Science.gov

Sample records for crimes aboard public vehicles

  1. Crime is a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Middleton, J

    1998-01-01

    Crime is a public health issue. It shares common causes with ill health, particularly poverty, and fear of violent crime is itself a major cause of anxiety. Community development in pre-school education, parental education, and among ethnic minorities, both reduces crime and promotes better health, for example in reducing the effects of alcohol and illicit drugs. Health workers should contribute in full to community development. PMID:9532958

  2. Miami: Public Attitudes About Crime. A National Crime Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paez, Adolfo L., Ed.

    The National Crime Survey (NCS) program has conducted a continuous national survey and separate surveys in 26 central cities to study the impact of crime on American society. Attitudinal information obtained from a 1974 survey of occupants of 4,929 housing units (9,650 residents age 16 and over) in Miami reflects crime trends, fear of crime,…

  3. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen

    1997-01-10

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  4. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  5. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, R.J.; Loughin, S.

    1997-01-01

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. ISS Update: Science Aboard Kounotori3

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Pete Hasbrook, associate program scientist, about the experiments traveling to the International Space Station aboard the H-II Transfer Vehicle...

  7. The Public's Perception of Crime and Police Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Joel H.; Sherman, Janet Schmidt

    The public's views about behaviors that should be crimes, behaviors that should come under the control of the police, and the public's view of how the police spend their time are examined. A telephone questionnaire survey was conducted with a random sample of 250 persons in San Diego (California). Over 98% of the respondents believed that the…

  8. Sex Crimes, Children, and Pornography: Public Views and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Daniel P.; Mancini, Christina; Gertz, Marc; Bratton, Jake

    2008-01-01

    "Get tough" approaches for responding to sex crimes have proliferated during the past decade. Child pornography in particular has garnered attention in recent years. Policy makers increasingly have emphasized incarceration as a response to such crime, including accessing child pornography. Juxtaposed against such efforts is a dearth of knowledge…

  9. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively…

  10. New Orleans: Public Attitudes About Crime. A National Crime Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paez, Adolfo L., Ed.

    The National Crime Survey (NCS) program has conducted a continuous national survey and separate surveys in 26 central cities to study the impact of crime on American society. Attitudinal information obtained from a 1974 survey of occupants of 4,918 housing units (9,301 residents age 16 and over) in New Orleans reflects crime trends, fear of crime,…

  11. San Diego: Public Attitudes About Crime. A National Crime Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paez, Adolfo L., Ed.

    The National Crime Survey program has conducted a continuous national survey and separate surveys in 26 central cities to study the impact of crime on American society. Attitudinal information obtained from a 1974 survey of occupants of 4,906 housing units (9,125 residents age 16 and over) in San Diego reflects crime trends, fear of crime,…

  12. Comparing Perceptions of Campus Crime Severity among Community College and Public Four-Year University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundstrom, Loren M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years violent crimes on several university campuses have been highlighted by mass media, drawing national attention to the issue of campus crime. Not all college campuses, however, experience the same level of crime. While community colleges serve roughly half of all undergraduates in the U.S., statistically these public institutions…

  13. "Taking a Bite Out of Crime": The Impact of a Public Information Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Garrett J.

    In contrast with earlier findings indicating that public information campaigns produce little change in public attitudes and behaviors, current research suggests that the Advertising Council's "Take a Bite Out of Crime" campaign, initiated in 1979, has had a substantive impact on the public's response to crime prevention. Data from a national…

  14. Victimization and Fear of Crime in Elderly Public Housing Tenants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, M. Powell; Yaffe, Silvia

    1980-01-01

    Fear of crime was central in determining psychological well-being. Crime-related variables were minimally related to size of social space and activity outside the housing site. Planned housing serves a protective function and tenants are not necessarily made prisoners in their homes by crime or fear. (Author)

  15. Student Reactions to Public Safety Reports of Hate Crimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jessica E.; Koenig, Anne; Smith, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated participant's reactions to hate crime versus nonbiased crime incident reports that included more or less detail about the crime using a 2 (victim race: African American, unstated) × 2 (amount of information: vague, detailed) between-subjects factorial design. We hypothesized that participants would be more sympathetic,…

  16. Student reactions to public safety reports of hate crimes.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Jessica E; Koenig, Anne; Smith, Ramon

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated participant's reactions to hate crime versus nonbiased crime incident reports that included more or less detail about the crime using a 2 (victim race: African American, unstated)×2 (amount of information: vague, detailed) between-subjects factorial design. We hypothesized that participants would be more sympathetic, more distressed, and blame the victim less if the victim was African American (designating a hate crime) and if more detail was included in the incident report. The results generally showed greater psychological impact for a hate crime versus nonbiased crime and when more information was presented than with vague information, and these two manipulations did not interact in influencing participants' reactions. These results indicate that amount of detail provided about a crime should be considered when publishing incident reports. PMID:23666501

  17. Sensing the public's reaction to crime news using the ‘Links Correspondence Method’

    PubMed Central

    Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.; Kounadi, Ourania; Sitko, Izabela; Hawelka, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    Public media such as TV or newspapers, paired with crime statistics from the authority, raise awareness of crimes within society. However, in today's digital society, other sources rapidly gain importance as well. The Internet and social networks act heavily as information distribution platforms. Therefore, this paper aims at exploring the influence of the social Web service Twitter as an information distribution platform for crime news. In order to detect messages with crime-related contents, the Links Correspondence Method (LCM) is introduced, which gathers and investigates Twitter messages related to crime articles via associated Web links. Detected crime tweets are analysed in regard to the distance between the location of an incident and the location of associated tweets, as well as regards demographic aspects of the corresponding crime news. The results show that there exists a spatial dependency regarding the activity space of a user (and the crime-related tweets of this user) and the actual location of the crime incident. Furthermore, the demographic analysis indicates that the type of a crime as well as the gender of the victim has great influence on whether the crime incident is spread via Twitter or not. PMID:25843991

  18. Public health and the potential benefits of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design.

    PubMed

    Cozens, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Studies have consistently found that safety and security are major public concerns; however, crime is rarely considered as an outcome in public health. The recent shift by planning policy towards promoting compact, 'walkable' communities close to public transport aims to redress many of the problems associated with urban sprawl. However, communities that do not feel safe are less likely to be active citizens. This paper argues that Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design has potential benefits for public health in the provision of local crime risk assessments and in delivering safer environments, which can support active living, walkable communities and public health. PMID:18093465

  19. Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools. Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2005-06. NCES 2007-361

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolle, Kacey Lee; Guerino, Paul; Dinkes, Rachel; Chandler, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This report presents findings on crime and violence in U.S. public schools, using data from the 2005-06 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2006). Developed by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and supported by the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools of the U.S. Department of Education, SSOCS asks public school principals…

  20. The use of models to predict potential contamination aboard orbital vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boraas, Martin E.; Seale, Dianne B.

    1989-01-01

    A model of fungal growth on air-exposed, nonnutritive solid surfaces, developed for utilization aboard orbital vehicles is presented. A unique feature of this testable model is that the development of a fungal mycelium can facilitate its own growth by condensation of water vapor from its environment directly onto fungal hyphae. The fungal growth rate is limited by the rate of supply of volatile nutrients and fungal biomass is limited by either the supply of nonvolatile nutrients or by metabolic loss processes. The model discussed is structurally simple, but its dynamics can be quite complex. Biofilm accumulation can vary from a simple linear increase to sustained exponential growth, depending on the values of the environmental variable and model parameters. The results of the model are consistent with data from aquatic biofilm studies, insofar as the two types of systems are comparable. It is shown that the model presented is experimentally testable and provides a platform for the interpretation of observational data that may be directly relevant to the question of growth of organisms aboard the proposed Space Station.

  1. Pornography, public acceptance and sex related crime: a review.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Milton

    2009-01-01

    A vocal segment of the population has serious concerns about the effect of pornography in society and challenges its public use and acceptance. This manuscript reviews the major issues associated with the availability of sexually explicit material. It has been found everywhere it was scientifically investigated that as pornography has increased in availability, sex crimes have either decreased or not increased. It is further been found that sexual erotica has not only wide spread personal acceptance and use but general tolerance for its availability to adults. This attitude is seen by both men and women and not only in urban communities but also in reputed conservative ones as well. Further this finding holds nationally in the United States and in widely different countries around the world. Indeed, no country where this matter has been scientifically studied has yet been found to think pornography ought be restricted from adults. The only consistent finding is that adults prefer to have the material restricted from children's production or use. PMID:19665229

  2. [Cell biology researches aboard the robotic space vehicles: preparation and performance].

    PubMed

    Tairbekov, M G

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the unique aspects of preparation and performance of cell biology experiments flown on robotic space vehicles Bion and Foton, and gives an overview of key findings in researches made under the author's leadership over the past decades. Described are the criteria of selecting test objects, and the conditions required for preparation and implementation of space and control (synchronous) experiments. The present-day status and issues of researches into cell responsivity to space microgravity and other factors are discussed. Also, potentialities of equipment designed to conduct experiments with cell cultures in vitro and populations of single-celled organisms are presented, as well as some ideas for new devices and systems. Unveiled are some circumstances inherent to the development and performance of space experiments, setting up laboratory facilities at the launch and landing site, and methods of safe transportation and storage of biosamples. In conclusion, the author puts forward his view on biospecies, equipment and areas of research aboard future space vehicles. PMID:17357620

  3. Crime and American Culture. Ethics and Public Policy Essay #43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.

    The great waves of foreign immigration, the onset of rapid industrialization, the emergence of an urban working class--all features of the post Civil War United States that might have contributed to rising crime rates--did not. Ted Robert Gurr suggests that a growth of the "civilizing process" occurred in which people turned away from violence and…

  4. The War on Drugs: Methamphetamine, Public Health, and Crime

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Carlos; Nicosia, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    In mid-1995, a government effort to reduce the supply of methamphetamine precursors successfully disrupted the methamphetamine market and interrupted a trajectory of increasing usage. The price of methamphetamine tripled and purity declined from 90 percent to 20 percent. Simultaneously, amphetaminerelated hospital and treatment admissions dropped 50 percent and 35 percent, respectively. Methamphetamine use among arrestees declined 55 percent. Although felony methamphetamine arrests fell 50 percent, there is no evidence of substantial reductions in property or violent crime. The impact was largely temporary. The price returned to its original level within four months; purity, hospital admissions, treatment admissions, and arrests approached preintervention levels within eighteen months. (JEL I12, K42) PMID:20543969

  5. Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools. Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2007-08. First Look. NCES 2009-326

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiman, Samantha; DeVoe, Jill F.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents findings on crime and violence in U.S. public schools, using data from the 2007-08 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2008). SSOCS provides information about school crime-related topics from the perspective of schools by asking school principals about the frequency of incidents, such as physical attacks, robberies, and…

  6. Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools. Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2009-10. First Look. NCES 2011-320

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiman, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Education Statistics collects data on crime and violence in U.S. public schools through the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS). This First Look report presents findings from the 2009-10 School Survey on Crime and Safety data collection. Developed and managed by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)…

  7. Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools: Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2003-04. First Look. NCES 2007-302

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerino, Paul; Hurwitz, Michael D.; Noonan, Margaret E.; Kaffenberger, Sarah M.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents findings on crime and violence in regular public schools in the United States, using data from the 2003--04 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2004). First administered in the 1999--2000 school year, SSOCS provides information about school crime-related topics from the perspective of school administrators. Developed by…

  8. Oil, pollution, and crime: Three essays in public economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Conan Christopher

    The overall goal of this dissertation is to study important questions in public economics. In its three chapters, I look at peak world oil production and its implications for oil prices; cross-country pollution emission rates and implications for institutional quality; and finally, black-white arrest rates and implications for law enforcement discount factors. Each chapter of this dissertation combines new theory with robust empirical work to extend the quantitative frontier of research in public economics.

  9. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to every type of mechanically powered vehicle used for material or equipment... the vehicle's capacity or safety, shall not be done without either the manufacturers' prior written... the vehicle and shall be visible to the operator. The vehicle weight, with and without a...

  10. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to every type of mechanically powered vehicle used for material or equipment... the vehicle's capacity or safety, shall not be done without either the manufacturers' prior written... the vehicle and shall be visible to the operator. The vehicle weight, with and without a...

  11. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to every type of mechanically powered vehicle used for material or equipment... the vehicle's capacity or safety, shall not be done without either the manufacturers' prior written... the vehicle and shall be visible to the operator. The vehicle weight, with and without a...

  12. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to every type of mechanically powered vehicle used for material or equipment... the vehicle's capacity or safety, shall not be done without either the manufacturers' prior written... the vehicle and shall be visible to the operator. The vehicle weight, with and without a...

  13. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to every type of mechanically powered vehicle used for material or equipment... the vehicle's capacity or safety, shall not be done without either the manufacturers' prior written... the vehicle and shall be visible to the operator. The vehicle weight, with and without a...

  14. The importance of an anthropological scene of crime investigation in the case of burnt remains in vehicles: 3 case studies.

    PubMed

    Porta, Davide; Poppa, Pasquale; Regazzola, Valeria; Gibelli, Daniele; Schillaci, Daniela Roberta; Amadasi, Alberto; Magli, Francesca; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-09-01

    Inspection of a crime scene is a crucial step in forensic medicine, and even the methods taught by forensic anthropology are essential. Whereas a thorough inspection can provide crucial information, an approximate inspection can be useless or even harmful. This study reports 3 cases of burnt bodies found inside vehicles between 2006 and 2009 in the outskirts of Milan (Italy). In all 3 cases, the victim was killed by gunshot, and the body was burnt in the vehicle to destroy signs of skeletal injury and prevent identification. In every case, the assistance of forensic anthropologists was requested, but only after the inspection of the body at autopsy showed that the remains were incomplete, thus making it more difficult to determine the identity, cause, and manner of death. A second scene of crime inspection was therefore performed with strict anthropological and adapted archeological methods by forensic anthropologists to perform a more complete recovery, proving how much material had been left behind. These cases clearly show the importance of a proper recovery and of the application of forensic anthropology methods on badly charred bodies and the importance of recovering every fragment of bone: even the smallest fragment can provide essential information. Thus, a precise coordination, a correct and thorough recovery of bone fragments, and an anthropological approach are crucial for many issues: analysis of the scene of crime, reconstruction of the corpse, and reconstruction of the perimortem events. PMID:23629387

  15. [Economic crime].

    PubMed

    Dinitz, S

    1976-01-01

    Economic crime, often also referred to as white collar crime, is one of the most incidious and predatory of offenses. Unlike street crime, for which there may well be some protection, the average citizen is completely at the mercy of the perpetrators of economic crimes. The concept of white collar crime was first identified by Edwin H. Sutherland. He dealt with the problem as a violation of trust involving either or both misrepresentation and duplicity. He argued for the use of criminal sanctions rather than civil remedies as a means of dealing with white collar offenses. Sutherland's views were attacked by the legal profession, by sociologists and criminologists and by public opinion specialists. They contended that an act treated in civil court is not a crime; that criminals are those persons who are defined as such and white collar criminals are neither so defined nor do they define themselves as criminals and, finally, that economic crime is universal. Can anyone be criminal, then, ask the critics? A number of studies by Clinard, Quinney, Black, Ball, Cressey, Newman and others have translated the interest in white collar crime into empirical terms. The last thirty-five years have also witnessed the elaboration and alteration of the theory itself. Geis' work has been particularly important in this respect. His "street" versus "suite" crime is a useful dichotomy. Most important, however, have been the monograph and papers by Herbert Edelhertz who has conceptualized the issues on various levels - from consumer fraud to the illegal activities of the multinational corporation. This article is concerned with the exposition of the theory and research in the field. Most significant, the paper raises serious doubts whether the problem of economic crime can be researched and studied; it raises even more difficult issues concerning the legal and sociological implications of economic crime and of its prevention, management and control. PMID:1030807

  16. Korean version of the notification policy on sexual offenders: did it enhance public awareness of sexual crimes against minors?

    PubMed

    Shin, Junseob; Lee, Young-Boon

    2005-08-01

    This study reviewed the public notification policy of sexual offenders against minors in South Korea as compared to community notification programs in the United States. The study then examined the policy's impact on increasing the general public's awareness of such sexual crimes. This is based on the assumption that heightening public awareness can be a starting point in combating such crimes. Results of the data, drawn from a sample of 1,409 Koreans across the nation, showed that the notification policy enhanced public awareness. Factors related to this increase in awareness were people's concern about or familiarity with the policy and people's experience in identifying the existence of known sexual offenders in their communities. Based on the results of this study, strategies for enhancing public awareness of sexual crimes on minors were formulated. The need to develop treatment programs for sexual offenders was likewise highlighted. PMID:15983053

  17. AllAboard: Visual Exploration of Cellphone Mobility Data to Optimise Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Sbodio, M; Calabrese, F; Berlingerio, M; Pinelli, F; Nair, R

    2016-02-01

    The deep penetration of mobile phones offers cities the ability to opportunistically monitor citizens' mobility and use data-driven insights to better plan and manage services. With large scale data on mobility patterns, operators can move away from the costly, mostly survey based, transportation planning processes, to a more data-centric view, that places the instrumented user at the center of development. In this framework, using mobile phone data to perform transit analysis and optimization represents a new frontier with significant societal impact, especially in developing countries. In this paper we present AllAboard, an intelligent tool that analyses cellphone data to help city authorities in visually exploring urban mobility and optimizing public transport. This is performed within a self contained tool, as opposed to the current solutions which rely on a combination of several distinct tools for analysis, reporting, optimisation and planning. An interactive user interface allows transit operators to visually explore the travel demand in both space and time, correlate it with the transit network, and evaluate the quality of service that a transit network provides to the citizens at very fine grain. Operators can visually test scenarios for transit network improvements, and compare the expected impact on the travellers' experience. The system has been tested using real telecommunication data for the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and evaluated from a data mining, optimisation and user prospective. PMID:26731450

  18. School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2003-04. Public-Use Data File Codebook. NCES 2007-333

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izrael, David; deFriesse, Frederick A.

    2006-01-01

    The 2003-04 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2004) public-use data file codebook contains a list of variables and information about the variables on the SSOCS:2004 public-use data file. Users are provided with weighted and unweighted frequencies for the categorical variables on the file and descriptive statistics for the continuous…

  19. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the public health impacts of the income-generating activities of organised crime. These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply of young people and children as sex workers through deceit, coercion or purchase from family, through to smuggling of migrants, forced labour and the theft of human tissues for transplant, and the sale of fake medications, foodstuffs and beverages, cigarettes and other counterfeit manufactures. It looks at the effect of globalisation on integrating supply chains from poorly-regulated and impoverished source regions through to their distant markets, often via disparate groups of organised criminals who have linked across their traditional territories for mutual benefit and enhanced profit, with both traditional and newly-created linkages between production, distribution and retail functions of cooperating criminal networks from different cultures. It discusses the interactions between criminals and the structures of the state which enable illegal and socially undesirable activities to proceed on a massive scale through corruption and subversion of regulatory mechanisms. It argues that conventional approaches to tackling organised crime often have deleterious consequences for public health, and calls for an evidence-based approach with a focus on outcomes rather than ideology. PMID:21078158

  20. Organised crime and the efforts to combat it: a concern for public health.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lucy; McKee, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the public health impacts of the income-generating activities of organised crime. These range from the traditional vice activities of running prostitution and supplying narcotics, to the newer growth areas of human trafficking in its various forms, from international supply of young people and children as sex workers through deceit, coercion or purchase from family, through to smuggling of migrants, forced labour and the theft of human tissues for transplant, and the sale of fake medications, foodstuffs and beverages, cigarettes and other counterfeit manufactures. It looks at the effect of globalisation on integrating supply chains from poorly-regulated and impoverished source regions through to their distant markets, often via disparate groups of organised criminals who have linked across their traditional territories for mutual benefit and enhanced profit, with both traditional and newly-created linkages between production, distribution and retail functions of cooperating criminal networks from different cultures. It discusses the interactions between criminals and the structures of the state which enable illegal and socially undesirable activities to proceed on a massive scale through corruption and subversion of regulatory mechanisms. It argues that conventional approaches to tackling organised crime often have deleterious consequences for public health, and calls for an evidence-based approach with a focus on outcomes rather than ideology. PMID:21078158

  1. 78 FR 52997 - Connected Vehicle Research Program Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Connected Vehicle Research Program Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program Office... JPO) will host its annual free public meeting to provide an overview of the ITS JPO Connected Vehicle... opportunity to learn details about the Connected Vehicle research program in anticipation of the...

  2. Integration of the real-time tracking gradiometer (RTG) aboard the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Morpheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George I.; Matthews, Robert; Wynn, Michael

    2001-10-01

    In keeping with the Navy's policy to remove humans from harms way, the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) is replacing human divers for many missions. The Advanced Marine Systems Lab at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) has developed a small, magnetically friendly, modular plastic AUV called Morpheus designed for coastal applications and especially suited for very shallow water (VSW) mine reconnaissance. Currently employed sensor technologies on AUVs have certain deficiencies and limitations when used across the wide gamut of naval targets and environments, and a strong requirement exists for a sensor or sensors to fill these niches. The Real-time Tracking Gradiometer (RTG) selected for this integration is truly such a niche sensor because its capabilities are not degraded by media interfaces or environmental conditions. It is an experimental prototype fluxgate magnetometer array developed by Quantum Magnetics for the Coastal Systems Station (CSS) and was designed to be man portable and self contained. While limited by physics in detection range, it is capable of detecting ferrous targets under the worst environmental conditions, even when the target is buried. While not having the range of sonar, the RTG does not respond to the false alarms that are indicated by sonar, and since it is capable of also providing range and bearing information, it provides an invaluable niche filling classification tool. The placing of any magnetic sensing system on a conventional AUV is a non-trivial problem. The standard AUV is designed around materials and components that were selected to maximize performance without regard to the magnetic properties of the materials used in its fabrication. To minimize the degradation of sensor performance caused by the platform, several steps must be taken. These include; the substitution of nonferrous components for ferrous, maximizing the separation between the sensor and magnetic field sources, minimizing current loops and using auxiliary

  3. 78 FR 78467 - Connected Vehicle Research Program Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Connected Vehicle Research Program Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program Office... Vehicle Systems. The meeting will take place Thursday, January 16, 2014, from 1:00 p.m. (EST) to 4:00 p.m... the successful implementation and operations of connected vehicle technologies. The primary...

  4. Science against Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Julia

    2002-01-01

    Describes a project involving students in forensic science and crime prevention to improve their investigative skills using a DNA fingerprinting workshop and designing burglar alarms, investigating blood splatter patterns, investigating vehicle collisions, and researching crime prevention advice on the Internet. (YDS)

  5. Reaction of passengers to public service vehicle ride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. J.; Oborne, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A series of questionnaire studies is described, which was carried out on passengers in public service vehicles in the United Kingdom particularly cross-channel hovercraft, helicopter and train. The effectiveness of the different rating techniques employed is examined and it is demonstrated that useful and reliable information can be obtained on the effects of such physical parameters as vibration, vehicle motion and noise using rating methods which involve no external standards. Some results obtained from analysis of the survey returns are presented.

  6. Crime on Campus: Analyzing and Managing the Increasing Risk of Institutional Liability. The Publication Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burling, Philip

    This monograph reviews a college or university's responsibility for incidents of crime occurring on its campus or in the course of its programs. Part 1 reviews the legal analyses which courts undertake in responding to claims that, under common tort law or contract theories, liability for the injuries suffered by a person ought to be shifted from…

  7. Preventing Smoking in Open Public Places in University Campus Settings: A Situational Crime Prevention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jing; Prenzler, Tim; Buys, Nicholas; McMeniman, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions using situational crime prevention approaches to reduce the smoking rate in outdoor areas of a university campus. Design/methodology/approach: A prospective intervention design was designed for the study. Surveys and observations were used to measure the impacts…

  8. Bad Kids: Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile Court. Studies in Crime and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feld, Barry C.

    This book examines what is wrong with the U.S. juvenile court system and proposes an alternative model for youth crime control and child welfare. Under this model, states would try all offenders in an integrated criminal justice system with appropriate modifications to accommodate younger offenders. The chapters are: (1) "The Social Construction…

  9. Sunday Liquor Laws and Crime.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Many jurisdictions have considered relaxing Sunday alcohol sales restrictions, yet such restrictions' effects on public health remain poorly understood. This paper analyzes the effects of legalization of Sunday packaged liquor sales on crime, focusing on the phased introduction of such sales in Virginia beginning in 2004. Differences-in-differences and triple-differences estimates indicate the liberalization increased minor crime by 5% and alcohol-involved serious crime by 10%. The law change did not affect domestic crime or induce significant geographic or inter-temporal crime displacement. The costs of this additional crime are comparable to the state's revenues from increased liquor sales. PMID:22125348

  10. School Crime Patterns: A National Profile of U.S. Public High Schools Using Rates of Crime Reported to Police. Report on the Study on School Violence and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, David; Wright, Mareena McKinley

    This report profiles violence in U.S. public high schools. It is based on data taken from a U.S. Department of Education survey of school principals that asked about the number and types of crimes reported to police for the 1996-97 school year. The analysis shows that 60 percent of the violence occurred in 4 percent of the schools. The high…

  11. Addressing fear of crime in public space: gender differences in reaction to safety measures in train transit.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Nilay; Welch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Research has identified several factors that affect fear of crime in public space. However, the extent to which gender moderates the effectiveness of fear-reducing measures has received little attention. Using data from the Chicago Transit Authority Customer Satisfaction Survey of 2003, this study aims to understand whether train transit security practices and service attributes affect men and women differently. Findings indicate that, while the presence of video cameras has a lower effect on women's feelings of safety compared with men, frequent and on-time service matters more to male passengers. Additionally, experience with safety-related problems affects women significantly more than men. Conclusions discuss the implications of the study for theory and gender-specific policies to improve perceptions of transit safety. PMID:20976976

  12. School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) 2000 Public-Use Data Files, User's Manual, and Detailed Data Documentation. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This CD-ROM contains the raw, public-use data from the 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) along with a User's Manual and Detailed Data Documentation. The data are provided in SAS, SPSS, STATA, and ASCII formats. The User's Manual and the Detailed Data Documentation are provided as .pdf files. (Author)

  13. Remote profiling of lake ice using an S-band short pulse radar aboard an all-terrain vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne short-pulse radar system to measure ice thickness was designed. The system supported an effort to develop an all-weather Great Lakes Ice Information System to aid in extending the winter navigation season. Experimental studies into the accuracy and limitations of the system are described. A low power version was operated from an all-terrain vehicle on the Straits of Mackinac during March 1975. The vehicle allowed rapid surveying of large areas and eliminated the ambiguity in location between the radar system and the ground truth ice auger team. It was also possible to the effects of snow cover, surface melt water, pressure ridging, and ice type upon the accuracy of the system. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses from 29 to 60 cm. The maximum radar overestimate was 9.8 percent, while the maximum underestimate was 6.6 percent. The average error of the 25 measurements was 0.1 percent.

  14. Digging Up a Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witham, Shelly Anne; Krockover, Gerald H.; Burgess, Wilella; Bayley, Bill

    2004-01-01

    Forensics can serve as the perfect vehicle for science exploration and learning. As part of a professional development workshop, teachers participated in various forensic activities. This article describes an archaeological dig simulation that provides the catalyst for an inquiry-based activity. In this activity, teachers make crime scene…

  15. Interpretation of Observations of Trans-Spectral Phenomena Acquired Using Hyperspectral Sensors Aboard a Remotely Operated Vehicle in Exuma Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, D.; Carder, Kendall L.; Ivey, J.; English, D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyper-spectral (512-channel) optical data acquired during a relatively deep (102m) dive of our ROSEBUD Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) in the clear waters of Exuma Sound, Bahamas provided the opportunity to investigate the trans-spectral shift of photonic energy (inelastic scattering) as a function of water depth. Results show a convolution of several spectral processes (e.g. absorption, scattering) involving water molecules, dissolved material and particulates as well as trans-spectral (inelastic) processes involving fluorescence by water molecules (Raman), dissolved material and chlorophyll. The spectral signatures of these convolved causes and effects allow deconvolution with a hyperspectral approach. Intrinsic to the convolution was the ability to position the vehicle at depths where Raman fluorescence dominated at red wavelengths. Results show that the calculated Raman absorption coefficients are generally consistent with historical values (i.e. 0.9 x 10(sup)-4 at 525 nm excitation) and that an angstrom exponent of 5 is more appropriate than the often cited value of 4.

  16. A Groundswell Response to Recent Crime Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda

    1989-01-01

    The public is "mad as hell" about crime in their communities and many residents are taking positive steps to counter street violence. Several groups around the country have organized to combat the crime problem. (SI)

  17. 49 CFR 573.15 - Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... when the manufacturer includes that vehicle on its list compiled for purposes of 49 CFR 573.8(a); (5... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall... NONCOMPLIANCE RESPONSIBILITY AND REPORTS § 573.15 Public Availability of Motor Vehicle Recall Information....

  18. 49 CFR 573.15 - Public availability of motor vehicle recall information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... when the manufacturer includes that vehicle on its list compiled for purposes of 49 CFR 573.8(a); (5... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public availability of motor vehicle recall... NONCOMPLIANCE RESPONSIBILITY AND REPORTS § 573.15 Public availability of motor vehicle recall information....

  19. Crime Witness

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    Damaging BPA Transmission lines and property is a crime – and it can also be extremely dangerous. BPA’s toll-free, crime informant hotline allows you to report any illegal or suspicious activity you witness against BPA’s transmission system, property or personnel.

  20. Research Note: Assessing the Perceived Seriousness of White-Collar and Street Crimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Nicole Leeper; Carmichael, Stephanie; Piquero, Alex R.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the ranking of crime seriousness of white-collar crimes relative to street crimes, with early research suggesting the general public is indifferent to crimes of the elite, whereas more recent research indicates that the public thinks certain types of white-collar crime are serious. Building on prior research limitations and…

  1. 49 CFR 37.83 - Remanufacture of rail vehicles and purchase or lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public entities operating rapid or light rail systems. 37.83... operating rapid or light rail systems. (a) This section applies to any public entity operating a rapid or light rail system which takes one of the following actions: (1) After August 25, 1990, remanufactures...

  2. 49 CFR 37.83 - Remanufacture of rail vehicles and purchase or lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public entities operating rapid or light rail systems. 37.83... operating rapid or light rail systems. (a) This section applies to any public entity operating a rapid or light rail system which takes one of the following actions: (1) After August 25, 1990, remanufactures...

  3. 49 CFR 37.83 - Remanufacture of rail vehicles and purchase or lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public entities operating rapid or light rail systems. 37.83... operating rapid or light rail systems. (a) This section applies to any public entity operating a rapid or light rail system which takes one of the following actions: (1) After August 25, 1990, remanufactures...

  4. 49 CFR 37.83 - Remanufacture of rail vehicles and purchase or lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public entities operating rapid or light rail systems. 37.83... operating rapid or light rail systems. (a) This section applies to any public entity operating a rapid or light rail system which takes one of the following actions: (1) After August 25, 1990, remanufactures...

  5. 49 CFR 37.83 - Remanufacture of rail vehicles and purchase or lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lease of remanufactured rail vehicles by public entities operating rapid or light rail systems. 37.83... operating rapid or light rail systems. (a) This section applies to any public entity operating a rapid or light rail system which takes one of the following actions: (1) After August 25, 1990, remanufactures...

  6. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition... lifts in operative condition: Public entities. (a) This section applies only to public entities with respect to lifts in non-rail vehicles. (b) The entity shall establish a system of regular and...

  7. Crime and Crime Prevention. Community Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joe B.

    Focusing on law enforcement agents and taxpayers at the local level, this two-part report examines facts about crime in the United States and reports results of a survey conducted to determine attitudes about crime and police protection. Part One presents facts and issues related to types of crime, crime statistics, the extent of crime, trends in…

  8. Economic crime: does personality matter?

    PubMed

    Alalehto, Tage

    2003-06-01

    Since the publication of Edwin Sutherland's classical study, White Collar Crime, personality has been treated as completely irrelevant as a cause or as a correlating variable in studies of economic crime. This article questions that thesis. In an ongoing Swedish project studying economic crime in the areas of construction, engineering, and the music industry, 128 informants were interviewed regarding the personal character of the economic criminal compared to that of the law-abiding businessperson. Data were collected from five different regions in Sweden using the Big Five model, the personality model most often used within the field of personality research today. This article compares the results from the interviews with the few international studies that exist regarding economic crimes in these areas and common results are emphasized. It also presents nuanced analyses of the significance of personality in economic crime. PMID:12808742

  9. An empirical analysis of farm vehicle crash injury severities on Iowa's public road system.

    PubMed

    Gkritza, Konstantina; Kinzenbaw, Caroline R; Hallmark, Shauna; Hawkins, Neal

    2010-07-01

    Farm vehicle crashes are a major safety concern for farmers as well as all other users of the public road system in agricultural states. Using data on farm vehicle crashes that occurred on Iowa's public roads between 2004 and 2006, we estimate a multinomial logit model to identify crash-, farm vehicle-, and driver-specific factors that determine farm vehicle crash injury severity outcomes. Estimation findings indicate that there are crash patterns (rear-end manner of collision; single-vehicle crash; farm vehicle crossed the centerline or median) and conditions (obstructed vision and crash in rural area; dry road, dark lighting, speed limit 55 mph or higher, and harvesting season), as well as farm vehicle and driver-contributing characteristics (old farm vehicle, young farm vehicle driver), where targeted intervention can help reduce the severity of crash outcomes. Determining these contributing factors and their effect is the first step to identifying countermeasures and safety strategies in a bid to improve transportation safety for all users on the public road system in Iowa as well as other agricultural states. PMID:20441857

  10. 77 FR 39206 - Public Hearing on Proposed Rule for Heavy Vehicle Electronic Stability Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... No. 136, Electronic Stability Control Systems for Heavy Vehicles (77 FR 30766). The standard would require truck tractors, and certain large buses with a gross vehicle weight rating of greater than 11,793... (ESC) systems on truck tractors and large buses. NHTSA is announcing a public hearing to provide...

  11. Crime and the Countryside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGranahan, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Attributes rising crime rates in rural areas to increase in incomplete or broken families, instead of factors such as poverty, race, or population growth. Discusses differences in types of crimes in urban and rural areas, characteristics of high crime counties, family structure and crime rates, and crime and population growth. (LFL)

  12. Supporting the mission and goals of 2014 National Crime Victims' Rights Week, which include increasing public awareness of the rights, needs, and concerns of, and services available to assist, victims of crime in the United States.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Costa, Jim [D-CA-16

    2014-04-10

    06/09/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Using Massive Vehicle Positioning Data to Improve Control and Planning of Public Road Transport

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, Gabino; García, Carmelo R.; Quesada-Arencibia, A.; Alayón, Francisco; Pérez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a system for the automatic recording of positioning data for public transport vehicles used on roads. With the data provided by this system, transportation-regulatory authorities can control, verify and improve the routes that vehicles use, while also providing new data to improve the representation of the transportation network and providing new services in the context of intelligent metropolitan areas. The system is executed autonomously in the vehicles, by recording their massive positioning data and transferring them to remote data banks for subsequent processing. To illustrate the utility of the system, we present a case of application that consists of identifying the points at which vehicles stop systematically, which may be points of scheduled stops or points at which traffic signals or road topology force the vehicle to stop. This identification is performed using pattern recognition techniques. The system has been applied under real operating conditions, providing the results discussed in the present study. PMID:24763212

  14. Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Chapman, Christopher D.; Rand, Michael R.; Ringel, Cheryl

    The string of tragic, violent incidents that occurred during the 1997-98 school year has refocused the American public's attention on school crime and safety. This statistical compilation supports the "Annual Report on School Safety: 1998" by presenting the latest available data on school crime and student safety. The report presents a profile of…

  15. Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

  16. Black Women, Crime and Crime Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Elsie L.

    Several factors indicate that there is a relationship between economic conditions and crime among black women. Crime statistics show that outside of the misdemeanors of drunkenness and disorderly conduct, black women tend to be arrested for larceny and prostitution, both economic crimes. The fact that black women are at the bottom of the economic…

  17. Crime: social disorganization and relative deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, I; Kennedy, B P; Wilkinson, R G

    1999-03-01

    Crime is seldom considered as an outcome in public health research. Yet major theoretical and empirical developments in the field of criminology during the past 50 years suggest that the same social environmental factors which predict geographic variation in crime rates may also be relevant for explaining community variations in health and wellbeing. Understanding the causes of variability in crime across countries and across regions within a country will help us to solve one of the enduring puzzles in public health, viz. why some communities are healthier than others. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework for investigating the influence of the social context on community health, using crime as the indicator of collective wellbeing. We argue that two sets of societal characteristics influence the level of crime: the degree of relative deprivation in society (for instance, measured by the extent of income inequality), and the degree of cohesiveness in social relations among citizens (measured, for instance, by indicators of 'social capital' and 'collective efficacy'). We provided a test of our conceptual framework using state-level ecologic data on violent crimes and property crimes within the USA. Violent crimes (homicide, assault, robbery) were consistently associated with relative deprivation (income inequality) and indicators of low social capital. Among property crimes, burglary was also associated with deprivation and low social capital. Areas with high crime rates tend also to exhibit higher mortality rates from all causes, suggesting that crime and population health share the same social origins. Crime is thus a mirror of the quality of the social environment. PMID:10190635

  18. Motor Vehicle Theft. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    Thirteen years of data from the National Crime Survey were analyzed to examine the characteristics of motor vehicle theft, to identify trends during the past 13 years, and to determine who are most likely to be victims of motor vehicle theft. All motor vehicle thefts reported to the National Crime Survey from 1973 through 1985 were examined.…

  19. Drug Treatment as a Crime Fighting Tool.

    PubMed

    Jofre-Bonet, Mireia; Sindelar, Jody L.

    2001-12-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary approach to reducing crime in the US has been through the criminal justice system. However, drug treatment may be an effective tool in reducing crime. In order to make better use of treatment as an alternative approach, one needs to know if reducing drug use through treatment results in decreased crime. AIMS OF THE STUDY: The objective of this paper is to model and empirically investigate the extent to which a change in drug use that results from treatment reduces crime and whether a change in drug use is causally related to change in crime. We focus on crime-for-profit. METHODS: We use a multi-site dataset of 3,502 inner-city drug users entering treatment. We analyze the change in drug use and crime pre and post treatment. We take first differences to address the omitted variable problem. RESULTS: We find that treatment reduces drug use and that, in turn, reduced drug use has a significant impact on crime. For our study population, reduced drug use seems to be causally related to reduced crime. This finding is robust to specification and subsamples. We estimate that reduced drug use due to treatment is associated with 54% fewer days of crime for profit, ceteris paribus. DISCUSSION: We use a longitudinal data set and a novel approach to analyze the relationship between crime and drugs. We analyze a low-income, inner-city, drug-addicted sample. We use self-reported crime. For our purposes, the use of individual data is an improvement over the use of aggregate level data that has been used in much of the related literature. Limitations of our paper include that we do not have a random sample and that our measure is self-reported in the previous 30 days. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: Our findings suggest that drug treatment may be an effective crime-fighting tool. Treatment reduces not only the crime of drug possession, but also crime-for-profit. Current public policy emphasizes use of the criminal justice system, incarceration in

  20. The Public Mind: Views of Pennsylvania Citizens. Smoking, Education, Tax Reform, Crime Control, Welfare Reform, Health Care Reform. Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield Univ., PA. Rural Services Inst.

    The sixth annual survey conducted by the Rural Services Institute examined the opinions of Pennsylvania residents on crime control, welfare reform, smoking, and education reform proposals. Sixty percent of respondents believed that the most urgent issue facing Pennsylvania was violent crime and strongly supported measures to reduce the…

  1. 76 FR 14014 - Public Roundtables: Protecting Consumers in the Sale and Leasing of Motor Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... July 21, 2011 as the transfer date. See 75 FR 57252 (Sept. 20, 2010). II. Roundtable Goals and Topics... Public Roundtables: Protecting Consumers in the Sale and Leasing of Motor Vehicles AGENCY: Federal Trade... efforts to fulfill this commitment in connection with the sale, financing, and leasing practices of...

  2. 78 FR 45996 - Connected Vehicle Planning and Policy Stakeholder Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Connected Vehicle Planning and Policy Stakeholder Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program Office, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department...

  3. 78 FR 18415 - Connected Vehicle Reference Implementation Architecture Workshop; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... management of the ITS Architecture and Standards Programs and in cooperation with the Systems Engineering and.... ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Intelligent Transportation System Joint... Connected Vehicle Reference Implementation Architecture Workshop; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS...

  4. Problems in Education about Violence: Factors Affecting the Perceived Increase in Violent Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mersky, Rebecca A.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Although most national and regional statistics show that violent crimes have been declining, there is a widespread misperception among the public that such crimes are increasing. The Perception and Experience of Violent Crime survey, based on research on actual rates and perceptions of crime, was administered to subjects enrolled in a college…

  5. Skin cancer comic book: evaluation of a public educational vehicle.

    PubMed

    Putnam, G L; Yanagisako, K L

    1982-01-01

    A 16-page 4-color comic book was developed as part of a multimedia public education campaign designed to improve skin cancer knowledge and prevention/detection behavior. A concentrated comic book distribution to each of 8,000 households in a predominantly Caucasian area was preceded and followed by personal interviews with 300 residents randomly selected from this area. In households reading the comic book (N-122), respondents reported the following changes as a direct result of readership--avoidance of sun exposure between 10 am and 2 pm (44.3%), use of sunscreens with SPF 8 and over (38.5%), skin self-examination (34.4%), and use of protective clothing (29.5%). To a lesser extent nonreaders also showed positive increases, suggesting exposure to other educational efforts of the skin cancer campaign. Over 90% of the readers felt that the comic book was easy to read, easy to understand, and interesting. The comic book appealed less to males and to those above the age of 50 years. PMID:7151069

  6. Harnessing Vehicle Automation for Public Mobility -- An Overview of Ongoing Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Stanley E.

    2015-11-05

    This presentation takes a look at the efforts to harness automated vehicle technology for public transport. The European CityMobil2 is the leading demonstration project in which automated shuttles were, or are planned to be, demonstrated in several cities and regions. The presentation provides a brief overview of the demonstrations at Oristano, Italy (July 2014), LaRochelle, France (Dec 2014), Lausanne, Switzerland (Apr 2015), Vantaa, Finland (July 2015), and Trikala, Greece (Sept 2015). In addition to technology exposition, the objectives included generating a legal framework for operation in each location and gaging the reaction of the public to unmanned shuttles, both of which were successfully achieved. Several such demonstrations are planned throughout the world, including efforts in North America in conjunction with the GoMentum Station in California. These early demonstration with low-speed automated shuttles provide a glimpse of the possible with a fully automated fleet of driverless vehicle providing a public transit service.

  7. The public health approach to motor vehicles, tobacco, and alcohol, with applications to firearms policy.

    PubMed

    Hemenway, D

    2001-01-01

    The public health approach that has been used to reduce problems caused by motor vehicles, tobacco and alcohol is applied to firearms policy. Manufacturers try to focus prevention efforts on the user rather than the product, and promote education and law enforcement policies directed toward the consumer. Public health efforts emphasize the systematic collection of data, scientific inquiry, and a multi-faceted policy approach that includes modifying the product and the environment. The endeavor to reduce gun violence is part of the general and continuing public health struggle to reduce harms caused by consumer products. PMID:11787305

  8. Effects of a National Public Service Information Campaign on Crime Prevention: Perspectives from Social Learning and Social Control Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lordan, Edward J.; Kwon, Joongrok

    This study examined the effects of public service advertising from two theoretical backgrounds: social learning theory and social control theory. Traditional social learning theory assumes that learning occurs by subjects performing responses and experiencing their effects, with reinforcement as the main determinant. Social control theory, as…

  9. Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, Brent; Southworth, Frank; Meyer, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types of public transit service, and their usefulness in helping a transit agency to reduce its carbon footprint through informed vehicle and fuel procurement decisions. Available calculators fall into two categories: registry/inventory based calculators most suitable for standardized voluntary reporting, carbon trading, and regulatory compliance; and multi-modal life cycle analysis calculators that seek comprehensive coverage of all direct and indirect emissions. Despite significant progress in calculator development, no single calculator as yet contains all of the information needed by transit agencies to develop a truly comprehensive, life cycle analysis-based accounting of the emissions produced by its vehicle fleet operations, and for a wide range of vehicle/fuel technology options.

  10. Non-public vehicle traffic-violation detection using mobile cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huini; Hu, Yang; Huang, Rui

    2013-10-01

    With the rapid development of technologies, road traffic surveillance tends to be more intelligent. Detection of non-public vehicles driving in public bus lanes is one of the emerging applications. Commonly, fixed cameras are adopted in video surveillance systems. Compared with the limited monitoring areas of fixed cameras, mobile cameras can follow the moving targets and in this way greatly extend the monitoring areas. However, for mobile cameras, many detection methods do not perform well because the background is rapidly changing and the target is moving fast as well. In this paper, we propose a novel method to detect non-public vehicles driving in the bus lanes (hence violating the traffic regulations) using mobile cameras installed on buses. In particular, we first use Hough transform and SVM classifier with color features to detect bus lanes, and then use AdaBoost cascade classifier with Haar features to detect license plates in the bus lane area. Finally another SVM classifier is used to classify the color of the license plate to determine if it belongs to a non-public vehicle. As shown in the experiments, our method is proven to be robust to complex background and performs well in the real world situations.

  11. To amend the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to reauthorize the public safety and community policing grant program, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Reed, Tom [R-NY-23

    2014-09-18

    11/24/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Within-Day Recharge of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Energy Impact of Public Charging Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jing; Lin, Zhenhong

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the role of public charging infrastructure in increasing the share of driving on electricity that plug-in hybrid electric vehicles might exhibit, thus reducing their gasoline consumption. Vehicle activity data obtained from a global positioning system tracked household travel survey in Austin, Texas, is used to estimate gasoline and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Drivers within-day recharging behavior, constrained by travel activities and public charger availability, is modeled. It is found that public charging offers greater fuel savings for hybrid electric vehicles s equipped with smaller batteries, by encouraging within-day recharge, and providing an extensive public charging service is expected to reduce plug-in hybrid electric vehicles gasoline consumption by more than 30% and energy cost by 10%, compared to the scenario of home charging only.

  13. Crime Scene Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Barbara; Kohlmeier, Kris; Kiel, Robert D.

    Casting students in grades 5 through 12 in the roles of reporters, lawyers, and detectives at the scene of a crime, this interdisciplinary activity involves participants in the intrigue and drama of crime investigation. Using a hands-on, step-by-step approach, students work in teams to investigate a crime and solve a mystery. Through role-playing…

  14. Computer Crimes in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telem, Moshe

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the occurrence of computer crimes in schools, focusing on the main types of crimes possible, potential criminals in schools, and how the organizational characteristics of schools invite computer crimes. Means to counter this problem and minimize it as far as possible are suggested. (MBR)

  15. Eliciting road traffic injuries cost among Iranian drivers’ public vehicles using willingness to pay method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: To allocate resources at the national level and ensure the safety level of roads with the aim of economic efficiency, cost calculation can help determine the size of the problem and demonstrate the economic benefits resulting from preventing such injuries. This study was carried out to elicit the cost of traffic injuries among Iranian drivers of public vehicles. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 410 drivers of public vehicles were randomly selected from all the drivers in city of Tehran, Iran. The research questionnaire was prepared based on the standard for willingness to pay (WTP) method (stated preference (SP), contingent value (CV), and revealed preference (RP) model). Data were collected along with a scenario for vehicle drivers. Inclusion criteria were having at least high school education and being in the age range of 18 to 65 years old. Final analysis of willingness to pay was carried out using Weibull model. Results: Mean WTP was 3,337,130 IRR among drivers of public vehicles. Statistical value of life was estimated 118,222,552,601,648 IRR, for according to 4,694 dead drivers, which was equivalent to 3,940,751,753 $ based on the dollar free market rate of 30,000 IRR (purchase power parity). Injury cost was 108,376,366,437,500 IRR, equivalent to 3,612,545,548 $. In sum, injury and death cases came to 226,606,472,346,449 IRR, equivalent to 7,553,549,078 $. Moreover in 2013, cost of traffic injuries among the drivers of public vehicles constituted 1.25% of gross national income, which was 604,300,000,000$. WTP had a significant relationship with gender, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, more pay to less traffic, and minibus drivers. Conclusion: Cost of traffic injuries among drivers of public vehicles included 1.25% of gross national income, which was noticeable; minibus drivers had less perception of risk reduction than others. PMID:26157655

  16. 77 FR 20872 - Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Research Workshop; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Research Workshop; Notice of Public Meeting... program is to enable the development of vehicle based applications and safety systems that will...

  17. Cyber crimes.

    PubMed

    Nuzback, Kara

    2014-07-01

    Since it began offering cyber liability coverage in December 2011, the Texas Medical Liability Trust has received more than 150 cyber liability claims, most of which involved breaches of electronic protected health information. TMLT's cyber liability insurance will protect practices financially should a breach occur. The insurance covers a breach notification to customers and business partners, expenses for legal counsel, information security and forensic data services, public relations support, call center and website support, credit monitoring, and identity theft restoration services. PMID:25023560

  18. VIOLENT CRIME EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES: A GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEFINED COHORT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background

    Area-level socioeconomic disparities have long been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Crime is an important element of the neighborhood environment inadequately investigated in the public health literature. Using geocoded linked birth, crime and cens...

  19. Aboard the Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Florence S.

    This 32-page pamphlet contains color photographs and detailed diagrams which illustrate general descriptive comments about living conditions aboard the space shuttle. Described are details of the launch, the cabin, the condition of weightlessness, food, sleep, exercise, atmosphere, personal hygiene, medicine, going EVA (extra-vehicular activity),…

  20. Public policies for hybrid-electric vehicles: The impact of government incentives on consumer adoption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, David B.

    This dissertation examines the outcomes and effectiveness of public policies designed to promote the adoption of hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). As a primary methodology, I employ cross-sectional analysis of hybrid registration data over time for U.S. states and Virginia municipalities to examine the relationship between hybrid adoption and a variety of socioeconomic and policy variables. I also compare hybrid adoption patterns over time to the U.S. average for specific states that have changed incentive policies, to determine whether these policy changes are consistent with significant changes in adoption patterns. The results of these analyses suggest a strong relationship between gasoline prices and hybrid adoption, but a much weaker relationship between incentive policies and hybrid adoption. Incentives that allow hybrids to access High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes with only one occupant may also be effective in promoting adoption, but only under specific circumstances and with the potential for significant unintended consequences.

  1. Development of car theft crime index in peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Malina; Ismail, Noriszura; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Kasim, Maznah Mat

    2014-06-01

    Vehicle theft is classified as property crime and is considered as the most frequently reported crime in Malaysia. The rising number of vehicle thefts requires proper control by relevant authorities, especially through planning and implementation of strategic and effective measures. Nevertheless, the effort to control this crime would be much easier if there is an indication or index which is more specific to vehicle theft. This study aims to build an index crime which is specific to vehicle theft. The development of vehicle theft index proposed in this study requires three main steps; the first involves identification of criteria related to vehicle theft, the second requires calculation of degrees of importance, or weighting criteria, which involves application of correlation and entropy methods, and the final involves building of vehicle theft index using method of linear combination, or weighted arithmetic average. The results show that the two methods used for determining weights of vehicle theft index are similar. Information generated from the results can be used as a primary source for local authorities to plan strategies for reduction of vehicle theft and for insurance companies to determine premium rates of automobile insurance.

  2. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  3. Hazing: Hidden Campus Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollmann, Barbara B.

    2002-01-01

    Initiation traditions and rites of passage are important for group and team membership, but the violent behavior and alcohol abuse involved in hazing constitute serious campus crime. This article helps campus administrators to develop new strategies for attacking the hidden crime of hazing. (Contains 32 references.) (Author)

  4. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  5. Crime and Corruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Deborah; Turner, Robert; Selke, Karl

    Like intergroup violence (Chap. 7) and insurgency (Chap. 8), crime and ­corruption are nearly inevitable companions of an international intervention. Both contribute to the reasons why the intervention occurs, and both may even grow and fester as side-effects of an intervention. Moreover, crime and corruption frequently serve as obstacles to a successful termination of an intervention.

  6. [Linkage analysis of serial sex crimes].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kaeko; Watanabe, Kazumi; Wachi, Taeko; Otsuka, Yusuke; Kuraishi, Hiroki; Fujita, Goro

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to create an index for a behavioral linkage analysis of serial sex crimes, and second, to construct a predictive model for the analysis. Data on 720 sex crimes (rape, indecent assault) committed by 360 offenders arrested between 1993 and 2005 throughout Japan were collected. The following seven behaviors were examined during a series of analyses aimed at illustrating the effectiveness of crime linkage in serial sex crimes: victim age group, area type, publicness of offense site, weapon, time, contact method, and day of the week. The results indicated that six of the seven behaviors (excluding "day of the week") significantly distinguished between linked and unlinked crime pairs. Under a logistic regression of these six variables, which were dichotomously coded in terms of the concordance or discordance between each pair of incidents, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.85 (95% CI = 0.82-0.87), indicating a high level of discriminative accuracy in identifying disparate sex crimes committed by the same person. PMID:26402952

  7. Administrator's Handbook for Crime Prevention and Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Crime Prevention and Drug Education.

    Acts of three Texas Legislatures have mandated that the schools of Texas provide a program for all public school students, grades K-12, in crime prevention and drug education. To assist schools in formulating a philosophy about and in developing appropriate programs and techniques for drug education and crime prevention programs, the Texas…

  8. Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 1998. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Chapman, Christopher D.; Rand, Michael R.; Ringel, Cheryl

    This executive summary of "Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 1998" notes the structure, highlights, and the reasoning behind the full report. The string of violent incidents that occurred in the 1997-98 school year has refocused the American public's attention on school crime and safety. As the Departments of Justice and Education responded…

  9. Hate Crime: The Rise of Hate Crime on School Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodinger-deUriarte, Cristina

    1991-01-01

    The varying definitions, the primary characteristics, and the causes of hate crimes are reviewed. In addition, misconceptions about what constitutes a hate crime are discussed, as are the increasing upward trends in various form of hate crime. The important role schools can play in alleviating the hate crime phenomenon is the focus of the…

  10. Preventing Hate Crime and Profiling Hate Crime Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James F.; Dyson, Laronistine; Brooks, Willie, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the Hate Crime Statistics Act, signed into law in 1990 to make hate crimes a federal offense, these types of crimes appear to be continuing in the new millennium. Provides hate crime statistics for 1996-98, presents theories on the cause and spread of hate, asserts that a general profile of those with a propensity to act on hate can be…

  11. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  12. Reporting Crime and Fearing Crime in Three Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaehnig, Walter B.; And Others

    A study was conducted to investigate whether readers of newspapers that carry large amounts of crime news have a greater fear of being victims of crime than do readers of newspapers that place less emphasis on crime coverage. Data were gathered through a content analysis of crime news in three newspapers of widely differing circulation, interviews…

  13. The Public Health Reach of High Fluoride Vehicles: Examples of Innovative Approaches.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Marisol; Wolff, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorides and sealants have been shown to reduce caries in populations, making fluoride interventions a large part of the dental public health effort. Although public health programs have traditionally focused on fluoride vehicles delivering less than 1,000 ppm of fluoride, more recent efforts have shifted toward the use of high fluoride vehicles such as varnishes and prescription toothpastes. In the USA, states are developing innovative strategies to increase access to dental services by using primary care medical providers to deliver early preventive services as part of well-child care visits. Currently, Medicaid programs in 43 states reimburse medical providers for preventive services including varnish application. Still, there is uncertainty about the cost-effectiveness of such interventions. In many resource-strained environments, with shortages of dental health care providers, lack of fluoridated water and lower dental awareness, it is necessary to develop sustainable programs utilizing already established programs, like primary school education, where caries prevention may be set as a priority. Dental caries among the elderly is an ongoing complex problem. The 5,000-ppm F toothpaste may be a reasonable approach for developing public health programs where root caries control is the main concern. Fluoride varnish and high concentration fluoride toothpaste are attractive because they can easily be incorporated into well-child visits and community-based geriatric programs. Additional research on the effectiveness and costs associated with population-based programs of this nature for high risk groups is needed, especially in areas where a community-based fluoride delivery program is not available. PMID:27099929

  14. Are "Sisters in Crime" Finally Being Booked? The Coverage of Women and Crime in Journals and Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    Compares coverage of women and crime in sociology journals published from 1956-1960 and from 1976-1980 with coverage in criminology texts published from 1956-1965 and from 1976-1985. Data shows despite recent increases in publication of research in journals, criminology texts show little improvement in their coverage of women and crime. Concludes…

  15. Complex researches aboard the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhyl, Yu. A.

    Special Research and Development Bureau SRDB is a general organizer on Ukrainian part of three Ukrainian- Russian joint experiments to be implemented aboard the Russian segment of International Space Station RS-ISS Experiment Material- Friction It is proposed to carry out a series of comparative tribological research under conditions of orbital flight aboard the ISS versus those in on- ground laboratory conditions To meet these objectives there will be employed a special onboard 6-module Space- borne tribometer- facility The on- ground research will be implemented under conditions of laboratory simulation of Space environmental factors Results thus obtained would enable one to forecast a behavior of friction pairs as well as functional safety and lifetime of the space- vehicle This experiment will also enable us determine an adequacy of tribological results obtained under conditions of outer Space and on- ground simulation Experiment Penta- Fatigue It is proposed to develop fabricate and deliver aboard the RS-ISS a facility intended for studies of SEF- influence on characteristics of metallic and polymeric materials resistance to fatigue destruction Such a project to be implemented in outer Space for the first ever time would enable us to estimate the parameter of cosmic lifetime for constructional materials due to such mechanical characteristic as fatigue strength so as to enable selection of specific sorts of constructional materials appropriate to service in Space technologies At the same time

  16. Are America's Schools Safe? Students Speak Out: 1999 School Crime Supplement. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Lynn A.; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; DeVoe, Jill F.

    The American public continues to be concerned about crime in schools and the safety of students. This report is the first to focus on data collected by the 1999 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Following the introduction and background, nine chapters report and provide statistics on various facets of school…

  17. Should Hate Be a Crime?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Explores issues surrounding hate crime legislation and prosecution, with emphasis on motivation and first amendment issues. Hate crime legislation attempts to import the civil rights model into criminal law, but the very existence of the hate crime label raises social and political stakes in intergroup crimes. (SLD)

  18. 76 FR 11417 - Public Workshop and Hearing for Rear Visibility; Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard, Rearview...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Federal motor vehicle safety standard on rearview mirrors to improve the ability of a driver of a vehicle... Act of 2007 (75 FR 76186). NHTSA's proposal would specify an area immediately behind each vehicle and require that the driver must be able to see that area when the vehicle's transmission is in...

  19. Within-Day Recharge of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Energy Impact of Public Charging Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jing; Lin, Zhenhong

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the role of public charging infrastructure in increasing PHEV s share of driving on electricity and the resulting petroleum use reduction. Using vehicle activity data obtained from the GPS-tracking household travel survey in Austin, Texas, gasoline and electricity consumptions of PHEVs in real world driving context are estimated. Driver s within-day recharging behavior, constrained by travel activities and public charger network, is modeled as a boundedly rational decision and incorporated in the energy use estimation. The key findings from the Austin dataset include: (1) public charging infrastructure makes PHEV a competitive vehicle choice for consumers without a home charger; (2) providing sufficient public charging service is expected to significantly reduce petroleum consumption of PHEVs; and (3) public charging opportunities offer greater benefits for PHEVs with a smaller battery pack, as within-day recharges compensate battery capacity.

  20. Characteristics of carbonyl compounds in public vehicles of Beijing city: Concentrations, sources, and personal exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Mu, Yujing

    The characteristics of carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) including concentrations, major sources, and personal exposure were investigated for 29 vehicles including taxi, bus and subway in Beijing. It was found that the taxis (Xiali, TA) and buses (Huanghe, BA) fueled by gasoline with longer service years had the higher indoor carbonyl levels (178±42.7 and 188±31.6 μg m -3) while subways energized by electricity without exhaust and the jingwa buses (BB) driven in the suburb had the lower levels with total concentrations of 98.5±26.3 and 92.1±20.3 μg m -3, respectively. Outdoor carbonyls of taxi cars and buses were nearly at the same level with their total concentrations varying from 80 to 110 μg m -3. The level of outdoor subways carbonyls was equal with the ambient air levels. Exhaust leakage, indoor material emissions, photochemical formation, and infiltration of outdoor air were considered to be the major sources to in-vehicle carbonyls. Personal exposures and cancer risk to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were calculated for professional bus and taxi drivers, respectively. Taxi drivers had the highest cancer risk with personal exposure to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde of 212 and 243 μg day -1, respectively. The public concern should pay considerable attention to professional drivers' health.

  1. Computer Crime and Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudoin, Ralph H.

    1985-01-01

    The susceptibility of colleges and universities to computer crime is great. While insurance coverage is available to cover the risks, an aggressive loss-prevention program is the wisest approach to limiting the exposures presented by computer technology. (MLW)

  2. [Drugs and crime].

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Munehide

    2010-08-01

    In law-related problems on drugs and crime, there are two types: (1) possession/use of drugs, (2) crimes caused by mental distress after the use of drugs. In this paper, I will focus on the former type called 'drug crimes'. Since drugs cause medically negative effects on the human body, the management/use of drugs is limited by the law which prescribes penalties. At the present, the management/use of narcotics, other mentally stimulating drugs, opium and its raw material, an opium poppy, cannabis, and antihypnotics are limited by six laws, including criminal laws. In this paper, I will introduce the contents of these laws, and the current situation of 'drug crimes'. PMID:20715491

  3. Corporate Crime Database Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Conyers, John, Jr. [D-MI-13

    2014-04-10

    06/09/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Crime Gun Tracing Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Kelly, Robin L. [D-IL-2

    2014-06-24

    07/21/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Counterfeit Conservatism and the War on Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Ness, Arlin E.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the current reversion to a punitive public mentality that is being promoted as a purportedly conservative agenda for fighting crime and delinquency. Suggests that while punitive measures and rehabilitation appear to be opposite solutions, each is reactive and rooted in pessimism and blame. (JPS)

  6. Forensic investigation of sex crimes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cabelus, Nancy B; Sheridan, Gary T

    2007-01-01

    Victimization by sexual assault has become not only a public health and safety issue but a way of life for many in Colombia. Poverty, gender inequality, and a lack of family and community support contribute to the cycle of sexual violence. Ineffective medico-legal systems have added to a rate of 93% for sex crimes that go without arrest or prosecution in Bogotá, the capital. Collaborative efforts are underway between the United States and Colombian governments to change the criminal justice system and strengthen forensic investigation of sex crimes in Colombia. PMID:18027530

  7. Why healthcare facilities are vulnerable to crime.

    PubMed

    Mikow-Porto, Victoria A; Smith, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the public's view of healthcare facilities is that they are inherently safe and secure, administrators and staff members in hospitals are very aware that they could be vulnerable to an episode of violence at any time, according to the author. Today, crimes, including homicide, are an ever-present reality in healthcare facilities, they report, citing recent studies which attempt to explain why this is so. The article is based on the introduction to the IAHSS and IHSS Foundation 2012 Crime and Security Trends Survey. The complete survey is accessible to members in the Reference Section of the IAHSS web page. PMID:24020317

  8. 76 FR 55840 - Cape Hatteras National Seashore Proposed Rule: Off-Road Vehicle Management-Reopening of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Seashore, North Carolina. (76 FR 39350) The 60-day public comment period for this proposal closed on... National Park Service 36 CFR Part 7 RIN 1024-AD85 Cape Hatteras National Seashore Proposed Rule: Off-Road... comment period for the proposed rule to manage off-road vehicle use at Cape Hatteras National Seashore...

  9. Combating computer crimes: A long term strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kizza, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    Computer crimes are a new kind of crime less than twenty years old, but in these twenty years or so the computer crime rate has risen alarmingly, costing society billions of dollars annually. In software alone this figure is in billions; software piracy in USA resulted in a loss of 2.9 billion dollars in 1989 and 2.4 billion dollars in 1990. The problem is growing rapidly with a steadily increasing use of computers by the public. The number of people using computers in the USA in the last 10 years either at work or at home has jumped from almost zero to about 40 per cent of the population. In the next decade this number may approach 80 percent. With such widespread use of computers at work and home together with the ever increasing number of local, national, and international networks, computer crimes are expected to sky rocket, and if no adequate means are devised to combat these crimes now, the future promises to be no less frightening than the present.

  10. Aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, F. S.

    1980-01-01

    Livability aboard the space shuttle orbiter makes it possible for men and women scientists and technicians in reasonably good health to join superbly healthy astronauts as space travelers and workers. Features of the flight deck, the mid-deck living quarters, and the subfloor life support and house-keeping equipment are illustrated as well as the provisions for food preparation, eating, sleeping, exercising, and medical care. Operation of the personal hygiene equipment and of the air revitalization system for maintaining sea level atmosphere in space is described. Capabilities of Spacelab, the purpose and use of the remote manipulator arm, and the design of a permanent space operations center assembled on-orbit by shuttle personnel are also depicted.

  11. Analysis of the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on mixing traffic flow in a two-lane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Shi, Pei-Ji; Zeng, Qiong; Ma, Chang-Xi; Lin, Fang; Sun, Peng; Yin, Xiao-Ting

    2009-09-01

    Based on the existing classical cellular automaton model of traffic flow, a cellular automaton traffic model with different-maximum-speed vehicles mixed on a single lane is proposed, in which public transit and harbour-shaped bus stops are taken into consideration. Parameters such as length of cellular automaton, operation speed and random slow mechanism are re-demarcated. A harbour-shaped bus stop is set up and the vehicle changing lane regulation is changed. Through computer simulation, the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on mixed traffic flow and traffic capacity is analysed. The results show that a public transport system can ease urban traffic congestion but creates new jams at the same time, and that the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on traffic capacity is considerable. To develop urban traffic, attention should be paid to the occupation rate of public transit vehicles and traffic development in a haphazard way should be strictly avoided.

  12. Crew of Gemini 10 arrive aboard the recovery ship U.S.S. Guadalcanal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Crew of Gemini 10 space flight, Astronauts John W. Young (left) and Michael Collins (right), arrive aboard the recovery ship U.S.S. Guadalcanal. Greeting them are Ben James, Senior NASA Public Affairs Officer aboard ship and John C. Stonesifer, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Landing and Recovery Division.

  13. Robots Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Ames Research Center, MIT and Johnson Space Center have two new robotics projects aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Robonaut 2, a two-armed humanoid robot with astronaut-like dexterity,...

  14. Crime and Psychiatry*

    PubMed Central

    Matcheswalla, Yusuf; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatry and crime are linked in certain ways. On one hand, we have criminal offenders with serious psychopathology; and on the other hand, we have psychiatric patients who may commit criminal offences during the influence of a psychiatric disorder. The psychiatrist in practice has to come in contact with the criminal justice system at some point of time in his career. Forensic psychiatry under whose realm these issues reside is a branch yet underdeveloped in India. The present paper reviews the inter-relationship between crime and psychiatry and the factors involved therein. PMID:25838733

  15. Reducing Crime by Eliminating Cash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, David R.

    Ending the use of cash in the United States can provide substantial social and economic gain while requiring only modest levels of investment. One primary benefit is the reduction of cash-related crimes. Because most street crime is committed to obtain cash or uses cash as a transaction medium, elimination of cash will dramatically reduce crime.…

  16. School Crime and Juvenile Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Richard

    In the face of an unprecedented increase in school crime and violence, this book addresses school crime as a two-dimensional issue consisting of the problem of crime in schools and the role of schools in preventing delinquency and dealing with delinquent students. This book reviews the theories that attempt to explain the relationships among…

  17. Crime Prevention through Environmental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Rick; Cadzow, Emma

    2004-01-01

    Applying CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design) strategies to schools can significantly contribute to a safer learning environment by influencing the behaviour of students and visitors. CPTED has three overlapping primary concepts that are intended to reduce opportunities for crime as well as fear of crime: access control,…

  18. 78 FR 63454 - Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... of the Secretary Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel; Notice of Federal Advisory... Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel. DATES: A meeting of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel (``the Panel'') will be held November 7-8, 2013. The Public Session...

  19. White-collar crime: corporate and securities and commodities fraud.

    PubMed

    Price, Marilyn; Norris, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    In this era of increased interest in white-collar crime, forensic psychiatrists are in a key position to study the individual characteristics of offenders. While a comprehensive theory of high-level white-collar crime should consider societal and organizational contributions, there is value in understanding the personal traits that place an individual at high risk for offending. As the impact of the criminal acts of this group has been increasingly felt by larger groups from all socioeconomic strata, there is less willingness by the public to view these crimes as victimless and harmless. PMID:20019002

  20. The impact of range anxiety and home, workplace, and public charging infrastructure on simulated battery electric vehicle lifetime utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Wood, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions, but have a limited utility due to factors including driver range anxiety and access to charging infrastructure. In this paper we apply NREL's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V) to examine the sensitivity of BEV utility to range anxiety and different charging infrastructure scenarios, including variable time schedules, power levels, and locations (home, work, and public installations). We find that the effects of range anxiety can be significant, but are reduced with access to additional charging infrastructure. We also find that (1) increasing home charging power above that provided by a common 15 A, 120 V circuit offers little added utility, (2) workplace charging offers significant utility benefits to select high mileage commuters, and (3) broadly available public charging can bring many lower mileage drivers to near-100% utility while strongly increasing the achieved miles of high mileage drivers.

  1. Social Disadvantage and Crime

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Per-Olof H.; Treiber, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the relationship between social disadvantage and crime, starting from the paradox that most persistent offenders come from disadvantaged backgrounds, but most people from disadvantaged backgrounds do not become persistent offenders. We argue that despite the fact that social disadvantage has been a key criminological topic for some time, the mechanisms which link it to offending remain poorly specified. Drawing on situational action theory, we suggest social disadvantage is linked to crime because more people from disadvantaged versus affluent backgrounds develop a high crime propensity and are exposed to criminogenic contexts, and the reason for this is that processes of social and self-selection place the former more frequently in (developmental and action) contexts conducive to the development and expression of high crime propensities. This article will explore this hypothesis through a series of analyses using data from the Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+), a longitudinal study which uses a range of data collection methods to study the interaction between personal characteristics and social environments. It pays particular attention to the macro-to-micro processes behind the intersection of people with certain characteristics and environments with certain features – i.e., their exposure – which leads to their interaction. PMID:27524829

  2. Cities, Crowding and Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    This article considers the effects of human crowding in light of recent tests and observations. Factors such as sex, age, culture, socio-economic standing, frustration, and interpersonal physical distance are examined. Results indicate that crowding contributes to social problems and crime. (TK)

  3. The Crime Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  4. Education, Youth, and Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Milton G.

    1976-01-01

    Neither the schools, nor the juvenile justice system, nor the criminal justice system can cure the problem of juvenile crime, says the author. Before the problem can be solved, we must separate delinquency from criminality, and offer troubled youth some alternatives. (Editor/RK)

  5. Systematic, appropriate, and cost-effective application of security technologies in U.S. public schools to reduce crime, violence, and drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mary W.

    1997-01-01

    As problems of violence and crime become more prevalent in our schools, more and more school districts will elect to use security technologies to control these problems. While the desired change in student and community attitudes will require significant systemic change through intense US social programs, security technologies can greatly augment school staff today by providing services similar to having extra adults present. Technologies such as cameras, sensors, drug detection, biometric and personnel identification, lighting, barriers, weapon and explosives detection, anti- graffiti methods, and duress alarms can all be effective, given they are used in appropriate applications, with realistic expectations and an understanding of limitations. Similar to a high-risk government facility, schools must consider a systems approach to security, which includes the use of personnel and procedures as well as security technologies, such that the synergy created by all these elements together contributes more tot he general 'order maintenance' of the facility than could be achieved by separate measures not integrated or related.

  6. Systematic, appropriate, and cost-effective application of security technologies in U.S. public schools to reduce crime, violence, and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    As problems of violence and crime become more prevalent in our schools (or at least the perception of their prevalence), more and more school districts will elect to use security technologies to control these problems. While the desired change in student and community attitudes will require significant systemic change through intense U.S. social programs, security technologies can greatly augment school staff today by providing services similar to having extra adults present. Technologies such as cameras, sensors, drug detection, biometric and personnel identification, lighting, barriers, weapon and explosives detection, anti-graffiti methods, and duress alarms can all be effective, given they are used in appropriate applications, with realistic expectations and an understanding of limitations. Similar to a high-risk government facility, schools must consider a systems (`big picture`) approach to security, which includes the use of personnel and procedures as well as security technologies, such that the synergy created by all these elements together contributes more to the general `order maintenance` of the facility than could be achieved by separate measures not integrated or related.

  7. Emergence of the nuclear industry and associated crime. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear energy, in weapons production and electrical power generation, is a technology that has endured public scrutiny since the late 1940s. Societal acceptance of this industry has been affected by controversy in the following areas: health effects of exposure to radiation, possible consequences resulting from accidents, and nuclear nonproliferation. The literature review begins in Chapter 2 by examining the changing public perceptions of nuclear energy over the last forty years. Support for the ideals and practices of the industry has often wavered, due to media representation of incidents, accidents, and potential catastrophic events. The second part of the chapter highlights the crimes associated with nuclear energy in a chronological order of concern by nuclear industry security specialists. Research has found certain types of crime to be more prevalent during particular eras than others. Crimes instigated by spies, peace activists, terrorists, and the insider (employee) are reviewed, with an emphasis on insider crime.

  8. Apollo 16 Crew Aboard Rescue Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Command Module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on April 27, 1972 after an 11-day moon exploration mission. The 3-man crew is shown here aboard the rescue ship, USS Horton. From left to right are: Mission Commander John W. Young, Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, and Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II. The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511) lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 mission continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon's crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used.

  9. Imaging sprites aboard TARANIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth; Sato, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Grosjean, Olivier

    TLE (Transient Luminous Event) is the generic name for phenomena which occur over thundercloud from the troposphere to the lower thermosphere (20 to 100 km-height). They are called sprites, elves, blue jets, gigantic jets . . . Each class of phenomenon has their own properties: duration, vertical and horizontal extension, delay after their parent lightning. They are mainly observed from ground since 1990 and from space since 2004 with the ISUAL experiment. All these observations have been done pointing at the limb. We propose an experiment, to image and characterize TLEs and lightning from space, which novelty is looking at the nadir. This concept was tested by the CEA with the Lightning and Sprite Observations on board the International Space Station from 2001 to 2004. The advantage of this point of view is that other radiations (as gamma-rays, electron beams, or electrostatic field) emitted mainly vertically and simultaneously to TLE or lightning can be observed with the same satellite, but the difficulty is how the superimposed light from lightning and TLE can be differentiate. Taking account this constraint and other ones due to satellite accommodation, we define a set of sensors allowing the detection, the localisation and the characterisation of lightning and TLE. Our studies show that two cameras and four photometers are necessary to reach those objectives. This experiment, called MCP for MicroCameras and Photometers, will be aboard TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) which is a microsatellite project of the CNES Myriade program with a launch planned in 2011. The photometer set will be provided by a Japanese team joining Hokkaido and Tohoku Universities and ISAS/JAXA. In this talk, we will present the main scientific goals of MCP. Need requirement studies (particularly radiometric analysis including sensor trade-off) will be described. We will finish describing the actual development status of the sensors.

  10. Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes. [Public fleet groups--information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF's) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV's) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV'S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available practical''. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  11. 42 CFR 455.106 - Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes. 455.106 Section 455.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... persons convicted of crimes. (a) Information that must be disclosed. Before the Medicaid agency...

  12. 42 CFR 455.106 - Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes. 455.106 Section 455.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... persons convicted of crimes. (a) Information that must be disclosed. Before the Medicaid agency...

  13. 42 CFR 455.106 - Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes. 455.106 Section 455.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... persons convicted of crimes. (a) Information that must be disclosed. Before the Medicaid agency...

  14. 42 CFR 455.106 - Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes. 455.106 Section 455.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... persons convicted of crimes. (a) Information that must be disclosed. Before the Medicaid agency...

  15. 42 CFR 455.106 - Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disclosure by providers: Information on persons convicted of crimes. 455.106 Section 455.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... persons convicted of crimes. (a) Information that must be disclosed. Before the Medicaid agency...

  16. Effects of Legal Education and Work Experience on Perceptions of Crime Seriousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Criminal justice bureaucrats, including judges, prosecutors, public defenders, and probation officers were surveyed. Data indicate that both formal education and work experience underlie consensus as to seriousness of particular crimes. Furthermore, unlike the general public, criminal justice bureaucrats perceive crime seriousness in…

  17. The different faces of impulsivity as links between childhood maltreatment and young adult crime.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunny H; Cook, Amy K; Morris, Nancy A; McDougle, Robyn; Groves, Lauren Peasley

    2016-07-01

    Crime is a major public health and safety threat. Many studies have suggested that early exposure to child maltreatment increases an individual's risk for persistent serious crime in adulthood. Despite these findings about the connection between child maltreatment and criminal behavior, there is a paucity of empirically-based knowledge about the processes or pathways that link child maltreatment to later involvement in crime. Using a community sample of 337 young adults (ages 18-25) in a U.S. metropolitan area, the present study examined the role of various facets of impulsivity in linking child maltreatment to crime. A series of factor analyses identified three types of crime including property crime, violent crime, and fraud. Structural equation modelings were conducted to examine the associations among childhood maltreatment, four facets of impulsivity, and criminal behavior, controlling for sociodemographic information, family income and psychological symptoms. The present study found that child emotional abuse was indirectly related to property crime and fraud through urgency while a lack of premeditation mediates the relationship between child neglect and property crime. Child physical abuse was directly related to all three types of crime. Personality traits of urgency and lack of premeditation may play a significant role in the maltreatment-crime link. Preventive interventions targeting impulsivity traits such as urgency and a lack of premeditation might have promising impacts in curbing criminal behavior among maltreatment victims. PMID:27083525

  18. ISS Update: Launching Aboard the Soyuz to Live on the Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Mike Fossum, astronaut and Commander of Expedition 29, about his Soyuz launch experience and his insight into life aboard the station. Question...

  19. A Cure for Crime? Psycho-Pharmaceuticals and Crime Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcotte, Dave E.; Markowitz, Sara

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider possible links between the diffusion of new pharmaceuticals used for treating mental illness and crime rates. We describe recent trends in crime and review the evidence showing that mental illness is a clear risk factor both for criminal behavior and victimization. We summarize the development of a number of new…

  20. Crimes on Campus: Act Now before a Violent Crime Occurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The article reports on a 1989-90 survey which examined the campus crime rate and perceived issues at 219 colleges and universities. Institutional liability is addressed; and ways to reduce liability are recommended, including distributing notices to keep room doors and windows locked, conducting crime prevention workshops, and increasing security…

  1. Nuclear accident and incident public affairs (pa) guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-20

    This Directive reissues reference (a) DoD Directive 5230.16 to update DoD policy, responsibilities, and procedures for the prompt release of information to the public in the interest of public safety, and to prevent public alarm in the event of accidents or significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear components, radioactive material, nuclear weapon launch or transport vehicles (when a nuclear weapon is aboard), or nuclear reactors under DoD control. It updates DoD policy, responsibilities, and procedures during an improvised nuclear device (IND) incident.

  2. Wheeled mobility device transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive public transit vehicles within the United States.

    PubMed

    Frost, Karen L; van Roosmalen, Linda; Bertocci, Gina; Cross, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current status of wheelchair transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive, non-rail, public transportation vehicles within the US is presented. A description of each mode of transportation is provided, followed by a discussion of the primary issues affecting safety, accessibility, and usability. Technologies such as lifts, ramps, securement systems, and occupant restraint systems, along with regulations and voluntary industry standards have been implemented with the intent of improving safety and accessibility for individuals who travel while seated in their wheeled mobility device (e.g., wheelchair or scooter). However, across both fixed route and demand-responsive transit systems a myriad of factors such as nonuse and misuse of safety systems, oversized wheeled mobility devices, vehicle space constraints, and inadequate vehicle operator training may place wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users at risk of injury even under non-impact driving conditions. Since WhMD-related incidents also often occur during the boarding and alighting process, the frequency of these events, along with factors associated with these events are described for each transit mode. Recommendations for improving WhMD transportation are discussed given the current state of PMID:22876731

  3. Predicting Airborne Particle Levels Aboard Washington State School Buses

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Sara D.; Davey, Mark; Sullivan, James R.; Compher, Michael; Szpiro, Adam; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2008-01-01

    School buses contribute substantially to childhood air pollution exposures yet they are rarely quantified in epidemiology studies. This paper characterizes fine particulate matter (PM2.5) aboard school buses as part of a larger study examining the respiratory health impacts of emission-reducing retrofits. To assess onboard concentrations, continuous PM2.5 data were collected during 85 trips aboard 43 school buses during normal driving routines, and aboard hybrid lead vehicles traveling in front of the monitored buses during 46 trips. Ordinary and partial least square regression models for PM2.5 onboard buses were created with and without control for roadway concentrations, which were also modeled. Predictors examined included ambient PM2.5 levels, ambient weather, and bus and route characteristics. Concentrations aboard school buses (21 μg/m3) were four and two-times higher than ambient and roadway levels, respectively. Differences in PM2.5 levels between the buses and lead vehicles indicated an average of 7 μg/m3 originating from the bus's own emission sources. While roadway concentrations were dominated by ambient PM2.5, bus concentrations were influenced by bus age, diesel oxidative catalysts, and roadway concentrations. Cross validation confirmed the roadway models but the bus models were less robust. These results confirm that children are exposed to air pollution from the bus and other roadway traffic while riding school buses. In-cabin air pollution is higher than roadway concentrations and is likely influenced by bus characteristics. PMID:18985175

  4. Solving crimes with hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Wester, William C; Hammond, D Corydon

    2011-04-01

    Following a brief review of the literature on hypnosis and memory, this paper overviews the procedures that are used in conducting forensic hypnosis interviews. Ten forensic hypnosis cases are then described. These real world cases are in stark contrast to research done in an artificial laboratory setting where the information to be recalled lacks personal relevance and was not associated with emotionally arousing situations. These cases illustrate how forensic hypnosis can result in obtaining important additional investigative leads which lead to the solving of crimes. PMID:21598840

  5. Childhood Victimization and Crime Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Jared Kean; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether abused and neglected children are at increased risk for subsequent crime victimization. We ask four basic questions: (a) Does a history of child abuse/neglect increase one's risk of physical, sexual, and property crime victimization? (b) Do lifestyle characteristics (prostitution, running away,…

  6. Violent Crime in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Il Iashenko, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The spread of crime has become one of the most acute problems in Russia. There are increasing numbers of crimes, the level of violence is going up, and episodes are becoming more and more brutal and professional. Criminals are moving from encroaching on people's property to contract murders, terrorism, and the seizure of hostages, and they are…

  7. CyberCrime and Punishment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Susan J.; Gumpert, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Surveys ways in which criminal laws are finding their way into cyberspace, the implications of such actions for communicative rights and liabilities, and the media differentials of crime and punishment. Examines crime committed using email and the Internet; computer mediated felonies, misdemeanors, and violations committed in cyberspace; forgery;…

  8. Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, A. E., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

  9. Crime Prevention Services for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Harold A.

    The purpose of this guide is to identify the various opportunities available in most communities for delivering crime prevention services to youth so that they will be better prepared to reduce their vulnerability to crime, while enhancing their involvement in prevention efforts. It also serves to outline the benefits of programming with youth;…

  10. A multi-criteria decision aid methodology to design electric vehicles public charging networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, João; Rodrigues, Ana; Silva, Carlos; Dentinho, Tomaz

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a new multi-criteria decision aid methodology, dynamic-PROMETHEE, here used to design electric vehicle charging networks. In applying this methodology to a Portuguese city, results suggest that it is effective in designing electric vehicle charging networks, generating time and policy based scenarios, considering offer and demand and the city's urban structure. Dynamic-PROMETHE adds to the already known PROMETHEE's characteristics other useful features, such as decision memory over time, versatility and adaptability. The case study, used here to present the dynamic-PROMETHEE, served as inspiration and base to create this new methodology. It can be used to model different problems and scenarios that may present similar requirement characteristics.

  11. Availability of litigation as a public health tool for firearm injury prevention: comparison of guns, vaccines, and motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vernick, Jon S; Rutkow, Lainie; Salmon, Daniel A

    2007-11-01

    The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA), enacted in 2005, grants the firearm industry broad immunity from liability. The PLCAA not only prevents most people from receiving compensation for their firearm-related injuries, it erodes litigation's ability to serve its public health role of providing manufacturers with a financial incentive to make their products safer. When the viability of the vaccine industry was threatened in the 1980s, Congress provided limited protection from liability and also established the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The liability of nearly all other products, for example motor vehicles, is governed by traditional common law principles. The absence of both litigation and product safety rules for firearms is a potentially dangerous combination for the public's health. PMID:17901450

  12. The Effect of Medical Marijuana Laws on Crime: Evidence from State Panel Data, 1990-2006

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Robert G.; TenEyck, Michael; Barnes, J. C.; Kovandzic, Tomislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Debate has surrounded the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes for decades. Some have argued medical marijuana legalization (MML) poses a threat to public health and safety, perhaps also affecting crime rates. In recent years, some U.S. states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes, reigniting political and public interest in the impact of marijuana legalization on a range of outcomes. Methods Relying on U.S. state panel data, we analyzed the association between state MML and state crime rates for all Part I offenses collected by the FBI. Findings Results did not indicate a crime exacerbating effect of MML on any of the Part I offenses. Alternatively, state MML may be correlated with a reduction in homicide and assault rates, net of other covariates. Conclusions These findings run counter to arguments suggesting the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes poses a danger to public health in terms of exposure to violent crime and property crimes. PMID:24671103

  13. Mental health in violent crime victims: Does sexual orientation matter?

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; McNiel, Dale E; Holley, Sarah R; Shumway, Martha; Boccellari, Alicia

    2012-04-01

    The present study investigates victim sexual orientation in a sample of 641 violent crime victims seeking emergency medical treatment at a public-sector hospital. Victim sexual orientation was examined as it: (a) varies by type of violent crime and demographic characteristics, (b) directly relates to psychological symptoms, and (c) moderates the relationship between victim and crime characteristics (i.e., victim gender, victim trauma history, and type of crime) and psychological symptoms (i.e., symptoms of acute stress, depression, panic, and general anxiety). Results showed that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) victims were more likely to be victims of sexual assault. Heterosexual victims were more likely to be victims of general assault and shootings. LGBT victims demonstrated significantly higher levels of acute stress and general anxiety. Moreover, victim sexual orientation moderated the association of type of crime with experience of panic symptoms. Also, victim sexual orientation moderated the relation of victim trauma history and general anxiety symptoms. Results are discussed in relation to victimization prevalence rates, sexual prejudice theory, and assessment and treatment of violent crime victims. PMID:22471413

  14. Space-Time Analysis of Crime Patterns in Central London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Williams, D.

    2012-07-01

    Crime continues to cast a shadow over citizen well-being in big cities today, while also imposing huge economic and social costs. Timely understanding of how criminality emerges and how crime patterns evolve is crucial to anticipating crime, dealing with it when it occurs and developing public confidence in the police service. Every day, about 10,000 crime incidents are reported by citizens, recorded and geo-referenced in the London Metropolitan Police Service Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) database. The unique nature of this dataset allows the patterns to be explored at particularly fine temporal granularity and at multiple spatial resolutions. This study provides a framework for the exploratory spatio-temporal analysis of crime patterns that combines visual inquiry tools (interactive animations, space-time cubes and map matrices) with cluster analysis (spatial-temporal scan statistics and the self-organizing map). This framework is tested on the CAD dataset for the London Borough of Camden in March 2010. Patterns of crime through space and time are discovered and the clustering methods were evaluated on their ability to facilitate the discovery and interpretation of these patterns.

  15. Stigma or Sympathy? Attributions of Fault to Hate Crime Victims and Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of social status on attributions of blame in specific instances of hate crime. Two theoretical explanations for the impact of offender's and victim's social status characteristics on evaluations of hate crimes are examined. The stigma perspective suggests that the public will deride minority-status…

  16. Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2012. NCES 2013-036/NCJ 241446

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robers, Simone; Kemp, Jana; Truman, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Establishing reliable indicators of the current state of school crime and safety across the nation and regularly updating and monitoring these indicators is important in ensuring the safety of our nation's students. This is the aim of "Indicators of School Crime and Safety." This report is the fifteenth in a series of annual publications produced…

  17. 42 CFR 420.204 - Principals convicted of a program-related crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Principals convicted of a program-related crime... and Control Information § 420.204 Principals convicted of a program-related crime. (a) Information... the facts and circumstances of the specific case, including the nature and severity of the...

  18. 42 CFR 420.204 - Principals convicted of a program-related crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Principals convicted of a program-related crime... Ownership and Control Information § 420.204 Principals convicted of a program-related crime. (a) Information... the facts and circumstances of the specific case, including the nature and severity of the...

  19. 42 CFR 420.204 - Principals convicted of a program-related crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Principals convicted of a program-related crime... Ownership and Control Information § 420.204 Principals convicted of a program-related crime. (a) Information... the facts and circumstances of the specific case, including the nature and severity of the...

  20. 42 CFR 420.204 - Principals convicted of a program-related crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Principals convicted of a program-related crime... Ownership and Control Information § 420.204 Principals convicted of a program-related crime. (a) Information... the facts and circumstances of the specific case, including the nature and severity of the...

  1. 42 CFR 420.204 - Principals convicted of a program-related crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Principals convicted of a program-related crime... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICARE Disclosure of Ownership and Control Information § 420.204 Principals convicted of a program-related crime. (a)...

  2. Less Hype, More Help: Reducing Juvenile Crime, What Works--and What Doesn't.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    The goal of this report is to foster a national discussion about the complex and important challenges posed by youth crime in America, and to raise public awareness about promising approaches to youth crime that currently receive too little attention and too few resources. The report is divided into three sections. Part One details the wealth of…

  3. Crime in Rural America: January 1979-October 1993. Quick Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Patricia La Caille

    This bibliography lists materials available from the National Agricultural Library's (NAL) AGRICOLA database that are related to crime and crime prevention in rural areas. The bibliography was derived from a search of books, journals, research reports, and Cooperative Extension Service publications that have been entered into the database since…

  4. Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

  5. Vehicles for Education: Turkish Students' Beliefs and Views about Public Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Seymen, Hatice; Malandrakis, George; Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of private rather than public transport is impacting on the environment in a number of ways, including contributing to the major problem of global warming. It is necessary, therefore, to improve strategies to encourage greater use of public transport. The aim of this study is to explore which perceived aspects of public…

  6. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  7. Official crime data versus collaborative crime mapping at a Brazilian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, P. L.; Jesus, E. G. V.; Sant'Ana, R. M. S.; Martins, C.; Delgado, J. P. M.; Fernandes, V. O.

    2014-11-01

    In July of 2013 a group of undergraduate students from the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, published a collaborative web map called "Where I Was Robbed". Their initial efforts in publicizing their web map were restricted to announce it at a local radio as a tool of social interest. In two months the map had almost 10.000 reports, 155 reports per day and people from more the 350 cities had already reported a crime. The present study consists in an investigation about this collaborative web map spatial correlation to official robbery data registered at the Secretary of Public Safety database, for the city of Salvador, Bahia. Kernel density estimator combined with map algebra was used to the investigation. Spatial correlations with official robbery data for the city of Salvador were not found initially, but after standardizing collaborative data and mining official registers, both data pointed at very similar areas as the main hot spots for pedestrian robbery. Both areas are located at two of the most economical active areas of the city, although web map crimes reports were more concentrated in an area with higher income population. This results and discussions indicates that this collaborative application is been used mainly by mid class and upper class parcel of the city population, but can still provide significant information on public safety priority areas. Therefore, extended divulgation, on local papers, radio and TV, of the collaborative crime map application and partnership with official agencies are strongly recommended.

  8. Mentally ill persons who commit crimes: punishment or treatment?

    PubMed

    Melamed, Yuval

    2010-01-01

    In many countries, there continue to be conflicting opinions and mechanisms regarding the appropriateness of treatment and/or punishment for mentally ill individuals who commit crimes. The general population is concerned with public safety and often finds it difficult to accept the possibility that a mentally ill individual who commits a crime can be hospitalized and eventually discharged, sometimes after a relatively short time. In most countries the options of incarceration and hospitalization are available in concert. In some, incarceration occurs before hospitalization. In others, hospitalization is first, followed by a prison term. An additional option could be "treatment years." The court would determine the number of years of treatment required, according to the crime. This dilemma has no unequivocal solution. The goal is to reach a balance between the right of the patient to treatment and the responsibility of the courts to ensure public safety. PMID:20305082

  9. 78 FR 13607 - Minimum Training Requirements for Entry-Level Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Register on December 29, 2010 (75 FR 82132). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information concerning... public comment on enhanced ELDT requirements (72 FR 73226). In the NPRM, FMCSA proposed revisions to...

  10. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Joan, Ed.; Widom, Cathy Spatz, Ed.; Crowell, Nancy A., Ed.

    This book discusses patterns and trends in crimes committed by children and adolescents, analyzing youth crime as a subset of general crime and studying the impact of race and gender. It evaluates different approaches to forecasting future crime rates. Data come from a national panel that examined what is known about juvenile crime and its…

  11. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanich, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

  12. Violent Crime, Hazing, and Arson on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvers, Suzanne E.

    The extent of violent crimes reported on New Jersey colleges and universities in 1985 is discussed, based on reports from the institutions. Recommendations for crime prevention made by the Chancellor's Special Advisory Committee on Violent Crimes, Hazing, and Arson on Campus are also considered. There were 477 reported incidents of violent crime,…

  13. On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

  14. Hate Crimes and Disability in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Brian T.; West, Steven L.; Lewis, Allen N.; Armstrong, Amy J.; Conway, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against person or property that is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender's prejudice. Hate crimes are sometimes termed "bias-motivated crimes." The theoretical bases for bias motivation and their implications for hate crimes against Americans with disabilities are outlined. The history of…

  15. Crewmen of the Gemini 7 spacecraft arrive aboard aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., (left), pilot, and Frank Borman, command pilot, are shown just after they arrived aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. Greeting the astronauts are Donald Stullken (at Lovell's right), Recovery Operations Branch, Landing and Recovery Division; Dr. Howard Minners (standing beside Borman), Flight Medicine Branch, Cneter Medical Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, and Bennett James (standing behind Borman), a NASA Public Affairs Officer.

  16. Crimes of gender.

    PubMed

    Heise, L

    1990-01-01

    Everyday, thousands of women are targets of violation that range from simple cases of sexual harassment to extreme cases of dowry deaths. This article describes different forms of violence against women. Wife beating has been prevalent in all societies regardless of race, culture, and socioeconomic status. In India, incidents like bride burning and dowry death are common because laws against these crimes have never been enforced. In Chile, the constitution grants the husband marital authority over his wife, resulting to wife beating due to unequal power balance. Due to the prevalence of these violations, shelters, legal reforms, and various groups and agencies to combat violence against women all over the world have initiated programs. Coalitions have also been organized to promote awareness and denounce male violence. PMID:12179731

  17. Analyzing crime scene videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Cindy C.; Peloquin, Tracy D.

    1999-02-01

    Since late 1996 the Forensic Identification Services Section of the Ontario Provincial Police has been actively involved in state-of-the-art image capture and the processing of video images extracted from crime scene videos. The benefits and problems of this technology for video analysis are discussed. All analysis is being conducted on SUN Microsystems UNIX computers, networked to a digital disk recorder that is used for video capture. The primary advantage of this system over traditional frame grabber technology is reviewed. Examples from actual cases are presented and the successes and limitations of this approach are explored. Suggestions to companies implementing security technology plans for various organizations (banks, stores, restaurants, etc.) will be made. Future directions for this work and new technologies are also discussed.

  18. Expedition Seven Launched Aboard Soyez Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Destined for the International Space Station (ISS), a Soyez TMA-1 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 26, 2003. Aboard are Expedition Seven crew members, cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition Seven mission commander, and Astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition Seven NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer. Expedition Six crew members returned to Earth aboard the Russian spacecraft after a 5 and 1/2 month stay aboard the ISS. Photo credit: NASA/Scott Andrews

  19. Designing cathodic protection systems for marine structures and vehicles. ASTM special technical publication 1370

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    Cathodic protection is an important method of protecting structures and ships from the corrosive effects of seawater. Poor designs can be far more costly to implement than optimal designs, Improper design can cause overprotection, with resulting paint blistering and accelerated corrosion of some alloys, underprotection, with resultant structure corrosion, or stray current corrosion of nearby structures. The first ASTM symposium specifically aimed at cathodic protection in seawater was intended to compile all the criteria and philosophy for designing both sacrificial and impressed current cathodic protection systems for structures and vehicles in seawater. The papers which are included in this STP are significant in that they summarize the major seawater cathodic protection system design philosophies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  20. Availability of Litigation as a Public Health Tool for Firearm Injury Prevention: Comparison of Guns, Vaccines, and Motor Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Jon S.; Rutkow, Lainie; Salmon, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA), enacted in 2005, grants the firearm industry broad immunity from liability. The PLCAA not only prevents most people from receiving compensation for their firearm-related injuries, it erodes litigation’s ability to serve its public health role of providing manufacturers with a financial incentive to make their products safer. When the viability of the vaccine industry was threatened in the 1980s, Congress provided limited protection from liability and also established the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The liability of nearly all other products, for example motor vehicles, is governed by traditional common law principles. The absence of both litigation and product safety rules for firearms is a potentially dangerous combination for the public’s health. PMID:17901450

  1. Web Card - Clean Cities Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-01

    A 2" x 3-1/4" web card which has a quick response code for accessing the PEV Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts via a smart phone. The cards are intended to be handed out instead of the handbook.

  2. Hate Is a Campus Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeClerc, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Activities at Hunter College of the City University of New York to deal creatively and democratically with hate crimes on campus are reported including establishment of a Diversity Commission and heavy commitment of trustees and college president. (DB)

  3. Perceived and Police Reported Neighborhood Crime: Linkages to Adolescent Activity Behaviors and Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Melanie; Choo, Tse; Larson, Nicole; Van Riper, David; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inadequate physical activity and obesity during adolescence are areas of public health concern. Questions exist about the role of neighborhoods in the etiology of these problems. This research addressed the relationships of perceived and objective reports of neighborhood crime to adolescent physical activity, screen media use, and BMI. Methods Socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse adolescents (N=2,455, 53.4% female) from 20 urban, public middle and high schools in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota responded to a classroom survey in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study. Body mass index (BMI) was measured by research staff. Participants’ mean age was 14.6 (SD=2.0); 82.7% represented racial/ethnic groups other than non-Hispanic white. Linear regressions examined associations between crime perceived by adolescents and crime reported to police and the outcomes of interest (BMI z-scores, physical activity, and screen time). Models were stratified by gender and adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and school. Results BMI was positively associated with perceived crime among girls and boys and with reported crime in girls. For girls, there was an association between higher perceived crime and increased screen time; for boys, between higher reported property crime and reduced physical activity. Perceived crime was associated with reported crime, both property and personal, in both genders. Conclusions Few prior studies of adolescents have studied the association between both perceived and reported crime and BMI. Community-based programs for youth should consider addressing adolescents’ safety concerns along with other perceived barriers to physical activity. Interventions targeting actual crime rates are also important. PMID:26206444

  4. Communication Strategies for Promoting Crime Prevention Competence among Elderly Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Garrett J.; Reid, Kathaleen

    Recent research indicates that public information campaigns and promotional programs can have an impact on the extent to which citizens involve themselves in crime prevention. Subgroups such as the elderly may especially benefit from efforts more carefully tailored to their own needs and circumstances. The design of successful programs requires…

  5. Arresting Children: Examining Recent Trends in Preteen Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.; Snyder, Howard N.

    2008-01-01

    The public believes that today's juvenile offenders are younger than those of 20 or 25 years ago, and this common perception influences juvenile justice policy. To assess whether the age profile of juvenile delinquents has in fact changed, juvenile crime patterns from 1980 through 2006 were tracked by examining data collected by law enforcement…

  6. Do neighborhood attributes moderate the relationship between alcohol establishment density and crime?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Darin J.; Carlin, Bradley P.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Quick, Harrison S.; Harwood, Eileen M.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies have found a positive association between density of alcohol establishments and various types of crime, few have examined how neighborhood attributes (e.g., schools, parks) could moderate this association. We used data from Minneapolis, Minnesota with neighborhood as the unit of analysis (n = 83). We examined eight types of crime (assault, rape, robbery, vandalism, nuisance crime, public alcohol consumption, driving while intoxicated, underage alcohol possession/consumption) and measured density as total number of establishments per roadway mile. Neighborhood attributes assessed as potential moderators included non-alcohol businesses, schools, parks, religious institutions, neighborhood activism, neighborhood quality, and number of condemned houses. Using Bayesian techniques, we created a model for each crime outcome (accounting for spatial auto-correlation and controlling for relevant demographics) with an interaction term (moderator × density) to test each potential moderating effect. Few interaction terms were statistically significant. Presence of at least one college was the only neighborhood attribute that consistently moderated the density-crime association, with presence of a college attenuating the association between density and three types of crime (assaults, nuisance crime, and public consumption). However, caution should be used when interpreting the moderating effect of college presence because of the small number of colleges in our sample. The lack of moderating effects of neighborhood attributes except for presence of a college suggests that the addition of alcohol establishments to any neighborhood regardless of its other attributes could result in an increase in a wide range of crime. PMID:24337980

  7. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  8. The philosophical aspects of hate crime and hate crime legislation: introducing the special section on the philosophy of hate crime.

    PubMed

    Brax, David; Munthe, Christian

    2015-06-01

    In this introduction to the special symposium on the philosophy of hate crime, we provide an overview of the main philosophical aspects of hate crime and hate crime legislation. We point out that there are two overarching philosophical issues that span over the literature: the Conceptual Question--concerning what hate crime is--and the Normative Question--concerning the status of hate crimes and the justification of hate crime legislation. We also provide brief summaries of the articles in the special section and point to their relations to the broader themes. PMID:25355863

  9. Building Clean. The Control of Crime, Corruption, and Racketeering in the Public Construction Markets of New York City. A Preliminary Assessment of Efforts Made by the Office of the Inspector General, New York City School Construction Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H.; Tumin, R. Zachary

    The Office of the Inspector General of the New York City School Construction Authority (SCA) is attempting to secure the School Construction Authority and its building program from crime, corruption, and racketeering. This report is a preliminary assessment of this effort. It sets forth for practitioners and theorists the strategy that guided the…

  10. Community-Based Participatory Research: A Vehicle to Promote Public Engagement for Environmental Health in China

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Robbie; Olden, Kenneth; Xu, Shunqing

    2008-01-01

    Background In the past 25 years, China has experienced remarkable economic growth and rapid agricultural-to-industrial and rural-to-urban transitions. As a consequence, China now faces many daunting environmental challenges that are significantly affecting human health and quality of life, including indoor and outdoor air pollution, water pollution, deforestation, loss of agricultural land, and sustainability. Chinese government leaders have recently emphasized the need for better environmental protection practices along with interventions involving strong public participation. Objectives Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a collaborative approach to research that involves community members, organizational representatives, and researchers as equal participants in all phases of the research process. Over the past 15 years, CBPR has gained recognition and acceptance and is now valued as a means to effect change and provide scientific knowledge relevant to human health and the environment. In this article we highlight the success of CBPR in the United States and suggest that it could be a useful model for addressing environmental health problems in the People’s Republic of China. Discussion CBPR can reduce the tension between science and society by promoting genuine communication, by enabling scientists and administrators to listen and respond to the public, by allowing communities to help shape the research agenda, and by increasing accountability of researchers and governments to the public. Conclusions CBPR can potentially help improve environmental health in China, but it is likely to take a different form than it has in the West because the government will be leading the way. PMID:18941566

  11. Public attitudes to laws for smoke-free private vehicles: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G; Wilson, N

    2009-08-01

    As smoke-free car policy is a frontier domain for tobacco control, attitudes to smoke-free private car laws are briefly reviewed. Medline and Google Scholar searches for the period up to mid-November 2008, from English language sources, were undertaken. Studies were included that contained data from national and subnational populations (eg, in states and provinces), but not for smaller administrative units, eg, cities or councils. Jurisdiction, sample size and survey questions were assessed. One reviewer conducted the data extraction and both authors conducted assessments. A total of 15 relevant studies (from 1988) were identified, set in North America, the UK and Australasia. The available data indicates that, for the jurisdictions with data, there is majority public support for laws requiring cars that contain children to be smoke free. There appears to be an increase over time in this support. In five surveys in 2005 or since (in California, New Zealand and Australia), the support from smokers was 77% or more. The high levels of public (and smoker) support for smoke-free car laws found in the studies to date suggest that this can be a relatively non-controversial tobacco control intervention. Survey series on attitudes to such laws are needed, and surveys in jurisdictions where the issue has not been investigated to date. PMID:19052041

  12. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Aboard Command Module Yankee Clipper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is a view of astronaut Richard F. Gordon attaching a high resolution telephoto lens to a camera aboard the Apollo 12 Command Module (CM) Yankee Clipper. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  13. Florida Postsecondary Education Security Information Act. Annual Report of Campus Crime Statistics 1991-93 and Annual Assessment of Physical Plant Safety 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Postsecondary Education Coordination.

    This state-mandated report presents crime statistics at higher education institutions in Florida and an assessment of physical plant security. The crime data list numbers of homicides, forcible sex offenses, robberies, aggravated assaults, burglaries/breaking and entering, larcenies and thefts, and motor vehicle thefts for each state university,…

  14. Research Findings on Xylitol and the Development of Xylitol Vehicles to Address Public Health Needs

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, P.; Ly, K.A.; Rothen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Xylitol has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective tooth decay preventive agent when used habitually. Nevertheless, its application has been limited by absence of formulations that demand minimal adherence and are acceptable and safe in settings where chewing gum may not be allowed. A substantial literature suggests that a minimum of five to six grams and three exposures per day from chewing gum or candies are needed for a clinical effect. At the same time there is conflicting evidence in the literature from toothpaste studies suggesting that lower-doses and less frequent exposures might be effective. The growing use of xylitol as a sweetener in low amounts in foods and other consumables is, simultaneously, increasing the overall exposure of the public to xylitol and may have additive benefits. PMID:19710081

  15. Violent crime in San Antonio, Texas: an application of spatial epidemiological methods.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S

    2011-12-01

    Violent crimes are rarely considered a public health problem or investigated using epidemiological methods. But patterns of violent crime and other health conditions are often affected by similar characteristics of the built environment. In this paper, methods and perspectives from spatial epidemiology are used in an analysis of violent crimes in San Antonio, TX. Bayesian statistical methods are used to examine the contextual influence of several aspects of the built environment. Additionally, spatial regression models using Bayesian model specifications are used to examine spatial patterns of violent crime risk. Results indicate that the determinants of violent crime depend on the model specification, but are primarily related to the built environment and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions. Results are discussed within the context of a rapidly growing urban area with a diverse population. PMID:22748228

  16. From white-collar crime to red-collar crime

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Richard G.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of violence with respect to white-collar criminals. Design/methodology/approach The analysis is conceptual, focusing on the historical underpinnings of white-collar crime and reviewing the evolution of white-collar criminals. Findings Findings suggest that white-collar criminals do display violent tendencies and, contrary to popular belief, can become dangerous individuals. Practical implications The paper represents an extremely useful and practical source for fraud examiners and other white-collar crime investigators. Raising the mvareness of investigators dealing with white-collar criminals may prevent them from becoming victims of a violent act. Originality/value The paper fulfills a need to highlight a dangerous trend with white-collar criminals in that they may be driven to violence against those involved in investigating their crimes. PMID:25414590

  17. Dynamic Simulation of Community Crime and Crime-Reporting Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonas, Michael A.; Borrebach, Jeffrey D.; Burke, Jessica G.; Brown, Shawn T.; Philp, Katherine D.; Burke, Donald S.; Grefenstette, John J.

    An agent-based model was developed to explore the effectiveness of possible interventions to reduce neighborhood crime and violence. Both offenders and non-offenders (or citizens) were modeled as agents living in neighborhoods, with a set of rules controlling changes in behavior based on individual experience. Offenders may become more or less inclined to actively commit criminal offenses, depending on the behavior of the neighborhood residents and other nearby offenders, and on their arrest experience. In turn, citizens may become more or less inclined to report crimes, based on the observed prevalence of criminal activity within their neighborhood. This paper describes the basic design and dynamics of the model, and how such models might be used to investigate practical crime intervention programs.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Removal Troubleshooting aboard the International Space Station (ISS) during Space Shuttle (STS) Docked Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Christopher M.; Cover, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a largely closed-system habitable volume which requires active control of atmospheric constituents, including removal of exhaled Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The ISS provides a unique opportunity to observe system requirements for (CO2) removal. CO2 removal is managed by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) aboard the US segment of ISS and by Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) aboard the Space Shuttle (STS). While the ISS and STS are docked, various methods are used to balance the CO2 levels between the two vehicles, including mechanical air handling and management of general crew locations. Over the course of ISS operation, several unexpected anomalies have occurred which have required troubleshooting, including possible compromised performance of the CDRA and LiOH systems, and possible imbalance in CO2 levels between the ISS and STS while docked. This paper will cover efforts to troubleshoot the CO2 removal systems aboard the ISS and docked STS.

  19. Estimating costs of traffic crashes and crime: tools for informed decision making.

    PubMed

    Streff, F M; Molnar, L J; Cohen, M A; Miller, T R; Rossman, S B

    1992-01-01

    Traffic crashes and crime both impose significant economic and social burdens through injury and loss of life, as well as property damage and loss. Efforts to reduce crashes and crime often result in competing demands on limited public resources. Comparable and up-to-date cost data on crashes and crime contribute to informed decisions about allocation of these resources in important ways. As a first step, cost data provide information about the magnitude of the problems of crashes and crime by allowing us to estimate associated dollar losses to society. More importantly, cost data on crashes and crime are essential to evaluating costs and benefits of various policy alternatives that compete for resources. This paper presents the first comparable comprehensive cost estimates for crashes and crime and applies them to crash and crime incidence data for Michigan to generate dollar losses for the state. An example illustrates how cost estimates can be used to evaluate costs and benefits of crash-reduction and crime-reduction policies in making resource allocation decisions. Traffic crash and selected index crime incidence data from the calendar year 1988 were obtained from the Michigan State Police. Costs for crashes and index crimes were generated and applied to incidence data to estimate dollar losses from crashes and index crimes for the state of Michigan. In 1988, index crimes in Michigan resulted in $0.8 billion in monetary costs and $2.4 billion in total monetary and nonmonetary quality-of-life costs (using the willingness-to-pay approach). Traffic crashes in Michigan resulted in $2.3 billion in monetary costs and $7.1 billion in total monetary and nonmonetary quality-of-life costs, nearly three times the costs of index crimes. Based on dollar losses to the state, the magnitude of the problem of traffic crashes clearly exceeded that of index crimes in Michigan in 1988. From a policy perspective, summing the total dollar losses from crashes or crime is of less

  20. Assessing Crime as a Problem: The Relationship between Residents' Perception of Crime and Official Crime Rates over 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the relationship between official crime rates in census tracts and resident perceptions of crime. Using a unique data set that links household-level data from the American Housing Survey metro samples over 25 years (1976-1999) with official crime rate data for census tracts in selected cities during selected years, this study…

  1. Exploration of the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas Aboard E/V Nautilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. L.; Ballard, R. D.; Brennan, M. L.; Raineault, N. A.; Shank, T. M.; Mayer, L. A.; Roman, C.; Mitchell, G. A.; Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus undertook a two-month expedition to the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas. The primary goal of the Nautilus is to create a focus of international leadership for the development and integration of leading-edge technologies, educational programs, field operations, and public outreach programs for ocean exploration, in partnership with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research, and corporate partners. To do so, the program uses a complement of deep submergence vehicle systems and telepresence technologies to engage scientists, educators and the public, both at sea and ashore, allowing them to become integral members of the on-board exploration team. When discoveries are made, experts ashore are notified and brought aboard virtually within a short period of time to help guide shipboard response before the ship moves on. The 2012 expedition is comprised of four areas of interest. Extensive sidescan mapping took place off the Turkish coasts of the southern Black Sea and eastern Aegean Sea, and was followed by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives on targets of archaeological, geological, and biological interest. In the Black Sea, additional work was done on the porewater chemistry of the sediments in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. Nautilus returned to the Anaximander Seamounts, including Kazan, Amserdam, Thessaloniki, and Athina, to further explore active and formerly active seep sites located in 2010. Finally, based on biological and geological discoveries made on Eratosthenes Seamount in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, we returned to further study chemosynthetic vent communities and tectonic processes.;

  2. [Do daily newspapers of former West and East Germany cover crime in a different way?].

    PubMed

    Liebl, Karlhans

    2007-01-01

    The question investigated in the presented paper is whether crime is discussed differently in the media of former East and West Germany, how it is weighted and whether the real crime situation provides an explanation for any differences in press coverage. The study showed that there are no significant differences in the press coverage and that violent crime is not overrepresented. Coverage of offences like robbery, damage to property, sexual assaults or bodily injury, which are also categorized as violent crime, was of average frequency, so that again there was no overrepresentation in the newspapers of the two cities compared in this study (Stuttgart and Dresden). Surprisingly, sexual offences such as rape or sexual abuse played a minor role in the daily newspapers. Further interesting results of the analysis were that offences in the field of "intelligent crime" (e. g. white-collar crime) were of no importance in the print media, whereas the number of reports on crimes for which the general public assumes a higher probability to become a victim itself (e. g. burglary and robbery) was disproportionately high in relation to the recorded number of cases. Reports on drug offences played a more important role in the newspapers analyzed by us than violent crime. PMID:18020141

  3. Teaching about Crime in Communist Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichel, Philip L.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information on developing a short college level module on crime and societal reaction in communist society. Presented are techniques for gauging student knowledge of crime in communist states, theories by communist criminologists, and comparative criminology suggestions. (Author/DB)

  4. Statistical physics of crime: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-03-01

    Containing the spread of crime in urban societies remains a major challenge. Empirical evidence suggests that, if left unchecked, crimes may be recurrent and proliferate. On the other hand, eradicating a culture of crime may be difficult, especially under extreme social circumstances that impair the creation of a shared sense of social responsibility. Although our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the emergence and diffusion of crime is still incomplete, recent

  5. [The effects of information about crime on mother's anxiety about crime].

    PubMed

    Arai, Takashi; Fuji, Kei; Yoshida, Fujio

    2010-10-01

    This study examined a causal model that the effect of information about crime on risk perception, anxiety about crime, and crime prevention is mediated by the informational content and source. We measured risk perception and anxiety about crime from a social and an individual perspective. A web-based survey was conducted with mothers (N=1040) who have children aged 3-12 years. The results of structural equation modeling indicated the following. (a) Information about crime given by the mass media, Internet, and hearsay increased the risk perception and anxiety about crime through the impact of informational content (i.e., "feeling that crime is close," "emotional fluctuations," "sympathy for the victims," and "remembering a similar crime"). (b) Hearsay information directly controlled optimistic cognitions. (c) Mass media and hearsay information directly promoted crime prevention. (d) Cognition about the deterioration of security advanced cooperative crime prevention in the neighborhood. PMID:21061510

  6. Prognostic framing of stakeholders' subjectivities: a case of all-terrain vehicle management on state public lands.

    PubMed

    Asah, Stanley T; Bengston, David N; Wendt, Keith; DeVaney, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Management of all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use on Minnesota state forest lands has a contentious history and land managers are caught between ATV riders, non-motorized recreationists, private landowners, and environmental advocates. In this paper, we demonstrate the usefulness of framing distinct perspectives about ATV management on Minnesota state public forests, understand the structure of these management perspectives, identify areas of consensus and disagreement, specify which stakeholders hold the various perspectives, clarify stakeholder perceptions of other stakeholders, and explore the implications for ATV planning and management. Using Q methodology, three distinct perspectives about how we should or should not manage ATVs resulted from our analysis, labeled Expert Management, Multiple Use, and Enforcement and Balance. A surprising degree of unanimity among the three management perspectives was found. Although some of the areas of agreement would be difficult to implement, others would be relatively simple to put into place. We suggest that land managers focus on widely accepted management actions to ameliorate commonly recognized problems, which may ease tensions between stakeholders and make tackling the tougher issues easier. PMID:21984046

  7. Whose problem is it anyway? Crimes against women in India.

    PubMed

    Himabindu, B L; Arora, Radhika; Prashanth, N S

    2014-01-01

    The recent public outcry following a brutal gang rape of a young woman in India's national capital was a watershed moment in the world's largest democracy. It generated widespread public and political support for strengthening legal provisions to punish sex offenders. Although the legal response is a useful deterrent against such heinous crimes, women continue to suffer due to deeply rooted social prejudices that make them vulnerable to violence and discrimination in society. In this commentary, we aim to analyse the current developments with respect to gender violence in India within a background of the social position of women in Indian society. Using secondary data related to sex-selective abortions and crimes against women, and a critical review of the portrayal of women in Indian cinema, we reflect on the role of health workers, researchers and public health professionals in shaping a social response towards improving gender parity in our country. PMID:25053256

  8. Whose problem is it anyway? Crimes against women in India

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, B. L.; Arora, Radhika; Prashanth, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    The recent public outcry following a brutal gang rape of a young woman in India's national capital was a watershed moment in the world's largest democracy. It generated widespread public and political support for strengthening legal provisions to punish sex offenders. Although the legal response is a useful deterrent against such heinous crimes, women continue to suffer due to deeply rooted social prejudices that make them vulnerable to violence and discrimination in society. In this commentary, we aim to analyse the current developments with respect to gender violence in India within a background of the social position of women in Indian society. Using secondary data related to sex-selective abortions and crimes against women, and a critical review of the portrayal of women in Indian cinema, we reflect on the role of health workers, researchers and public health professionals in shaping a social response towards improving gender parity in our country. PMID:25053256

  9. Hate-Crime Hoaxes Unsettle Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    1999-01-01

    In recent months, police on a number of college and university campuses have investigated hate crimes that made headlines, only to discover that the crimes had been made up. While some feel the hoaxes are by individual students during difficult times in their lives, others feel leftists may be faking the crimes to influence the campus movement…

  10. Policing Alcohol and Related Crimes on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Andrea N.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that college students drink alcohol frequently and heavily. This can compromise their health and well-being. Student drinking is also tied to crime. While prior work explores the nature and extent of crimes involving alcohol on campus, to date no study has examined how police handle these incidents or crime generally. This study…

  11. Mass Media and the Fear of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Linda; Gilbert, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of the research on mass media effects on perceptions of crime danger, personal fear of crime, and reactions to crime risk. Discovers that mass media effects involve a number of variables and moderators. These include audience characteristics, degree and type of coverage, and location. (MJP)

  12. Schools, Neighborhood Risk Factors, and Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Dale; Broidy, Lisa; Denman, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has identified a link between schools (particularly high schools) and neighborhood crime rates. However, it remains unclear whether the relationship between schools and crime is a reflection of other criminogenic dynamics at the neighborhood level or whether schools influence neighborhood crime patterns independently of other…

  13. New Campus Crime Prevention Resources Available

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Law Enforcement Journal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Campus Crime Prevention Committee has compiled a list of university and college crime prevention agencies and resources, which includes contact information, links to agency crime prevention web pages, and a list of resources they offer (i.e., brochures, guides, PowerPoint programs, videos, etc.) as well as a spreadsheet showing organizations…

  14. Gun Attitudes and Fear of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Linda; Weeks, Kyle; Murphy, Marie Mackay

    1997-01-01

    Using three studies, examined the relationship between attitudes toward guns and fear of crime. Findings indicate a connection between fear of crime and attitudes toward guns: people higher in fear of crime favored gun control. Results also established a relationship between stereotypical beliefs about gun victims and support for gun control. (RJM)

  15. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  16. Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Peter, Katharin; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; Fleury, Jill K.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Plany, Michael G.; Rand, Michael R.

    This report, the fourth in a series of annual reports on school crime, presents the latest available data on school crime and student safety. National indicators affirm that the levels of crime in school have continued to decline, that acts that promote fear and detract from learning are decreasing, and that students feel safer in school than they…

  17. Aging and Aged in Organized Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Menachem

    1989-01-01

    Examines problems of the aged in organized crime, basing discussion on organized crime bosses over age 60 operating in Italy, the United States, and Israel. Looks at problems stemming from normative system in organized crime, role of the aged, intergenerational problems, fears of the aged, excuses and justifications, standards of life, and…

  18. Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Chapman, Christopher D.; Rand, Michael R.; Klaus, Patsy

    This report provides detailed statistical information on crime in schools. It is a companion document to the "Annual Report on School Safety: 1999," which offers an overview of the nature and scope of school crime. This report is organized as a series of indicators, with each indicator presenting data on a different aspect of school crime and…

  19. Crime and the Decline of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Mark W.

    This paper focuses on crime in American society, with emphasis on the causes of crime and delinquent behavior. A brief overview of numerous theories which have been advanced to explain causes of crime begins the paper. Among the theories discussed are those based on alcoholism, poverty, and perceived social injustice. Maintaining that these…

  20. CSI (Crime Scene Induction): Creating False Memories of Committing Crime.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen B; Baker, Alysha T

    2015-12-01

    We describe two merging lines of empirical inquiry: entire false memories for autobiographical events and false confessions. A recent study showed that people can be led to remember, and confess to, perpetrating serious crimes that never occurred when confronted with suggestive interview tactics commonly used in police interrogations. PMID:26639160

  1. 77 FR 12355 - Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Transactions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle- to-Infrastructure Transactions Workshop... Environment for Vehicle- to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) Transactions on April 19-20... presented in August 2012 during the annual Connected Vehicle Safety public meeting and via other...

  2. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention. PMID:14726266

  3. Does walkable neighbourhood design influence the association between objective crime and walking?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated associations between objectively measured crime and walking, and findings are mixed. One explanation for null or counterintuitive findings emerges from criminology studies, which indicate that the permeable street layouts and non-residential land uses that underpin walkable neighbourhoods are also associated with more crime. This study examined associations between objective crime and walking, controlling for the characteristics of walkable neighbourhoods. Methods A population representative sample of adults (25–65 years) (n = 3,487) completed the Western Australian Health and Wellbeing Survey (2006–2008) demographic and walking frequency items. Objective environmental measures were generated for each participant’s 400 m and 1600 m neighbourhood areas, including burglary, personal crime (i.e., crimes committed against people) in public space, residential density, street connectivity and local destinations. Log-linear negative binomial regression models were used to examine associations between crime and walking frequency/week, with progressive adjustment for residential density, street connectivity and local destinations. Results Burglary and personal crime occurring within a participant’s 400 m and 1600 m neighbourhoods were positively and significantly associated with walking frequency. For example, for every additional 10 crimes against the person/year within 400 m of a participant’s home, walking frequency increased by 8% (relative change = 1.077, p = 0.017). Associations remained constant after controlling for residential density and street connectivity, but attenuated after adjusting for local destinations (e.g., for personal crime in 400 m: relative change = 1.054, p = 0.104). This pattern of attenuation was evident across both crime categories and both neighbourhood sizes. Conclusions The observed positive associations between objective crime and walking appear to be a function of

  4. Coping with Crime on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael Clay

    A compilation, analysis and interpretation are provided of the court cases, involving crime or criminal-like behavior on college campuses, that have reached the appellate courts. The book is designed for the non-lawyer administrator. In addition, suggestions for successful administrative strategies are offered, together with checklists for…

  5. When is negligence a crime?

    PubMed

    Huxley-Binns, Rebecca

    This article considers the crime of gross negligence manslaughter and explains how the criminal offence is based on the civil form of negligence, but where the negligence is very serious and involves a risk of death. It also considers the offence of corporate manslaughter. PMID:19633603

  6. School Crime Prevention: NOLPE's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Robert J.

    School attorneys are primarily concerned with such issues as search and seizure, chain of custody, civil rights liability, and tort liability. Members of the National Organization on Legal Problems of Education (NOLPE) working within school districts can help reduce crime in the schools. NOLPE members could contribute to the clarity of thought and…

  7. Fact File: Crime Data from 489 U.S. College and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Data on crime at 489 colleges and universities with over 5,000 enrollment are presented for 1994 and 1995. Reported incidents of murder, forcible sex offenses, non-forcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, and motor-vehicle theft and arrests for liquor-law violations, drugs, and weapons are included. Institutions are listed by…

  8. Fact File: Crime Data From 2,400 Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Data from over 2,400 colleges and universities concerning the number and types of crimes committed on campus are tabulated by state and institution. Statistics are presented on reported numbers of incidents involving murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, and motor vehicle theft and on arrests for liquor violations, drugs, and…

  9. Fact File: Crime Data from 483 U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Statistics from the crime reports of 483 four-year colleges and universities with enrollments of over 5,000 are charted by state and institution for 1996 and 1997. Reported incidents include murder, forcible sex offenses, nonforcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, and motor-vehicle theft. Arrests reported are for liquor-law…

  10. More Choice, Less Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dills, Angela K.; Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2011-01-01

    Previous research debates whether public school choice improves students' academic outcomes, but there is little examination of its effects on their nonacademic outcomes. We use data from a nationally representative sample of high school students, a previously developed Tiebout choice measure, and metropolitan-level data on teenage arrest rates to…

  11. The hidden crime: human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kristen J; Lawler, Kate Byrnes

    2013-01-01

    As the primary contact in the health care system, nurses can play a role in combating this crime and assisting the victims. Assessment for abuse, neglect, trauma, recurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and fear of a controlling partner is critical. Following up on "red flags" and understanding methods of safe questioning can make the difference between slavery and recovery for victims. Nurses must also know the professional referrals in their areas once a potential victim has been identified. This may be a very dangerous undertaking and must be handled by experienced personnel. Referrals to forensic nurses or physicians, domestic violence professionals or law enforcement may be indicated. Initially, a nurse may want to consult with the agency social worker for guidance. Human trafficking is a human rights crime. Unfortunately, it is more prevalent in all types of communities than most people suspect. Nurses can be heroes to the victims through understanding of this crime and vigilance in the assessment and care of all people they encounter in their practices. PMID:24218718

  12. The hidden crime: human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kristen J; Lawler, Kate Byrnes

    2013-01-01

    As the primary contact in the health care system, nurses can play a role in combating this crime and assisting the victims. Assessment for abuse, neglect, trauma, recurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and fear of a controlling partner is critical. Following up on "red flags" and understanding methods of safe questioning can make the difference between slavery and recovery for victims. Nurses must also know the professional referrals in their areas once a potential victim has been identified. This may be a very dangerous undertaking and must be handled by experienced personnel. Referrals to forensic nurses or physicians, domestic violence professionals or law enforcement may be indicated. Initially, a nurse may want to consult with the agency social worker for guidance. Human trafficking is a human rights crime. Unfortunately, it is more prevalent in all types of communities than most people suspect. Nurses can be heroes to the victims through understanding of this crime and vigilance in the assessment and care of all people they encounter in their practices. To learn more or to help with this cause, visit the Somaly Mam Foundation at www.somaly.org or the U.S. Department of State at www. state.gov. PMID:23977773

  13. Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of crime is associated with negative health and wellbeing outcomes, and may mediate some impacts of the built environment on public health. A range of environmental interventions have been hypothesized to reduce the fear of crime. Methods This review aimed to synthesize the literature on the effectiveness of interventions in the built environment to reduce the fear of crime. Systematic review methodology, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance, was used. Studies of environmental interventions which reported a fear of crime outcome and used any prospective evaluation design (randomized controlled trial (RCT), trial or uncontrolled before-and-after study) were included. Eighteen databases were searched. The Hamilton tool was used to assess quality. A narrative synthesis of findings was undertaken. Results A total of 47 studies were included, 22 controlled and 25 uncontrolled, with total sample sizes ranging from n = 52 to approximately n = 23,000. Thirty-six studies were conducted in the UK, ten studies in the USA and one study in the Netherlands. The quality of the evidence overall is low. There are some indications that home security improvements and non-crime-related environmental improvements may be effective for some fear of crime outcomes. There is little evidence that the following reduce fear of crime: street lighting improvements, closed-circuit television (CCTV), multi-component environmental crime prevention programs or regeneration programs. Conclusions There is some evidence for the effectiveness of specific environmental interventions in reducing some indicators of fear of crime, but more attention to the context and possible confounders is needed in future evaluations of complex social interventions such as these. PMID:23663285

  14. Racial disparities in hate crime reporting.

    PubMed

    Zaykowski, Heather

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of the victim's race in reporting hate crimes to the police. Data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) concentrated incident-level files (1992-2005) were used to (a) analyze how the victim's race influences the likelihood of reporting and (b) explore differences between reporting racial hate crimes and non-racial hate crimes. Controlling for other demographic and incident characteristics, the results indicate that minority victimizations are less likely to be reported for both racial and nonracial hate crimes; however, the magnitude of this effect was greater for racial hate crimes. Failure to report to the police has serious consequences for the victim and the criminal justice system. Implications and suggestions for further research are discussed. PMID:20565008

  15. Publications

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI publications including PDQ cancer information for patients and health professionals, patient-education publications, fact sheets, dictionaries, NCI blogs and newsletters and major reports.

  16. The Prosecution of Hate Crimes: The Limitations of the Hate Crime Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Nickie D.

    2009-01-01

    Since the development of bias crime legislation over the past few decades, scholars have debated the merits of the legislation and questioned its enforcement. In light of such concerns, this study presents characteristics of all cases prosecuted as bias crimes in a New Jersey county between 2001 and 2004 and applies the hate crime typology…

  17. Fear of Crime among the Elderly: The Role of Crime Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Lee; Courlander, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Examined the effect of police patrol and crime education on the fear of crime and security-conscious behavior of 152 senior citizens. Results indicated that, although those who were highly affected by the crime education component exhibited increased security-conscious behavior, they also showed increased fear. (Author)

  18. Crime and the Elderly. A Report of the Crime Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Aaron; And Others

    The purpose of this document is to perform a comprehensive examination of the controversies and contradictions surrounding the issue of crime and the elderly, based on analysis of National Crime Survey data for 1973-1980. Chapter 1 introduces the study of crime and the elderly, describing the controversy that exists regarding the elderly and their…

  19. Joint Utility of Event-Dependent and Environmental Crime Analysis Techniques for Violent Crime Forecasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Joel M.; Kennedy, Leslie W.; Piza, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Violent crime incidents occurring in Irvington, New Jersey, in 2007 and 2008 are used to assess the joint analytical capabilities of point pattern analysis, hotspot mapping, near-repeat analysis, and risk terrain modeling. One approach to crime analysis suggests that the best way to predict future crime occurrence is to use past behavior, such as…

  20. Review of Current Crime Prediction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Vikas; Adderley, Richard; Bramer, Max

    Police analysts are requiredto unravel the complexities in data to assist operational personnel in arresting offenders and directing crime prevention strategies. However, the volume of crime that is being committed and the awareness of modern criminals make this a daunting task. The ability to analyse this amount of data with its inherent complexities without. using computational support puts a strain on human resources. This paper examines the current techniques that are used to predict crime and criminality. Over time, these techniques have been refined and have achieved limited success. They are concentrated into three categories: statistical methods, these mainly relate to the journey to crime, age of offending and offending behaviour; techniques using geographical information systems that identify crime hot spots, repeat victimisation, crime attractors and crime generators; a miscellaneous group which includes machine learning techniques to identify patterns in criminal behaviour and studies involving reoffending. The majority of current techniques involve the prediction of either a single offender's criminality or a single crimetype's next offence. These results are of only limited use in practical policing. It is our contention that Knowledge Discovery in Databases should be used on all crime types together with offender data, as a whole, to predict crime and criminality within a small geographical area of a police force.

  1. Statistical physics of crime: a review.

    PubMed

    D'Orsogna, Maria R; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-03-01

    Containing the spread of crime in urban societies remains a major challenge. Empirical evidence suggests that, if left unchecked, crimes may be recurrent and proliferate. On the other hand, eradicating a culture of crime may be difficult, especially under extreme social circumstances that impair the creation of a shared sense of social responsibility. Although our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the emergence and diffusion of crime is still incomplete, recent research highlights applied mathematics and methods of statistical physics as valuable theoretical resources that may help us better understand criminal activity. We review different approaches aimed at modeling and improving our understanding of crime, focusing on the nucleation of crime hotspots using partial differential equations, self-exciting point process and agent-based modeling, adversarial evolutionary games, and the network science behind the formation of gangs and large-scale organized crime. We emphasize that statistical physics of crime can relevantly inform the design of successful crime prevention strategies, as well as improve the accuracy of expectations about how different policing interventions should impact malicious human activity that deviates from social norms. We also outline possible directions for future research, related to the effects of social and coevolving networks and to the hierarchical growth of criminal structures due to self-organization. PMID:25468514

  2. Do neighborhood attributes moderate the relationship between alcohol establishment density and crime?

    PubMed

    Erickson, Darin J; Carlin, Bradley P; Lenk, Kathleen M; Quick, Harrison S; Harwood, Eileen M; Toomey, Traci L

    2015-02-01

    Although numerous studies have found a positive association between the density of alcohol establishments and various types of crime, few have examined how neighborhood attributes (e.g., schools, parks) could moderate this association. We used data from Minneapolis, MN with neighborhood as the unit of analysis (n = 83). We examined eight types of crime (assault, rape, robbery, vandalism, nuisance crime, public alcohol consumption, driving while intoxicated, underage alcohol possession/consumption) and measured density as the total number of establishments per roadway mile. Neighborhood attributes assessed as potential moderators included non-alcohol businesses, schools, parks, religious institutions, neighborhood activism, neighborhood quality, and number of condemned houses. Using Bayesian techniques, we created a model for each crime outcome (accounting for spatial auto-correlation and controlling for relevant demographics) with an interaction term (moderator × density) to test each potential moderating effect. Few interaction terms were statistically significant. The presence of at least one college was the only neighborhood attribute that consistently moderated the density-crime association, with the presence of a college attenuating the association between the density and three types of crime (assaults, nuisance crime, and public consumption). However, caution should be used when interpreting the moderating effect of college presence because of the small number of colleges in our sample. The lack of moderating effects of neighborhood attributes, except for presence of a college, suggests that the addition of alcohol establishments to any neighborhood, regardless of its other attributes, could result in an increase in a wide range of crime. PMID:24337980

  3. 75 FR 20889 - National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9414 Filed 4-20-10... community involvement. Beyond violent crime and property crime, we must also fight white-collar crime...

  4. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of a criminal offense related to participation in the delivery of health care items or services under... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH...

  5. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of a criminal offense related to participation in the delivery of health care items or services under... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH...

  6. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of a criminal offense related to participation in the delivery of health care items or services under... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH...

  7. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of a criminal offense related to participation in the delivery of health care items or services under... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH...

  8. 42 CFR 1002.230 - Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of a criminal offense related to participation in the delivery of health care items or services under... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notification of State or local convictions of crimes against Medicaid. 1002.230 Section 1002.230 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH...

  9. A Training Tool for Internet Crimes Against Children Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Sudhir; Breeden, Bob; Henry, Peter; Mulholland, Judie

    The Internet has greatly increased the vulnerability of children to those who would commit crimes against them. In response to Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) legislation, law enforcement agencies have dedicated resources to educate the public of the threat, respond to ongoing attacks, and assist victims. A significant trend in the investigation of ICAC cases is the proactive masquerading of law enforcement agents as vulnerable prey in Internet forums. This approach has shown great promise, and agents who have mastered it possess valuable knowledge and skills that could assist others. The Predator and Prey Alert (PAPA) system, a hardware and software suite of tools, originally developed for proactive shadowing, assistance and direct manipulation of a cyberstalking victim's computer, shows potential as a proactive forensic tool for ICAC investigations. This paper discusses the use of PAPA as a networked application to train law enforcement agents to investigate online cases involving the exploitation of children and teenagers.

  10. Experimental and statistical analyses to characterize in-vehicle fine particulate matter behavior inside public transit buses operating on B20-grade biodiesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Abhilash; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents results from an in-vehicle air quality study of public transit buses in Toledo, Ohio, involving continuous monitoring, and experimental and statistical analyses to understand in-vehicle particulate matter (PM) behavior inside buses operating on B20-grade biodiesel fuel. The study also focused on evaluating the effects of vehicle's fuel type, operating periods, operation status, passenger counts, traffic conditions, and the seasonal and meteorological variation on particulates with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 micron (PM 1.0). The study found that the average PM 1.0 mass concentrations in B20-grade biodiesel-fueled bus compartments were approximately 15 μg m -3, while PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentration averages were approximately 19 μg m -3 and 37 μg m -3, respectively. It was also observed that average hourly concentration trends of PM 1.0 and PM 2.5 followed a "μ-shaped" pattern during transit hours. Experimental analyses revealed that the in-vehicle PM 1.0 mass concentrations were higher inside diesel-fueled buses (10.0-71.0 μg m -3 with a mean of 31.8 μg m -3) as compared to biodiesel buses (3.3-33.5 μg m -3 with a mean of 15.3 μg m -3) when the windows were kept open. Vehicle idling conditions and open door status were found to facilitate smaller particle concentrations inside the cabin, while closed door facilitated larger particle concentrations suggesting that smaller particles were originating outside the vehicle and larger particles were formed within the cabin, potentially from passenger activity. The study also found that PM 1.0 mass concentrations at the back of bus compartment (5.7-39.1 μg m -3 with a mean of 28.3 μg m -3) were higher than the concentrations in the front (5.7-25.9 μg m -3 with a mean of 21.9 μg m -3), and the mass concentrations inside the bus compartment were generally 30-70% lower than the just-outside concentrations. Further, bus route, window position, and time of day were found to affect the in-vehicle

  11. Seafarers and passengers who disappear without a trace from aboard ships.

    PubMed

    Low, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    It is a fact that not only ships, but also seafarers and passengers vanish without a trace at sea, be it in the past or in present times. Several examples for this phenomenon are given. A scheme of the ship conditions found after discovering that single persons or even whole crews had disappeared from board is provided as an orientation, before describing in detail the more than 18 reasons for vanishing from ships for good, giving examples where appropriate. These reasons are in their majority logical, but strange and bizarre reasons also exist. Causes may e.g. be the sea state, crimes, suicide, alcohol, piracy. A chapter concerning passengers lost from large modem cruise ships, especially in the Caribbean, follows. Finally, suggestions are made, for instance psychological aptitude tests, as regards how to maybe help decrease the number of disappearing persons, especially young seafarers, from aboard ships on the high seas. PMID:17312709

  12. 1D and 3D anthropometric data application on public transport vehicle layout and on oil and gas laboratories work environment design.

    PubMed

    Pastura, F C H; Guimarães, C P; Zamberlan, M C P; Cid, G L; Santos, V S; Streit, P; Paranhos, A G; Cobbe, R T; Cobbe, K T; Batista, D S

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present 1D and 3D anthropometric data applied to two distinct design situations: one related to the interior layout of a public transport vehicle and another one related to oil and gas laboratories work environment design. On this study, the 1D anthropometric data were extracted from the Brazilian anthropometric database developed by INT and the 3D anthropometric data were obtained using a Cyberware 3D whole body scanner. A second purpose of this paper is to present the 3D human scanning data as a tool that can help designers on decision making. PMID:22317431

  13. Distinctive characteristics of sexual orientation bias crimes.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-10-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question: What are the differences between sexual orientation motivated bias crimes and racial bias crimes? This question is examined using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and multiple regression techniques. This analysis draws on the strengths of NIBRS to look at the incident characteristics of hate crimes and distinguishing characteristics of sexual orientation crimes. Specifically this analysis looks at the types and seriousness of offenses motivated by sexual orientation bias as opposed to race bias as well as victim and offender characteristics. The findings suggest that there are differences between these two types of bias crimes, suggesting a need for further separation of the bias types in policy and research. PMID:21156686

  14. Contextualizing Restorative Justice for Hate Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavrielides, Theo

    2012-01-01

    The application of restorative justice (RJ) with hate crime remains an underdeveloped field of research, policy, and practice. This article aims to advance the understanding of these two areas of inquiry: RJ and hate crime. It is known that while most hate incidents involve minor, punishable offenses, their impact can be long lasting and…

  15. Stop Crime by 1984, Here's How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Frank M.

    This booklet discusses the need for a developmental approach to the prevention of juvenile deliquency and crime in general. It presents an overview of the crime problem, mentions some common viewpoints concerning causal factors, and makes a case for the relationship between early life experiences and incidence of adult criminal behavior. The…

  16. [Organized and professional crime: a comparative approach].

    PubMed

    Kerner, H J; Mack, J A

    1975-01-01

    After a short preliminary statement of a terminological character, the authors review the basic features of professional and organized crime, also in relation to historically well defined aspects of it, of the "crime-syndicate" type. The tracts differentiating in this sector the European criminality from the North-American one are identified, and the most significant examples of criminal organization active in recent times especially in Great Britain are illustrated. The survey is carried out taking into account the quantitative and qualitative evolution of the phenomenon and probing further into the value and function that the various categories of crime operators assume in the most modern forms of organized crime. A special attention is devoted to the activities of particular importance that precede and follow the perpetration of crimes. The problem of the professional and organized crime is also viewed in the light of the difference existing in the various European countries, and of the easy access to international connections which afford to this type of crime quite a comprehensive scope of action and which involve a greater difficulty of the activities carried out by the authorities of the various countries. The authors finally emphasize the gravity of the new forms of crime that are being committed especially in the business field, and urge all those concerned in criminological problems to devote their attention to the phenomenon, delving further into the connection it has with the deviance theory. PMID:1230832

  17. The Dynamics of Crime and Punishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    This article analyzes crime development which is one of the largest threats in today's world, frequently referred to as the war on crime. The criminal commits crimes in his free time (when not in jail) according to a non-stationary Poisson process which accounts for fluctuations. Expected values and variances for crime development are determined. The deterrent effect of imprisonment follows from the amount of time in imprisonment. Each criminal maximizes expected utility defined as expected benefit (from crime) minus expected cost (imprisonment). A first-order differential equation of the criminal's utility-maximizing response to the given punishment policy is then developed. The analysis shows that if imprisonment is absent, criminal activity grows substantially. All else being equal, any equilibrium is unstable (labile), implying growth of criminal activity, unless imprisonment increases sufficiently as a function of criminal activity. This dynamic approach or perspective is quite interesting and has to our knowledge not been presented earlier. The empirical data material for crime intensity and imprisonment for Norway, England and Wales, and the US supports the model. Future crime development is shown to depend strongly on the societally chosen imprisonment policy. The model is intended as a valuable tool for policy makers who can envision arbitrarily sophisticated imprisonment functions and foresee the impact they have on crime development.

  18. Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Peter, Katharin; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; Fleury, Jill K.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Planty, Michael G.; Rand, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the latest indicator data on school crime and student safety, including updates on student and teacher victimization, weapons and fights at school, students' alcohol and marijuana use, and students' reports of drug availability at school. Data present a mixed picture of school safety, with a decline in overall crime rates but continued…

  19. Technology-Enabled Crime, Policing and Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuade, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Crime, policing and security are enabled by and co-evolve with technologies that make them possible. As criminals compete with security and policing officials for technological advantage perpetually complex crime, policing and security results in relatively confusing and therefore unmanageable threats to society. New, adaptive and ordinary crimes…

  20. 15 CFR 742.7 - Crime control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crime control. 742.7 Section 742.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.7 Crime control. (a)...

  1. Crime and Delinquency in California, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    A statistical portrait of crime and deliquency in California in 1986 is presented in this document. These topics are discussed and illustrated by data tables and graphs: crimes (violent, property); arrests (felony, misdemeanor, changes in rates); adult felony arrest dispositions (dispositions, arrestees convicted); adult corrections (supervision,…

  2. Crime and Delinquency in California, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    A statistical portrait of crime and deliquency in California in 1985 is presented in this document. These topics are discussed and illustrated by data tables and graphs: crimes (violent, property); arrests (felony, misdemeanor, changes in rates); adult felony arrest dispositions (dispositions, arrestees convicted); adult corrections (supervision,…

  3. Critical Issues in Crime Control Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Edith Elisabeth, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Entire issue discusses crime control policy in the United States, including such issues as the relation of social and environmental variables to criminal activity, dealing with the career offender, biological correlates of criminal behavior, juvenile delinquency, and white collar crime. (CS)

  4. War Crimes Tribunals: A Permanent Criminal Court?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, James E.; Rudelius-Palmer, Kristi

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the establishment and jurisdiction of war crimes tribunals in recent years. The tribunals, established and supported by the United Nations, investigate atrocities and other crimes committed during wartime. Discusses the tribunals in Rwanda and Yugoslavia, and the political opposition to the establishment of a permanent court. (MJP)

  5. Crime on Campus. Annual Report: 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Michael D.

    This report portrays the nature, volume, and extent of crime occurring on the campuses and housing of approximately 65 institutions of higher education in Tennessee from January to December of 1990. Following an introduction, a sample reporting form is provided, along with information on classification of offenses and calculation of crime rates.…

  6. State Legislative Responses to School Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menacker, Julius; Mertz, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Identifies laws from 36 states responding to school crime and violence in the following categories: (1) assault, battery, and related violent crime; (2) illicit drugs; (3) possession of weapons; (4) vandalism and damage to school property; and (5) miscellaneous statutes. Draws policy implications for states. (102 footnotes) (MLF)

  7. Evaluation of Teens, Crime & the Community, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Program Evaluators and Consultants, Inc., Bingham Farms, MI.

    Since 1985, the National Crime Prevention Council and the National Institute for Citizen Education in the Law have been supporting the implementation of the Teens, Crime, and the Community (TCC) curriculum for use in a variety of settings. The curriculum is intended for teenagers aged 14 to 18. The 1992 evaluation was an outgrowth of smaller…

  8. Women and Crime: 1960-1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noblit, George W.; Burcart, Janie M.

    1976-01-01

    Using data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Report, this research looks at crimes committed by women in 1960 and 1970. The study documents trends and offers possible explanations for the observed patterns. (For a critique of this article, see SO 504 653). (Author/RM)

  9. Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; Fleury, Jill K.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Rand, Michael R.; Klaus, Patsy; Planty, Michael G.

    This report contains the most recent available data on school crime and safety drawn from a number of statistical series supported by the federal government. It is organized as a series of indicators, with each indicator presenting data on a different aspect of school crime and safety. There are five sections to the report: Violent Deaths at…

  10. Addressing Hate Crimes: Six Initiatives That Are Enhancing the Efforts of Criminal Justice Practitioners. Hate Crimes Series. Bureau of Justice Assistance Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    This publication focuses on initiatives that are designed to address hate crimes by enhancing efforts of the criminal justice system. After discussing the pivotal role of law enforcement in this effort, the paper describes six Bureau of Justice Assistance-funded initiatives, which include: the International Association of Chiefs of Police Summit:…

  11. Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a variety of publications available from government and nongovernment sources. The government publications are from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and are designed for educators, students, and the public. (Author/SA)

  12. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  13. Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Johnson, Renee M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether past-30 day illicit drug use among sexual minority youth was more common in neighborhoods with a greater prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) individuals. Methods We used a population-based survey of public school youth in Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of 1292 9th–12th grade students from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (sexual minority n = 108). Data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults and battery between 2005 and 2008 were obtained from the Boston Police Department and linked to youths’ residential address. Youth reported past-30 day use of marijuana and other illicit drugs. Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney tests and corresponding p-values were computed to assess differences in substance use by neighborhood-level LGBT assault hate crime rate among sexual minority youth (n = 103). Results The LGBT assault hate crime rate in the neighborhoods of sexual minority youth who reported current marijuana use was 23.7 per 100,000, compared to 12.9 per 100,000 for sexual minority youth who reported no marijuana use (p = 0.04). No associations between LGBT assault hate crimes and marijuana use among heterosexual youth (p > 0.05) or between sexual minority marijuana use and overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes (p > 0.05) were detected, providing evidence for result specificity. Conclusions We found a significantly greater prevalence of marijuana use among sexual minority youth in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of LGBT assault hate crimes. These results suggest that neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in marijuana use. PMID:24326203

  14. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  15. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  16. Crime and Perceptions after a Decade of Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, Antoinette

    2007-01-01

    Crime has become central to any discussion about the consolidation of democracy in South Africa. Concerns about crime intensified in the years after 1994, as the country attempted to grapple with the apparent "crime wave" that accompanied the transition. A decade later crime is still a priority for government and a concern among citizens, but the…

  17. 32 CFR 635.33 - Crime rate reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crime rate reporting. 635.33 Section 635.33... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Army Quarterly Trends and Analysis Report § 635.33 Crime... aggregate crime data. Requests for Army-wide crime data reports will be forwarded through HQDA, Office...

  18. 32 CFR 635.33 - Crime rate reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Crime rate reporting. 635.33 Section 635.33... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Army Quarterly Trends and Analysis Report § 635.33 Crime... aggregate crime data. Requests for Army-wide crime data reports will be forwarded through HQDA, Office...

  19. 32 CFR 635.33 - Crime rate reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crime rate reporting. 635.33 Section 635.33... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Army Quarterly Trends and Analysis Report § 635.33 Crime... aggregate crime data. Requests for Army-wide crime data reports will be forwarded through HQDA, Office...

  20. 32 CFR 635.33 - Crime rate reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Crime rate reporting. 635.33 Section 635.33... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Army Quarterly Trends and Analysis Report § 635.33 Crime... aggregate crime data. Requests for Army-wide crime data reports will be forwarded through HQDA, Office...

  1. Crime scene investigation, reporting, and reconstuction (CSIRR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, John F.; Young, Jeffrey M.; Corrigan, Paul

    1997-02-01

    Graphic Data Systems Corporation (GDS Corp.) and Intellignet Graphics Solutions, Inc. (IGS) combined talents in 1995 to design and develop a MicroGDSTM application to support field investiations of crime scenes, such as homoicides, bombings, and arsons. IGS and GDS Corp. prepared design documents under the guidance of federal, state, and local crime scene reconstruction experts and with information from the FBI's evidence response team field book. The application was then developed to encompass the key components of crime scene investigaton: staff assigned to the incident, tasks occuring at the scene, visits to the scene location, photogrpahs taken of the crime scene, related documents, involved persons, catalogued evidence, and two- or three- dimensional crime scene reconstruction. Crime scene investigation, reporting, and reconstruction (CSIRR$CPY) provides investigators with a single applicaiton for both capturing all tabular data about the crime scene and quickly renderng a sketch of the scene. Tabular data is captured through ituitive database forms, while MicroGDSTM has been modified to readily allow non-CAD users to sketch the scene.

  2. Radon measurements aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Rosner, Stefan W.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out three (piggyback) radon-related projects aboard the KAO. The first, which was limited to upper tropospheric measurements while in level flight, revealed the systematic occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations in this region of the atmosphere. The second project was an instrument development project, which led to the installation of an automatic radon measurement system aboard the NASA ER-2 High Altitude Research Aircraft. In the third, we installed a new system capable of collecting samples during the normal climb and descent of the KAO. The results obtained in these projects have resulted in significant contributions to our knowledge of atmospheric transport processes, and are currently playing a key role in the validation of global circulation and transport models.

  3. Preventing sexual violence: can examination of offense location inform sex crime policy?

    PubMed

    Colombino, Nicole; Mercado, Cynthia Calkins; Levenson, Jill; Jeglic, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Recently, legislative initiatives to prevent sex crime recidivism include the passage of child safety zones (also called loitering zones) that prohibit sex offenders from lingering near places where children congregate. The ability of policies such as these or residence restrictions to curb sexual recidivism depends on the empirical reality of sex offender perpetration patterns. As such, the current study sought to examine locations where sex offenders first come into contact with their victims and whether sex crime locations differ among those who perpetrate offenses against children as compared to those who perpetrate offenses against adults. Further, this study examined actuarial risk scores and recidivism rates among offenders who met victims in child-dense public locations to determine if these offenders are more at risk of re-offense. Descriptive analyses, based on archival sex offender file review (N=1557), revealed that offenders primarily cultivated their offenses in private residential locations (67.0%); relatively few offenders (4.4%) met their victims in child-dense public locations. Further, offenders who perpetrated crimes against children were more likely to meet victims within a residence, while those who perpetrate crimes against adults were more likely to encounter victims in a more public type of location (e.g., bar, workplace). Though only 3.7% of all offenders in this sample sexually recidivated, those who recidivated were more likely to have met their victim in a child-dense public location than those who did not recidivate. Current sex crime policies that focus only on where offenders live may fail to focus on where offenders go and, further, may misdirect efforts away from the place where sex crimes most often occur, namely, in the home. PMID:21531024

  4. Punishment goals of crime victims.

    PubMed

    Orth, Uli

    2003-04-01

    Research on subjective punishment goals has focused on the perspective of third-party observers of criminal offenses and neglected the perspective of victims. This study investigates punishment goals among 174 adult crime victims (rape and nonsexual assault) for each participant's real criminal case. Scales measuring support for punishment goals are constructed by factor analysis of an 18-item list. Results show that 5 highly supported goals can be distinguished: retaliation, recognition of victim status, confirmation of societal values, victim security, and societal security. Analysis of relations between punishment goal scales and personal variables, situational variables, and demanded punishment severity corroborates the view that the punishment goals revealed can be classified according to the two independent dichotomies of moral versus instrumental goals, and micro versus macro goals. PMID:12733420

  5. The Minimum Legal Drinking Age and Crime

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We use variation from the minimum legal drinking age to estimate the causal effect of access to alcohol on crime. Using a census of arrests in California and a regression discontinuity design, we find that individuals just over age 21 are 5.9% more likely to be arrested than individuals just under 21. This increase is mostly due to assaults, alcohol-related offenses, and nuisance crimes. These results suggest that policies that restrict access to alcohol have the potential to substantially reduce crime. PMID:26120205

  6. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  7. The company man: a case of white-collar crime.

    PubMed

    Brottman, Mikita

    2009-06-01

    Insider trading scandals on Wall Street have focused public attention on the abuse of money and power in the service of greed. The analytic situation described in this paper involves a patient who was involved in a major white-collar crime in the 1990s and imprisoned on charges of fraud. Release from prison brought his anxieties about money, work, and masculinity into sharp focus. The paper explores the some of the emotional conflicts and confusion around corporate success and failure, and the particular issues that arise when people identify themselves with the company they work for, something that corporate culture has always encouraged. PMID:19536178

  8. Evaluation of AN Integrated Gis-Based Crime Analysis & 3d Modelling for Izmir-Konak Municipality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, C.; Deniz, D.

    2011-08-01

    GIS integrated 3D modelling is crucial for the city planning and design processes because urban modelling is a tool used in virtual environments, and provides convenience to work. Although, the creation and display of 3D city models for large regions is difficult it is vital for planning and designing safer cities, as well as public places. Today, crime is a significant problem in Turkey. When it was compared by years of crime rates, population growth and urbanization rate, an increasing more than in parallel has been observed. This paper aims to discuss GIS integrated 3D modelling affects in urban planning and design, explaining Turkish planning processes with GIS and 3D modelling. To do that, it presents a case study for Izmir Konak Municipality about GIS integrated crime analysis and 3D models of the crime scenes. Izmir crime records has been obtained from Izmir Police Department belonging to 2003-2004 and 2005 (D. Deniz, 2007) are used for districts' crime map. In the light of these data, the highest rate crime district, Konak, is analyzed between 2001 and 2005 data.

  9. Childhood trauma and neighborhood-level crime interact in predicting adult posttraumatic stress and major depression symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Quinn, James W; Richards, Catherine A; Pothen, John; Rundle, Andrew; Galea, Sandro; Ressler, Kerry J; Koenen, Karestan C; Bradley, Bekh

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has identified several individual-level factors that modify the risk of childhood trauma on adult psychiatric symptoms, including symptoms of major depression (MD) and posttraumatic stress (PTS). Neighborhood-level factors also influence the impact of individual-level exposures on adult psychopathology. However, no prior studies to our knowledge have explored cross-level interactions between childhood trauma and neighborhood-level factors on MD and PTS symptoms. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore cross-level interactions between a neighborhood-level factor - neighborhood-level crime - and childhood trauma on MD and PTS symptoms. Participants in this study (N=3192) were recruited from a large public hospital, and completed self-report inventories of childhood trauma and MD and PTS symptoms. Participant addresses were mapped onto 2010 census tracts, and data on crime within each tract were collected. Multilevel models found a significant cross-level interaction between childhood trauma and neighborhood crime on MD symptoms, such that the influence of high levels of childhood trauma on MD symptoms was enhanced for participants living in high-crime neighborhoods. Supplementary analyses found variation in the strength of cross-level interaction terms by types of childhood trauma and crime, with the strongest associations including emotional neglect paired with personal and property crime. The results provide preliminary support for interventions that help childhood trauma survivors find housing in less vulnerable neighborhoods and build skills to cope with neighborhood crime. PMID:26499372

  10. 43 CFR 423.40 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... addition to the regulations in this part, the regulations governing off-road-vehicle use in 43 CFR part 420... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicles. 423.40 Section 423.40 Public... Vehicles. (a) When operating a vehicle on Reclamation lands and Reclamation projects, you must comply...

  11. 43 CFR 423.40 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... addition to the regulations in this part, the regulations governing off-road-vehicle use in 43 CFR part 420... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vehicles. 423.40 Section 423.40 Public... Vehicles. (a) When operating a vehicle on Reclamation lands and Reclamation projects, you must comply...

  12. 43 CFR 423.40 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... addition to the regulations in this part, the regulations governing off-road-vehicle use in 43 CFR part 420... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vehicles. 423.40 Section 423.40 Public... Vehicles. (a) When operating a vehicle on Reclamation lands and Reclamation projects, you must comply...

  13. 43 CFR 8365.1-3 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operating a vehicle on the public lands, no person shall exceed posted speed limits, willfully endanger... vehicle is prohibited from operating a motor vehicle in motion, unless the operator and each front seat... by the vehicle operator and any front seat passenger. It also applies on public lands, or...

  14. Introducing fear of crime to risk research.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    This article introduces the fear of crime to risk research, noting a number of areas for future interdisciplinary study. First, the article analyzes both the career of the concept of fear of crime and the politics of fear. Second, it considers research and theory on the psychology of risk, particularly the interplay between emotion and cognition, and what might be called the risk as image perspective. Third, the article speculates how people learn about risk and suggests how to customize a social amplification of risk framework to fear of crime. Finally, the article advances the argument that fear of crime may be an individual response to community social order and a generalized attitude toward the moral trajectory of society. Each of these areas of discussion has implications for future theoretical developments within risk research; each highlights how risk research can contribute to the social scientific understanding of an important issue of the day. PMID:16492196

  15. National Hate Crimes Hotline Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Israel, Steve [D-NY-3

    2014-07-08

    09/02/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Help Communities Fight Violent Crime Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Kildee, Daniel T [D-MI-5

    2014-02-25

    04/16/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Justice for Crime Victims Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Franks, Trent [R-AZ-8

    2014-03-06

    04/16/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Tax Crimes and Identity Theft Prevention Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Castor, Kathy [D-FL-14

    2013-02-06

    02/28/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Perceived crime severity and biological kinship.

    PubMed

    Quinsey, V L; Lalumière, M L; Querée, M; McNaughton, J K

    1999-12-01

    Two predictions concerning the perceived severity of crimes can be derived from evolutionary theory. The first, arising from the theory of inclusive fitness, is that crimes in general should be viewed as more serious to the degree that the victim is genetically related to the perpetrator. The second, arising from the deleterious effects of inbreeding depression, is that heterosexual sexual coercion should be perceived as more serious the closer the genetic relationship of victim and perpetrator, particularly when the victim is a female of fertile age. Two hundred and thirty university students estimated the magnitude of the severity of brief crime descriptions in three separate studies. In the first two, the biological kinship of victim and perpetrator was varied, and in the third, the hypothetical genetic relatedness of the subject and the fictitious victim was varied. All three studies found the linear relationships between biological kinship and perceived crime severity predicted by theory. PMID:26196416

  20. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Garetson, Thomas

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations.Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing.

  1. Child rape: facets of a heinous crime.

    PubMed

    Gangrade, K D; Sooryamoorthy, R; Renjini, D

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the extent of child rape in India, case studies of girl children in legal procedures, rape settings and perpetrators, public morality, and the nature of rape laws in India. It is concluded that there is no safe place for children. Currently, rapists are allowed to go free or are acquitted. Prevention and control of child rape must involve punishment of rapists. It is not appropriate that society ostracize the victim and her family. Victims should not remain silent. National Crime Records Bureau statistics reveal increases in rape during 1986-91. State figures are given for 1986-88. Madhya Pradesh had the highest reported incidence of rape in 1988. In 1993, Madhya Pradesh had a total of 2459 rapes. Nationally, 10,425 women were reported as raped in 1991. 51.7% were 16-30 years old. There were 1099 cases of pedophilia in 1991, which was an increase over 1990. Over 50% of the pedophilia cases were reported in Uttar Pradesh. The record of convictions shows very low figures. 1992 trial results of 276 rape cases indicated that only 46 persons were convicted. Victims suffer from psychological effects of embarrassment, disgust, depression, guilt, and even suicidal tendencies. There is police and prosecution indifference as well as social stigma and social ostracism of the victim and her family. Many cases go unreported. The case studies illustrate the difficulties for the victim of experiencing the rape and the social responses: police harassment, shame and fear, and occasionally public outrage. The case studies illustrate rape in familiar settings, such as schools, family homes, and neighbors and friends' homes; rape by policemen; and rape by political influentials. Most offenders are young, married, and socioeconomically poor. Mass media portrayals fuel the frustrations of poor and lonely men in cities. Rapists exhibit anti-social behavior or psychopathology. Sexual offenses are related to society's moral values. PMID:12158004

  2. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that…

  3. Criminal Justice Profile--Statewide, 1984. Supplement to "Crime and Delinquency in California."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    This California annual Criminal Justice Statewide Profile presents data which supplements the Bureau of Criminal Statistics' (BCS) annual Crime and Delinquency publication. This monograph summarizes and combines data pertaining to California's justice system. The profile consists of two sections. The first section consists of 12 tables displaying…

  4. Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2010. NCES 2011-002/NCJ 230812

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robers, Simone; Zhang, Jijun; Truman, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring safer schools requires establishing good indicators of the current state of school crime and safety across the nation and regularly updating and monitoring these indicators. This is the aim of this report. This report is the thirteenth in a series of annual publications produced jointly by the National Center for Education Statistics…

  5. FBI Director Mueller Cites Partnerships as Key to Combating Crime and Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher G.

    2008-01-01

    At the Public Policy General Session held June 30 during IACLEA's 50th Anniversary Annual Conference, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller told the audience that through its partnerships with IACLEA and other law enforcement organizations and agencies, the FBI has made great strides in combating both crime and terrorism in the communities and on…

  6. STS-65 Payload Specialist Mukai enters IML-2 spacelab module aboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During STS-65 aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai is ready to begin one of her busy twelve hour shifts as she enters the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) spacelab science module via the spacelab tunnel (note hatch opening behind her). The tunnel connects the IML-2 module with the OV-102's crew compartment. Mounted on a rack handrail and on an forward end cone bracket are video cameras that will record the two weeks of experimenting inside the module. Mukai is a representative from the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  7. STS-65 crew works inside the IML-2 spacelab module aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In the spacelab science module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, four members of the STS-65 crew busy themselves with experiments in support of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Mission Specialist (MS) Donald A. Thomas with his feet hooked on a center aisle stowage unit handrail talks with MS Leroy Chiao in the foreground while Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb takes notes at Rack 5 Biorack (BR) glovebox. Japanese Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai reviews her notes in the background. Mukai represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  8. Nurses wage war on hate crime.

    PubMed

    Snell, Janet

    The number of hate crimes reported to the police is rising sharply, in part because increased awareness has prompted more victims and witnesses to come forward. This article explains how nurses are taking steps to identify such crimes and prevent them happening in the first place. The panel opposite offers some practical advice on how to raise concerns with the police and other authorities. PMID:23427622

  9. Crime scene interpretation: back to basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Hayden B.

    1999-02-01

    This presentation is a review of the basics involved in the interpretation of the crime scene based on facts derived from the physical and testimonial evidence obtained from the scene. This presentation will demonstrate the need to thoroughly document the scene to prove the interpretation. Part of this documentation is based on photography and crime scene sketches. While the methodology is simple and well demonstrated in this presentation this aspect is one of the tasks least completed by most law enforcement agencies.

  10. 77 FR 41334 - Request for Comments: Customer Due Diligence Requirements for Financial Institutions; Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Financial Crimes Enforcement Network 31 CFR Chapter X RIN 1506-AB15 Request for... Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public hearing; request for comment... entry to the hearing site. \\1\\ Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, ``Customer Due...

  11. Violence in U.S. Public Schools: A Summary of Findings. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Eric

    This report analyzes data from the 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety presented in "Violence in U.S. Public Schools: 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety. Statistical Analysis Report." Principals at 3,314 nationally-representative K-12 schools described incidents of crime and violence, disciplinary problems and actions, use of security…

  12. Juvenile crime and criminal justice: resolving border disputes.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal architecture of the new boundary-drawing regime and how effective it has been in reducing crime. The juvenile court, Fagan emphasizes, has always had the power to transfer juveniles to the criminal court. Transfer decisions were made individually by judges who weighed the competing interests of public safety and the possibility of rehabilitating young offenders. This authority has now been usurped by legislators and prosecutors. The recent changes in state law have moved large numbers of juveniles into the adult system. As many as 25 percent of all juvenile offenders younger than eighteen, says Fagan, are now prosecuted in adult court. Many live in states where the age boundary between juvenile and criminal court has been lowered to sixteen or seventeen. The key policy question is: do these new transfer laws reduce crime? In examining the research evidence, Fagan finds that rates of juvenile offending are not lower in states where it is relatively more common to try adolescents as adults. Likewise, juveniles who have been tried as adults are no less likely to re-offend than their counterparts who have been tried as juveniles. Treating juveniles as adult criminals, Fagan concludes, is not effective as a means of crime control. Fagan argues that the proliferation of transfer regimes over the past several decades calls into question the very rationale for a juvenile court. Transferring adolescent offenders to the criminal court exposes them to harsh and sometimes toxic forms of punishment that have the perverse effect of increasing criminal activity. The accumulating evidence on transfer, the recent decrease in serious juvenile

  13. Neighborhood social capital and crime victimization: comparison of spatial regression analysis and hierarchical regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Ken'ichi; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2012-11-01

    Crime is an important determinant of public health outcomes, including quality of life, mental well-being, and health behavior. A body of research has documented the association between community social capital and crime victimization. The association between social capital and crime victimization has been examined at multiple levels of spatial aggregation, ranging from entire countries, to states, metropolitan areas, counties, and neighborhoods. In multilevel analysis, the spatial boundaries at level 2 are most often drawn from administrative boundaries (e.g., Census tracts in the U.S.). One problem with adopting administrative definitions of neighborhoods is that it ignores spatial spillover. We conducted a study of social capital and crime victimization in one ward of Tokyo city, using a spatial Durbin model with an inverse-distance weighting matrix that assigned each respondent a unique level of "exposure" to social capital based on all other residents' perceptions. The study is based on a postal questionnaire sent to 20-69 years old residents of Arakawa Ward, Tokyo. The response rate was 43.7%. We examined the contextual influence of generalized trust, perceptions of reciprocity, two types of social network variables, as well as two principal components of social capital (constructed from the above four variables). Our outcome measure was self-reported crime victimization in the last five years. In the spatial Durbin model, we found that neighborhood generalized trust, reciprocity, supportive networks and two principal components of social capital were each inversely associated with crime victimization. By contrast, a multilevel regression performed with the same data (using administrative neighborhood boundaries) found generally null associations between neighborhood social capital and crime. Spatial regression methods may be more appropriate for investigating the contextual influence of social capital in homogeneous cultural settings such as Japan. PMID

  14. 75 FR 39251 - Control of Air Pollution From New Motor Vehicles: Announcement of Public Workshop for Heavy-Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ...) Technologies'' dated December 30, 2009. \\2\\ See 74 FR 57671 (November 9, 2009). II. Public Workshop: EPA is... (SCR). EPA will be reviewing its policies regarding the operation of SCR- equipped heavy-duty diesel... the SCR system) is detected. DATES: The workshop will be held on July 20, 2010 from 10 a.m. to 4...

  15. 76 FR 76932 - Public Hearings for 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Standards.'' (December, 1, 2011; 76 FR 74854) These hearings also offer an opportunity for the public to... published in the Federal Register on December 1, 2011 (76 FR 74854) and is also available at the Web pages... the proposal must be received by January 30, 2012 (76 FR 74854). Written comments on NHTSA's Draft...

  16. Traumatogenic Processes and Pathways to Mental Health Outcomes for Sexual Minorities Exposed to Bias Crime Information.

    PubMed

    Lannert, Brittany K

    2015-07-01

    Vicarious traumatization of nonvictim members of communities targeted by bias crimes has been suggested by previous qualitative studies and often dominates public discussion following bias events, but proximal and distal responses of community members have yet to be comprehensively modeled, and quantitative research on vicarious responses is scarce. This comprehensive review integrates theoretical and empirical literatures in social, clinical, and physiological psychology in the development of a model of affective, cognitive, and physiological responses of lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals upon exposure to information about bias crimes. Extant qualitative research in vicarious response to bias crimes is reviewed in light of theoretical implications and methodological limitations. Potential pathways to mental health outcomes are outlined, including accumulative effects of anticipatory defensive responding, multiplicative effects of minority stress, and putative traumatogenic physiological and cognitive processes of threat. Methodological considerations, future research directions, and clinical implications are also discussed. PMID:24626458

  17. Using Campus Crime Statistics in Classroom Discussions of Official Measures of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Observes that many undergraduate students find standard lectures on official measures of crime to be rather dry. Discusses a technique to help make police measures more relevant to students through the integration of campus crime statistics into criminology courses. Includes a discussion of potential drawbacks, and provides a sample student…

  18. Crimes against Children by Babysitters. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

    This bulletin, part of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's "Crimes against Children Series," draws on the FBI's National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide data on the frequency and nature of crimes against children committed by babysitters. According to the bulletin, babysitters account for approximately 4 percent…

  19. A Crime Analysis Decision Support System for Crime Report Classification and Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Chih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Today's Internet-based crime reporting systems make timely and anonymous crime reporting possible. However, these reports also result in a rapidly growing set of unstructured text files. Complicating the problem is that the information has not been filtered or guided in a detective-led interview resulting in much irrelevant information. To…

  20. Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G.; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to “conventional” property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11–18 years old in 1976–77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36–44) in 2002–2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002–2003 (total age range 11–88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes. PMID:22347761

  1. Heavy Cosmic Ray Measurement Aboard Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Krause, J.; Fischer, E.; Enge, W.

    1985-01-01

    A stack of CR-39 plastic track detectors was exposed to cosmic radiation during the 10 days mission aboard Spacelab-1. A part of the stack was rotated one revolution within 7 days. The impact time of most of the particles was correlated with the orbit position of the shuttle and thus with geomagnetic field parameters. The analysis of heavy particles with charge Z greater than or equal to 6 in the energy range 50-150 MeV per nucleon with special emphasis on geomagnetically forbidden particles is reported.

  2. Zoning out crime and improving community health in Sarasota, Florida: "Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design".

    PubMed

    Carter, Sherry Plaster; Carter, Stanley L; Dannenberg, Andrew L

    2003-09-01

    Sarasota, Fla, used Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles to guide revitalization efforts in its crime-ridden North Trail area. A team of city planners, police officers, and architects examined land use and crime data and sought input from local businesses, residents, and community leaders. Beginning in 1990, interventions included increased police patrols to reduce prostitution and the creation of a new zoning district to encourage area redevelopment based on CPTED principles. Compared with the rest of Sarasota, from 1990 to 1998 the North Trail Corridor experienced decreases in calls for police service (P <.005), crimes against persons and property (P = not significant), and prostitution (P <.05). These results suggest that community design may be a useful tool for decreasing crime and improving community health. PMID:12948960

  3. Geovisualization Approaches for Spatio-temporal Crime Scene Analysis - Towards 4D Crime Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Markus; Asche, Hartmut

    This paper presents a set of methods and techniques for analysis and multidimensional visualisation of crime scenes in a German city. As a first step the approach implies spatio-temporal analysis of crime scenes. Against this background a GIS-based application is developed that facilitates discovering initial trends in spatio-temporal crime scene distributions even for a GIS untrained user. Based on these results further spatio-temporal analysis is conducted to detect variations of certain hotspots in space and time. In a next step these findings of crime scene analysis are integrated into a geovirtual environment. Behind this background the concept of the space-time cube is adopted to allow for visual analysis of repeat burglary victimisation. Since these procedures require incorporating temporal elements into virtual 3D environments, basic methods for 4D crime scene visualisation are outlined in this paper.

  4. Cultivation and counter cultivation: does religiosity shape the relationship between television viewing and estimates of crime prevalence and assessment of victimization likelihood?

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Amir; Lowenstein, Hila

    2013-02-01

    Religiosity may change the direction of the effect of TV viewing on assessment of the likelihood of personal victimization and estimates concerning crime prevalence. A content analysis of a representative sample of TV programming (56 hours of prime-time shows) was done to identify the most common crimes on television, followed by a survey of a representative sample of the adult public in a large urban district (778 respondents) who were asked to estimate the prevalence of these crimes and to assess the likelihood of themselves being victimized. People who defined themselves as non-religious increased their estimates of prevalence for crimes often depicted on TV, as they reported more time watching TV (ordinary cultivation effect), whereas estimates regarding the prevalence of crime and assessment of victimization likelihood among religious respondents were lower with reports of more time devoted to television viewing (counter-cultivation effect). PMID:23654044

  5. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  6. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  7. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  8. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  9. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  10. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  11. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  12. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  13. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  14. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Quentin S; Khatun, Suniya; Yosef, Amal; Dyer, Rachel-May

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026) while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029) indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs) to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes). Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation. PMID:25271781

  15. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime. PMID:25589599

  16. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just after departing the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Shuttle Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter wends its way to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler-transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler-transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  17. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  18. Contextualizing restorative justice for hate crime.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, Theo

    2012-12-01

    The application of restorative justice (RJ) with hate crime remains an underdeveloped field of research, policy, and practice. This article aims to advance the understanding of these two areas of inquiry: RJ and hate crime. It is known that while most hate incidents involve minor, punishable offenses, their impact can be long lasting and detrimental to victims and affected communities. The article investigates how RJ is conceptualized within the hate crime context. The findings are based on a 3-year research program, which combined theoretical analysis, literature review, and U.K.-focused field research that was carried out through a combination of qualitative methods. These included semistructured interviews with an expert sample of practitioners and policy makers as well as focus groups with young victims and offenders of hate incidents. Direct observation was also carried out with two RJ practices. PMID:22645026

  19. [A doctor's action within possible crime scene].

    PubMed

    Sowizdraniuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Every doctor regardless of specialization in his practice may meet the need to provide assistance to victims of crime-related action. In this article there were disscused the issues of informing the investigative authorities about the crime, ensuring the safety of themselves and the environment at the scene. It also shows the specific elements of necessary procedures and practice to deal with the victims designed to securing any evidence present of potential or committed crime in proper manner. Special attention has been given to medical operation and other, necessary in case of certain criminal groups, among the latter we need to underline: actions against sexual freedom and decency, bodily integrity, life and well-being of human, and specially homicide, infanticide and suicide. PMID:27164285

  20. Introduction to LNG vehicle safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratvold, Delma; Friedman, David; Chernoff, Harry; Farkhondehpay, Dariush; Comay, Claudia

    1994-03-01

    Basic information on the characteristics of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is assembled to provide an overview of safety issues and practices for the use of LNG vehicles. This document is intended for those planning or considering the use of LNG vehicles, including vehicle fleet owners and operators, public transit officials and boards, local fire and safety officials, manufacturers and distributors, and gas industry officials. Safety issues and mitigation measures that should be considered for candidate LNG vehicle projects are addressed.

  1. [Surveillance of drinking water supply systems on markets and in vehicles].

    PubMed

    Rädel, U; Puchert, W; Suchenwirth, R

    2007-03-01

    The new German Drinking Water Ordinance (TrinkwV 2001) demands that the requirements of water intended for human consumption be met up to the intrinsic tap, at which the water is used. This also applies to water supply systems for food trade aboard non-stationary facilities and in vehicles for commercial purposes. In contrast to stationary units for drinking water supply, the nonstationary units relocate and the responsibility changes with each public health authority agent. Therefore, a coordinated action between the federal states is desirable and necessary. The experience of the public health departments presents many non-compliant parameters of microbiology in water supply systems on markets and in vehicles. The development of practical and consistent recommendations for the surveillance of non-stationary units is required to give consistent standards to the users. The article gives a review about legal foundations and technical rules in order to define the drinking water supply systems on markets and in vehicles in compliance with the German Drinking Water Ordinance. Examples of laboratory results from different monitoring episodes from three federal states are shown. PMID:17334887

  2. A Case for Hypogravity Studies Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions being contemplated by NASA and other spacefaring nations include some that would require long stays upon bodies having gravity levels much lower than that of Earth. While we have been able to quantify the physiological effects of sustained exposure to microgravity during various spaceflight programs over the past half-century, there has been no opportunity to study the physiological adaptations to gravity levels between zero-g and one-g. We know now that the microgravity environment of spaceflight drives adaptive responses of the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensorimotor systems, causing bone demineralization, muscle atrophy, reduced aerobic capacity, motion sickness, and malcoordination. All of these outcomes can affect crew health and performance, particularly after return to a one-g environment. An important question for physicians, scientists, and mission designers planning human exploration missions to Mars (3/8 g), the Moon (1/6 g), or asteroids (likely negligible g) is: What protection can be expected from gravitational levels between zero-g and one-g? Will crewmembers deconditioned by six months of microgravity exposure on their way to Mars experience continued deconditioning on the Martian surface? Or, will the 3/8 g be sufficient to arrest or even reverse these adaptive changes? The implications for countermeasure deployment, habitat accommodations, and mission design warrant further investigation into the physiological responses to hypogravity. It is not possible to fully simulate hypogravity exposure on Earth for other than transient episodes (e.g., parabolic flight). However, it would be possible to do so in low Earth orbit (LEO) using the centrifugal forces produced in a live-aboard centrifuge. As we're not likely to launch a rotating human spacecraft into LEO anytime in the near future, we could take advantage of rodent subjects aboard the ISS if we had a centrifuge that could accommodate the rodent

  3. Crime, fear of crime, environment, and mental health and wellbeing: mapping review of theories and causal pathways.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Theo; Clayton, Stephen; Neary, David; Whitehead, Margaret; Petticrew, Mark; Thomson, Hilary; Cummins, Steven; Sowden, Amanda; Renton, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the findings from a review of the theoretical and empirical literature on the links between crime and fear of crime, the social and built environment, and health and wellbeing. A pragmatic approach was employed, with iterative stages of searching and synthesis. This produced a holistic causal framework of pathways to guide future research. The framework emphasises that crime and fear of crime may have substantial impacts on wellbeing, but the pathways are often highly indirect, mediated by environmental factors, difficult to disentangle and not always in the expected direction. The built environment, for example, may affect health via its impacts on health behaviours; via its effects on crime and fear of crime; or via the social environment. The framework also helps to identify unexpected factors which may affect intervention success, such as the risk of adverse effects from crime prevention interventions as a result of raising awareness of crime. PMID:22542441

  4. Rural Crime and Criminal Justice: A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Robert D., Comp.; Horton, David M., Comp.

    The 140-item bibliography highlights available literature on crime and the administration of criminal justice in rural America, published between 1921 and 1979 (primarily in the 1970's). The 31 citations in Chapter 1, "Rural Crime: Nature and Extent," deal with incidence rates, contributing factors, offender studies, and crimes unique to rural…

  5. Victim-Offender Mediation with Adolescents Who Commit Hate Crimes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Stephen C.; Swain, Jennifer E.

    The number of reported hate crimes has steadily increased. Racial prejudice motivates most of these crimes, which typically are committed by a small, loosely associated group of adolescent offenders. In addition to the physical pain and material loss associated with these crimes, they can be psychologically devastating to the victim. New…

  6. Chemistry and Crime: From Sherlock Holmes to Today's Courtroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Samuel M., Ed.

    The application of the principles of chemistry both for committing crimes and for tracking down criminals interests audiences of all ages and walks of life. This interest is the reason for the long-standing popularity of fictional works that describe crimes made possible by the criminal's knowledge of chemistry and crimes solved by the sleuth's…

  7. Quality of Life and Perceptions of Crime in Saskatoon, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between crime and quality of life in Saskatoon, Canada. The city has one of the highest crime rates in the country and has been referred to as the "Crime Capital of Canada", a label that comes as a surprise to many residents and causes considerable concern among others. The aim of this research is to…

  8. Disaggregating the Relationship Between Schools and Crime: A Spatial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Rebecca K.; Swatt, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    Although an extensive literature exists on crime in schools, surprisingly few studies have examined crime within the vicinity of schools. Schools, like other urban facilities, can generate crime by providing youth opportunities to congregate with little supervision, particularly before and after school hours. Some noteworthy studies have…

  9. First Things First: Developing a Crime Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlem, Carole B.

    1996-01-01

    A brief history of the concept of scientific crime prevention is outlined, and development of a college crime prevention program is discussed, including criteria for judging proposals that address a security threat; advantages and disadvantages of three prevention approaches (informational, mechanical, human); innovations; crime in the surrounding…

  10. Households Touched by Crime, 1987. Bureau of Justice Statistics Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Michael R.; And Others

    For the year 1987, 24.4 % of American households were touched by crime. A household is considered touched by crime if during the year it was affected by a burglarly, auto theft, or household theft or if a household member was raped, robbed, or assaulted or was a victim of personal theft, no matter where the crime occurred. These offenses, which…

  11. 28 CFR 0.91 - Office for Victims of Crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office for Victims of Crime. 0.91 Section...-Office of Justice Programs and Related Agencies § 0.91 Office for Victims of Crime. The Office for Victims of Crime is headed by a Director appointed by the Assistant Attorney General, Office of...

  12. 28 CFR 0.91 - Office for Victims of Crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Office for Victims of Crime. 0.91 Section...-Office of Justice Programs and Related Agencies § 0.91 Office for Victims of Crime. The Office for Victims of Crime is headed by a Director appointed by the Assistant Attorney General, Office of...

  13. 28 CFR 0.91 - Office for Victims of Crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Office for Victims of Crime. 0.91 Section...-Office of Justice Programs and Related Agencies § 0.91 Office for Victims of Crime. The Office for Victims of Crime is headed by a Director appointed by the Assistant Attorney General, Office of...

  14. 28 CFR 0.91 - Office for Victims of Crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office for Victims of Crime. 0.91 Section...-Office of Justice Programs and Related Agencies § 0.91 Office for Victims of Crime. The Office for Victims of Crime is headed by a Director appointed by the Assistant Attorney General, Office of...

  15. Supporting Young Crime Victims: Discursive Environments and Formula Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofstrand, Cecilia Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Within the crime victim movement and discourse on victimization, a novel victim category has been introduced: the young crime victim. This article analyses the professional discourse formed around the new notion, focusing on the needs of the young crime victim along with the practices, tools, and techniques used to deal with resistance at a…

  16. 28 CFR 0.91 - Office for Victims of Crime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office for Victims of Crime. 0.91 Section...-Office of Justice Programs and Related Agencies § 0.91 Office for Victims of Crime. The Office for Victims of Crime is headed by a Director appointed by the Assistant Attorney General, Office of...

  17. Making a Difference: Young People in Community Crime Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Jean F.; Calhoun, John C.

    This document discusses the involvement of teenagers in community crime prevention. It gives the justification, methods, successes, and problems of crime prevention programs in which young people participate. Several reasons for involving teenagers are given: teenagers need to develop a sense of community, they are often the victims of crime, and…

  18. Teens, Crime, and the Community in Boys & Girls Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Andrea

    Teens, Crime, and the Community (TCC) curriculum creates an awareness among teens of the crime problems facing our communities and how they affect our nation. It encourages youth to take responsibility for reducing crime and victimization, making schools and neighborhoods safer. Boys and Girls Clubs offer a variety of programs for youth, and TCC…

  19. Workplace Violence, Hate Crime and Free Speech: A Proactive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romas, Ted; Parmer, Harry

    For community colleges, crime on campus is a complex and pressing issue since most maintain open campuses with no physical security features, such as entry control points or fencing. Workplace crimes can take the form of robbery or other violent crimes, domestic and misdirected affection cases, employer-directed situations, terrorism, and hate…

  20. The Role of Perpetrator Motivation in Two Crime Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizemore, O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate volunteers (n = 134) were randomly assigned in a 2 x 2 design that manipulated type of crime (rape vs. robbery) and perpetrator motivation (anger vs. desire). After reading one of the crime scenarios, participants responded to a series of attitude items regarding responsibility for the crime, assigned blame to agents mentioned in the…

  1. Gender and Crime Victimization Modify Neighborhood Effects on Adolescent Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nicole M.; Bates, Lisa M.; Tchetgen-Tchetgen, Eric J.; Earls, Felton J.; Glymour, M. Maria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Leverage an experimental study to determine whether gender or recent crime victimization modify the mental health effects of moving to low-poverty neighborhoods. METHODS: The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) study randomized low-income families in public housing to an intervention arm receiving vouchers to subsidize rental housing in lower-poverty neighborhoods or to controls receiving no voucher. We examined 3 outcomes 4 to 7 years after randomization, among youth aged 5 to 16 years at baseline (n = 2829): lifetime major depressive disorder (MDD), psychological distress (K6), and Behavior Problems Index (BPI). Treatment effect modification by gender and family’s baseline report of recent violent crime victimization was tested via interactions in covariate-adjusted intent-to-treat and instrumental variable adherence-adjusted regression models. RESULTS: Gender and crime victimization significantly modified treatment effects on distress and BPI (P < .10). Female adolescents in families without crime victimization benefited from MTO treatment, for all outcomes (Distress B = –0.19, P = .008; BPI B = –0.13, P = .06; MDD B = –0.036, P = .03). Male adolescents in intervention families experiencing crime victimization had worse distress (B = 0.24, P = .004), more behavior problems (B = 0.30, P < .001), and nonsignificantly higher MDD (B = 0.022, P = .16) versus controls. Other subgroups experienced no effect of MTO treatment. Instrumental variable estimates were similar but larger. CONCLUSIONS: Girls from families experiencing recent violent crime victimization were significantly less likely to achieve mental health benefits, and boys were harmed, by MTO, suggesting need for cross-sectoral program supports to offset multiple stressors. PMID:22908105

  2. [Comparative study of the proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia aboard a satellite and aboard a stratospheric balloon].

    PubMed

    Tixador, R; Richoilley, G; Gasset, G; Planel, H

    1982-05-17

    A possible effect of cosmic rays on cell proliferation was investigated in cultures of Paramecium tetraurelia during a stratospheric balloon flight, with the techniques already used for the CYTOS experiments, performed aboard the orbital station Salyut 6. The results show that the stimulating effect of space on cell proliferation, reported in the CYTOS experiments, also occurs in the balloon flight. The respective roles of cosmic rays and weightlessness in the biological response are discussed. PMID:6814711

  3. The effect of reduced street lighting on road casualties and crime in England and Wales: controlled interrupted time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Rebecca; Perkins, Chloe; Tompson, Lisa; Johnson, Shane; Armstrong, Ben; Green, Judith; Grundy, Chris; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Many local authorities in England and Wales have reduced street lighting at night to save money and reduce carbon emissions. There is no evidence to date on whether these reductions impact on public health. We quantified the effect of 4 street lighting adaptation strategies (switch off, part-night lighting, dimming and white light) on casualties and crime in England and Wales. Methods Observational study based on analysis of geographically coded police data on road traffic collisions and crime in 62 local authorities. Conditional Poisson models were used to analyse longitudinal changes in the counts of night-time collisions occurring on affected roads during 2000–2013, and crime within census Middle Super Output Areas during 2010–2013. Effect estimates were adjusted for regional temporal trends in casualties and crime. Results There was no evidence that any street lighting adaptation strategy was associated with a change in collisions at night. There was significant statistical heterogeneity in the effects on crime estimated at police force level. Overall, there was no evidence for an association between the aggregate count of crime and switch off (RR 0.11; 95% CI 0.01 to 2.75) or part-night lighting (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.06). There was weak evidence for a reduction in the aggregate count of crime and dimming (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.02) and white light (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.03). Conclusions This study found little evidence of harmful effects of switch off, part-night lighting, dimming, or changes to white light/LEDs on road collisions or crime in England and Wales. PMID:26219885

  4. Neighborhood alcohol outlets and the association with violent crime in one mid-Atlantic City: the implications for zoning policy.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jacky M; Milam, Adam J; Greiner, Amelia; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Curriero, Frank C; Thornton, Rachel J

    2014-02-01

    Violent crime such as homicide causes significant excess morbidity and mortality in US urban areas. A health impact assessment (HIA) identified zoning policy related to alcohol outlets as one way to decrease violent crime. The objectives were to determine the relationship between alcohol outlets including off-premise alcohol outlets and violent crime in one urban area to provide local public health evidence to inform a zoning code rewrite. An ecologic analysis of census tracts in Baltimore City was conducted from 2011 to 2012. The data included violent crimes (n = 51,942) from 2006 to 2010, licensed alcohol outlets establishments (n = 1,327) from 2005 to 2006, and data on neighborhood disadvantage, percent minority, percent occupancy, and drug arrests from 2005 to 2009. Negative binomial regression models were used to determine the relationship between the counts of alcohol outlets and violent crimes controlling for other factors. Spatial correlation was assessed and regression inference adjusted accordingly. Each one-unit increase in the number of alcohol outlets was associated with a 2.2 % increase in the count of violent crimes adjusting for neighborhood disadvantage, percent minority, percent occupancy, drug arrests, and spatial dependence (IRR = 1.022, 95 % CI = 1.015, 1.028). Off-premise alcohol outlets were significantly associated with violent crime in the adjusted model (IRR = 1.048, 95 % CI = 1.035, 1.061). Generating Baltimore-specific estimates of the relationship between alcohol outlets and violent crime has been central to supporting the incorporation of alcohol outlet policies in the zoning code rewrite being conducted in Baltimore City. PMID:24002723

  5. Students' Reports of School Crime: 1989 and 1995. 1989 and 1995 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Kathryn A.; Chapman, Christopher D.; Rand, Michael R.; Taylor, Bruce M.

    Everyone is concerned when children, especially school children, are the victims of violent crime, but schools bear a special responsibility for the safety of students when they are in the classroom, on school grounds, or on school-provided transportation. The Bureau of Justice Statistics and the National Center for Educational Statistics have…

  6. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  7. Biological investigations aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairbekov, M. G.; Parfyonov, G. P.; Platonova, R. W.; Abramova, V. M.; Golov, V. K.; Rostopshina, A. V.; Lyubchenko, V. Yu.; Chuchkin, V. G.

    Experiments on insects, higher plants and lower fungi were carried out aboard the biological satellite Cosmos-1129, in Earth orbit, from 25 September to 14 October 1979. The main objective of these experiments was to gain more profound knowledge of the effect of weightlessness on living organisms and to study the mechanisms by which these various organisms with different life cycles can adjust and develop in weightlessness. Experiments on insects (Drosophila melanogaster) were made with a view towards understanding gravitational preference in flies, the life cycle of which took place on board the biosatellite under conditions of artificial gravity. Experiments on higher plants (Zea mays, Arabidopsis taliana, Lycopersicum esculentum) and lower fungi (Physarum polycephalum) were performed.

  8. Crime Control Act of 1990 [29 November 1990]. [Summary].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    In the US, the Crime Control Act of 1990 was approved on November 29, 1990. This various titles of this Act include provisions relating to the following: 1) international money laundering; 2) child abuse; 3) child pornography; 4) kidnapping, abducting, or unlawfully restraining a child; 5) the protection of crime victims; 6) funding for local law enforcement agencies; 7) funding for federal law enforcement; 8) rural drug enforcement assistance; 9) mandatory detention for certain criminals; 10) juvenile justice; 11) penalties for use of certain firearms; 12) improvements in miscellaneous criminal law; 13) disability benefits for public safety officers; 14) money laundering; 15) drug-free school zones; 16) miscellaneous amendments to the federal judicial and criminal codes; 17) general provisions; 18) grants for correctional options; 19) control of anabolic steroids; 20) asset forfeiture; 21) student loan cancellation for law enforcement officers; 22) firearms provisions; 23) chemical diversion and trafficking; 24) drug paraphernalia; 25) banking law enforcement; 26) licit opium imports; 27) sentencing for methamphetamine offenses; 28) drug enforcement grants; 29) prisons; 30) shock incarceration (prison boot camps); 31) bankruptcy and restitution; 32) appropriations for law and drug enforcement agencies; 33) anti-drug programs; 34) support of law enforcement; 35) technical and minor substantive amendments to the federal criminal code; 36) federal debt collection; and 37) national child search assistance (for missing children). PMID:12177848

  9. The role of PTSD in adjudicating violent crimes.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Mark B

    2014-01-01

    PTSD was formalized as a diagnosis by the American Psychiatric Association in 1980 with the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), 3rd edition. Since that time, the diagnosis has been widely utilized in the courts including the use in criminal proceedings. PTSD may play a role in the assessment of violent crimes both as a possible contributing factor in the perpetrators as well as a consequence in the victims. There are a number of ethical and clinical considerations in the use of this diagnosis. Importantly, the diagnostic criteria have changed to a degree with subsequent editions of the DSM. This may have an impact on the interpretation of past legal judgments. Moreover, extensive psychiatric comorbidity may complicate the clinical picture, e.g., mood disorders, substance use disorders, or psychosis. The diagnosis of PTSD is still based on clinical, largely subjective criteria, e.g., biological markers are not yet utilized. As such, there may not be consistent agreement about the diagnosis among experts. This paper summarizes some of these relevant issues in adjudicating violent crimes. PMID:25040379

  10. Commercial investments in Combustion research aboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado School of Mines is working with a number of companies planning commercial combustion research to be done aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This research will be conducted in two major ISS facilities, SpaceDRUMS™ and the Fluids and Combustion Facility. SpaceDRUMS™, under development by Guigne Technologies, Ltd., of St. John's Newfoundland, is a containerless processing facility employing active acoustic sample positioning. It is capable of processing the large samples needed in commercial research and development with virtually complete vibration isolation from the space station. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), being developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, is a general-purpose combustion furnace designed to accommodate a wide range of scientific experiments. SpaceDRUMS™ will be the first commercial hardware to be launched to ISS. Launch is currently scheduled for UF-1 in 2001. The CCACS research to be done in SpaceDRUMS™ includes combustion synthesis of glass-ceramics and porous materials. The FCF is currently scheduled to be launched to ISS aboard UF-3 in 2002. The CCACS research to be done in the FCF includes water mist fire suppression, catalytic combustion and flame synthesis of ceramic powders. The companies currently planning to be involved in the research include Guigne International, Ltd., Technology International, Inc., Coors Ceramics Company, TDA Research, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., ADA Technologies, Inc., ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Princeton Instruments, Inc., Environmental Engineering Concepts, Inc., and Solar Turbines, Inc. Together, these companies are currently investing almost $2 million in cash and in-kind annually toward the seven commercial projects within CCACS. Total private investment in CCACS research to date is over $7 million. .

  11. Communities, Students, Schools, and School Crime: A Confirmatory Study of Crime in U.S. High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Greg

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how community characteristics, student background, school climate, and zero-tolerance policies interact to affect school crime. The study articulates and fits a school crime model to 712 high schools participating in the 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety, confirming that school location and student socioeconomic status…

  12. Crime Prevention Starts at Home! Setting the Stage for Community Action To Prevent Violence and Other Crimes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Crime Prevention Council, Washington, DC.

    Crime prevention works. This simple fact is often forgotten in the ongoing debate over crime and its causes. Prevention works when individuals take common-sense actions to protect themselves, their families and property. The theme from Crime Prevention Month 1995 goes back to these basics: good home security, self-protection skills for kids and…

  13. Teens, Crime, and Rural Communities. How Youth in Rural America Can Help Reduce Violent and Property Crimes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Erin; O'Neil, Jean F., Ed.

    Featuring the Teens, Crime, and Community (TCC) program, this monograph focuses on youth crime and crime prevention in rural settings. TCC actively involves teens and adults in a partnership designed to reduce teen victimization and to encourage teens to be catalysts of change for community safety. The guide provides teachers, administrators, and…

  14. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in § 668.46, in accordance with the Federal Bureau... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal...

  15. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in § 668.46, in accordance with the Federal Bureau... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal...

  16. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in § 668.46, in accordance with the Federal Bureau... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal...

  17. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in § 668.46, in accordance with the Federal Bureau... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal...

  18. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Accordance With the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in § 668.46, in accordance with the Federal Bureau... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crime Definitions in Accordance With the Federal...

  19. Hate Crimes on Campus: The Problem and Efforts To Confront It. Hate Crimes Series. Bureau of Justice Assistance Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen; Moss, Margaret

    This monograph examines four aspects of the problem of bias, prejudice, and hate crimes on American college and university campuses. First, the monograph examines the prevalence of hate crimes on campuses, considering who is targeted, the kinds of crimes that are committed, and the frequency and impact of bias incidents. The monograph then…

  20. The prosecution of hate crimes: the limitations of the hate crime typology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nickie D

    2009-05-01

    Since the development of bias crime legislation over the past few decades, scholars have debated the merits of the legislation and questioned its enforcement.(1) In light of such concerns, this study presents characteristics of all cases prosecuted as bias crimes in a New Jersey county between 2001 and 2004 and applies the hate crime typology originally developed in 1993. Results show that, in this jurisdiction, the typology is an inadequate tool for classifying cases prosecuted as hate crimes. Approximately one third of the cases are unclassifiable according to the typology. Findings indicate that the typology is useful for understanding cases in which bias is the sole motivation but inadequate for application to the many cases in which bias is a peripheral motivation. PMID:18458351

  1. 49 CFR 575.7 - Special vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special vehicles. 575.7 Section 575.7... 112(d) of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act; General § 575.7 Special vehicles. A manufacturer who produces vehicles having a configuration not available for purchase by the general public...

  2. 36 CFR 327.2 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicles. 327.2 Section 327.2... Vehicles. (a) This section pertains to all vehicles, including, but not limited to, automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, mini-bikes, snowmobiles, dune buggies, all-terrain vehicles, and trailers, campers, bicycles,...

  3. 49 CFR 575.7 - Special vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special vehicles. 575.7 Section 575.7... 112(d) of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act; General § 575.7 Special vehicles. A manufacturer who produces vehicles having a configuration not available for purchase by the general public...

  4. 49 CFR 575.7 - Special vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special vehicles. 575.7 Section 575.7... 112(d) of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act; General § 575.7 Special vehicles. A manufacturer who produces vehicles having a configuration not available for purchase by the general public...

  5. Opportunity Theory and Agricultural Crime Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Daniel P.; Scott, Michelle L.; Bhati, Avinash S.

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of research lends support to opportunity theory and its variants, but has yet to focus systematically on a number of specific offenses and contexts. Typically, the more crimes and contexts to which a theory applies, the broader its scope and range, respectively, and thus generalizability. In this paper, we focus on agricultural…

  6. The Effect of Divorce on Domestic Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzenberg, Lisa; D'Alessio, Stewart J.

    2007-01-01

    Social scientists remain unsure as to whether divorce acts to alleviate domestic violence or whether ex-spouses become the targets of the displaced violence. Using data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System and the Census, this study investigates the relationship between the divorce rate and the domestic crime rate. The study…

  7. Storylines As a Neglected Cause of Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Researchers usually explain individual offending in terms of background factors like low self-control and association with delinquent peers. Such factors reflect the routine or typical aspects of the individual's life over an extended period of time and they influence the individual's predisposition for crime. Researchers also sometimes explain…

  8. The Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Diane; Lee, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Campus security and safety are important issues in postsecondary education today. Providing students nationwide with a safe environment in which to learn and keeping students, parents and employees well informed about campus security are goals that have been voiced by many groups. These goals were advanced by the Crime Awareness and Campus…

  9. Addressing the Causes of Youth Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Rights Resource Center, San Rafael, CA.

    This report comprises papers that discuss how grassroots organizations, police involvement, and partnerships with local government and boards of education can prevent youth from criminal involvement through participation in productive and enjoyable work and activities. The following articles are included: (1) "Police Officers Can 'Prevent' Crime:…

  10. Reconstruction of crimes by infrared photography.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, V; Bohnert, M

    2016-09-01

    Whenever blunt or sharp forces are used in a crime, analysis of bloodstain pattern distribution may provide important information for the reconstruction of happenings. Thereby, attention should be paid to both the crime scene and the clothes of everyone involved in the crime. On dark textiles, though, it is difficult or even impossible for the human eye to detect bloodstains because of the low contrast to the background. However, in the near infrared wavelength range, contrast is considerably higher. Many textiles reflect light beyond a wavelength of 830 nm and thus appear light-colored, whereas blood absorbs the light and appears dark. In our studies, a D7000 NIKON reflex camera modified for infrared photography produced high-resolution photographs visualizing even very small spatter stains on dark textiles. The equipment can be used at any crime scene or lab and provides immediately available and interpretable images. Thus, important findings can be obtained at an early stage of police investigations, as two examples (homicide and attempted homicide) illustrate. PMID:26932868

  11. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  12. Women's Fear of Crime: A Rural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jo; Panelli, Ruth; Kraack, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines women's experience of fear of crime in rural areas. It argues that much existing research on issues of gender, fear and safety have focused on urban areas and that as a result we know relatively little about women's experience of fear in a rural context. As well as arguing that we need to redress the balance and respond to the…

  13. Indicators of School Crime Safety, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Phillip; Chen, Xianglei; Choy, Susan P.; Ruddy, Sally A.; Miller, Amanda K.; Fleury, Jill K.; Chandler, Kathryn A.; Rand, Michael R.; Klaus, Patsy; Planty, Michael

    Providing the latest data, this report on school safety presents a mixed picture: while overall crime has declined, violence, gangs, and drugs remain at some schools. Victimization at school declined from 1995-99, though rates for fighting and weapon threats remain steady. Students seem more secure, and gang activity decreased; however, in grades…

  14. National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Training Videos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC. National Crime Information Center.

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) maintains a set of computerized files of documented criminal justice information reported by a network of over 60,000 participating national, regional, state, and local agencies. The files, dealing with wanted persons, missing persons, unidentified persons, and stolen…

  15. Annual Report and Crime Summary, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Dept. of Safety and Security.

    In accordance with the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, the Safety and Security Department of Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Kansas, prepared this report providing information on crime statistics and departmental policies. Introductory sections of the annual report feature an overview of the department's mission,…

  16. The Good, the Bad, and the Incomprehensible: Typifications of Victims and Offenders as Antecedents of Beliefs About Sex Crime.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Christina; Pickett, Justin T

    2016-01-01

    Public opinion has played a critical role in the development of sex crime laws. However, little scholarly work has focused directly on the origins of negative attitudes toward sex offenders. We address this research gap by developing and testing a theoretical account of such views. Drawing on recent national survey data, we examine the extent to which typifications about sexual victims and offenders--believing sex crime typically affects children and female victims and is committed by strangers--explain beliefs about the reformability of sex offenders, harm inflicted on victims, and the causes of offending. Results indicate that judging children to be typical targets of sex crimes is a key determinant of public views. We discuss the implications of our findings. PMID:25381282

  17. Medical Differential Diagnosis (MDD) as the Architectural Framework for a Knowledge Model: A Vulnerability Detection and Threat Identification Methodology for Cyber-Crime and Cyber-Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley-Ware, Lakita D.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses a real world cyberspace problem, where currently no cross industry standard methodology exists. The goal is to develop a model for identification and detection of vulnerabilities and threats of cyber-crime or cyber-terrorism where cyber-technology is the vehicle to commit the criminal or terrorist act (CVCT). This goal was…

  18. URBAN REVITALIZATION AND SEATTLE CRIME, 1982–2000

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Derek A.; Lyons, Christopher J.; Hays, Zachary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between crime and processes of urban revitalization, or gentrification. Drawing on recent urban demography research, we hypothesize that gentrification progressed rapidly in many American cities over the last decade of the 20th century, and that these changes had implications for area crime rates. Criminological theories hold competing hypotheses for the connections between gentrification and crime, and quantitative studies of this link remain infrequent and limited. Using two measures of gentrification and longitudinal tract-level demographic and crime data for the city of Seattle, we find that many of Seattle’s downtown tracts underwent rapid revitalization during the 1990’s, and that these areas 1) saw reductions in crime relative to similar tracts that did not gentrify, and 2) were areas with higher-than-average crime at the beginning of the decade. Moreover, using a within-tract longitudinal design, we find that yearly housing investments in the 1980’s showed a modest positive association with crime change, while yearly investments in the 1990’s showed the opposite pattern. Our findings suggest a curvilinear gentrification-crime relationship, whereby gentrification in its earlier stages is associated with small increases in crime, but gentrification in its more consolidated form is associated with modest crime declines. Implications of these results for criminological theory, urban development, and broader crime patterns are discussed. PMID:25505350

  19. Age and the explanation of crime, revisited.

    PubMed

    Sweeten, Gary; Piquero, Alex R; Steinberg, Laurence

    2013-06-01

    Age is one of the most robust correlates of criminal behavior. Yet, explanations for this relationship are varied and conflicting. Developmental theories point to a multitude of sociological, psychological, and biological changes that occur during adolescence and adulthood. One prominent criminological perspective outlined by Gottfredson and Hirschi claims that age has a direct effect on crime, inexplicable from sociological and psychological variables. Despite the attention this claim has received, few direct empirical tests of it have been conducted. We use data from Pathways to Desistance, a longitudinal study of over 1,300 serious youthful offenders (85.8% male, 40.1% African-American, 34.3% Hispanic, 21.0% White), to test this claim. On average, youths were 16.5 years old at the initial interview and were followed for 7 years. We use multilevel longitudinal models to assess the extent to which the direct effects of age are reduced to statistical and substantive non-significance when constructs from a wide range of developmental and criminological theories are controlled. Unlike previous studies, we are able to control for changes across numerous realms emphasized within differing theoretical perspectives including social control (e.g., employment and marriage), procedural justice (e.g., perceptions of the legitimacy and fairness of the legal system), learning (e.g., gang membership and exposure to antisocial peers), strain (e.g., victimization and relationship breakup), psychosocial maturity (e.g., impulse control, self-regulation and moral disengagement), and rational choice (e.g., costs and rewards of crime). Assessed separately, these perspectives explain anywhere from 3% (procedural justice) to 49% (social learning) of the age-crime relationship. Together, changes in these constructs explain 69% of the drop in crime from ages 15 to 25. We conclude that the relationship between age and crime in adolescence and early adulthood is largely explainable, though

  20. Reporting Crime Victimizations to the Police and the Incidence of Future Victimizations: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ranapurwala, Shabbar I.; Berg, Mark T.; Casteel, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Background Law enforcement depends on cooperation from the public and crime victims to protect citizens and maintain public safety; however, many crimes are not reported to police because of fear of repercussions or because the crime is considered trivial. It is unclear how police reporting affects the incidence of future victimization. Objective To evaluate the association between reporting victimization to police and incident future victimization. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using National Crime Victimization Survey 2008–2012 data. Participants were 12+ years old household members who may or may not be victimized, were followed biannually for 3 years, and who completed at least one follow-up survey after their first reported victimization between 2008 and 2012. Crude and adjusted generalized linear mixed regression for survey data with Poisson link were used to compare rates of future victimization. Results Out of 18,657 eligible participants, 41% participants reported to their initial victimization to police and had a future victimization rate of 42.8/100 person-years (PY) (95% CI: 40.7, 44.8). The future victimization rate of those who did not report to the police (59%) was 55.0/100 PY (95% CI: 53.0, 57.0). The adjusted rate ratio comparing police reporting to not reporting was 0.78 (95%CI: 0.72, 0.84) for all future victimizations, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.90) for interpersonal violence, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.78) for thefts, and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.07) for burglaries. Conclusions Reporting victimization to police is associated with fewer future victimization, underscoring the importance of police reporting in crime prevention. This association may be attributed to police action and victim services provisions resulting from reporting. PMID:27466811

  1. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  2. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  3. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  4. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  5. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  6. Gemini 12 Liftoff Via Titan Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 12 astronauts James Lovell and Edwin Aldrin lifted off aboard a Titan launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center on November 11, 1966, an hour and a half after their Agena target vehicle was orbited by an Atlas rocket. Launched atop an Atlas booster, the Agena target vehicle (ATV) was a spacecraft used by NASA to develop and practice orbital space rendezvous and docking techniques in preparation for the Apollo program lunar missions. The objective was for Agena and Gemini to rendezvous in space and practice docking procedures. An intermediate step between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program, the Gemini Program's major objectives were to subject two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights, to perfect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicles, methods of reentry, and landing of the spacecraft.

  7. Crime rates and sedentary behavior among 4th grade Texas school children

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H Shelton; Pérez, Adriana; Mirchandani, Gita G; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kelder, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Although per capita crime has generally fallen over the period which coincides with the obesity epidemic, it has not fallen uniformly across communities. It also has not fallen enough to allay fears on the part of parents. Over the past 30 years, technological changes have made the indoor alternatives to playing outside, where children are more vulnerable to criminal activity, more enjoyable (cable TV, video games, and the internet) and comfortable (the spread of air conditioning to low income neighborhoods). We determined whether indoor sedentary behavior patterns are associated with community crime statistics. 4th graders in the U.S. are typically 9 or 10 years old. Methods We used data from the 2004–2005 Texas School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey linked with U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics data for the years 2000 through 2005 and Texas State data on sexual offenders. The probability-based sample included a total of 7,907 children in grade four. Multistage probability sampling weights were used. The dependent variables included were hours of TV watching, video game playing, computer use and total indoor sedentary behavior after school. Incremental Relative Rates were computed for community crime rates including robberies, all violent crimes, murders, assaults, property crimes, rapes, burglaries, larcenies and motor vehicle thefts as well as for sexual offenders living in the neighborhood. The neighborhood refers to the areas where the students at each school live. In the case of sexual offenders, sexual offenders per capita are estimated using the per capita rate in the zip code of the school attended; all other crime statistics are estimated by the crimes per capita in the police department jurisdiction covering the school attended. After controlling for sex, age, and African-American and Hispanic, cross-sectional associations were determined using multivariate Poisson regression

  8. Electric vehicle activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmonaco, J. L.; Pandya, D. A.

    1995-02-01

    The data and information collected for the Public Service Electric and Gas Company's (PSE&G) electric vehicle demonstration program were intended to support and enhance DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator Program. The DOE Site Operator Program is focused on the life cycle and reliability of Electric Vehicles (EV's). Of particular interest are vehicles currently available with features that are likely to be put into production or demonstrate new technology. PSE&G acquired eight GMC Electric G-Vans in 1991, and three TEVans in 1993, and conducted a program plan to test and assess the overall performance of these electric vehicles. To accomplish the objectives of DOE's Site Operator's test program, a manual data collection system was implemented. The manual data collection system has provided energy use and mileage data. From September 1991 to October 1994 PSE&G logged 69,368 miles on eleven test vehicles. PSE&G also demonstrated the EVs to diverse groups and associations at fifty seven various events. Included in the report are lessons learned concerning maintenance, operation, public reactions, and driver's acceptance of the electric vehicles.

  9. Investigating CSI: portrayals of DNA testing on a forensic crime show and their potential effects.

    PubMed

    Ley, Barbara L; Jankowski, Natalie; Brewer, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    The popularity of forensic crime shows such as CSI has fueled debate about their potential social impact. This study considers CSI's potential effects on public understandings regarding DNA testing in the context of judicial processes, the policy debates surrounding crime laboratory procedures, and the forensic science profession, as well as an effect not discussed in previous accounts: namely, the show's potential impact on public understandings of DNA and genetics more generally. To develop a theoretical foundation for research on the "CSI effect," it draws on cultivation theory, social cognitive theory, and audience reception studies. It then uses content analysis and textual analysis to illuminate how the show depicts DNA testing. The results demonstrate that CSI tends to depict DNA testing as routine, swift, useful, and reliable and that it echoes broader discourses about genetics. At times, however, the show suggests more complex ways of thinking about DNA testing and genetics. PMID:22530487

  10. Multi-stream face recognition for crime-fighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassim, Sabah A.; Sellahewa, Harin

    2007-04-01

    Automatic face recognition (AFR) is a challenging task that is increasingly becoming the preferred biometric trait for identification and has the potential of becoming an essential tool in the fight against crime and terrorism. Closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras have increasingly been used over the last few years for surveillance in public places such as airports, train stations and shopping centers. They are used to detect and prevent crime, shoplifting, public disorder and terrorism. The work of law-enforcing and intelligence agencies is becoming more reliant on the use of databases of biometric data for large section of the population. Face is one of the most natural biometric traits that can be used for identification and surveillance. However, variations in lighting conditions, facial expressions, face size and pose are a great obstacle to AFR. This paper is concerned with using waveletbased face recognition schemes in the presence of variations of expressions and illumination. In particular, we will investigate the use of a combination of wavelet frequency channels for a multi-stream face recognition using various wavelet subbands as different face signal streams. The proposed schemes extend our recently developed face veri.cation scheme for implementation on mobile devices. We shall present experimental results on the performance of our proposed schemes for a number of face databases including a new AV database recorded on a PDA. By analyzing the various experimental data, we shall demonstrate that the multi-stream approach is robust against variations in illumination and facial expressions than the previous single-stream approach.

  11. Between Hope and Fear: Teens Speak Out on Crime and the Community. Study No. 952013. A Survey Conducted for the National Teens, Crime and the Community Program. Fieldwork: October 5 to November 16, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Crime Prevention Council, Washington, DC.

    A survey considered young people's attitudes toward crime and violence and community service. The survey was based on a sample of 2,023 public, private, and parochial school students in grades 7 through 12, including a representative sample of urban students. The majority felt safe in their communities, but many did not always feel safe.…

  12. Schizophrenia, Substance Abuse, and Violent Crime

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Långström, Niklas; Hjern, Anders; Grann, Martin; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Context Persons with schizophrenia are thought to be at increased risk of committing violent crime 4 to 6 times the level of general population individuals without this disorder. However, risk estimates vary substantially across studies, and considerable uncertainty exists as to what mediates this elevated risk. Despite this uncertainty, current guidelines recommend that violence risk assessment should be conducted for all patients with schizophrenia. Objective To determine the risk of violent crime among patients diagnosed as having schizophrenia and the role of substance abuse in mediating this risk. Design, Setting, and Participants Longitudinal designs were used to link data from nationwide Swedish registers of hospital admissions and criminal convictions in 1973-2006. Risk of violent crime in patients after diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 8003) was compared with that among general population controls (n = 80 025). Potential confounders (age, sex, income, and marital and immigrant status) and mediators (substance abuse comorbidity) were measured at baseline. To study familial confounding, we also investigated risk of violence among unaffected siblings (n = 8123) of patients with schizophrenia. Information on treatment was not available. Main Outcome Measure Violent crime (any criminal conviction for homicide, assault, robbery, arson, any sexual offense, illegal threats, or intimidation). Results In patients with schizophrenia, 1054 (13.2%) had at least 1 violent offense compared with 4276 (5.3%) of general population controls (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-2.2). The risk was mostly confined to patients with substance abuse comorbidity (of whom 27.6% committed an offense), yielding an increased risk of violent crime among such patients (adjusted OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 3.9-5.0), whereas the risk increase was small in schizophrenia patients without substance abuse comorbidity (8.5% of whom had at least 1 violent offense; adjusted OR, 1

  13. 31 CFR Appendix M to Subpart A of... - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). 2. Public Reading Room. FinCEN will provide a room on an ad hoc... records. Initial determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(h) as to whether to grant requests for records of FinCEN.... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to the records of FinCEN will be made by...

  14. 31 CFR Appendix M to Subpart A of... - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). 2. Public Reading Room. FinCEN will provide a room on an ad hoc... records. Initial determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(h) as to whether to grant requests for records of FinCEN.... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to the records of FinCEN will be made by...

  15. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Hate Crimes and Suicidality Among a Population-Based Sample of Sexual-Minority Adolescents in Boston

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether past-year suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents was more common in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Methods. Participants’ data came from a racially/ethnically diverse population-based sample of 9th- through 12th-grade public school students in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 1292). Of these, 108 (8.36%) reported a minority sexual orientation. We obtained data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults with battery between 2005 and 2008 from the Boston Police Department and linked the data to the adolescent’s residential address. Results. Sexual-minority youths residing in neighborhoods with higher rates of LGBT assault hate crimes were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation (P = .013) and suicide attempts (P = .006), than were those residing in neighborhoods with lower LGBT assault hate crime rates. We observed no relationships between overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes and suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents (P > .05), providing evidence for specificity of the results to LGBT assault hate crimes. Conclusions. Neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual-orientation disparities in adolescent suicidality, highlighting potential targets for community-level suicide-prevention programs. PMID:24328619

  16. ISS Update: Human Research Aboard Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs at the Marshall Space Flight Center’s Payload Operations Integration Center in Huntsville, Ala., recently spoke with Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries ...

  17. Radiation measurements aboard the fourth Gemini flight.

    PubMed

    Janni, J F; Schneider, M F

    1967-01-01

    Two special tissue-equivalent ionization chambers and 5 highly sensitive passive dosimetry packages were flown aboard the recent Gemini 4 flight for the purpose of obtaining precise values of instantaneous dose rate, accumulated dose. and shielding effectiveness. This experiment marked the first time that well-defined tissue dose and radiation survey measurements have been carried out in manned spaceflight operations. Since all measurements were accomplished under normal spacecraft environmental conditions, the biological dose resulted primarily from trapped inner Van Allen Belt radiation encountered by the spacecraft in the South Atlantic Anomaly. The experiment determined the particle type, ionizing and penetrating power, and variation with time and position within the Gemini spacecraft. Measured dose rates ranged from 100 mrad/hr for passes penetrating deeply into the South Atlantic Anomaly to less than 0.1 mrad/hr from lower latitude cosmic radiation. The accumulated tissue dose measured by the active ionization chambers, shielded by 0.4 gm/cm2 for the 4-day mission, was 82 mrad. Since the 5 passive dosimetry packages were each located in different positions within the spacecraft, the total mission surface dose measured by these detectors varied from 73 to 27 mrad, depending upon location and shielding. The particles within the spacecraft were recorded in nuclear emulsion, which established that over 90% of the tissue dose was attributable to penetrating protons. This experiment indicates that the radiation environment under shielded conditions at Gemini altitudes was not hazardous. PMID:11973852

  18. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-06-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  19. Occupational lead exposure aboard a tall ship

    SciTech Connect

    Landrigan, P.J.; Straub, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate occupational exposures to lead in shipfitters cutting and riveting lead-painted iron plates aboard an iron-hulled sailing vessel, the authors conducted an environmental and medical survey. Lead exposures in seven personal (breathing zone) air samples ranged from 108 to 500 micrograms/mT (mean 257 micrograms/mT); all were above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard of 50 micrograms/mT. In two short-term air samples obtained while exhaust ventilation was temporarily disconnected, mean lead exposure rose to 547 micrograms/mT. Blood lead levels in ten shipfitters ranged from 25 to 53 micrograms/dl. Blood lead levels in shipfitters were significantly higher than in other shipyard workers. Smoking shipfitters had significantly higher lead levels than nonsmokers. Lead levels in shipfitters who wore respirators were not lower than in those who wore no protective gear. Four shipfitters had erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations above the adult upper normal limit of 50 micrograms/dl. A close correlation was found between blood lead and EP levels. Prevalence of lead-related symptoms was no higher in shipfitters than in other workers. These data indicate that serious occupational exposure to lead can occur in a relatively small boatyard.

  20. Driving Curfews May Curb Teen Crime

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Motor Vehicle Safety Teen Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Motor Vehicle Safety Teen Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  1. Education-Based Incarceration and Recidivism: The Ultimate Social Justice Crime Fighting Tool. Educational Leadership for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Brian D., Ed.; Normore, Anthony H., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Education-Based Incarceration and Recidivism: The Ultimate Social Justice Crime Fighting Tool takes a penetrating look at the needs and challenges of society's disenfranchised jail populations. It is incumbent to encourage public awareness of the causes that underlie the destructive cycles plaguing these populations, including the abuse and…

  2. Positivity in Practice: Approaches to Improving Perceptions of Young People and Their Involvement in Crime and Anti-Social Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kerry; Hart, Ruth; MacLeod, Shona; Kinder, Kay

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the approaches being taken by local authorities (LAs) and partner organisations to improve how young people are perceived, especially in relation to crime and antisocial behaviour. The study also looked at the challenges for and benefits of activities aiming to improve public perceptions of young people,…

  3. The Cost of Crime to Society: New Crime-Specific Estimates for Policy and Program Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    French, Michael T.; Fang, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Estimating the cost to society of individual crimes is essential to the economic evaluation of many social programs, such as substance abuse treatment and community policing. A review of the crime-costing literature reveals multiple sources, including published articles and government reports, which collectively represent the alternative approaches for estimating the economic losses associated with criminal activity. Many of these sources are based upon data that are more than ten years old, indicating a need for updated figures. This study presents a comprehensive methodology for calculating the cost of society of various criminal acts. Tangible and intangible losses are estimated using the most current data available. The selected approach, which incorporates both the cost-of-illness and the jury compensation methods, yields cost estimates for more than a dozen major crime categories, including several categories not found in previous studies. Updated crime cost estimates can help government agencies and other organizations execute more prudent policy evaluations, particularly benefit-cost analyses of substance abuse treatment or other interventions that reduce crime. PMID:20071107

  4. The Impact of Racial Slurs and Racism on the Perceptions and Punishment of Violent Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucier, Donald A.; Hockett, Jericho M.; Wallenberg, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    When a crime is committed by an individual of one race against an individual of another race, there is the possibility that the crime is a hate crime. Legislation often mandates harsher penalties for perpetrators convicted of crimes determined to be hate crimes, yet this determination is difficult to make. This study used vignettes of violent…

  5. Relationships Between Minimum Alcohol Pricing and Crime During the Partial Privatization of a Canadian Government Alcohol Monopoly

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Tim; Zhao, Jinhui; Marzell, Miesha; Gruenewald, Paul J.; Macdonald, Scott; Ponicki, William R.; Martin, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the independent effects of increases in minimum alcohol prices and densities of private liquor stores on crime outcomes in British Columbia, Canada, during a partial privatization of off-premise liquor sales. Method: A time-series cross-sectional panel study was conducted using mixed model regression analysis to explore associations between minimum alcohol prices, densities of liquor outlets, and crime outcomes across 89 local health areas of British Columbia between 2002 and 2010. Archival data on minimum alcohol prices, per capita alcohol outlet densities, and ecological demographic characteristics were related to measures of crimes against persons, alcohol-related traffic violations, and non–alcohol-related traffic violations. Analyses were adjusted for temporal and regional autocorrelation. Results: A 10% increase in provincial minimum alcohol prices was associated with an 18.81% (95% CI: ±17.99%, p < .05) reduction in alcohol-related traffic violations, a 9.17% (95% CI: ±5.95%, p < .01) reduction in crimes against persons, and a 9.39% (95% CI: ±3.80%, p < .001) reduction in total rates of crime outcomes examined. There was no significant association between minimum alcohol prices and non–alcohol-related traffic violations (p > .05). Densities of private liquor stores were not significantly associated with alcohol-involved traffic violations or crimes against persons, though they were with non–alcohol-related traffic violations. Conclusions: Reductions in crime events associated with minimum-alcohol-price changes were more substantial and specific to alcohol-related events than the countervailing increases in densities of private liquor stores. The findings lend further support to the application of minimum alcohol prices for public health and safety objectives. PMID:26098040

  6. Emotional reactions to crime across cultures.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, David; Hwang, Hyisung C

    2015-10-01

    Information about the emotions experienced by observers when they witness crimes would have important theoretical and practical implications, but to date no study has broadly assessed such emotional reactions. This study addressed this gap in the literature. Observers in seven countries viewed seven videos portraying actual crimes and rated their emotional reactions to each using 14 emotion scales. Observers reported significantly high levels of negative emotions including anger, contempt, disgust, fear and sadness-related emotions, and anger, contempt and disgust were the most salient emotions experienced by viewers across all countries. Witnesses also reported significantly high levels of positive emotions as well (compared to not feeling the emotion at all), which was unexpected. Country moderated the emotion ratings; post-hoc analyses indicated that masculine-oriented cultures reported less nervousness, surprise, excitement, fear and embarrassment than feminine cultures. PMID:25291087

  7. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-12-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based problem solving in a team environment provides a terrific backdrop for fostering communication, analysis, and critical thinking skills. One such activity, inspired jointly by the museum exhibit "CSI: The Experience"2 and David Bonner's TPT article "Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene,"3 provides students with three different crime scenes, each requiring an analysis of projectile motion. In this lesson students socially engage in higher-order analysis of two-dimensional projectile motion problems by collecting information from 3-D scale models and collaborating with one another on its interpretation, in addition to diagramming and mathematical analysis typical to problem solving in physics.

  8. Combating Drugs in America: Putting the Drug Strategy into Action. Hearing on Examining the Administration's Drug Strategy and How It Relates to the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (Public Law 103-322) before the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    Following the passage of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, a Senate hearing was held to examine whether the prescriptions set forth in the Act could function and how they could be implemented as part of the U.S. government's drug strategy. This transcript of the hearing contains statements (in order) by: Senators Joseph R. Biden…

  9. Advancing crime scene computer forensics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Chet; Feldman, John; Giordano, Joe

    1999-02-01

    Computers and network technology have become inexpensive and powerful tools that can be applied to a wide range of criminal activity. Computers have changed the world's view of evidence because computers are used more and more as tools in committing `traditional crimes' such as embezzlements, thefts, extortion and murder. This paper will focus on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of the data recovery and evidence construction tools used in both the field and laboratory for prosection purposes.

  10. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS #3, 7, and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Since the United States of America is moving into an age of reusable space vehicles, both electronic and photographic materials will continue to be an integral part of the recording techniques available. Film as a scientifically viable recording technique in astronomy is well documented. There is a real need to expose various types of films to the Shuttle environment. Thus, the main objective was to look at the subtle densitometric changes of canisters of IIaO film that was placed aboard the Space Shuttle 3 (STS-3).

  11. Crime scene investigation (as seen on TV).

    PubMed

    Durnal, Evan W

    2010-06-15

    A mysterious green ooze is injected into a brightly illuminated and humming machine; 10s later, a printout containing a complete biography of the substance is at the fingertips of an attractive young investigator who exclaims "we found it!" We have all seen this event occur countless times on any and all of the three CSI dramas, Cold Cases, Crossing Jordans, and many more. With this new style of "infotainment" (Surette, 2007), comes an increasingly blurred line between the hard facts of reality and the soft, quick solutions of entertainment. With these advances in technology, how can crime rates be anything but plummeting as would-be criminals cringe at the idea of leaving the smallest speck of themselves at a crime scene? Surely there are very few serious crimes that go unpunished in today's world of high-tech, fast-paced gadgetry. Science and technology have come a great distance since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first described the first famous forensic scientist (Sherlock Holmes), but still have light-years to go. PMID:20227206

  12. Security and Crime Prevention Strategies in California Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Marcus

    Key findings are presented from a survey conducted by the California Research Bureau showing that most California school districts incorporate violence prevention program curricula with a strong police and security presence. Many schools have installed closed circuit video surveillance cameras, canine searches, and metal detectors. Unfortunately,…

  13. Crime scene units: a look to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Hayden B.

    1999-02-01

    The scientific examination of physical evidence is well recognized as a critical element in conducting successful criminal investigations and prosecutions. The forensic science field is an ever changing discipline. With the arrival of DNA, new processing techniques for latent prints, portable lasers, and electro-static dust print lifters, and training of evidence technicians has become more important than ever. These scientific and technology breakthroughs have increased the possibility of collecting and analyzing physical evidence that was never possible before. The problem arises with the collection of physical evidence from the crime scene not from the analysis of the evidence. The need for specialized units in the processing of all crime scenes is imperative. These specialized units, called crime scene units, should be trained and equipped to handle all forms of crime scenes. The crime scenes units would have the capability to professionally evaluate and collect pertinent physical evidence from the crime scenes.

  14. 75 FR 65650 - Notice of Closure to Motorized Vehicle Travel on Public Lands in the Big Pole Fire Area in Tooele...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... greater risk for water runoff and soil erosion. Soil composition in the area is highly erodible. Subsequent motor vehicle traffic in burned areas has increased the risk of erosion and may have a...

  15. Atlas-Agena Target Vehicle Launched for Gemini 12 Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Launched atop an Atlas booster, the Agena target vehicle (ATV) was a spacecraft used by NASA to develop and practice orbital space rendezvous and docking techniques in preparation for the Apollo program lunar missions. This particular launch preceded the Gemini 12, which launched aboard a Titan launch vehicle one and one half hours later. The objective was for Agena and Gemini to rendezvous in space and practice docking procedures. An intermediate step between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program, the Gemini Program's major objectives were to subject two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights, to perfect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicles, methods of reentry, and landing of the spacecraft.

  16. A cure for crime: can mental health treatment diversion reduce crime among youth?

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; McReynolds, Larkin S; Wasserman, Gail A

    2006-01-01

    Youth crime is a serious social problem, as is the high proportion of young offenders in the juvenile justice system who have mental disorders. A recent policy innovation applies the theory of therapeutic jurisprudence and diverts youth with mental disorders to treatment in lieu of further court processing. The expansion of mental health diversion programs reflects an increasingly popular view that there is a causal relationship between youth mental disorders and crime. Policymakers who share this view place greater emphasis on rehabilitation and treatment as a way to reduce crime, rather than on stricter punishment. This paper considers the policy issues around youth mental health diversion programs. In addition, it evaluates the effect of a mental health diversion program for youth that was implemented in Texas. The paper finds that mental health diversion can be used effectively to delay or prevent youth recidivism. PMID:16465707

  17. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Passing by a palm tree, the Space Shuttle Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter makes its way to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler- transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler-transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  18. STS-65 Earth observation of Lake Chad, Africa, taken aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows Lake Chad, Africa. This is another long term ecological monitoring site for NASA scientists. Lake Chad was first photographed from space in 1965. A 25-year length-of-record data set exists for this environmentally important area. A number of these scenes have been digitized, rectified, classified and results show that the lake area has been shrinking and only 15% to 20% of the surface water is visible on space images. NASA's objective in monitoring this lake is to document the intra- and interannual areal changes of the largest standing water body in the Sahelian biome of North Africa. These areal changes are an indicator of the presence or absence of drought across the arguably overpopulated, overgrazed, and over biological carrying capacity limits nations of the Sahel.

  19. STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard OV-105 taken by ESC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is documented by the Electronic Still Camera (ESC) as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography Test (With Downlink). Various elements in the PLB foretell of a busy week ahead for OV-105's crew. In the foreground is the hardware for the Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Methods (ASEM), which is a demonstration of extravehicular procedures required for the construction of Space Station Freedom (SSF). Backdropped against the aft firewall is the vertical perigee stage which EVA crewmembers will attach to the International Telcommunications Organization Satellite (INTELSAT) VI F-3 on 05-10-92. Running along the port side sill longern is the stowed remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. Electronic still photography is a new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approach

  20. 36 CFR 1004.3 - Authorized emergency vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Authorized emergency vehicles. 1004.3 Section 1004.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.3 Authorized emergency vehicles. (a) The operator of an authorized emergency vehicle,...

  1. Toward Understanding the Biology of Crime in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, D

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serious crime is a scourge within Trinidad and Tobago's borders and seems to be escalating yearly with no resolution in sight. It is commonplace for governments to view/implement policies targeting crime based on sociological and psychological paradigms. What is most often overlooked, however, is that crime has unique biological underpinnings, which, if characterized, could lead toward clinical interventions that could mitigate its incidence within the population. PMID:25803384

  2. 36 CFR 327.2 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vehicles. 327.2 Section 327.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.2 Vehicles. (a) This section pertains...

  3. 43 CFR 8365.1-3 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vehicles. 8365.1-3 Section 8365.1-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.1-3 Vehicles. (a)...

  4. 43 CFR 8365.2-4 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicles. 8365.2-4 Section 8365.2-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2-4 Vehicles....

  5. 43 CFR 8365.2-4 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vehicles. 8365.2-4 Section 8365.2-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2-4 Vehicles....

  6. 43 CFR 8365.1-3 - Vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicles. 8365.1-3 Section 8365.1-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.1-3 Vehicles. (a)...

  7. Examination of crime and similar concepts in the medical law

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Crime is a human behavior that has captivated the thoughts of scholars of various disciplines throughout history. Philosophers, sociologists, psychologists and others have investigated and analyzed the concept of crime from different aspects. Crime is the main topic of criminal law, and in its legal meaning is a well-known term with a certain conceptual load that should not be confused with similar concepts such as guilt, civil crime (quasi tort), and particularly, the disciplinary transgression. Although crime has common points with all the above, it is an independent concept with unique effects, features, and descriptions that distinguish it from similar acts. This article aims to determine the difference between the concepts of crime, guilt, civil crime and disciplinary transgression through enumeration of the related issues as well as examples of medical disciplinary crimes and transgressions. Identifying and distinguishing these concepts can improve the procedure of prosecuting crimes and disciplinary transgression, bring punishment to criminals and transgressors, and facilitate compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary losses due to committers’ fault or failure. Thus we may avoid taking a wrong route that can lead to infringement of individuals’ rights. PMID:27471587

  8. The Impact of Crime Victimization on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Rochelle F.; Sawyer, Genelle K.; Begle, Angela M.; Hubel, Grace S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors review the extant literature examining the functional impact of crime victimization on indices of quality of life. They present findings within a conceptual framework comprised of role functioning, life satisfaction, and well-being, and social–material conditions, including crime-related medical, mental health, and employer costs, and health care utilization. The review indicates that crime victimization impacts multiple domains, including parenting skills, impaired occupational functioning, higher rates of unemployment, and problematic intimate relationships. However, data on relationships between crime victimization and overall life satisfaction were mixed, suggesting the need for further investigation. The authors conclude with a brief discussion of directions for future research. PMID:20419728

  9. Examination of crime and similar concepts in the medical law.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Crime is a human behavior that has captivated the thoughts of scholars of various disciplines throughout history. Philosophers, sociologists, psychologists and others have investigated and analyzed the concept of crime from different aspects. Crime is the main topic of criminal law, and in its legal meaning is a well-known term with a certain conceptual load that should not be confused with similar concepts such as guilt, civil crime (quasi tort), and particularly, the disciplinary transgression. Although crime has common points with all the above, it is an independent concept with unique effects, features, and descriptions that distinguish it from similar acts. This article aims to determine the difference between the concepts of crime, guilt, civil crime and disciplinary transgression through enumeration of the related issues as well as examples of medical disciplinary crimes and transgressions. Identifying and distinguishing these concepts can improve the procedure of prosecuting crimes and disciplinary transgression, bring punishment to criminals and transgressors, and facilitate compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary losses due to committers' fault or failure. Thus we may avoid taking a wrong route that can lead to infringement of individuals' rights. PMID:27471587

  10. Crime prevention through social and physical environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Nietzel, Michael T.; Himelein, Melissa J.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to crime prevention where behavior analysts can make important contributions is the modification of environmental opportunities and victim vulnerabilities that are related to higher rates of offending. Examples of environmental crime prevention are discussed in the following areas: (1) modifying physical environments in order to “harden” targets of crime, (2) training victims to be less vulnerable to victimization, (3) eliminating portrayals of certain groups of people that legitimize their victimization, and (4) organizing neighborhoods and communities to strengthen their means of social control. Two implications of environmental crime prevention—the role of individual differences and the scope of prevention—are discussed. PMID:22477962

  11. Preliminary Performance Analyses of the Constellation Program ARES 1 Crew Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Mark; Hanson, John; Shmitt, Terri; Dukemand, Greg; Hays, Jim; Hill, Ashley; Garcia, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    By the time NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) report had been released to the public in December 2005, engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center had already initiated the first of a series of detailed design analysis cycles (DACs) for the Constellation Program Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which has been given the name Ares I. As a major component of the Constellation Architecture, the CLV's initial role will be to deliver crew and cargo aboard the newly conceived Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to a staging orbit for eventual rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). However, the long-term goal and design focus of the CLV will be to provide launch services for a crewed CEV in support of lunar exploration missions. Key to the success of the CLV design effort and an integral part of each DAC is a detailed performance analysis tailored to assess nominal and dispersed performance of the vehicle, to determine performance sensitivities, and to generate design-driving dispersed trajectories. Results of these analyses provide valuable design information to the program for the current design as well as provide feedback to engineers on how to adjust the current design in order to maintain program goals. This paper presents a condensed subset of the CLV performance analyses performed during the CLV DAC-1 cycle. Deterministic studies include development of the CLV DAC-1 reference trajectories, identification of vehicle stage impact footprints, an assessment of launch window impacts to payload performance, and the computation of select CLV payload partials. Dispersion studies include definition of input uncertainties, Monte Carlo analysis of trajectory performance parameters based on input dispersions, assessment of CLV flight performance reserve (FPR), assessment of orbital insertion accuracy, and an assessment of bending load indicators due to dispersions in vehicle angle of attack and side slip angle. A short discussion of the various

  12. Student Victimization in U.S. Schools: Results from the 2005 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. NCES 2009-306

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Lynn; Guerino, Paul; Nolle, Kacey Lee; Tang, Sze-Wei

    2008-01-01

    This report provides estimates of student victimization as defined by the 2005 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the 2005 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). the nation's primary source of information on crime victimization and the victims of crime in the United States. SCS is a supplement to NCVS that was created to collect information…

  13. Link between unemployment and crime in the US: a Markov-Switching approach.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouz; Rodríguez, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    This study has two goals. The first is to use Markov Switching models to identify and analyze the cycles in the unemployment rate and four different types of property-related criminal activities in the US. The second is to apply the nonparametric concordance index of Harding and Pagan (2006) to determine the correlation between the cycles of unemployment rate and property crimes. Findings show that there is a positive but insignificant relationship between the unemployment rate, burglary, larceny, and robbery. However, the unemployment rate has a significant and negative (i.e., a counter-cyclical) relationship with motor-vehicle theft. Therefore, more motor-vehicle thefts occur during economic expansions relative to contractions. Next, we divide the sample into three different subsamples to examine the consistency of the findings. The results show that the co-movements between the unemployment rate and property crimes during recession periods are much weaker, when compared with that of the normal periods of the US economy. PMID:24576625

  14. Safety Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Shauna M.

    2004-01-01

    As with any task that NASA takes on, safety is of utmost importaqce. There are pages of safety codes and procedures that must be followed before any idea can be brought to life. Unfortunately, the International Space Station s (ISS) safety regulations and procedures are based on lg standards rather than on Og. To aide in making this space age home away from home a less hazardous environment, I worked on several projects revolving around the dangers of flammable items in microgravity. The first task I was assigned was to track flames. This involves turning eight millimeter video recordings, of tests run in the five second drop tower, into avi format on the computer. The footage is then compressed and altered so that the flame can be seen more clearly. Using another program called Spotlight, line profiles were used to collect data describing the luminescence of the flame at different points. These raw data are saved as text files and run trough a macro so that a Matlab program can analyze it. By fitting the data to a curve and determining the areas of brightest luminescence, the behavior of the flame can be recorded numerically. After entering the data into a database, researchers can come back later and easily get information on flames resulting from different gas and liquid mixtures in microgravity. I also worked on phase two of the FATE project, which deals with safety aboard the ISS. This phase involves igniting projected droplets and determining how they react with secondary materials. Such simulations represent, on a small scale, the spread of onboard fires due to the effervescence of burning primary materials. I set up existing hardware to operate these experiments and ran tests with it, photographing the results. I also made CAD drawings of the apparatus and the area available on the (SF)2 rig for it to fit into. The experiment will later be performed on the KC-135, and the results gathered will be used to reanalyze current safety standards for the ISS

  15. The polymorphism of crime scene investigation: An exploratory analysis of the influence of crime and forensic intelligence on decisions made by crime scene examiners.

    PubMed

    Resnikoff, Tatiana; Ribaux, Olivier; Baylon, Amélie; Jendly, Manon; Rossy, Quentin

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of scientific literature recurrently indicates that crime and forensic intelligence influence how crime scene investigators make decisions in their practices. This study scrutinises further this intelligence-led crime scene examination view. It analyses results obtained from two questionnaires. Data have been collected from nine chiefs of Intelligence Units (IUs) and 73 Crime Scene Examiners (CSEs) working in forensic science units (FSUs) in the French speaking part of Switzerland (six cantonal police agencies). Four salient elements emerged: (1) the actual existence of communication channels between IUs and FSUs across the police agencies under consideration; (2) most CSEs take into account crime intelligence disseminated; (3) a differentiated, but significant use by CSEs in their daily practice of this kind of intelligence; (4) a probable deep influence of this kind of intelligence on the most concerned CSEs, specially in the selection of the type of material/trace to detect, collect, analyse and exploit. These results contribute to decipher the subtle dialectic articulating crime intelligence and crime scene investigation, and to express further the polymorph role of CSEs, beyond their most recognised input to the justice system. Indeed, they appear to be central, but implicit, stakeholders in intelligence-led style of policing. PMID:26583959

  16. Nonresidential Crime Attractors and Generators Elevate Perceived Neighborhood Crime and Incivilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Eric S.; Ratcliffe, Jerry H.; Garcia, R. Marie; Taylor, Ralph B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have produced conflicting findings about the impacts of local nonresidential land uses on perceived incivilities. This study advances work in this area by developing a land-use perspective theoretically grounded in Brantingham and Brantingham's geometry of crime model in environmental criminology. That focus directs attention to…

  17. A Cure for Crime: Can Mental Health Treatment Diversion Reduce Crime among Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; McReynolds, Larkin S.; Wasserman, Gail A.

    2006-01-01

    Youth crime is a serious social problem, as is the high proportion of young offenders in the juvenile justice system who have mental disorders. A recent policy innovation applies the theory of therapeutic jurisprudence and diverts youth with mental disorders to treatment in lieu of further court processing. The expansion of mental health diversion…

  18. [The genesis of crime according to dialectic criminology. II. Comments on the genesis of crime].

    PubMed

    Lyra, R; Ferracuti, F

    1978-01-01

    Prof. Lyra discusses in this article the basic problem of criminological sciences, stating that its essential object of study is the determination of the genesis of crime. The Author states that, before defining the crime genesis, it is necessary to outline, through a synthesis of epistemological restructurization of criminology itself. This way, we can develop a conception of Dialectic Criminology, where the term "dialectic" does not necessarily coincide with a marxist posture, but it extends along much more complex and comprehensive parameters. Dialectic Criminology is defined, in Lyra's conception, as a Classified Criminology, synthetizing both the psychological approach (clinical criminology, or micro-criminology), and the sociological approach (sociological criminology or macro-criminology), according to an anthropological basic frame of reference, which constitutes the new and original prerequisite. To this aim, according to Prof. Lyra, it is necessary to overcome merely biological or psychological theories, and the new sociologisms, which cannot explain deviant behavior without falling into dogmatism or relativism. It is necessary to give back to criminology its original ethico-philosophical roots, and to place the problem of crime within a new "praxis" concept, which takes into account the authentic freedom of man, interracting with historical evolution. This way, through Dialectic Criminology, we can overcome the conception of crime and delinquency viewed as counterparts of the concept of Law. PMID:756568

  19. Reducing Residential Crime and Fear: The Hartford Neighborhood Crime Prevention Program [and] Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Floyd J., Jr.; And Others

    The Hartford project, an experimental effort to reduce residential burglary, street robberies, and fear of those crimes in an urban residential neighborhood, is described. Its most distinctive feature is its integrative approach in which police, community organization, and physical design changes were used to increase the willingness and ability…

  20. Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

    This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

  1. Clauberg's eponym and crimes against humanity.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Frederick; Csapó-Sweet, Rita M

    2012-12-01

    Scientific journals are ethically bound to cite Professor Dr. Carl Clauberg's Nazi medical crimes against humanity whenever the eponym Clauberg is used. Modern articles still publish the eponym citing only the rabbit bioassy used in developing progesterone agonists or antagonists for birth control. Clauberg's Nazi career is traced to his having subjected thousands of Jewish women at the Ravensbruck and Auschwitz-Birkenau death camps to cruel, murderous sterilization experiments that are enthusiastically described by incriminating letters (reproduced here) between him and the notorious Nazi Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. The experiments were carried out in women's block 10 in Auschwitz-Birkenau where Clauberg's colleague Dr. Josef Mengele worked alongside. After Germany lost World War II in 1945 Mengele fled to South America, where he lived to an old age. Clauberg was caught by Russian soldiers, put on trial in the Soviet Union for his crimes against humanity, and imprisoned in 1948. In 1955 he was repatriated to Germany, once again imprisoned for his crimes, and belatedly expelled from the German Medical Association. To estimate the contemporary usage of the names Mengele and Clauberg, Internet hits were recorded for Clauberg C or Mengele J (with and without adding the term Auschwitz) with the Google and Scirus search engines. The ratios of hits for combinations of these terms reveal that relative to Mengele, Clauberg's name is barely known. We propose that journals and books printing the eponym Clauberg cite its derivation and reference to the convicted Nazi criminal. The present article can serve for such citations. PMID:23393707

  2. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  3. U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon Arrives Aboard U.S.S. Hornet for Apollo 11 Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (center), is saluted by the honor guard of flight deck crewmen when he arrives aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 11 mission, to watch recovery operations and welcome the astronauts home. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days following the mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun.

  4. Understanding Recurrent Crime as System-Immanent Collective Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Donnay, Karsten; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Containing the spreading of crime is a major challenge for society. Yet, since thousands of years, no effective strategy has been found to overcome crime. To the contrary, empirical evidence shows that crime is recurrent, a fact that is not captured well by rational choice theories of crime. According to these, strong enough punishment should prevent crime from happening. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between crime and punishment, we consider that the latter requires prior discovery of illicit behavior and study a spatial version of the inspection game. Simulations reveal the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance between “criminals”, “inspectors”, and “ordinary people” as a consequence of spatial interactions. Such cycles dominate the evolutionary process, in particular when the temptation to commit crime or the cost of inspection are low or moderate. Yet, there are also critical parameter values beyond which cycles cease to exist and the population is dominated either by a stable mixture of criminals and inspectors or one of these two strategies alone. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions to different final states are possible, indicating that successful strategies to contain crime can be very much counter-intuitive and complex. Our results demonstrate that spatial interactions are crucial for the evolutionary outcome of the inspection game, and they also reveal why criminal behavior is likely to be recurrent rather than evolving towards an equilibrium with monotonous parameter dependencies. PMID:24124533

  5. Study Sheds Light on Effects of Hate Crimes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan, N.; Harper, Shaun R.; Hildebrand, Emily S.; Burns, Shannon L.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of effects of hate crime on college campuses reports findings of a survey taken three months after a fatal hate crime. The study found that students in the targeted group, especially females and organizational leaders, had increased extracurricular involvement in campus organizations. Also provides statistics on racist acts on campus…

  6. Effects of Victims' Characteristics on Attitudes toward Hate Crimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucier, Donald A.; Brown, Tamara L.; Mitchell, Raquel C.; Cawman, Audrey J.

    2006-01-01

    Hate crimes are motivated by perpetrators' prejudice toward targets' group. To examine individuals' attitudes toward hate crime perpetrators and targets, participants responded to vignettes of court cases in which the victim's group membership was varied. Results showed that participants recommended more severe sentences for perpetrators when the…

  7. Psychosocial Motivations of Hate Crimes Perpetrators: Implications for Educational Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Karen

    This paper discusses three aspects of bias crimes against sexual minorities: (1) perpetration rates among young adults; (2) perpetrators' motivations; and (3) factors that prevent some people from committing hate crimes. In an anonymous survey of 484 students at 6 community colleges: one in 10 respondents admitted physical violence or threats…

  8. Legality Principle of Crimes and Punishments in Iranian Legal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habibzadeh, Mohammad Ja'far

    2006-01-01

    The Principle of legality of crimes and punishments (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege) refers to the fact that an act is not considered a crime and deserves no punishment, unless the Legislator determines and announces the criminal title and its penalty before. The legality principle protects individual security by ensuring basic individual…

  9. Court Backs a University on Reporting Campus Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    How colleges should report crimes on and near their campuses is a high-stakes question that, for the first time, a federal appellate court has tried to answer. Colleges are required to issue "timely warnings" under the federal campus-crime law known as the Clery Act, but how fast those warnings should come and what kind of information they should…

  10. Understanding the Cycle: Childhood Maltreatment and Future Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet; Tekin, Erdal

    2012-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a major social problem. This paper focuses on measuring the relationship between child maltreatment and crime using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). We focus on crime because it is one of the most costly potential outcomes of maltreatment. Our work addresses two main limitations of…

  11. Computer Crime: Criminal Justice Resource Manual (Second Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donn B.

    This advanced training and reference manual is designed to aid investigators and prosecutors in dealing with white collar computer crime. The first five sections follow the typical order of events for prosecutors handling a criminal case: classifying the crime, computer abuse methods and detection, experts and suspects using information systems,…

  12. Crime and Disruption in Schools. A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Robert, Comp.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography about crime and disruption in schools has been assembled from academic, professional, and government sources. The citations are organized into four major parts. "Overview: Nature and Extent of the Problem" contains studies that describe the cost of school crimes, primarily vandalism and arson, both in dollars and in…

  13. 24 CFR 1006.220 - Crime prevention and safety activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Crime prevention and safety... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.220 Crime... enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from...

  14. Determinants of Crime in Virginia: An Empirical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Abdiweli M.; Peek, Willam

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an empirical analysis of the determinants of crime in Virginia. Over a dozen explanatory variables that current literature suggests as important determinants of crime are collected. The data is from 1970 to 2000. These include economic, fiscal, demographic, political, and social variables. The regression results indicate that crime…

  15. 24 CFR 1006.220 - Crime prevention and safety activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Crime prevention and safety... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.220 Crime... enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from...

  16. Testing Incapacitation Theory: Youth Crime and Incarceration in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlkopf, Christina; Males, Mike; Macallair, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Under incapacitation theory, higher incarceration rates are expected to correlate with accelerated reductions in crime. California's contemporary incarceration patterns offer an opportunity to analyze the validity of this theory, particularly as it applies to young people. This study focuses on California's juvenile incarceration and crime trends…

  17. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  18. 24 CFR 1006.220 - Crime prevention and safety activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Crime prevention and safety... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.220 Crime... enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from...

  19. 24 CFR 1006.220 - Crime prevention and safety activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Crime prevention and safety... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.220 Crime... enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from...

  20. Significant Others and Fear of Crime among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Leslie W.; Silverman, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Examined demographic, environmental, behavioral, and social psychological factors that affect fear of crime among the elderly (N=1,439). Results showed elderly women were more fearful than other groups. Social isolation, type of housing, length of residence, and area of the city were all related to fear of crime. (JAC)