Science.gov

Sample records for cross flow fan

  1. Simulation of the cross-flow fan and application to a propulsive airfoil concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummer, Joseph

    A concept of embedding a cross-flow fan into a wing for lift enhancement and thrust production is proposed. The design places a cross-flow fan near the trailing edge of the wing. Flow is drawn in from the suction surface, energized, and expelled out the trailing edge. The commercial CFD software Fluent is used to perform both 2D and 3D calculations for validation of an isolated cross-flow fan and housing against experimental data, with good correlation found in terms of both global performance and local flow field data. CFD results are used to identify regions of high loss, as well as make recommendations in regard to the temporal and spatial accuracy of collected data. Parametric studies demonstrate fan performance and flow field sensitivities to various cross-flow fan housing parameters. The effect of vortex cavities, clearance gap, and blade shape are investigated. A new inline housing geometry is developed and integrated within a modified Gottingen 570 airfoil. Unsteady sliding mesh calculations are used to visualize the flow field, and calculate fan performance and airfoil lift coefficient. The results of the CFD work show that the jet leaving the fan fills up the wake behind the airfoil, while the suction effect produced by the fan virtually eliminates flow separation at high angle of attack, yielding very high lift coefficients. A system level analysis demonstrates the benefits of using an embedded cross-flow fan for distributed aircraft propulsion. The goal of the system analysis is to investigate the tradeoffs between various design parameters, and provide a basis for preliminary cross-flow fan airfoil design.

  2. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  3. Unstable flow in centrifugal fans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Soundra-Nayagam, M.; Bolton, A.N.; Simpson, H.C.

    1996-03-01

    Rotating stall and the inlet vortex in centrifugal fans with inlet vane control has been studied. The advances in stall research in aero-engine compressors are discussed. The present study shows that stall in centrifugal fans can be quite different from that in axial compressors, in that stall can occur in a progressive and intermittent fashion. The study also shows that a discontinuity in the fan characteristic is not necessarily accompanied by rotating stall, unlike the axial machines. Experimental results indicate that the positive prewhirl created by inlet vanes tends to delay the occurrence of stall. Also, dorsal fin devices that are used to control the inlet vortex do not seem to affect the stall point unfavorably. The inlet vortex frequency was found to invariably exhibit a linear relation with the flow rate even when dorsal fins were used. This offers a practical method to distinguish between the inlet vortex and rotating stall.

  4. Turbulent dispersion via fan-generated flows

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, Siobhan K.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent dispersion of passive scalar quantities has been extensively studied in wind tunnel settings, where the flow is carefully conditioned using flow straighteners and grids. Much less is known about turbulent dispersion in the “unconditioned” flows generated by fans that are ubiquitous in indoor environments, despite the importance of these flows to pathogen and contaminant transport. Here, we demonstrate that a point source of scalars released into an airflow generated by an axial fan yields a plume whose width is invariant with respect to the fan speed. The results point toward a useful simplification in modeling of disease and pollution spread via fan-generated flows. PMID:24932096

  5. Supersonic through-flow fan assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan engine for supersonic cruise aircraft. It included a mean-line analysis of fans designed to operate with in-flow velocities ranging from subsonic to high supersonic speeds. The fan performance generated was used to estimate the performance of supersonic fan engines designed for four applications: a Mach 2.3 supersonic transport, a Mach 2.5 fighter, a Mach 3.5 cruise missile, and a Mach 5.0 cruise vehicle. For each application an engine was conceptualized, fan performance and engine performance calculated, weight estimates made, engine installed in a hypothetical vehicle, and mission analysis was conducted.

  6. Erosion and deposition on a debris-flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, A. L.; Schuerch, P.; Rosser, N. J.; McArdell, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ability of a debris flow to entrain or deposit sediment controls the downstream evolution of flow volume, and ultimately dictates both the geomorphic impact of the flow and the potential hazard that it represents. Our understanding of the patterns of, and controls on, such flow volume changes remains extremely limited, however, partly due to a poor mechanistic grasp of the interactions between debris flows and their bed and banks. In addition, we lack a good understanding of the cumulative long-term effects of sequences of flows in a single catchment-fan system. Here we begin to address these issues by using repeated terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to characterize the detailed surface change associated with the passage of multiple debris flows on the Illgraben fan, Switzerland. We calculate surface elevation change along a 300 m study reach, and from this derive the downfan rate of flow volume change, or lag rate; for comparison, we also derive the spatially-averaged lag rate over the entire ~2 km length of the fan. Lag rates are broadly comparable over both length scales, indicating that flow behavior does not vary significantly across the fan for most flows, but importantly we find that flow volume at the fan head is a poor predictor of volume at the fan toe. The sign and magnitude of bed elevation change scale with local flow depth; at flow depths < 2 m, erosion and deposition are approximately equally likely, but erosion becomes increasingly dominant for flow depths > 2 m. On the Illgraben fan, this depth corresponds to a basal shear stress of 3-4 kPa. Because flow depth is in part a function of channel cross-sectional topography, which varies strongly both within and between flows, this result indicates that erosion and deposition are likely to be highly dynamic. The dependence of flow volume change on both the channel topography and the flow history may thus complicate efforts to predict debris-flow inundation areas by simple flow routing. We then apply

  7. Meander in valley crossing a deep-ocean fan.

    PubMed

    Shepard, F P

    1966-10-21

    Seaward of most submarine canyons there are large sediment fans comparable to the fans at the base of mountain ranges. Many of the submarine fans are cut by valleys called fan-valleys which usually connect with the mouths of submarine canyons. Loop-like bends or meanders characterize the channels of rivers in their lower flood plains, but have never been found in the shallow channels that cross the alluvial fans at the base of mountain canyons. Therefore, it was surprising to find that the channel in a very deep submarine fan-valley off Monterey Bay, California, has a tight meander. PMID:17751705

  8. Fan Stall Flutter Flow Mechanism Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. Experimental data that can be used to clarify the origins of blade flutter in modern transonic fan designs are very limited. The Transonic Flutter Cascade Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center was developed to experimentally study the details of flow mechanisms associated with fan flutter. The cascade airfoils are instrumented to measure high-frequency unsteady flow variations in addition to the steady flow data normally recorded in cascade tests. The test program measures the variation in surface pressure in response to the oscillation of one or more of the cascade airfoils. However, during the initial phases of the program when all airfoils were in fixed positions, conditions were found where significant time variations in the pressures near the airfoil leading edges could be observed.

  9. Sedimentology of Holocene debris flow-dominated alluvial fans, northwest Wyoming: Contributions to alluvial fan facies models

    SciTech Connect

    Cechovic, M.T.; Schmitt, J.G. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Facies models for debris flow-dominated alluvial fans are based exclusively upon studies of relatively few fans in the arid American southwest. Detailed geomorphic, stratigraphic, and sedimentologic analyses of several highly-active, debris flow-dominated alluvial fans in northern Yellowstone National Park, WY (temperature, semi-arid) serve to diversify and increase the usefulness of alluvial fan facies models. These fans display an intricate distributary pattern of incised active (0--6 m deep; 700--900 m long) and abandoned channels (1--4 m deep; 400 m long) with levees/levee complexes (<3 m high; <20 m wide; <750 m long) and lobes constructed by pseudoplastic to plastic debris flows. The complex pattern of debris flow deposits is due to repeated channel back filling and overtopping by debris flows behind in-channel obstructions which subsequently lead to channel abandonment. Debris-flow deposition is dominant due to: (1) small, steep (up to 35 degrees) source area catchments, (2) extensive mud rock outcrops in the source area, and (3) episodic summer rainfall events. Proximal to distal fan surfaces exhibit sheetflood deposits several cm thick and up to 70 m in lateral extent. Vertical lithofacies profiles reveal: (1) massive, matrix- and clast-supported gravel units (1--2 m thick) deposited by clast-poor and clast-rich debris flows respectively, with reworked; scoured tops overlain by thin (<0.25 m) trough cross-bedded gravel and ripple cross-laminated sand intervals, and (2) volumetrically less significant 1--2 m thick intervals comprising fining-upward sequences of interbedded cm-scale trough cross-bedded pebbly gravel, massive sand, horizontally stratified sand, and mud rock deposited by hyperconcentrated flow and stream flow during decelerating sheetflood events. Organic rich layers record periods of non-deposition. Channelized stream flow is restricted to minor reworking of in-channel debris flow and hyperconcentrated flow deposits.

  10. Supersonic through-flow fan engines for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    Engine performance, weight and mission studies were carried out for supersonic through flow fan engine concepts. The mission used was a Mach 2.32 cruise mission. The advantages of supersonic through flow fan engines were evaluated in terms of mission range comparisons between the supersonic through flow fan engines and a more conventional turbofan engine. The specific fuel consumption of the supersonic through flow fan engines was 12 percent lower than the more conventional turbofan. The aircraft mission range was increased by 20 percent with the supersonic fan engines compared to the conventional turbofan.

  11. Through flow analysis of pumps and fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, A. N.

    1980-08-01

    Incompressible through flow calculations in axial, mixed and centrifugal flow pumps and fans are described. An iterative scheme is used. A simple blade to blade model is applied on the surfaces of revolution defined by the meridional streamlines. This defines the fluid properties and the mean stream surface (S2 surface) for the next meridional solution. A computer program is available allowing the method to be applied for design purposes. APL is used for input and output and FORTRAN IV for computation. A typical calculation requires 30 sec of Univac 1100 time.

  12. A general representation for axial-flow fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W; Tucker, M

    1945-01-01

    A general representation of fan and turbine arrangements on a single classification chart is presented that is made possible by a particular definition of the stage of an axial-flow fan or turbine. Several unconventional fan and turbine arrangements are indicated and the applications of these arrangements are discussed.

  13. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  14. Supersonic through-flow fan engine and aircraft mission performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C.; Maldonado, Jaime J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made to evaluate potential improvement to a commercial supersonic transport by powering it with supersonic through-flow fan turbofan engines. A Mach 3.2 mission was considered. The three supersonic fan engines considered were designed to operate at bypass ratios of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 at supersonic cruise. For comparison a turbine bypass turbojet was included in the study. The engines were evaluated on the basis of aircraft takeoff gross weight with a payload of 250 passengers for a fixed range of 5000 N.MI. The installed specific fuel consumption of the supersonic fan engines was 7 to 8 percent lower than that of the turbine bypass engine. The aircraft powered by the supersonic fan engines had takeoff gross weights 9 to 13 percent lower than aircraft powered by turbine bypass engines.

  15. Interaction of fan rotor flow with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. F., Jr.; Reimers, S. L.; Richardson, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed unsteady pressure field produced on the rotor blades of an axial-flow fan by interaction with downstream struts was investigated. The experimental arrangement was similar to that found in the fan casings of turbofan aircraft engines. Acoustically significant pressure fluctuations were measured on both thy suction and pressure sides of the rotor blades for several positions of the downstream struts. The level of the observed interaction decreased with increased spacing of the struts behind the rotor. An inviscid flow analysis for the disturbance level is compared with trends of the measured results.

  16. Fan organs of crayfish enhance chemical information flow.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, T

    2001-04-01

    Animals as well as autonomous robots need to acquire environmental signals in order to adjust their activity in time and space. Some information is accessible to the sensors only as a result of specific behaviors for stimulus acquisition. Due to the slow rate of molecular diffusion, dispersal of chemical stimuli depends on fluid flow. Aquatic crustaceans can generate directed water currents by specialized appendages. Here I describe the crayfish fan organs, which are feathered flagella of the mouthparts, and their activity in sending and receiving chemical signals in environments with stagnant flow conditions. During the power-stroke, the fan opens and displaces water; during the return stroke, it collapses and thereby minimizes drag. These organs can create a variety of flow fields including water jets, and in many different directions. Bilateral upward fanning draws water horizontally from all directions toward the anterior chemoreceptors. Unilateral upward fanning draws water from only one side towards the body. The versatility of the crayfish fan organ makes it a candidate for biomimetic reconstruction and use in autonomous robots that can search chemical sources. PMID:11341576

  17. Detailed design of a quiet high flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltau, J. D.; Orelup, M. J.; Beguhn, A. A.; Wiles, F. M.; Anderson, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A single stage fan was designed to demonstrate the noise abatement properties of near-sonic inlet flow and long-chord stator vanes for the reduction of both upstream and downstream propagated fan source noise. It is designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.653:1 with an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9%. The fan has a 508 mm inlet diameter with a hub/tip ratio of 0.426 and a design tip speed of 533.4 m/sec. The design inlet specific flow rate is 219.71 kg/sec sq m and there are 10 tandem stator vanes with a combined aspect ratio of 0.54.

  18. Morphometric differences in debris flow and mixed flow fans in eastern Death Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T. A.; Whitworth, J.

    2004-12-01

    Geomorphological features are best examined through direct measurement and parameterization of accurate topographic data. Fine-scale data are therefore required to produce a complete set of elevation data. Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) data provide high-resolution data over large spatially continuous areas. The National Center for Advanced Laser Mapping (NCALM) collected ALSM data for an area along the eastern side of Death Valley extending from slightly north of Badwater to Mormon Point. The raw ALSM data were post-processed and delivered by NCALM in one-meter grid nodes that we converted to one-meter raster data sets. ALSM data are used to assess variations in the dimensions of surficial features found in 32 alluvial fans (21 debris flow and 11 mixed flow fans). Planimetric curvature of the fan surfaces is used to develop a topographic signature to distinguish debris flow from mixed flow fans. These two groups of fans are identified from field analysis of near vertical exposures along channels as well as surficial exposures at proximal, medial, and distal fan locations. One group of fans exhibited debris flow characteristics (DF), while the second group contained a mixture of fluid and debris flows (MF). Local planimetric curvature of the alluvial fan surfaces was derived from the one-meter DEM. The local curvature data were reclassified into concave and convex features. This sequence corresponds to two broad classes of fan features: channels and interfluves. Thirty random points were generated inside each fan polygon. The length of the nearest concave-convex (channel-interfluve) couplet was measured at each point and the percentage of convex and concave pixels in a 10m box centered on the random point was also recorded. Plots and statistical analyses of the data show clear indication that local planimetric curvature can be used as a topographic signature to distinguish between the varying formative processes in alluvial fans. Significant differences in the

  19. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  20. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  1. Experimental investigation of unsteady fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F.; Olsen, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study of the unsteady pressure field produced on fan rotor blades by interaction with downstream struts, a single stage, low speed axial-flow fan was instrumented with blade-mounted high frequency pressure transducers. In addition, stationary pressure problems were used to map out the flowfield. Fluctuating pressure measurements are presented for blade midspan and 85-percent span on both the suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor blades at several positions of the downstream struts, and for two different flow coefficients. The strut is found to produce an effect on the unsteady pressure field on the rotor blades; this effect exceeds that due to the stator at design rotor-stator-strut spacing, but it rapidly declines as the struts are moved downstream.

  2. An overview of flow control for fan noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Matthew; Burdisso, R. A.; Ng, W.

    2005-09-01

    The dominant tonal noise source from modern high-bypass-ratio turbofan aircraft engines is due to the impingement of viscous fan rotor wakes onto the downstream stator row. Prior research conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig has demonstrated that significant tonal noise attenuation can be achieved by injecting 1.2% to 1.8% of the fan throughflow along a slot in the trailing edge of the rotor. Efforts presented in this paper have focused on reducing the required blowing mass flow while maintaining equivalent noise attenuation levels. Two primary approaches were investigated: blowing in circumferentially non-uniform patterns (i.e., blowing on every other blade), and optimizing the injection scheme itself. The concept of blowing on alternate rotors was experimentally tested in the ANCF rig using NASA's current slot-blown rotors, and improved attenuation efficiencies were found (although the overall attenuation levels were less). Cascade wind tunnel tests of several different injection schemes were conducted, and the best-performing configuration was incorporated into a new rotor design for experimental validation in the ANCF rig. These rotors achieved similar tonal noise attenuation levels as the slot-blown configuration, but they required injecting less than 0.75% of the fan throughflow.

  3. Eliminating primary air axial flow fan stall at the D. B. Wilson station

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, B.C. ); Schmidt, E. ); Foreman, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Having originally chosen two axial flow primary air fans operating in parallel to deliver pulverized coal to this 440 Mw facility because of their high efficiencies and precise flow control, a program for first controlling and then eliminating fan stall was undertaken. An axial flow fan stalls when air flow separation occurs around the blades. This results in heavy turbulence with the fan no longer operating on its normal performance curve and consequently a rapid decrease in both pressure and flow is experienced. In addition, this condition results in high vibration which over time can be destructive to the fan. The immediate effect is obviously a sudden decrease in fuel flow followed b y both steam flow and electrical output. Although fan stall is a potential drawback of axial flow fans, the program implemented, which is described in this paper, has been successful at first controlling and recently eliminating fan stall all together. This was possible through an extensive test program and finally the installation of anti-stall rings on both fans. The net result of this operating improvement has been improved availability, reliability and capacity, in addition to higher fan discharge pressures as the anti-stall rings have modified the pressure-versus-volume curves of the fan similar to the characteristics of a cof a centrifugal fan.

  4. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  5. Extended parametric representation of compressor fans and turbines. Volume 3: MODFAN user's manual (parametric modulating flow fan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A modeling technique for single stage flow modulating fans or centrifugal compressors has been developed which will enable the user to obtain consistent and rapid off-design performnce from design point input. The fan flow modulation may be obtained by either a VIGV (variable inlet guide vane) or a VPF (variable pitch rotor) option. Only the VIGV option is available for the centrifugal compressor. The modeling technique has been incorporated into a time-sharing program to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and examples cases, it is suitable as a user's manual. This report is the last of a three volume set describing the parametric representation of compressor fans, and turbines. The titles of the three volumes are as follows: (1) Volume 1 CMGEN USER's Manual (Parametric Compressor Generator); (2) Volume 2 PART USER's Manual (Parametric Turbine); (3) Volume 3 MODFAN USER's Manual (Parametric Modulating Flow Fan).

  6. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  7. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight noise fan in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis anechoic chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results show about a 5 db reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device, the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  8. Timing and frequency of glacigenic debris flows on the Bear Island Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Ed; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James

    2015-04-01

    Trough Mouth Fans represent one of the most significant deposition systems for sediment on the planet. Trough mouth fans are found in front of bathymetric troughs that extend across continental shelves to the shelf break. It is along these troughs that large volumes of subglacial sediment are transported by fast flowing ice streams. Following initial deposition, glacially derived sediment is then often re-mobilised and re-deposited down the continental slope via gravity flow processes. Glacigenic debris flows are among the most significant of these processes, often occurring on slopes with gradients of <10. These flows commonly occur in lobes with characteristic lengths (30 - 200 km), widths (2 - 10 km) and thicknesses (10 - 50 m). The stacking of these lobes provides a significant proportion of the material making up trough mouth fans. Despite processes of sedimentation and sediment reworking being long established for these systems they are incompletely understood and there has been little work specifically dating individual events. We therefore have little information regarding the frequency of these events. This is especially true on more distal parts of trough mouth fans. Instead work has focussed primarily on upper areas of trough mouth fans in an attempt to precisely date ice retreat from these features. The Bear Island Trough Mouth Fan is situated in front of the Bear Island Trough in the Barents Sea. The cross shelf trough is about 150 km wide and 500 m deep at its mouth and served as a major drainage pathway for the Barents Sea Ice Sheet. The fan covers an area of 125,000 km2 and extends from the continental shelf edge at water depths of about 500 m to over 3000 m water depth in the Lofoten Basin. Previous studies using GLORIA have shown debris flows radiating out from near the top of the fan, extending to near its base, whilst 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler records show these lobes to be staked. Some dates have been produced from hemipelagic material above

  9. Measurements of inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan (6 and 9 blade rotor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A large quantity of experimental data on inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan were obtained. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of design and operating variables and the type of distortion on the response of an axial flow turbomachinery rotor. Included are background information and overall trends observed in distortion attenuation and unsteady total pressure losses.

  10. Debris-flow hazards on tributary junction fans, Chitral, Hindu Kush Range, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Asif; Haneef, M.; Khan, Anwar S.; Tahirkheli, Tazeem

    2013-01-01

    The Chitral district of northern Pakistan lies in the eastern Hindu Kush Range. The population in this high-relief mountainous terrain is restricted to tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley. Proximity to steep valley slopes renders these fans prone to hydrogeomorphic hazards, including landslides, floods and debris flows. This paper focuses on debris-flow hazards on tributary-junction fans in Chitral. Using field observations, satellite-image analyses and a preliminary morphometry, the tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley are classified into (1) discrete and (2) composite. The discrete fans are modern-day active landforms and include debris cones associated with ephemeral gullies, debris fans associated with ephemeral channels and alluvial fans formed by perennial streams. The composite fans are a collage of sediment deposits of widely different ages and formed by diverse alluvial-fan forming processes. These include fans formed predominantly during MIS-2/Holocene interglacial stages superimposed by modern-day alluvial and debris fans. Composite fans are turned into relict fans when entrenched by modern-day perennial streams. These deeply incised channels discharge their sediment load directly into the trunk river without significant spread on fan surface. In comparison, when associated with ephemeral streams, active debris fans develop directly at composite-fan surfaces. Major settlements in Chitral are located on composite fans, as they provide large tracts of leveled land with easy accesses to water from the tributary streams. These fan surfaces are relatively more stable, especially when they are entrenched by perennial streams (e.g., Chitral, Ayun, and Reshun). When associated with ephemeral streams (e.g., Snowghar) or a combination of ephemeral and perennial streams (e.g., Drosh), these fans are subject to frequent debris-flow hazards. Fans associated with ephemeral streams are prone to high-frequency (˜10 years return period) debris-flow

  11. Effect of attack angle on flow characteristic of centrifugal fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dou, H. S.; Wei, Y. K.; Chen, X. P.; Chen, Y. N.; Cao, W. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation is performed for the performance and internal flow of a centrifugal fan with different operating conditions using steady three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-e turbulent model. The performance curves, the contours of static pressure, total pressure, radial velocity, relative streamlines and turbulence intensity at different attack angles are obtained. The distributions of static pressure and velocity on suction surface and pressure surface in the same impeller channel are compared for various attack angles. The research shows that the efficiency of the centrifugal fan is the highest when the attack angle is 8 degree. The main reason is that the vortex flow in the impeller is reduced, and the jet-wake pattern is weakened at the impeller outlet. The pressure difference between pressure side and suction side is smooth and the amplitude of the total pressure fluctuation is low along the circumferential direction. These phenomena may cause the loss reduced for the attack angle of about 8 degree.

  12. Flow Measurements and Multiple Pure Tone Noise From a Forward Swept Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2005-01-01

    A forward-swept fan, designated the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate its noise reduction relative to a baseline fan of the same aerodynamic performance. The objective of the Quiet High Speed Fan was a 6-dB reduction in the Effective Perceived Noise Level relative to the baseline fan at the takeoff condition. The intent of the Quiet High Speed Fan design was to provide both a multiple pure tone noise reduction from the forward sweep of the fan rotor and a rotor-stator interaction blade passing tone noise reduction from a leaned stator. The tunnel noise data indicted that the Quiet High Speed Fan was quieter than the baseline fan for a significant portion of the operating line and was 6 dB quieter near the takeoff condition. Although reductions in the multiple pure tones were observed, the vast majority of the EPNdB reduction was a result of the reduction in the blade passing tone and its harmonics. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and shroud unsteady pressure measurement data were obtained upstream of the QHSF and baseline rotors to improve the understanding of the shocks which propagate upstream of the two fans when they are operated at high speeds. The flow phenomena that produce multiple pure tone noise is discussed and compared to measurements of the fan acoustic inlet modes and the far field noise signature of the fan.

  13. A preliminary design study of supersonic through-flow fan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    From Mach 3.20 cruise propulsion systems, preliminary design studies for two supersonic through-flow fan primary inlets and a single core inlet were undertaken. Method of characteristics and one dimensional performance techniques were applied to assess the potential improvements supersonic through-flow fan technology has over more conventional systems. A fixed geometry supersonic through-flow fan primary inlet was found to have better performance than a conventional inlet design on the basis of total pressure recovery, air flow, aerodynamic drag and size and weight.

  14. A preliminary design study of supersonic through-flow fan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    From Mach 3.20 cruise propulsion systems, preliminary design studies for two supersonic through-flow fan primary inlets and a single core inlet were undertaken. Method of characteristics and one-dimensional performance techniques were applied to assess the potential improvements supersonic through-flow fan technology has over more conventional systems. A fixed geometry supersonic through-flow fan primary inlet was found to have better performance than a conventional inlet design on the basis of total pressure recovery, air flow, aerodynamic drag and size and weight.

  15. Complex Flow Separation Pattern on Transonic Fan Airfoils Revealed by Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. The latest view is that the blade oscillations are triggered by high-frequency changes in the extent of the partially separated area on the airfoil suction side. There is a lack of experimental data describing the separated flow characteristics of modern airfoils for transonic fans.

  16. High fidelity phase locked PIV measurements analysing the flow fields surrounding an oscillating piezoelectric fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Nolan, Kevin; Stafford, Jason; Donnelly, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Piezoelectric fans have been studied extensively and are seen as a promising technology for thermal management due to their ability to provide quiet, reliable cooling with low power consumption. The fluid mechanics of an unconfined piezoelectric fan are complex which is why the majority of the literature to date confines the fan in an attempt to simplify the flow field. This paper investigates the fluid mechanics of an unconfined fan operating in its first vibration frequency mode. The piezoelectric fan used in this study measures 12.7mm × 70mm and resonates at 92.5Hz in air. A custom built experimental facility was developed to capture the fan's flow field using phase locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The phase locked PIV results are presented in terms of vorticity and show the formation of a horse shoe vortex. A three dimensional A2 criterion constructed from interpolated PIV measurements was used to identify the vortex core in the vicinity of the fan. This analysis was used to clearly identify the formation of a horse shoe vortex that turns into a hairpin vortex before it breaks up due to a combination of vortex shedding and flow along the fan blade. The results presented in this paper contribute to both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer literature concerning first mode fan oscillation.

  17. Drainage basin morphometry controls on the active depositional area of debris flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Malamud, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A majority of the research on understanding the connection between alluvial fans and drainage basins to date has focused on coarse-scale relations between total fan area and drainage basin area. Here we take a new approach where we assess relationships between active fan depositional area and drainage basin morphometry using 52 debris flow fans (32 from the White Mountains and 20 from the Inyo Mountains) on the eastern side of Owens Valley, California, USA. The boundaries for fans, drainage basin and active depositional areas were delineated from 10m digital elevation models and 1 m aerial photographs. We examined the relationships between the normalised active depositional area of the fan (Afad/Af, where Afad is the fan active depositional area and Af the entire fan area) and the following four variables for drainage basin: (i) area (Adb), (ii) total stream length (Ls), (iii) relief (BHH), (iv) roughness (R). We find a statistically significant (r2 > 0.40) inverse power-law relationship between recent sediment contribution to the fan and drainage basin area (Afad/Af = 0.29Adb-0.167) drainage network length (Afad/Af = 0.39Ls-0.161) and basin relief (Afad/Af = 3.90BHH-0.401), and a statistically weak (r2 = 0.22) inverse power law with basin roughness (Afad/Af = 0.32R0.5441). Drainage basin size combined with other morphometric variables may largely determine efficiency in sediment transport and delivery to the fan surface. A large proportion of the total fan area of smaller fans are flooded by debris flow indicating less sediment storage in the drainage basins and greater efficiency in sediment delivery. The findings signify the importance of coarse-scale relationships to both long- and short-term fan evolution.

  18. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  19. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  20. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  1. Experimental and analytical dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan from an air cushion landing system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. C.; Boghani, A. B.; Leland, T. J. W.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the steady-state and dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan which had been used previously as the air supply fan for some model air cushion landing system studies. Steady-state flow characteristics were determined in the standard manner by using differential orifice pressures for the flow regime from free flow to zero flow. In this same regime, a correlative technique was established so that fan inlet and outlet pressures could be used to measure dynamic flow as created by a rotating damper. Dynamic tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz showed very different flow characteristics when compared with steady-state flow, particularly with respect to peak pressures and the pressure-flow relationship at fan stall and unstall. A generalized, rational mathematical fan model was developed based on physical fan parameters and a steady-state flow characteristic. The model showed good correlation with experimental tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  2. Discrete frequency noise and its reduction in small axial-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. M.

    1982-03-01

    The discrete frequency noise radiated from representative types of axial-flow fans used in electronic equipment is studied in detail. Narrowband analysis of the discrete frequency noise radiated by these types of fans has been conducted in a free-field environment. The far-field sound pressure level, radiated directivity, and total radiated power of the discrete frequency noise is presented. The influence of operating point on the sound radiated from the fans is determined. The discrete frequency noise dominates the characteristic acoustic spectra at high flow coefficients.

  3. Unsteady Flow Dynamics and Acoustics of Two-Outlet Centrifugal Fan Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, I. Y. W.; Leung, R. C. K.; Law, A. K. Y.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, a centrifugal fan design with two flow outlets is investigated. This design aims to provide high mass flow rate but low noise performance. Two dimensional unsteady flow simulation with CFD code (FLUENT 6.3) is carried out to analyze the fan flow dynamics and its acoustics. The calculations were done using the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) approach in which effects of turbulence were accounted for using κ-ɛ model. This work aims to provide an insight how the dominant noise source mechanisms vary with a key fan geometrical paramters, namely, the ratio between cutoff distance and the radius of curvature of the fan housing. Four new fan designs were calculated. Simulation results show that the unsteady flow-induced forces on the fan blades are found to be the main noise sources. The blade force coefficients are then used to build the dipole source terms in Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) Equation for estimating their noise effects. It is found that one design is able to deliver a mass flow 34% more, but with sound pressure level (SPL) 10 dB lower, than the existing design .

  4. Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Wray, Craig

    2010-05-19

    A substantial fraction of HVAC energy use in large commercial buildings is due to fan operation. Fan energy use depends in part on the relationship between system pressure drop and flow through the fan, which is commonly called a "system curve." As a step toward enabling better selections of air-handling system components and analyses of common energy efficiency measures such as duct static pressure reset and duct leakage sealing, this paper shows that a simple four-parameter physical model can be used to define system curves. Our model depends on the square of the fan flow, as is commonly considered. It also includes terms that account for linear-like flow resistances such as filters and coils, and for supply duct leakage when damper positions are fixed or are changed independently of static pressure or fan flow. Only two parameters are needed for systems with variable-position supply dampers (e.g., VAV box dampers modulating to control flow). For these systems, reducing or eliminating supply duct leakage does not change the system curve. The parametric system curve may be most useful when applied to field data. Non-linear techniques could be used to fit the curve to fan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design, when measurements are unavailable, one could use duct design calculation tools instead to determine the coefficients.

  5. Subaqueous ice-contact fans: Depositional systems characterised by highly aggradational supercritical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Joerg; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Subaqueous ice-contact fans are deposited by high-energy plane-wall jets from subglacial conduits into standing water bodies. Highly aggradational conditions during flow expansion and deceleration allow for the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows, which are commonly considered rare in the depositional record. We present field examples from gravelly and sandy subaqueous ice-contact fan successions, which indicate that deposition by supercritical flows might be considered as a characteristic feature of these depositional systems. The studied successions were deposited in deep ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. The gravel-rich subaqueous fan deposits are dominated by large scour-fills (up to 25 m wide and 3 m) deep and deposits of turbulent hyperconcentrated flows, which are partly attributed to supercritical flow conditions (Winsemann et al., 2009). Scours (up to 4.5 m wide and 0.9 m deep) infilled by gravelly backsets are observed above laterally extensive erosional surfaces and are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps. Laterally discontinuous beds of low-angle cross-stratified gravel are interpreted as antidune deposits. Downflow and up-section the gravel-rich deposits pass into sand-rich successions, which include deposits of chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes and humpback dunes (Lang and Winsemann, 2013). Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes are characterised by scour-fills (up to 4 m wide and 1.2 m deep) comprising backsets or gently dipping sigmoidal foresets. Stationary antidune deposits consist of laterally extensive sinusoidal waveforms with long wavelengths (1-12 m) and low amplitudes (0.1-0.5 m), which formed under quasi-steady flows at the lower limit of the supercritical flow stage and high rates of sedimentation. Humpback dunes are characterised by divergent sigmoidal foresets and are interpreted as

  6. Flow control of a centrifugal fan in a commercial air conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiyu; Bang, Kyeongtae; Choi, Haecheon; Seo, Eung Ryeol; Kang, Yonghun

    2015-11-01

    Air-conditioning fans require a low noise level to provide user comfort and quietness. The aerodynamic noise sources are generated by highly unsteady, turbulent structures near the fan blade. In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of a centrifugal fan in an air-conditioner indoor unit and suggest control ideas to develop a low noise fan. The experiment is conducted at the operation condition where the Reynolds number is 163000 based on the blade tip velocity and chord length. Intermittent separation occurs at the blade leading edge and thus flow significantly fluctuates there, whereas vortex shedding occurs at the blade trailing edge. Furthermore, the discharge flow observed in the axial plane near the shroud shows low-frequency intermittent behaviors, resulting in high Reynolds stresses. To control these flow structures, we modify the shapes of the blade leading edge and shroud of the centrifugal fan and obtain noise reduction. The flow characteristics of the base and modified fans will be discussed. Supported by 0420-20130051.

  7. Effects of Inflow Distortion due to Hub Cap's Shape on the Performance of Axial Flow Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Choi, Seung-Man; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    Performance characteristics of an axial flow fan having distorted inlet flow have been investigated using numerical analysis. Two kinds of hub-cap, rounded and right-angled front shape, are tested to investigate the effect of inlet flow distortion on the fan performance. In case of right-angled front shape, axisymmetric distorted inflow is induced by flow separation at the sharp edge of hub-cap, and the characteristics of the inflow depend on the distance between hub-cap and blade leading edge. Three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are introduced to analyze the flow characteristics inside the blade passage. Numerical solutions are validated in comparison with experimental data measured by a five-hole probe downstream of the fan rotor. It is found from the numerical results that non-uniform axial inlet velocity profile near the hub results in the change of inlet flow angle. Large recirculation flow upstream the fan rotor for the right-angled hub-cap induces separated flow on the blade surfaces near the hub region, and thus deteriorates the performance of fan rotor. The effect of the distance between hub-cap and blade leading edge on the efficiency is also discussed.

  8. Study of Near-Stall Flow Behavior in a Modern Transonic Fan with Composite Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Shin, Hyoun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Detailed flow behavior in a modern transonic fan with a composite sweep is investigated in this paper. Both unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods are applied to investigate the flow field over a wide operating range. The calculated flow fields are compared with the data from an array of high-frequency response pressure transducers embedded in the fan casing. The current study shows that a relatively fine computational grid is required to resolve the flow field adequately and to calculate the pressure rise across the fan correctly. The calculated flow field shows detailed flow structure near the fan rotor tip region. Due to the introduction of composite sweep toward the rotor tip, the flow structure at the rotor tip is much more stable compared to that of the conventional blade design. The passage shock stays very close to the leading edge at the rotor tip even at the throttle limit. On the other hand, the passage shock becomes stronger and detaches earlier from the blade passage at the radius where the blade sweep is in the opposite direction. The interaction between the tip clearance vortex and the passage shock becomes intense as the fan operates toward the stall limit, and tip clearance vortex breakdown occurs at near-stall operation. URANS calculates the time-averaged flow field fairly well. Details of measured RMS static pressure are not calculated with sufficient accuracy with URANS. On the other hand, LES calculates details of the measured unsteady flow features in the current transonic fan with composite sweep fairly well and reveals the flow mechanism behind the measured unsteady flow field.

  9. Preliminary design study of a quiet, high flow fan (QHF) stage. [turbofans - quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. L.; Kisner, L. S.; Delaney, R. A.; Beguhn, A. A.; Frye, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts selected to reduce fan generated noise in a turbofan are presented. Near-sonic flow at the fan inlet to reduce upstream propagated noise and the use of long-chord vanes to reduce downstream noise is discussed. The near-sonic condition at the rotor inlet plane was achieved by designing for high specific mass flow and by maintaining the high flow at reduced power by variable stators and variable fan exhaust nozzle. The long-chord vanes reduce response to unsteady flow. The acoustic design showed that long-chord stators would significantly reduce turbofan source noise and that other stator design parameters have no appreciable effect on noise for the spacing and chord length of the turbofan design. Four rig flow paths studied in the aerodynamic preliminary design are discussed. Noise prediction results indicate that a turbofan powered aircraft would be under federal air regulations levels without any acoustic treatment.

  10. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  11. Sediment mass-flow processes on a depositional lobe, outer Mississippi Fan

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; Lee, H.J.; Nelson, C.H.; McArthur, W.G.; Locat, J.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1996-09-01

    As exploration for hydrocarbons moves toward subtler traps, channel-end sand deposits of deep-sea fans and related turbidite systems are among the key targets. SeaMARC 1A sidescan-sonar imagery and cores from the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized mass flow as the dominant mechanism for transport of silt and sand during the formation of this part of the fan. Sediments in these flows were rapidly deposited once outside of their confining channels. The depositional lobe is formed of a series of long, narrow sublobes composed of thin-bedded turbidites (normally graded siliciclastic sand and silt, 20 cm thick on average), debris-flow deposits (soft clay clasts up to 5 cm in diameter in a siliciclastic silt matrix, 48 cm thick on average), and background-sedimentation hemipelagic muds. The mass flows most likely originated from slope failure at the head of the Mississippi Canyon or on the outer continental shelf and flowed approximately 500 km to the distal reaches of the fan, with debris flow being the dominant flow type. An analysis that uses the geometry of the confining channels and strength properties of the debris-flow material shows that these thin debris flows could have traveled hundreds of kilometers on extremely small sea-floor slopes at low velocities if the flowing medium behaved as Bingham fluids and were steady-state phenomena.

  12. Effects of Alluvial and Debris Flow Fans on Channel Morphology in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, P. E.; Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Andras, K.

    2003-12-01

    Formation of debris flow and alluvial fans at tributary confluences from episodic erosion associated with large storms and fires ("extreme events") are often viewed negatively over short time spans (years). However, when viewed over long periods of time (decades to centuries), fans that form at tributary junctions are often sources of morphological diversity in streams and rivers. To evaluate effects of tributary fans on the morphology of mainstem channels, we surveyed a total of 44 km of streams in the Sawtooth Mountains of Idaho (27 km), Olympic Mountains of Washington (10 km), and Central Coast Range of Oregon (7 km). Rejuvenated alluvial fans resulting from post-fire gully erosion in the Sawtooth Mountains created gradient nick points in 4th to 6th order mainstem channels (30 to 350 km2 drainage area) that increased sediment storage upstream resulting in decreased channel gradients, widened flood plains, side channel construction, and the beginning of terrace formation. Downstream effects included increased channel gradients, often creating rapids. In 3rd and 4th order mainstem channels (< 10 km2 drainage area) in the Olympic Mountains, there was statistically significant association between low-order confluences containing debris flow deposits and gravel abundance, wide channels, and numbers of logs and large pools. Moreover, heterogeneity of mainstem channel morphology increased in proximity to low-order confluences prone to debris flows in the Olympic study sites. In 3rd and 4th order channels in the Oregon Coast Range, density of large wood and boulders in mainstem channels (< 30 km2 drainage area) increased with proximity to all debris flow fans at low-order confluences regardless of fan age, while channel gradients and sediment depth in mainstem channels increased with proximity to recent (< 60 yrs old) debris fans. Consequently, alluvial and debris flow fans can be significant agents of heterogeneity in riverine habitats, similar to other sources of

  13. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.35-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall blade element performances and the aerodynamic design parameters are presented for a 1.35-pressure-ratio fan stage. The fan stage was designed for a weight flow of 32.7 kilograms per second and a tip speed of 302.8 meters per second. At design speed the stage peak efficiency of 0.879 occurred at a pressure ratio of 1.329 and design flow. Stage stall margin was approximately 14 percent. At design flow rotor efficiency was 0.94 and the pressure ratio was 1.360.

  14. Flow in a centrifugal fan impeller at off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T.; Tzou, K. T. S.; Madhavan, S.

    1984-06-01

    A fully three-dimensional finite element analysis of inviscid, incompressible blade channel flow is the basis of the present study of both predicted and measured surface velocity and pressure distributions in the internal flow channels of a centrifugal fan impeller, for volume flow rates of 80-125 percent the design flow rate. The experimental results made extensive use of blade and sidewall surface pressure taps installed in a scale model of an airfoil-bladed centrifugal fan impeller. The results obtained illustrate the ability of both flow analyses to predict the dominant features of the impeller flow field, including peak blade surface velocities and adverse gradients at flows far from the design point. Insight is also gained into the limiting channel diffusion values for typical centrifugal cascade performance, together with the influence of viscous effects, as seen in deviations from ideal flow predictions.

  15. Performance potential of air turbo-ramjet employing supersonic through-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan in an advanced engine designed to power a Mach-5 cruise vehicle. It included a preliminary evaluation of fan performance requirements and the desirability of supersonic versus subsonic combustion, the design and performance of supersonic fans, and the conceptual design of a single-pass air-turbo-rocket/ramjet engine for a Mach 5 cruise vehicle. The study results showed that such an engine could provide high thrust over the entire speed range from sea-level takeoff to Mach 5 cruise, especially over the transonic speed range, and high fuel specific impulse at the Mach 5 cruise condition, with the fan windmilling.

  16. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  17. Detailed flow measurements and predictions for a three-stage transonic fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, W. J.; Stapleton, A. W.

    1994-04-01

    Detailed flow measurements were taken at DRA Pyestock on a Rolls-Royce three-stage transonic research fan using advanced laser transit velocimetry and holography techniques to supplement the fixed pressure and temperature instrumentation. The results have been compared with predictions using the DRA S1-S2 quasi-three-dimensional flow calculation system at a range of speeds. The agreement was generally encouraging, both for the overall performance and for details of the internal flow such as positions of shock waves. Taken together with the computational efficiency of the calculations and previous experience on single-stage transonic fans and core compressors, this establishes the S1-S2 system as a viable design tool for future multistage transonic fans.

  18. Near Stall Flow Analysis in the Transonic Fan of the RTA Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2010-01-01

    Turbine-based propulsion systems for access to space have been investigated at NASA Glenn Research center. A ground demonstrator engine for validation testing has been developed as a part of the program. The demonstrator, the Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA-1), is a variable cycle turbofan ramjet designed to transition from an augmented turbofan to a ramjet that produces the thrust required to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 4. The RTA-1 is designed to accommodate a large variation in bypass ratio from sea level static to Mach 4 flight condition. A key component of this engine is a new fan stage that accommodates these large variations in bypass ratio and flow ranges. In the present study, unsteady flow behavior in the fan of the RTA-1 is studied in detail with large eddy simulation (LES) and the numerical results are compared with measured data. During the experimental study of the fan stage, humming sound was detected at 100 % speed near stall operation. The main purpose of the study is to investigate details of the unsteady flow behavior at near stall operation and to identify a possible cause of the hum. The large eddy simulation of the current flow field reproduces main features of the measured flow very well. The LES simulation indicates that non-synchronous flow instability develops as the fan operates toward the stall limit. The FFT analysis of the calculated wall pressure shows that the rotating flow instability has the characteristic frequency that is about 50% of the blade passing frequency.

  19. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the study is to advance the current understanding of the flow interaction between two different ultra-compact inlets and a transonic fan for future design applications. Both URANS and LES approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field and are compared with the available measured data. The present study indicates that stall inception is mildly affected by the distortion pattern generated by the inlet with the current test set-up. The numerical study indicates that the inlet distortion pattern decays significantly before it reaches the fan face for the current configuration. Numerical results with a shorter distance between the inlet and fan show that counter-rotating vortices near the rotor tip due to the serpentine diffuser affects fan characteristics significantly.

  20. Hydrogeochemical Indicators of Groundwater Flow Systems in the Yangwu River Alluvial Fan, Xinzhou Basin, Shanxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongmei; Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Currell, Matthew J.; Han, Ying; Song, Xianfang

    2009-08-01

    Based on analysis of groundwater hydrochemical and isotopic indicators, this article aims to identify the groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, in the Xinzhou Basin, China. Groundwater δ2H and δ18O values indicate that the origin of groundwater is mainly from precipitation, with local evaporative influence. d-excess values lower than 10% in most groundwaters suggest a cold climate during recharge in the area. Major ion chemistry, including rCa/rMg and rNa/rCl ratios, show that groundwater salinization is probably dominated by water-rock interaction (e.g., silicate mineral weathering, dissolution of calcite and dolomite and cation exchange) in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, and locally by intensive evapotranspiration in the Hutuo River valley. Cl and Sr concentrations follow an increasing trend in shallow groundwater affected by evaporation, and a decreasing trend in deep groundwater. 87Sr/86Sr ratios reflect the variety of lithologies encountered during throughflow. The groundwater flow systems (GFS) of the Yangwu River alluvial fan include local and intermediate flow systems. Hydrogeochemical modeling results, simulated using PHREEQC, reveal water-rock interaction processes along different flow paths. This modeling method is more effective for characterizing flow paths in the intermediate system than in the local system. Artificial exploitation on groundwater in the alluvial fan enhances mixing between different groundwater flow systems.

  1. Hydrogeochemical indicators of groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, Xinzhou Basin, Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongmei; Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Currell, Matthew J; Han, Ying; Song, Xianfang

    2009-08-01

    Based on analysis of groundwater hydrochemical and isotopic indicators, this article aims to identify the groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, in the Xinzhou Basin, China. Groundwater delta(2)H and delta(18)O values indicate that the origin of groundwater is mainly from precipitation, with local evaporative influence. d-excess values lower than 10% in most groundwaters suggest a cold climate during recharge in the area. Major ion chemistry, including rCa/rMg and rNa/rCl ratios, show that groundwater salinization is probably dominated by water-rock interaction (e.g., silicate mineral weathering, dissolution of calcite and dolomite and cation exchange) in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, and locally by intensive evapotranspiration in the Hutuo River valley. Cl and Sr concentrations follow an increasing trend in shallow groundwater affected by evaporation, and a decreasing trend in deep groundwater. (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios reflect the variety of lithologies encountered during throughflow. The groundwater flow systems (GFS) of the Yangwu River alluvial fan include local and intermediate flow systems. Hydrogeochemical modeling results, simulated using PHREEQC, reveal water-rock interaction processes along different flow paths. This modeling method is more effective for characterizing flow paths in the intermediate system than in the local system. Artificial exploitation on groundwater in the alluvial fan enhances mixing between different groundwater flow systems. PMID:19548025

  2. Comparative study of the vortex motion between in-fan and across-fan in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 single crystals with crossed columnar defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, T. W.; Lee, C. W.; Ri, H.-C.

    2001-11-01

    We have studied vortex motions along the across-fan and in-fan directions in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 single crystals with crossed columnar defects using micro-Hall probe array. We find anisotropic critical current density, Jc, depending on the relative orientation of the vortex motion with respect to the defect configuration. Jc was higher for the across-fan motion. On the other hand, the normalized relaxation rate, S, and the activation energy, U, did not show a clear anisotropy except at 30 K. The lack of obvious directional dependence in S and U compared to Jc implies that the observed Jc anisotropy is mainly due to the anisotropy in the flux bundle volume. In addition, during the flux entry below the full penetration we find the largest relaxation takes place at the advancing flux front.

  3. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the study presented, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft engines require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the current study is to advance the understanding of the flow interaction between a modern ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan for future design applications. Many experimental/ analytical studies have been reported on the aerodynamics of compact inlets in aircraft engines. On the other hand, very few studies have been reported on the effects of flow distortion from these inlets on the performance of the following fan/compressor stages. The primary goal of the study presented is to investigate how flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic compressor influence the operating margin of the compressor. Both Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field, and the numerical results are used to study the flow interaction. The present study indicates that stall inception of the following compressor stage is affected directly based on how the distortion pattern evolves before it interacts with the fan/compressor face. For the present compressor, the stall initiates at the tip section with clean inlet flow and distortion pattern away from the casing itself seems to have limited impacts on the stall inception of the compressor. A counter-rotating swirl, which is generated due to flow separation inside the s-shaped compact duct, generates an increased flow angle near the blade tip. This increased flow angle near the rotor tip due to the secondary flow from the counter-rotating vortices is the primary reason for the reduced compressor stall margin.

  4. Fan noise reduction achieved by removing tip flow irregularities behind the rotor - forward arc test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The noise source caused by the interaction of the rotor tip flow irregularities (vortices and velocity defects) with the downstream stator vanes was studied. Fan flow was removed behind a 0.508 meter (20 in.) diameter model turbofan through an outer wall slot between the rotor and stator. Noise measurements were made with far-field microphones positioned in an arc about the fan inlet and with a pressure transducer in the duct behind the stator. Little tone noise reduction was observed in the forward arc during flow removal; possibly because the rotor-stator interaction noise did not propagate upstream through the rotor. Noise reductions were maded in the duct behind the stator and the largest decrease occurred with the first increment of flow removal. This result indicates that the rotor tip flow irregularity-stator interaction is as important a noise producing mechanism as the normally considered rotor wake-stator interaction.

  5. Investigation of Axial-flow Fan and Compressor Rotors Designed for Three-dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahane, A

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine whether three-dimensional flows may be utilized in axial-flow fan and compressor rotors so that the spanwise load distribution may be varied to obtain high pressure rise. Two rotors, one with approximately uniform and one with solid-body downstream tangential-velocity distributions, were designed and tested at the design blade angle. Radial surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle were made upstream and downstream of the test rotors through a quantity-coefficient range. Tests of the solid-body rotor were also conducted at a large value of tip clearance. The results indicated that the three-dimensional flows may be utilized with high efficiency and that the three-dimensional theory used in conjunction with two-dimensional cascade data is sufficiently accurate for design purposes. The tests also showed that the tip-clearance losses of rotors highly loaded at the tips are not excessive. The existing three-dimensional theory in simplified for and an illustrative rotor design are presented in appendixes.

  6. Investigation of Flow Separation in a Transonic-fan Linear Cascade Using Visualization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Chima, Rodrick V.; Jett, Thomas A.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive study into the nature of the separated flows on the suction side of modem transonic fan airfoils at high incidence is described in the paper. Suction surface.flow separation is an important flow characteristic that may significantly contribute to stall flutter in transonic fans. Flutter in axial turbomachines is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high cycle fatigue blade failure. The study basically focused on two visualization techniques: surface flow visualization using dye oils, and schlieren (and shadowgraph) flow visualization. The following key observations were made during the study. For subsonic inlet flow, the flow on the suction side of the blade is separated over a large portion of the blade, and the separated area increases with increasing inlet Mach number. For the supersonic inlet flow condition, the flow is attached from the leading edge up to the point where a bow shock from the upper neighboring blade hits the blade surface. Low cascade solidity, for the subsonic inlet flow, results in an increased area of separated flow. For supersonic flow conditions, a low solidity results in an improvement in flow over the suction surface. Finally, computational results modeling the transonic cascade flowfield illustrate our ability to simulate these flows numerically.

  7. Processes of late Quaternary turbidity current flow and deposition on the Var deep sea fan, northwest Mediterranean sea

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, D. ); Savoye, B. )

    1993-09-01

    Late Quaternary sedimentation patterns on the Var deep-sea fan are known from high-resolution seismic boomer profiles (vertical resolution < 1 m), piston cores, SAR side-scan sonargraphs, and submersible dives. Foram biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provide chronologic control that is seismically correlated across the fan. Regional erosional events correspond to the isotopic state 2 and 6 glacial maxima. A widespread surface sand layer was deposited from the 1979 turbidity current, which broke two submarine cables. Numerical modeling constrains its character. A small slide on the upper prodelta developed into an accelerating turbidity current, which eroded sand from the Var canyon. The current was 30 m thick in the upper valley, expanding downflow to >120 m, where it spilled over the eastern Var sedimentary ridge at a velocity of 2.5 ms[sup [minus]1]. Other Holocene turbidity currents (with a 103-yr recurrence interval) were muddier and thicker, but also deposited sand on middle fan-valley levees and are inferred to have had a similar slide-related origin. Late Pleistocene turbidity currents deposited on the high Var sedimentary ridge. The presence of sediment waves and the cross-flow slope inferred from levee asymmetry indicate that some flow were hundreds of meters thick, with velocities of 0.35 ms[sup [minus]1]. Estimated times for deposition of thick levee mud beds are many days or weeks. Late Pleistocene flows therefore are interpreted to result from hyperpycnal flow of glacial outwash in the Var River. Variation in late Pleistocene-Holocene turbidite sedimentation thus is controlled more by changes in sediment supply than by sea level.

  8. Calculation of unsteady fan rotor response caused by downstream flow distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. F.; Richardson, S. M.; Ng, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The present model for fan rotor/support strut airfoil interaction uses a time-marching code for the rotor flow, coupled with a potential flow model for the stator-strut region. Study of the effect of strut design variables indicates that rotor flow disturbance is increased by the primary variables of larger strut thickness and circumferential spacing, while decreasing exponentially with increased rotor-strut separation. The time-marching code predicts local rotor pressure and flow perturbations in response to an unsteady downstream boundary condition.

  9. Experimental and analytical investigation of fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, T. L.; Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation which was designed to provide insight into the fundamental aspects of fan rotor-downstream strut interaction was undertaken. High response, miniature pressure transducers were embedded in the rotor blades of an experimental fan rig. Five downstream struts were placed at several downstream locations in the discharge flow annulus of the single-stage machine. Significant interaction of the rotor blade surface pressures with the flow disturbance produced by the downstream struts was measured. Several numerical procedures for calculating the quasi-steady rotor response due to downstream flow obstructions were developed. A preliminary comparison of experimental and calculated fluctuating blade pressures on the rotor blades shows general agreement between the experimental and calculated values.

  10. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki

    2009-11-15

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  11. Effects of installation caused flow distortion on noise from a fan designed for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, F. P.; Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Far-field noise measurements were taken for three different installations of essentially the same fan. The installation with the most uniform inlet flow resulted in fan-blade-passage tone sound pressure levels more than 10 dB lower than the installation with more nonuniform inflow. Perceived noise levels were computed for the various installations and compared. Some measurements of inlet flow distortion were made and used in a blade-passage noise generation theory to predict the effects of distortion on noise. Good agreement was obtained between the prediction and the measured effect. Possible origins of the distortion were identified by observation of tuft action in the vicinity of the inlet.

  12. Performance of a low-pressure fan stage with reverse flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Tysl, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    The reverse flow aerodynamic performance of a 51-centimeter-diameter fan stage is presented. The stage was tested with the variable pitch rotor blades set through feather at -75 deg, -80 deg, and -85 deg from design setting angle. Of the three tested the stage with the rotor blades set at -75 deg exhibited the highest pressure ratio and highest flow. For all three configurations, there was little or no flow in the inner third of the exit passage due to the rotor blade being almost perpendicular to the axial direction in the hub region.

  13. Numerical simulation and analysis of the flow in a two-staged axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Dou, H. S.; Jia, H. X.; Chen, X. P.; Wei, Y. K.; Dong, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation was performed for the internal three-dimensional turbulent flow field in the two-stage axial fan using steady three-dimensional in-compressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Realizable turbulent model. The numerical simulation results of the steady analysis were combined with the flow characteristics of two- staged axial fan, the influence of the mutual effect between the blade and the vane on the flow of the two inter-stages was analyzed emphatically. This paper studied how the flow field distribution in inter-stage is influenced by the wake interaction and potential flow interaction of mutual effect in the impeller-vane inter-stage and the vane-impeller inter-stage. The results showed that: Relatively, wake interaction has an advantage over potential flow interaction in the impeller-vane inter-stage; potential flow interaction has an advantage over wake interaction in the vane-impeller inter-stage. In other words, distribution of flow field in the two interstages is determined by the rotating component.

  14. Ducted fan inlet/exit and rotor tip flow improvements for vertical lift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Ali

    The current research utilized experimental and computational techniques in 5" and 22" diameter ducted fan test systems that have been custom designed and manufactured. Qualitative investigation of flow around the ducted fan was also performed using smoke flow visualizations. Quantitative measurements consisted of 2D and 3D velocity measurements using planar and Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and SPIV), high resolution total pressure measurements using Kiel total pressure probes and real time six-component force and torque measurements. The computational techniques used in this thesis included a recently developed radial equilibrium based rotor model(REBRM) and a three dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) based CFD model. A radial equilibrium based rotor model (REBRM) developed by the author was effectively integrated into a three-dimensional RANS based computational system. The PIV measurements and computational flow predictions using (REBRM) near the fan inlet plane were in a good agreement at hover and forward flight conditions. The aerodynamic modifications resulting from the fan inlet flow distortions in forward flight regime were clearly captured in 2D PIV results. High resolution total pressure measurements at the downstream of the fan rotor showed that tip leakage, rotor hub separation, and passage flow related total pressure losses were dominant in hover condition. However, the losses were dramatically increased in forward flight because of inlet lip separation and distortion. A novel ducted fan inlet flow conditioning concept named "Double Ducted Fan" (DDF) was developed. The (DDF) concept has a potential to significantly improve the performance and controllability of VTOL UAVs and many other ducted fan based vertical lift systems. The new concept that will significantly reduce the inlet lip separation related performance penalties used a secondary stationary duct system to control "inlet lip separation" occurring especially at

  15. Relationship between surface roughness and age of deposits in debris flow fans, Eastern Owens Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Liu, Tanzhuo

    2015-04-01

    The episodic nature of debris flows result in deposits of variable ages on the debris flow fan surface. This study maps the variable ages of fan deposits (called geomorphic units here) of four debris flow fans of south-eastern Owens Valley, California, USA from aerial photographs and field surveys. It then assesses the relationships between the age of the deposits, and their surface roughness and particle sizes. The deposits of different ages have different characteristics and are distinguished on the basis of different soil development, varnish accumulation, desert pavement development and surficial topography. The four fans typically have 4 geomorphic units on their surface. Numerical dates of the geomorphic units were obtained with the aid of varnish microlamination dating techniques. High resolution digital elevation data (5 cm planimetric resolution), were generated from a terrestrial laser scanner for each geomorphic unit (16 geomorphic units in total). The elevation data was then used in quantifying surface roughness. Particle sizes were also measured at each geomorphic unit where 50 particles were measured within a rectangular box (1.24 m by 1.00 m). We find that (i) the age of the oldest deposits range from 11,100 to 12,350 years BP (before present), second oldest deposits are around 7300-9500 years BP, third oldest deposits are around 4000 to 6000 years BP and the active deposits are essentially modern to several hundred years old, (ii) the oldest deposits have maximum surface roughness while the youngest deposits have comparatively less surface roughness, (iii) the average particle sizes of the deposits range from 3.15 cm to 22.04 cm with high variability (standard deviation ranging from 2.75 to 10.50) observed in all geomorphic units. Study of relationships between the variables brings out (i) an insignificant relationship between the surface roughness and age of deposits, (ii) an insignificant relationship between particle size variability and age of

  16. Study on the effects of flow in the volute casing on the performance of a sirocco fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Tsutomu; Sugita, Naohiro; Ohomori, Satoshi

    2004-08-01

    The flow at the exit from the runner blade of a centrifugal fan with forward curved blades (a sirocco fan) sometimes separates and becomes unstable. We have conducted many researches on the impeller shape of a sirocco fan, proper inlet and exit blade angles were considered to obtain optimum performance. In this paper, the casing shape were decided by changing the circumferential angle, magnifying angle and the width, 21 sorts of casings were used. Performance tests, inner flow velocity and pressure distributions were measured as well. Computational fluid dynamic calculations were also made and compared with the experimental results. Finally, the most suitable casing shape for best performance is considered.

  17. Experimental Analysis of 3D Flow in Scroll Casing of Multi-Blade Fan for Air-Conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadume, Michio; Kawahashi, Masaaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tadashi; Yanagawa, Hideki

    The multi-blade fan, which has been widely used as a blower for air-conditioning systems of vehicles, is one of the well-established fluid machinery. However, many factors must be considered in its practical design because the flow generated in the fan is quite complicated with three-dimensionality and unsteadiness. The fundamental fan performance is primarily determined by the impeller of the fan, and is also affected by the scroll casing. However, the theoretical estimation of the effect of the casing on the performance has not been well established. In order to estimate the casing effect on fan performance, detailed three-dimensional (3D) flow analysis in the casing is necessary. Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) is one of the useful techniques for experimental analysis of 3D flow fields. There are some difficulties in practical application of SPIV for flow analysis in fluid machinery with complicated geometry, but the results obtained provide useful information for understanding the 3D flow field. In this report, experimental investigation of the flow in the scroll casing has been carried out using PIV and SPIV under the premise of downsizing automobile air conditioner fans.

  18. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, V.; Trávníček, Z.; Wurst, P.; Kordík, J.

    2013-04-01

    Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV), rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz - 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 - 12) mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  19. Unsteady three-dimensional flow in a single-stage transonic fan: Part 2: Unsteady stator exit flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Cherrett, M.A.; Bryce, J.D.; Ginder, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed unsteady aerodynamic measurements have been taken in a single-stage transonic fan with a very high stage-hub loading. Two-dimensional dynamic yawmeter probes, capable of measuring mean levels and fluctuations in stagnation pressure, static pressure, and yaw angle have been traversed at rotor exit and downstream of the stator, along with several types of pneumatic three-dimensional probe. Part 1 describes measurements taken at rotor exit. This paper, Part 2, describes measurements taken at stator exit when the fan was operating at near-peak efficiency, on the design speed characteristic. The measurements indicate the effects of rotor-stator interaction on the development of the viscous endwall-corner flows at the hub and casing. In addition, they illustrate that significant changes in stagnation pressure level occur within much of the stator exit flow field during the rotor passing cycle.

  20. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  1. The STOL performance of a two-engine, USB powered-lift aircraft with cross-shafted fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, V. C.; Wilson, S. B., III; Zola, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The short takeoff and landing capabilities that characterize the performance of powered-lift aircraft are dependent on engine thrust and are, therefore, severely affected by loss of an engine. This paper shows that the effects of engine loss on the short takeoff and landing performance of powered-lift aircraft can be effectively mitigated by cross-shafting the engine fans in a twin-engine configuration. Engine-out takeoff and landing performances are compared for three powered-lift aircraft configurations: one with four engines, one with two engines, and one with two engines in which the fans are cross-shafted. The results show that the engine-out takeoff and landing performance of the cross-shafted two-engine configuration is significantly better than that of the two-engine configuration without cross-shafting.

  2. Natural hazards on alluvial fans: the debris flow and flash flood disaster of December 1999, Vargas state, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Eaton, L.S.; Torres-Sierra, Heriberto

    2001-01-01

    Large populations live on or near alluvial fans in locations such as Los Angeles, California, Salt Lake City, Utah, Denver, Colorado, and lesser known areas such as Sarno, Italy, and Vargas, Venezuela. Debris flows and flash floods occur episodically in these alluvial fan environments, and place many communities at high risk during intense and prolonged rainfall. In December 1999, rainstorms induced thousands of landslides along the Cordillera de la Costa, Vargas, Venezuela. Rainfall accumulation of 293 mm during the first 2 weeks of December was followed by an additional 911 mm of rainfall on December 14 through 16. Debris flows and floods inundated coastal communities resulting in a catastrophic death toll of as many as 30,000 people. Flash floods and debris flows caused severe property destruction on alluvial fans at the mouths of the coastal mountain drainage network. In time scales spanning thousands of years, the alluvial fans along this Caribbean coastline are dynamic zones of high geomorphic activity. Because most of the coastal zone in Vargas consists of steep mountain fronts that rise abruptly from the Caribbean Sea, the alluvial fans provide practically the only flat areas upon which to build. Rebuilding and reoccupation of these areas requires careful determination of hazard zones to avoid future loss of life and property. KEY TERMS: Debris flows, flash floods, alluvial fans, natural hazards, landslides, Venezuela

  3. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  4. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser anemometer surveys were made of the 3-D flow field in NASA rotor 67, a low aspect ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor. The test rotor has a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The flowfield was surveyed at design speed at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Data is presented in the form of relative Mach number and relative flow angle distributions on surfaces of revolution at nine spanwise locations evenly spaced from hub to tip. At each spanwise location, data was acquired upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. Aerodynamic performance measurements and detailed rotor blade and annulus geometry are also presented so that the experimental results can be used as a test case for 3-D turbomachinery flow analysis codes.

  5. Laser cross-flow gas system

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A method and laser apparatus are disclosed which provide for a cross-flow of gas near one end of a laser discharge tube. The cross-flow of gas causes a concentration gradient which affects diffusion of contaminants in the discharge tube towards the cross-flow of the gas, which contaminants are then withdrawn from the discharge tube.

  6. A million miles from rivers: secondary flow in submarine canyon-fan systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, Robert; Darby, Steve; Peakall, Jeff; Parsons, Dan; Sumner, Esther; Wynn, Russell

    2013-04-01

    In both subaerial and submarine meander bends, fluid flow travels in a helical spiral, as centrifugal and hydrostatic forces balance the turbulent shear stress within the flow. Understanding the sense of the secondary flow circulation is important because the near bed orientation of the fluid flow vector strongly affects sediment transport and hence meander bend morphodynamic evolution, the patterns of surface grain size sorting and therefore the character of the sedimentary deposits produced. To evaluate the conditions favouring the onset of distinctive secondary flow circulations (and in particular, to discriminate cases when the near-bed radial flow is directed towards the inner bank ('river like') or outer bank ('river reversed'), we develop a holistic analytical model incorporating centrifugal and Coriolis forces, the radial pressure gradient and the baroclinicity of the flow. This new model is validated using experimental data and used to highlight the influence on the secondary flow of the principle physical forces acting on the flow. Previous analytical studies have considered a temporally constant, two-dimensional, rotationally invariant, framework that leads to vanishing radial material flux conditions when applied to flows within bounded channels. However, we show that a three-dimensional flow framework, with non-zero radial material fluxes resultant of flow super-elevation and overspill, is required to capture the rotational structure of flow within submarine meanders. Given this three-dimensional model, we present phase-space diagrams indicating the variation of the generic vertical structure of rotational flow within submarine meanders. Our findings highlight the importance of the radial flux boundary conditions as the primary control of secondary flow dynamics of submarine meanders. Further, the new model presented here suggests that the propensity for the occurrence of "river-reversed" secondary flow in canyon-fan networks is greater than recently

  7. Investigation of the Flow Physics Driving Stall-Side Flutter in Advanced Forward Swept Fan Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Albert J.; Liu, Jong S.; Panovsky, Josef; Bakhle, Milind A.; Stefko, George; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2003-01-01

    Flutter-free operation of advanced transonic fan designs continues to be a challenging task for the designers of aircraft engines. In order to meet the demands of increased performance and lighter weight, these modern fan designs usually feature low-aspect ratio shroudless rotor blade designs that make the task of achieving adequate flutter margin even more challenging for the aeroelastician. This is especially true for advanced forward swept designs that encompass an entirely new design space compared to previous experience. Fortunately, advances in unsteady computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques over the past decade now provide an analysis capability that can be used to quantitatively assess the aeroelastic characteristics of these next generation fans during the design cycle. For aeroelastic applications, Mississippi State University and NASA Glenn Research Center have developed the CFD code TURBO-AE. This code is a time-accurate three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady flow solver developed for axial-flow turbomachinery that can model multiple blade rows undergoing harmonic oscillations with arbitrary interblade phase angles, i.e., nodal diameter patterns. Details of the code can be found in Chen et al. (1993, 1994), Bakhle et al. (1997, 1998), and Srivastava et al. (1999). To assess aeroelastic stability, the work-per-cycle from TURBO-AE is converted to the critical damping ratio since this value is more physically meaningful, with both the unsteady normal pressure and viscous shear forces included in the work-per-cycle calculation. If the total damping (aerodynamic plus mechanical) is negative, then the blade is unstable since it extracts energy from the flow field over the vibration cycle. TURBO-AE is an integral part of an aeroelastic design system being developed at Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services for flutter and forced response predictions, with test cases from development rig and engine tests being used to validate its predictive

  8. A computational study of the interaction noise from a small axial-flow fan.

    PubMed

    Lu, H Z; Huang, Lixi; So, R M C; Wang, J

    2007-09-01

    Small axial-flow fans used for computer cooling and many other appliances feature a rotor driven by a downstream motor held by several cylindrical struts. This study focuses on the aerodynamic mechanism of rotor-strut interaction for an isolated fan. The three-dimensional, unsteady flow field is calculated using FLUENT, and the sound radiation predicted by acoustic analogy is compared with measurement data. Striking differences are found between the pressure oscillations in various parts of the structural surfaces during an interaction event. The suction surface of the blade experiences a sudden increase in pressure when the blade trailing edge sweeps past a strut, while the process of pressure decrease on the pressure side of the blade is rather gradual during the interaction. The contribution of the latter towards the total thrust force on the structure is cancelled out significantly by that on the strut. In terms of the acoustic contributions from the rotor and strut, the upstream rotor dominates and this feature differs from the usual rotor-stator interaction acoustics in which the downstream part is responsible for most of the noise. It is therefore argued that the dominant interaction mechanism is potential flow in nature. PMID:17927402

  9. Steady and Unsteady Flow Field Measurements Within a NASA 22-Inch Fan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Krupar, Martin J.; Helland, Stephen M.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate possible sources of fan noise in the flow developed by a 22-in. (55.9 cm) diameter turbofan model. Flow diagnostic data were acquired to identify possible sources of both tone and broadband noise. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to characterize the tip flows that develop within the rotor blade passages, the wake flow downstream of the rotor, and the shock waves that develop on the blades when operated at transonic relative tip speeds. Single-point hot-wire measurements were made in the rotor wake to determine the frequency content and the length scales of the flow unsteadiness. The results document the changes in the rotor wake flow with both rotor speed and axial distance downstream of the rotor. The data also show the tip flow development within the blade passage, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the following blade. Data also depict the variation of the tip flow with tip clearance. LDV data obtained within the blade passages at high rotor speeds illustrate the passage-to-passage variation of the mean shock position. Spectra computed from the single-point hot-wire measurements illustrate how the energy in the flow oscillations is split between periodic and random components, and how this split varies with both radial and axial position in the rotor wake.

  10. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  11. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  12. Performance of a highly loaded two stage axial-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.; Benser, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage axial-flow fan with a tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (442 m/sec) and an overall pressure ratio of 2.8 was designed, built, and tested. At design speed and pressure ratio, the measured flow matched the design value of 184.2 lbm/sec (83.55kg/sec). The adiabatic efficiency at the design operating point was 85.7 percent. The stall margin at design speed was 10 percent. A first-bending-mode flutter of the second-stage rotor blades was encountered near stall at speeds between 77 and 93 percent of design, and also at high pressure ratios at speeds above 105 percent of design. A 5 deg closed reset of the first-stage stator eliminated second-stage flutter for all but a narrow speed range near 90 percent of design.

  13. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.25-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters and overall and blade-element performances of a 1.25-pressure-ratio fan stage are reported. Detailed radial surveys were made over the stable operating flow range at rotative speeds from 70 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed, the measured stage peak efficiency of 0.872 occurred at a weight flow of 34.92 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.242. Stage stall margin is about 20 percent based on the peak efficiency and stall conditions. The overall peak efficiency for the rotor was 0.911. The overall stage performance showed no significant change when the stators were positioned at 1, 2, or 4 chords downstream of the rotor.

  14. On the application of a linearized unsteady potential-flow analysis to fan-tip cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usab, W. J., Jr.; Verdon, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A linearized potential flow analysis, which accounts for the effects of nonuniform steady flow phenomena on the unsteady response to prescribed blade motions, has been applied to five two-dimensional cascade configurations. These include a flat-plate cascade and three cascades which are representative of the tip sections of current fan designs. Here the blades are closely spaced, highly staggered, and operate at low mean incidence. The fifth configuration is a NASA Lewis cascade of symmetric biconvex airfoils for which experimental measurements are available. Numerical solutions are presented that clearly illustrate the effects and importance of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the linearized unsteady response at high subsonic inlet Mach number and high blade-vibrational frequency. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is shown between the analytical predictions and experimental measurements for the cascade of symmetric biconvex airfoils. Finally, recommendations on the research needed to extend the range of application of linearized unsteady aerodynamic analyses are provided.

  15. Deionization shocks in cross flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ali

    2011-11-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that surface conduction in supported electrolytes, such as in micro/nanochannels or porous media, can lead to nonlinear modes of transport and formation of sharp concentration fronts analogous to shock waves in gas dynamics. Propagation of these shocks leaves behind a region of ultra pure fluid, acting to deionize the bulk solution. In this work we present the analysis of salt transport in a porous medium next to a membrane with an electric field applied normal to the interface and cross flow in tangential direction. We show that two distinct boundary layers grow near the membrane: an inner (shocked) region with almost deionized solution dominated by surface conduction, and an outer layer with diffuse dynamics. Under certain conditions both regions collapse into a similarity solution with the same scaling. We will discuss advantages of such systems for desalination and water purification. Research performed in collaboration with Martin Bazant (MIT).

  16. GIS-based cell model for simulating debris flow runout on a fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, Carlo; Degetto, Massimo; Boreggio, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    A GIS-based cell model, based on a kinematic approach is proposed to simulate debris flow routing on a fan. The sediment-water mixture is modeled as a monophasic continuum, and the flow pattern is discretized by square cells, 1 m in size, that coincide with the DEM cells. Flow occurs from cells with a higher mixture free surface to those with a lower mixture free surface. A uniform-flow law is used if the elevation of the former cell is higher than that of the latter; otherwise, the flow is simulated using the broad-crested weir law. Erosion and deposition are simulated using an empirical law that is adjusted for a monophasic continuum. The sediment concentration in the routing volume is computed at each time step and controls both erosion and deposition. The cell model is used to simulate a debris flow that occurred on the Rio Lazer (Dolomites, North-Eastern Italian Alps) on November 4th, 1966. Furthermore, the hydrologic and the hydraulic conditions for the initiation of debris flow are simulated, providing the solid-liquid hydrograph of the resulting debris flow. A number of simulations has been carried out with physically reasonable parameters. The results are compared with the extension of the debris-flow deposition area and the map of observed depths of deposited sediments. This comparison shows that the proposed model provides good performance. The analysis of sensitivity carried out by systematically varying the model parameters shows that lower performances are associated with parameter values that are not physically reasonable. The same event is also simulated using a cellular automata model and a finite volume two-dimensional model. The results show that the two models provide a sediment deposition pattern less accurate than that provided by the present cell model.

  17. Investigation of the three-dimensional flow field within a transonic fan rotor: experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierzga, M.J.; Wood, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the three-dimensional flow field through a low aspect ratio, transonic, axial-flow fan rotor has been conducted using an advanced laser anemometer (LA) system. Laser velocimeter measurements of the rotor flow field at the design operating speed and over a range of through-flow conditions are compared to analytical solutions. The numerical technique used yields the solution to the full, three-dimensional, unsteady Euler equations using an explicit time-marching, finite volume approach. The numerical analysis, when coupled with a simplified boundary layer calculation, generally yields good agreement with the experimental data. The test rotor has an aspect ratio of 1.56, a design total pressure ratio of 1.629 and a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The high spatial resolution of the LA data matrix (9 radial by 30 axial by 50 blade-to-blade) permits details of the transonic flow field such as shock location, turning distribution and blade loading levels to be investigated and compared to analytical results.

  18. An experimental investigation on the tip leakage noise in axial-flow fans with rotating shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio; Milanese, Gabriele; Parodi, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The tip leakage noise generated by a shrouded rotor of an axial-flow fan has been experimentally studied. The measurements have been taken at high flow rate and at the design point in a hemi-anechoic chamber, at constant rotational speed and during speed ramps. A test plenum designed according to ISO 10302 has been employed to modify the operating conditions and different inlet configurations, ducted and unducted with standard and reduced tip gap, have been considered. The basic features of the inflow have been studied by means of aerodynamic measurements taken upstream of the rotor. To separate the noise generating mechanisms from the acoustic propagation effects, the acoustic response function of the test configuration has been computed employing the spectral decomposition method, and then it has been compared with the velocity-scaled, constant-Strouhal number SPL. In this way, the noise components related to the tip leakage flow have been identified and their connection with geometry have been highlighted. The broadband part of the spectra and the peaks related to the tip leakage flow are affected by the same propagation effects, but show a different dependence on the rotational speed and on the operating point. The upstream geometry affects the radiated noise much more than the performance and even a strong reduction in the tip-gap cannot completely eliminate the related noise.

  19. Semi-empirical analysis of liquid fuel distribution downstream of a plain orifice injector under cross-stream air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, J. S.; Jiang, H. K.; Cao, M. H.

    1981-07-01

    A simple, flat-fan spray model is proposed, which can with two empirical parameters predict both the value and the position of liquid fuel distribution curve maximums downstream of a plain orifice injector under high-velocity cross flow. It was found that the model is useful in the preliminary design of the fan air flow portion of a turbofan afterburner, due to its ability to predict the influence on liquid fuel distribution of (1) such flow parameters as air velocity and viscosity, pressure and temperature; (2) injector parameters such as diameter and injection velocity; and (3) liquid properties including viscosity, density, and surface tension.

  20. Effects of the Tip Clearance on Vortical Flow and Its Relation to Noise in an Axial Flow Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Fukano, Tohru; Furukawa, Masato

    Three-dimensional vortical flow structures and velocity fluctuation near the rotor tip in an axial flow fan having two different tip clearances have been investigated by experimental analysis using a rotating hot wire probe and a numerical simulation. It is found that a tip leakage vortex is observed in the blade passage, which has a major role near the rotor tip. The tip leakage vortex formed close to the leading edge of the blade tip on suction side grows in the streamwise direction, and forms a local recirculation region resulting from a vortex breakdown inside the blade passage. The recirculation region is enlarged by increasing the tip clearance. The larger recirculation region induces the acceleration of the through flow, thus resulting in the increase of the broadband noise. High velocity fluctuation is observed at the interference region between the tip leakage vortex and the through flow in the flow field where the tip leakage vortex is tightly rolled up without its breakdown. Near the casing wall, a discrete frequency is formed between tip leakage vortex core and rotor trailing edge.

  1. Installation effects on the tonal noise generated by axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments on a low-speed axial-flow fan flush mounted on flat panels typically employed in tests on automotive cooling fans. The experiments have been conducted in a hemi-anechoic chamber and were aimed at evaluating the installation effects of the whole test configuration, including chamber floor and size and shape of the mounting panel. The largest panels cause important SPL variations in a narrow, low frequency range. Their effect on the propagation function has been verified by means of parametric BEM computations. A regular wavy trend associated with reflections from the floor is also present. In both cases, the tonal noise is more strongly affected than the broadband one. The analysis is performed by means of an existing spectral decomposition technique and a new one, which allows to consider different noise generating mechanisms and also to separate the emitted tonal and broadband noise from the associated propagation effects. In order to better identify the features of the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonics, the phase of the acoustic pressure is also analysed. Measurements are taken during speed ramps, which allow to obtain both constant-Strouhal number SPL data and constant-speed data. The former data set is employed in the new technique, while the latter may be employed in the standard spectral decomposition techniques. Based on both the similarity theory and the analysis of the Green's function of the problem, a theoretical description of the structure of the received SPL spectrum is given. Then, the possibility of discriminating between tonal and broadband noise generating mechanisms is analysed and a theoretical base for the new spectral decomposition technique is provided.

  2. Unsteady three-dimensional flow in a single-stage transonic fan. Part 1: Unsteady rotor exit flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Cherrett, M.A.; Bryce, J.D.; Ginder, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed unsteady aerodynamic measurements have been taken in a single-stage transonic fan with a very high stator-hub loading. Two-dimensional dynamic yawmeter probes, capable of measuring mean and fluctuating levels of stagnation pressure, static pressure, and yaw angle have been traversed at rotor exit, and downstream of the stator along with several types of pneumatic three-dimensional probe. Part 1 of this paper describes the dynamic yawmeters and their performance, and presents ensemble-averaged stagnation pressure and random stagnation pressure unsteadiness measurements taken at rotor exit. These are used to illustrate the salient features of the rotor flow field, and the effects of compressor aerodynamic loading. Part 2 presents measurements taken at stator exit.

  3. Analysis of tonal noise generating mechanisms in low-speed axial-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Zecchin, Fabio Mazzocut

    2016-08-01

    The present paper reports a comparison of experimental SPL spectral data related to the tonal noise generated by axial-flow fans. A nine blade rotor has been operated at free discharge conditions and in four geometrical configurations in which different kinds of tonal noise generating mechanisms are present: large-scale inlet turbulent structures, tip-gap flow, turbulent wakes, and rotor-stator interaction. The measurements have been taken in a hemi-anechoic chamber at constant rotational speed and, in order to vary the acoustic source strength, during low angular acceleration, linear speed ramps. In order to avoid erroneous quantitative evaluations if the acoustic propagation effects are not considered, the acoustic response functions of the different test configurations have been computed by means of the spectral decomposition method. Then, the properties of the tonal noise generating mechanisms have been studied. To this aim, the constant-Strouhal number SPL, obtained by means of measurements taken during the speed ramps, have been compared with the propagation function. Finally, the analysis of the phase of the acoustic pressure has allowed to distinguish between random and deterministic tonal noise generating mechanisms and to collect information about the presence of important propagation effects.

  4. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  5. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  6. Two-stage fan. 2: Data and performance with redesigned second stage rotor uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Keenan, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan with a first rotor tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (441.96 m/sec) and no inlet guide vanes was tested with uniform and distorted inlet flows, with a redesigned second rotor having a part span shroud to prevent flutter, with variable-stagger stators set in nominal positions, and without rotor casing treatment. The fan achieved a pressure ratio 2.8 at a corrected flow of 185.4 lbm/sec (84.0 kg/sec), an adiabatic efficiency of 85.0 percent, and a stall margin of 12 percent. The redesigned second rotor did not flutter. Tip radial distortion reduced the stall margin at intermediate speed, but had little effect on stall margin at high or low speeds. Hub radial distortion reduced the stall margin at design speed but increased stall margin at low speed. Circumferential distortion reduced stall pressure ratio and flow to give approximately the same stall lines with uniform inlet flow. Distortions were attenuated by the fan. For Vol. 1, see N74-11421.

  7. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  8. Debris flow dominated alluvial fans in the Australian high country indicate that landscape denudation through the Holocene has been dominated by post-bushfire runoff events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marren, Philip; Nyman, Petter; Kermode, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Bushfires play a major role in shaping landscapes across the globe. Whilst the role of fire in shaping and changing vegetation assemblages is relatively well understood, there is still debate about the significance of fire in driving landscape denudation, relative to other processes, such as major rainfall and flood events and questions remain about the frequency of extreme fire events over longer timescales in response to climate forcing. Studies of post-fire landscape impact of recent bushfires in southeast Australia indicate that where storm events occur shortly after a major bushfire, hillslope erosion is enhanced, due to debris flows and erosion of both primary hillslope sediment and sediment stored in hillslope channel networks. In Australia, knowledge of long-term bushfire frequency is largely derived from pollen and micro-charcoal records in lake-sediment archives and is not directly relevant to resolving questions regarding fire impacts on landscape denudation and sediment transfer. We excavated trenches in four alluvial fans at the base of hillslopes in the high country of northeast Victoria, Australia. This area was burnt by bushfires in 1939 and 2003, and regional climate and hydrology are strongly controlled by El Niño. The trenches were up to 3.5m deep, and in most cases intersected underlying floodplain sediment at the base of the trench, indicating that they provide a full record of sedimentation for that sector of the fan. Fan stratigraphy consisted of sub-horizontal (parallel to the fan surface) units 0.3-0.5m thick, with occasional units 1-1.2m thick, and cross-cutting channelized units. Debris flow deposits accounted for 70-80% of the observed sediments, with water-laid gravels and soil units forming the remainder. Most soil layers were burnt, and most (but not all) debris flow units contained charcoal. A typical stratigraphy consisted of 6-8 debris flow units per fan, with four units containing a fire signature or overlying a burnt soil layer

  9. Detailed flow measurements in casing boundary layer of 429-meter-per-second-tip-speed two-stage fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorrell, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed flow measurements between all blade rows were taken in the outer 30 percent of passage height of a two stage fan. Tabulations of the detailed flow measurements are included. Results of these measurements revealed the steep axial velocity profiles near the casing. The axial velocity profile near the casing at the rotor exists was much steeper than at the stator exits. The data also show overturning of the flow at the tip at the stator exits. The effect of mixing is shown by the redistribution of the first stage rotor exit total temperature profile as it passes through the following stator.

  10. Counter-Rotatable Fan Gas Turbine Engine with Axial Flow Positive Displacement Worm Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A counter-rotatable fan turbine engine includes a counter-rotatable fan section, a worm gas generator, and a low pressure turbine to power the counter-rotatable fan section. The low pressure turbine maybe counter-rotatable or have a single direction of rotation in which case it powers the counter-rotatable fan section through a gearbox. The gas generator has inner and outer bodies having offset inner and outer axes extending through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes and extending radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. A combustor section extends through at least a portion of the second section.

  11. Design features of fans, blowers, and compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisinoff, N. P.; Cheremisinoff, P. N.

    Fan engineering and compression machines are discussed. Basic aspects of fan performance and design are reviewed, and the design and performance characteristics of radial-flow fans, axial-flow fans, and controllable pitch fans are examined in detail. Air-conditioning systems are discussed, and noise, vibration, and mechanical considerations in fans are extensively examined. The thermodynamic principles governing compression machines are reviewed, and piston compressors, rotary compressors, blowers, and centrifugal compressors are discussed.

  12. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery. I - Comparison of theory and experiment in a transonic fan stage. II - A parameter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, a semi-actuator-disk theory is reviewed that was developed previously for the distorted inflow to a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Flow distortion occurs far upstream; it may be a distortion in stagnation temperature, stagnation pressure, or both. Losses, quasi-steady deviation angles, and reference incidence correlations are included in the analysis, and both subsonic and transonic relative Mach numbers are considered. The theory is compared with measurements made in a transonic fan stage, and a parameter study is carried out to determine the influence of solidity on the attenuation of distortions in stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature.

  13. Design of flood protection for transportation alignments on alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The method of floodplain delineation on alluvial fans developed for the national flood insurance program is modified to provide estimates of peak flood flows at transportation alignments crossing an alluvial fan. The modified methodology divides the total alignment length into drainage design segments and estimates the peak flows that drainage structures would be required to convey as a function of the length of the drainage design segment, the return period of the event, and the location of the alignment on the alluvial fan. An example of the application of the methodology is provided. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Rotor tip clearance effects on overall and blade-element performance of axial-flow transonic fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of tip clearance on the overall and blade-element performance of an axial-flow transonic fan stage are presented. The 50-centimeter-diameter fan was tested at four tip clearances (nonrotating) from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter. The calculated radial growth of the blades was 0.040 centimeter at design conditions. The decrease in overall stage performance with increasing clearance is attributed to the loss in rotor performance. For the rotor the effects of clearance on performance parameters extended to about 70 percent of blade span from the tip. The stage still margin based on an assumed operating line decreased from 15.3 to 0 percent as the clearance increased from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter.

  15. Analysis of the Air Flow Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans Using a 3D Sonic Anemometer

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans. PMID:22969363

  16. Two-stage fan. 3: Data and performance with rotor tip casing treatment, uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, G. D.; Hodges, T. R.; Keenan, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two stage fan with a 1st-stage rotor design tip speed of 1450 ft/sec, a design pressure ratio of 2.8, and corrected flow of 184.2 lbm/sec was tested with axial skewed slots in the casings over the tips of both rotors. The variable stagger stators were set in the nominal positions. Casing treatment improved stall margin by nine percentage points at 70 percent speed but decreased stall margin, efficiency, and flow by small amounts at design speed. Treatment improved first stage performance at low speed only and decreased second stage performance at all operating conditions. Casing treatment did not affect the stall line with tip radially distorted flow but improved stall margin with circumferentially distorted flow. Casing treatment increased the attenuation for both types of inlet flow distortion.

  17. Delta wings with shock-free cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sritharan, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    In order to have a high level of maneuverability, supersonic delta wings should have a cross flow that is free of embedded shock waves. The conical cross flow sonic surface differs from that of plane transonic flow in many aspects. Well-known properties such as the monotone law are not true for conical cross flow sonic surfaces. By using a local analysis of the cross flow sonic line, relevant conditions for smooth cross flow are obtained. A technique to artificially construct a smooth sonic surface and an efficient numerical method to calculate the flow field are used to obtain cones with smooth cross flow.

  18. A study of active tonal noise control for a small axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Huang, L.; Cheng, L.

    2005-02-01

    Sound radiated by a computer cooling fan consists of tones which are phase locked with the rotation, and other less deterministic tones and broadband random noise. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of globally eliminating the rotation-locked tones by applying a very simple destructive interference to a modified cooling fan with the number of struts equal to the number of rotor blades. The rig consists of a miniature electret microphone used as a rotation sensor, an ordinary loudspeaker, and a bandpass filter with adjustable amplitude and phase delay. The microphone is located at the inlet bellmouth of the fan to pick up the fluctuating aerodynamic pressure caused by the passing rotor blades. The pressure spectrum is rich in the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its low-order harmonics. It provides much better performance than a pulse-generating tachometer. Analysis of the original fan noise shows that about 90% of the radiated tonal sound is phase locked with rotation, and this portion is almost completely eliminated in all directions. The reductions of the radiated sound power in the first two BPFs are 18.5 and 13.0 dB, respectively, and the overall sound power reduction is 11.0 dB. .

  19. A study of active tonal noise control for a small axial flow fan.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2005-02-01

    Sound radiated by a computer cooling fan consists of tones which are phase locked with the rotation, and other less deterministic tones and broadband random noise. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of globally eliminating the rotation-locked tones by applying a very simple destructive interference to a modified cooling fan with the number of struts equal to the number of rotor blades. The rig consists of a miniature electret microphone used as a rotation sensor, an ordinary loudspeaker, and a bandpass filter with adjustable amplitude and phase delay. The microphone is located at the inlet bellmouth of the fan to pick up the fluctuating aerodynamic pressure caused by the passing rotor blades. The pressure spectrum is rich in the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its low-order harmonics. It provides much better performance than a pulse-generating tachometer. Analysis of the original fan noise shows that about 90% of the radiated tonal sound is phase locked with rotation, and this portion is almost completely eliminated in all directions. The reductions of the radiated sound power in the first two BPFs are 18.5 and 13.0 dB, respectively, and the overall sound power reduction is 11.0 dB. PMID:15759693

  20. Centrifugal fans: Similarity, scaling laws, and fan performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Asad Mohammad

    Centrifugal fans are rotodynamic machines used for moving air continuously against moderate pressures through ventilation and air conditioning systems. There are five major topics presented in this thesis: (1) analysis of the fan scaling laws and consequences of dynamic similarity on modelling; (2) detailed flow visualization studies (in water) covering the flow path starting at the fan blade exit to the evaporator core of an actual HVAC fan scroll-diffuser module; (3) mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements (flow field studies) at the inlet and outlet of large scale blower; (4) fan installation effects on overall fan performance and evaluation of fan testing methods; (5) two point coherence and spectral measurements conducted on an actual HVAC fan module for flow structure identification of possible aeroacoustic noise sources. A major objective of the study was to identity flow structures within the HVAC module that are responsible for noise and in particular "rumble noise" generation. Possible mechanisms for the generation of flow induced noise in the automotive HVAC fan module are also investigated. It is demonstrated that different modes of HVAC operation represent very different internal flow characteristics. This has implications on both fan HVAC airflow performance and noise characteristics. It is demonstrated from principles of complete dynamic similarity that fan scaling laws require that Reynolds, number matching is a necessary condition for developing scale model fans or fan test facilities. The physical basis for the fan scaling laws derived was established from both pure dimensional analysis and also from the fundamental equations of fluid motion. Fan performance was measured in a three times scale model (large scale blower) in air of an actual forward curved automotive HVAC blower. Different fan testing methods (based on AMCA fan test codes) were compared on the basis of static pressure measurements. Also, the flow through an actual HVAC

  1. Numerical investigation on the self-induced unsteadiness in tip leakage flow of a micro-axial fan rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinxin; Lai, Huanxin

    2015-06-01

    The self-induced unsteadiness in tip leakage flow (TLF) of a micro-axial fan rotor is numerically studied by solvingReynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The micro-axial fan, which is widely used in cooling systems of electronic devices, has a tip clearance of 6% of the axial chord length of the blade. At the design rotation speed, four cases near the peak efficiency point (PEP) with self-induced unsteadiness and four steady cases which have much weaker pressure fluctuations are investigated Using the "interface" separating the incoming main flow and the TLF defined by Du et al. [1], an explanation based on the propagation of the low energy spot and its multi-passing through the high gradient zone of the relativetotal pressure, is proposed to clarify the originating mechanism of the unsteadiness. At the operating points near the PEP, the main flow is weaker than the TLF and the interface moves upstream. The low energy spot which propagates along in the close behind of the interface has opportunity to circulate in the circumferential direction and passes through the sensitive interfaces several times, a slight perturbation therefore may be magnified significantlyand develops into the self-induced unsteadiness. The explanation is demonstrated by numerical results

  2. Subharmonic tonal noise from backflow vortices radiated by a low-speed ring fan in uniform inlet flow.

    PubMed

    Magne, Stéphan; Moreau, Stéphane; Berry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In order to highlight the mechanisms responsible for subharmonic tonal noise, a complete aeroacoustic study of a ring fan in presence of a uniform inlet flow is conducted. Unsteady RANS simulations with a compressible flow solver are used to compute the flow field and identify the acoustic sources on the rotor. The tip clearance recirculation shows upstream vortices that impinge the rotor blades and create the main source of unsteadiness on the fan. Since these vortices rotate at a lower speed than the rotor, the frequency of the impact is lower than the blade passing frequency. The acoustic signature is computed by propagating the noise sources located on the rotor surfaces using two methods: A Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings analogy in the time-domain and an analytical model in the frequency-domain based on the compact rotating dipole formulation. A comparison with experimental results confirms that the aeroacoustic phenomena responsible for the subharmonic tonal noise are well captured and properly propagated by the acoustic codes. PMID:25618054

  3. Experimental research of the couette flow with cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, Matthias; Stücke, Peter; Schmidt, Marcus

    2012-04-01

    When a solid cylinder is rotating inside a hollow cylinder, a characteristic fluid flow occurs inside the gap between the two cylinders, caused by the adhesion of the fluid at the walls. This flow problem is widely known as the Couette-flow. If an additional flow entrances through a radial located feedhole at the outer hollow cylinder, there is an interaction between the cross flow and the Couette-flow. In result there are complex three dimensional flow structures in the gap at the area around the feedhole. These arising flow structures are closely related with the technical important flow inside the gap of hydrodynamic lubricated journal bearings. When the flow conditions inside the bearing gap are well explored and appreciated, it will be possible to give suggestions for constructive details like the design, the location and the dimension of the feedhole for longer lifecycles or an even more efficiently running. In this paper the test rig of the bearing model will be presented. Moreover some representative results from researches with a Laser-Doppler-Velocimeter (LDV) in comparison with the output of three dimensional numerical simulations will be illustrated.

  4. Engine cooling fan and fan shrouding arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Longhouse, R.E.; Vona, N.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a vehicle engine cooling fan and shrouding assembly for forcing cooling air through a radiator in which engine coolant is circulated comprising support means adjacent to the radiator, a fan shroud and mounting shell operatively secured to the support means adjacent to the radiator. The shell has a peripheral forwardly extending wall portion to provide an intake for air flowing through the radiator. The shell further has a generally cylindrical and rearwardly extending portion to provide a reduced dimensioned air ejector for the shell, spoke means extending inwardly from the air ejector, a fan drive motor supported by the spoke means extending axially into the shell, the motor having a rotatable output shaft extending outwardly therefrom toward the radiator and having a terminal end portion, and engine cooling fan operatively driven by the drive motor and rotatably mounted in the shell.

  5. Layered Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03692 Layered Fan

    This beautiful fan deposit is located at the end of a mega-gully that empties into the southern trough of Coprates Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.9N, Longitude 299.8E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Modeling groundwater-surface water interaction in cross-cutting alluvial fan system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sager, J. C.; Fogg, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    In the classic interpretation, a deep water table can cause hydraulic 'disconnection' between a river and an underlying aquifer, with the lack of a saturated zone connection between them. Previous research indicates that in such cases heterogeneity may create localized saturated connections between the river and a deep water table. The dynamics of groundwater and surface water interaction under such circumstances has not been adequately investigated. This basin- scale modeling study of the Cosumnes River and American River groundwater systems of the Central Valley of California, which includes both high-resolution (200m×200m×0.5m) modeling of the hydro-facies (~18 million nodes) and variably saturated flow modeling with the parallel computing code ParFlow, investigates how the textual heterogeneity (e.g., connected channels and abundant aquitard facies) affects interplay between the groundwater and surface water, including possible mechanisms for enhancing both stream base flow and recharge through surface spreading. The possible influence of perched aquifers created by low permeability layers on river base flow is also investigated. Optimal locations of floodplain and flooding time frames are being examined. Results of this study will enhance our understanding of the mechanism of water dynamics in the variably saturated zone coupling with heterogeneity. Ultimately, the results will also help restore or better manage the stream base flow and the ecosystem that depends on it.

  7. Estimating debris-flow probability using fan stratigraphy, historic records, and drainage-basin morphology, Interstate 70 highway corridor, central Colorado, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Parise, M.; Moscariello, A.

    2003-01-01

    We have used stratigraphic and historic records of debris-flows to estimate mean recurrence intervals of past debris-flow events on 19 fans along the Interstate 70 highway corridor in the Front Range of Colorado. Estimated mean recurrence intervals were used in the Poisson probability model to estimate the probability of future debris-flow events on the fans. Mean recurrence intervals range from 7 to about 2900 years. Annual probabilities range from less than 0.1% to about 13%. A regression analysis of mean recurrence interval data and drainage-basin morphometry yields a regression model that may be suitable to estimate mean recurrence intervals on fans with no stratigraphic or historic records. Additional work is needed to verify this model. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  8. Unsteady Flows in a Single-Stage Transonic Axial-Flow Fan Stator Row. Ph.D. Thesis - Iowa State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan were acquired using a laser anemometer. Measurements were obtained on axisymmetric surfaces located at 10 and 50 percent span from the shroud, with the fan operating at maximum efficiency at design speed. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify rotor-wake-generated (deterministic) unsteadiness and turbulence, respectively. Correlations of both deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations provide information on the characteristics of unsteady interactions within the stator row. These correlations are derived from the Navier-Stokes equation in a manner similar to deriving the Reynolds stress terms, whereby various averaging operators are used to average the aperiodic, deterministic, and turbulent velocity fluctuations which are known to be present in multistage turbomachines. The correlations of deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations throughout the axial fan stator row are presented. In particular, amplification and attenuation of both types of unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  9. Cross-Spectral Signatures in Global Helioseismology Data of Large-Scale Flow in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, M. F.

    2005-05-01

    Large-scale flows in the Sun's interior have been studied using a variety of helioseismic techniques, including spectral analysis of spherical harmonic time series of photospheric velocity oscillations. Detailed maps of differential rotation have been obtained from measurements of the frequencies of resonance peaks in the power spectra. Flows can also affect power spectra in subtler ways, e.g., by their influence on the widths of resonance peaks. In addition to their spectral signature, flows and other aspherical perturbations also produce cross-spectral signatures, via the mode-coupling effect of a flow. Cross power spectra of time series of coefficients in the spherical-harmonic decomposition of SOHO/MDI medium-ℓ velocity images have been computed and are being compared with theoretical predictions. The results of a preliminary comparison of observed and theoretically predicted cross spectra for differential rotation and meridional circulation will be presented. A program to systematically map large-scale solar internal flow using cross-spectral data will be described. The author acknowledges useful discussions with colleagues, especially Doug Braun, Yuhong Fan, Aaron Birch, and Jesper Schou. He is also grateful to Jesper Schou for help in acquiring MDI data products and to NASA for support under contract NAS5-3114. The Solar Oscillations Investigation- Michelson Doppler Imager experiment on SOHO is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

  10. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of the unsteady flow field and tone generation in an isolated centrifugal fan impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Daniel; Carolus, Thomas H.

    2010-10-01

    In spite of a low circumferential Mach number the sound of isolated centrifugal fan impellers is sometimes dominated by distinctive tones at blade passing frequency (BPF) and integer multiples. This paper reports on an experimental and numerical investigation intended to unveil the tone generating mechanism. The sound spectra from three impellers operating at a large range of speed were measured and decomposed into Strouhal and Helmholtz number dependent functions. This led to the preliminary conclusion that the BPF related tones are exclusively flow-induced. Based on hot-wire and blade pressure fluctuation measurements and a subsequent correlation analysis, coherent flow structures different from those associated with the principal azimuthal flow pattern due to the blades were detected. Eventually a numerical three-dimensional unsteady flow simulation revealed an inlet vortex. It takes on a helical form, with the vortex core slowly varying its position with respect to the impeller center. As the blades cut through that quasi-stationary helical vortex they encounter blade force fluctuations, producing the BPF tones. Slow spin of the vortex core and slow variation of vortex strength were identified as the reasons for amplitude modulation of the BPF tone.

  12. Some Effects of Compressibility on the Flow Through Fans and Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W.; Epstein, H. T.

    1946-01-01

    The laws of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are applied to the compressible flow through a two-dimensional cascade of airfoils. A fundamental relation between the ultimate upstream and downstream flow angles, the inlet Mach number, and the pressure ratio across the cascade is derived. Comparison with the corresponding relation for incompressible flow shows large differences. The fundamental relation reveals two ranges of flow angles and inlet Mach numbers, for which no ideal pressure ratio exists. One of these nonideal operating ranges is analogous to a similar type in incompressible flow. The other is characteristic only of compressible flow. The effect of variable axial-flow area is treated. Some implications of the basic conservation laws in the case of nonideal flow through cascades are discussed.

  13. Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring systems in and out of ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.; Roddiger, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The calibration tests carried out on the propulsion system components of a 70 percent scale, powered model of a NASA 3-fan V/STOL aircraft configuration are described. The three X3/6B/T58 turbotip fan units used in the large scale powered model were tested on an isolated basis over a range of ground heights from H/D of 1.02 to infinity. A higher pressure ratio LF336/J85 fan unit was tested over a range of ground heights from 1.55 to infinity. The results of the test program demonstrated that: (1) the thrust and mass flow performance of the X376B/T58 nose lift unit is essentially constant for H/D variations down to 1.55; at H/D 1.02 back pressurization of the fan exit occurs and is accompanied by an increase in thrust of five percent; (2) a change in nose fan exit hub shape from flat plate to hemispherical produces no significant difference in louvered lift nozzle performance for height variations from H/D = 1.02 to infinity; (3) operation of the nose lift nozzle at the higher fan pressure ratio generated by the LF336/J85 fan system causes no significant change in ground proximity performance down to an H/D of 1.55, the lowest height tested with this unit; and (4) the performance of the left and right X376B/T58 lift/cruise units in the vertical lift mode remains unchanged, within plus or minus two percent for the range of ground heights from H/D = 1.02 to infinity.

  14. Sedimentary facies of alluvial fan deposits, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. )

    1992-01-01

    Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River. The most remarkable features of the fan deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the complete absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and even large wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper flow regimes. There are also very few trends in facies abundance down fans: most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). The facies characteristics of a given fan vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from the facies seen in adjacent fans. Ancient deposits that show clear segregation of gravel from cross-bedded sand beds, or strong proximal to distal facies transitions, must have been deposited in environments quite different from Death Valley.

  15. Cross-Effects in Microgravity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Tompson, R. V.; Ivchenko, I. N.; Ghosh, T. K.; Hamoodi, S. A.; Hickey, K. A.; Huang, C. M.; Tebbe, Patrick A.; Gabis, D. H.; Tekasakul, P.; Bentz, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Film growth by chemical/physical vapor deposition is a process of considerable interest in microgravity experiments. The absence of natural convection should allow better control of film growth processes but, in highly non-isothermal ampoules, thermal slip (creep) can become a matter of significant concern. The reported research is a theoretical and experimental investigation of the flow of gas/vapor mixtures under non-continuum conditions. The Boltzmann equation has been solved for a monatomic gas under non-condensing conditions and the various phenomenological coefficients have been computed. Computations for realistic potentials as well as for velocity and creep slip have been completed and the creep slip has been found to be dependent on the type of gas confirming the accuracy of previous variational results. The variational technique has been extended and planar flows calculated via the Burnett solutions. Velocity, diffusion and creep slips have been computed for gas mixtures and previously unknown dependencies of the creep slip on the mixture properties have been observed. Also for gas mixtures, an integral representation of the linearized Boltzmann operator has been developed for use in numerical and variational calculations for all intermolecular force laws. Two, two-bulb capillary systems have been designed, built and tested for the measurements of cross-flows; one of glass for isothermal measurements and one of stainless steel for non-isothermal measurements. Extensive data have been collected for Ar-He and N2-He mixtures at a variety of pressures and mole ratios. Viscosity, velocity slip coefficients and tangential momentum accommodation coefficients have been obtained from measurements with a spinning rotor gauge via a new theory that has been formulated for the spinning rotor gauge in the slip regime. The FIDAP fluid dynamics code has been applied to condensing flows in ampoules in the continuum regime and agreement obtained with the earlier work of

  16. Use of a beat effect for the automatic positioning of flow obstructions to control tonal fan noise: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, A.; Berry, A.; Masson, P.; Moreau, S.

    2013-09-01

    Tonal noise generated by axial fans at the Blade Passage Frequency and its harmonics is a source of discomfort for low-speed fans used in many cooling and ventilation applications. The noise control approach presented here is based on the interference between the unsteady aerodynamic blade loads responsible for tonal noise generation and secondary aerodynamic loads generated in the rotor plane by fixed, carefully positioned, small obstructions in the upstream flow. Although not strictly active control, the magnitude and phase of the secondary tonal noise can be adjusted by varying the axial distance between the rotor and the obstruction, and the circumferential position of the obstruction, respectively. An optimal position of the obstruction generally exists, that minimizes the total noise at a given frequency. This paper establishes a practical method for automatic positioning of such control obstructions. In a first step, the method searches for the optimal axial distance between the rotor and the obstruction using a slowly rotating control obstruction. The modulation created by the rotation of the obstruction allows for the primary and secondary noises to be distinguished in the frequency response of the sound field. The steepest descent algorithm is used to find the optimal axial distance, for which the magnitudes of the primary and secondary tonal noise are equal at the error microphone. Then, the optimal angular position of the obstruction is obtained by slowly rotating the obstruction until minimal total noise is achieved. Finally, it is shown that at the optimal axial and angular position, the BPF tone, which produced the largest area in the loudness pattern, has been greatly reduced.

  17. Large Alluvial Fans on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    Several dozen distinct alluvial fans, 10 to greater than 40 km long downslope are observed exclusively in highlands craters. Within a search region between 0 deg. and 30 deg. S, alluvial fan-containing craters were only found between 18 and 29 S, and they all occur at around plus or minus 1 km of the MOLA-defined Martian datum. Within the study area they are not randomly distributed but instead form three distinct clusters. Fans typically descend greater than 1 km from where they disgorge from their alcoves. Longitudinal profiles show that their surfaces are very slightly concave with a mean slope of 2 degrees. Many fans exhibit very long, narrow low-relief ridges radially oriented down-slope, often branching at their distal ends, suggestive of distributaries. Morphometric data for 31 fans was derived from MOLA data and compared with terrestrial fans with high-relief source areas, terrestrial low gradient alluvial ramps in inactive tectonic settings, and older Martian alluvial ramps along crater floors. The Martian alluvial fans generally fall on the same trends as the terrestrial alluvial fans, whereas the gentler Martian crater floor ramps are similar in gradient to the low relief terrestrial alluvial surfaces. For a given fan gradient, Martian alluvial fans generally have greater source basin relief than terrestrial fans in active tectonic settings. This suggests that the terrestrial source basins either yield coarser debris or have higher sediment concentrations than their Martian counterpoints. Martian fans and Basin and Range fans have steeper gradients than the older Martian alluvial ramps and terrestrial low relief alluvial surfaces, which is consistent with a supply of coarse sediment. Martian fans are relatively large and of low gradient, similar to terrestrial fluvial fans rather than debris flow fans. However, gravity scaling uncertainties make the flow regime forming Martian fans uncertain. Martian fans, at least those in Holden crater, apparently

  18. Why do Cross-Flow Turbines Stall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Robert; Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines are prone to instability and stall near their peak operating points under torque control. Understanding the physics of turbine stall may help to mitigate this undesirable occurrence and improve the robustness of torque controllers. A laboratory-scale two-bladed cross-flow turbine operating at a chord-based Reynolds number ~ 3 ×104 is shown to stall at a critical tip-speed ratio. Experiments are conducting bringing the turbine to this critical speed in a recirculating current flume by increasing resistive torque and allowing the rotor to rapidly decelerate while monitoring inflow velocity, torque, and drag. The turbine stalls probabilistically with a distribution generated from hundreds of such events. A machine learning algorithm identifies stall events and indicates the effectiveness of available measurements or combinations of measurements as predictors. Bubble flow visualization and PIV are utilized to observe fluid conditions during stall events including the formation, separation, and advection of leading-edge vortices involved in the stall process.

  19. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  20. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  1. Highly Inclined Jets in Cross Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20deg and 45deg and yawed between Beta = 0deg and 90deg in increments of 15deg. The measurements were performed with two ×-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulent stresses. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x, normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, ? max, with the downstream distance is significantly less at higher Beta but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, ?xmax is about five times larger for Beta = 75deg compared to the levels at Beta = 0deg. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J. Distributions of turbulent stresses for various cases are documented. Peak normal stresses are found to occur within the core of the streamwise vortices. With yaw, at lower values of J, high turbulence is also observed in the boundary layer underneath the jet-vortex structure

  2. Alluvial fan facies in Death Valley: Contrasts with fluvial gravels and implications for the interpretation of ancient fan'' gravels

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Sedimentary environments in Death Valley belong to three major groups: fans, washes, and playas. Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits of the playa, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River, which drains into the south end of Death Valley. The most remarkable features of the fan and wash deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper regime flows. Most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). Within a fan, facies vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from facies seen in adjacent fans.

  3. Effects of four inlet and outlet tip-annulus-area blockage configurations on the performance of an axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Hager, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An axial-flow fan rotor was tested with four configurations of tip-annulus-area blockage to speeds as high as 0.8 of design speed. The rotor performance with the four blockage configurations is compared with the unblocked rotor performance and with blockage configurations previously investigated. The blockage configurations enable the rotor to operate in a stable condition, to much lower flows than the unblocked rotor, with no evidence of rotating stall. The blockage configurations were effective in reducing rotor torque and weight flow but were accompanied by reductions in pressure ratio and efficiency.

  4. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  5. Cross flow filter development for advanced fossil power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Haldipur, G.B.; Newby, R.A.; Smeltzer, E.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The porous ceramic cross flow filter has been under development at Westinghouse in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) for advanced fossil power generation. The ceramic cross flow filter is capable of high temperature operation, and is basically an absolute filter on ash. The cross flow filter can be operated at high flow capacity, while simultaneously exhibiting relatively low pressure drop flow characteristics. This paper describes the cross flow filter development at Westinghouse, and reviews the results of many in-house and field test programs. Testing has included operation of the filter in subpilot pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification applications. Testing is also being conducted at Westinghouse to evaluate filter characteristics over long-term operation (3,000 hours) utilizing dedicated test facilities.

  6. The Effect of Cross Flow on Slat Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper continues the computational examination (AIAA Journal, Vol. 45, No. 9, 2007, pp. 2174-2186) of the unsteady flow within the slat cove region of a multi-element high-lift airfoil configuration. Two simulations have been performed to examine the effect of cross flow on the near-field fluctuations and far-field acoustics. The cross flow was imposed by changing the free-stream velocity vector and modifying the Reynolds number. The cross flow does appear to alter the dynamics in the cove region, but the impact on the noise seems to be more dependent on the flow conditions. However, separating out the true effects of the cross flow from those of the Mach and Reynolds number would require additional calculations to isolate those effects.

  7. Investigation of the unsteady pressure distribution on the blades of an axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. E.; Franke, G. F.

    1978-01-01

    The unsteady response of a stator blade caused by the interaction of the stator with the wakes of an upstream rotor was investigated. Unsteady pressure distributions were measured using a blade instrumented with a series miniature pressure transducers. The influence of several geometrical and flow parameters - rotor/stator spacing, stator solidity and stator incidence angle - were studied to determine the unsteady response of the stator to these parameters. A major influence on the stator unsteady response is due to the stator solidity. At high solidities the blade-to-blade interference has a larger contribution. While the range of rotor/stator spacings investigated had a minor influence, the effect of stator incidence angle is significant. The data indicate the existence of an optimum positive incidence which minimizes the unsteady response.

  8. Cross flow characteristics in a three fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J. H.; Euh, D. J.; Park, C. K.; Youn, Y. J.; Kwon, T. S.

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the reactor thermal margin of APR+, reactor core flow distribution including both axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies should be known. 3-Ch cross flow test facility has been constructed with three full-size fuel assemblies to investigate the cross flow characteristics. Performance tests have been performed. The axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies have been measured. The test results have been compared to the CFD calculation. (authors)

  9. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  10. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  11. Energy efficient engine: Fan test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    A single stage fan and quarter stage booster were designed for the energy efficient engine. The fan has an inlet radius ratio of 0.342 and a specific flow rate of 208.9 Kg/S sq m (42.8 lbm/sec sq ft). The fan rotor has 32 medium aspect ratio (2.597) titanium blades with a partspan shroud at 55% blade height. The design corrected fan tip speed is 411.5 M/S (1350 ft/sec). The quarter stage island splits the total fan flow with approximately 22% of the flow being supercharged by the quarter stage rotor. The fan bypass ratio is 6.8. The core flow total pressure ratio is 1.67 and the fan bypass pressure ratio is 1.65. The design details of the fan and booster blading, and the fan frame and static structure for the fan configuration are presented.

  12. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 1; Round Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on synthetic jets from round orifices with and without cross-flow are presented. Jet Reynolds number up to 46,000 with a fully turbulent approach boundary layer, and Stokes number up to 400. are covered. The threshold of stroke length for synthetic jet formation. in the absence of the cross-flow, is found to be Lo /D approximately 0.5. Above Lo /D is approximately 10, the profiles of normalized centerline mean velocity appear to become invariant. It is reasoned that the latter threshold may be related to the phenomenon of saturation of impulsively generated vortices. In the presence of the cross-flow, the penetration height of a synthetic jet is found to depend on the momentum- flux ratio . When this ratio is defined in terms of the maximum jet velocity and the cross-flow velocity. not only all data collapse but also the jet trajectory is predicted well by correlation equation available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as turbulence intensity for a synthetic jet in cross-flow are found to be similar to those of a steady jet-in-cross-flow. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, corresponding to the bound vortex pair of the steady case, is clearly observed. Mean velocity distribution exhibits a dome of low momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer, and the entire domain is characterized by high turbulence.

  13. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  14. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  15. Flood hazard assessment on alluvial fans: an examination of the methodology

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents the results of a critical examination of assumptions and methodology recommended by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assess flood hazard on alluvial fans. The conculsions reached are as follows. First, the assumption that a flow on an alluvial fan has an equal probability of crossing any point on a given contour seems to be a very conservative assumption. Second, given the data from the Nevada Test Site, it would appear that the assumption that fans have critical to supercritical slopes is acceptable. Third, the present methods of estimating channel width and depth on alluvial fans seem to be invalid. Fourth, the specific flood hazard evaluation procedures recommended by FEMA are not valid in some cases because they are based on the assumption that sufficient records exist to do a standard peak flow analysis. Fifth, the validity of the implied assumption that debris flows present no risk can only be assessed after a location on a fan relative to the intersection point has been established. It is concluded that the current methods of flood hazard assessment on alluvial fans are not adequate given the current and projected economic value of structures and development on alluvial fans in the southwestern United States. 55 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Highly Loaded Fan by Using Tandem Cascade Rotor Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Suga, Shinya; Matsuoka, Akinori

    For axial flow compressors and fans in the aircraft engines higher pressure ratio is required in order to attain the high thrust engines. In this study, the fan with the tandem cascades was introduced to increase the fan pressure ratio. The use of tandem cascades in the fan allows savings in length and weight and therefore a compact fan could be built. The design of fan with tandem cascades and the fan testing were carried out to develop the high pressure ratio fan for the Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) propulsion system. The ATR is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds. In particular, high fan pressure ratio contributes to increase the engine thrust during subsonic flight at which the engine does not make use of ram effect. The results of the fan testing indicate that the pressure ratio of 2.2 is achieved in single stage fan.

  17. Fracture Flow Channel Imaging Using Cross-Polarized GPR Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Perll, C.; Baker, M.; Becker, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fractures control the flow of fluids in rocks with important implications for groundwater resources, contaminant transport, geothermal resources, sequestration of carbon dioxide, and the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to image fractured rock and monitor the flow of fluids in the subsurface. Conventional GPR imaging uses single-polarization, co-polarized signals. Changes in reflected signal amplitude result from changes in fracture aperture and changes in fluid electrical properties introduced by tracers or contaminants. Recent research has also shown changes in radar reflected signal phase resulting from changes in fluid electrical conductivity. However, the radar response is dependent on the polarization of EM waves. This study investigates the use of cross-polarized GPR signals for imaging flow channeling at a discrete horizontal fracture. Numerical modeling demonstrated that cross-polarized GPR data are able to image fracture channels when the axis of the channel is oriented obliquely to the EM wavefield orientation. Summation of the cross-polarized and co-polarized components results in an accurate representation of the total scattered energy from the channel. Multipolarization, time-lapse 3D GPR field data were used investigate GPR imaging of flow channeling in a discrete subhorizontal fracture. The GPR surveys were conducted during background fresh fracture water conditions and during six varying orientation dipole flow saline tracer tests. The cross-polarized data revealed flow channeling which is in agreement with the co-polarized GPR data and with independent hydraulic tests. In addition, the cross-polarized components showed changes in flow channeling as a result of changing dipole flow orientation and position. This study demonstrates that cross-polarized GPR signals can be used to enhance imaging of flow in fractured rock.

  18. Micro-jets in confined turbulent cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kelman, J.B.; Greenhalgh, D.A.; Whiteman, M.

    2006-03-01

    The mixing of sub-millimetre diameter jets issuing into a turbulent cross flow is examined with a combination of laser diagnostic techniques. The cross flow stream is in a confined duct and the micro-jet issue from the sides of injector vanes. A range of cross jet momentum ratios, cross flow temperatures and turbulence intensities are investigated to examine the influence on the jet mixing. Methane, seeded with acetone, was used to measure the concentrations of the jets and the mixing of the jet fluid in the duct. Unlike previous jet in cross flow work, mixing appears to be dominated by the free stream turbulence, rather than the cross jet momentum ratios. Temperature increases in the free stream appear to increase the rate of mixing in the duct, despite the associated decrease in the Reynolds number. The dominance of the free stream turbulence in controlling the mixing is of particular interest in respect of gas turbine injection systems, as the cross jet momentum ratio is insufficient in defining the mixing process. (author)

  19. Crossing Borders Virtual and Real: A Transnational Internet-Based Community of Spaghetti Western Fans Finally Meet Each Other Face to Face on the Wild Plains of Almeria, Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Since the rise of the Internet, the act of border crossing has become a pursuit that must necessarily be conceptualized in both real and virtual terms. By using theories connected to virtual communities, new technologies, fan cultures and tourism, this paper seeks to show that the culturally productive activities of a transnational virtual…

  20. Performance of a 1.15-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage with a blade tip solidity of 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a low-solidity, low-pressure-ratio, low-tip-speed fan stage is presented over the stable operating range at rotative speeds from 90 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed a stage peak efficiency of 0.836 was obtained at a weight flow of 30.27 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.111. The pressure ratio was less than design pressure ratio, and the design energy input into the rotor was not achieved. A mismatch of the rotor and stator blade elements resulted due to the lower than design pressure ratio of the rotor.

  1. Two circular cylinders in cross-flow: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, D.

    2010-08-01

    Pairs of circular cylinders immersed in a steady cross-flow are encountered in many engineering applications. The cylinders may be arranged in tandem, side-by-side, or staggered configurations. Wake and proximity interference effects, which are determined primarily by the longitudinal and transverse spacing between the cylinders, and also by the Reynolds number, have a strong influence on the flow patterns, aerodynamic forces, vortex shedding, and other parameters. This paper reviews the current understanding of the flow around two “infinite” circular cylinders of equal diameter immersed in a steady cross-flow, with a focus on the near-wake flow patterns, Reynolds number effects, intermediate wake structure and behaviour, and the general trends in the measurements of the aerodynamic force coefficients and Strouhal numbers. A primary focus is on the key experimental and numerical studies that have appeared since the last major review of this subject more than 20 years ago.

  2. Image Cross-Correlation Analysis of Time Varying Flows.

    PubMed

    Marquezin, Cassia A; Ceffa, Nicolò G; Cotelli, Franco; Collini, Maddalena; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2016-07-19

    In vivo studies of blood circulation pathologies have great medical relevance and need methods for the characterization of time varying flows at high spatial and time resolution in small animal models. We test here the efficacy of the combination of image correlation techniques and single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) in characterizing time varying flows in vitro and in vivo. As indicated by numerical simulations and by in vitro experiments on straight capillaries, the complex analytical form of the cross-correlation function for SPIM detection can be simplified, in conditions of interest for hemodynamics, to a superposition of Gaussian components, easily amenable to the analysis of variable flows. The possibility to select a wide field of view with a good spatial resolution along the collection optical axis and to compute the cross-correlation between regions of interest at varying distances on a single time stack of images allows one to single out periodic flow components from spurious peaks on the cross-correlation functions and to infer the duration of each flow component. We apply this cross-correlation analysis to the blood flow in Zebrafish embryos at 4 days after fertilization, measuring the average speed and the duration of the systolic and diastolic phases. PMID:27348197

  3. Entrainment of Vertical Jets in Turbulent Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedland, Graham; Roberts, Karen; Mastin, Larry; Solovitz, Stephen; Cal, Raul

    2015-11-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce high concentrations of ash that produce clouds in the atmosphere that are hazardous for private and commercial aviation. Without accurate models to predict ash concentrations, air traffic is unable to safely navigate ash clouds downwind of an eruption as critical concentrations are difficult to identify visually. Current models rely on inputs such as plume height, eruptive dissipation and cross-flow wind speeds as well as empirical parameters such as the entrainment ratio between the cross-flow and the plume velocity. A wind tunnel experiment has been designed to investigate these models by injecting air orthogonally into a cross-flow. The ratio of the cross-flow and jet velocities is varied to simulate a weak plume and flow response is measured using particle image velocimetry. Grids upstream of the plume create different turbulence intensities, which, combined with different jet geometries, allow us to study the flow field, mean and second order moments and thereby obtain information to accurately model volcanic ash concentrations in the atmosphere.

  4. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  5. Noise generated by quiet engine fans. 3: Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegan, F. J.; Schaefer, J. W.; Schmiedlin, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A family of fans designed with low noise features was acoustically evaluated, and noise results are documented for a 1.6-pressure-ratio, 472-m/sec (155-ft/sec) tip speed fan. The fan is described and some aerodynamic operating data are given. Far field noise around the fan was measured over a range of operating conditions for a variety of configurations having different arrangements of sound absorbing material in the flow ducts. Complete results of 1.3 octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Included also are acoustic power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels. Representative 1/3 octave band data are presented graphically, and sample graphs of continuous narrow band spectra are also provided.

  6. Simulation and experiment research of aerodynamic performance of small axial fans with struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Lin, Peifeng; Zhang, Li; Jin, Yingzi; Wang, Yanping; Kim, Heuy Dong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between rotor and struts has great effect on the performance of small axial fan systems. The small axial fan systems are selected as the studied objects in this paper, and four square struts are downstream of the rotor. The cross section of the struts is changed to the cylindrical shapes for the investigation: one is in the same hydraulic diameter as the square struts and another one is in the same cross section as the square struts. Influence of the shape of the struts on the static pressure characteristics, the internal flow and the sound emission of the small axial fans are studied. Standard K-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm are applied in the calculation of the steady fluid field, and the curves of the pressure rising against the flow rate are obtained, which demonstrates that the simulation results are in nice consistence with the experimental data. The steady calculation results are set as the initial field in the unsteady calculation. Large eddy simulation and PISO algorithm are used in the transient calculation, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings model is introduced to predict the sound level at the eight monitoring points. The research results show that: the static pressure coefficients of the fan with cylindrical struts increase by about 25% compared to the fan with square struts, and the efficiencies increase by about 28.6%. The research provides a theoretical guide for shape optimization and noise reduction of small axial fan with struts.

  7. Development of a monolithic ceramic cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    High-temperature, high-pressure particulate control is required to protect turbine equipment and to meet environmental stack emissions standards in coal-fueled power systems. Ceramic cross flow filters have high surface area per unit volume for removing particulates from these hot gas streams. A one-piece monolithic ceramic cross flow filter is needed. Mullite bonded, porous, permeable alumina ceramics were made on a lab scale with the Blasch injection forming process. Permeability and other initial targeted property requirements were achieved: >200 cd (<1 iwg/fpm), room temperature modulus of rupture >1000 psi, particle size 100/200 mesh, pore size 20 microns. It is concluded that it is feasible to use the proprietary Blasch process to form cross flow filters.

  8. Thermal imaging of sedimentary features on alluvial fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, Craig; Moersch, Jeffrey; Whisner, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Aerial thermal imaging is used to study grain-size distributions and induration on a wide variety of alluvial fans in the desert southwest of the United States. High-resolution aerial thermal images reveal evidence of sedimentary processes that rework and build alluvial fans, as preserved in the grain-size distributions and surface induration those processes leave behind. A catalog of constituent sedimentary features that can be identified using aerial thermal and visible imaging is provided. These features include clast-rich and clast-poor debris flows, incised channel deposits, headward-eroding gullies, sheetflood, lag surfaces, active/inactive lobes, distal sand-skirts and basin-related salt pans. Ground-based field observations of surface grain-size distributions, as well as morphologic, cross-cutting and topographic relationships were used to confirm the identifications of these feature types in remotely acquired thermal and visible images. Thermal images can also reveal trends in grain sizes between neighboring alluvial fans on a regional scale. Although inferences can be made using thermal images alone, the results from this study demonstrate that a more thorough geological interpretation of sedimentary features on an alluvial fan can be made using a combination of thermal and visible images. The results of this study have potential applications for Mars, where orbital thermal imaging might be used as a tool for evaluating constituent sedimentary processes on proposed alluvial fans.

  9. Vehicle hydraulic cooling fan system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, C.A.

    1993-06-08

    A hydraulic cooling system for vehicles having an internal combustion engine cooled by a radiator and a coolant is described, comprising, in combination, a shroud adapted to be mounted adjacent the radiator having a wall forming an air passage and defining a first port disposed adjacent the radiator and a second port spaced from the first port, a fan located within the second port, a hydraulic fan motor operatively connected to the fan, a hydraulic pump operatively connected to the engine for producing a pressurized hydraulic fluid flow, a hydraulic circuit interconnecting the pump to the fan motor, the circuit including a control valve, a hydraulic fluid reservoir and a heat exchanger, the heat exchanger being mounted within the shroud air passage.

  10. Hydraulic processes on alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Alluvial fans are among the most prominent landscape features in the American Southwest and throughout the semi-arid and arid regions of the world. The importance of developing a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the hydraulic processes which formed, and which continue to modify, these features derives from their rapid and significant development over the past four decades. As unplanned urban sprawl moved from valley floors onto alluvial fans, the serious damage incurred from infrequent flow events has dramatically increased. This book presents a discussion of our current and rapidly expanding knowledge of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans. It addresses the subject from a multidisciplinary viewpoint, acquainting the reader with geological principles pertinent to the analysis of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans.

  11. Aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fan stage operated at nine inlet guide vane angles. [to be used on vertical lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1979-01-01

    The overall performance of a fan stage with nine inlet guide vane angle settings is presented. These data were obtained over the stable flow range at speeds from 60 to 120 percent of design for vane setting angles from -25 to 42.5 degrees. At design speed and design inlet guide vane angle, the stage has a peak efficiency of 0.892 at a pressure ratio of 1.322 and a flow of 25.31 kg/s. The stall margin based on peak efficiency and stall was 20 percent. Based on an operating line passing through the peak efficiency point at the design setting angle, the useful operating range of the stage at design speed is limited by stall at the positive setting angles and by choke at the negative angles. At design the calculated static thrust along the operating line varied from 68 to 114 percent of that obtained at design setting angle.

  12. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees ( cross flow'') to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the roof and floor'' of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, dirty side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the dirty side'' channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  13. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system. Final submittal

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees (``cross flow``) to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the ``roof and floor`` of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, ``dirty side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the ``dirty side`` channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  14. Horizontal anisotropy of the principal ground-water flow zone in the Salinas alluvial fan, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, V.

    1989-01-01

    Well drawdown data from an anisotropic aquifer in the Salinas alluvial fan were collected and analyzed with a computer program called TENSOR2D. The program uses ordinary and weighted least-squares optimization procedures to solve the system of simultaneous equations needed to define the theoretical transmissivity ellipse. Prediction of drawdown data was made by coupling the anisotropy ellipse with the Hantush modified leaky-confined or Theis model. Drawdown data predicted by using the theoretical directional diffusivity obtained with the weighted least-squared fit gave a more accurate representation of the actual drawdown data than when using the test-data directional diffusivity. -from Author

  15. Field, Laboratory and Imaging spectroscopic Analysis of Landslide, Debris Flow and Flood Hazards in Lacustrine, Aeolian and Alluvial Fan Deposits Surrounding the Salton Sea, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, B. E.; Hooper, D. M.; Mars, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite imagery, field spectral measurements using a portable ASD spectrometer, and 2013 hyperspectral AVIRIS imagery were used to evaluate the age of the Martinez Mountain Landslide (MML) near the Salton Sea, in order to determine the relative ages of adjacent alluvial fan surfaces and the potential for additional landslides, debris flows, and floods. The Salton Sea (SS) occupies a pluvial lake basin, with ancient shorelines ranging from 81 meters to 113 meters above the modern lake level. The highest shoreline overlaps the toe of the 0.24 - 0.38 km3 MML deposit derived from hydrothermally altered granites exposed near the summit of Martinez Mountain. The MML was originally believed to be of early Holocene age. However, AVIRIS mineral maps show abundant desert varnish on the top and toe of the landslide. Desert varnish can provide a means of relative dating of alluvial fan (AF) or landslide surfaces, as it accumulates at determinable rates over time. Based on the 1) highest levels of desert varnish accumulation mapped within the basin, 2) abundant evaporite playa minerals on top of the toe of the landslide, and 3) the highest shoreline of the ancestral lake overtopping the toe of the landslide with gastropod and bivalve shells, we conclude that the MML predates the oldest alluvial fan terraces and lake sediments exposed in the Coachella and Imperial valleys and must be older than early Holocene (i.e. Late Pleistocene?). Thus, the MML landslide has the potential to be used as a spectral endmember for desert varnish thickness and thus proxy for age discrimination of active AF washes versus desert pavements. Given the older age of the MML landslide and low water levels in the modern SS, the risk from future rockslides of this size and related seiches is rather low. However, catastrophic floods and debris flows do occur along the most active AF channels; and the aftermath of such flows can be identified spectrally by montmorillonite crusts forming in

  16. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOEpatents

    Bathina, Mahesh; Singh, Ramanand

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  17. Measuring two phase flow parameters using impedance cross-correlation flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamedsalih, Y.; Lucas, G.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an impedance cross correlation flow meter which can be used in solids-water pipe flows to measure the local solids volume fraction distribution and the local solids velocity distribution. The system is composed of two arrays of electrodes, separated by an axial distance of 50 mm and each array contains eights electrodes mounted over the internal circumference of the pipe carrying the flow. Furthermore every electrode in each array can be selected to be either"excitation", "measurement" or "earth". Changing the electrode configuration leads to a change in the electric field, and hence in the region of the flow cross section which is interrogated. The local flow velocity in the interrogated region is obtained by cross correlation between the two electrode arrays. Additionally, the local solids volume fraction can be obtained from the mean mixture conductivity in the region under interrogation. The system is being integrated with a microcontroller to measure the velocity distribution of the solids and the volume fraction distribution of the solids in order to create a portable flow meter capable of measuring the multi-phase flow parameters without the need of a PC to control it. Integration of the product of the local solids volume fraction and the local solids velocity in the flow cross section enables the solids volumetric flow rate to be determined.

  18. Low Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, David E.; Neubert, Robert J.; Malmborg, Eric W.; Philbrick, Daniel H.; Spear, David A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Low Noise ADP Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes and core stators. This fan stage design was combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle, subscale model. This model is intended for use in aerodynamic performance, acoustic and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The model has a 22-inch outer fan diameter and a hub-to-top ratio of 0.426 which permits the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance designs and rig drive system. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the PW 17-inch rig previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric analysis at aerodynamic design condition are included. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is described including the material selections and stress analysis. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low cycle fatigue life, and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the fan exit guide vane and core stator to minimize noise. A fan-FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine these airfoil counts. The fan stage design was matched to a nacelle design to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. The nacelle design was developed under a separate NASA contract. The nacelle was designed with an axisymmetric inlet, cowl and nozzle for convenience in testing and fabrication. Aerodynamic analysis of the nacelle confirmed the required performance at various aircraft operating conditions.

  19. Alluvial fans and their natural distinction from rivers based on morphology, hydraulic processes, sedimentary processes, and facies assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, T.C. ); McPherson, J.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Contrary to common contemporary usage, alluvial fans are a naturally unique phenomenon readily distinguishable from other sedimentary environments, including gravel-bed rivers, on the basis of morphology, hydraulic processes, sedimentologic processes, and facies assemblages. The piedmont setting of alluvial fans where the feeder channel of an upland drainage basin intersects the mountain front assures that catastrophic fluid gravity flows and sediment gravity flows, including sheetfloods, rock falls, rock slides, rock avalanches, and debris flows, are major constructional processes, regardless of climate. The unconfinement of these flows at the mountain front gives rise to the high-sloping, semiconical form that typifies fans. The plano-convex cross-profile geometry inherent in this form is the inverse of the toughlike cross-sectional form of river systems, and precludes the development of floodplains that characterize rivers. The relatively high slope of alluvial fans creates unique hydraulic conditions where passing fluid gravity flows attain high capacity, high competency, and upper flow regime, resulting in sheetfloods that deposit low-angle antidune or surface-parallel planar-stratified sequences. These waterlaid facies contrast with the typically lower-flow-regime thick-bedded, cross-bedded, and lenticular channel facies, and associated floodplain sequences, of rivers. The unconfinement of flows on fans causes a swift decrease in velocity, competency, and capacity as they attenuate, inducing rapid deposition that leads to the angular, poorly sorted textures and short radii typical of fans. This condition is markedly different than for rivers, where sediment gravity flows are rare and water flows remain confined by channel walls or spill into floodplains, and increase in depth downstream.

  20. Phase Resolved Angular Velocity Control of Cross Flow Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Cross flow turbines have a number of operational advantages for the conversion of kinetic energy in marine or fluvial currents, but they are often less efficient than axial flow devices. Here a control scheme is presented in which the angular velocity of a cross flow turbine with two straight blades is prescribed as a function of azimuthal blade position, altering the time-varying effective angle of attack. Flume experiments conducted with a scale model turbine show approximately an 80% increase in turbine efficiency versus optimal constant angular velocity and constant resistive torque control schemes. Torque, drag, and lateral forces on one- and two-bladed turbines are analyzed and interpreted with bubble flow visualization to develop a simple model that describes the hydrodynamics responsible for the observed increase in mean efficiency. Challenges associated with implementing this control scheme on commercial-scale devices are discussed. If solutions are found, the performance increase presented here may impact the future development of cross flow turbines.

  1. Flow interaction between multiple cross-flow inlets in a horizontal pipe or channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab N.; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph W.

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible flow in horizontal channels and pipes with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. Flow interference among the inlets was studied using an axisymmetric pipe flow model with five cross-flow inlets. Three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The effects of inlet pressure and inlet size on the flow regimes under steady state conditions were studied. The presence of these regimes was supported by field data obtained from a horizontal natural gas well at two different times in the production cycle. Using a hydrostatic pressure model of reservoirs as the inlet boundary condition that drained fluid into the channel, the dynamic interaction of the inlets was studied. The transient behavior of the flow regimes was simulated and the key time-scales involved were identified. This is supported by field data where a similar behavior can be observed over time. Initially, the upstream inlets were in a blocked state, but opened up at a later time, leading to a trickle flow regime. Supported in Part by Apache Corporation.

  2. Heat transfer characteristics for disk fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhodko, Yu. M.; Chekhov, V. P.; Fomichev, V. P.

    2014-08-01

    Multiple-disk fans belong to the class of friction machines; they can be designed in two variants: centrifugal disk fans and diametrical disk fans. Flow patterns in these two types of machines are different, and they possess different heat transfer characteristics. The paper presents results of experimental study for a centrifugal disk fan under atmospheric pressure with air taken as working gas. The radial temperature distribution for a disk was obtained at different rotation speed of the rotor and different heating of the disks. Heat transfer characteristics of a centrifugal disk fan and a diametrical disk fan were compared. The research results demonstrate a higher heat transfer efficiency for centrifugal design versus diametrical disk design.

  3. A Comparison of Propeller and Centrifugal Fans for Circulating the Air in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E

    1928-01-01

    The tests described in this paper afford a direct comparison of the efficiency and smoothness of flow obtained with propeller fan and multiblade centrifugal fan drives in the same wind tunnel. The propeller fan was found to be superior to the centrifugal fan in that the efficiency was about twice as great, and the flow much smoother.

  4. Design Guidelines for Quiet Fans and Pumps for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, John S.; Magliozzi, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This document presents guidelines for the design of quiet fans and pumps of the class used on space vehicles. A simple procedure is presented for the prediction of fan noise over the meaningful frequency spectrum. A section also presents general design criteria for axial flow fans, squirrel cage fans, centrifugal fans, and centrifugal pumps. The basis for this report is an experimental program conducted by Hamilton Standard under NASA Contract NAS 9-12457. The derivations of the noise predicting methods used in this document are explained in Hamilton Standard Report SVHSER 6183, "Fan and Pump Noise Control," dated May 1973 (6).

  5. Regional and local risk assessments of alluvial fans by combination of historical and geomorphological data on debris flows, the most damaging natural hazard in the Aosta Valley Region (NW-Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Ratto, Sara; Alberto, Walter; Armand, Marco; Cignetti, Martina; Palomba, Mauro; Navillod, Evelyne

    2010-05-01

    The Aosta Valley (NW-Italy) is a small alpine Region (area = 3262 km2) where alluvial fans occupy large sectors of the main valley bottom and also of the tributary valleys; most towns and villages lie in these sectors which are frequently affected by different geomorphological processes, including debris flows. For a best environmental hazard assessment and management of alluvial fans, a research project has been carried out with a particular attention to debris flows, responsible for causing major damages to human activities and infrastructures. A debris flows inventory on a regional scale has been created, combining historical data (1900 to present), technical maps and geomorphological analysis on the alluvial fans areas. A complex methodology for data collection and analysis has been organized in two different stages. As a first step, aerial photointerpretation and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) analysis were conducted over the Aosta Valley Region to obtain a complete fans inventory and to identify the most affected sectors by debris flows. As a second step, data on debris flow events occurred in the Region has been collected from different sources, such as bibliographic and historical data, municipality hazard maps for land planning restriction and drainage basin technical studies. For each inventored debris flow, aerial photointerpretations have been performed to validate geomorphological and historical data, mostly collected during major regional flood events. Finally, the selected debris flow events has been formally organized in a GIS to perform spatial and statistical analysis. Application of the methodology to the complete Aosta Valley Region dataset involved the overcoming of some difficulties, such as: 1) correct identification of repeated events from different sources, 2) exact recognition of small phenomena by photointerpretation and 3) problems related to the rapid landforms obliteration. The preliminary results of the research activity are outlined

  6. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  7. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  8. A database on flood and debris-flow processes in alluvial fans: a preliminary analysis aimed at evaluation of the damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Carmela; Santangelo, Nicoletta; Santo, Antonio; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Debris-flow and flood events cause yearly wide damages to buildings and infrastructures, and produce many casualties and fatalities. These processes are very common in Italy, affecting mainly torrential stream basins with different geological and morphological settings: in the Alpine mountain areas they are quite well analysed, whilst much less attention is generally paid in contexts such as those of the Apennines mostly due to the minor frequency of the events. Nevertheless, debris-flows and flood processes occur along many alluvial fans, have greatly contributed to their building up, and are therefore worth to be studied. Along many areas of the Southern Apennines, coalescent alluvial fans are a widespread geomorphic unit, typically located at the foot of steep slopes. In most cases these areas correspond to the more highly urbanised sectors, generally considered to be safer than the bottom valley, as concerns the direct effects from flooding. During intense storms, villages and towns built on alluvial fans may be affected by flooding and/or debris flow processes originated in the above catchment, and rapidly transferred downslope due to the steep slopes and the torrential character of the streams. This creates a very high hazard to the population and is at the origin of the severe and recurrent damage to urban settlements. Starting from the above considerations, we compiled a catalogue of flood and debris-flow events occurred in Campania Region, southern Italy, by consulting very different information sources: national and local newspapers and journals, regional historical archives, scientific literature, internet blogs. More than 350 events, occurred in Campania from 1700 to present, were collected. Information on time of occurrence and location are available for each event, with different level of accuracy, that is typically lower going back to the oldest events for which only the year or the month of occurrence of the event was identified; nevertheless, for

  9. Cross-flow membrane microfiltration of a bacteriol fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Nagata, N; Herouvis, K J; Dziewulski, D M; Belfort, G

    1989-08-01

    Although cross-flow membrane filtration is a very attractive option for harvesting cells and recovering enzymes from cell homogenates, the process is not without its problems. Foremost of these is the deposit of dissolved and suspended solutes onto the membrane surface during operation. The formation of these dense and sometimes compressive sublayers (often called cakes) offers additional resistance to axial and permeate flows and often affects the retention characteristics of the process. In view of the complex nature of the sublayer formation process and its sensitivity to cross-flow velocity, this investigation was undertaken to determine the main factors responsible for the decline in performance during the harvesting of B. polymyxa broth by membrane microfiltration. System parameters varied include axial flow rate, concentration of cells, proteins and other components in the feed, membrane materials (ceramic, polypropylene, and stainless steel), and cleaning methods. To help explain the observed results, a new mass transport model-the solids flux model-based on the assumptions that back migration of particles from the sublayer or membrane surface is negligible and that particles that reach the solid-solution interface attach (stick) completely, is tested. Using a variety of diagnostic methods, magnesium ammonium phosphate precipitate is formed during steam sterilization of the medium and is implicated as the major foulant in this study. PMID:18588126

  10. Investigation of non-symmetric jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fan-Ming

    1987-05-01

    Non-symmetric jets in crossflow were studied with various jet geometries, jet orientations, jet characteristics, and jet to crossflow velocity ratios. Four different cross-section geometry jets were studied and compared with a circular jet with identical jet port cross-sectional area. Standard dye and laser induced fluorescent flow visualization techniques were used to identify the existence of various vortices in the flow field. Among the many forms of secondary vortices produced, three major vortex systems were identified: main jet vortices, wake vortices, and spinoff vortices. A reconstruction of the asymmetric flow field based on observations and its evolution and relationships with established symmetric jets in the crossflow were made. The large scale rolled-up vortex structure which was found at low jet to crossflow velocity ratio is very similar to the hair-pin vortex structure. This observation provides a potential research tool on the study of the structure of turbulent boundary layers. Unsteady jets created by pulsation of the jet flow at low pulsation frequencies give the increase of the depth of penetration. However, the introducing of swirl into jets by passive methods reduces the depth of penetration.

  11. Numerical simulation of a cross flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Taylor; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    In the search for alternative sources of energy, the kinetic energy of water currents in oceans, rivers and estuaries is being explored as predictable and environmentally benign. We are investigating the flow past a cross flow turbine in which a helical blade under hydrodynamic forces turns around a shaft perpendicular to the free stream. This type of turbine, while very different from the classical horizontal axis turbine commonly used in the wind energy field, presents advantages for stacking in very narrow constricted channels where the water currents are consistently high and therefore turbine installation may be economically feasible. We use a model of a helical four-bladed turbine in cross flow to investigate the efficiency of the energy capture and the dynamics of the turbulent wake. Scale model experiments in a flume are used to validate the numerical results on a stationary configuration as an initial step towards creating an accurate numerical model of the turbine. The simulation of the rotating turbine provides a full perspective on the effect of angular position on flow detachment and vortex shedding from the blade, as well as on the fluctuations of the shaft torque produced (a problematic feature of this type of turbine). The results are analyzed in terms of hydrodynamic optimization of the blade and its structural loading. Supported by DOE through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center.

  12. Cross-correlation-aided transport in stochastically driven accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Amit K.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of linear instability resulting in rotating sheared accretion flows has remained a controversial subject for a long time. While some explanations of such non-normal transient growth of disturbances in the Rayleigh stable limit were available for magnetized accretion flows, similar instabilities in the absence of magnetic perturbations remained unexplained. This dichotomy was resolved in two recent publications by Chattopadhyay and co-workers [Mukhopadhyay and Chattopadhyay, J. Phys. A 46, 035501 (2013), 10.1088/1751-8113/46/3/035501; Nath et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 013010 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.013010] where it was shown that such instabilities, especially for nonmagnetized accretion flows, were introduced through interaction of the inherent stochastic noise in the system (even a "cold" accretion flow at 3000 K is too "hot" in the statistical parlance and is capable of inducing strong thermal modes) with the underlying Taylor-Couette flow profiles. Both studies, however, excluded the additional energy influx (or efflux) that could result from nonzero cross correlation of a noise perturbing the velocity flow, say, with the noise that is driving the vorticity flow (or equivalently the magnetic field and magnetic vorticity flow dynamics). Through the introduction of such a time symmetry violating effect, in this article we show that nonzero noise cross correlations essentially renormalize the strength of temporal correlations. Apart from an overall boost in the energy rate (both for spatial and temporal correlations, and hence in the ensemble averaged energy spectra), this results in mutual competition in growth rates of affected variables often resulting in suppression of oscillating Alfven waves at small times while leading to faster saturations at relatively longer time scales. The effects are seen to be more pronounced with magnetic field fluxes where the noise cross correlation magnifies the strength of the field concerned. Another remarkable

  13. Directional scales of heterogeneity in alluvial fan aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Neton, M.J.; Dorsch, J.; Young, S.C.; Olson, C.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences Tennessee Valley Authority Engineering Lab., Norris, TN )

    1992-01-01

    Abrupt lateral and vertical permeability changes of up to 12 orders of magnitude are common in alluvial fan aquifers due to depositional heterogeneity. This abrupt heterogeneity is problematic, particularly in construction of a continuous hydraulic conductivity field from point measurements. Site characterization is improved through use of a scale-and-directionally-related model of fan heterogeneities. A directional classification of alluvial fan aquifer heterogeneities is proposed. The three directional scales of heterogeneity in alluvial fan aquifers are: (1) within-fan, (2) between-fan (strike-parallel), and (3) cross-fan (strike-perpendicular). Within-fan heterogeneity ranges from very small-scale intergrain relationships which control the nature of pores, to larger scale permeability trends between fan apex and toe, and includes abrupt lateral and vertical facies relationships. Between-fan heterogeneities are of a larger-scale and include differences between adjacent (non)coalescent fans along a basin-margin fault due primarily to changes in lithology between adjacent upland source basins. These differences produce different (a) grain and pore fluid compositions, (b) lithologic facies and proportions, and (c) down-fan fining trends, between adjacent fans. Cross-fan heterogeneities extend from source to basin. Fan deposits are in abrupt contact upgradient with low permeability, basin-margin source rock. Downgradient, fan deposits are in gradational to abrupt contact with time-equivalent, generally lower permeability deposits of lake, desert, longitudinal braided and meandering river, volcanic, and shallow marine environments. Throughout basin history these environments may abruptly cover the fan with low permeability horizons.

  14. An analysis of prop-fan/airframe aerodynamic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boctor, M. L.; Clay, C. W.; Watson, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to aerodynamic integration of turboprops and airframes, with emphasis placed upon wing mounted installations is addressed. Potential flow analytical techniques were employed to study aerodynamic integration of the prop fan propulsion concept with advanced, subsonic, commercial transport airframes. Three basic configurations were defined and analyzed: wing mounted prop fan at a cruise Mach number of 0.8, wing mounted prop fan in a low speed configuration, and aft mounted prop fan at a cruise Mach number of 0.8.

  15. Noise suppression by flexible fan silencers

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, J.; Kelly, T.R.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results on noise testing of a fan only, as well as the results of a steel silencer and of flexible silencers that were connected directly to a fan. On-site facilities and free-field method set by the British Standards Institution were used to measure and then compare the fan only and different practical silencer configuration setups. In order to determine the fan-silencer combination that would give the maximum noise attenuation, total noise intensity, noise contributed to by the fan motor only, as well as aerodynamical noise created through air interacting with the fan parts were considered to obtain decibel readings for the octave bands. Subsequently, the optimal configuration found was the setup with flexible silencers on the fan inlet and the fan outlet. If only one silencer is used, it should be installed on the fan inlet. The aerodynamic noise affects the low frequencies. The flow noise is then overtaken at 1 kHz by the mechanical noise.

  16. Geophysical Investigation of Subsurface Characteristics of Icy Debris Fans with Ground Penetrating Radar in the Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. F.; Pun, W.; Milkereit, B.

    2011-12-01

    Authors Tracey Smith^1, Rob Jacob^1, Jeffrey Trop^1, Keith Williams^2 and Craig Kochel^1 Bucknell University, Geology and Environmental Geoscience Department, Lewisburg, PA UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Dr., Boulder, CO 80301 Icy debris fans have recently been described as deglaciation features on Earth and similar features have been observed on Mars, however, the subsurface characteristics remain unknown. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to non-invasively investigate the subsurface characteristics of icy debris fans near McCarthy, Alaska, USA. The three fans investigated in Alaska are the East, West, and Middle fans which are between the Nabesna ice cap and the McCarthy Glacier. Icy debris fans in general are a largely unexplored suite of paraglacial landforms and processes in alpine regions. Recent field studies focused on direct observations and depositional processes. The results showed that each fan's composition is primarily influenced by the type and frequency of mass wasting processes that supply the fan. Photographic studies show that the East fan receives far more ice and snow avalanches whereas the Middle and West fan receive fewer mass wasting events but more clastic debris is deposited on the Middle and West fan from rock falls and icy debris flows. GPR profiles and WARR surveys consisting of both, common mid-point (CMP), and common shot-point (CSP) surveys investigated the subsurface geometry of the fans and the McCarthy Glacier.All GPR surveys were collected in 2013 with 100MHz bi-static antennas. Four axial profiles and three cross-fan profiles were done on the West and Middle fans as well as the McCarthy Glacier in order to investigate the relationship between the three features. Terrestrial laser surveying of the surface and real-time kinematic GPS provided the surface elevation used to correct the GPR data for topographic changes. GPR profiles yielded reflectors that were continuous for 10+ m and hyperbolic reflections in the subsurface. The WARR

  17. Geophysical Investigation of Subsurface Characteristics of Icy Debris Fans with Ground Penetrating Radar in the Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. D.; Jacob, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Authors Tracey Smith^1, Rob Jacob^1, Jeffrey Trop^1, Keith Williams^2 and Craig Kochel^1 Bucknell University, Geology and Environmental Geoscience Department, Lewisburg, PA UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Dr., Boulder, CO 80301 Icy debris fans have recently been described as deglaciation features on Earth and similar features have been observed on Mars, however, the subsurface characteristics remain unknown. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to non-invasively investigate the subsurface characteristics of icy debris fans near McCarthy, Alaska, USA. The three fans investigated in Alaska are the East, West, and Middle fans which are between the Nabesna ice cap and the McCarthy Glacier. Icy debris fans in general are a largely unexplored suite of paraglacial landforms and processes in alpine regions. Recent field studies focused on direct observations and depositional processes. The results showed that each fan's composition is primarily influenced by the type and frequency of mass wasting processes that supply the fan. Photographic studies show that the East fan receives far more ice and snow avalanches whereas the Middle and West fan receive fewer mass wasting events but more clastic debris is deposited on the Middle and West fan from rock falls and icy debris flows. GPR profiles and WARR surveys consisting of both, common mid-point (CMP), and common shot-point (CSP) surveys investigated the subsurface geometry of the fans and the McCarthy Glacier.All GPR surveys were collected in 2013 with 100MHz bi-static antennas. Four axial profiles and three cross-fan profiles were done on the West and Middle fans as well as the McCarthy Glacier in order to investigate the relationship between the three features. Terrestrial laser surveying of the surface and real-time kinematic GPS provided the surface elevation used to correct the GPR data for topographic changes. GPR profiles yielded reflectors that were continuous for 10+ m and hyperbolic reflections in the subsurface. The WARR

  18. Vibration effect on cross-flow and co-flow focusing mechanism for droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Microbubbles are widely used in many industries such as water treatment, drug coating, and ultrasonic contrast agents. Cross-flow focusing and co-flow focusing are considered basic mechanisms used for microbubble generation. Typically, to achieve micron-sized droplets requires structure dimensions in the same order of magnitude of the desired droplet sizes. In this paper we report a method of applying an external vibration to a cross-flow and co-flow focusing structure, which allows for smaller droplets to be generated. The junction dimension was 700×400 μm, and the channel width was 800 μm. The two assumed fluids are selected in a way that the Capillary number is high (Ca>10) to make use of necking effect occurred in the downstream. Linear vibration was exerted on the microchannel structure in the direction of central flow. A 2D structure was simulated using finite element software, and the numerical approach was then verified by comparing the experimental data of a typical cross-flow focusing structure taken from our previous study with the corresponding simulation assuming the same parameters. The results show that although the droplet generation regime depends on flow ratio (Qa/Qw) and vibration parameter (ampl×freq), Capillary number also has a significant effect on the regime. Briefly, applying a low-cost linear vibration to the conventional flow focusing structures can be used as an accurate controlling technique for increasing the chance of droplet generation. In fact, vibration motion can change the flow regime and breakup mechanism. It can also change the breakup point at which the droplets are formed.

  19. Dilution Jets in Accelerated Cross Flows. Degree awarded May 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, Abraham; Greber, Isaac; Riddlebaugh, Stephen M. (Technical Monitor)

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments were designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio, and the densimetric Froude number. When injection velocities are large or densities are small, the Froude number becomes very large and hence, unimportant. Therefore, the Froude number is generally significant in describing liquid experiments but is unimportant for the gas experiments in the combustor. Agreement between test and calculated results is encouraging but tends to become poorer with increasing momentum ratio. The temperature measurements are presented primarily in the form of consecutive normalized temperature profiles. Some interpolated isothermal contours are also shown. The single jet trajectories are consistently found to be swept towards the inner wall of the bend, whether injection is from the outer or the inner wall. This behavior is explained by a drifting effect which consists of a transverse velocity component across the combustor due to the developing nature of the flow along it. Plots of lateral temperature distributions of the jet indicate that under

  20. Three-dimensional computations of cross-flow injection and combustion in a supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A low-storage version of the SPARK3D code which is based on the temporally second-order accurate MacCormack (1969) explicit scheme is used to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional chemically reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. The code includes a fourth-order compact spatial scheme capable of providing higher order spatial accuracy, and it is used to study two-dimensional linear advection, two-dimensional Euler flow, and three-dimensional viscous flow. Also considered are the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen in a supersonic cross stream.

  1. The stability and visualized flame and flow structures of a combusting jet in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Chang, J.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    The blowoff stability and flame behavior of a combusting propane gas jet issuing from a well-contoured burner perpendicularly to a cross air stream in a wind tunnel test section is studied experimentally. A category of never-lift flames was found to have different stability characteristics and behavior from the conventionally reported liftable flames. The stability domain of the never-lift flames covers higher cross-flow velocities and lower fuel jet velocities compared with the liftable flames. The flame configurations in the stability domain are identified by characteristic modes: down-washed flame, flashing flame, developing flame, dual-flame, flickering flame, and pre-blowoff flame. The schlieren photographs are presented in order to discuss the effects of the flow structures on the general behavior of the flames in each characteristic mode and on the flame stability characteristics. The bisector of the eddy travelling avenue reasonably depicts the trajectory of the combusting jet in cross flow. Correlations for the trajectories of cold and combusting jets in cross flow are obtained.

  2. Unsteady Simulation of an ASME Venturi Flow in a Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady numerical simulations of an ASME venturi flow into a cross flow were performed. The velocity ratios between the venturi flow and the free stream were 25, 50, and 75%. Two cases of the venturi with and without a tube extension have been investigated. The tube extension length was approximately 4D (here D is the inner diameter of the venturi's outlet), connecting the venturi to the bottom surface of the numerical wind tunnel. A finite volume approach with the Wilcox K-φ turbulence model were used. Results that include contours of the mean velocity, velocity vector, turbulent kinetic energy, pressure and vortices within the venturi as well as downstream in the interaction region indicate that when the venturi is flushed with the surface, there is evidence of flow separation within the venturi, near the outlet. However, when the tube extension was added, the pressure recovery was sustained and flow separation within the venturi was not present and the characteristics of the flow in the interaction region were similar to the corresponding characteristics of a pipe jet in a cross flow.

  3. The Alternative Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Elliott, David M.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Moore, Royce D.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2000-01-01

    A 106 bladed fan with a design takeoff tip speed of 1100 ft/sec was hypothesized as reducing perceived noise because of the shift of the blade passing harmonics to frequencies beyond the perceived noise rating range. A 22 in. model of this Alternative Low Noise Fan, ALNF, was tested in the NASA Glenn 9x 15 Wind Tunnel. 'Me fan was tested with a 7 vane long chord stator assembly and a 70 vane conventional stator assembly in both hard and acoustically treated configurations. In addition a partially treated 7 vane configuration was tested wherein the acoustic material between the 7 long chord stators was made inactive. The noise data from the 106 bladed fan with 7 long chord stators in a hard configuration was shown to be around 4 EPNdB quieter than a low tip speed Allison fan at takeoff and around 5 EPNdB quieter at approach. Although the tone noise behaved as hypothesized, the majority of this noise reduction was from reduced broadband noise related to the large number of rotor blades. This 106 bladed ALNF is a research fan designed to push the technology limits and as such is probably not a practical device with present materials technology. However, a low tip speed fan with around 50 blades would be a practical device and calculations indicate that it could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter at takeoff and 3 to 4 EPNdB quieter at approach than the Allison fan. 7 vane data compared with 70 vane data indicated that the tone noise was controlled by rotor wake-stator interaction but that the broadband noise is probably controlled by the interaction of the rotor with incoming flows. A possible multiple pure tone noise reduction technique for a fan/acoustic treatment system was identified. The data from the fully treated configuration showed significant noise reductions over a large frequency range thereby providing a real tribute to this bulk absorber treatment design. The tone noise data with the partially treated 7 vane configuration indicated that acoustic material in the

  4. Supersonic throughflow fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, C. L.; Moore, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic throughflow fan research, and technology needs are reviewed. The design of a supersonic throughflow fan stage, a facility inlet, and a downstream diffuser is described. The results from the analysis codes used in executing the design are shown. An engine concept intended to permit establishing supersonic throughflow within the fan on the runway and maintaining the supersonic throughflow condition within the fan throughout the flight envelope is presented.

  5. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  6. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  7. Improved numerical method for subchannel cross-flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, S.; Anghaie, S.

    1986-01-01

    COBRA-OSU is a fast running computer code for coupled kinetic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor core subchannels, currently under development at Oregon State University. This code is a modified version of COBRA-IV with two major improved features. First, COBRA-OSU uses the Gaussian elimination method instead of Gauss-Seidel iteration for subchannel cross-flow calculation. Second, COBRA-OSU has an additional model for regionwise point reactor kinetics which includes all major feedback reactivity effects on calculation of the axial power profile during the course of a transient. This paper summarizes the improved numerical features of the COBRA-OSU code.

  8. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Raptis, A. C.

    1984-05-01

    An apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe is described. It includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  9. Two-, three-, and four-poster jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukits, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    In connection with the problems of the ingestion of hot exhaust gases in engines of V/STOL and STOVL aircraft in ground effect, a series of studies have been undertaken. Ground impinging, two- and three-poster jets operating in the presence of cross flow were studied. The current paper is divided into two parts. The first part is a comparison of the low speed, two-, three-, and four-poster jet cases, with respect to the flowfield in the region of interaction between the forward and the jet flows. These include cases with mass balanced inlet suction. An analysis of the inlet entry plane of the low speed two- and three-poster jet cases is also given. In the second part, high speed results for a two jet configuration without inlet suction are given. The results are based on quantitative, marker concentration distributions obtained by digitizing video images.

  10. Quiet High Speed Fan II (QHSF II): Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen; Weir, Don; Ross, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This report details the aerodynamic, mechanical, structural design and fabrication of a Honey Engines Quiet High Speed Fan II (lower hub/tip ratio and higher specific flow than the Baseline I fan). This fan/nacelle system incorporates features such as advanced forward sweep and an advanced integrated fan/fan exit guide vane design that provides for the following characteristics: (1) Reduced noise at supersonic tip speeds, in comparison to current state-of-the-art fan technology; (2) Improved aeroelastic stability within the anticipated operating envelope; and (3) Aerodynamic performance consistent with current state-of-the-art fan technology. This fan was fabricated by Honeywell and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel for aerodynamic, aeromechanical, and acoustic performance.

  11. Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-08-30

    Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) is a global leader in hydrokinetic technology and project development. ORPC develops hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of oceans and rivers to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC’s technology consists of a family of modular hydrokinetic power systems: the TidGen® Power System, for use at shallow to medium-depth tidal sites; the RivGen™ Power System, for use at river and estuary sites; and the OCGen® Power System, presently under development, for use at deep tidal and offshore ocean current sites. These power systems convert kinetic energy in moving water into clean, renewable, grid-compatible electric power. The core technology component for all ORPC power systems is its patented turbine generator unit (TGU). The TGU uses proprietary advanced design cross flow (ADCF) turbines to drive an underwater permanent magnet generator mounted at the TGU’s center. It is a gearless, direct-drive system that has the potential for high reliability, requires no lubricants and releases no toxins that could contaminate the surrounding water. The hydrokinetic industry shows tremendous promise as a means of helping reduce the U.S.’s use of fossil fuels and dependence on foreign oil. To exploit this market opportunity, cross-flow hydrokinetic devices need to advance beyond the pre-commercial state and more systematic data about the structure and function of cross-flow hydrokinetic devices is required. This DOE STTR project, “Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils,” refined the cross-flow turbine design process to improve efficiency and performance and developed turbine manufacturing processes appropriate for volume production. The project proposed (1) to overcome the lack of data by extensively studying the properties of cross flow turbines, a particularly competitive design approach for extracting hydrokinetic energy and (2) to help ORPC mature its pre

  12. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  14. Radon reduction using sub floor fans

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.

    1996-06-01

    The basement and second floor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in an energy efficient home were measured hourly for 6 y using continuous monitors of our design. The home had a subslab pipe network installed during construction, and for the past 2 y a 150 cfm fan was operative venting air via ductwork inside the chimney exiting on the roof. During this measurement interval, experiments were conducted with the fan in 3 modes: (1) with the subslab fan off, (2) in the conventional direction auctioning air from beneath the slab to outside, and (3) reversed, blowing outdoor air into the network under the slab. We have a large data base to show that the indoor {sup 222}R n concentration varies inversely with the indoor/outdoor temperature difference. In order to compare the 3 fan modes directly, we selected 50 to 90 d periods when the outdoor temperature was essentially the same. For the 3 modes, the fan off, blowing upward, and blowing downward, the basement concentration averaged 80, 38, and 34 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. Radon peaks or surges occur over a period of about 1 d during falling barometric pressure. With the fan blowing downward, these {sup 222}Rn peaks tend to be smaller but only marginally so. We conclude that in this home the reduction in {sup 222}Rn with the fan and subslab pipe network operating was essentially the same regardless of the direction of flow from the fan.

  15. Alluvial Fans on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraal, E. R.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Asphaug, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Moore and Howard [1] reported the discovery of large alluvial fans in craters on Mars. Their initial survey from 0-30 S found that these fans clustered in three distinct regions and occurred at around the +1 km MOLA defined Mars datum. However, due to incomplete image coverage, Moore and Howard [1]could not conduct a comprehensive survey. They also recognized, though did not quantitatively address, gravity scaling issues. Here, we briefly discuss the identification of alluvial fans on Mars, then consider the general equations governing the deposition of alluvial fans and hypothesize a method for learning about grain size in alluvial fans on Mars.

  16. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and anorthite (CaAl[sub 2]Si[sub 2]O[sub 8]). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841[plus minus]259 psi at 870[degrees]C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870[degrees]C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600[degrees]C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at [approximately]700[degrees]C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an [approximately]30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700[degrees]C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  17. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-11-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841{plus_minus}259 psi at 870{degrees}C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870{degrees}C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600{degrees}C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at {approximately}700{degrees}C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an {approximately}30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700{degrees}C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  18. Transverse jet injection into a supersonic turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    Jet injection into a supersonic cross-flow is a challenging fluid dynamics problem in the field of aerospace engineering which has applications as part of a rocket thrust vector control system for noise control in cavities and fuel injection in scramjet combustion chambers. Several experimental and theoretical/numerical works have been conducted to explore this flow; however, there is a dearth of literature detailing the instantaneous flow which is vital to improve the efficiency of the mixing of fluids. In this paper, a sonic jet in a Mach 1.6 free-stream is studied using a finite volume Godunov type implicit large eddy simulations technique, which employs fifth-order accurate MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme with modified variable extrapolation and a three-stage second-order strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal advancement. A digital filter based turbulent inflow data generation method is implemented in order to capture the physics of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. This paper details the averaged and instantaneous flow features including vortex structures downstream of the jet injection, along with the jet penetration, jet mixing, pressure distributions, turbulent kinetic energy, and Reynolds stresses in the downstream flow. It demonstrates that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities in the upper jet shear layer are primarily responsible for mixing of the two fluids. The results are compared to experimental data and recently performed classical large eddy simulations (LES) with the same initial conditions in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical methods and utility of the inflow generation method. Results here show equivalent accuracy for 1/45th of the computational resources used in the classical LES study.

  19. Fan noise prediction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bent, Paul H.

    1995-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of two techniques for predicting the fan noise radiation from engine nacelles. The first is a relatively computational intensive finite element technique. The code is named ARC, an abbreviation of Acoustic Radiation Code, and was developed by Eversman. This is actually a suite of software that first generates a grid around the nacelle, then solves for the potential flowfield, and finally solves the acoustic radiation problem. The second approach is an analytical technique requiring minimal computational effort. This is termed the cutoff ratio technique and was developed by Rice. Details of the duct geometry, such as the hub-to-tip ratio and Mach number of the flow in the duct, and modal content of the duct noise are required for proper prediction.

  20. Cross correlation and length scales in turbulent flows near surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.; Moin, P.; Lee, M.; Moser, R. D.; Spalart, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Kaimal, J. C.; Gaynor, E.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of length scales are used in turbulent flows; 'functional length scales' such as mixing length, dissipation length L(sub epsilon), etc., and 'flow-field length scales' derived from cross correlations of velocity, pressure, etc. in the flow. Some connection between these scales are derived here. We first consider the cross correlation R(sub vv)(y,y(sub 1)) of the normal components u at two heights y, y(sub 1) above a rigid surface, normalized by the velocity y(sub 1) (greater than y). For shear-free boundary layers it is found theoretically, and in field and numerical experiments that R(sub vv) approximately equals y/y(sub 1). For shear layers it is also found that R(sub vv) approximately equals f(y/y(sub 1)) less than or equal to y,y(sub 1). This function f differs slightly between low Reynolds number numerical simulations and field experiments. The lateral structure defined by R(sub vv)(y,r(sub 3); y(sub 1),0) is also self similar and shows that the eddies centered at about y(sub 1) appear to have constant lateral width a(sub 3) above and below y(sub 1), where a(sub 3, sup +) approximately equals 7+1/(1.4dU(sup +)/dy(sup +)), when normalized on u(sub *) and v, where U is the mean velocity. Results for L(sub epsilon, sup -1) from direct numerical simulation are found to compare well with the formula L(sub epsilon, sup -1) = A(sub B)/y + A(sub S)dU/dy/v, for unidirectional and reversing turbulent boundary layers and channel flow, except near where dU/dy approximately equals 0. The conclusion is that the large-scale eddy structure and length scales in these flows are determined by a combination of shear and blocking, and that the vertical component of turbulence has a self-similar structure in both kinds of boundary layer.

  1. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohany, A.; Ziada, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aeroacoustic response of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow is investigated experimentally. Eleven spacing ratios between the cylinders, in the range of L/D=1.2 4.5, have been tested to investigate the effect of the gap between the cylinders on the excitation mechanism of acoustic resonance. During the tests, the acoustic cross-modes of the duct housing the cylinders are self-excited. Similar tests are performed on isolated cylinders. The aeroacoustic response of the tandem cylinders is found to be considerably different from that of isolated cylinders. For isolated cylinders, acoustic resonance of a given mode occurs over a single range of flow velocity and is excited by the natural vortex shedding process observed in the absence of acoustic resonance. In the case of tandem cylinders with a spacing ratio inside the proximity region, L/D is less than 3.5, the resonance occurs over two different ranges of flow velocity. One of these ranges is similar to that observed for isolated cylinders and the other occurs at much lower flow velocities. The latter resonance range seems to be triggered by the instability of the separated flow in the gap between the cylinders. Outside the proximity region, the aeroacoustic response of the two tandem cylinders is similar to that of isolated cylinder.

  2. Fan Database and Web-tool for Choosing Quieter Spaceflight Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2007-01-01

    One critical aspect of designing spaceflight hardware is the selection of fans to provide the necessary cooling. And with efforts to minimize cost and the tendancy to be conservative with the amount of cooling provided, it is easy to choose an overpowered fan. One impact of this is that the fan uses more energy than is necessary. But, the more significant impact is that the hardware produces much more acoustic noise than if an optimal fan was chosen. Choosing the right fan for a specific hardware application is no simple task. It requires knowledge of cooling requirements and various fan performance characteristics as well as knowledge of the aerodynamic losses of the hardware in which the fan is to be installed. Knowledge of the acoustic emissions of each fan as a function of operating condition is also required in order to choose a quieter fan for a given design point. The purpose of this paper is to describe a database and design-tool that have been developed to aid spaceflight hardware developers in choosing a fan for their application that is based on aerodynamic performance and reduced acoustic emissions as well. This web-based-tool provides a limited amount of fan-data, provides a method for selecting a fan based on its projected operating point, and also provides a method for comparing and contrasting aerodynamic performance and acoustic data from different fans. Drill-down techniques are used to display details of the spectral noise characteristics of the fan at specific operation conditions. The fan aerodynamic and acoustic data were acquired at Ames Research Center in the Experimental Aero-Physics Branch's Anechoic Chamber. Acoustic data were acquired according to ANSI Standard S12.11-1987, "Method for the Measurement of Noise Emitted by Small Air-Moving Devices." One significant improvement made to this technique included automation that allows for a significant increase in flow-rate resolution. The web-tool was developed at Johnson Space Center and is

  3. Fan Noise Prediction: Status and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1997-01-01

    The prediction of fan noise is an important part to the prediction of overall turbofan engine noise. Advances in computers and better understanding of the flow physics have allowed researchers to compute sound generation from first principles and rely less on empirical correlations. While progress has been made, there are still many aspects of the problem that need to be explored. This paper presents some recent advances in fan noise prediction and suggests areas that still need further development. Fan noise predictions that support the recommendations are taken from existing publications.

  4. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines.

  5. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34947

  6. Experimental Study of Alluvial Fan Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, P.; Devauchelle, O.; Barrier, L.; Métivier, F.

    2015-12-01

    At the outlet of mountain ranges, rivers flow onto flatter lowlands. The associated change of slope causes sediment deposition. As the river is free to move laterally, it builds conical sedimentary structures called alluvial fans. Their location at the interface between erosional and depositional areas makes them valuable sedimentary archives. To decipher these sedimentary records, we need to understand the dynamics of their growth. Most natural fans are built by braided streams. However, to avoid the complexity of braided rivers, we develop a small-scale experiment in which an alluvial fan is formed by a single channel. We use a mixture of water and glycerol to produce a laminar river. The fluid is mixed with corindon sand (~ 300 μm) in a tilted channel and left free to form a fan around its outlet. The sediment and water discharges are constant during an experimental run. We record the fan progradation and the channel morphology with top-view pictures. We also generate an elevation map with an optical method based on the deformation of a moiré pattern. We observe that, to leading order, the fan remains self-affine as it grows, with a constant slope. We compare two recent studies about the formation of one-dimensionnal fan [Guerit et al. 2014] and threshold rivers [Seizilles et al. 2013] to our experimental findings. In particular, we propose a theory witch relates the fan morphology to the control parameters ( fluid and sediment discharges, grain size). Our observation accord with the predictions, suggesting that the fan is built near the threshold of sediment motion. Finally, we intend to expand our interpretation to alluvial fans build by single-thread channels ( Okavango, Bostwana; Taquari and Paraguay, Brasil; Pastaza, Peru).

  7. Static test of a fan-powered chin nozzle for V/STOl applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salemann, V.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a "chin" nozzle which diverts flow in a downward direction immediately downstream of a fan typical of designs suitable for V/STOL A applications was evaluated. Back pressure distortion to the fan and fan discharge pressure distortion were also measured. Results show that the distortion is significant at the closest spacing between the fan exit and cascade entrance tested, and that the chin nozzle performance deteriorates with increased flow diversion to the chin nozzle. Color oil flow visualization on video tape and still photos were also obtained. Tests were conducted behind a 12" model fan in the NASA-Lewis fan calibration facility.

  8. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  9. Pitched and Yawed Circular Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20 degrees and 45 degrees and yawed between beta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees in increments of 15 degrees. The measurements were performed with two X-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulence intensity. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, with the downstream distance is significantly lessened at higher alpha but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, omega(sub xmax) is about five times larger for beta = 0 degrees compared to the levels at beta = 0 degrees. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J.

  10. Centrifugal fan monitoring guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Piety, K.R.; Piety, R.W.; Greene, R.H.; Johnson, E.L. )

    1991-07-01

    This study provide guidelines on the vibration monitoring of centrifugal fans in fossil-fired utility plants. Based on an intensive analysis of a fan database, it provides a substantial amount of detailed information relating to vibration patterns and vibration amplitudes and recommends parameter bands and alarm levels. The study focuses on forced draft, induced draft, primary air, and gas recirculating fans. 8 refs., 19 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Dynamic response of Hovercraft lift fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, D. D.

    1981-08-01

    Hovercraft lift fans are subjected to varying back pressure due to wave action and craft motions when these vehicles are operating in a seaway. The oscillatory back pressure causes the fans to perform dynamically, exhibiting a hysteresis type of response and a corresponding degradation in mean performance. Since Hovercraft motions are influenced by variations in lift fan pressure and discharge, it is important to understand completely the nature of the dynamic performance of lift fans in order to completely solve the Hovercraft seakeeping problem. The present study was performed to determine and classify the instabilities encountered in a centrifugal fan operating against time-varying back pressure. A model-scale experiment was developed in which the fan discharge was directed into a flow-measuring device, terminating in a rotating valve which produced an oscillatory back pressure superimposed upon a mean aerodynamic resistance. Pressure and local velocity were measured as functions of time at several locations in the fan volute. The measurements permitted the identification of rotating (or propagating) stall in the impeller. One cell and two cell configurations were classified and the transient condition connecting these two configurations was observed. The mechanisms which lead to rotating stall in a centrifugal compressor are presented and discussed with specific reference to Hovercraft applications.

  12. TBCC Fan Stage Operability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. Studies performed under NASA s NGLT and the NASP High Speed Propulsion Assessment (HiSPA) program indicated a variable cycle turbofan/ramjet was the best configuration to satisfy access-to-space mission requirements because this configuration maximizes the engine thrust-to-weight ratio while minimizing frontal area. To this end, NASA and GE teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10X), fan speed (7X), inlet mass flow (3.5X), inlet pressure (8X), and inlet temperature (3X). The primary goal of the fan stage was to provide a high pressure ratio level with good efficiency at takeoff through the mid range of engine operation, while avoiding stall and losses at the higher flight Mach numbers, without the use of variable inlet guide vanes. Overall fan performance and operability therefore requires major consideration, as competing goals at different operating points and aeromechanical issues become major drivers in the design. To mitigate risk of meeting the unique design requirements for the fan stage, NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57% engine scaled fan stage to be tested in NASA s transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test are to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off, 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio, 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet, and 4) fan windmilling operation at high Mach

  13. Self-similar growth of an alluvial fan fed with bimodal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Pauline; Voller, Vaughan; Paola, Chris; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Eric; Barrier, Laurie; Métivier, François

    2016-04-01

    At the outlet of mountain ranges, rivers flow onto flatter lowlands. The associated change of slope causes sediment deposition. As the river is free to move laterally, it builds conical sedimentary structures called alluvial fans. Their location at the interface between erosional and depositional areas makes them valuable sedimentary archives. To decipher these sedimentary records, we need to understand the dynamics of their growth. We carried out a series of experiments to investigate the growth of alluvial fans fed with mixed sediments. The density difference between silica and coal sediments mimics a bimodal grain-size distribution in nature. The sediment and water discharges are constant during an experiment. During the run, we track the evolution of the surface pattern by digital imaging. At the end of each run, we acquire the fan topography using a scanning laser. Finally, we cut a radial cross section to visualize the sedimentary deposit. We observe there is a distinct slope break at the transition that dominates the overall curvature of the fan surface. Based on mass conservation and observations, we propose that this alluvial fan grows in a self-similar way, thus causing the transition between silica and coal deposits to be a straight line. The shape of the experimental transition accords with this prediction.

  14. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF NEW FAN HOUSE AND HILLMAN FAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF NEW FAN HOUSE AND HILLMAN FAN HOUSE LOOKING NORTHWEST The building on the left, the New Fan House, houses a Corliss steam engine which powered a Buffalo Forge Company single inlet Duplex Conoidal centrifugal exhausted fan through a metal updraft chimney. Part of the brick airway leading to the Baltimore shaft is visible to its right rear. The Hillman Fan House, on the right, houses the 1883 double inlet Guibal fan. The south entry, the curve of the fan housing, and brick updraft chimney are visible in this view. - Dorrance Colliery Fan Complex, South side of Susquehanna River at Route 115 & Riechard Street, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, PA

  15. Submarine fans in a sequence stratigraphic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posamentier, H.W.; Erskine, R.D.; Mitchum, R.M.; Vail, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Submarine fans are fan- or cone-shaped turbiditic deposits formed in upper bathyal or deeper water depths. Within a sequence stratigraphic framework, these basin-floor turbidites can occur during lowstand-fan or lowstand-wedge systems tract time. During lowstand fan time, streams are rejuvenated and depocenters shift from the coastal plain to the upper slope, causing retrogradational slope failure and canyon formation. The sediment delivered here bypasses the canyon and continues down the slope as a succession of gravity flows and is deposited as fan-shaped turbiditic deposits at the base of the slope. Seismic and outcrop evidence suggest that these sand-prone deposits are abruptly introduced into the basin and are generally characterized by subtle external mounding and internal bidirectionally down lapping seismic reflections where seismically resolvable. Deep-water sediment deposited during this interval has no coeval shelf equivalent. During lowstand wedge time, streams cease down cutting and valleys which have been freshly incised begin to fill. Because coarse sediment will preferentially be deposited within these incised valleys, the sand-to-mud ratio delivered to the upper slope will be decreased and, consequently, there is an inherent difference between submarine fans deposited at this time and those deposited during lowstand fan time. Deposition during lowstand wedge time is characterized seismically by slope front fill or wedge-shaped geometries down lapping the earlier submarine fan (i.e., deposited during lowstand fan time). These shale-prone deposits are largely comprised of thinner-bedded turbidites as well as the occasional leveed channel.

  16. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  17. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  18. The Connemara Fan: a major glacial grounding line fan west of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, Stephen; Praeg, Daniel; Monteys, Xavier; Scott, Gill

    2014-05-01

    Glacigenic topography on the mid-shelf (~130-350 m water depth) west of Galway, Ireland appears to have the morphological form, internal architecture and sediments associated with a large glacial grounding-line fan. Seismic data collected in 2009 and 2012 (during the GLAMAR and GATEWAYS 1 campaigns) reveal that the broad, arcuate ridges of the 'Olex moraine' form the landward part of a fan system which prograded beyond the mid-shelf break (defining the outer margin of the 'Clare Platform') westwards into the Porcupine Seabight. The topography is comparable to larger shelf-edge trough-mouth fans found further north along the same margin, however no discernible 'trough' has been identified on the Clare Platform. The ridge and fan topographic assemblage is renamed the 'Connemara Fan' in its entirety, based on its genetic relations and geographic location due west of Connemara, western Ireland. A macrofossil recovered from within a debris flow on the outer fan slope comprised of remobilised plumites dates to ~ 20 ka Cal B.P., indicating sediment reworking downslope following deglacial sediment input to at least that time. The Connemara Fan is the most southerly glacigenic fan identified along the north-east Atlantic margin. Its identification also adds to our knowledge of possibly multiple generations of ice sheets feeding onto the Irish shelf from west-central Ireland and the occurrence of ice sheet geometries and dynamics that evacuated ice, melt-water and sediment (ice streams?) westwards across the Clare Platform during past glaciations.

  19. Coastal alluvial fans (fan deltas) of the Gulf of Aqaba (Gulf of Eilat), Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, A. B.

    1985-04-01

    Coastal sediments of the Gulf of Aqaba are dominated by alluvial fans that prograde directly into the sea. The fans can be subdivided into four types: (1) largely inactive alluvial fans that merge into a braided fluvial system and pass seaward into sabkha flats, lagoons, mangroves and fringing reefs; (2) large alluvial fans that pass directly into the sea with one major entrenched channel and a fringing reef with a large incised canyon; both of these were formed during the Pleistocene, present fluvial activity is confined to the entrenched channels; (3) medium-sized (1-2 km long, 3-4 km wide) moderate to highly active alluvial fans with fringing reefs and backreef lagoons; and (4) small short-headed wadis that empty directly into the sea. The scale, overall sediment body geometry and facies associations of type (3) coastal alluvial fans (fan deltas) provide a close and useful modern analogue for many ancient fan-delta sedimentary sequences. On subaerial parts of the fan, disorganised cobbles and boulders, at the apex, deposited by debris flows pass downslope into longitudinal bars deposited during the high flood stage of periodic flash-flood events. The bars extend over the entire fan surface becoming progressively smaller and finer grained down fan. In general, the fans are characterised by a low proportion of floodplain deposits and extensive modification by aeolian processes, producing widespread gravel pavements and small dune fields over inactive areas of the lower fan. In the marine environment the fans are modified by a combination of wave action and longshore drift. Sand beaches are characterised by low-angle seaward-dipping lamination. On shingle beaches all gravel clasts have a strong preferred seaward dipping orientation. In areas where the fringing reefs are situated offshore from the fan, mixed quartz-bioclastic sand-filled lagoons develop. The nearshore lagoon areas are characterised by large sand bars orientated parallel to the shore. These pass

  20. Impact of ENSO on Western Pacific Cross-equatorial Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Kim, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Western Pacific cross-equatorial flows (CEFs) show evident interannual variability in boreal summer. Results from Principle Component Analysis indicate that El Niño/Southern Oscillation modulates the interannual variability of Western Pacific CEFs. Both Matsuno-Gill mechanism and Lindzen-Nigam mechanism are introduced and applied in order to better explain the development of CEFs. Using the Mixed Layer Model by Stevens (2002) and methods stated by Back and Bretherton (2009), the low-level CEFs are decomposed into two pressure gradient contributions: free-atmosphere and boundary layer; and further found mainly contributed by the latter one. The intensity of boundary layer pressure gradient is highly coincide with the distribution of sea surface temperature (SST) gradient on Western Pacific, which is intensified by El Niño in boreal summer. These results show that the Lindzen-Nigam mechanism plays a major role on CEFs' interannual change. An atmosphere general circulation model is included to support the influence of SST forcing on low-level CEFs. North American Multi-Model Ensemble is further adopted to understand the seasonal predictability of CEFs.

  1. V/STOL model fan stage rig design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. G.; Creason, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A model single-stage fan with variable inlet guide vanes (VIGV) was designed to demonstrate efficient point operation while providing flow and pressure ratio modulation capability required for a V/STOL propulsion system. The fan stage incorporates a split-flap VIGV with an independently actuated ID flap to permit independent modulation of fan and core engine airstreams, a flow splitter integrally designed into the blade and vanes to completely segregate fan and core airstreams in order to maximize core stream supercharging for V/STOL operation, and an EGV with a variable leading edge fan flap for rig performance optimization. The stage was designed for a maximum flow size of 37.4 kg/s (82.3 lb/s) for compatibility with LeRC test facility requirements. Design values at maximum flow for blade tip velocity and stage pressure ratio are 472 m/s (1550 ft/s) and 1.68, respectively.

  2. The Problem of Alluvial Fan Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. D.; Schmidt, K.

    2005-12-01

    Water and debris flows exiting confined valleys have a tendency to deposit sediment on steep fans. On alluvial fans, where water transport predominates, channel slopes tend to decrease downfan from ~0.08 to ~0.01 across wide ranges of climate and tectonism. Some have argued that this pattern reflects downfan grainsize fining so that higher slopes are required just to entrain coarser particles in the waters of the upper fan, while entrainment of finer grains downfan requires lower slopes (threshold hypothesis). An older hypothesis is that slope is adjusted to transport the supplied sediment load, which decreases downfan as deposition occurs (transport hypothesis). We have begun to test these hypotheses using detailed field measurements of hydraulic and sediment variables in sediment transport models. On some fans in the western U.S. we find that alluvial fan channel bankfull depths are largely 0.5-1.5 m at fan heads, decreasing to 0.1-0.2 m at distal margins. Contrary to many previous studies, we find that median gravel diameter does not change systematically along the upper 60- 80% of active fan channels. So downstream gravel fining cannot explain most of the observed channel slope reduction. However, as slope declines, surface sand cover increases systematically downfan from values of <20% above fan heads to distal fan values in excess of 70%. As a result, the threshold for sediment motion might decrease systematically downfan, leading to lower slopes. However, current models of this effect alone tend to underpredict downfan slope changes. This is likely due to off- channel gravel deposition. Calculations that match observed fan long-profiles require an exponential decline in gravel transport rate, so that on some fans approximately half of the load must be deposited off-channel every ~0.25-1.25 km downfan. This leads us to hypothesize that alluvial fan long- profiles are largely statements about the rate of deposition downfan. If so, there may be climatic and

  3. Controls on alluvial fan long-profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Schmidt, K.M.; Miller, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and debris flows exiting confined valleys have a tendency to deposit sediment on steep fans. On alluvial fans where water transport of gravel predominates, channel slopes tend to decrease downfan from ???0.10-0.04 to ???0.01 across wide ranges of climate and tectonism. Some have argued that this pattern reflects grain-size fining downfan such that higher threshold slopes are required just to entrain coarser particles in the waters of the upper fan, whereas lower slopes are required to entrain finer grains downfan (threshold hypothesis). An older hypothesis is that slope is adjusted to transport the supplied sediment load, which decreases downfan as deposition occurs (transport hypothesis). We have begun to test these hypotheses for alluvial fan long-profiles using detailed hydraulic and particle-size data in sediment transport models. On four alluvial fans in the western U.S., we find that channel hydraulic radiiare largely 0.5-0.9 m at fan heads, decreasing to 0.1-0.2 m at distal margins. We find that median gravel diameter does not change systematically along the upper 60%-80% of active fan channels as slope declines, so downstream gravel fining cannot explain most of the observed channel slope reduction. However, as slope declines, channel-bed sand cover increases systematically downfan from areal fractions of <20% above fan heads to distal fan values in excess of 70%. As a result, entrainment thresholds for bed material might decrease systematically downfan, leading to lower slopes. However, current models of this effect alone tend to underpredict downfan slope changes. This is likely due to off-channel gravel deposition. Calculations that match observed fan long-profiles require an exponential decline in gravel transport rate, so that on some fans approximately half of the load must be deposited off channel every -0.20-1.4 km downfan. This leads us to hypothesize that some alluvial fan long-proffies are statements about the rate of overbank deposition of

  4. Seabed morphology and sedimentary processes on high-gradient trough mouth fans offshore Troms, northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydningen, Tom Arne; Laberg, Jan Sverre; Kolstad, Vidar

    2015-10-01

    Trough mouth fans (TMF) situated at the mouths of formerly glaciated cross-shelf troughs are important paleoclimatic archives. Whereas the sedimentary processes of large, low-gradient TMFs have received considerable interest, little attention has been paid to the other end member of this landform class, i.e. TMFs with higher slope gradients. Detailed swath-bathymetric data and seismic profiles from the continental margin offshore Troms, northern Norway cover three high-gradient TMFs (the Andfjorden, Malangsdjupet and Rebbenesdjupet TMFs; slope gradients generally between 1° and 15°), as well as inter-fan areas, which include two submarine canyons (the Andøya and Senja Canyon) and the Malangsgrunnen inter-fan slope. The present-day morphologies of the Andfjorden and Malangsdjupet TMFs have evolved from sediment transport and distribution through gully-channel complexes. The Andfjorden TMF has later been affected by a large submarine landslide that remobilized much of these complexes. The Rebbenesdjupet TMF is dominated by a number of small and relatively shallow slide scars, which are inferred to be related to small-scale sediment failure of glaciomarine and/or contouritic sediments. The canyons cut into the adjacent TMFs, and turbidity currents originating on the fans widened and deepened the canyons during downslope flow. The Malangsgrunnen shelf break and inter-fan slope acted as a funnel for turbidity currents originating on the upper slope, forming a dendritic pattern of gullies. A conceptual model for the high-gradient TMFs on the Troms margin has been compiled. The main sediment input onto the TMFs has occurred during peak glacials when the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet reached the shelf edge. The overall convex fan form and progradational seismic facies show that these glacigenic deposits were repeatedly distributed onto the fan. On the Andfjorden and Malangsdjupet TMFs, gully-channel complexes occur within such deposits. It is thus inferred that the steep

  5. Viscous Flow through Pipes of Various Cross-Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2007-01-01

    An interesting variety of pipe cross-sectional shapes can be generated, for which the Navier-Stokes equations can be solved exactly. The simplest cases include the known solutions for elliptical and equilateral triangle cross-sections. Students can find pipe cross-sections from solutions of Laplace's equation in two dimensions, and then plot the…

  6. Jet through a wall protrusion in a cross-flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Murthy, S. N. B.; Warner, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    The flow interactions between a jet issuing out of a protrusion in a wall and a crosswise flow are of interest because of the manner in which the spreading and mixing of the jet are affected by the flow separation, formation of vortices and recirculation zones and the associated flow instabilities. In combustors and in aircraft void spaces adjoining fuel tanks such interactions determine flame stability and propagation characteristics. Results from flow visualization and from predictions based on a three-dimensional viscous flow code are utilized to show the effects of several flow and geometrical parameters on the processes occuring in the vicinity of the protrusion and the jet.

  7. Illustration of cross flow of polystyrene melts through a coathanger die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöppner, V.; Henke, B.

    2015-05-01

    To design an optimal coathanger die with a uniform flow rate distribution and low pressure drop, it is essential to understand the flow conditions in the die. This is important because the quality of the product is influenced by the flow velocity and the flow rate distribution. In extrusion dies, cross flows also occur in addition to the main flow, which flow perpendicular to the main flow. This results in pressure gradients in the extrusion direction, which have an influence on flow distribution and pressure drop in the die. In recent decades, quantitative representation and analysis of physical flow processes have made considerable progress in predicting the weather, developing drive technologies and designing aircraft using simulation methods and lab trials. Using the flow-line method, the flow is analyzed in flat film extrusion dies with a rectangular cross-section, in particular cross flows. The simplest method to visualize the flow is based on the measurement of obstacle orientation in the flow field by adding individual particles. A near-surface flow field can be visualized by using wool or textile yarns. By sticking thin, frayed at the ends of strands of wool surface that is to be examined cross flows, near-wall profiles of the flow and vortex and separation regions can be visualized. A further possibility is to add glass fibers and analyze the fiber orientation by microscopy and x-ray analysis. In this paper the influence of process parameters (e.g. melt temperatures and throughput) on cross flow and fiber orientation is described.

  8. Discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiation from diesel engine cooling fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geon-Seok

    theory to predict the discrete-frequency noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and harmonics. The unsteady lift was predicted by considering transverse and longitudinal velocity fluctuations. The influences due to an upstream finger guard were also investigated. The radiated sound power spectra that were measured for the fan are shown to be in excellent agreement with those predicted. The agreement between prediction and measurement is only fair at the fundamental BPF tone. Further experimental investigations revealed that the interaction noise between the fan blades and a shroud surrounding the fan might be the dominant source for the radiation at the first harmonic. The space-time correlation functions of the inflow velocity fluctuations were measured and utilized in stochastic lifting surface theory to calculate the unsteady blade lift and resulting broadband fan noise. The integral length scale of the inlet flow was found to be much smaller than the blade-to-blade separate distance of the fan. Therefore, contributions from blade-to-blade correlations of the various elements on different blades were found to be negligible and hence ignored; only the correlations between the strip elements on a given blade were considered. The cross-correlations measured between elements separated by more than the integral length scale were also found to be negligibly small. The predicted broadband sound power spectra agree well with those measured for frequencies greater than 400 Hz. There are deviations between the predictions and measurements at lower frequencies. These are likely due to fan blade stall, and possibly, anomalies in the noise measurement environment. In order to reduce the sound radiation at the blade rate tones, the baseline fan was replaced with a skewed fan. The backward skew angle of 30° was found to effectively reduce the 2nd and higher harmonics of the blade rate tone. The interaction of the shroud opening and the blade tips dominates the sound level at

  9. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.

  10. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A. M.; Lacaze, G.; Oefelein, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of Su and Mungal ["Simultaneous measurements of scalar and velocity field evolution in turbulent crossflowing jets," J. Fluid Mech. 513(1), 1-45 (2004)]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.