endemic sub-himalayan regions of India. Due to low clinical suspicion and atypical presentation, cases may go undetected or there may be a delay in diagnosis. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate clinico-haematological parameters and bone marrow findings so that a high degree of suspicion could be made in unsuspected cases of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) and Leishman Donovan (LD) body negative bone marrow smears. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary care centre serving the kumaon region of Uttarakhand from 2010 to 2014. Forty bone marrow aspirates were included, which were sent on clinical suspicion of VL. Twenty cases were positive for LD bodies. Their clinico-haematological features including bone marrow findings were studied in detail and compared with rest of the 20 LD negative cases. Five LD negative cases were also positive for rk39. Results Twenty LD positive cases were evaluated. Splenomegaly was the most common sign present in 17 cases (85%). Anaemia, leucopenia and lymphocytosis were present in all the cases (100%). Pancytopenia was seen in 17 cases (85%). Microcytic hypochromic blood picture was the most common finding in 11 cases (55%). Bone marrow was normocellular in 7 cases (35%), hypercellular in 7 cases (35%). Erythropoesis was micro-normoblastic in 11 cases (55%). Overall, there were 25 cases of VL (20 LD positive, 5 LD negative). Increased plasma cells, lymphocytes and histiocytes were seen in 17 cases (68%) of VL. Conclusion In non-endemic region where clinical suspicion is low, bone marrow findings can be a strong indicator for VL even though marrow is negative for LD bodies. If required other ancillary investigations can also be ordered. This study also emphasizes the need for epidemiological work up in this region.

  11. Bayesian model selection techniques as decision support for shaping a statistical analysis plan of a clinical trial: An example from a vertigo phase III study with longitudinal count data as primary endpoint

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A statistical analysis plan (SAP) is a critical link between how a clinical trial is conducted and the clinical study report. To secure objective study results, regulatory bodies expect that the SAP will meet requirements in pre-specifying inferential analyses and other important statistical techniques. To write a good SAP for model-based sensitivity and ancillary analyses involves non-trivial decisions on and justification of many aspects of the chosen setting. In particular, trials with longitudinal count data as primary endpoints pose challenges for model choice and model validation. In the random effects setting, frequentist strategies for model assessment and model diagnosis are complex and not easily implemented and have several limitations. Therefore, it is of interest to explore Bayesian alternatives which provide the needed decision support to finalize a SAP. Methods We focus on generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) for the analysis of longitudinal count data. A series of distributions with over- and under-dispersion is considered. Additionally, the structure of the variance components is modified. We perform a simulation study to investigate the discriminatory power of Bayesian tools for model criticism in different scenarios derived from the model setting. We apply the findings to the data from an open clinical trial on vertigo attacks. These data are seen as pilot data for an ongoing phase III trial. To fit GLMMs we use a novel Bayesian computational approach based on integrated nested Laplace approximations (INLAs). The INLA methodology enables the direct computation of leave-one-out predictive distributions. These distributions are crucial for Bayesian model assessment. We evaluate competing GLMMs for longitudinal count data according to the deviance information criterion (DIC) or probability integral transform (PIT), and by using proper scoring rules (e.g. the logarithmic score). Results The instruments under study provide excellent

  12. Association of hip and pelvic geometrywith tibiofemoral osteoarthritis: Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)

    PubMed Central

    Boissonneault, A; Lynch, JA; Wise, BL; Segal, NA; Gross, KD; Murray, DW; Nevitt, MC; Pandit, HG

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lateral tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) is overall less common than medial tibiofemoral OA, but it is more prevalent in women. This may be explained by sex differences in hip and pelvic geometry. The aim of this study is to explore sex differences in hip and pelvic geometry and determine if such parameters are associated with the presence of compartment-specific knee OA. Methods This case-control study reports on 1,328 hips/knees from 664 participants and is an ancillary to the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST). Of the 1,328 knees, 219 had lateral OA, 260 medial OA, and 849 no OA. Hip and pelvic measurements were taken from full-limb radiographs on the ipsilateral side of the knee of interest. After adjusting for covariates, means were compared between sexes and also between knees with medial and lateral OA versus no OA using separate regression models. Results Women were shown to have a reduced femoral offset (mean 40.9 mm vs. 45.9 mm; p=0.001) and more valgus neck-shaft angle (mean 128.4° vs. 125.9°; p<0.001) compared to men. Compared to those with no OA, knees with lateral OA were associated with a reduced femoral offset (p=0.012), increased height of hip centre (p=0.003), more valgus neck-shaft angle (p=0.042), and increased abductor angle (p=0.031). Knees with medial OA were associated with a more varus neck-shaft angle (p=0.043) and a decreased abductor angle (p=0.003). Conclusion These data suggest anatomical variations at the hip and pelvis are associated with compartment-specific knee OA and may help to explain sex differences in patterns of knee OA. PMID:24971867

  13. Status of groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel study unit, 2005--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Michael; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile San Fernando--San Gabriel (FG) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study area is in Los Angeles County and includes Tertiary-Quaternary sedimentary basins situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA FG study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) throughout California. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 35 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the FG study unit. The quality of groundwater in primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the FG study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.

  14. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  15. Objective sleep, a novel risk factor for alterations in kidney function: the CARDIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Megan E.; Kim, Yongin; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Reis, Jared P.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Knutson, Kristen L.; Glasser, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between objectively measured sleep and 10-year changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Methods From 2003 to 2005, an ancillary sleep study was conducted at the Chicago site of the Coronary Artery Disease in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Community-based black and white adults (aged 32–51 years) wore a wrist actigraph up to six nights to record sleep duration and fragmentation. Sleep quality was measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Participants without history of cardiovascular or chronic kidney diseases, proteinuria, or hypertension at the 2000–2001 CARDIA examination were followed over 10 years (n = 463). eGFR was estimated from serum creatinine (eGFRCr) at the 2000–2001, 2005–2006, and 2010–2011 CARDIA examinations, whereas cystatin-C-estimated eGFR (eGFRCys) was measured at the 2000–2001 and 2005–2006 examinations. Generalized estimating equation regression and linear models estimated the associations of each sleep parameter with changes in eGFRCr and eGFRCys, controlling for cardiovascular and renal risk. Results Sleep parameters were not related to 5-year change in eGFRCys. However, each 1 h decrease in sleep duration was significantly associated with a 1.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 higher eGFRCr [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.2–2.7], and each one-point increase in PSQI was significantly associated with a 0.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 higher eGFRCr (95% CI, 0.04–0.9) over 10 years. Conclusion In this community-based sample, shorter sleep and poorer sleep quality were related to higher kidney filtration rates over 10 years. PMID:25037841

  16. Elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Iraj; Vahdat, Katayoun; Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Beigi, Saeideh; Assadi, Majid; Azizi, Fatemeh; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that low-grade systemic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, limited information is available about the relationship of diabetes mellitus and inflammation in Asia. We examined the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and diabetes in a general Iranian population. In an ancillary study to the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study, a cohort study of men and women aged > or = 25 years, a random sample of 1754 (49.2 percent males, 50.8 percent females) subjects were evaluated. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Elevated serum CRP was defined as more than 3.0 mg/l. The diabetes classification was based on the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. A total of 8.6 percent of the subjects (8.0 percent of males & 9.1 percent of females; p>0.05) had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Geometric mean of CRP was 1.94 mg/l (3.80 SD) in the studied population. The subjects with diabetes had a higher geometric mean of CRP levels than the subjects with no diabetes [3.67 (SD 3.71) versus 1.85 (3.83) respectively; p<0.0001)]. In multiple logistic regression analysis, diabetes showed a significant age-adjusted association with elevated CRP levels [Odds Ratio = 2.03, Confidence Interval (1.38-2.98); p<0.0001] after adjusting for sex, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol blood pressure, smoking and body mass index. In conclusion, beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, elevated CRP is significantly correlated with diabetes in general population of the northern Persian Gulf. Further insight into the specific effects of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins will be essential for the development of new preventive strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:18493107

  17. Concerns About Climate Change Mitigation Projects: Summary of Findings from Case Studies in Brazil, India, Mexico, and South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth; Makundi, Willy; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre; Ravinandranath, N.H.; Melli, Anandi; Rangachari, Anita; Amaz, Mireya; Gay, Carlos; Friedmann, Rafael; Goldberg, Beth; van Horen, Clive; Simmonds, Gillina; Parker, Gretchen

    1998-11-01

    The concept of joint implementation as a way to implement climate change mitigation projects in another country has been controversial ever since its inception. Developing countries have raised numerous issues at the project-specific technical level, and broader concerns having to do with equity and burden sharing. This paper summarizes the findings of studies for Brazil, India, Mexico and South Africa, four countries that have large greenhouse gas emissions and are heavily engaged in the debate on climate change projects under the Kyoto Protocol. The studies examine potential or current projects/programs to determine whether eight technical concerns about joint implementation can be adequately addressed. They conclude that about half the concerns were minor or well managed by project developers, but concerns about additionality of funds, host country institutions and guarantees of performance (including the issues of baselines and possible leakage) need much more effort to be adequately addressed. All the papers agree on the need to develop institutional arrangements for approving and monitoring such projects in each of the countries represented. The case studies illustrate that these projects have the potential to bring new technology, investment, employment and ancillary socioeconomic and environmental benefits to developing countries. These benefits are consistent with the goal of sustainable development in the four study countries. At a policy level, the studies' authors note that in their view, the Annex I countries should consider limits on the use of jointly implemented projects as a way to get credits against their own emissions at home, and stress the importance of industrialized countries developing new technologies that will benefit all countries. The authors also observe that if all countries accepted caps on their emissions (with a longer time period allowed for developing countries to do so) project-based GHG mitigation would be significantly

  18. Neighborhood and weight-related health behaviors in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that neighborhood factors are associated with obesity, but few studies have evaluated the association with weight control behaviors. This study aims to conduct a multi-level analysis to examine the relationship between neighborhood SES and weight-related health behaviors. Methods In this ancillary study to Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) a trial of long-term weight loss among individuals with type 2 diabetes, individual-level data on 1219 participants from 4 clinic sites at baseline were linked to neighborhood-level data at the tract level from the 2000 US Census and other databases. Neighborhood variables included SES (% living below the federal poverty level) and the availability of food stores, convenience stores, and restaurants. Dependent variables included BMI, eating patterns, weight control behaviors and resource use related to food and physical activity. Multi-level models were used to account for individual-level SES and potential confounders. Results The availability of restaurants was related to several eating and weight control behaviors. Compared to their counterparts in neighborhoods with fewer restaurants, participants in neighborhoods with more restaurants were more likely to eat breakfast (prevalence Ratio [PR] 1.29 95% CI: 1.01-1.62) and lunch (PR = 1.19, 1.04-1.36) at non-fast food restaurants. They were less likely to be attempting weight loss (OR = 0.93, 0.89-0.97) but more likely to engage in weight control behaviors for food and physical activity, respectively, than those who lived in neighborhoods with fewer restaurants. In contrast, neighborhood SES had little association with weight control behaviors. Conclusion In this selected group of weight loss trial participants, restaurant availability was associated with some weight control practices, but neighborhood SES was not. Future studies should give attention to other populations and to evaluating various aspects of the physical and social

  19. Synthesis and Single-Molecule Conductance Study of Redox-Active Ruthenium Complexes with Pyridyl and Dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroaki; Baghernejad, Masoud; Al-Owaedi, Oday A; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Nagashima, Takumi; Ferrer, Jaime; Wandlowski, Thomas; García-Suárez, Víctor M; Broekmann, Peter; Lambert, Colin J; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2016-08-26

    The ancillary ligands 4'-(4-pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and 4'-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene)-2,2'-6',2"-terpyridine were used to synthesize two series of mono- and dinuclear ruthenium complexes differing in their lengths and anchoring groups. The electrochemical and single-molecular conductance properties of these two series of ruthenium complexes were studied experimentally by means of cyclic voltammetry and the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ) and theoretically by means of density functional theory (DFT). Cyclic voltammetry data showed clear redox peaks corresponding to both the metal- and ligand-related redox reactions. Single-molecular conductance demonstrated an exponential decay of the molecular conductance with the increase in molecular length for both the series of ruthenium complexes, with decay constants of βPY =2.07±0.1 nm(-1) and βBT =2.16±0.1 nm(-1) , respectively. The contact resistance of complexes with 2,3-dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene (BT) anchoring groups is found to be smaller than the contact resistance of ruthenium complexes with pyridine (PY) anchors. DFT calculations support the experimental results and provided additional information on the electronic structure and charge transport properties in those metal|ruthenium complex|metal junctions. PMID:27472889

  20. Land cover change monitoring within the east central Louisiana study site: A case for large area surveys with LANDSAT multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results established for four digital procedures developed for characterizing the radiometric changes between multidate LANDSAT spectral data sets into meaningful measures of land cover/use dynamics are documented. Each technique's performance was contrasted against digitized land use change maps, which were produced from contemporaneous, retrospective aerophoto coverage, in a cell by cell comparison over a one half by one degree area in east central Louisiana as a standard for comparison. The four techniques identify from 10.5 to 13.0% loss in area of forestland in a five year period; however, they differ more by how accurately this amount of change is distributed, the need for ancillary ground truth, and amount of usable information that is extractable. All require some method of digitally co-registering the two data sets. All are capable of providing tabular statistics as well as map products. Two are capable of detecting changes and identifying their locations. The other two, in addition to this, provide information to qualify land cover conditions at each end of the study interval.

  1. A pilot effectiveness study: placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive L-triiodothyronine (T3) used to accelerate and potentiate the antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Michael; Novak, Scott; Stern, Robert; Hennessey, James; Joffe, Russell; Prange, Arthur; Zimmerman, Mark

    2008-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether adjunctive T3 can help accelerate the antidepressant response and improve overall outcomes when used under naturalistic conditions. Fifty consecutive psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder who were initiated on antidepressant therapy were randomized to receive adjunctive T3 or placebo in a double-blind manner over the course of 6 wk. There were no restrictions placed on the selection of antidepressant agent, dosing, ancillary medications, or psychotherapy, and there were few exclusion criteria. A positive response was defined as a > or = 50% reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores. Response rates were higher for the adjunctive T3 cohort compared to the adjunctive placebo cohort after 1 wk (45% vs. 24%) and 2 wk (57% vs. 33%) of treatment. The likelihood of experiencing a positive response at any point over the 6-wk trial was 4.5 times greater in the adjunctive T3 cohort (95% CI 1.3-15.7). The study provides preliminary evidence that T3 can successfully be used in clinical practice to accelerate the antidepressant response and improve overall outcomes. The effectiveness model may be an untapped mechanism for evaluating the value of psychopharmacological agents. PMID:17352847

  2. Spectroscopic study in the visible and near infrared wavelength of an Hα-selected sample of star-forming galaxies at z = 0.84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Zamorano, J.; Cardiel, N.; Acosta Pulido, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we study the physical properties of star-forming galaxies selected in an Hα near-infrared narrow-band survey tuned for redshift z=0.84 (Villar et al. 2008, 2011). Also, we present a sample at z˜1 with mass greater than 10^{10} M_{⊙} with Hα emission. The observations were carried out with WHT/LIRIS (see Sánchez de Miguel et al. 2011, in Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VI). The rest of the data from the spectra archive of the RAINBOW Cosmological Survey database (Pérez-González et al. 2005, 2008; Barro et al. 2011ab). According to the redshift distribution of these galaxies, 65% of the galaxies are in a redshift range of 0.005. This velocity range corresponds to less than 25% of the effective volume. Which could be indicative of the presence of substructure. A total of 48 galaxies have detected Hα emission and other 12 show [NII]6584. To complete our multi-wavelength sample we found 23 galaxies with Hβ, [OIII]5007 or [OII]3727 detections. Using this photometry from ancillary data we will calculate nebular and stellar extinctions. We have calculated metallicities using the [NII]/Hα ratio and the Pettini & Pagel (2004) calibrations. The metallicity of samples are compatible with the local galaxies. We found that in all the diagnostic diagrams galaxies have similar properties to the local ones, except they are intrinsically brighter for the same equivalent width [OII]3727.

  3. Two essays on problems of deregulated electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perekhodtsev, Dmitri

    Empirical test of models of unilateral and collusive market power in California's electricity market in 2000. The data from California energy crisis of 2000 suggests that the largest departures of observed electricity prices from the estimates of the competitive price occur when demand approaches market capacity. This paper studies models of unilateral and collusive market power applicable to electricity markets. Both suggest a unique mechanism explaining the increase of the price-cost margin with demand. The empirical test of these models provides more evidence for unilateral market power than for behavior suggesting tacit collusion. Economics of hydro generating plants operating in markets for energy and ancillary services. In order to preserve the stability of electricity supply, electric generators have to provide ancillary services in addition to energy production. Hydro generators are believed to be the most efficient source of ancillary services because of their good dynamic flexibility. This paper studies optimal operation decisions for river dams and pumped storage facilities operating in markets for energy and ancillary services as well as the change in the water shadow price in presence of ancillary services markets. The analysis is applied to valuation of the ancillary services provided by hydro resources in the Tennessee Valley Authority. A simulation of ancillary services markets shows that TVA's hydro resources providing ancillary services can allow for substantial savings in total costs of energy provision. Optimal hydro scheduling in markets for energy and ancillary services increases the value of TVA's hydro resources by 9% on average and up to 26% for particular units. As a result of hydro participation in ancillary services markets water shadow prices of river dams drop significantly allowing for tightening hydro constraints in favor of other water uses.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Hedonic Studies to Assess the Property Value Effects of Low Impact Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater runoff from urban areas is a significant source of water pollution in the United States. Many states are promoting low impact development (LID) practices, which provide a variety of direct and ancillary ecosystem services. We describe a meta-analysis designed to evalua...

  5. Studies of Laser Interferometer Design and a Vibration Isolation System for Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaime, Joseph Anthony

    1995-01-01

    Two techniques are developed that are needed in the design of an interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detector such as the LIGO, or Long-baseline Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory. The detector sensitivity of a long-baseline instrument is studied. A multi-layer mechanical isolation stack to filter seismic noise from test masses is designed, modeled and tested in vacuum. This is a four-stage elastomer (spring) and stainless steel (mass) stack, consisting of a table resting on three separate legs of three layers each. The visco-elastic properties of elastomer springs are exploited to damp the stack's normal modes while providing rapid roll-off of stack transmission above these modal frequencies. The stack's transmission of base motion to top motion is measured in vacuum and compared with 3-D finite-element models. In one tested configuration, at 100 Hz, horizontal transmission is 10^{-7}, vertical transmission is 3 times 10^{-6}, and the cross-coupling terms are between these values. A length detection scheme using RF phase modulated light and synchronous detection is developed for Fabry -Perot arm power-recycled Michelson interferometer GW detectors. This scheme uses an external Mach-Zehnder interferometer to measure the GW signal, and a frequency-shifted subcarrier to measure ancillary interferometer degrees of freedom. Use of the Mach-Zehnder allows rejection of laser source amplitude noise from the output, as well as the ability to exploit well-balanced Fabry-Perot arms to reject frequency noise from the output. A long baseline GW detector using these techniques should meet the LIGO initial goal sensitivity to GW strain of h_{rm RMS} = 10^ {-21} at 100 Hz. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-1307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  6. Does "responsive insertion technology" improve practice of colonoscopy? Results of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Rubén; Sola-Vera, Javier; Uceda, Francisco; García Sepulcre, Mariana Fe; Morillo, Elena; Vázquez, Narcís

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. During colonoscopy, advancing the endoscope can sometimes be difficult due to the appearance of loops or bends in the insertion tube. Therefore, research continues toward improving colonoscope technology. The aim of this study is to compare the use of colonoscopes equipped with "responsive insertion technology" (RIT) versus regular non-RIT colonoscopes. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Prospective, comparative and randomized trials that included patients submitted to colonoscopy. In group I, RIT colonoscopes were used, while in group II, colonoscopies with variable stiffness but without the other components of the RIT technology were used. Demographic variables and variables related to colonoscopy, as well as the pain perceived by the patient and the difficulty in performing endoscopy were recorded. RESULTS. A total of 122 patients were included in group I and 120 patients in group II. The cecal intubation rate was similar in both groups. The use of the RIT colonoscopes was associated with a lower cecal intubation time (4.4 ± 2.0 vs. 5.4 ± 3.5, p = 0.005) and a lower difficulty in performing examinations for both the endoscopist (19.1 ± 20.0 vs. 27.7 ± 22.2, p = 0.002) and the nursing staff (20.8 ± 17.0 vs. 26.3 ± 19.6, p = 0.04). No significant differences were found between both groups in the need for ancillary maneuvers or in the pain perceived by the patient. CONCLUSIONS. RIT colonoscopes allow cecal intubation in a shorter time compared to variable stiffness colonoscopes, and are associated with a greater level of ease of the procedure. PMID:24417584

  7. Secondary malignancies diagnosed using kidney needle core biopsies: a clinical and pathological study of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Tamboli, Pheroze; Karam, Jose A; Vikram, Raghu; Zhang, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Involvement of the kidney by secondary malignancies is uncommon. Differentiating secondary malignancies from primary kidney/urothelial tumors can be challenging, especially on limited biopsy material. A retrospective search of our institutional archive from January 2002 to May 2015 identified 1572 cases of imaging-guided needle core biopsies of the kidney. Of these, 75 (5%) cases revealed a secondary malignancy; 48 (64%) patients had undergone the biopsy with a primary kidney tumor favored clinically. There were 39 male and 36 female patients with a mean age of 59.4 years (range, 21-83 years). The majority of the cases (n = 55, 73%) were metastases from solid tumors, with lung being the most common primary site (n = 22, 29%). Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common hematological malignancy (n = 6) secondarily involving the kidney. Radiographically, 58 (77%) cases presented as a solitary kidney mass. The primary malignancy was known prior to the kidney biopsy in 66 (88%) cases. The mean interval between diagnoses of the primary tumor and secondary involvement of the kidney was 4.5 years. Immunohistochemical stains were performed in 65 (87%) cases. Follow-up information was available for 73 patients; mean survival was 19.4 months, with 43 patients dead of their disease (mean, 12 months) and 30 patients alive at last follow-up (21 with and 9 without disease; mean, 30 months). Secondary malignancy in the kidney may clinically and pathologically mimic primary kidney tumors. Accurate diagnosis can be rendered by correlating pathological features with clinical and radiographic findings and judicious use of ancillary studies. PMID:26980018

  8. A Numerical Study on Combining CO2 Mineral Carbonation and Geothermal Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO2 may achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. A fully developed EGS with CO2 would consist of three distinct zones, (1) a central zone or “core” in which all aqueous phase has been removed by dissolution into the flowing CO2 stream, so that the reservoir fluid is a single supercritical CO2 phase; (2) a surrounding intermediate zone, in which the reservoir fluid consists of a two-phase water-CO2 mixture; and (3) an outer or peripheral zone, in which the reservoir fluid is a single aqueous phase with dissolved CO2. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO2 are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO2. We have performed chemically reactive transport (TOUGHREACT ) modeling to investigate fluid-rock interactions and CO2 mineral carbonation of an EGS operated with CO2. The quartz monzodiorite unit at the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) was taken as an example. A geothermal injection well system with supercritical CO2 injection was simulated to (1) investigate mineral dissolution/precipitation and associated porosity changes, and (2) impacts on reservoir growth and longevity, with ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO2 loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and CO2 mineralization (geologic storage).

  9. Developing immune function assays to monitor fish health in field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.D.; Kergosien, D.H.; Adams, S.M. |

    1995-12-31

    The East Fork Poplar Creek system, a 24km long stream in TN that receives point source discharges of contaminants near its headwaters, was chosen to evaluate a field approach to fish immunotoxicology. Previous studies in this stream have shown that cytochrome P4501A activity, liver somatic indices, macrophage aggregates, and parasitic liver lesions are significantly elevated in sunfish with the degree of impact decreasing with distance from the contaminant source. Red-breasted sunfish were collected between May 23 and June 3 of 1994. Captured fish were anesthetized in MS-222 and processed by two different methods. One group was sacrificed at each sampling station, weights and lengths recorded, and the spleen and anterior kidney tissues removed and placed in buffer on ice. The other group was kept in MS-222 for 2 hr and transported to the laboratory. The spleen and anterior kidney from each fish were then prepared as a single cell suspension and shipped overnight to Mississippi State University. Cells were then washed by centrifugation and resuspended in appropriate media to evaluate PMA-stimulated phagocyte oxidative burst and non-specific cytotoxic cell (NCC) activity against K562 tumor targets. Oxidative burst responses were dramatically suppressed in both groups at stations near the headwaters but returned to reference levels further downstream. There were no differences between treatment groups at each station. NCC activities did not follow gradient-response patterns observed with phagocyte oxidative burst data and there were inconsistent differences between treatment groups at each station. These data show that simple immune function assays, such as phagocyte oxidative burst responses, can be used as an ancillary biomarker in fish health monitoring.

  10. Lecture Outlines and Ancillary Materials, and Evaluation Questionnaire for a General Undergraduate Course, Psychoactive Drugs, as offered Spring 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Joel W.; Korn, James H.

    The specific objectives for the course on "Psychoactive Drugs" are to gain knowledge about drugs and drug users, and to acquire the ability to seek out and use available information on drugs. This course outline is divided into 2 sections: (1) basic psychological, pharmacological, and physical aspects of psychoactive drug use; and (11) cultural,…

  11. INVESTIGATIONS OF SUBMARINE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE IN DELMARVA COASTAL BAYS BY HORIZONTAL RESISTIVITY SURVEYING AND ANCILLARY TECHNIQUES. (R826945)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. 30 CFR 250.210 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what reporting and data/information retention requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR... submitted data and information in accordance with § 250.197(b). Contents of Exploration Plans (EP)...

  13. 76 FR 36400 - Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets, 76 FR 11177 (Mar. 1, 2011), Notice of... depending on the intended use or capability of the facility; possible business models for storage, including... Financial Reporting for New Electric Storage Technologies AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission,...

  14. 47 CFR 25.149 - Application requirements for ancillary terrestrial components in the mobile-satellite service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... terrestrial components in the mobile-satellite service networks operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and... service networks operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2 GHz mobile-satellite service. (a... shall not exceed the geographical coverage area of the mobile satellite service network of the...

  15. 47 CFR 25.149 - Application requirements for ancillary terrestrial components in the mobile-satellite service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... terrestrial components in the mobile-satellite service networks operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and... service networks operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2 GHz mobile-satellite service. (a... shall not exceed the geographical coverage area of the mobile satellite service network of the...

  16. 75 FR 14342 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... & Light Company, doing business as Progress Energy Carolinas, Inc., and Florida Power Corporation, doing... that companies must prepare a significant number of financial and operational reports at the end of... January 28, 2009, in response to Tampa Electric Company's (Tampa Electric) request for extension of...

  17. 47 CFR 25.149 - Application requirements for ancillary terrestrial components in the mobile-satellite service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Operational NGSO MSS ATC systems shall maintain an in-orbit spare satellite. (ii) Operational GSO MSS ATC... it into orbit during the next commercially reasonable launch window following a satellite...

  18. Design of an easy-to-use physician order entry system with support for nursing and ancillary departments.

    PubMed

    Teich, J M; Hurley, J F; Beckley, R F; Aranow, M

    1992-01-01

    The Brigham Integrated Computing System (BICS) provides a broad range of clinical and administrative data-management functions for Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a 720-bed major urban teaching hospital. We describe here the development of an inpatient order-entry system (BICS-OE) which is fully integrated into the BICS clinical environment. BICS-OE uses direct entry of orders by physicians to improve order response time and minimize transcription problems. BICS-OE includes a number of novel features to enhance its acceptance by physician users and its benefit to clinical practice in the hospital. Dual-mode input gives users a choice of full-screen assistance with ordering, or an intelligent text mode which provides rapid entry of orders by direct typing. An automated primary/on-call coverage by direct typing. An automated primary/on-call coverage list directs patient alerts and cosigning requests to the proper physician. Variable order sets allow a large group of orders to be stored and entered rapidly, even when some of the orders may change for different conditions. Multitasking allows the user to check prior orders and labs while concurrently entering new orders. The system permits a wide range of order checking and alerts. PMID:1483016

  19. 41 CFR 102-72.69 - What additional terms and conditions apply to an Executive agencies' delegation of ancillary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the approved project requirements, schedules, plans, drawings, specifications, and other related... project, the Executive agency shall be responsible for any such costs or expenses. (g) Disputes between... agrees that, in the event GSA's Public Buildings Service and the Executive agency fail to resolve...

  20. Design, ancillary testing, analysis and fabrication data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parsons, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The horizontal stabilizer of the 737 transport was redesigned. Five shipsets were fabricated using composite materials. Weight reduction greater than the 20% goal was achieved. Parts and assemblies were readily produced on production-type tooling. Quality assurance methods were demonstrated. Repair methods were developed and demonstrated. Strength and stiffness analytical methods were substantiated by comparison with test results. Cost data was accumulated in a semiproduction environment. FAA certification was obtained.