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Sample records for critical reynolds number

  1. Numerical investigation of transition critical Reynolds number of channel flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongming

    2015-11-01

    Two critical Reynolds numbers are mentioned in investigation of laminar-turbulent transition. One is instability critical Reynolds number from linear stability theory (LST). The other is transition critical Reynolds number at which transition occurs in reality, which is significantly lower than the former in general. The determination of transition critical Reynolds number is of important practical significance in some engineering problems. Theoretical method has not been proposed for its determination, so it has to depend on experiments. However, for some flows with important practical significance, such as hypersonic boundary layer, transition critical Reynolds number cannot be determined by experiments in current situation. In this paper, transition critical Reynolds number of incompressible channel flow is determined by direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found as Re =1114, which agrees with experimental data. In subsequent paper, transition critical Reynolds number of boundary layer will be investigation by the similar method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11202147, 11332007, 11172203, and 91216111) and the Specialized Research Fund (New Teacher Class) for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120032120007).

  2. Phenomenology of a flow around a circular cylinder at sub-critical and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Di Felice, Fabio; Miozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the flow around a circular cylinder is investigated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 79 000 up to 238 000 by means of a combined acquisition system based on Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) and particle velocimetry. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and time-resolved measurement of absolute temperature and relative skin friction fields onto the cylinder surface and near-wake velocity field. Combination of time-resolved surface measurements and planar near-field velocity data allows the investigation of the profound modifications undergone by the wall shear stress topology and its connections to the near-field structure as the flow regime travels from the sub-critical to the critical regime. Laminar boundary-layer separation, transition, and re-attachment are analyzed in the light of temperature, relative skin friction maps, and Reynolds stress fields bringing about a new perspective on the relationship between boundary layer development and shear layer evolution. The fast-responding TSP employed allows high acquisition frequency and calculation of power spectral density from surface data. Correlation maps of surface and near-wake data provide insight into the relationship between boundary-layer evolution and vortex shedding. We find that as the Reynolds number approaches the critical state, the separation line oscillations feature an increasingly weaker spectrum peak compared to the near-wake velocity spectrum. In the critical regime, separation line oscillations are strongly reduced and the correlation to the local vorticity undergoes an overall decrease giving evidence of modifications in the vortex shedding mechanism.

  3. The critical layer in pipe flow at high Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, D

    2009-02-13

    We report the computation of a family of travelling wave solutions of pipe flow up to Re=75000. As in all lower branch solutions, streaks and rolls feature prominently in these solutions. For large Re, these solutions develop a critical layer away from the wall. Although the solutions are linearly unstable, the two unstable eigenvalues approach 0 as Re-->infinity at rates given by Re-0.41 and Re-0.87; surprisingly, the solutions become more stable as the flow becomes less viscous. The formation of the critical layer and other aspects of the Re-->infinity limit could be universal to lower branch solutions of shear flows. We give implementation details of the GMRES-hookstep and Arnoldi iterations used for computing these solutions and their spectra, while pointing out the new aspects of our method. PMID:18990661

  4. Negative Magnus Effect on a Rotating Sphere at around the Critical Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow is investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0× 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods adopted are first validated on a non-rotating sphere and the spatial resolution around the sphere is determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed at around the critical Reynolds number. In the rotating sphere, positive or negative Magnus effect is observed depending on the Reynolds number and the rotating speed imposed. At the Reynolds number in the subcritical or supercritical region, the direction of the lift force follows the Magnus effect to be independent of the rotational speed tested here. In contrast, negative lift is observed at the Reynolds number at the critical region when particular rotating speeds are imposed. The negative Magnus effect is discussed in the context of the suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  5. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  6. Negative Magnus lift on a rotating sphere at around the critical Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow was investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0 × 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods used were first validated on a non-rotating sphere, and the spatial resolution around the sphere was determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed in the vicinity of the critical Reynolds number. The rotating sphere exhibited a positive or negative Magnus effect depending on the Reynolds number and the imposed rotating speed. At Reynolds numbers in the subcritical or supercritical regimes, the direction of the Magnus lift force was independent of the rotational speed. In contrast, the lift force was negative in the critical regime when particular rotating speeds were imposed. This negative Magnus effect was investigated in the context of suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  7. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  8. Calculation of the Minimum Critical Reynolds Number for Circular Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Hidesada

    1999-11-01

    A conceptual model was constructed for the problem of determining in circular pipes the conditions under which the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs. From many previous experimental investigations, it became clear that (i) plots of the transition length versus the Reynolds number (Re) show that the transition occurs in the entrance region under the condition of a natural disturbance, and (ii) plots of the critical Re versus the ratio of bellmouth diameter to the pipe diameter show that for the case of a straight pipe the critical Re takes a minimum value of about 2000. In the entrance region, the velocity profile changes from uniform at the inlet to parabolic at the entrance length. We found that the radial component of the curl of vorticity multiplied by (2/Re), which we call the normal wall strength, works as an acceleration force and decreases inversely as Re increases. Hence, the onset of the transition should depend on whether or not the acceleration power provided by the normal wall strength exceeds a required value. In this study we calculated the acceleration power via finite difference calculations, and thus obtained the minimum critical Reynolds number of 2040 when using J0 = 101 radial grid points.

  9. Laminar-Turbulent Transition: A Hysteresis Curve of Two Critical Reynolds Numbers in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Hidesada

    2006-11-01

    A laminar-turbulent transition model (DFD 2004) has been constructed for pipe flows: (1) Natural transition occurs in the entrance region, and (2) Entrance shape determines a critical Reynolds number Rc. To verify the model, we have carried out experiments similar to Reynolds's color-dye experiment with 5 bellmouth entrances and a straight pipe. Then, we observed the following: (i) two different types of Rc exist, Rc1 from laminar to turbulent and Rc2 from turbulent to laminar, and (ii) the ratio of bellmouth diameter BD to pipe diameter D affects the values of Rc1 and Rc2. For each entrance, Rc1 has a maximum value Rc1(max) and Rc2 has a minimum value Rc2(min). When overlapping the two curves of Rc1(max) and Rc2(min) against BD/D, a hysteresis curve is confirmed. All Rc values exist inside this hysteresis curve. Consequently, Rc takes a minimum value Rc(min) of approximately 2000 when BD/D is at a minimum, i.e., at BD/D = 1, Rc(min) = Rc1(max) = Rc2(min) = 2000. Regarding Reynolds's Rc of 12,830, we observed Rc1(max) of approximately 13,000 at BD/D above 1.54. Therefore, the model has been partly verified.

  10. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  11. Breaking axi-symmetry in stenotic flow lowers the critical transition Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsson, J.; Tammisola, O.; Juniper, M. P.

    2015-10-01

    Flow through a sinuous stenosis with varying degrees of non-axisymmetric shape variations and at Reynolds number ranging from 250 to 750 is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and global linear stability analysis. At low Reynolds numbers (Re < 390), the flow is always steady and symmetric for an axisymmetric geometry. Two steady state solutions are obtained when the Reynolds number is increased: a symmetric steady state and an eccentric, non-axisymmetric steady state. Either one can be obtained in the DNS depending on the initial condition. A linear global stability analysis around the symmetric and non-axisymmetric steady state reveals that both flows are linearly stable for the same Reynolds number, showing that the first bifurcation from symmetry to antisymmetry is subcritical. When the Reynolds number is increased further, the symmetric state becomes linearly unstable to an eigenmode, which drives the flow towards the non-axisymmetric state. The symmetric state remains steady up to Re = 713, while the non-axisymmetric state displays regimes of periodic oscillations for Re ≥ 417 and intermittency for Re ≳ 525. Further, an offset of the stenosis throat is introduced through the eccentricity parameter E. When eccentricity is increased from zero to only 0.3% of the pipe diameter, the bifurcation Reynolds number decreases by more than 50%, showing that it is highly sensitive to non-axisymmetric shape variations. Based on the resulting bifurcation map and its dependency on E, we resolve the discrepancies between previous experimental and computational studies. We also present excellent agreement between our numerical results and previous experimental results.

  12. Nonlocality and the critical Reynolds numbers of the minimum state magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ye; Oughton, Sean

    2011-07-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems can be strongly nonlinear (turbulent) when their kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers are high, as is the case in many astrophysical and space plasma flows. Unfortunately these high Reynolds numbers are typically much greater than those currently attainable in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. A natural question to ask is how can researchers be sure that their simulations have reproduced all of the most influential physics of the flows and magnetic fields? In this paper, a metric is defined to indicate whether the necessary physics of interest has been captured. It is found that current computing resources will typically not be sufficient to achieve this minimum state metric.

  13. Experimental Conditions for the Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Hidesada

    2004-11-01

    A transition model has been constructed for determining a critical Reynolds number Rc between laminar and turbulent flows in circular pipes. (1) Transition occurs in the entrance region under the conditions of natural disturbances. (2) Entrance shape determines Rc with disturbances; Rc takes a minimum value when the contraction ratio at the inlet is minimum or in the case of a straight pipe. (3) In the entrance boundary layer, there exists a normal wall strength which decreases as Re increases; let its rate of doing work be NW. The velocity profile develops from a uniform distribution at the inlet to a parabolic one; KE is the constant required acceleration power. Thus, the occurrence of the transition is determined by RW and KE: when RW > KE, transition never occurs, and when RW < KE, transition occurs. To prove the model, color-dye experiments were carried out. Consequently, two different types of Rc existed: Rc1 from laminar to turbulent and Rc2 from turbulent to laminar. As the ratio of bellmouth diameter to pipe diameter increases, Rc2 increased. Both Rc1 and Rc2 took a minimum value of approximately 2000 in the case of a straight pipe.

  14. Low Reynolds number airfoil survey, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    The differences in flow behavior two dimensional airfoils in the critical chordlength Reynolds number compared with lower and higher Reynolds number are discussed. The large laminar separation bubble is discussed in view of its important influence on critical Reynolds number airfoil behavior. The shortcomings of application of theoretical boundary layer computations which are successful at higher Reynolds numbers to the critical regime are discussed. The large variation in experimental aerodynamic characteristic measurement due to small changes in ambient turbulence, vibration, and sound level is illustrated. The difficulties in obtaining accurate detailed measurements in free flight and dramatic performance improvements at critical Reynolds number, achieved with various types of boundary layer tripping devices are discussed.

  15. Measurements of Intensity and Scale of Wind-Tunnel Turbulence and Their Relation to the Critical Reynolds Number of Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L; Schubauer, G B; Mock, W C , Jr; Skramstad, H K

    1937-01-01

    The investigation of wind-tunnel turbulence, conducted at the National Bureau of Standards with the cooperation of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, has been extended to include a new variable, namely, the scale of the turbulence. This report presents the results of a study of this new variable together with the intensity of the turbulence, and the effect of both on the critical Reynolds number of spheres.

  16. Numerical Estimation of the Critical Reynolds Number for Flow Past one Square Cylinder with Symmetric Geometry Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. H.; Zhu, W. F.; He, Z. Y.

    It is well known that the steady flow past a circular cylinder loses stability at Re takes the value about 50 (Y. Ding et al, 1999). Most papers about the characterization and understanding of the stability for the flow past blunt bodies are mainly carried out for such flow past one circular cylinder. And there is a large variation in the values of Re cr and correspondingly the values of St cr reported by different reseachers. Bhascar and Sunjay (2006) have attributed it to the effect of blockage (here, it means the ratio of the diameter of cylinder to the lateral width of domain). And for high Re cr first decreases and then increases with the increase of the blockage. And the correspondingly values of St cr are quite sensitive to the blockage. In this paper, we attampt to estimate the critical Re for the flow past one square cylinder. It is obviously that geometry symmetry or attack degree will not change just with rotation of the circular cylinder, but for the square cylinder, the symmetry or the degree will not keep for the rotation. So the numerical estimation of the critical Re for the flow past square cylinders should be carried out for the symmetric or unsymmetric geometry boundary conditions separately. Based on the calculation of the lid driven cavity flow at Re=100 and 1000, a second order Euler-Taylor-Galerkin finite element method was used to estimate the critical Reynolds number for flow past one square cylinder with zero attact degree through direct time integration of the NS equationes. The role of blockage on such flow was analysed at Re=100. It was found that the averged St tend to be constant as blockage took the value larger than 50. The critical Reynolds number is then computed. As the result shown, it was estimated that Re Cr =40.11. And the computation for unsymmetric geometry condition will discussed laterly.

  17. Biotechnology at low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, J P; Yager, P; Goldstein, R E; Austin, R H

    1996-01-01

    The shrinking of liquid handling systems to the micron and submicron size range entails moving into the area of small Reynolds numbers. The fluid dynamics in this regime are very different from the macroscale. We present an intuitive explanation of how the different physics of small Reynolds numbers flow, along with microscopic sizes, can influence device design, and give examples from our own work using fluid flow in microfabricated devices designed for biological processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8968612

  18. A critical comparison of several low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence models for flow over a backward facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent backward-facing step flow was examined using four low turbulent Reynolds number k-epsilon models and one standard high Reynolds number technique. A tunnel configuration of 1:9 (step height: exit tunnel height) was used. The models tested include: the original Jones and Launder; Chien; Launder and Sharma; and the recent Shih and Lumley formulation. The experimental reference of Driver and Seegmiller was used to make detailed comparisons between reattachment length, velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds shear stress, and skin friction predictions. The results indicated that the use of a wall function for the standard k-epsilon technique did not reduce the calculation accuracy for this separated flow when compared to the low turbulent Reynolds number techniques.

  19. High Reynolds number research - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required were examined. Potential experiments which maximize the research returns from the use of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) were outlined. Calibration plans were reviewed and the following topics were discussed: fluid dynamics; high lit; configuration aerodynamics; aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics; wind tunnel/flight correlation; space vehicles; and theoretical aerodynamics

  20. The aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of wing model gliders and bird wings in particular are discussed. Wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers are enumerated. Airfoil behavior in the critical transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer, which is more important to bird wing models than to large airplanes, was observed. Experimental results are provided, and an artificial bird wing is described.

  1. Propulsion at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Ali; Golestanian, Ramin

    2005-04-01

    We study the propulsion of two model swimmers at low Reynolds number. Inspired by Purcell's model, we propose a very simple one-dimensional swimmer consisting of three spheres that are connected by two arms whose lengths can change between two values. The proposed swimmer can swim with a special type of motion, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry. We also show that an ellipsoidal membrane with tangential travelling wave on it can also propel itself in the direction preferred by the travelling wave. This system resembles the realistic biological animals like Paramecium.

  2. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  3. MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE TRANSPORTS ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN STRATIFIED DISKS WITH LOW MAGNETIC PRANDTL NUMBER BUT MAGNETIC REYNOLDS NUMBER ABOVE A CRITICAL VALUE

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.

    2011-10-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean-field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean-field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  4. Low-Reynolds-number predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Mehran; Yekehzare, Mohammad; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    To generalize simple bead-linker model of swimmers to higher dimensions and to demonstrate the chemotaxis ability of such swimmers, here we introduce a low-Reynolds predator, using a two-dimensional triangular bead-spring model. Two-state linkers as mechanochemical enzymes expand as a result of interaction with particular activator substances in the environment, causing the whole body to translate and rotate. The concentration of the chemical stimulator controls expansion versus the contraction rate of each arm and so affects the ability of the body for diffusive movements; also the variation of activator substance's concentration in the environment breaks the symmetry of linkers' preferred state, resulting in the drift of the random walker along the gradient of the density of activators. External food or danger sources may attract or repel the body by producing or consuming the chemical activators of the organism's enzymes, inducing chemotaxis behavior. Generalization of the model to three dimensions is straightforward.

  5. Low-Reynolds-number predator.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Mehran; Yekehzare, Mohammad; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    To generalize simple bead-linker model of swimmers to higher dimensions and to demonstrate the chemotaxis ability of such swimmers, here we introduce a low-Reynolds predator, using a two-dimensional triangular bead-spring model. Two-state linkers as mechanochemical enzymes expand as a result of interaction with particular activator substances in the environment, causing the whole body to translate and rotate. The concentration of the chemical stimulator controls expansion versus the contraction rate of each arm and so affects the ability of the body for diffusive movements; also the variation of activator substance's concentration in the environment breaks the symmetry of linkers' preferred state, resulting in the drift of the random walker along the gradient of the density of activators. External food or danger sources may attract or repel the body by producing or consuming the chemical activators of the organism's enzymes, inducing chemotaxis behavior. Generalization of the model to three dimensions is straightforward. PMID:26764831

  6. Decay of turbulence at high reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bewley, Gregory P

    2015-01-23

    Turbulent motions in a fluid decay at a certain rate once stirring has stopped. The role of the most basic parameter in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds number, in setting the decay rate is not generally known. This Letter concerns the high-Reynolds-number limit of the process. In a classical grid-turbulence wind-tunnel experiment that both reaches higher Reynolds numbers than ever before and covers a wide range of them (10^{4}Reynolds-number independent, which contradicts some models and supports others. PMID:25659002

  7. Decay of Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bewley, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent motions in a fluid decay at a certain rate once stirring has stopped. The role of the most basic parameter in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds number, in setting the decay rate is not generally known. This Letter concerns the high-Reynolds-number limit of the process. In a classical grid-turbulence wind-tunnel experiment that both reaches higher Reynolds numbers than ever before and covers a wide range of them (1 04Reynolds-number independent, which contradicts some models and supports others.

  8. Experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Smith, Tamara A.; Saltz, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    High-performance electrothermal thrusters operate in a low nozzle-throat Reynolds number regime. Under these conditions, the flow boundary layer occupies a large volume inside the nozzle, contributing to large viscous losses. Four nozzles (conical, bell, trumpet, and modified trumpet) and a sharp-edged orifice were evaluated over a Reynolds number range of 500 to 9000 with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The nozzles showed significant decreases in specific impulse efficiency with decreasing Reynolds number. At Reynolds numbers less than 1000, all four nozzles were probably filled with a large boundary layer. The discharge coefficient decreased with Reynolds number in the same manner as the specific impulse efficiency. The bell and modified trumpet nozzles had discharge coefficients 4 to 8 percent higher than those of the cone or trumpet nozzles. The Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle analysis computer program was used to predict nozzle performance. The results were then compared to the experimental results in order to determine the accuracy of the program within this flow regime.

  9. A critical comparison of several low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence models for flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent backward-facing step flow was examined using four low turbulent Reynolds number k-epsilon models and one standard high Reynolds number technique. A tunnel configuration of 1:9 (step height: exit tunnel height) was used. The models tested include: the original Jones and Launder; Chien; Launder and Sharma; and the recent Shih and Lumley formulation. The experimental reference of Driver and Seegmiller was used to make detailed comparisons between reattachment length, velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds shear stress, and skin friction predictions. The results indicated that the use of a wall function for the standard k-epsilon technique did not reduce the calculation accuracy for this separated flow when compared to the low turbulent Reynolds number techniques.

  10. A critical comparison of several low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence models for flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    Turbulent backward-facing step flow was examined using four low turbulent Reynolds number k-epsilon models and one standard high Reynolds number technique. A tunnel configuration of 1:9 (step height: exit tunnel height) was used. The models tested include: the original Jones and Launder; Chien; Launder and Sharma; and the recent Shih and Lumley formulation. The experimental reference of Driver and Seegmiller was used to make detailed comparisons between reattachment length, velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds shear stress, and skin friction predictions. The results indicated that the use of a wall function for the standard k-epsilon technique did not reduce the calculation accuracy for this separated flow when compared to the low turbulent Reynolds number techniques.

  11. Measurements in a High Reynolds Number Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Jimenez, Juan; Bailey, Sean; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in the Princeton/ONR HRTF windtunnel with highly pressurized air. The wake of a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model was measured over a large range of Reynolds numbers at 5 different downstream locations. The model is an axisymmetric body without appendages (fins) supported by a streamlined support, mimicking a semi-infinite sail. For all Reynolds numbers studied, the mean velocity distribution becomes self-similar between 3 and 6 diameters, D, downstream for the side where the support is not located. In contrast, self-similarity in the Reynolds stresses is not reached at the furthest downstream location (x/D=15). The spectra reveal two peaks in the near-wake. The lower wavenumber peak corresponds to a Strouhal number based on diameter and freestream velocity of about 0.22, suggesting that it is associated with an azimuthal or helical shedding mode in the wake. This mode is evident at all Reynolds numbers, at all cross-stream positions, indicating that it is unlikely to be due to the interference of the support wake with the model wake. The mode is seen only for x/D<15, suggesting that it plays a partial role in the approach to self-similarity of the turbulent stresses.

  12. High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emens, Jessica M.; Brown, Sarah P.; Frederick Robert A., Jr.; Wood, A. John

    2004-01-01

    This work represents preliminary thermal stability results for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability experiments with Jet A and RP-1 resulted in a quantitative measurement of the thermal stability. Each fuel flowed through a heated capillary tube that held the outlet temperature at 290 C. An optical pyrometer measured the surface temperature of the tube at 12 locations as a function of time. The High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability number was then determined using standards published by the American Society for Testing and Materials. The results for Jet A showed lower thermal stability than similar tests conducted at another facility. The RP-1 results are the first reported using this technique. Because the temperature rise on the capillary tube during testing for the RP-1 fuels was not significant, a new standard for the testing conditions should be developed for these types of fuels.

  13. MHD Turbulence at Moderate Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Kassinos, S.; Carati, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the present article we will consider the decay of MHD turbulence under the influence of a strong external magnetic field at moderate magnetic Reynolds numbers. Typical values of R(sub m) that are considered here range from R(sub m) approx. 0.1 to R(sub m) approx. 20. As a comparison, the initial kinetic Reynolds number common to all our simulations is Re(sub L) = 199. This means that the range of Prandtl numbers explored is 5 x 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1). Our motivation is mainly to exhibit how the transition from the QS approximation to FMHD occurs. At the lowest values of R(sub m) studied here, the QS approximation is shown to model the flow faithfully. However, for the higher values of R(sub m) considered, it is clearly inadequate but can be replaced by another approximation which will be referred to as the Quasi-Linear (QL) approximation. Another objective of the present study is to describe how variations in the magnetic Reynolds number (while maintaining all other parameters constant) affect the dynamics of the flow. This complements past studies where variations in either the strength of the external magnetic field or the kinetic Reynolds number were considered. This article is organized as follows. In section 2 we recall the definition of the quasi-static approximation. Section 3 is devoted to the description of the numerical experiments performed using the quasi-static approximation and full MHD. In section 4 we describe the quasi-linear approximation and test it numerically against full MHD. A concluding summary is given in section 5.

  14. Hot wire in low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, M. A.; Covert, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress reports were issued on the following experiments: (1) low Reynolds number flow phenomenon of periodic vortex shedding in the wake behind a cylinder as studied by applying the hot wire anemometer technique of flow measurement. The downstream diffusion of these shed vortices was of prime concern. An evaluation of the performance of the hot wire at low Reynolds number is also considered. (2) A brief examination of the back sections of the Wright Brothers wind tunnel circuits were conducted to establish whether or not gross flow deviations were present at corners, or turning vane regions. A calibration of the test sections was done. (3) The attractiveness of using rembedded grids for airfoil calculations modeled by the Euler equations was explored. These calculations were extended to C-type grids and then to Navier-Stokes calculations,

  15. Low Reynolds number, long endurance aircraft design

    SciTech Connect

    Foch, R.J.; Ailinger, K.G. )

    1992-02-01

    Airplanes are typically designed to maximize range at the highest practical cruising speed. However, several missions require extended duration rather than range, and favor the slowest possible cruise speed. Such missions include surveillance, radio relay, and ship's electronic decoy. These missions are ideally suited for advanced technology unmanned aircraft, either remotely piloted or autonomous. Feasibility studies have been conducted and flight demonstrator prototypes of such unique aircraft have been under steady research and development at the Naval Research Laboratory since 1978. This paper discusses the design aspects and tradeoffs unique to small, slow speed long endurance unmanned aircraft operating at wing chord Reynolds numbers between 150,000 and 500,000. Additionally, many of these low Reynolds number-driven design features have applicability to high altitude, long endurance aircraft. 6 refs.

  16. Reynolds and Mach number effects on multielement airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valarezo, Walter O.; Dominik, Chet J.; Mcghee, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to assess Reynolds and Mach number effects on a supercritical multielement airfoil. The airfoil is representative of the stall-critical station of an advanced transport wing design. The experimental work was conducted as part of a cooperative program between the Douglas Aircraft Company and the NASA LaRC to improve current knowledge of high-lift flows and to develop a validation database with practical geometries/conditions for emerging computational methods. This paper describes results obtained for both landing and takeoff multielement airfoils (four and three-element configurations) for a variety of Mach/Reynolds number combinations up to flight conditions. Effects on maximum lift are considered for the landing configurations and effects on both lift and drag are reported for the takeoff geometry. The present test results revealed considerable maximum lift effects on the three-element landing configuration for Reynolds number variations and significant Mach number effects on the four-element airfoil.

  17. Reynolds number effects in combustion noise

    SciTech Connect

    Seshan, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic emission spectra have been obtained for non-premixed turbulent combustion from two small diameter laboratory gas burners, two commercial gas burners and a large gas burner in the firebox of a Babcock-Wilcox Boiler (50,000 lb steam/hr). The changes in burner size and firing rate represent changes in Reynolds number and changes in air/fuel ratio represent departure from stoichiometric proportions. The combustion efficiency was measured independently through gas analysis. The acoustic spectra obtained from the various burners exhibit a persistent shape over the Reynolds number range of 8200-82,000. The spectra were analyzed for identification of a predictable frequency domain that is most responsive to, and readily correlated with, combustion efficiency. A simple parameter (consisting of the ratio of the average acoustic power output in the most responsive frequency bandwidth to the acoustic power level of the loudest frequency) is proposed whose value increases significantly and unmistakably as combustion efficiency approaches 100%. The dependence of the most responsive frequency domain on the various Reynolds numbers associated with turbulent jets is discussed.

  18. Preston Probe Calibrations at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of the research effort is to study the performance of two Preston probes designed by NASA Langley Research Center across an unprecedented range of Reynolds number (based on friction velocity and probe diameter), and perform an accurate calibration over the same Reynolds number range. Using the Superpipe facility in Princeton, two rounds of experiments were performed. In each round of experiments for each Reynolds number, the pressure gradient, static pressure from the Preston probes and the total pressure from the Preston probes were measured. In the first round, 3 Preston probes having outer diameters of 0.058 inches, 0.083 inches and 0.203 inches were tested over a large range of pipe Reynolds numbers. Two data reduction methods were employed: first, the static pressure measured on the Preston probe was used to calculate P (modified Preston probe configuration), and secondly, the static pressure measured at the reference pressure tap was used to calculate P (un-modified Preston probe configuration). For both methods, the static pressure was adjusted to correspond with the static pressure at the Preston probe tip using the pressure gradient. The measurements for Preston probes with diameters of 0.058 inches, and 0.083 inches respectively were performed in the test pipe before it was polished a second time. Therefore, the measurements at high pipe Reynolds numbers may have been affected by roughness. In the second round of experiments the 0.058 inches and 0.083 inches diameter, un-modified probes were tested after the pipe was polished and prepared to ensure that the surface was smooth. The average velocity was estimated by assuming that the connection between the centerline velocity and the average velocity was known, and by using a Pitot tube to measure the centerline velocity. A preliminary error estimate suggests that it is possible to introduce a 1% to 2% error in estimating the average velocity using this approach. The evidence on the errors

  19. Zero pressure gradient boundary layer at extreme Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in a zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layer using the Princeton/ONR High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF). The HRTF uses highly compressed air, up to 220 atmospheres, to produce Reynolds numbers up to Reθ =225,000 . This corresponds to a δ+ =65,000 which is one of the highest Reynolds numbers ever measured in a laboratory. When using pressure to achieve high Reynolds numbers the size of the measurement probes become critical, thus the need for very small sensors is acute. The streamwise component of velocity was investigated using a nanoscale thermal anemometer (NSTAP) as well as a 200 μm pitot tube. The NSTAP has a spatial resolution as well as a temporal resolution one order of magnitude better than conventional measurement techniques. The data was compared to recent data from a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow and it was shown that the two flows are more similar than previous data suggests. Supported under NR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257(program manager Henning Winter).

  20. Off-Design Reynolds Number Effects for a Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, S. Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A high Reynolds number wind tunnel test was conducted to assess Reynolds number effects on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of a realistic, second-generation supersonic transport concept. The tests included longitudinal studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of chord Reynolds numbers (8 million to 120 million). Results presented focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities at Mach 0.30 and 0.90 for a configuration without a tail. Static aeroelastic effects, which mask Reynolds number effects, were observed. Reynolds number effects were generally small and the drag data followed established trends of skin friction as a function of Reynolds number. A more nose-down pitching moment was produced as Reynolds number increased because of an outward movement of the inboard leading-edge separation at constant angles of attack. This study extends the existing Reynolds number database for supersonic transports operating at off-design conditions.

  1. Turbulent intensity and Reynolds number effects on an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Yang, H.

    2014-11-01

    This work investigates the aerodynamics of a NACA 0012 airfoil at the chord-based Reynolds numbers (Rec) from 5.3 × 103 to 2.0 × 104. The lift and drag coefficients, CL and CD, of the airfoil, along with the flow structure, were measured as the turbulent intensity Tu of oncoming flow varies from 0.6% to 6.0%. The analysis of the present data and those in the literature unveils a total of eight distinct flow structures around the suction side of the airfoil. Four Rec regimes, i.e., the ultra-low (<1.0 × 104), low (1.0 × 104-3.0 × 105), moderate (3.0 × 105-5.0 × 106), and high Rec (>5.0 × 106), are proposed based on their characteristics of the CL-Rec relationship and the flow structure. It has been observed that Tu has a more pronounced effect at lower Rec than at higher Rec on the shear layer separation, reattachment, transition, and formation of the separation bubble. As a result, CL, CD, CL/CD and their dependence on the airfoil angle of attack all vary with Tu. So does the critical Reynolds number Rec,cr that divides the ultra-low and low Rec regimes. It is further noted that the effect of increasing Tu bears similarity in many aspects to that of increasing Rec, albeit with differences. The concept of the effective Reynolds number Rec,eff advocated for the moderate and high Rec regimes is re-evaluated for the low and ultra-low Rec regimes. The Rec,eff treats the non-zero Tu effect as an addition of Rec and is determined based on the presently defined Rec,cr. It has been found that all the maximum lift data from both present measurements and previous reports collapse into a single curve in the low and ultra-low Rec regimes if scaled with Rec,eff.

  2. Reynold-Number Effects on Near-Wall Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Kim, J.; Moser, R. D.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Reynolds stress budget in a full developed turbulent channel flow for three Reynolds numbers (Re = 180,395,590) are used to investigate the near wall scaling of various turbulence quantities. We find that as the Reynolds number increases, the extent of the region where the production of the kinetic energy is equal to the dissipation increases. At the highest Reynolds number the region of equilibrium extends from y+ - 120 to y+ = 240. As the Reynolds number increases, we find that wall scaling collapses the budgets for the streamwise fluctuating component, but the budgets for the other two components show Reynolds number dependency.

  3. Low-Reynolds-number swimming at pycnoclines

    PubMed Central

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Stocker, Roman; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms play pivotal functions in the trophic dynamics and biogeochemistry of aquatic ecosystems. Their concentrations and activities often peak at localized hotspots, an important example of which are pycnoclines, where water density increases sharply with depth due to gradients in temperature or salinity. At pycnoclines organisms are exposed to different environmental conditions compared to the bulk water column, including reduced turbulence, slow mass transfer, and high particle and predator concentrations. Here we show that, at an even more fundamental level, the density stratification itself can affect microbial ecology at pycnoclines, by quenching the flow signature, increasing the energetic expenditure, and stifling the nutrient uptake of motile organisms. We demonstrate this through numerical simulations of an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimmer, the “squirmer.” We identify the Richardson number—the ratio of buoyancy forces to viscous forces—as the fundamental parameter that quantifies the effects of stratification. These results demonstrate an unexpected effect of buoyancy on low-Reynolds-number swimming, potentially affecting a broad range of abundant organisms living at pycnoclines in oceans and lakes. PMID:22355147

  4. Low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sandeep; Salin, Dominique; Talon, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The extension of a gravity current in a lock-exchange problem, proceeds as square root of time in the viscous-buoyancy phase, where there is a balance between gravitational and viscous forces. In the presence of particles however, this scenario is drastically altered, because sedimentation reduces the motive gravitational force and introduces a finite distance and time at which the gravity current halts. We investigate the spreading of low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents using a novel approach based on the Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. The suspension is modeled as a continuous medium with a concentration-dependent viscosity. The settling of particles is simulated using a drift flux function approach that enables us to capture sudden discontinuities in particle concentration that travel as kinematic shock waves. Thereafter a numerical investigation of lock-exchange flows between pure fluids of unequal viscosity, reveals the existence of wall layers which reduce the spreading rate substantially compared to the lubrication theory prediction. In suspension gravity currents, we observe that the settling of particles leads to the formation of two additional fronts: a horizontal front near the top that descends vertically and a sediment layer at the bottom which aggrandises due to deposition of particles. Three phases are identified in the spreading process: the final corresponding to the mutual approach of the two horizontal fronts while the laterally advancing front halts indicating that the suspension current stops even before all the particles have settled. The first two regimes represent a constant and a decreasing spreading rate respectively. Finally we conduct experiments to substantiate the conclusions of our numerical and theoretical investigation. PMID:23933985

  5. Tests of Spheres with Reference to Reynolds Number, Turbulence, and Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerner, S

    1935-01-01

    The behavior of the Reynolds Number of the sphere is explained (in known manner) with the aid of the boundary-layer theory. Rear spindles may falsify, under certain conditions, the supercritical sphere drag, while suspension wires in the space behind the sphere leave no traceable influence. The critical Reynolds Number of the sphere was arrived at by an unconventional method; that is, by determining the critical wind speed at which the static pressure at the back of the sphere is the same as that of the undisturbed flow. The method makes it possible to interpret the critical Reynolds Number with only one test station.

  6. Active Flow Control on a Low Reynolds Number Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Matthew; Gharib, Morteza

    2010-11-01

    Control of vortex formation has been shown to be a critical mechanism in some forms of animal flight. Flapping motions create advantageous flow structures which play a role in enhancing lift and increasing maneuverability. Active flow control may be capable of providing similar influence over vortex formation processes in fixed wing flight at small Reynolds numbers. Steady and pulsed mass injection strategies through simple slot actuators are used to explore the open-loop response of the flow around a simple low-aspect ratio wing. Flow dynamics and vortex formation will be quantitatively visualized with DPIV and flow forces will be simultaneously measured with a six-component balance.

  7. Large eddy breakup devices as low Reynolds number airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, John B.

    1986-01-01

    Turbulent drag reduction downstream of large-eddy breakup (LEBU) devices is analyzed from the viewpoint of low-Reynolds number airfoil aerodynamics. It is argued that the variability of results between different research labs is primarily due to low Reynolds number 'phenomena' associated with unsteady separation/transition of the LEBU device boundary layer. LEBU drag reduction is shown to be an extremely sensitive function of device microgeometry at the low Reynolds numbers of all current investigations, and by analogy with conventional low-Reynolds number airfoil testing, the conclusion is drawn that the full potential for LEBU drag reduction must be explored at chord Reynolds numbers of 300,000 and above.

  8. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing & transport

    SciTech Connect

    Warhaft, Z.

    1996-12-31

    An overview of recent experiments, in which the author generated high Reynolds number homogeneous grid turbulence, is provided. The author shows that in a small wind tunnel, Reynolds numbers that are sufficiently high (R{sub {lambda}} {approximately} 800, R{sub {ell}} {approximately} 36, 000) such that many of the aspects of turbulence that hitherto have only been observed in large scale anisotropic shear flows, are obtained. In particular the author studied the evolution of the spectrum with Reynolds number, the Kolmogorov constant and the internal intermittency, showing the way they tend to their high Reynolds number asymptotes. Thus the author links previous low Reynolds number laboratory experiments with large scale environmental measurements.

  9. Reynolds Number Effects on the Performance of Lateral Control Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number on the performance of outboard spoilers and ailerons was investigated on a generic subsonic transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility over a chord Reynolds number range 41 from 3x10(exp 6) to 30xl0(exp 6) and a Mach number range from 0.50 to 0.94, Spoiler deflection angles of 0, 10, 15, and 20 deg and aileron deflection angles of -10, 0, and 10 deg were tested. Aeroelastic effects were minimized by testing at constant normalized dynamic pressure conditions over intermediate Reynolds number ranges. Results indicated that the increment in rolling moment due to spoiler deflection generally becomes more negative as the Reynolds number increases from 3x10(exp 6) to 22x10(exp 6) with only small changes between Reynolds numbers of 22x10(exp 6) and 30x10(exp 6). The change in the increment in rolling moment coefficient with Reynolds number for the aileron deflected configuration is generally small with a general trend of increasing magnitude with increasing Reynolds number.

  10. Mixing length in low Reynolds number compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Holley, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of low Reynolds number in high-speed turbulent boundary layers on variations of mixing length. Boundary layers downstream of natural transition on plates, cones and cylinders, and boundary layers on nozzle walls without laminarization-retransition are considered. The problem of whether low Reynolds number amplification of shear stress is a result of transitional flow structure is considered. It is concluded that a knowledge of low Reynolds number boundary layer transition may be relevant to the design of high-speed vehicles.

  11. Numerical study of rowing hydrofoil performance at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.-H.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, the hydrodynamic performance of a 2-D flat-plate hydrofoil in rowing motion is numerically studied by a Cartesian grid method with the cut-cell approach. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to save on the number of mesh cells without harming spatial resolution in critical regions. The rowing kinematics of the hydrofoil is the same for all simulations in this work. The design parameters studied are the reduced frequency of the rowing motion, the heave amplitude, and the time lags of the feathered-to-broadside rotation and the broadside-to-feathered rotation. Results show that larger thrust and efficiency can be attained if the feathered-to-broadside rotation is started right after the beginning of the power stroke and the broadside-to-feathered rotation is finished right before the end of the power stroke. Finally, both the thrust and the efficiency increase with Reynolds number.

  12. Generalized reynolds number for non-newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madlener, K.; Frey, B.; Ciezki, H. K.

    2009-09-01

    An extended version of the generalized Reynolds number was derived to characterize the duct flow of non-Newtonian gelled fluids of the Herschel-Bulkley-Extended (HBE) type. This number allows also estimating the transition from laminar to turbulent flow conditions. An experimental investigation was conducted with a capillary rheometer for several non-Newtonian gelled fluids to evaluate the introduced HBE-generalized Reynolds number Regen HBE. A good correlation between the experimental results and the theory could be found for laminar flow conditions. For one of the examined gelled fuels, the necessary high Reynolds numbers could be realized so that the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow regime could be measured. Because of its general description, the HBE-generalized Reynolds number can also be applied to Newtonian liquids as well as to non-Newtonian fluids of the Herschel-Bulkley (HB), Ostwald-de-Waele (power-law, PL), and Bingham type.

  13. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. N.; Owens, L. R.; Rivers, S. M. B.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and the high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at low speed high-lift and transonic conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on both the Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.90 for a configuration without an empennage.

  14. The Influence of Realistic Reynolds Numbers on Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system has been computed using a computational fluid dynamics code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. Varying the Reynolds number from 1.71 to 12.0 million based on the stowed chord resulted in slight changes in the radiated noise. Tonal features in the spectra were robust and evident for all Reynolds numbers and even when a spanwise flow was imposed. The general trends observed in near-field fluctuations were also similar for all the different Reynolds numbers. Experiments on simplified, subscale high-lift systems have exhibited noticeable dependencies on the Reynolds number and tripping, although primarily for tonal features rather than the broadband portion of the spectra. Either the 30P/30N model behaves differently, or the computational model is unable to capture these effects. Hence, the results underscore the need for more detailed measurements of the slat cove flow.

  15. High Reynolds Number and Turbulence Effects on Turbine Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; vanFossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1994-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.0 x 10(exp 6) and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15%. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range or Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine turbopump turbines. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can generally be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparisons of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  16. Energy transfer in isotropic turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaradzki, J. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of energy transfer among the scales of motion in incompressible turbulent fields at low Reynolds numbers generated by direct numerical simulation. It was observed that although the transfer resulted from triad interactions that were non-local in k space, the energy always transferred locally. The results are consistent with the notion of non-uniform advection of small weak eddies by larger and stronger ones, similar to transfer processes in the far dissipation range at high Reynolds numbers.

  17. Reynolds and froude number effect on the flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bonguk; Yang, Jianming; Yeon, Seong Mo; Stern, Frederick

    2014-09-01

    The two-phase turbulent flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder is studied using a high-fidelity orthogonal curvilinear grid solver with a Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model for large-eddy simulation and a coupled level set and volume of fluid method for air-water interface tracking. The simulations cover the sub-critical and critical and post critical regimes of the Reynolds and sub and super-critical Froude numbers in order to investigate the effect of both dimensionless parameters on the flow. Significant changes in flow features near the air-water interface were observed as the Reynolds number was increased from the sub-critical to the critical regime. The interface makes the separation point near the interface much delayed for all Reynolds numbers. The separation region at intermediate depths is remarkably reduced for the critical Reynolds number regime. The deep flow resembles the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder, but includes the effect of the free-surface and the limited span length for sub-critical Reynolds numbers. At different Froude numbers, the air-water interface exhibits significantly changed structures, including breaking bow waves with splashes and bubbles at high Froude numbers. Instantaneous and mean flow features such as interface structures, vortex shedding, Reynolds stresses, and vorticity transport are also analyzed. The results are compared with reference experimental data available in the literature. The deep flow is also compared with the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder in the similar ranges of Reynolds numbers. Discussion is provided concerning the limitations of the current simulations and available experimental data along with future research

  18. The cryogenic wind tunnel concept for high Reynolds number testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Goodyer, M. J.; Adcock, J. B.; Davenport, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical considerations indicate that cooling the wind-tunnel test gas to cryogenic temperatures will provide a large increase in Reynolds number with no increase in dynamic pressure while reducing the tunnel drive-power requirements. Studies were made to determine the expected variations of Reynolds number and other parameters over wide ranges of Mach number, pressure, and temperature, with due regard to avoiding liquefaction. Practical operational procedures were developed in a low-speed cryogenic tunnel. Aerodynamic experiments in the facility demonstrated the theoretically predicted variations in Reynolds number and drive power. The continuous-flow-fan-driven tunnel is shown to be particularly well suited to take full advantage of operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Inertial range ESS scaling deteriorates with increasing Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Sinhuber, Michael; Bewley, Gregory; Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We examined the scaling of velocity structure functions in turbulence generated by a classical biplanar grid of crossed bars in the Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel in Göttingen. The flow had neither a mean shear nor strong anisotropy. Despite this, the structure functions did not exhibit power-law scaling unless Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) was employed. The ESS exponents were remarkably stable at Taylor Reynolds numbers between 100 and 1600. That is, at higher Reynolds numbers than in any other comparable flow. However, the extent to which ESS applied at small scales deteriorated as the Reynolds number increased. The experiments were performed in pressurized sulfur hexafluoride gas at pressures between 1 and 15 bar. The data were acquired with both classical hot wires, and with the NSTAP anemometers developed at Princeton.

  20. Simplified dragonfly airfoil aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers below 8000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2009-07-01

    Effective aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers lower than 10 000 is of great technological interest and a fundamental scientific challenge. The current study covers a Reynolds number range of 2000-8000. At these Reynolds numbers, natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development. Insect wings are commonly characterized by corrugated airfoils. In particular, the airfoil of the dragonfly, which is able to glide, can be used for two-dimensional aerodynamic study of fixed rigid wings. In this study, a simplified dragonfly airfoil is numerically analyzed in a steady free-stream flow. The aerodynamic performance (such as mean and fluctuating lift and drag), are first compared to a "traditional" low Reynolds number airfoil: the Eppler-E61. The numerical results demonstrate superior performances of the corrugated airfoil. A series of low-speed wind and water tunnel experiments were performed on the corrugated airfoil, to validate the numerical results. The findings indicate quantitative agreement with the mean wake velocity profiles and shedding frequencies while validating the two dimensionality of the flow. A flow physics numerical study was performed in order to understand the underlying mechanism of corrugated airfoils at these Reynolds numbers. Airfoil shapes based on the flow field characteristics of the corrugated airfoil were built and analyzed. Their performances were compared to those of the corrugated airfoil, stressing the advantages of the latter. It was found that the flow which separates from the corrugations and forms spanwise vortices intermittently reattaches to the aft-upper arc region of the airfoil. This mechanism is responsible for the relatively low intensity of the vortices in the airfoil wake, reducing the drag and increasing the flight performances of this kind of corrugated airfoil as compared to traditional low Reynolds number airfoils such as the Eppler E-61.

  1. Grid sensitivity in low Reynolds number hypersonic continuum flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, W.H. ); Hoffmann, K.A. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    A computational scheme is presented to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations over a blunt body at high altitude, high Mach number atmospheric reentry flow conditions. This continuum approach is directed to low Reynolds/low density hypersonic flows by accounting for non-zero bulk viscosity effects in near frozen flow conditions. A significant difference from previous studies is the inclusion of the capability to model non-zero bulk viscosity effects. The grid definition for these low Reynolds number, viscous dominated flow fields is especially important in terms of numerical stability and accurate heat transfer solutions. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Numerical solution of compressible viscous flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical method which was used to reduce the computation time required in fluid dynamics to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described. The method is the implicit analogue of the explicit finite different method. It uses this as its first stage, while the second stage removes the restrictive stability condition by recasting the difference equations in an implicit form. The resulting matrix equations to be solved are either upper or lower block bidiagonal equations. The new method makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.

  3. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  4. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  5. Vegetation-Induced Roughness in Low-Reynold's Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C. D.; Wynn, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Wetlands are important ecosystems, providing habitat for wildlife and fish and shellfish production, water storage, erosion control, and water quality improvement and preservation. Models to estimate hydraulic resistance due to vegetation in emergent wetlands are crucial to good wetland design and analysis. The goal of this project is to improve modeling of emergent wetlands by linking properties of the vegetation to flow. Existing resistance equations such as Hoffmann (2004), Kadlec (1990), Moghadam and Kouwen (1997), Nepf (1999), and Stone and Shen (2002) were evaluated. A large outdoor vegetated flume was constructed at the Price's Fork Research Center near Blacksburg, Virginia to measure flow and water surface slope through woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus), a common native emergent wetland plant. Measurements of clump and stem density, diameter, and volume, blockage factor, and stiffness were made after each set of flume runs. Flow rates through the flume were low (3-4 L/s) resulting in very low stem-Reynold's numbers (15-102). Since experimental flow conditions were in the laminar to transitional range, most of the models considered did not predict velocity or stage accurately except for conditions in which the stem-Reynold's number approached 100. At low stem-Reynold's numbers (<100), the drag coefficient is inversely proportional to the Reynold's number and can vary greatly with flow conditions. Most of the models considered assumed a stem-Reynold's number in the 100-105 range in which the drag coefficient is relatively constant and as a result did not predict velocity or stage accurately except for conditions in which the stem-Reynold's number approached 100. The only model that accurately predicted stem layer velocity was the Kadlec (1990) model since it does not make assumptions about flow regime; instead, the parameters are adjusted according to the site conditions. Future work includes relating the parameters used to fit the Kadlec (1990) model to measured

  6. Analysis of Reynolds number scaling for viscous vortex reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin; Hussain, Fazle; Wang, Jianchun; Chen, Shiyi

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical analysis of viscous vortex reconnection is developed based on scale separation, and the Reynolds number, Re (= circulation/viscosity), scaling for the reconnection time Trec is derived. The scaling varies continuously as Re increases from T_{rec} ˜ {mathopRenolimits} ^{ - 1} to T_{rec} ˜ {mathopRenolimits} ^{ - 1/2}. This theoretical prediction agrees well with direct numerical simulations by Garten et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 426, 1 (2001)], 10.1017/S0022112000002251 and Hussain and Duraisamy [Phys. Fluids 23, 021701 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3532039. Moreover, our analysis yields two Re's, namely, a characteristic Re {mathopRenolimits} _{0.75} in left[ {Oleft({10^2 } right),Oleft({10^3 } right)} right] for the T_{rec} ˜ {mathopRenolimits} ^{ - 0.75} scaling given by Hussain and Duraisamy and the critical Re {mathopRenolimits} _c ˜ Oleft({10^4 } right) for the transition after which the first reconnection is completed. For {mathopRenolimits} > {mathopRenolimits} _c, a quiescent state follows, and then, a second reconnection may occur.

  7. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  8. The Sensitivity Analysis for the Flow Past Obstacles Problem with Respect to the Reynolds Number

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazufumi; Li, Zhilin; Qiao, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, numerical sensitivity analysis with respect to the Reynolds number for the flow past obstacle problem is presented. To carry out such analysis, at each time step, we need to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on irregular domains twice, one for the primary variables; the other is for the sensitivity variables with homogeneous boundary conditions. The Navier-Stokes solver is the augmented immersed interface method for Navier-Stokes equations on irregular domains. One of the most important contribution of this paper is that our analysis can predict the critical Reynolds number at which the vortex shading begins to develop in the wake of the obstacle. Some interesting experiments are shown to illustrate how the critical Reynolds number varies with different geometric settings. PMID:24910780

  9. Aerodynamics and design for ultra-low Reynolds number flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Peter Josef

    Growing interest in micro-air-vehicles has created the need for improved understanding of the relevant aerodynamics. A reasonable starting point is the study of airfoil aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers below 10,000, here termed ultra-low Reynolds numbers. The effects of airfoil geometry on performance are explored using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. Variations in thickness, camber, and the shape of leading and trailing edges are studied. Results indicate an increase in maximum lift coefficient with decreasing Reynolds number, but the lift to drag ratio continues to decrease, making the power required for flight a more restrictive consideration than lift. This performance penalty can be mitigated by careful airfoil design. Contrary to the notion that viscous fairing reduces airfoil geometry effectiveness, the computational results indicate that geometry still has a profound effect on performance at ultra-low Reynolds numbers. To further explore this design space, the flow solver has been coupled with an optimizer, resulting in the first airfoils quantitatively designed for this flow regime and demonstrating that unconventional camberlines can offer significant performance gains. Building on these results, tools are developed for ultra-low Reynolds number rotors combining enhanced classical rotor theory with airfoil data from Navier-Stokes calculations. This performance prediction method is coupled with optimization for both design and analysis. Performance predictions from these tools are compared with three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses and experimental data for several micro-rotor designs. Comparisons among the analyses and experimental data show reasonable agreement both in the global thrust and power, but the spanwise distributions of these quantities exhibit deviations, partially attributable to three-dimensional and rotational effects that effectively modify airfoil section performance. While these issues may limit the applicability of blade

  10. Wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit

    Measurements are reported that give new insight into the behavior of turbulent wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number. Turbulent pipe and boundary layer flows are examined experimentally over a wide range of Reynolds numbers -- up to Retau=100,000 (Re D=6x106) in pipe flow, and up to Re tau=73,000 (ReD=235x103) in a flat plate zero pressure gradient boundary layer. A Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed for very high spatial and temporal resolution measurements. Sensors with wire lengths 30 and 60 mum were fabricated, tested and validated in known flows, and then used to obtain single-point measurements at high Reynolds numbers in pipe and boundary layers. The mean velocity data together with data from previous studies and extensive error analysis showed that the von Karman's constant in the log-law is kappa=0.40+/-0.02. It was shown that the streamwise Reynolds stress exhibits a logarithmic behavior in the inertial sublayer for Retau≥20,000, in both pipes and boundary layers. Variances as well as higher order even moments were compared for pipes and boundary layers and it was shown that all even moments have a logarithmic behavior in the inertial sublayer, suggesting a true scale separation. Streamwise turbulent spectra showed a clear k --5/3 region for up to two decades in wavenumber. No k--1 region was found to be present in any of the cases in the pipe or the boundary layer. The location of the outer spectral peak, associated with very large scale motions, was found to have only a weak dependence on Reynolds number. The loci of these peak occur at the same wall-normal distance where the streamwise stresses establish a logarithmic behavior and where the amplitude modulation coefficient has a zero value. This suggests that with Reynolds number increasing to infinity most of the energy is contained within a diminishing wall-layer in physical coordinates.

  11. High Reynolds number effects on a localized stratified turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report large-eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent flow behind a sphere of diameter D translating at speed U in a linearly stratified Boussinesq fluid with buoyancy frequency N. These simulations are performed using a spectral-multidomain-penalty incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, at Reynolds numbers Re ≡ UD / ν ∈ { 5 ×103 , 105 , 4 ×105 } and Froude numbers Fr ≡ 2 U / (ND) ∈ { 4 , 16 , 64 } . An increasingly richer turbulent fine-structure is observed within the larger-scale quasi-horizontal vortices at later times. Turbulent transport of momentum is examined during the non-equilibrium (NEQ) regime of the turbulent life cycle, with an emphasis on the vertical transport that occurs after the establishment of local buoyancy control. The turbulent viscosities in both horizontal and vertical directions are estimated through the LES data; possible parameterization of the vertical turbulent viscosity with the buoyancy Reynolds number Reb = ɛ / (νN2) (or its easy-to-obtain surrogates) is discussed. The dynamical role of the buoyancy Reynolds number in choosing the vertical turbulence length scales is also investigated. ONR grant N00014-13-1-0665 (managed by Dr. R. Joslin); HPCMP Frontier Project FP-CFD-FY14-007 (P.I.: Dr. S. de Bruyn Kops).

  12. Low Reynolds Number Nozzle Flow Study. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Margaret V.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzle flow was performed. A brief comparison was made between some of the experimental performance data and performance predicted by a viscous flow code. The performance of 15, 20, and 25 deg conical nozzles, bell nozzles, and trumpet nozzles was evaluated with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The numerical analysis was applied to the conical nozzles only, using an existing viscous flow code that was based on a slender-channel approximation. Although the trumpet and 25 deg conical nozzles had slightly better performance at lower Reynolds numbers, it is unclear which nozzle is superior as all fell within the experimental error band. The numerical rssults were found to agree with experimental results for nitrogen and for some of the hydrogen data. Some code modification is recommended to improve confidence in the performance prediction.

  13. Performance measurements of an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, Robert J.; Walker, Betty S.

    1989-01-01

    Performance characteristics of an Eppler 387 airfoil using both direct (force) and indirect (pressure) measurement techniques have been obtained at Reynolds numbers from 60,000 to 460,000 in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment data were obtained from two internally-mounted strain-gage balances specifically designed for small aerodynamic loads. Comparisons of these results with data from a pressure model of an Eppler 387 airfoil are included. Drag data for both models using the wake traverse method are compared with the balance data. Oil flow visualization and surface mounted hot-film sensors were used to determine laminar-separation and turbulent-reattachment locations. Problems associated with obtaining accurate wind-tunnel data at low Reynolds numbers are discussed.

  14. Turbulence Model Selection for Low Reynolds Number Flows

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One of the major flow phenomena associated with low Reynolds number flow is the formation of separation bubbles on an airfoil’s surface. NACA4415 airfoil is commonly used in wind turbines and UAV applications. The stall characteristics are gradual compared to thin airfoils. The primary criterion set for this work is the capture of laminar separation bubble. Flow is simulated for a Reynolds number of 120,000. The numerical analysis carried out shows the advantages and disadvantages of a few turbulence models. The turbulence models tested were: one equation Spallart Allmars (S-A), two equation SST K-ω, three equation Intermittency (γ) SST, k-kl-ω and finally, the four equation transition γ-Reθ SST. However, the variation in flow physics differs between these turbulence models. Procedure to establish the accuracy of the simulation, in accord with previous experimental results, has been discussed in detail. PMID:27104354

  15. Subsonic Reynolds Number Effects on a Diamond Wing Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Ghee, T. A.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced diamond-wing configuration was tested at low speeds in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in air at chord Reynolds numbers from 4.4 million (typical wind-tunnel conditions) to 24 million (nominal flight value). Extensive variations on high-lift rigging were explored as part of a broad multinational program. The analysis for this study is focused on the cruise and landing settings of the wing high-lift systems. Three flow domains were identified from the data and provide a context for the ensuing data analysis. Reynolds number effects were examined in incremental form based upon attached-flow theory. A similar approach showed very little effect of low-speed compressibility.

  16. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  17. The Variation of Slat Noise with Mach and Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P30N high-lift system has been computed using a computational fluid dynamics code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. By varying the Mach number from 0.13 to 0.25, the noise was found to vary roughly with the 5th power of the speed. Slight changes in the behavior with directivity angle could easily account for the different speed dependencies reported in the literature. Varying the Reynolds number from 1.4 to 2.4 million resulted in almost no differences, and primarily served to demonstrate the repeatability of the results. However, changing the underlying hybrid Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes/Large-Eddy-Simulation turbulence model significantly altered the mean flow because of changes in the flap separation. However, the general trends observed in both the acoustics and near-field fluctuations were similar for both models.

  18. Numerical simulations of undulatory swimming at moderate Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Jeff D

    2006-12-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the swimming of a three-linkage articulated system in a moderately viscous regime. The computational methodology focuses on the creation, diffusion and transport of vorticity from the surface of the bodies into the fluid. The simulations are dynamically coupled, in that the motion of the three-linkage swimmer is computed simultaneously with the dynamics of the fluid. The novel coupling scheme presented in this work is the first to exploit the relationship between vorticity creation and body dynamics. The locomotion of the system, when subject to undulatory inputs of the hinges, is computed at Reynolds numbers of 200 and 1000. It is found that the forward swimming speed increases with the Reynolds number, and that in both cases the swimming is slower than in an inviscid medium. The vortex shedding is examined, and found to exhibit behavior consistent with experimental flow visualizations of fish. PMID:17671314

  19. Turbulence Model Selection for Low Reynolds Number Flows.

    PubMed

    Aftab, S M A; Mohd Rafie, A S; Razak, N A; Ahmad, K A

    2016-01-01

    One of the major flow phenomena associated with low Reynolds number flow is the formation of separation bubbles on an airfoil's surface. NACA4415 airfoil is commonly used in wind turbines and UAV applications. The stall characteristics are gradual compared to thin airfoils. The primary criterion set for this work is the capture of laminar separation bubble. Flow is simulated for a Reynolds number of 120,000. The numerical analysis carried out shows the advantages and disadvantages of a few turbulence models. The turbulence models tested were: one equation Spallart Allmars (S-A), two equation SST K-ω, three equation Intermittency (γ) SST, k-kl-ω and finally, the four equation transition γ-Reθ SST. However, the variation in flow physics differs between these turbulence models. Procedure to establish the accuracy of the simulation, in accord with previous experimental results, has been discussed in detail. PMID:27104354

  20. Identifying a Superfluid Reynolds Number via Dynamical Similarity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, M T; Billam, T P; Anderson, B P; Bradley, A S

    2015-04-17

    The Reynolds number provides a characterization of the transition to turbulent flow, with wide application in classical fluid dynamics. Identifying such a parameter in superfluid systems is challenging due to their fundamentally inviscid nature. Performing a systematic study of superfluid cylinder wakes in two dimensions, we observe dynamical similarity of the frequency of vortex shedding by a cylindrical obstacle. The universality of the turbulent wake dynamics is revealed by expressing shedding frequencies in terms of an appropriately defined superfluid Reynolds number, Re(s), that accounts for the breakdown of superfluid flow through quantum vortex shedding. For large obstacles, the dimensionless shedding frequency exhibits a universal form that is well-fitted by a classical empirical relation. In this regime the transition to turbulence occurs at Re(s)≈0.7, irrespective of obstacle width. PMID:25933320

  1. Study of the motions contributing to the Reynolds stress in high and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshana, P. J. A.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Physical experiments are used to explore the properties of the motions contributing to the Reynolds stresses in high and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. The low Reynolds number smooth wall measurements (Rθ=1010, Rθ=2870, and Rθ=4850) were acquired in a large-scale low speed wind tunnel, while the high Reynolds number measurements [Rθ˜O(106)] were acquired at the Surface Layer Turbulence and Environmental Science Test site, Dugway, Utah. These high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer data were acquired over nearly hydraulically smooth and rough walls. At each Reynolds number and surface roughness, data comparisons were made at approximately yp/2 and 2yp, where yp is the peak position of the Reynolds shear stress. Scale separation effects associated with increasing Rθ are analyzed via spectral measurements (u, v, and u-v cospectra), and by segregating the streamwise and wall-normal velocities according to their frequency content using simultaneous high- and low-pass filtering. A primary observation is that the predominant motions underlying the stress undergo a significant shift from large to intermediate scales as Rθ becomes large, irrespective of surface roughness. Quadrant analysis of the filtered signals is employed to clarify the correlated scales involved in the generation of the stress. Overall, it is apparent that the types of motions contributing to Reynolds stress undergo significant variations at comparable wall-normal locations (relative to yp) over the Reynolds number range explored.

  2. Lagrangian coherent structures in low Reynolds number swimming.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan M; Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O; Eldredge, Jeff D

    2009-05-20

    This work explores the utility of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for revealing flow structures in low Reynolds number biological locomotion. Previous studies of high Reynolds number unsteady flows have demonstrated that ridges of the FTLE field coincide with transport barriers within the flow, which are not shown by a more classical quantity such as vorticity. In low Reynolds number locomotion (O(1)-O(100)), in which viscous diffusion rapidly smears the vorticity in the wake, the FTLE field has the potential to add new insight to locomotion mechanics. The target of study is an articulated two-dimensional model for jellyfish-like locomotion, with swimming Reynolds number of order 1. The self-propulsion of the model is numerically simulated with a viscous vortex particle method, using kinematics adapted from previous experimental measurements on a live medusan swimmer. The roles of the ridges of the computed forward- and backward-time FTLE fields are clarified by tracking clusters of particles both backward and forward in time. It is shown that a series of ridges in front of the jellyfish in the forward-time FTLE field transport slender fingers of fluid toward the lip of the bell orifice, which are pulled once per contraction cycle into the wake of the jellyfish, where the fluid remains partitioned. A strong ridge in the backward-time FTLE field reveals a persistent barrier between fluid inside and outside the subumbrellar cavity. The system is also analyzed in a body-fixed frame subject to a steady free stream, and the FTLE field is used to highlight differences in these frames of reference. PMID:21825514

  3. Lagrangian coherent structures in low Reynolds number swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Megan M.; Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2009-05-01

    This work explores the utility of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for revealing flow structures in low Reynolds number biological locomotion. Previous studies of high Reynolds number unsteady flows have demonstrated that ridges of the FTLE field coincide with transport barriers within the flow, which are not shown by a more classical quantity such as vorticity. In low Reynolds number locomotion (O(1)-O(100)), in which viscous diffusion rapidly smears the vorticity in the wake, the FTLE field has the potential to add new insight to locomotion mechanics. The target of study is an articulated two-dimensional model for jellyfish-like locomotion, with swimming Reynolds number of order 1. The self-propulsion of the model is numerically simulated with a viscous vortex particle method, using kinematics adapted from previous experimental measurements on a live medusan swimmer. The roles of the ridges of the computed forward- and backward-time FTLE fields are clarified by tracking clusters of particles both backward and forward in time. It is shown that a series of ridges in front of the jellyfish in the forward-time FTLE field transport slender fingers of fluid toward the lip of the bell orifice, which are pulled once per contraction cycle into the wake of the jellyfish, where the fluid remains partitioned. A strong ridge in the backward-time FTLE field reveals a persistent barrier between fluid inside and outside the subumbrellar cavity. The system is also analyzed in a body-fixed frame subject to a steady free stream, and the FTLE field is used to highlight differences in these frames of reference.

  4. High Reynolds Number Transition Experiments in ETW (TELFONA project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, J.; Archambaud, J.-P.; Schrauf, G.; Donelli, R. S.; Hanifi, A.; Quest, J.; Hein, S.; Streit, T.; Fey, U.; Egami, Y.

    A wind-tunnel experiment on laminar-turbulent transition has been performed in ETW (the European Transonic Wind Tunnel in Koln) at high Reynolds number and cryogenic conditions. The studied geometry is a sting mounted full model in swept-wing configuration. The transition location was determined by means of Temperature Sensitive Paint (CryoTSP). The experimental observations were further analysed using different transition prediction tools, based on linear stability theory.

  5. Aerodynamic Performances of Corrugated Dragonfly Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Masatoshi; He, Guowei; Hu, Hui

    2006-11-01

    The cross-sections of dragonfly wings have well-defined corrugated configurations, which seem to be not very suitable for flight according to traditional airfoil design principles. However, previous studies have led to surprising conclusions of that corrugated dragonfly wings would have better aerodynamic performances compared with traditional technical airfoils in the low Reynolds number regime where dragonflies usually fly. Unlike most of the previous studies of either measuring total aerodynamics forces (lift and drag) or conducting qualitative flow visualization, a series of wind tunnel experiments will be conducted in the present study to investigate the aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings at low Reynolds numbers quantitatively. In addition to aerodynamics force measurements, detailed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements will be conducted to quantify of the flow field around a two-dimensional corrugated dragonfly wing model to elucidate the fundamental physics associated with the flight features and aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings. The aerodynamic performances of the dragonfly wing model will be compared with those of a simple flat plate and a NASA low-speed airfoil at low Reynolds numbers.

  6. Reynolds number effects on mixing due to topological chaos.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spencer A; Warrier, Sangeeta

    2016-03-01

    Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. To help clarify this dependency, we numerically simulate the effects of a batch stirring device on a 2D incompressible Newtonian fluid in the laminar regime. In particular, we calculate the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for three different stirring protocols, one topologically complex (pseudo-Anosov) and two simple (finite-order), over a range of viscosities. After extracting appropriate measures indicative of both the amount of mixing and the area of effective mixing from the FTLE field, we see a clearly defined Reynolds number range in which the relative efficacy of the pseudo-Anosov protocol over the finite-order protocols justifies the application of topological chaos. More unexpectedly, we see that while the measures of effective mixing area increase with increasing Reynolds number for the finite-order protocols, they actually exhibit non-monotonic behavior for the pseudo-Anosov protocol. PMID:27036184

  7. Boundary layer Reynolds stress composition at high and low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage; Klewicki, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    Properties of the motions contributing to the Reynolds stresses (-\\overlineuv) in high and low Reynolds number (R_θ) turbulent boundary layers are studied through physical experiments. The low R_θ measurements (R_θ = 2870) were acquired in a laboratory wind tunnel, while the high R_θ data (R_θ ≃ 5 × 10^6) were acquired at the SLTEST site, Utah. At each R_θ, comparisons are made at yp / 2 and 2y_p, where yp is the peak position of -\\overlineuv. Scale separation effects associated with increasing R_θ are analyzed via spectra, and by using high and low-pass filtering. The predominant motions underlying the stress undergo a significant shift from large to intermediate scales as R_θ becomes large. Specifically, the peak in the u-v cospectrum is close to the peak in the u power spectrum at low R_θ but shifts to near the peak in the v power spectrum at high R_θ. The low R_θ fractional quadrant -\\overlineuv contributions agree well with published results. High R_θ effects are observed in the fractional contributions through an increase in their magnitudes in each quadrant. Near the wall, an increase in outward interactions is observed at high R_θ. Overall, the contributions to -\\overlineuv are shown to undergo significant variations at comparable wall normal locations (relative to y_p) at the two Reynolds numbers. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, grant monitor R. Joslin.

  8. On the modeling of low-Reynolds-number turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Yoo, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    A full Reynolds-stress closure that is capable of describing the flow all the way to the wall was formulated for turbulent flow through circular pipe. Since viscosity does not appear explicitly in the pressure redistribution terms, conventional high-number models for these terms are found to be applicable. However, the models for turbulent diffusion and viscous dissipation have to be modified to account for viscous diffusion near a wall. Two redistribution and two diffusion models are investigated for their effects on the model calculations. Wall correction to pressure redistribution modeling is also examined. Diffusion effects on calculated turbulent properties are further investigated by simplifying the transport equations to algebraic equations for Reynolds stress. Two approximations are explored. These are the equilibrium and nonequilibrium turbulence assumptions. Finally, the two-equation closure is also used to calculate the flow in question and the results compared with all the other model calculations. Fully developed pipe flows at two moderate Reynolds numbers are used to validate these model calculations.

  9. High Reynolds Number Configuration Development of a High-Lift Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valarezo, Walter O.; Dominik, Chet J.; Mcghee, Robert J.; Goodman, Wesley L.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to assess performance of a transport multielement airfoil at flight Reynolds numbers. The studies were performed at chord Reynolds numbers as high as 16 million in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Sidewall boundary-layer control to enforce flow two dimensionality was provided via an endplate suction system. The basic airfoil was an 11.55 percent thick supercritical airfoil representative of the stall critical station of a new-generation transport aircraft wing. The multielement airfoil was configured as a three-element airfoil with slat and flap chord ratios of 14.48 percent and 30 percent respectively. Testing focused on the development of landing configurations with high maximum lift capability and the assessment of Reynolds and Mach number effects. Also assessed were high-lift performance effects due to devices such as drooped spoilers and trailing-edge wedges. The present experimental studies revealed significant effects on high-lift airfoil performance due to Reynolds and Mach number variations and favorable lift increments at approach angles of attack due to the use of drooped spoilers or trailing-edge wedges. However, no substantial improvements in maximum lift capability were identified. A recently developed high performance single-segment flap was also tested and results indicated considerable improvements in lift and drag performance over existing airfoils. Additionally, it was found that this new flap shape at its optimum rigging was less sensitive to Reynolds number variations than previous designs.

  10. Reynolds number influence on statistical behaviors of turbulence in a circular free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, J.; Xu, M.; Zhou, T.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper examines the effect of Reynolds number on turbulence properties in the transition region of a circular jet issuing from a smoothly contracting nozzle. Hot-wire measurements were performed for this investigation through varying the jet-exit Reynolds number Red (≡ Ujd/ν, where Uj, d, and ν are the jet-exit mean velocity, nozzle diameter, and kinematic viscosity) approximately from Red ≈ 4 × 103 to Red ≈ 2 × 104. Results reveal that the rates of the mean flow decay and spread vary with Reynolds number for Red < 104 and tend to become Reynolds-number independent at Red ≥ 104. Even more importantly, the small-scale turbulence properties, e.g., the mean rate of dissipation of kinetic energy (ɛ), the Kolmogorov and Taylor microscales, are found to vary in different forms over the Red ranges of Red > 104 and Red < 104. Namely, the critical Reynolds number appears to occur at Red,cr ≈ 104 across which the jet turbulence behaves distinctly. Two turbulence regimes are therefore identified: (i) developing or partially developed turbulence at Red < Red,cr and (ii) fully developed turbulence at Red ≥ Red,cr. It is suggested that the energy dissipation rate (DR) can be expressed as \\varepsilon ˜ ν U_c^2 /R^2 in regime (i) and \\varepsilon ˜ U_c^3 /R in regime (ii), where Uc and R are the centerline (or maximum) mean velocity and half-radius at which the mean velocity is 0.5Uc. In addition, the critical Reynolds number appears to vary from flow to flow.

  11. Inertial migration of spherical particles in circular Poiseuille flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xueming; Yu, Zhaosheng; Sun, Bo

    2008-10-01

    The inertial migration of spherical particles in a circular Poiseuille flow is numerically investigated for the tube Reynolds number up to 2200. The periodic boundary condition is imposed in the streamwise direction. The equilibrium positions, the migration velocity, and the angular velocity of a single particle in a tube cell are examined at different Reynolds numbers, particle-tube size ratios, and tube lengths. Inner equilibrium positions are observed as the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value, in qualitatively agreement with the previous experimental observations [J.-P. Matas, J. F. Morris, and E. Guazzelli, J. Fluid Mech. 515, 171 (2004)]. Our results indicate that the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles in different periodic cells have significant effects on the migration of the particles at the tube length being even as large as 6.7 particle diameters and they tend to stabilize the particles at the outer Segré-Silberberg equilibrium positions and to suppress the emergence of the inner equilibrium positions. A mirror-symmetric traveling-wave-like structure is observed when the particle Reynolds number is large enough. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices exists at both upstream and downstream of the particle but with different rotating directions. The fluids in the half of the pipe without the particle flow more slowly and most fluids in the other half with the particle move faster with respect to the parabolic profile. The intensity of the structure is influenced by the local particle Reynolds number, the particle motion, and the tube length. In addition, the migration of multiple particles in a periodic tube cell is examined. We attribute the disparity in the critical particle Reynolds number for the occurrence of the inner particle annulus for the experiments and our simulations to the effect of the tube length or the periodic boundary condition in our numerical model.

  12. Linearized pipe flow to Reynolds number 10 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Á.; Trefethen, L. N.

    2003-03-01

    A Fourier-Chebyshev Petrov-Galerkin spectral method is described for high-accuracy computation of linearized dynamics for flow in an infinite circular pipe. Our code is unusual in being based on solenoidal velocity variables and in being written in MATLAB. Systematic studies are presented of the dependence of eigenvalues, transient growth factors, and other quantities on the axial and azimuthal wave numbers and the Reynolds number R for R ranging from 10 2 to the idealized (physically unrealizable) value 10 7. Implications for transition to turbulence are considered in the light of recent theoretical results of S.J. Chapman.

  13. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  14. Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances.

    PubMed

    Bergthorson, Jeffrey M; Sone, Kazuo; Mattner, Trent W; Dimotakis, Paul E; Goodwin, David G; Meiron, Dan I

    2005-12-01

    An experimental and numerical study of impinging, incompressible, axisymmetric, laminar jets is described, where the jet axis of symmetry is aligned normal to the wall. Particle streak velocimetry (PSV) is used to measure axial velocities along the centerline of the flow field. The jet-nozzle pressure drop is measured simultaneously and determines the Bernoulli velocity. The flow field is simulated numerically by an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes spectral-element code, an axisymmetric potential-flow model, and an axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function approximation. The axisymmetric viscous and potential-flow simulations include the nozzle in the solution domain, allowing nozzle-wall proximity effects to be investigated. Scaling the centerline axial velocity by the Bernoulli velocity collapses the experimental velocity profiles onto a single curve that is independent of the nozzle-to-plate separation distance. Axisymmetric direct numerical simulations yield good agreement with experiment and confirm the velocity profile scaling. Potential-flow simulations reproduce the collapse of the data; however, viscous effects result in disagreement with experiment. Axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function simulations can predict the flow in the stagnation region if the boundary conditions are correctly specified. The scaled axial velocity profiles are well characterized by an error function with one Reynolds-number-dependent parameter. Rescaling the wall-normal distance by the boundary-layer displacement-thickness-corrected diameter yields a collapse of the data onto a single curve that is independent of the Reynolds number. These scalings allow the specification of an analytical expression for the velocity profile of an impinging laminar jet over the Reynolds number range investigated of . PMID:16486059

  15. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of spatially unstable waves in a high Reynolds number compressible laminar boundary layer is investigated by solution of the laminar two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations (solved to fourth-order accuracy) over a flat plate with a fluctuating disturbance generated at the inflow. A significant nonlinear distortion is produced, in qualitative agreement with experimental data. It is shown that increasing compressibility can significantly stabilize the flow over a flat plate, and that the mechanism of phase cancellation is a viable mechanism for the control of growing disturbances.

  16. Anisotropy of MHD Turbulence at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zikanov, O.; Vorobev, A.; Thess, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Knaepen, B.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in MHD flows are known to become dimensionally anisotropic under the action of a sufficiently strong magnetic field. We consider the technologically relevant case of low magnetic Reynolds number and apply the method of DNS of forced flow in a periodic box to generate velocity fields. The analysis based on different anisotropy characteristics shows that the dimensional anisotropy is virtually scale-independent. We also find that, except for the case of very strong magnetic field, the flow is componentally isotropic. Its kinetic energy is practically uniformly distributed among the velocity components.

  17. Grid-generated isotropic homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to an empirical formula for the longitudinal correlation function for grid-generated incompressible fluid turbulence at Reynolds numbers above 12,800. The formula, which relates the longitudinal correlation function to the inverse cube of a dimensionless geometrical ratio, is shown to minimize the global correlation integrals into which the two-point velocity correlation tensor has been substituted subject to a global constraint on the Sobolev concomitent of the longitudinal correlation function. Furthermore, the energy spectrum function associated with the empirical formula is shown to satisfy a tertiary Helmholtz-type linear condition throughout the initial period of decay.

  18. Implicit turbulence modeling for high reynolds number flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L. G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; Wyszogrodzki, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    We continue our investigation of the implicit turbulence modeling property of the nonoscillatory finite volume scheme MPDATA. We start by comparing MPDATA simulations of decaying turbulence in a triply periodic cube with analogous pseudospectral studies. In the regime of direct numerical simulation, MPDATA is shown to agree closely with the pseudospectral model. As viscosity is reduced, the two model results diverge. We study the MPDATA results in the inviscid limit, using a combination of mathematical analysis and computational experiment. We validate the inviscid MPDATA results as representing the turbulent flow in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  19. Resonance of flexible flapping wings at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Alexeev, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Using three-dimensional computer simulations, we examine hovering aerodynamics of flexible planar wings oscillating at resonance. We model flexible wings as tilted elastic plates whose sinusoidal plunging motion is imposed at the plate root. Our simulations reveal that large-amplitude resonance oscillations of elastic wings drastically enhance aerodynamic lift and efficiency of low-Reynolds-number plunging. Driven by a simple sinusoidal stroke, flexible wings at resonance generate a hovering force comparable to that of small insects that employ a very efficient but much more complicated stroke kinematics. Our results indicate the feasibility of using flexible wings driven by a simple harmonic stroke for designing efficient microscale flying machines.

  20. Axisymmetric bubble pinch-off at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Sevilla, A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, J; Martínez-Bazán, C

    2005-11-01

    Analytical considerations and potential-flow numerical simulations of the pinch-off of bubbles at high Reynolds numbers reveal that the bubble minimum radius, rn, decreases as tau proportional to r2n sqrt[1lnr2n], where tau is the time to break up, when the local shape of the bubble near the singularity is symmetric. However, if the gas convective terms in the momentum equation become of the order of those of the liquid, the bubble shape is no longer symmetric and the evolution of the neck changes to a rn proportional to tau1/3 power law. These findings are verified experimentally. PMID:16383983

  1. Local isotropy in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of experiments, which Dr. Srinivas Veeravalli and the present author started in 1991, to investigate the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods like large-eddy simulation. The importance of Kolmogorov's ideas arises from the fact that they create a foundation for turbulence theory.

  2. Reynolds number effects on supersonic asymmetrical flows over a cone at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The supersonic viscous flow over a 5-degree half-angle cone at an angle of attack of four times the cone half-angle is studied computationally using both the conical and the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical solutions were obtained with an implicit, upwind-biased algorithm. Asymmetrical flowfields of the absolute-instability type are found using the conical-flow equations which agree with published results. However, the absolute instabilities of the originally symmetric flow found with the conical equations do not occur in the three-dimensional simulations, although spurious asymmetric three-dimensional flows for symmetric bodies arise if the grid resolution is insufficient in the nose region. The asymmetric flows computed with the three-dimensional equations are convective instabilities and are possible if the local Reynolds number exceeds a critical value and a fixed geometric asymmetry is imposed. A continuous range of asymmetries can be developed, depending on the size of the disturbance and the Reynolds number. As the Reynolds number is increased, the asymmetries demonstrate a bistable behavior at levels of side force consistent with those predicted using the conical equations. Below a certain critical Reynolds number, any flow asymmetries arising from a geometrical asymmetry are damped with increasing distance downstream from the geometrical asymmetry.

  3. Unsteady aerodynamic models for agile flight at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunton, Steven L.

    This work develops low-order models for the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing in response to agile maneuvers at low Reynolds number. Model performance is assessed on the basis of accuracy across a range of parameters and frequencies as well as of computational efficiency and compatibility with existing control techniques and flight dynamic models. The result is a flexible modeling procedure that yields accurate, low-dimensional, state-space models. The modeling procedures are developed and tested on direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional flat plate airfoil in motion at low Reynolds number, Re=100, and in a wind tunnel experiment at the Illinois Institute of Technology involving a NACA 0006 airfoil pitching and plunging at Reynolds number Re=65,000. In both instances, low-order models are obtained that accurately capture the unsteady aerodynamic forces at all frequencies. These cases demonstrate the utility of the modeling procedure developed in this thesis for obtaining accurate models for different geometries and Reynolds numbers. Linear reduced-order models are constructed from either the indicial response (step response) or realistic input/output maneuvers using a flexible modeling procedure. The method is based on identifying stability derivatives and modeling the remaining dynamics with the eigensystem realization algorithm. A hierarchy of models is developed, based on linearizing the flow at various operating conditions. These models are shown to be accurate and efficient for plunging, pitching about various points, and combined pitch and plunge maneuvers, at various angle of attack and Reynolds number. Models are compared against the classical unsteady aerodynamic models of Wagner and Theodorsen over a large range of Strouhal number and reduced frequency for a baseline comparison. Additionally, state-space representations are developed for Wagner's and Theodorsen's models, making them compatible with modern control-system analysis. A number of

  4. Toward Immersed Boundary Simulation of High Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2003-01-01

    of high Reynolds number wall bounded flows is particularly challenging as it requires the consideration of thin turbulent boundary layers, i.e. near wall regions with large gradients of the flow field variables. For such flows, the representation of the wall boundary has a large impact on the accuracy of the computation. It is also critical for the robustness and convergence of the flow solver.

  5. Effect of Reynolds Number and Mach Number on flow angularity probe sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary calibrations were performed on nine flow angularity probes in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST) and the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). These probes will be used in surveying the test section flows of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The probes used in this study have a pyramid head with five pressure orifices. The calibrations consisted of both isolated probe measurements and rake-mounted multiprobe measurements that covered a range of subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.90 and Reynolds numbers per foot up to 40 X 10 to the 6th power. The preliminary calibration in the 7 x 10 HST included testing the probes both individually and in a rake. The 0.3-m TCT calibration tested two probes singly at varying Reynolds numbers. The results from these tests include Mach number, Reynolds number, and rake-mounting effects. The results of these tests showed probe sensitivity to be slightly affected by Mach number. At Reynolds numbers per foot above 10 x 10 to the 6th power, the probe did not exhibit a Reynolds number sensitivity.

  6. Fabrication and control of simple low Reynolds number microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    The development of miniaturized robotic swimmers is hindered by technical limitations in micro- and nanofabrication. To circumvent these limitations, we investigated the minimal geometrical requirements for swimming in low Reynolds number. Micro- and nanofabrication of complex shapes, such as helices, on a massive scale requires sophisticated state of the art technologies and has size limitations. In contrast, simple shaped structures, such as spherical particles, can be fabricated massively using chemical synthesis with relative ease. Here, simple microswimmers were fabricated using two microparticles with debris attached to their surface. The debris on the microswimmer's surface creates a geometry with two or more planes of symmetry, allowing the microswimmer to swim in bulk fluid at low Reynolds number. The microswimmers are magnetically actuated and controlled via a uniform rotating magnetic field generated by an approximate Helmholtz electromagnetic coil system. We characterized the microswimmer's velocity profile with respect to rotating frequency and analyzed the motion of the microswimmer using image processing. Finally, we demonstrated the controllability of the microswimmers by freely steering them in any desired directions.

  7. Passive scalars in turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzoli, Sergio; Bernardini, Matteo; Orlandi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    We study passive scalars in turbulent plane channels at computationally high Reynolds number, which allows to observe previously unnoticed effects. The mean scalar profiles are found to obey a generalized logarithmic law which includes a linear correction term in the whole lower half-channel, and they follow a universal parabolic defect profile in the core region. This is consistent with recent findings regarding the mean velocity profiles in channel flow. The scalar variances also exhibit a near universal parabolic distribution in the core flow, and hints of a sizeable log layer, unlike the velocity variances. The energy spectra highlight the formation of large scalar-bearing eddies spanning each half-channel, which are caused by production excess over dissipation, and which are clearly visible in the flow visualizations. Close correspondence of the velocity and scalar eddies is observed, the main difference being that the latter have more convoluted interfaces, which translates into higher scalar dissipation. Another notable Reynolds number effect is the decreased correlation of the scalar field with the vertical velocity field, which is traced to the reduced effectiveness of ejection events. We acknowledge that the results reported in this paper have been achieved using the PRACE Research Infrastructure resource FERMI based at CINECA, Casalecchio di Reno, Italy.

  8. Reynolds number effects on gill pumping mechanics in mayfly nymphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensenig, Andrew; Shultz, Jeffrey; Kiger, Ken

    2006-11-01

    Mayfly nymphs have an entirely aquatic life stage in which they frequently inhabit stagnant water. Nymphs have the capability to generate a ventilation current to compensate for the low oxygen level of the water by beating two linear arrays of plate-like gills that typically line the lateral edge of the abdomen. The characteristic Reynolds number associated with the gill motion changes with animal size, varying over a span of Re = 5 to 100 depending on age and species. The assumption that the system maintains optimal energetic efficiency leads to the prediction that animals transition from rowing to flapping mechanisms with increasing Re, while possibly utilizing a squeeze mechanism to a greater extent at lower Re. To investigate this hypothesis, we capture the motion of the gills through 3D imaging to investigate the effect of Reynolds number on the stroke patterns. PIV is utilized to assess flow rates and viscous dissipation. The effectiveness of the ventilation mechanism at each size has important consequences for the range of oxygen levels, and hence the habitat range, that can be tolerated by that size.

  9. Design of a High-Reynolds Number Recirculating Water Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Libin; Elbing, Brian

    2014-11-01

    An experimental fluid mechanics laboratory focused on turbulent boundary layers, drag reduction techniques, multiphase flows and fluid-structure interactions has recently been established at Oklahoma State University. This laboratory has three primary components; (1) a recirculating water tunnel, (2) a multiphase pipe flow loop, and (3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. The design of the water tunnel is the focus of this talk. The criteria used for the water tunnel design was that it had to produce a momentum-thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104, negligible flow acceleration due to boundary layer growth, maximize optical access for use of the flow visualization system, and minimize inlet flow non-uniformity. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university/commercial water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105) . These objectives were achieved with a 152 mm (6-inch) square test section that is 1 m long and has a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. The flow non-uniformity was mitigated with the use of a tandem honeycomb configuration, a settling chamber and an 8.5:1 contraction. The design process that produced this final design will be presented along with its current status.

  10. Reynolds number, thickness and camber effects on flapping airfoil propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, M. A.; Young, J.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2011-02-01

    The effect of varying airfoil thickness and camber on plunging and combined pitching and plunging airfoil propulsion at Reynolds number Re=200, 2000, 20 000 and 2×106 was studied by numerical simulations for fully laminar and fully turbulent flow regimes. The thickness study was performed on 2-D NACA symmetric airfoils with 6-50% thick sections undergoing pure plunging motion at reduced frequency k=2 and amplitudes h=0.25 and 0.5, and for combined pitching and plunging motion at k=2, h=0.5, phase ϕ=90°, pitch angle θo=15° and 30° and the pitch axis was located at 1/3 of chord from leading edge. At Re=200 for motions where positive thrust is generated, thin airfoils outperform thick airfoils. At higher Re significant gains could be achieved both in thrust generation and propulsive efficiency by using a thicker airfoil section for plunging and combined motion with low pitch amplitude. The camber study was performed on 2-D NACA airfoils with varying camber locations undergoing pure plunging motion at k=2, h=0.5 and Re=20 000. Little variation in thrust performance was found with camber. The underlying physics behind the alteration in propulsive performance between low and high Reynolds numbers has been explored by comparing viscous Navier-Stokes and inviscid panel method results. The role of leading edge vortices was found to be key to the observed performance variation.

  11. The random walk of a low-Reynolds-number swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Garcia, Michaël; Berti, Stefano; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    Swimming at a micrometer scale demands particular strategies. Indeed when inertia is negligible as compared to viscous forces (i.e. Reynolds number Re is lower than unity), hydrodynamics equations are reversible in time. To achieve propulsion a low Reynolds number, swimmers must then deform in a way that is not invariant under time reversal. Here we investigate the dispersal properties of self propelled organisms by means of microscopy and cell tracking. Our system of interest is the microalga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a motile single celled green alga about 10 micrometers in diameter that swims with two flagellae. In the case of dilute suspensions, we show that tracked trajectories are well modelled by a correlated random walk. This process is based on short time correlations in the direction of movement called persistence. At longer times, correlations are lost and a standard random walk caracterizes the trajectories. Moreover, high speed imaging enables us to show how speed fluctuations at very short times affect the statistical description of the dynamics. Finally we show how drag forces modify the characteristics of this particular random walk.

  12. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  13. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. One key response of the system is the torque required to retain constant angular velocities, which can be connected to the angular velocity transport through the gap. Whereas the low-Reynolds number regime was well explored in the 1980s and 1990s of the past century, in the fully turbulent regime major research activity developed only in the past decade. In this article, we review this recent progress in our understanding of fully developed Taylor-Couette turbulence from the experimental, numerical, and theoretical points of view. We focus on the parameter dependence of the global torque and on the local flow organization, including velocity profiles and boundary layers. Next, we discuss transitions between different (turbulent) flow states. We also elaborate on the relevance of this system for astrophysical disks (quasi-Keplerian flows). The review ends with a list of challenges for future research on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

  14. Universality at low Reynolds numbers and the emergence of intermittent behavior in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2015-11-01

    Most approaches to understand turbulence have sought universal behavior believed to manifest at high Reynolds numbers (Rλ). However, recent theory and simulations suggest that universal characteristics, such as the non-trivial anomalous scaling exponents of moments of velocity gradients, emerge even at very low Rλ at which no inertial range exists. Furthermore, with decreasing Reynolds numbers, a transition occurs from fully intermittent turbulence to (approximately) Gaussian behavior at an apparently universal critical Rλ. A potential implication of these observations is that significant information concerning the inertial range (e.g. scaling exponents) is already manifest in the dissipation range at very low Rλ. Thus, high Rλ properties can be studied with well-resolved low-Rλ simulations instead of marginally resolved high-Reynolds flows. The focus of this talk is to explore signatures of universality at high-Reynolds numbers in the dissipation range of highly resolved DNS (kmax η ~ O (20)) for Rλ up to 90, and decaying simulations close to the critical Rλ. In addition to statistics of velocity gradients and dissipation we explore evidence of Beltramization as suggested in past theoretical work.

  15. A survey of the three-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.; Sawada, H.; Aoki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The facilities for aerodynamic testing of airplane models at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers are surveyed. The need for high Reynolds number testing is reviewed, using some experimental results. Some approaches to high Reynolds number testing such as the cryogenic wind tunnel, the induction driven wind tunnel, the Ludwieg tube, the Evans clean tunnel and the hydraulic driven wind tunnel are described. The level of development of high Reynolds number testing facilities in Japan is discussed.

  16. Turbulence effect on crossflow around a circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Saharon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of freestream turbulence on the flow around a smooth circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers from 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power to 2.09 x 10 to the 5th power was conducted. Measurements show that the interaction of incident turbulence with the initial laminar boundary layer: (1) modifies the characteristics of the mean surface pressure distribution; (2) induces an aft shift in the separation point ranging from 5 to 50 beyond the laminar separation angle of 80 degrees; and, (3) reduces the mean drag coefficient to values between 97 and 46% of its nearly constant laminar counterpart. The extent of these changes depends on the particular Reynolds number background turbulence combination. These results demonstrate that a boundary-layer flow similar to that found in critical, supercritical and/or transcritical flow regimes is induced by turbulence at subcritical Reynolds numbers and, hence, the effect of turbulence is equivalent to an effective increase in the Reynolds number. The change in the nature and properties of the boundary layer in the subcritical regime, consequent upon the penetration of turbulence into it, is in agreement with the model proposed by the vorticity-amplification theory.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  18. The effect of Prandtl number on mixing in low Reynolds number Kelvin-Helmholtz billows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, M.; Seymour, B. R.; Lawrence, G. A.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Prandtl number on mixing in temporally evolving Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities at low to moderate Reynolds numbers is studied through direct numerical simulation. We distinguish between the mixing induced by the primary billow and the mixing generated by three-dimensional motions by performing each simulation in two and three dimensions. The results indicate that the time evolution of the rate of two- and three-dimensional mixing through different stages of the life cycle of KH flow is significantly influenced by the Prandtl number. As the Prandtl number increases, the final amount of mixing increases for Reynolds that are too low to support active three-dimensional motions. This trend is the opposite in sufficiently high Reynolds number KH flows that can overcome viscous effects and develop significant three-dimensional instabilities. While the mixing generated in the two-dimensional flows, uniform in the span-wise direction, is not significantly dependent on the Prandtl number, the turbulent mixing induced by three-dimensional motions is a function of the Prandtl number. We observe a steady increase in the total amount of mixing for buoyancy Reynolds numbers above 7, consistent with the results of Shih et al. ["Parameterization of turbulent fluxes and scales using homogeneous sheared stably stratified turbulence simulations," J. Fluid Mech. 525, 193-214 (2005)]. Both maximum instantaneous and cumulative mixing efficiencies exhibit a decreasing trend with increasing Prandtl number. We compare the dependence of the mixing efficiency on Prandtl number to previous studies.

  19. Microelectrokinetic turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiren; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There is commonly no turbulence in microfluidics, and the flows are believed to be either laminar or chaotic, since Reynolds number (Re) in microflows is usually on the order of unity or lower. However, we recently demonstrated that it is possible to achieve turbulence with low Re (based on the measured flow velocity and the width of the channel entrance) when a pressure-driven flow is electrokinetically forced in a quasi T-microchannel. To be able to measure high frequency velocity fluctuations in microchannels, a velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, called a laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer, is developed. Here we characterize the microelectrokinetic turbulence and observe some typical and important features of high Re flows, such as Kolmogorov -5 /3 spectrum of velocity fluctuation, which usually can be realized only at very high Re in macroturbulent flows.

  20. Magnetic propulsion of robotic sperms at low-Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Fatih Tabak, Ahmet; Klingner, Anke; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the microswimming behaviour of robotic sperms in viscous fluids. These robotic sperms are fabricated from polystyrene dissolved in dimethyl formamide and iron-oxide nanoparticles. This composition allows the nanoparticles to be concentrated within the bead of the robotic sperm and provide magnetic dipole, whereas the flexibility of the ultra-thin tail enables flagellated locomotion using magnetic fields in millitesla range. We show that these robotic sperms have similar morphology and swimming behaviour to those of sperm cells. Moreover, we show experimentally that our robotic sperms swim controllably at an average speed of approximately one body length per second (around 125 μm s-1), and they are relatively faster than the microswimmers that depend on planar wave propulsion in low-Reynolds number fluids.

  1. Microelectrokinetic turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiren; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There is commonly no turbulence in microfluidics, and the flows are believed to be either laminar or chaotic, since Reynolds number (Re) in microflows is usually on the order of unity or lower. However, we recently demonstrated that it is possible to achieve turbulence with low Re (based on the measured flow velocity and the width of the channel entrance) when a pressure-driven flow is electrokinetically forced in a quasi T-microchannel. To be able to measure high frequency velocity fluctuations in microchannels, a velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, called a laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer, is developed. Here we characterize the microelectrokinetic turbulence and observe some typical and important features of high Re flows, such as Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum of velocity fluctuation, which usually can be realized only at very high Re in macroturbulent flows. PMID:26871154

  2. Steady flows around two cylinders at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Masakazu

    1989-06-01

    Steady flow patterns around two circular cylinders are experimentally studied at Reynolds numbers lower than unity. The cylinders are towed at a uniform speed in a tank filled with glycerin, and the dependence of the streamline patterns on the ratio of the radii of the two cylinders, their mutual spacing, and the angle between the line joining the centers and the direction of the flow are studied. When the two cylinders are in tandem arrangements, the process of changes of the first twin eddies in the gap is in accordance with the theoretical results of Miyazaki and Hasimoto. When the two cylinders are in staggered arrangement, the flow separation occurs both at small values of gaps and at large ratio of the radii of the two cylinders.

  3. Resistance of plates and pipes at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, L; Hermann, R

    1931-01-01

    It was learned that the law of resistance for high R values does not follow the simple powers, and that the powers, which can be obtained approximately for the velocity distribution, gradually change. Since, moreover, very important investigations have recently been made on the resistance of plates at very high R values, it seemed of interest to apply the above line of reasoning to the new general law of resistance. For this purpose, the resistance and velocity distribution along the plate must always be equal to the values of the pipe flow at the corresponding Reynolds number. We made two kinds of calculations, of which the one given here is the simpler and more practical and also agrees better with the experimental results.

  4. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert

    responsive to flexibility satisfying an inverse proportionality to stiffness. In hover, an effective pitch angle can be defined in a flexible wing that accounts for deflection which shifts results toward trend lines of rigid wings. Three-dimensional simulations examining the effects of two distinct deformation modes undergoing prescribed deformation associated with root and tip deflection demonstrated a greater aerodynamic response to tip deflection in hover. Efficiency gains in flexion wings over rigid wing counterpart were shown to be dependent on Reynolds number with efficiency in both modes increasing with increased Reynolds number. Additionally, while the leading-edge vortex axis proved insensitive to deformation, the shape and orientation of the LEV core is modified. Experiments on three-dimensional dynamically-scaled fruit fly wings with passive deformation operating in the bursting limit Reynolds number regime revealed enhanced leading-edge vortex bursting with tip deflection promoting greater LEV core flow deceleration in stroke. Experimental studies on rotary wings highlights a universal formation time of the leading-edge vortex independent of Reynolds number, acceleration profile and aspect ratio. Efforts to replicate LEV bursting phenomena of higher aspect ratio wings in a unity aspect ratio wing such that LEV growth is no limited by span but by the LEV traversing the chord revealed a flow regime of oscillatory lift generation reminiscent of behavior exhibited in translating wings that also maintains magnitude peak to peak.

  5. High Reynolds number decay of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number turbulence in a Taylor-Couette facility for pure inner cylinder rotation. The rotation of the inner cylinder (Rei = 2 ×106) is suddenly decelerated as fast as possible, thus removing the energy input within seconds. Local velocity measurements show that the decay in this wall-bounded inhomogeneous flow is faster than observed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent flows, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the inner and outer cylinder surfaces. We found that the decay over time can be described with the differential equation Re . (t) =cf (Re)Re2 , where the effects of the walls are included through the friction coefficient. A self-similar behavior of the azimuthal velocity is found: its normalized velocity profile as a function of the radius collapses over time during the decay process.

  6. Low Reynolds number Couette flow facility for drag measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tyler J; Lang, Amy W; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Westcott, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    For this study a new low Reynolds number Couette facility was constructed to investigate surface drag. In this facility, mineral oil was used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of the experimental models. A mounted conveyor inside a tank creates a flow above which an experimental model of a flat plate was suspended. The experimental plate was attached to linear bearings on a slide system that connects to a force gauge used to measure the drag. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile was created. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to confirm the velocity profile. The drag measurements agreed within 5% of the theoretically predicted Couette flow value. PMID:20887004

  7. Reynolds Number Effects on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Vitaliy, Krivets; Collins, Brett; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    This presentation compares the results of two very different experimental studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: shock tube experiments in which an air/SF6 interface is accelerated by a weak shock wave; and incompressible experiments in which a box containing two different density miscible liquids is impulsively accelerated by bouncing it off of a fixed coil spring. Both experiments are initiated with sinusoidal initial perturbations. The interface perturbation initially remains sinusoidal as it grows in amplitude, but eventually the interfacial vorticity concentrates into points, forming a row of line vortices of alternating sign. The Reynolds number based on vortex circulation ranges from 1,000 to 45,000 in these experiments. It is found that viscous effects have a large, quantifiable effect on the evolution of the individual vortices. The effects of viscosity on the overall perturbation amplitude, however, are small and will be compared to theory.

  8. Flow instabilities behind rotating bluff bodies for moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujon-Durand, Sophie; Gibi?Ski, Kornel; Skarysz, Maciej; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present experiments to study the flow behind 3D bodies (spheres, disks and propellers) rotating about an axis aligned with the streamwise direction. The experiments has been performed in a water channel using LIF visualizations and PIV measurements. We study the flow evolution and the different flow regimes as a function of two control parameters: the Reynolds number Re and the dimensionless rotation or swirl rate Ω which is the ratio of the maximum azimuthal velocity of the body to the free stream velocity. In the present investigation, we covers the range of Re smaller than 400 and Ω from 0 to 4 in some cases. Different wakes regimes such as an axisymmetric base flow (or n-symmetric in the case of propellers), low frequency helicoidal states and higher frequency state are observed. The transitions between states are studied measuring the amplitude of the azimuthal modes components of the streamwise vorticity obtained by Fourier decomposition.

  9. Experimental investigations of He II flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Sciver, Steve W.

    1991-01-01

    Fluid dynamics studies of He II at high Reynolds number (Re(d) greater than 10 exp 6) reveal characteristics which are best interpreted in terms of classical scaling relationships. In particular, the smooth tube friction factor is seen to correlate with the Von Karman-Nikuradse formulation. Also, the performance of a centrifugal pump is unchanged whether being used with He I or He II. These effects are expected to result provided the He II possesses a viscous sublayer and that the drag is determined by laminar flow within this layer. On the other hand, heat transfer in He II is substantially different from that of He I because of the unique internal convection mechanism present in this quantum fluid. These experiments are performed in the University of Wisconsin liquid helium flow facility which has unique capabilities of He II temperature, pressure and flow.

  10. Flow and roller array interaction at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Zubair M.; Wang, Lipo; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Differing from the conventional no-slip wall boundary condition, the moving surface may have strong influences on the flow structures and the flow physics. Such effects are potentially important and useful for flow control. In this paper we analyze the two-dimensional flow over a roller array with different spacing and rotating speeds at the low Reynolds numbers. The numerical results indicate that the pressure drag and the friction drag of the rollers are strongly dependent on flowing and geometric parameters. Physically, surface motion can induce the viscous traction stream, which leads to very important effects, such as the so called impingement block and traction stream flush. These interesting findings may help to better understand the fluid dynamics for the general moving boundary cases.

  11. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  12. The effect of Reynolds number on the drag of a rectangular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Wai, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow past a rectangular cylinder at low Reynolds number reveal that the aspect ratio for maximum drag is much less than that measured at high Reynolds number. Nakaguchi et al. (1967) discovered a remarkably sharp peak in the drag coefficient at a cylinder aspect ratio of 0.62 for Re = 20,000. In contrast, our numerical simulations at Re = 500 indicate a maximum-drag aspect ratio of 0.2. This dramatic difference is attributed to the rollup station of the laminar vortex sheet from the separating boundary layer. Essentially inviscid, the rollup process scales with the thickness of the vortex sheet at the separation point, which in turn varies inversely with the square root of the Reynolds number. Consequently, at low Reynolds number, the sheet remains thin and laminar, curving tightly toward the cylinder. On the other hand, at high Reynolds number, the vortex sheet promptly rolls up into a rapidly growing, turbulent shear layer. The thick, turbulent layer has a large displacement thickness, deflecting the outer streamlines and altering its own trajectory so that it curves relatively gradually toward the cylinder. Bearman and Trueman (1972) showed that the peak drag corresponds to the shear layer nearly reattaching to the bluff body and rolling up into vortices very close to the base of the cylinder. The low pressure of the vortex cores is reflected in a low base pressure and thus high drag. The critical aspect ratio is much smaller for the laminar vortex sheet because of its more tightly curved trajectory.

  13. Investigation of Transonic Reynolds Number Scaling on a Twin-Engine Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtin, M. M.; Bogue, D. R.; Om, D.; Rivers, S. M. B.; Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Wahls, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses Reynolds number scaling for aerodynamic parameters including force and wing pressure measurements. A full-span model of the Boeing 777 configuration was tested at transonic conditions in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Reynolds numbers (based on mean aerodynamic chord) from 3.0 to 40.0 million. Data was obtained for a tail-off configuration both with and without wing vortex generators and flap support fairings. The effects of aeroelastics were separated from Reynolds number effects by varying total pressure and temperature independently. Data from the NTF at flight Reynolds number are compared with flight data to establish the wind tunnel/flight correlation. The importance of high Reynolds number testing and the need for developing a process for transonic Reynolds number scaling is discussed. This paper also identifies issues that need to be worked for Boeing Commercial to continue to conduct future high Reynolds number testing in the NTF.

  14. Influence of Reynolds number on coalescence of droplets with particle in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Yatagawa, Yuta; Kumagai, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence of droplets in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number is potentially useful for different purposes including the handling of fluids, control of chemical reaction, and in drug delivery systems. The phenomenon is also the basis for analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media such as in enhanced oil recovery and the breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers. With regard to examples of studies on the creeping motion of droplets in a flow through a tube, Hetsroni G. et al.[1] theoretically examined the motion of a spherical droplet or bubble with small d/D, where d is the undeformed diameter of the droplet or bubble, and D is the tube diameter. Higdon J.J.L. and Muldowney G.P. [2] numerically obtained the resistance functions for a spherical particle, droplet, and bubble. Olbricht, W.L. and Kung D.M.[3] and Aul R.W. and Olbricht, W.L.[4] mainly investigated the coalescence time of droplets. Aul R.W. and Olbricht W.L. proposed a semi-theoretical formula of the coalescence time. Based on the formula by them, Muraoka, M. et al.[5] proposed other semi-theoretical formulas of the coalescence time in terms of the resistance experienced by the liquid droplet in creeping flow through a tube. The latter formulas take the eccentricity of the following droplets into consideration. In the present study, a glass tube of inner diameter 2.0mm, outer diameter 7.0mm, and length 1500 mm was used as the test tube. Silicon oil with a kinematic viscosity of 3000cSt was employed as the test fluid of the droplet. A mixture of glycerol and pure water was used as the surrounding fluid of the creeping flow through a tube. A large volumetric syringe pump was used to maintain steady flow through the tube at a designated average velocity. The test tube was immersed in temperature-controlled water contained in a tank to maintain constant temperature of the system. The droplets were injected into the test tube. The behaviors of the droplets were monitored by a

  15. Low-Reynolds number compressible flow around a triangular airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, Phillip; Taira, Kunihiko; Suwa, Tetsuya; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    We report on the combined numerical and experimental effort to analyze the nonlinear aerodynamics of a triangular airfoil in low-Reynolds number compressible flow that is representative of wings on future Martian air vehicles. The flow field around this airfoil is examined for a wide range of angles of attack and Mach numbers with three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at Re = 3000 . Companion experiments are conducted in a unique Martian wind tunnel that is placed in a vacuum chamber to simulate the Martian atmosphere. Computational findings are compared with pressure sensitive paint and direct force measurements and are found to be in agreement. The separated flow from the leading edge is found to form a large leading-edge vortex that sits directly above the apex of the airfoil and provides enhanced lift at post stall angles of attack. For higher subsonic flows, the vortical structures elongate in the streamwise direction resulting in reduced lift enhancement. We also observe that the onset of spanwise instability for higher angles of attack is delayed at lower Mach numbers. Currently at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki.

  16. Anisotropic Structure of Rotating Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Squires, Kyle D.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the development of anisotropies and the evolution towards a quasi two-dimensional state in rotating homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds number. The present study demonstrates the existence of two transitions in the development of anisotropy. The first transition marks the onset of anisotropy and occurs when a macro-Rossby number (based on a longitudinal integral lengthscale) has decreased to near unity while the second transition occurs when a micro-Rossby number (defined in this work as the ratio of the rms fluctuating vorticity to background vorticity) has decreased to unity. The anisotropy marked by the first transition corresponds to a reduction in dimensionality while the second transition corresponds to a polarization of the flow, i.e., relative dominance of the velocity components in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Polarization is reflected by emergence of anisotropy measures based on the two-dimensional component of the turbulence. Investigation of the vorticity structure shows that the second transition is also characterized by an increasing tendency for alignment between the fluctuating vorticity vector and the background angular velocity vector with a preference for corrotative vorticity.

  17. Confined swirling jet impingement on a flat plate at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, M. A.; Del Pino, C.; Ortega-Casanova, J.

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of a swirling jet issuing from a pipe and impinging on a flat smooth wall is analyzed numerically by means of axisymmetric simulations. The axial velocity profile at the pipe outlet is assumed flat while the azimuthal velocity profile is a Burger's vortex characterized by two non-dimensional parameters; a swirl number S and a vortex core length δ. We concentrate on the effects of these two parameters on the mechanical characteristics of the flow at moderate Reynolds numbers. Our results for S =0 are in agreement with Phares et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 418, 351 (2000)], who provide a theoretical determination of the wall shear stress under nonswirling impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, we show that the swirl number has an important effect on the jet impact process. For a fixed nozzle-to-plate separation, we found that depending on the value of δ and the Reynolds number Re, there is a critical swirl number, S =S∗(δ ,Re), above which recirculating vortex breakdown bubbles are observed in the near axis region. For S >S∗, the presence of these bubbles enhances the transition from a steady to a periodic regime. For S

  18. Numerical simulation studies of unsteady low Reynolds number separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatineni, Mahidhar

    Numerical simulations were used to study unsteady low-Reynolds-number separated flows. The studies were focused on the instability of the separation bubbles, the associated vortex shedding, and the response to imposed disturbances. The simulations were performed for separation bubbles in both low Mach number compressible and incompressible flow regimes. The compressible study consisted of unsteady simulations of flows over the Eppler 387 airfoil and the APEX airfoil. For a sufficiently high Reynolds number the simulations showed that the flow over the airfoils is inherently unsteady, with associated vortex shedding. A Fourier analysis of the unsteady flowfield revealed the presence of a dominant frequency in the flow. The dominant frequency from the numerical solution was found to agree with the most unstable frequency calculated using linear stability theory. The vortex shedding was shown to be caused by the growth of the disturbance waves corresponding to the dominant mode calculated from the linear stability analysis. In order to study the separation bubble and the vortex shedding in detail, a simpler two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) incompressible flow over a flat plate was considered. The onset of self excited vortex shedding, and the response of the separation bubble to 2-D and 3-D disturbances was studied in detail through numerical simulations. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a fifth order finite difference scheme for spatial discretization and a fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement. A new high-order nonuniform grid finite difference scheme was also developed for the simulations. The incompressible simulation results showed that it was possible to induce vortex shedding by imposing disturbances upstream of the separation bubble. For a sufficiently large freestream velocity gradient the separation bubble was globally unstable, leading to a growth in the size of the separation bubble and the

  19. Reynolds and Atwood Numbers Effects on Homogeneous Rayleigh Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Atwood numbers on turbulent mixing of a heterogeneous mixture of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities are investigated by using high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The flow occurs in a triply periodic 3D domain, with the two fluids initially segregated in random patches, and turbulence is generated in response to buoyancy. In turn, stirring produced by turbulence breaks down the scalar structures, accelerating the molecular mixing. Statistically homogeneous variable-density (VD) mixing, with density variations due to compositional changes, is a basic mixing problem and aims to mimic the core of the mixing layer of acceleration driven Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI). We present results covering a large range of kinematic viscosity values for density contrasts including small (A =0.04), moderate (A =0.5), and high (A =0.75 and 0.9) Atwood numbers. Particular interest will be given to the structure of the turbulence and mixing process, including the alignment between various turbulence and scalar quantities, as well as providing fidelity data for verification and validation of mix models. Arindam Banerjee acknowledges support from NSF CAREER award # 1453056.

  20. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Mustafa Serdar; Koca, Kemal; Hakan Açıkel, Halil; Özkan, Gökhan; Sadık Kırış, Mehmet; Yıldız, Rahime

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  1. A third-order-accurate upwind scheme for Navier-Stokes solutions at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A third-order-accurate upwind scheme is presented for solution of the steady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in stream-function/vorticity form. The scheme is found to be accurate and stable at high Reynolds numbers. A series of test computations is performed on flows with large recirculating regions. In particular, highly accurate solutions are obtained for flow in a driven square cavity up to Reynolds numbers of 10,000. These computations are used to critically evaluate the accuracy of other existing first- and second-order-accurate upwind schemes. In addition, computations are carried out for flow in a channel with symmetric sudden expansion, flow in a channel with a symmetrically placed blunt base, and the flowfield of an impinging jet. Good agreement is obtained with the computations of other investigators as well as with the available experimental data.

  2. Electrokinetic turbulence in a microchannel at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Wang, Guiren

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence is commonly viewed as a type of macroflow phenomenon under a sufficiently high Reynolds number (Re). On the other hand, it has been widely perceived in science, engineering and medicine that there is never any turbulence in low Re flow for Newtonian fluids. There is even difficulty to characterize turbulence in microchannels with current available velocimeters, due to the requirement of simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution. Recently, we generated micro-electrokinetic (EK) turbulence in a microchannel when a pressure driven flow at low Re on the order of unity is electrokinetically forced. We also developed a novel velocimeter, i.e. laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA) that enables us to measure the velocity fluctuations with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution. Here we surprisingly observed with LIFPA that the corresponding micro EK turbulence can also have some features of high Re flows, such as Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum and the exponential tail of probability density function of velocity fluctuation, and the scaling behavior of velocity structure function. This work could provide a new perspective on turbulence. The work was supported by NSF under grant no. CAREER CBET-0954977, MRI CBET-1040227.

  3. Propulsion at low Reynolds number via beam extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Frederick; Neetzow, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results on the extrusion of a slender beam in a viscous fluid. We are particularly interested in the force necessary to extrude the beam as it buckles with large amplitude due to viscous friction. The problem is inspired by the propulsion of Paramecium via trichocyst extrusion. Self-propulsion in micro-organisms is mostly achieved through the beating of flagella or cilia. However, to avoid a severe aggression, unicellular Paramecium has been observed to extrude trichocysts in the direction of the aggression to burst away. These trichocysts are rod-like organelles which, upon activation, grow to about 40 μm in length in 3 milliseconds before detaching from the animal. The drag force created by these extruding rods pushing against the viscous fluid generates thrust in the opposite direction. We developed an experimental setup to measure the force required to push a steel piano wire into an aquarium filled with corn syrup. This setup offers a near-zero Reynolds number, and allows studying deployments for a range of constant extrusion speeds. The experimental results are reproduced with a numerical model coupling a large amplitude Euler-Bernoulli beam theory with a fluid load model proportional to the local beam velocity. This study was funded in part by the The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  4. Efficient simulation of detached flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Jose M.; Asensio, Victor; Herrero, Raul; Varas, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    A method is presented for the computationally efficient simulation of quasi-periodic detached flows in multi-parameter problems at very large Reynolds numbers, keeping in mind a variety of applications, including helicopter flight simulators, control and certification of unmanned aerial vehicles, control of wind turbines, conceptual design in aeronautics, and civil aerodynamics. In many of these applications, the large scale flows (ignoring the smaller turbulent scales) are at most quasi-periodic, namely the Fourier transform exhibits a finite set of concentrated peaks resulting from the nonlinear passive interaction of periodic wakes. The method consists in an offline preprocess and the online operation. In the preprocess, a standard CFD solver (such as URANS) is used in combination with several ingredients such as an iterative combination proper orthogonal decomposition and fast Fourier transform. The online operation is made with a combination of high order singular value decomposition and interpolation. The performance of the method is tested considering the ow over a fairly complex urban topography, for various free stream intensities and orientations, seeking real time online simulations.

  5. Flow control at low Reynolds numbers using periodic airfoil morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gareth; Santer, Matthew; Papadakis, George; Bouremel, Yann; Debiasi, Marco; Imperial-NUS Joint PhD Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The performance of airfoils operating at low Reynolds numbers is known to suffer from flow separation even at low angles of attack as a result of their boundary layers remaining laminar. The lack of mixing---a characteristic of turbulent boundary layers---leaves laminar boundary layers with insufficient energy to overcome the adverse pressure gradient that occurs in the pressure recovery region. This study looks at periodic surface morphing as an active flow control technique for airfoils in such a flight regime. It was discovered that at sufficiently high frequencies an oscillating surface is capable of not only reducing the size of the separated region---and consequently significantly reducing drag whilst simultaneously increasing lift---but it is also capable of delaying stall and as a result increasing CLmax. Furthermore, by bonding Macro Fiber Composite actuators (MFCs) to the underside of an airfoil skin and driving them with a sinusoidal frequency, it is shown that this control technique can be practically implemented in a lightweight, energy efficient way. Imperial-NUS Joint Ph.D. Programme.

  6. Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tian; Lee, Tung-Chun; Mark, Andrew G.; Morozov, Konstantin I.; Münster, Raphael; Mierka, Otto; Turek, Stefan; Leshansky, Alexander M.; Fischer, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Biological microorganisms swim with flagella and cilia that execute nonreciprocal motions for low Reynolds number (Re) propulsion in viscous fluids. This symmetry requirement is a consequence of Purcell’s scallop theorem, which complicates the actuation scheme needed by microswimmers. However, most biomedically important fluids are non-Newtonian where the scallop theorem no longer holds. It should therefore be possible to realize a microswimmer that moves with reciprocal periodic body-shape changes in non-Newtonian fluids. Here we report a symmetric ‘micro-scallop’, a single-hinge microswimmer that can propel in shear thickening and shear thinning (non-Newtonian) fluids by reciprocal motion at low Re. Excellent agreement between our measurements and both numerical and analytical theoretical predictions indicates that the net propulsion is caused by modulation of the fluid viscosity upon varying the shear rate. This reciprocal swimming mechanism opens new possibilities in designing biomedical microdevices that can propel by a simple actuation scheme in non-Newtonian biological fluids. PMID:25369018

  7. Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian; Lee, Tung-Chun; Mark, Andrew G; Morozov, Konstantin I; Münster, Raphael; Mierka, Otto; Turek, Stefan; Leshansky, Alexander M; Fischer, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Biological microorganisms swim with flagella and cilia that execute nonreciprocal motions for low Reynolds number (Re) propulsion in viscous fluids. This symmetry requirement is a consequence of Purcell's scallop theorem, which complicates the actuation scheme needed by microswimmers. However, most biomedically important fluids are non-Newtonian where the scallop theorem no longer holds. It should therefore be possible to realize a microswimmer that moves with reciprocal periodic body-shape changes in non-Newtonian fluids. Here we report a symmetric 'micro-scallop', a single-hinge microswimmer that can propel in shear thickening and shear thinning (non-Newtonian) fluids by reciprocal motion at low Re. Excellent agreement between our measurements and both numerical and analytical theoretical predictions indicates that the net propulsion is caused by modulation of the fluid viscosity upon varying the shear rate. This reciprocal swimming mechanism opens new possibilities in designing biomedical microdevices that can propel by a simple actuation scheme in non-Newtonian biological fluids. PMID:25369018

  8. A self-propelled biohybrid swimmer at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Anand, Sandeep V.; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan; Saif, M. Taher A.

    2014-01-01

    Many microorganisms, including spermatozoa and forms of bacteria, oscillate or twist a hair-like flagella to swim. At this small scale, where locomotion is challenged by large viscous drag, organisms must generate time-irreversible deformations of their flagella to produce thrust. To date, there is no demonstration of a self propelled, synthetic flagellar swimmer operating at low Reynolds number. Here we report a microscale, biohybrid swimmer enabled by a unique fabrication process and a supporting slender-body hydrodynamics model. The swimmer consists of a polydimethylsiloxane filament with a short, rigid head and a long, slender tail on which cardiomyocytes are selectively cultured. The cardiomyocytes contract and deform the filament to propel the swimmer at 5-10 μm s-1, consistent with model predictions. We then demonstrate a two-tailed swimmer swimming at 81 μm s-1. This small-scale, elementary biohybrid swimmer can serve as a platform for more complex biological machines.

  9. Elastic turbulence in high Reynolds number polymer drag reduced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    The present study discusses the existence of small scale dynamics resembling elastic turbulence in polymeric transitional and maximum drag reduction (MDR) flows. The observed flow patterns are driven by elastic stress and occur in regions of very low turbulence found before and after the breakdown of nonlinear instabilities in polymeric transitional flows leading to MDR. A state of polymer-dominated spanwise instabilities was found, resulting in a structure of the wall shear quite different than the structures observed in transitional Newtonian flow. Similar instabilities are observed in the wake of the head of hairpin vortices in simulated MDR flows, an extended region of extensional flow of the order of the Kolmogorov scale in the normal direction. The important Reynolds number is not that of flow (Reτ = 300 and 600 for the Newtonian flows) but that of the local turbulent flow, which according to Kolmogorov approaches unity in the above mentioned flows, a reasonable magnitude for elastic turbulence. The existence of small scale elastic turbulence in transitional and MDR flows explains the phenomenon of early turbulence first observed in the 70s and challenges the notion that, in drag reduced flows, the energy flows only from large to small scales and never goes back from polymers to flow.

  10. Low Reynolds Number Drag Alteration Inspired by Butterfly Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforte, Brent; Kronenberger, Courtney; Lang, Amy

    2012-11-01

    Biomimetics is the process of looking towards nature's adaptations for answers to today's engineering obstacles. An age-old engineering dilemma is trying to find new methods to reduce the amount of drag over a body. This research finds inspiration from butterfly scales which are hypothesized to alter surface friction over the wings. Drop testing was performed on axisymmetric, streamlined, teardrop models which were rapid-prototyped such that the surface was covered with either streamwise or transverse cavities modeled after the Monarch butterfly. The drop tank contained silicone oil with a viscosity two hundred times that of water insuring flow similarity between the model cavities (2.5 mm cavity depth) and the butterfly scale structures (about 30 microns cavity depth). A variation in Reynolds number was achieved by altering the model weight such that terminal speeds ranged from 5 to 70 cm/s. Results showed a reduction in surface friction for the transverse cavity configurations based on the roller-bearing effect. These findings suggest that the cavity shape and ratio is directly correlated to the amount of drag alteration. Funded by NSF REU grant 1062611.

  11. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Mustafa Serdar; Özden, Mustafa; Hakan Açikel, Halil; Demir, Hacımurat; Isabekov, Iliasbek

    2016-03-01

    In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1) was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000). Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC) was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  12. Computational analysis of amoeboid swimming at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixuan; Othmer, Hans G

    2016-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown that eukaryotic cells can swim in a fluid as well as crawl on a substrate. We investigate the swimming behavior of Dictyostelium discoideum  amoebae who swim by initiating traveling protrusions at the front that propagate rearward. In our model we prescribe the velocity at the surface of the swimming cell, and use techniques of complex analysis to develop 2D models that enable us to study the fluid-cell interaction. Shapes that approximate the protrusions used by Dictyostelium discoideum  can be generated via the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation, and the boundary-value problem that results for swimmers in the Stokes flow regime is then reduced to an integral equation on the boundary of the unit disk. We analyze the swimming characteristics of several varieties of swimming Dictyostelium discoideum  amoebae, and discuss how the slenderness of the cell body and the shapes of the protrusion effect the swimming of these cells. The results may provide guidance in designing low Reynolds number swimming models. PMID:26362281

  13. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Studies of Low Reynolds Number Effects on the Losses in a Low Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data from jet-engine tests have indicated that unsteady blade-row interaction effects can have a significant impact on the efficiency of low-pressure turbine stages. Measured turbine efficiencies at takeoff can be as much as two points higher than those at cruise conditions. Preliminary studies indicate that Reynolds number effects may contribute to the lower efficiencies at cruise conditions. In the current study, numerical experiments have been performed to quantify the Reynolds number dependence of unsteady wake/separation bubble interaction on the performance of a low-pressure turbine.

  14. Effects of Mach Number and Reynolds Number on the Maximum Lift Coefficient of a Wing of NACA 230-series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, G. Chester; Fitzpatrick, James E.

    1947-01-01

    Wing was tested with full-span, partial-span, or split flaps deflected 60 Degrees and without flaps. Chordwise pressure-distribution measurements were made for all flap configurations.. Peak values of maximum lift coefficient were obtained at relatively low free-stream Mach numbers and, before critical Mach number was reached, were almost entirely dependent on Reynolds Number. Lift coefficient increased by increasing Mach number or deflecting flaps while critical pressure coefficient was reached at lower free-stream Mach numbers.

  15. High Reynolds number analysis of an axisymmetric afterbody with flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.; Reubush, David E.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method, PAB3D, to predict nozzle afterbody flow at high Reynolds number was assessed. Predicted surface pressure coefficient distributions and integrated afterbody drag are compared with experimental data obtained from the NASA-Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Predicted afterbody surface pressures matched experimental data fairly closely. The change in the pressure coefficient distribution with Reynolds number was slightly over-predicted. Integrated afterbody drag was typically high compared to the experimental data. The change in afterbody pressure drag with Reynolds number was fairly small. The predicted point of flow separation on the nozzle was slightly downstream of that observed from oilflow data at low Reynolds numbers and had a very slight Reynolds number dependence, moving slightly further downstream as Reynolds number increased.

  16. Comments on Reynolds number effects in wall-bounded shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Reynolds number on the structure of turbulent boundary layers and channel flows is discussed. Published data are reexamined in light of the following questions: (1) does the boundary layer turbulence structure change after the well known Reynolds number limit viz, when Re(theta) is greater than 6000?; (2) is it possible to disturb a high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layer near the wall such that the recovery length is O(100 delta)?; and (3) how close is the numerically simulated low Reynolds number flat plate turbulence structure to that observed experimentally? The turbulence structure appears to change continuously with Reynolds number virtually throughout the bounday layer and sometimes in unexpected manners at high Reynolds numbers.

  17. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for two out-of-plane piping elbows at high Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; McKeown, P.T.

    1999-02-08

    Pressure drops of multiple piping elbows were experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used methods for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses and also to provide a qualification database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer codes. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. Recent single elbow test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40x 106 Reynolds number) than those from current correlations. This single piping elbow data has been extended in this study to a multiple elbow configuration of two elbows that are 90o out-of-plane relative to each other. The effects of separation distance and Reynolds number have been correlated and presented in a form that can be used for design application. Contrary to earlier extrapolations from low Reynolds numbers (Re c 1.0x 106), a strong Reynolds number dependence was found to exist. The combination of the high Reynolds number single elbow data with the multiple elbow interaction effects measured in this study shows that earlier design correlations are conservative by significant margins at high Reynolds numbers. Qualification of CFD predictions with this new high Reynolds number database will help guide the need for additional high Reynolds number testing of other piping configurations. The study also included velocity measurements at several positions downstream of the first and second test elbows using an ultrasonic flowmeter. Reasonable agreement after the first test elbow was found relative to flow fields that are known to exist from low Reynolds number visual tests and also from CFD predictions. This data should help to qualify CFD predictions of the three-dimensional flow stream downstream of the second test elbow.

  18. Aerodynamics and heat transfer investigations on a high Reynolds number turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Taher; Mcfarland, Eric; Yeh, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The results of aerodynamic and heat transfer experimental investigations performed in a high Reynolds number turbine cascade test facility are analyzed. The experimental facility simulates the high Reynolds number flow conditions similar to those encountered in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. In order to determine the influence of Reynolds number on aerodynamic and thermal behavior of the blades, heat transfer coefficients were measured at various Reynolds numbers using liquid crystal temperature measurement technique. Potential flow calculation methods were used to predict the cascade pressure distributions. Boundary layer and heat transfer calculation methods were used with these pressure distributions to verify the experimental results.

  19. Trends of Reynolds number effects on two-dimensional airfoil characteristics for helicopter rotor analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, G. K.; Johnson, W.

    1983-01-01

    The primary effects of Reynolds number on two dimensional airfoil characteristics are discussed. Results from an extensive literature search reveal the manner in which the minimum drag and maximum lift are affected by the Reynolds number. C sub d sub min and C sub l sub max are plotted versus Reynolds number for airfoils of various thickness and camber. From the trends observed in the airfoil data, universal scaling laws and easily implemented methods are developed to account for Reynolds number effects in helicopter rotor analyses.

  20. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for a short radius of curvature piping elbow at high Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; Koczko, J.P.; McKeown, P.T.; Zirpoli, P.J.

    1998-06-01

    Pressure drops in a piping elbow are experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used design values for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. The test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40 {times} 10{sup 6} Reynolds number) than those current correlations.

  1. Stall flutter of NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Shantanu S.; Govardhan, Raghuraman N.

    2013-08-01

    In the present work, we experimentally study and demarcate the stall flutter boundaries of a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers (Re˜104) by measuring the forces and flow fields around the airfoil when it is forced to oscillate. The airfoil is placed at large mean angle of attack (αm), and is forced to undergo small amplitude pitch oscillations, the amplitude (Δα) and frequency (f) of which are systematically varied. The unsteady loads on the oscillating airfoil are directly measured, and are used to calculate the energy transfer to the airfoil from the flow. These measurements indicate that for large mean angles of attack of the airfoil (αm), there is positive energy transfer to the airfoil over a range of reduced frequencies (k=πfc/U), indicating that there is a possibility of airfoil excitation or stall flutter even at these low Re (c=chord length). Outside this range of reduced frequencies, the energy transfer is negative and under these conditions the oscillations would be damped. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the flow around the oscillating airfoil show that the shear layer separates from the leading edge and forms a leading edge vortex, although it is not very clear and distinct due to the low oscillation amplitudes. On the other hand, the shear layer formed after separation is found to clearly move periodically away from the airfoil suction surface and towards it with a phase lag to the airfoil oscillations. The phase of the shear layer motion with respect to the airfoil motions shows a clear difference between the exciting and the damping case.

  2. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  3. Reynolds number dependency of an insect-based flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong-Seob; Chang, Jo-Won; Kim, Sun-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics depending on Reynolds number (Re) ranges were studied to investigate the suitable design parameters of an insect-based micro air vehicle (MAV). The tests centered on the wing rotation timing and Re ranges, and were conducted to understand the lift augmentations and unsteady effects. A dynamically scaled-up flapping wing controlled by a pair of servos was installed underwater with a micro force/torque sensor. A high-speed camera and a laser sheet were also put in front of the water tank for the time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The lift augmentations clearly appeared at low Re and were well reflected on the insect's flight range. In the case of the high Re, however, the peak standing for the wing–wake interaction was delayed, and the pitching-up rotation was not able to lead to another lift enhancement, i.e., rotational lift. In such Re, the mean CL and the L/D of the advanced rotation were substantially decreased from those of the other rotations. The DPIV results at high Re well described turbulent characteristics such as the irregular, unstable, and high-intensity vortex structures with a short temporal delay. In the advanced rotation, the LEV in the rotational phase could not maintain the attachment. Thus, the rotational lift was not able to work. On the contrary, the temporal response delay benefitted the wing in the delayed rotation. Therefore, the wing in the delayed rotation had both a similar level of the mean CL and a higher marked L/D than those of the advanced rotation. Such results indicate that the high Re could interrupt lift augmentation mechanisms, and these augmentations would not be suitable for a heavier MAV. In conclusion, using adequate wing kinematics to acquire estimations of the weight and range of the Re is highly recommended at the aerodynamic design step. PMID:25381677

  4. Direct numerical simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations with an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method are used to investigate the effects of particle rotation on flows past random arrays of mono-disperse spheres at moderate particle Reynolds numbers. This study is an extension of a previous study of the authors [Q. Zhou and L.-S. Fan, "Direct numerical simulation of low-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres," J. Fluid Mech. 765, 396-423 (2015)] that explored the effects of particle rotation at low particle Reynolds numbers. The results of this study indicate that as the particle Reynolds number increases, the normalized Magnus lift force decreases rapidly when the particle Reynolds number is in the range lower than 50. For the particle Reynolds number greater than 50, the normalized Magnus lift force approaches a constant value that is invariant with solid volume fractions. The proportional dependence of the Magnus lift force on the rotational Reynolds number (based on the angular velocity and the diameter of the spheres) observed at low particle Reynolds numbers does not change in the present study, making the Magnus lift force another possible factor that can significantly affect the overall dynamics of fluid-particle flows other than the drag force. Moreover, it is found that both the normalized drag force and the normalized torque increase with the increase of the particle Reynolds number and the solid volume fraction. Finally, correlations for the drag force, the Magnus lift force, and the torque in random arrays of rotating spheres at arbitrary solids volume fractions, rotational Reynolds numbers, and particle Reynolds numbers are formulated.

  5. The role of Reynolds number in the fluid-elastic instability of tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, Nicholas; Ghasemi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The onset of fluid-elastic instability in tube arrays is thought to depend primarily on the mean flow velocity, the Scruton number and the natural frequencies of the tubes. However, there is evidence from experiments and numerical simulations that the Reynolds number is also an important parameter, although the available data are not sufficient to understand or quantify this effect. We use a high resolution pseudo-spectral scheme to solve two-dimensional penalized Navier-Stokes equations in order to accurately model turbulent flow through tightly packed tube arrays. To investigate the Reynolds number effect we perform simulations that vary Reynolds number between about 100 and 13,600 independent of flow velocity at fixed Scruton numbers, and then analyze the tube responses. Increasing Reynolds number has a strong de-stabilizing effect for rotated arrays. For in-line arrays, although Reynolds number still affects the instability threshold, the effect is not monotonic with increasing Reynolds number. The main de-stabilizing effect of increasing Reynolds number appears to be broadening of the vortex shedding frequency spectrum. This study increases reduces uncertainties in the experimental data, which usually do not account for the effect of Reynolds number.

  6. Numerical investigations of lift suppression by feedback rotary oscillation of circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Qin, Jian-Min; Teng, Bin; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a strategy of active flow control for lift force reduction of circular cylinder subjected to uniform flow at low Reynolds numbers. The flow control is realized by rotationally oscillating the circular cylinder about its axis with ω(t )=-λCL(t), where ω(t ) is the dimensionless angular speed of rotation cylinder, λ is the control parameter and CL(t) is the feedback signal of lift coefficient. The study focuses on seeking optimum λ for the low Reynolds numbers of 60, 80, 100, 150, and 200. The effectiveness of the proposed flow control in suppressing lift force is examined comprehensively by a numerical model based on the finite element solution of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The dependence of lift reduction on the control parameter λ is investigated. The threshold of λ, denoted by λc, is identified for the Reynolds numbers considered in this work. The numerical results show that the present active rotary oscillation of circular cylinder is able to reduce the amplitude of lift force significantly as long as λ ≤λc, at least 50% for the laminar flow regime. Meanwhile, the present active flow control does not result in the undesirable increase in the drag force. The Strouhal number is observed to decrease slightly with the increase of λ. As for a specific Reynolds number, the larger λ gives rise to the larger amount of lift reduction. The lift reduction reaches the maximum at λ =λc. The mechanism behind the present lift reduction method is revealed by comparing the flow patterns and pressure distributions near the active rotationally oscillating circular cylinder and the stationary circular cylinder. It is found that the critical value λc generally increases with Reynolds number. Two types of lift shift are observed in the numerical results for the cases with λ >λc. The first is characterized by the regular fluctuation of lift coefficient but with nonzero mean value, while the second is associated with the

  7. Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Stewart, William J; Thompson, Joseph T

    2009-05-01

    Squid paralarvae (hatchlings) rely predominantly on a pulsed jet for locomotion, distinguishing them from the majority of aquatic locomotors at low/intermediate Reynolds numbers (Re), which employ oscillatory/undulatory modes of propulsion. Although squid paralarvae may delineate the lower size limit of biological jet propulsion, surprisingly little is known about the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of paralarval jetting within the intermediate Re realm. To better understand paralarval jet dynamics, we used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed video to measure bulk vortex properties (e.g. circulation, impulse, kinetic energy) and other jet features [e.g. average and peak jet velocity along the jet centerline (U(j) and U(jmax), respectively), jet angle, jet length based on the vorticity and velocity extents (L(omega) and L(V), respectively), jet diameter based on the distance between vorticity peaks (D(omega)), maximum funnel diameter (D(F)), average and maximum swimming speed (U and U(max), respectively)] in free-swimming Doryteuthis pealeii paralarvae (1.8 mm dorsal mantle length) (Re(squid)=25-90). Squid paralarvae spent the majority of their time station holding in the water column, relying predominantly on a frequent, high-volume, vertically directed jet. During station holding, paralarvae produced a range of jet structures from spherical vortex rings (L(omega)/D(omega)=2.1, L(V)/D(F)=13.6) to more elongated vortex ring structures with no distinguishable pinch-off (L(omega)/D(omega)=4.6, L(V)/D(F)=36.0). To swim faster, paralarvae increased pulse duration and L(omega)/D(omega), leading to higher impulse but kept jet velocity relatively constant. Paralarvae produced jets with low slip, i.e. ratio of jet velocity to swimming velocity (U(j)/U or U(jmax)/U(max)), and exhibited propulsive efficiency [eta(pd)=74.9+/-8.83% (+/-s.d.) for deconvolved data] comparable with oscillatory/undulatory swimmers. As slip decreased with speed

  8. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  9. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  10. Effect of Reynolds Number on the Force and Pressure Distribution Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Lifting Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.; McKinney, Linwood W.

    1960-01-01

    A two-dimensional lifting circular cylinder has been tested over a Mach number range from 0.011 to 0.32 and a Reynolds number range from 135,000 to 1,580,000 to determine the force and pressure distribution characteristics. Two flaps having chords of 0.37 and 6 percent of the cylinder diameter, respectively, and attached normal to the surface were used to generate lift. A third configuration which had 6-percent flaps 1800 apart was also investigated. All flaps were tested through a range of angular positions. The investigation also included tests of a plain cylinder without flaps. The lift coefficient showed a wide variation with Reynolds number for the 6-percent flap mounted on the bottom surface at the 50-percent-diameter station, varying from a low of about 0.2 at a Reynolds number of 165,000 to a high of 1.54 at a Reynolds number of 350,000 and then decreasing almost linearly to a value of 1.0 at a Reynolds number of 1,580,000. The pressure distribution showed that the loss of lift with Reynolds number above the critical was the result of the separation point moving forward on the upper surface. Pressure distributions on a plain cylinder also showed similar trends with respect to the separation point. The variation of drag coefficient with Reynolds number was in direct contrast to the lift coefficient with the minimum drag coefficient of 0.6 occurring at a Reynolds number of 360,000. At this point the lift-drag ratios were a maximum at a value of 2.54. Tests of a flap with a chord of 0.0037 diameter gave a lift coefficient of 0.85 at a Reynolds number of 520,000 with the same lift-drag ratio as the larger flap but the position of the flap for maximum lift was considerably farther forward than on the larger flap. Tests of two 6-percent flaps spaced 180 deg apart showed a change in the sign of the lift developed for angular positions of the flap greater than 132 deg at subcriti- cal Reynolds numbers. These results may find use in application to air- craft using

  11. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  12. Computational study of the effect of Reynolds number and motion trajectory asymmetry on the aerodynamics of a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Patrick R.

    It is well established that natural flyers flap their wings to sustain flight due to poor performance of steady wing aerodynamics at low Reynolds number. Natural flyers also benefit from the propulsive force generated by flapping. Unsteady airfoils allow for simplified study of flapping wing aerodynamics. Limited previous work has suggested that both the Reynolds number and motion trajectory asymmetry play a non-negligible role in the resulting forces and wake structure of an oscillating airfoil. In this work, computations are performed to on this topic for a NACA 0012 airfoil purely pitching about its quarter-chord point. Two-dimensional computations are undertaken using the high-order, extensively validated FDL3DI Navier-Strokes solver developed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The Reynolds number range of this study is 2,000-22,000, reduced frequencies as high as 16 are considered, and the pitching amplitude varies from 2° to 10°. In order to simulate the incompressible limit with the current compressible solver, freestream Mach numbers as low as 0.005 are used. The wake structure is accurately resolved using an overset grid approach. The results show that the streamwise force depends on Reynolds number such that the drag-to-thrust crossover reduced frequency decreases with increasing Reynolds number at a given amplitude. As the amplitude increases, the crossover reduced frequency decreases at a given Reynolds number. The crossover frequency data show good collapse for all pitching amplitudes considered when expressed as the Strouhal number based on trailing edge-amplitude for different Reynolds numbers. Appropriate scaling causes the thrust data to become nearly independent of Reynolds number and amplitude. An increase in propulsive efficiency is observed as the Reynolds number increases while less dependence is seen in the peak-to-peak lift and drag amplitudes. Reynolds number dependence is also seen for the wake structure. The crossover reduced frequency

  13. High Reynolds number droplet de-pinning on textured surfaces: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungyon; Wilcox, Benjamin; Xu, Feng; White, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The stability of drops on surfaces subject to forcing by wind and gravity is relevant to heat exchangers, fuel cells, and aircraft icing, and it lacks understanding in a high Reynolds number regime. To experimentally investigate this phenomenon, water drops are placed on the rough aluminum floor of a tiltable wind tunnel and brought to critical conditions for varying drop sizes, inclination angles, and flow speeds. In particular, the evolving 3D droplet shapes under flow are reconstructed based on a laser-speckle interface measurement tool, while the critical flow rates of droplet depinning are also noted. By accounting for the contact angle hysteresis and the pressure build-up in a nearly turbulent boundary layer, the critical depinning flow rate is theoretically predicted and is compared to the experimental results. We also observe and explain the transition of the drop depinning behavior from inertia-dominated to gravity-dominated regimes at non-zero inclination angles.

  14. Experimental determination of the laminar separation bubble characteristics on an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omeara, M. M.; Mueller, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in order to document the structure and behavior of laminar separation bubbles at low Reynolds numbers. Data of this type is necessary if the currently insufficient analytical and numerical models are to be improved. The laminar separation bubble which forms on a NACA 66(3)-018 airfoil model was surveyed at chord Reynolds numbers ranging from 50,000 to 200,000 at angles of attack from 8 to 12 degrees. The effects of the various testing conditions on the separation bubble were isolated, and the data was analyzed in relation to existing separation bubble correlations in order to test their low Reynolds number applicability. This analysis indicated that the chord Reynolds number and the disturbance environment strongly influence the experimental pressure distributions. These effects must be included in any analytic prediction technique applied to the low Reynolds number flight regime.

  15. Unsteady behavior of a confined jet in a cavity at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, G.; Climent, E.

    2012-04-01

    Self-sustained oscillations in the sinuous mode are observed when a jet impinges on a rigid surface. Confined jet instability is experimentally and numerically investigated here at moderate Reynolds numbers. When the Reynolds number is varied, the dynamic response of the jet is unusual in comparison with that of similar configurations (hole-tone, jet edge, etc). Modal transitions are clearly detected when the Reynolds number is varied. However, these transitions result in a reduction of the frequency, which means that the wavelength grows with Reynolds number. Moreover, the instability that sets in at low Reynolds number, as a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, disappears only 25% above the threshold. Then, the flow becomes steady again and symmetric. This atypical behavior is compared with our previous study on a submerged fountain (Bouchet et al 2002 Europhys. Lett. 59 826).

  16. The influence of laminar separation and transition on low Reynolds number airfoil hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of the Lissaman 7769 and Miley MO6-13-128 airfoils at low chord Reynolds numbers is presented. Although both airfoils perform well near their design Reynolds number of about 600,000, they each produce a different type of hysteresis loop in the lift and drag forces when operated below chord Reynolds numbers of 300,000. The type of hysteresis loop was found to depend upon the relative location of laminar separation and transition. The influence of disturbance environment and experimental procedure on the low Reynolds number airfoil boundary layer behavior is also presented. The use of potential flow solutions to help predict how a given airfoil will behave at low Reynolds numbers is also discussed.

  17. A finite Reynolds number approach for the prediction of boundary layer receptivity in localized regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Street, Craig L.

    1991-01-01

    Previous theoretical work on the boundary layer receptivity problem has utilized large Reynolds number asymptotic theories, thus being limited to a narrow part of the frequency - Reynolds number domain. An alternative approach is presented for the prediction of localized instability generation which has a general applicability, and also accounts for finite Reynolds number effects. This approach is illustrated for the case of Tollmien-Schlichting wave generation in a Blasius boundary layer due to the interaction of a free stream acoustic wave with a region of short scale variation in the surface boundary condition. The specific types of wall inhomogeneities studied are: regions of short scale variations in wall suction, wall admittance, and wall geometry (roughness). Extensive comparison is made between the results of the finite Reynolds number approach and previous asymptotic predictions, which also suggests an alternative way of using the latter at Reynolds numbers of interest in practice.

  18. High-fidelity simulations of moving and flexible airfoils at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Miguel R.; Gordnier, Raymond E.; Galbraith, Marshall C.

    2009-05-01

    observed to be minor and the dynamic stall vortex system remains fairly coherent. For Re c = 4 × 104, the dynamic-stall vortex system is laminar at is inception, however shortly afterwards, it experiences an abrupt breakdown associated with the onset of spanwise instability effects. The computed phased-averaged structures for both values of Reynolds number are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the effect of structural compliance on the unsteady flow past a membrane airfoil is investigated. The membrane deformation results in mean camber and large fluctuations which improve aerodynamic performance. Larger values of lift and a delay in stall are achieved relative to a rigid airfoil configuration. For Re c = 4.85 × 104, it is shown that correct prediction of the transitional process is critical to capturing the proper membrane structural response.

  19. High-fidelity simulations of moving and flexible airfoils at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Miguel R.; Gordnier, Raymond E.; Galbraith, Marshall C.

    observed to be minor and the dynamic stall vortex system remains fairly coherent. For Re_c = 4 × 10^4, the dynamic-stall vortex system is laminar at is inception, however shortly afterwards, it experiences an abrupt breakdown associated with the onset of spanwise instability effects. The computed phased-averaged structures for both values of Reynolds number are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the effect of structural compliance on the unsteady flow past a membrane airfoil is investigated. The membrane deformation results in mean camber and large fluctuations which improve aerodynamic performance. Larger values of lift and a delay in stall are achieved relative to a rigid airfoil configuration. For Re_c = 4.85 × 10^4, it is shown that correct prediction of the transitional process is critical to capturing the proper membrane structural response.

  20. A comparison of three approaches to compute the effective Reynolds number of the implicit large-eddy simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Ye; Thornber, Ben

    2016-04-12

    Here, the implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) has been utilized as an effective approach for calculating many complex flows at high Reynolds number flows. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) induced flow can be viewed as a homogeneous decaying turbulence (HDT) after the passage of the shock. In this article, a critical evaluation of three methods for estimating the effective Reynolds number and the effective kinematic viscosity is undertaken utilizing high-resolution ILES data. Effective Reynolds numbers based on the vorticity and dissipation rate, or the integral and inner-viscous length scales, are found to be the most self-consistent when compared to the expected phenomenology andmore » wind tunnel experiments.« less

  1. Superfluid Reynolds number and the transition from potential flow to turbulence in superfluid 4He at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepe, W.

    2015-07-01

    This comment is on Phys. Rev. Lett. 144, 155302 (2015) by M.T. Reeves, T.P. Billam, B.P. Anderson, and A.S. Bradley "Identifying a superfluid Reynolds number via dynamical similarity" where a new superfluid Reynolds number is introduced. This definition is shown to be useful in the data analysis of the finite lifetime of turbulence observed with an oscillating sphere in superfluid helium at mK temperatures in a small velocity interval Δ v = ( v-v c ) just above the critical velocity v c . The very rapid increase in the lifetime with increasing superfluid Reynolds number is compared with the "supertransient" turbulence observed in classical pipe flow.

  2. Reynolds Number Effects on the Performance of Ailerons and Spoilers (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number on the performance of outboard spoilers and ailerons was investigated on a generic subsonic transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility over a chord Reynolds number range from 3 to 30 million and a Mach number range from 0.70 to 0.94. Spoiler deflection angles of 0, 10, and 20 degrees and aileron deflection angles of -10, 0, and 10 degrees were tested. Aeroelastic effects were minimized by testing at constant normalized dynamic pressure conditions over intermediate Reynolds number ranges. Results indicated that the increment in rolling moment due to spoiler deflection generally becomes more negative as the Reynolds number increases from 3 x 10(exp 6) to 22 x 10 (exp 6) with only small changes between Reynolds numbers of 22 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6). The change in the increment in rolling moment coefficient with Reynolds number for the aileron deflected configuration is generally small with a general trend of increasing magnitude with increasing Reynolds number.

  3. Time-dependent measurement of base pressure in a blowdown tunnel with varying unit Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangovi, S.; Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    An operational characteristic of blowdown-type of wind tunnels is the drop in the stagnation temperature with time and the accompanying change in the test-section unit Reynolds number at constant stagnation pressure and Mach number. This apparent disadvantage can be turned to advantage in some cases where a Reynolds number scan is desired in order to study the effect of unit Reynolds number variation on a particular viscous flow phenomenon. This note presents such an instance arising from recent investigations on base pressure at transonic speeds conducted in the NAL 1-ft tunnel.

  4. Large Eddy Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at high Reynolds number stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Dana; Goodman, Lou; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities (KHI) at high Reynolds numbers are performed using the Large Eddy Simulation technique. Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 are achieved using our model. The resulting data set is used to examine the effect of Reynolds number on various statistics, including dissipation flux coefficient, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and Thorpe length scale. It is shown that KHI are qualitatively different at high Re, up to and including the onset of vortex pairing and billow collapse and quantitatively different afterward. The effect of Richardson number is also examined. The results are discussed as they apply to ocean experiments.

  5. Support-sting interference on boattail pressure drag for Reynolds numbers up to 70 x 10 to the 6th

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.; Sewall, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    A model was tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel to investigate the effects of Reynolds number on boattail pressure drag for a variety of sting shapes. The boattail pressure drag for constant Mach number increased linearly with Reynolds number over the Reynolds number range tested. The data indicated that, as the disturbance produced by the sting on the boattail increased, the boattail pressure drag became less sensitive to Reynolds number change. Also, it was found that the model base pressure versus Reynolds number curve reached a plateau within the Reynolds number range examined.

  6. Reynolds Number Effects on the Stability and Control Characteristics of a Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. R.; Wahls, R. A.; Elzey, M. B.; Hamner, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. A series of tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results presented focus on Reynolds number sensitivities of the stability and control characteristics at Mach 0.30 and 0.95 for a complete HSCT aircraft configuration including empennage. The angle of attack where the pitching-moment departure occurred increased with higher Reynolds numbers for both the landing and transonic configurations. The stabilizer effectiveness increased with Reynolds number for both configurations. The directional stability also increased with Reynolds number for both configurations. The landing configuration without forebody chines exhibited a large yawing-moment departure at high angles of attack and zero sideslip that varied with increasing Reynolds numbers. This departure characteristic nearly disappeared when forebody chines were added. The landing configuration's rudder effectiveness also exhibited sensitivities to changes in Reynolds number.

  7. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Subsonic High-Lift Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L.R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.30 for a configuration without an empennage. A fundamental change in flow-state occurred between Reynolds numbers of 30 to 40 million, which is characterized by significantly earlier inboard leading-edge separation at the high Reynolds numbers. Force and moment levels change but Reynolds number trends are consistent between the two states.

  8. Study of Low Reynolds Number Effects on the Losses in Low-Pressure Turbine Blade Rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Ashpis, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data from jet-engine tests have indicated that unsteady blade row interactions and separation can have a significant impact on the efficiency of low-pressure turbine stages. Measured turbine efficiencies at takeoff can be as much as two points higher than those at cruise conditions. Several recent studies have revealed that Reynolds number effects may contribute to the lower efficiencies at cruise conditions. In the current study numerical experiments have been performed to study the models available for low Reynolds number flows, and to quantify the Reynolds number dependence of low-pressure turbine cascades and stages. The predicted aerodynamic results exhibit good agreement with design data.

  9. Low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1986-01-01

    The present status of various types of low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research being conducted at the Fluid Dynamics Branch of NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed. The facilities, testing techniques, airfoil design, and experimental verification are addressed, and ongoing studies of laminar separation bubbles, boundary layer stability and transition control, and low-Reynolds number juncture flow are discussed. The possibility of improving vehicle characteristics at low Reynolds numbers and the general trends of the most promising research in these areas are examined.

  10. Reynolds number effects on the transonic aerodynamics of a slender wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Cundiff, Jeffrey S.

    1989-01-01

    Aerodynamic forces and moments for a slender wing-body configuration are summarized from an investigation in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The results include both longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic properties as well as slideslip derivatives. Results were selected to emphasize Reynolds number effects at a transonic speed although some lower speed results are also presented for context. The data indicate nominal Reynolds number effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients and more pronounced effects for the lateral-directional aerodynamic coefficients. The Reynolds number sensitivities for the lateral-directional coefficients were limited to high angles of attack.

  11. Merging of shielded Gaussian vortices and formation of a tripole at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Házi, Gábor

    2010-05-01

    The interaction between two corotating shielded Gaussian vortices is studied by two-dimensional numerical simulations at low Reynolds numbers. It is shown that the outcome of the interactions can be a shielded monopole, a tripole, or dipolar breaking depending on the initial separation distance and Reynolds number. A flow regime map is given in the parameter space of initial separation distance and Reynolds number. Using formal decomposition for vorticity, we show that the tripole formation is due the same physical mechanism than merging of unshielded vortices, while in dipolar breaking both the symmetric and antisymmetric vorticity contributions play important role.

  12. An experimental investigation of wall boundary layer transition Reynolds numbers in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental measurements of boundary-layer transition in an expansion-tube test-gas flow are presented along with radial distributions of pitot pressure. An integral method for calculating constant Reynolds number lines for an expansion-tube flow is introduced. Comparison of experimental data and constant Reynolds number calculations has shown that for given conditions, wall boundary-layer transition occurs at a constant Reynolds number in an expansion-tube flow. Operating conditions in the expansion tube were chosen so that the effects of test-gas nonequilibrium on boundary-layer transition could be studied.

  13. The variation with Reynolds number of pressure distribution over an airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Robert M

    1938-01-01

    Pressures were simultaneously measured at 54 orifices distributed over the midspan section of a 5 by 30-inch rectangular model of the NACA 4412 airfoil in the variable-density tunnel. These measurements were made at 17 angles of attack from -20 degrees to 30 degrees for eight values of the effective Reynolds number form approximately 100,000 to 8,200,000. Accurate data were thus obtained for studying the variation of pressure distribution with Reynolds number. These results on the NACA 4412 section indicated that the pressure distribution is practically unaffected by changes in Reynolds number except where separation is involved.

  14. The Stealth Biplane: a Proposal in Response to a Low Reynolds Number Station Keeping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Timothy E.; Flynn, Kevin T.; Donovan, Steven; Paul, Chris; Pangilinan, Harold; Padgett, John; Twomey, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The Stealth Biplane is conceived and constructed to serve as a remotely piloted vehicle designed to navigate a low-level figure-eight course at a target Reynolds number of 100,000. This flight vehicle will combine the latest in lightweight radio controlled hardware in conjunction with current low Reynolds number aerodynamic research to demonstrate feasible operation in a variety of applications. These potential low Reynolds number applications include high altitude atmospheric sampling, search and rescue, and even law enforcement. Design specs and fabrication technique are discussed.

  15. Influence of the Reynolds number on normal forces of slender bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, K.

    1982-01-01

    Comprehensive force, moment, and pressure distribution measurements as well as flow visualization experiments were carried out to determine the influence of the Reynolds number on nonlinear normal forces of slender bodies of revolution. Experiments were performed in transonic wind tunnels at angles of attack up to 90 deg in the Mach number range 0.5 to 2.2 at variable Reynolds numbers. The results were analysed theoretically and an empirical theory was developed which describes the test results satisfactory.

  16. Unsteady pressure measurements on a supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Steady and unsteady pressures were measured on a 14 percent supercritical airfoil at transonic Mach numbers at Reynolds numbers from 6,000,000 to 35,000,000. Instrumentation techniques were developed to measure unsteady pressures in a cryogenic tunnel at flight Reynolds numbers. Experimental steady data, corrected for wall effects show very good agreement with calculations from a full potential code with an interacted boundary layer. The steady and unsteady pressures both show a shock position that is dependent on Reynolds number. For a supercritical pressure distribution at a chord Reynolds number of 35,000,000 laminar flow was observed between the leading edge and the shock wave at 45 percent chord.

  17. Investigation of Reynolds Number Effects on a Generic Fighter Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomek, W. G.; Hall, R. M.; Wahls, R. A.; Luckring, J. M.; Owens, L. R.

    2002-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a generic fighter configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility through a cooperative agreement between NASA Langley Research Center and McDonnell Douglas. The primary purpose of the test was to assess Reynolds number scale effects on a thin-wing, fighter-type configuration up to full-scale flight conditions (that is, Reynolds numbers of the order of 60 million). The test included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at subsonic and transonic conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to flight conditions. Results are presented for three Mach numbers (0.6, 0.8, and 0.9) and three configurations: (1) Fuselage/Wing; (2) Fuselage/Wing/Centerline Vertical Tail/Horizontal Tail; and (3) Fuselage/Wing/Trailing-Edge Extension/Twin Vertical Tails. Reynolds number effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are presented herein.

  18. Flow in a differentially rotated cylindrical drop at moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, G. M.; Brown, R. A.

    1984-07-01

    Galerkin finite-element approximations are combined with computer-implemented perturbation methods for tracking families of solutions to calculate the steady axisymmetric flows in a differentially rotated cylindrical drop as a function of Reynolds number Re, drop aspect ratio and the rotation ratio between the two end disks. The flows for Reynolds numbers below 100 are primarily viscous and reasonably described by an asymptotic analysis. When the disks are exactly counter-rotated, multiple steady flows are calculated that bifurcate to higher values of Re from the expected solution with two identical secondary cells stacked symmetrically about the axial midplane. The new flows have two cells of different size and are stable beyond the critical value Re sub c. The slope of the locus of Re sub c for drops with aspect ratio up to 3 disagrees with the result for two disks of infinite radius computed assuming the similarity form of the velocity field. Changing the rotation ratio for exact counter-rotation ruptures the junction of the multiple flow fields into two separated flow families.

  19. Low Reynolds number turbulence modeling of blood flow in arterial stenoses.

    PubMed

    Ghalichi, F; Deng, X; De Champlain, A; Douville, Y; King, M; Guidoin, R

    1998-01-01

    Moderate and severe arterial stenoses can produce highly disturbed flow regions with transitional and or turbulent flow characteristics. Neither laminar flow modeling nor standard two-equation models such as the kappa-epsilon turbulence ones are suitable for this kind of blood flow. In order to analyze the transitional or turbulent flow distal to an arterial stenosis, authors of this study have used the Wilcox low-Re turbulence model. Flow simulations were carried out on stenoses with 50, 75 and 86% reductions in cross-sectional area over a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers. The results obtained with this low-Re turbulence model were compared with experimental measurements and with the results obtained by the standard kappa-epsilon model in terms of velocity profile, vortex length, wall shear stress, wall static pressure, and turbulence intensity. The comparisons show that results predicted by the low-Re model are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This model accurately predicts the critical Reynolds number at which blood flow becomes transitional or turbulent distal an arterial stenosis. Most interestingly, over the Re range of laminar flow, the vortex length calculated with the low-Re model also closely matches the vortex length predicted by laminar flow modeling. In conclusion, the study strongly suggests that the proposed model is suitable for blood flow studies in certain areas of the arterial tree where both laminar and transitional/turbulent flows coexist. PMID:10474655

  20. A universal prediction of stall onset for airfoils at a wide range of Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Wallace J., II

    The inception of leading-edge stall on two-dimensional, smooth, thin airfoils at various Reynolds number flows in the range O(103) to O(107) is investigated by an asymptotic approach and numerical simulations. The theory demonstrates that a subsonic flow about a thin airfoil can be described in terms of an outer region, around most of the airfoil chord, and an inner region, around the nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled coordinates and a modified Reynolds number ReM, both based on the nose radius of curvature, are used to account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the nose region, where stagnation and high suction occur. It results in a reduced-order model problem of a uniform, compressible, viscous flow past a semi-infinite canonic parabola. The inner far-field is governed by a circulation parameter A that is related to the airfoil's angle of attack, nose radius of curvature, thickness ratio, camber, and flow Mach number. The model parabola problem is solved numerically for various ReM and A using two methods. The first technique uses the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for simulating moderate to high ReM flows. The second method applies direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the unsteady and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for low to moderate ReM flows. In both methods, the critical value As is determined when a large separation zone first appears in the nose flow and the minimum pressure coefficient suddenly drops. The change of As with ReM is determined and these values indicate the onset of stall on the airfoil. The DNS results show that As decreases with ReM for ReM < ˜250, in agreement with Marginal Separation Theory (MST). However, calculations display the appearance of unsteady waves above a limiting value ReMcrit ˜250, where A s reaches a minimum of ˜1.55. For Re

  1. Turbulence Model Comparisons and Reynolds Number Effects Over a High-Speed Aircraft at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a grid study, a turbulence model study, and a Reynolds number effect study for transonic flows over a high-speed aircraft using the thin-layer, upwind, Navier-Stokes CFL3D code. The four turbulence models evaluated are the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications, the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, and Menter's two-equation Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests performed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF), are a Mach number of 0.90 and a Reynolds number of 30 million based on chord for a range of angle-of-attacks (1 degree to 10 degrees). For the Reynolds number effect study, Reynolds numbers of 10 and 80 million based on chord were also evaluated. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental data for all four of the turbulence models. The Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model show the best agreement with experiment overall. The Reynolds number effects are evaluated using the Baldwin-Lomax with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the Baldwin-Barth turbulence models. Five angles-of-attack were evaluated for the Reynolds number effect study at three different Reynolds numbers. More work is needed to determine the ability of CFL3D to accurately predict Reynolds number effects.

  2. Wall-modeling for large-eddy simulation of high Reynolds number supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan; Lele, Sanjiva

    2010-11-01

    We present an idea of approximate wall-boundary-condition approach with dynamic procedure for large-eddy simulation of Mach 3 supersonic turbulent boundary layer at various Reynolds numbers (Reδ=2 x10^4, 10^5 and 10^6) on a flat plate. This wall-model is the extension of previous work by Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluid, 14, 2043 (2002)] for incompressible flows to compressible flows. We note that the present study is both the first extension of the dynamic concept to compressible flows and also the first test at high Reynolds number flows. The present study also revisits the issue of numerical errors near wall-region on outer-layer coarse LES mesh. The numerical results are compared with wall-resolved LES data (at low Reynolds number case) and available experimental data (at high Reynolds number case).

  3. Inertial focusing of spherical particles in rectangular microchannels over a wide range of Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Xingyu; Sun, Jiashu

    2015-02-21

    Inertial microfluidics has emerged as an important tool for manipulating particles and cells. For a better design of inertial microfluidic devices, we conduct 3D direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experiments to determine the complicated dependence of focusing behaviour on the particle size, channel aspect ratio, and channel Reynolds number. We find that the well-known focusing of the particles at the two centers of the long channel walls occurs at a relatively low Reynolds number, whereas additional stable equilibrium positions emerge close to the short walls with increasing Reynolds number. Based on the numerically calculated trajectories of particles, we propose a two-stage particle migration which is consistent with experimental observations. We further present a general criterion to secure good focusing of particles for high flow rates. This work thus provides physical insight into the multiplex focusing of particles in rectangular microchannels with different geometries and Reynolds numbers, and paves the way for efficiently designing inertial microfluidic devices. PMID:25563524

  4. The Penguin: a Low Reynolds Number Powered Glider for Station Keeping Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, J. K.; Greene, D. W.; Lee, T. T.; Matier, P. T.; Mccarthy, T. R.; Mcguire, R. J.; Schuette, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The Penguin is a low Reynolds number (approx. 100,000) remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). It was designed to fly three laps indoors around two pylons in a figure-eight course while maximizing loiter time. The Penguin's low Reynolds number mission is an important one currently being studied for possible future flights in the atmospheres of other planets and for specialized military missions. Although the Penguin's mission seemed quite simple at first, the challenges of such low Reynolds number flight have proven to be quite unique. In addition to the constraint of low Reynolds number flight, the aircraft had to be robust in its control, highly durable, and it had to carry a small instrument package. The Penguin's flight plan, concept, performance, aerodynamic design, weight estimation, structural design, propulsion, stability and control, and cost estimate is detailed.

  5. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  6. Amplification of Reynolds number dependent processes by wave distortion. [liquid fuel combustor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    The amplification of a Reynolds number dependent process by wave distortion and the possibility of applying the results to other similar Reynolds number dependent processes were investigated. The process investigated was that associated with the operation of a constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer. The application of vaporization limited combustion, the type of combustion typically associated with liquid propellant rocket engines, was studied. A series of experiments were carried out to determine the effect of wave distortion on a Reynolds number dependent process and to establish the analogy between the anemometer process and the combustion process. Parametric trends, behavior common to different chamber geometries, and stability boundaries were identified. The results indicate a high degree of similarity between the two processes and the possibility of using the anemometer system to investigate combustion instability. The nonlinear aspects of a Reynolds number dependent process appear to be the dominant mechanisms controlling instability.

  7. Model-based control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Simon J.

    2016-03-01

    Model-based feedback control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers is considered. The feedback signal is provided by velocity measurements in the wake, and actuation is achieved using blowing and suction on the cylinder's surface. Using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and reduced-order modelling techniques, linear models of the wake are formed at Reynolds numbers between 45 and 110. These models are used to design feedback controllers using H_∞ loop-shaping. Complete suppression of shedding is demonstrated up to Re = 110—both for a single-sensor arrangement and for a three-sensor arrangement. The robustness of the feedback controllers is also investigated by applying them over a range of off-design Reynolds numbers, and good robustness properties are seen. It is also observed that it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve acceptable control performance—measured in a suitable way—as Reynolds number increases.

  8. Wind tunnel tests of two airfoils for wind turbines operating at high reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, D.; Tangler, J.

    2000-06-29

    The objectives of this study were to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for Reynolds numbers up to 6 x 106 and to acquire the section characteristics of two airfoils being considered for large, megawatt-size wind turbines. One airfoil, the S825, was designed to achieve a high maximum lift coefficient suitable for variable-speed machines. The other airfoil, the S827, was designed to achieve a low maximum lift coefficient suitable for stall-regulated machines. Both airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) for smooth, fixed-transition, and rough surface conditions at Reynolds numbers of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 x 106. The results show the maximum lift coefficient of both airfoils is substantially underpredicted for Reynolds numbers over 3 x 106 and emphasized the difficulty of designing low-lift airfoils for high Reynolds numbers.

  9. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  10. Experimental measurements of the laminar separation bubble on an Eppler 387 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gregory M.; Mueller, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to measure the flow velocity in the boundary layer of an Eppler 387 airfoil. In particular, the laminar separation bubble that this airfoil exhibits at low Reynolds numbers was the focus. Single component laser Doppler velocimetry data were obtained at a Reynolds number of 100,000 at an angle of attack of 2.0 degree. Static Pressure and flow visualization data for the Eppler 387 airfoil were also obtained. The difficulty in obtaining accurate experimental measurements at low Reynolds numbers is addressed. Laser Doppler velocimetry boundary layer data for the NACA 663-018 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 160,000 and angle of attack of 12 degree is also presented.

  11. Catalog of low-Reynolds-number airfoil data for wind-turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, S.J.

    1982-02-01

    A literature survey was performed to acquire airfoil data at low Reynolds numbers which would be applicable to small wind energy conversion systems. The data were screened and the most reliable compiled into a catalog. Each entry includes airfoil coordinates, lift, drag and pitching moment characteristics in both graphical and tabular form. A discussion in elementary terms is given concerning airfoil behavior and the effects of Reynolds number, surface roughness and turbulence.

  12. The effect of Reynolds number on transonic compressor blade rotor section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Shahrabi Farahani, A.; Khazaei, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the effect of Reynolds number on transonic compressor blade rotor section is investigated. After passing through the first transonic compressor stages , the flow becomes remarkably compressed. In the present work, it is intended to numerically investigate the effects of the inflow Reynolds number on the unique incidence, flow losses, deviation angle, and shock position, at three different important points of "Minimum Loss" and "Choked Flow" in started conditions and "Stall Operation" in un-started conditions.

  13. Reynolds number scaling of coherent vortex simulation and stochastic coherent adaptive large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza; Vezolainen, Alexei; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2013-11-01

    In view of the ongoing longtime pursuit of numerical approaches that can capture important flow physics of high Reynolds number flows with fewest degrees of freedom, two important wavelet-based multi-resolution schemes are thoroughly examined, namely, the Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) and the Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulation (SCALES) with constant and spatially/temporarily variable thresholding. Reynolds number scaling of active spatial modes for CVS and SCALES of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is investigated in dynamic study for the first time. This dynamic computational complexity study demonstrates that wavelet-based methods can capture flow-physics while using substantially fewer degrees of freedom than both direct numerical simulation and marginally resolved LES with the same level of fidelity or turbulence resolution, defined as ratio of subgrid scale and the total dissipations. The study provides four important observations: (1) the linear Reynolds number scaling of energy containing structures at a fixed level of kinetic energy, (2) small, close to unity, fractal dimension for constant-threshold CVS and SCALES simulations, (3) constant, close to two, fractal dimension for constant-dissipation SCALES that is insensitive to the level of fidelity, and (4) faster than quadratic decay of the compression ratio as a function of turbulence resolution. The very promising slope for Reynolds number scaling of CVS and SCALES demonstrates the potential of the wavelet-based methodologies for hierarchical multiscale space/time adaptive variable fidelity simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows.

  14. Influence of Reynolds number on performance modeling of horizontal axis wind rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.D.; Cromack, D.E.

    1988-05-01

    This paper investigates the influence of Reynolds number on performance modeling of horizontal axis wind rotors. A procedure for accounting for Reynolds number effects on airfoil section models was developed and implemented for NACA 0012 and NACA 4415 profiles; both of these models is valid through angles of attack up to 90 deg and for Reynolds numbers ranging from 4 x 10/sup 4/ to 3 x 10/sup 6/. These models were incorporated into both a lifting line computer code, LL200R, adapted for this report. This enabled greater uncertainty to be obtained in evaluating theoretical performance codes with respect to actual data, as well as providing a means by which a parametric analysis of the relative effects of Re changes on rotor performance to be performed. The use of low Reynolds number section data was found to significantly lower the predicted values of power coefficient, particularly at off-design tip speed-ratios. For symmetrical airfoils, this effect on performance was only significant for low tip-speed- ratios, while cambered airfoils were affected more uniformly at all operating conditions. Changes in performance were induced by parametric variations of wind speed, rotor scale, and rotor generating mode using the Reynolds number dependent section models. Results show that wind speed variations are more significant for smaller rotors at lower wind-speeds, and section models represented at only a single Reynolds number are more suitable for the analysis of constant RPM rotors.

  15. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  16. Investigation of the Turbulent Bursting Period over a Very Large Reynolds Number Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Larreta, Enrique; Metzger, Meredith

    2008-11-01

    The present study examines Reynolds number scaling of the average bursting period, Tb, over a Reynolds number range spanning three orders of magnitude, using hot-wire anemometry measurements from combined wind tunnel and field experiments. Wind tunnel data were obtained from the study of Klewicki and Falco (1990) at Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness of Reθ=1010, 2870, 4850; while the field data were acquired at the Surface Layer Turbulence and Environmental Test (SLTEST) facility at Reθ=5x10^6. Ejection events were detected from streamwise velocity time series using the U-Level algorithm of Lu and Wilmarth (1973). Events appearing in close succession were grouped into multiple event bursts using a statistical iterative approach based on pattern clustering. Four different Reynolds number scalings of Tb were investigated, namely: inner, outer, mixed, and intermediate. Data reveal that, of these four types of scalings, the Taylor microscale performs the best in removing Reynolds number dependencies in Tb. In addition, the present data reveal that outer scaled values of Tb decrease by two orders of magnitude over the range of Reynolds numbers; while inner scaled values of Tb increase by one order of magnitude.

  17. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  18. Fluid-structure analysis of a flexible flapping airfoil at low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Ralf; Haupt, Matthias C.; Horst, Peter; Radespiel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a coupling simulation methodology is applied to investigate the fluid flow around a light and flexible airfoil based on a handfoil of a seagull. A finite element model of the flexible airfoil is fully coupled to the flow solver by using a load and displacement transfer as well as a fluid grid deformation algorithm. The flow field is characterized by a laminar-turbulent transition at a Reynolds number of Re=100 000, which takes place along a laminar separation bubble. An unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver is used to take this transition process into account by comparison of a critical N-factor with the N-factor computed by the eN-method. Results of computations have shown that the flexibility of the airfoil has a major influence on the thrust efficiency, the mean drag and lift, and the location of laminar-turbulent transition. The thrust efficiency can be considerably improved by increasing the plunging amplitude and by using a time dependent airfoil stiffness, inspired by the muscle contraction of birds.

  19. Anomalous dissipation and kinetic-energy distribution in pipes at very high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wei, Bo-Bo; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A symmetry-based theory is developed for the description of (streamwise) kinetic energy K in turbulent pipes at extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re's). The theory assumes a mesolayer with continual deformation of wall-attached eddies which introduce an anomalous dissipation, breaking the exact balance between production and dissipation. An outer peak of K is predicted above a critical Re of 10^{4}, in good agreement with experimental data. The theory offers an alternative explanation for the recently discovered logarithmic distribution of K. The concept of anomalous dissipation is further supported by a significant modification of the k-ω equation, yielding an accurate prediction of the entire K profile. PMID:26871016

  20. Backward-facing step measurements at low Reynolds number, Re(sub h)=5000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srba; Driver, David M.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study of the flow over a backward-facing step at low Reynolds number was performed for the purpose of validating a direct numerical simulation (DNS) which was performed by the Stanford/NASA Center for Turbulence Research. Previous experimental data on back step flows were conducted at Reynolds numbers and/or expansion ratios which were significantly different from that of the DNS. The geometry of the experiment and the simulation were duplicated precisely, in an effort to perform a rigorous validation of the DNS. The Reynolds number used in the DNS was Re(sub h)=5100 based on step height, h. This was the maximum possible Reynolds number that could be economically simulated. The boundary layer thickness, d, was approximately 1.0 h in the simulation and the expansion ratio was 1.2. The Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness, Re(sub theta), upstream of the step was 610. All of these parameters were matched experimentally. Experimental results are presented in the form of tables, graphs and a floppy disk (for easy access to the data). An LDV instrument was used to measure mean velocity components and three Reynolds stresses components. In addition, surface pressure and skin friction coefficients were measured. LDV measurements were acquired in a measuring domain which included the recirculating flow region.

  1. Investigation of a co-flowing buoyant jet - Experiments on the effect of Reynolds number and Richardson number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, E. R.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a vertical jet of helium issuing into a co-flow of air at a fixed exit velocity ratio of 2 was investigated experimentally over a wide range of governing parameters with emphasis on flow structure and the scaling properties of the natural frequency of the jet. The experiments were conducted in a variable-pressure facility, which made it possible to vary the Reynolds number and the Richardson number independently. At all the experimental conditions studied, the flow exhibits a strong self-excited periodicity. A buoyancy Strouhal number is defined and used to correlate frequency data from the approximately seventy different Reynolds and Richardson numbers studied. The buoyancy Strouhal number is found to be nearly independent of Reynolds number and Richardson number for Richardson numbers greater than one.

  2. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  3. The effects of Reynolds number and Richardson number on the structure of a vertical co-flowing buoyant jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, E. R.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of a vertical jet of helium issuing into a coflow of air at a fixed exit velocity ratio of 2.0 has been studied for various Reynolds numbers and Richardson numbers. It is found that the transition to turbulence is very sudden and that the point of transition moves closer to the jet exit as either the Reynolds number or the Richardson number increases. Under most of the conditions considered, the flow exhibits a strong periodic longitudinal instability whose wavelength increases with Richardson number.

  4. An experimental study of high Reynolds number turbulence in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruva, Brindesh R.

    2000-11-01

    High Reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer has been investigated using constant temperature hot-wire anemometry. The Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers (Rλ) were typically between 5 × 103 at 2 meters in the salt flats of Western Utah and 2 × 104 at 35 meters on the meterological tower of Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island. The measurements were used to study the statistical properties of inertial range quantities, Reynolds stress and wind direction. The identification of possible self- similar behavior in the inertial range is a primary goal in turbulence research. To motivate the need for high Reynolds number measurements we demonstrate the Reynolds number effect on the existence and extent of the inertial range. We find that the inertial range is non-existent at typical laboratory Reynolds numbers. We thus turn to high Reynolds numbers and analyze the asymmetry in the probability distribution function (pdf) of the longitudinal velocity increment. We compute the scaling exponents of the positive and negative structure functions and find that the negative exponents are more anomalous than the positive ones. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution to the asymmetry-or the skewness-from different regions of the pdf. We find that the core region of the pdf is more or less symmetric and the skewness comes primarily from the rare large amplitude events contained in the tails of the pdf. We discuss this result in the context of the down-scale cascade of energy. Next it is shown that even at Rλ ~ 20,000 the structure functions do not scale unambiguously-although the situation is far better than that at low Reynolds numbers. By applying various filtering techniques and conditional sampling it is shown that this lack of strict scaling even at very high Reynolds numbers is due to large scale ``corrupting effects'' on the inertial range. We propose a plausible scheme to remove the large scale effects. Next, we characterize the

  5. Qualification of a Method to Calculate the Irrecoverable Pressure Loss in High Reynolds Number Piping Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, K. C.; Coffield, R. D.

    2002-09-01

    High Reynolds number test data has recently been reported for both single and multiple piping elbow design configurations at earlier ASME Fluid Engineering Division conferences. The data of these studies ranged up to a Reynolds number of 42 x 10[sup]6 which is significantly greater than that used to establish design correlations before the data was available. Many of the accepted design correlations, based on the lower Reynolds number data, date back as much as fifty years. The new data shows that these earlier correlations are extremely conservative for high Reynolds number applications. Based on the recent high Reynolds number information a new recommended method has been developed for calculating irrecoverable pressure loses in piping systems for design considerations such as establishing pump sizing requirements. This paper describes the recommended design approach and additional testing that has been performed as part of the qualification of the method. This qualification testing determined the irrecoverable pressure loss of a piping configuration that would typify a limiting piping section in a complicated piping network, i.e., multiple, tightly coupled, out-of-plane elbows in series under high Reynolds number flow conditions. The overall pressure loss measurements were then compared to predictions, which used the new methodology to assure that conservative estimates for the pressure loss (of the type used for pump sizing) were obtained. The recommended design methodology, the qualification testing and the comparison between the predictions and the test data are presented. A major conclusion of this study is that the recommended method for calculating irrecoverable pressure loss in piping systems is conservative yet significantly lower than predicted by early design correlations that were based on the extrapolation of low Reynolds number test data.

  6. Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, A.E.

    1939-01-01

    In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the NACA 23012. The possibility of maintaining a more extensive laminar boundary layer on these airfoils should result in a small drag reduction, and the absence of pressure peaks allows higher speeds to be reached before the compressibility burble is encountered. At lower Reynold numbers, below about 10,000,000, these airfoils have higher drags than airfoils designed to operate with very extensive laminar boundary layers.

  7. Reynolds number effects on the vortical-flow structure generated by a double-delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, S. K.; Platzer, M. F.; Fritzelas, A. E.

    An experimental investigation of the high-incidence vortical flowfield over a 76/40° double-delta wing model with sharp leading edges was conducted in the Naval Postgraduate School water tunnel facility at three nominal flow Reynolds numbers of 15000, 45000, and 75000 (based on centerline chord). Extensive flow visualization studies were performed with the dye-injection technique, followed by laser Doppler velocity measurements. The primary objective of this investigation was the determination of the influence of Reynolds number on vortex interactions/trajectories, and breakdown. It was found that there is a significant influence of Reynolds number. Specifically, with the increase of flow Reynolds number the strake and wing vortex trajectories tend to move outboards and closer to the model surface, and the vortex breakdown location moves forwards toward the apex of the model. The intertwining or coiling-up feature of the vortex interaction phenomenon becomes less dominant and disappears altogether at high Reynolds numbers. These trends in the vortex interaction and bursting data are found to be in good agreement with previous wind tunnel data.

  8. The influence of Reynolds numbers on resistance properties of jet pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Q.; Zhou, G.; Li, Q.

    2014-01-29

    Jet pumps are widely used in thermoacoustic Stirling heat engines and pulse tube cryocoolers to eliminate the effect of Gedeon streaming. The resistance properties of jet pumps are principally influenced by their structures and flow regimes which are always characterized by Reynolds numbers. In this paper, the jet pump of which cross section contracts abruptly is selected as our research subject. Based on linear thermoacoustic theory, a CFD model is built and the oscillating flow of the working gas is simulated and analyzed with different Reynolds numbers in the jet pump. According to the calculations, the influence of different structures and Reynolds numbers on the resistance properties of the jet pump are analyzed and presented. The results show that Reynolds numbers have a great influence on the resistance properties of jet pumps and some empirical formulas which are widely used are unsuitable for oscillating flow with small Reynolds numbers. This paper provides a more comprehensive understanding on resistance properties of jet pumps with oscillating flow and is significant for the design of jet pumps in practical thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, Myra L.; Maniaci, David Charles; Resor, Brian R.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  10. The influence of Reynolds numbers on resistance properties of jet pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Q.; Zhou, G.; Li, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Jet pumps are widely used in thermoacoustic Stirling heat engines and pulse tube cryocoolers to eliminate the effect of Gedeon streaming. The resistance properties of jet pumps are principally influenced by their structures and flow regimes which are always characterized by Reynolds numbers. In this paper, the jet pump of which cross section contracts abruptly is selected as our research subject. Based on linear thermoacoustic theory, a CFD model is built and the oscillating flow of the working gas is simulated and analyzed with different Reynolds numbers in the jet pump. According to the calculations, the influence of different structures and Reynolds numbers on the resistance properties of the jet pump are analyzed and presented. The results show that Reynolds numbers have a great influence on the resistance properties of jet pumps and some empirical formulas which are widely used are unsuitable for oscillating flow with small Reynolds numbers. This paper provides a more comprehensive understanding on resistance properties of jet pumps with oscillating flow and is significant for the design of jet pumps in practical thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators.

  11. Evaluation of high Reynolds number flow in a 180 degree turn-around-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.; Marcy, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mean and turbulent velocities were measured for the flow in a 180 degree turn-around-duct over a Reynolds number range from 600,000 to greater than 900,000. The measurements were made in water using a forward scattering laser velocimeter. A duct of 100 x 10 cm constant cross-section, with a mean radius of curvature (centerline) of 10 cm was employed for the study. The measurements are in agreement with previous studies in that the use of local bulk velocity to nondimensionalize the mean and turbulent velocities reduce the Reynolds number variations. The basic phenomenon of relaminarization along the inner surface at the exit of the turn are similar to the flow observed at low Reynolds numbers. The separation bubble region shows a systematic variation with Reynolds number, however the Reynolds number effect may be of second order in the calculation of the overall flow. Large tangential, radial, and lateral turbulent velocities are measured along the outer surface of the turn.

  12. Aeroacoustic Data for a High Reynolds Number Axisymmetric Subsonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Ukeiley, Lawrence S.; Lee, Sang W.

    1999-01-01

    The near field fluctuating pressure and aerodynamic mean flow characteristics of a cold subsonic jet issuing from a contoured convergent nozzle are presented. The data are presented for nozzle exit Mach numbers of 0.30, 0.60, and 0.85 at a constant jet stagnation temperature of 104 F. The fluctuating pressure measurements were acquired via linear and semi-circular microphone arrays and the presented results include plots of narrowband spectra, contour maps, streamwise/azimuthal spatial correlations for zero time delay, and cross-spectra of the azimuthal correlations. A pitot probe was used to characterize the mean flow velocity by assuming the subsonic flow to be pressure-balanced with the ambient field into which it exhausts. Presented are mean flow profiles and the momentum thickness of the free shear layer as a function of streamwise position.

  13. Selective decay hypothesis at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1980-12-01

    Implications of certain applications of turbulence theory to two-dimensional turbulence and magnetohydrodynamic flow are discussed. It is shown that the use of the Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) for measurements of turbulent fluctuations has been effective only for three-dimensional flows. For two-dimensional flows, used for the study of large-scale motions in the atmosphere or ocean, enstrophy is cascaded to high wave numbers and dissipated at a finite rate even at infinite Re. MHD flows are numerically calculated for the two-dimensional case and analytically for the three-dimensional case, for which discrepancies in the relative rates of energy and cross helicity decay lead to a recommendation that numerical calculations for the three-dimensional case be carried out to determine the precise decayed states.

  14. A High Altitude-Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Don; Krake, Keith; Hamory, Phil; Drela, Mark; Lee, Seunghee (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane is currently being developed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to support a high altitude flight experiment. The purpose of the experiment is to measure the performance characteristics of an airfoil at altitudes between 100,000 and 70,000 feet at Mach numbers between 0.65 and 0.5. The airfoil lift and drag are measured from pilot and static pressures. The location of the separation bubble and vortex shedding are measured from a hot film strip. The details of the flight experiment are presented. A comparison of several estimates of the airfoil performance is also presented. The airfoil, APEX-16, was designed by Drela (MIT) with his MSES code. A two dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis has been performed by Tatineni and Zhong (UCLA) and another at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The role these analysis served to define the experiment is discussed.

  15. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  16. A Study of Hypersonic Compression-Corner Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetlutsky, V. N.; Ganimedov, V. L.

    2002-07-01

    To numerically solve the problem for the ramp flow at high Reynolds number, it is justified to use the classical Prandtl model and to part the flow into an inviscid region and a thin boundary layer. This model is based on a rigorous asymptotic theory and describes the flow the more accurately, the higher the Reynolds number is. Since a flow separation in a compression corner may occur, the present work deals with unsteady boundary-layer equations. The approximation error in discretization of boundary-layer equations is always smaller than the value of viscid terms since the Reynolds number can be eliminated from the equations by a suitable substitution of variables. Besides, the requirement for the sufficient number of points in the cross-flow direction can be fulfilled in the case of middle-class computers since the solution is being built in a narrow near-wall region.

  17. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  18. Separation over a flat plate-wedge configuration at oceanic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of flow over a two-dimensional flat plate-wedge configuration is presented. The investigation encompasses a range of Reynolds numbers characteristics of conditions encountered by deep submersible oceanic vehicles. Flow separation, similar to that found on high speed aircraft control surfaces, is reported and discussed in light of the laminar or transitional nature of the separated shear layer. As discovered in previous high Mach number studies of plate-wedge or ramp configurations, the dependency of the size of the separated region on free stream Reynolds number is reversed for laminar and transitional types of flow separation.

  19. Low-Reynolds-number rising of a bubble near a free surface at vanishing Bond number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guémas, Marine; Sellier, Antoine; Pigeonneau, Franck

    2016-06-01

    This work considers a nearly spherical bubble and a nearly flat free surface interacting under buoyancy at vanishing Bond number Bo. For each perturbed surface, the deviation from the unperturbed shape is asymptotically obtained at leading order on Bo. The task appeals to the normal traction exerted on the unperturbed surface by the Stokes flow due to a spherical bubble translating toward a flat free surface. The free surface problem is then found to be well-posed and to admit a solution in closed form when gravity is still present in the linear differential equation governing the perturbed profile through a term proportional to Bo. In contrast, the bubble problem amazingly turns out to be over-determined. It however becomes well-posed if the requirement of horizontal tangent planes at the perturbed bubble north and south poles is discarded or if the term proportional to Bo is omitted. Both previous approaches turn out to predict for a small Bond number, quite close solutions except in the very vicinity of the bubble poles. The numerical solution of the proposed asymptotic analysis shows in the overlapping range Bo = O ( 0.1 ) and for both the bubble and the free surface perturbed shapes, a good agreement with a quite different boundary element approach developed in Pigeonneau and Sellier ["Low-Reynolds-number gravity-driven migration and deformation of bubbles near a free surface," Phys. Fluids 23, 092102 (2011)]. It also provides approximated bubble and free surface shapes whose sensitivity to the bubble location is examined.

  20. Critical assessment of Reynolds stress turbulence models using homogeneous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    In modeling the rapid part of the pressure correlation term in the Reynolds stress transport equations, extensive use has been made of its exact properties which were first suggested by Rotta. These, for example, have been employed in obtaining the widely used Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model. Some recent proposals have dropped one of these properties to obtain new models. We demonstrate, by computing some simple homogeneous flows, that doing so does not lead to any significant improvements over the LRR model and it is not the right direction in improving the performance of existing models. The reason for this, in our opinion, is that violation of one of the exact properties can not bring in any new physics into the model. We compute thirteen homogeneous flows using LRR (with a recalibrated rapid term constant), IP and SSG models. The flows computed include the flow through axisymmetric contraction; axisymmetric expansion; distortion by plane strain; and homogeneous shear flows with and without rotation. Results show that for most general representation for a model linear in the anisotropic tensor, performs either better or as good as the other two models of the same level.

  1. Energy Spectra of Higher Reynolds Number Turbulence by the DNS with up to 122883 Grid Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Uno, Atsuya

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box with up to 122883 grid points have been performed using K computer. The maximum Taylor-microscale Reynolds number Rλ, and the maximum Reynolds number Re based on the integral length scale are over 2000 and 105, respectively. Our previous DNS with Rλ up to 1100 showed that the energy spectrum has a slope steeper than - 5 / 3 (the Kolmogorov scaling law) by factor 0 . 1 at the wavenumber range (kη < 0 . 03). Here η is the Kolmogorov length scale. Our present DNS at higher resolutions show that the energy spectra with different Reynolds numbers (Rλ > 1000) are well normalized not by the integral length-scale but by the Kolmogorov length scale, at the wavenumber range of the steeper slope. This result indicates that the steeper slope is not inherent character in the inertial subrange, and is affected by viscosity.

  2. Fluid Dynamic Constraints on Morphology and Propulsion of Medusae at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, J. O.; Colin, S. P.; Costello, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    A recently developed mathematical model for physical constraints on the size and morphology of medusae was extended to include viscous effects that dominate at low Reynolds numbers. This fluid dynamic regime is experienced by all medusae during development and also by some adults. The lack of inertia in the flow field generated by medusae at low Reynolds numbers limits the vortex formation that is ubiquitous at higher Reynolds numbers. This consequently leads to the need for large oblate rowing medusae to use different propulsive solutions during their juvenile stages of development. Specifically, empirical observations of scyphomedusae (e.g., Aurelia sp.) and hydromedusae (e.g., Aequorea victoria and Obelia sp.) indicate distinct wake structures and swimming kinematics for each body type that exists during different stages of development. These differences can be explained by the extended mathematical model. In addition, ontogenetic changes can be visualized as trajectories within a plot of the new model.

  3. Addendum to a catalog of low Reynolds number airfoil data for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, S.J.

    1985-02-01

    The prediction of wind turbine performance requires airfoil data at Reynolds numbers lower than those used for aircraft operation. A Catalog of Low Reynolds Number Airfoil Data for Wind Turbine Applications, published in 1982 by Rockwell International Corporation, included airfoil data up to a Reynolds number of 3,000,000. After the catalog was finished, it was brought to the author's attention that the cubic spline fitting routine used in generating the curves from discrete data caused inaccuracies in some of the airfoils. A point-to-point curve fitting routing produced more accurate results. This addendum corrects the daag data for the affected airfoils, and is formatted to correlate with the original catalog.

  4. Measurements of the wall-normal velocity component in very high Reynolds number pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus; Smits, Alexander J.

    2012-11-01

    Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) have recently been developed and used to study the scaling of the streamwise component of turbulence in pipe flow over a very large range of Reynolds numbers. This probe has an order of magnitude higher spatial and temporal resolution than regular hot wires, allowing it to resolve small scale motions at very high Reynolds numbers. Here use a single inclined NSTAP probe to study the scaling of the wall normal component of velocity fluctuations in the same flow. These new probes are calibrated using a method that is based on the use of the linear stress region of a fully developed pipe flow. Results on the behavior of the wall-normal component of velocity for Reynolds numbers up to 2 million are reported. Supported under NR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  5. Airfoil Section Characteristics as Affected by Variations of the Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Sherman, Albert

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation of a systematically chosen representative group of related airfoils conducted in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel over a wide range of Reynolds number extending well into the flight range. The tests were made to provide information from which the variations of airfoil section characteristics with changes in the Reynolds number could be inferred and methods of allowing for these variations in practice could be determined. This work is one phase of an extensive and general airfoil investigation being conducted in the variable-density tunnel and extends the previously published researches concerning airfoil characteristics as affected by variations in airfoil profile determined at a single value of the Reynolds number.

  6. Unsteady mixed convection heat transfer from tandem square cylinders in cross flow at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Mondal, Bittagopal

    2013-07-01

    A two-dimensional numerical study is carried out to understand the influence of cross buoyancy on the vortex shedding processes behind two equal isothermal square cylinders placed in a tandem arrangement at low Reynolds numbers. The spacing between the cylinders is fixed with five widths of the cylinder dimension. The flow is considered in an unbounded medium, however, fictitious confining boundaries are chosen to make the problem computationally feasible. Numerical calculations are performed by using a finite volume method based on the PISO algorithm in a collocated grid system. The range of Reynolds number is chosen to be 50-150. The flow is unsteady laminar and two-dimensional in this Reynolds number range. The mixed convection effect is studied for Richardson number range of 0-2 and the Prandtl number is chosen constant as 0.71. The effect of superimposed thermal buoyancy on flow and isotherm patterns are presented and discussed. The global flow and heat transfer quantities such as overall drag and lift coefficients, local and surface average Nusselt numbers and Strouhal number are calculated and discussed for various Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  7. Simulations of Three-dimensional Droplet Deformation in a Square-Duct at Moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Jeremy; Kumar, Purushotam; Vanka, Pratap

    2013-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of deformation of a confined droplet in a three-dimensional square-duct flow using a multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method. We have studied the effects of capillary number, Reynolds number, and viscosity ratio on the droplet deformation characteristics. Unlike in the Stokes' limit where deformation is governed by a competition between viscous shear and interfacial tension, at higher Reynolds numbers, inertial effects play an increasingly important role. We observe that the deformation history is non-monotonic and contains an overshoot before relaxing to a steady deformed state. In contrast, the capillary number is seen to affect the magnitude of the deformation history and the time at which the peak deformation occurs. The viscosity ratio has a relatively modest effect on the magnitude of the deformation compared with the effects of Reynolds and capillary numbers. However, compared with the Reynolds number, the viscosity ratio and capillary number have a significant effect on the time to reach a steady state. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Center.

  8. Reynolds number effects on pressure loss and turbulence characteristics of four tube-bundle heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, L., Jr.; Gentry, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of pressure loss and turbulence on four tube-bundle configurations representing heat-exchanger geometries with nominally the same heat capacity were measured as a function of Reynolds numbers from about 4000 to 400,000 based on tube hydraulic diameter. Two configurations had elliptical tubes, the other two had round tubes, and all four had plate fins. The elliptical-tube configurations had lower pressure loss and turbulence characteristics than the round-tube configurations over the entire Reynolds number range.

  9. Simplified physical models of the flow around flexible insect wings at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harenberg, Steve; Reis, Johnny; Miller, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Some of the smallest insects fly at Reynolds numbers in the range of 5-100. We built a dynamically scaled physical model of a flexible insect wing and measured the resulting wing deformations and flow fields. The wing models were submerged in diluted corn syrup and rotated about the root of the wing for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1-100. Spatially resolved flow fields were obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Deformations of the wing were tracked using DLTdv software to determine the motion and induced curvature of the wing.

  10. Experimental studies of the Eppler 61 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, T. F.; Mueller, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to document the effects of separation and transition on the performance of an airfoil designed for low Reynolds number operation are presented. Lift, drag and flow visualization data were obtained for the Eppler 61 airfoil section for chord Reynolds numbers from about 30,000 to over 200,000. Smoke flow visualization was employed to document the boundary layer behavior and was correlated with the Eppler airfoil design and analysis computer program. Laminar separation, transition and turbulent reattachment had significant effects on the performance of this airfoil.