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Sample records for cross-connected figure-eight null-flux

  1. Electrodynamic forces of the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. L.; Rote, D. M.; Coffey, H. T.

    1993-03-01

    This paper analyzes the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system for maglev vehicles on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. The equivalent circuits and general magnetic force expressions for the system are developed. Simple analytical formulas for the magnetic force partitions on the basis of harmonic approximation are presented, and numerical results are also included.

  2. Electrodynamic forces of the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-06-01

    This paper analyzes the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system for maglev vehicles on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. The equivalent circuits and general magnetic force expressions for the system are developed. Simple analytical formulas for the magnetic force partitions on the basis of harmonic approximation are presented, and numerical results are also included.

  3. Electrodynamic forces of the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coil suspension system for maglev vehicles on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. The equivalent circuits and general magnetic force expressions for the system are developed. Simple analytical formulas for the magnetic force partitions on the basis of harmonic approximation are presented, and numerical results are also included.

  4. Computer modeling and experimental verification of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Mulcahey, T.M.; Rote, D.M.; Kelly, T.

    1994-12-01

    This report discusses the computer modeling and experimental verification of the magnetic forces associated with a figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system. A set of computer codes called COILGDWY, were developed on the basis of the dynamic circuit model and verified by means of a laboratory model. The experimental verification was conducted with a rotating PVC drum, the surface of which held various types of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils that interacted with a stationary permanent magnet. The transient and dynamic magnetic forces between the stationary magnet and the rotating conducting coils were measured and compared with results obtained from the computer model. Good agreement between the experimental results and computer simulations was obtained. The computer model can also be used to calculate magnetic forces in a large-scale magnetic-levitation system.

  5. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  6. Study on figure-eight-shaped coil electrodynamic suspension magnetic levitation systems without cross-connection

    SciTech Connect

    Ribani, P.L.; Urbano, N.

    2000-01-01

    Two figure-eight-shaped coils for electrodynamic suspension (EDS) magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) systems without cross-connection are proposed and analyzed. The guideway coils are positioned under the MAGLEV vehicle; they are parallel to the horizontal plane. The interaction of a magnetic module on the vehicle, composed of three or four superconducting (SC) coils, with a guideway module, comprised of two figure-eight coils, is studied by means of the dynamic circuit theory. The currents in the SC coils are supposed to be constant in time while they move as a rigid body, with a constant velocity. Some results are presented and compared with those for a standard side-wall cross-connected system.

  7. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M. ); Rossing, T.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

  8. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1993-03-01

    For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

  9. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; He, J.; Rote, D.M. ); Rossing, T.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the magnetic levitation of vehicles over guideways consisting of periodically-spaced conducting coils. Examples of proposed guideway configurations include arrays of independent coils (''loop track''), interconnected coils (''ladder track''), two layers of coils (double-layer ''null-flux'' track), and figure-eight coils (single-layer ''null-flux'' track). Typically, widely-separated superconducting magnets are mounted in the vehicle. A system that achieves both lift and guidance from vertical figure-eight coils in the guideway sidewalls has been developed in Japan. This system, when well designed, can have a very large lift-to-drag ratio. The authors conducted an experimental and theoretical investigation of the lift, drag, and guidance forces on a permanent magnet moving close to various arrays of figure-eight coils. The measured time-histories of the forces provide a basis for the evaluation of electrodynamic models and codes developed to analyze the magnetic levitation of vehicles using the discrete suspension coils of the null-flux type. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and the predictions of the code COIL GDWY. The authors report some of the results and discuss their application to the design of maglev systems.

  10. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  11. Eccentric figure-eight coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Keita; Matsuzaki, Taiga; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Hosomi, Koichi; Saitoh, Youichi

    2015-01-01

    Previously we proposed an eccentric figure-eight coil that can cause threshold stimulation in the brain at lower driving currents. In this study, we performed numerical simulations and magnetic stimulations to healthy subjects for evaluating the advantages of the eccentric coil. The simulations were performed using a simplified spherical brain model and a realistic human brain model. We found that the eccentric coil required a driving current intensity of approximately 18% less than that required by the concentric coil to cause comparable eddy current densities within the brain. The eddy current localization of the eccentric coil was slightly higher than that of the concentric coil. A prototype eccentric coil was designed and fabricated. Instead of winding a wire around a bobbin, we cut eccentric-spiral slits on the insulator cases, and a wire was woven through the slits. The coils were used to deliver magnetic stimulation to healthy subjects; among our results, we found that the current slew rate corresponding to motor threshold values for the concentric and eccentric coils were 86 and 78 A/µs, respectively. The results indicate that the eccentric coil consistently requires a lower driving current to reach the motor threshold than the concentric coil. Future development of compact magnetic stimulators will enable the treatment of some intractable neurological diseases at home. PMID:25399864

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF RAT PUPS IN FIGURE-EIGHT MAZES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a series of four experiments, social and experiential factors that influence the development of motor activity in rat pups were examined. Motor activity was monitored from postnatal days 13 to 21 as photocell interruptions in figure-eight mazes and comparisons were made betwee...

  13. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  14. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  15. Electromagnetic characteristics of eccentric figure-eight coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takuya; Sekino, Masaki; Matsuzaki, Taiga; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Saitoh, Youichi; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is effective for treatment of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. We proposed an eccentric figure-eight coil, which induces strong eddy currents in the target brain tissue. In this study, numerical analyses were carried out to obtain magnetic field distribution of the eccentric figure-eight coil and eddy current in the brain. The analyses were performed with various coil design parameters, such as the outer and inner diameters and number of turns, to investigate the influence of these parameters on the coil characteristics. Increases in the inner diameter, outer diameter, and number of turns caused increases in the maximum eddy current densities. Coil inductance, working voltage, and heat generation also became higher with the increases in these design parameters. In order to develop a compact stimulator system for use at home, we need to obtain strong eddy current density, keeping the working voltage as low as possible. Our results show that it is effective to enlarge the outer diameter.

  16. Eddy current probe for nondestructive testing using cross-coupled figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sasada, I.; Watanabe, N.

    1995-11-01

    It is shown that the pickup head consisting of cross-coupled figure-eight coils originally developed for the magnetostrictive torque sensor is well suited for the eddy current probe detecting small defects in a nonmagnetic conductive material. The probe is easily extended to a one dimensional array form, which substantially reduces number of times of scanning the targeted materials. The response of a single unit of the probe to a trough hole defect in an aluminum plate are presented. A half-way hole at the back of an aluminum plate of 1.2 mm in thickness was successfully detected from the front using this probe. A five-channel array was developed in which the excitation coil is shared by all the channel. A small through hole defect in an aluminum plate was detected clearly by a single scan with the array probe.

  17. Dissipative soliton resonance in a passively mode-locked figure-eight fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Ke; Ning, Qiu-Yi; Luo, Ai-Ping; Lin, Zhen-Bin; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2013-01-28

    The generation of mode-locked rectangular pulses operating in dissipative soliton resonance (DSR) region is demonstrated in an erbium-doped figure-eight fiber laser with net anomalous dispersion. The duration of the wave-breaking-free rectangular pulse broadens with the increase of pump power. At a maximum pump power of 341 mW, the pulse energy can be up to 3.25 nJ with a repetition rate of 3.54 MHz. Particularly, the spectrum of rectangular pulse operating in DSR exhibits conventional soliton sidebands. The observed results show that the formation of pulse operating in DSR region is independent of mode-locking techniques, which may be helpful for further understanding the DSR phenomenon. PMID:23389220

  18. Design approaches and parameters for magnetically levitated transport systems. [Null flux suspension (Maglev)

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Powell, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically levitated transport system approaches are assessed with regard to thrust power needs, track cost, suspension stability, and safety. The null flux suspension appears as the favored approach, having the least thrust power requirements, highest stability, and lowest amount of track material. Various null flux configurations are described together with their operating parameters. The Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) propulsion system is also described for propelling the suspended vehicles. Cryogenics and superconductivity aspects are discussed and the effect of high T/sub c/ superconductors evaluated. 13 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Calculation of motion induced eddy current forces in null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.; Morris, T.; Shaaf, J.; Rote, D.

    1995-11-01

    Time dependent motion induced eddy current forces can be quite difficult to compute. The movement of null flux coils between magnets is approached using a coupled boundary element-circuit approach to compute the forces on the structure. The technique involves treating the magnets as a separate circuit whose current is dictated by the product of the magnet thickness and the working coercivity. The mutual inductance between the windows of the moving null flux coil and the stationary equivalent magnet coil hold the key for predicting lift, guidance, and drag forces on the coil. The rate of change of these inductances with respect to position determines the forces and currents. A steady state approximation to these forces is derived in addition to a numerical simulation when the steady state assumption is invalid. The results compare favorably to laboratory results from a 4 ft. diameter experimental test wheel.

  20. Index and Stability of Symmetric Periodic Orbits in Hamiltonian Systems with Application to Figure-Eight Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xijun; Sun, Shanzhong

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, using the Maslov index theory in symplectic geometry, we build up some stability criteria for symmetric periodic orbits in a Hamiltonian system, which is motivated by the recent discoveries in the n-body problem. The key ingredient is a generalized Bott-type iteration formula for periodic solution in the presence of finite group action on the orbit. For second order system, we prove, under general boundary conditions, the close formula for the relationship between the Morse index of an orbit in a Lagrangian system and the Maslov index of the fundamental solution for the corresponding orbit in its Hamiltonian system counterpart, and the boundary conditions cover the cases which appeared in the n-body problem. As an application we consider the stability problem of the celebrated figure-eight orbit due to Chenciner and Montgomery in the planar three-body problem with equal masses, and we clarify the relationship between linear stability and its variational nature on various loop spaces. The basic idea is as follows: the variational characterization of the figure-eight orbit provides information about its Morse index; based on its relation to the Maslov index, our stability criteria come into play.

  1. Effects of mop handle height on shoulder muscle activity and perceived exertion during floor mopping using a figure eight method

    PubMed Central

    WALLIUS, Mari-Anne; RISSANEN, Saara M.; BRAGGE, Timo; VARTIAINEN, Paavo; KARJALAINEN, Pasi A.; RÄSÄNEN, Kimmo; JÄRVELIN-PASANEN, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of mop handle height on electromyographic (EMG) activities of the shoulder muscles and perceived exertion for the shoulder area during floor mopping using a figure eight method. An experimental study with 13 cleaners was conducted using surface EMG and category ratio (CR-10) scale. EMG activity was recorded unilaterally from the upper trapezius, infraspinatus, anterior and middle deltoid muscles. Each subject performed four trials of mopping and each trial consisted of using a different mop handle height (mop adjustment at the level of shoulder, chin, nose and eye) in randomized order. EMG data were normalized to a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). The muscle activities were assessed by estimating the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) of the EMG signals and analysed by linear mixed model analysis. Results showed that shoulder muscle activity was significantly lower when the mop handle height was adjusted to shoulder level or chin level as compared to eye level. These findings were supported by subjective ratings of exertion. It seems that mop handle height adjustment between shoulder and chin level may be recommended as a basis for figure eight mopping. PMID:26423328

  2. Effects of mop handle height on shoulder muscle activity and perceived exertion during floor mopping using a figure eight method.

    PubMed

    Wallius, Mari-Anne; Rissanen, Saara M; Bragge, Timo; Vartiainen, Paavo; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Räsänen, Kimmo; Järvelin-Pasanen, Susanna

    2016-01-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of mop handle height on electromyographic (EMG) activities of the shoulder muscles and perceived exertion for the shoulder area during floor mopping using a figure eight method. An experimental study with 13 cleaners was conducted using surface EMG and category ratio (CR-10) scale. EMG activity was recorded unilaterally from the upper trapezius, infraspinatus, anterior and middle deltoid muscles. Each subject performed four trials of mopping and each trial consisted of using a different mop handle height (mop adjustment at the level of shoulder, chin, nose and eye) in randomized order. EMG data were normalized to a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). The muscle activities were assessed by estimating the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) of the EMG signals and analysed by linear mixed model analysis. Results showed that shoulder muscle activity was significantly lower when the mop handle height was adjusted to shoulder level or chin level as compared to eye level. These ?ndings were supported by subjective ratings of exertion. It seems that mop handle height adjustment between shoulder and chin level may be recommended as a basis for figure eight mopping. PMID:26423328

  3. Water Treatment Technology - Cross-Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on cross connections provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on cross connections terminology and control devices. For each…

  4. Dual-keel electrodynamic Maglev system

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.; Wang, Zian; Coffey, H.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper introduces a new concept for an electrodynamic-suspension maglev system that has a dual-keel arrangement. Each keel consists of a row of superconducting magnets aboard the vehicle. The keels move in troughs in the guideway that are each lined with pairs of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils. Each pair of null-flux coils is cross-connected to produce null-flux suspension and guidance force. The cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coils in each trough are also energized by a three-phase power supply to produce propulsive force. Preliminary analysis shows that the new system has many advantages over other EDS systems in terms of system performance and dynamic stability.

  5. Intelligent optical networking with photonic cross connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuppens, L.; Jerphagnon, Olivier L.; Lang, Jonathan; Banerjee, Ayan; Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2002-09-01

    Optical amplification and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) have fundamentally changed optical transport networks. Now that these technologies are widely adopted, the bottleneck has moved from the outside line plant to nodal central offices, where electrical switching equipment has not kept pace. While OEO technology was (and still is) necessary for grooming and traffic aggregation, the transport network has dramatically changed, requiring a dramatic rethinking of how networks need to be designed and operated. While todays transport networks carry remarkable amounts of bandwidth, their optical layer is fundamentally static and provides for only simple point-to-point transport. Efficiently managing the growing number of wavelengths can only be achieved through a new breed of networking element. Photonic switching systems (PSS) can efficiently execute these functions because they are bit rate, wavelength, and protocol transparent. With their all-optical switch cores and interfaces, PSS can switch optical signals at various levels of granularity wavelength, sub band, and composite DWDM fiber levels. Though cross-connect systems with electrical switch cores are available, they perform these functions at very high capital costs and operational inefficiencies. This paper examines enabling technologies for deployment of intelligent optical transport networks (OTN), and takes a practical perspective on survivability architecture migration and implementation issues.

  6. Dual-keel electrodynamic maglev system

    DOEpatents

    He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Wang, Zian (Downers Grove, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL); Coffey, Howard T. (Darien, IL); Hull, John R. (Westmont, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL); Cal, Yigang (Woodridge, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system with a plurality of superconducting magnetic devices affixed to the dual-keels of a vehicle, where the superconducting magnetic devices produce a magnetic field when energized. The system also includes a plurality of figure-eight shaped null-flux coils affixed to opposing vertical sides of slots in a guideway. The figure-eight shaped null-flux coils are vertically oriented, laterally cross-connected in parallel, longitudinally connected in series, and continue the length of the vertical slots providing levitation and guidance force. An external power source energizes the figure-eight shaped null-flux coils to create a magnetic traveling wave that interacts with the magnetic field produced by the superconducting magnets to impart motion to the vehicle.

  7. Study of Japanese electrodynamic-suspension maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the Japanese MLU magnetic-levitation (maglev) system. The development of the MLU system is reviewed, and the dynamic circuit model then is introduced and applied to the figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system. Three different types of figure-eight-shaped null-flux suspension systems are discussed in detail: (1) the figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system without cross-connection; (2) the combined suspension and guidance system; and (3) the combined propulsion, levitation, and guidance system. The electrodynamic-suspension maglev systems developed in Japan seem to be very promising and could result in a commercial application in the near future.

  8. Dual-keel electrodynamic maglev system

    DOEpatents

    He, J.L.; Wang, Z.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Cal, Y.

    1996-12-24

    A propulsion and stabilization system is disclosed with a plurality of superconducting magnetic devices affixed to the dual-keels of a vehicle, where the superconducting magnetic devices produce a magnetic field when energized. The system also includes a plurality of figure-eight shaped null-flux coils affixed to opposing vertical sides of slots in a guideway. The figure-eight shaped null-flux coils are vertically oriented, laterally cross-connected in parallel, longitudinally connected in series, and continue the length of the vertical slots providing levitation and guidance force. An external power source energizes the figure-eight shaped null-flux coils to create a magnetic traveling wave that interacts with the magnetic field produced by the superconducting magnets to impart motion to the vehicle. 6 figs.

  9. Dual-keel electrodynamic maglev system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Wang, Z.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Cai, Y.

    1995-12-31

    A propulsion and stabilization system with a plurality of superconducting magnetic devices affixed to the dual-keels of a vehicle, where the superconducting magnetic devices produce a magnetic field when energized. The system also includes a plurality of figure-eight shaped null-flux coils affixed to opposing vertical sides of slots in a guideway. The figure-eight shaped null-flux coils are vertically oriented, laterally cross-connected in parallel, longitudinally connected in series, and continue the length of the vertical slots providing levitation and guidance force. An external power source energizes the figure-eight shaped null-flux coils to create a magnetic traveling wave that interacts with the magnetic field produced by the superconducting magnets to impart motion to the vehicle.

  10. Generation of dual-wavelength square pulse in a figure-eight erbium-doped fiber laser with ultra-large net-anomalous dispersion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhihua; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Su, Dan

    2015-08-01

    A type of wave-breaking-free mode-locked dual-wavelength square pulse was experimentally observed in a figure-eight erbium-doped fiber laser with ultra-large net-anomalous dispersion. A 2.7 km long single-mode fiber (SMF) was incorporated as a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and provided largely nonlinear phase accumulation and anomalous dispersion, which enhanced the four-wave-mixing effect to improve the stability of the dual-wavelength operation. In the NOLM, the long SMF with small birefringence supported the Sagnac interference as a filter to manage the dual-wavelength lasing. The dual-wavelength operation was made switchable by adjusting the intra-cavity polarization loss and phase delay corresponding to two square pulses. When the pump power was increased, the duration of the square pulse increased continuously while the peak pulse power gradually decreased. This square-type pulse can potentially be utilized for signal transmission and sensing. PMID:26368084

  11. Impact of dispersion on the output characteristics of an all-fiber Er-doped nanosecond mode-locked figure-eight laser with passive nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshkina, S. S.; Bubnov, M. M.; Senatorov, A. K.; Lipatov, D. S.; Likhachev, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    A mode-locked all-fiber Er-doped laser based on a figure-eight scheme with a passive nonlinear optical loop mirror and pulse duration of few nanoseconds has been realized for the first time. It has been revealed that the main problem of utilization of standard fibers with anomalous dispersion is the propagation of low-energy optical solitons accompanied by nanosecond pulse break up. Herein, the solution to this problem is discussed and stable laser schemes (i.e. all-polarization maintaining) are realized. A strong influence of the total laser dispersion on the nanosecond laser spectral bandwidth has been found.

  12. Cross-connection control of the potable water lines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.M.

    1996-04-01

    A 1991 independent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) audit of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified the need for establishing a cross-connection control program for the potable and nonpotable water systems at the facility. An informal cross-connection policy had been in place for some time, but the formal implementation of a cross-connection program brought together individuals from the Quality Engineering and Inspection Section of the Office of Quality Programs and Inspection, Industrial Hygiene, Health Physics, Plant and Equipment Division, and the Atomic Trade and Labor Council. In January 1994 a Cross-Connection Control Committee was established at ORNL to identify potential and actual cross connections between potable and nonpotable water systems. Potable water is safe to drink, and nonpotable or process water (e.g., sewage, laboratory wastewater, cooling water, and tower water) is not intended for human consumption, washing of the body, or food preparation. The program is intended to conform with the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1986 and with state and local regulations. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration addresses cross-connection functions, it does not define specific program requirements. The program at ORNL is designed to ensure that necessary recommendations are implemented to safeguard all internal and external potable water distribution lines. Program responsibilities include a thorough engineering assessment to (1) identify the potable water lines, (2) identify any existing or potential cross connections, and (3) inspect the integrity of the water lines. If any cross-connection deficiencies are found, corrective actions are initiated according to industry standards.

  13. 78 FR 25577 - Safety Zone, Figure Eight Causeway Channel; Figure Eight Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... Property Rights. 9. Civil Justice Reform This rule meets applicable standards in sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity,...

  14. Densely packed NxN wavelength cross-connect switch module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuka, Hisato; Tachikura, Masao; Kawashima, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Sorimoto, Keisuke; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Keiichi; Yamashita, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength cross-connect switch (WXC) is proposed and demonstrated. The cross-connect optics have orthogonal imaging systems that operate differently in the switching and spectral planes. The switching plane has 2f Fourier optics with a Rayleigh length. On the other hand, the spectral plane has 4f imaging optics. Two types of switching engines, microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors and liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS), are applied for the same cross-connect optics. The 5×5 WXC with MEMS mirrors has a 100 GHz channel spacing, which is compatible with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) grid. On the other hand, the WXC with LCOS has a variable channel spacing. The characteristics of two types of WXC are compared. In addition, the port count, which is one of the important parameters, is discussed.

  15. Dynamic multi-path WDM routing in a monolithically integrated 8 × 8 cross-connect.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Ripalta; Rohit, Abhinav; Williams, Kevin A

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate for the first time WDM multi-path routing through a monolithically integrated InP/InGaAsP 8 × 8 space and wavelength selective cross-connect. Data channels are dynamically routed from four input ports to the same output port with excellent OSNR from 27.0 to 31.1 dB. Representative data paths are evaluated in terms of optical power penalty. Data routing experiments are performed using round-robin scheduling with nanosecond time-scale switching times. PMID:24515003

  16. Allocation of wavelength selective and convertible cross connects in optical multicast networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fangfang; Hu, Weisheng; Sun, Weiqiang; Guo, Wei; Jin, Yaohui; He, Hao

    2009-11-01

    To support multicast in the optical layer, a wavelength cross connect node need to be equipped with light splitters. Wavelength conversion can improve the fiber link utilization and reduce the blocking probability for both unicast and multicast traffic. However, it is of high complexity to integrate light splitters and wavelength converters in a single node. This paper investigates a new resource allocation strategy in optical multicast network: a subset of optical nodes are multicast-capable, while the other nodes are wavelength convertible. The optimal configuration of the wavelength crossconnect nodes is investigated to produce the minimal blocking probability for dynamic multicast traffic.

  17. Design and analysis of a multicast-capable optical cross-connect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunlei; Hu, Weisheng

    2008-11-01

    As multicast applications become more and more popular, implementing multicast in optical domain has attracted more and more attention due to its more efficient bandwidth usage. The MC-OXC is the key for realizing multicasting at optical layer and directly affects the performance of the multicast services in WDM networks. In this paper, a novel mixed-integrated optical multicast switch for multicast-capable cross-connect is proposed. The new architecture uses power splitters for multicast connections only, allowing unicast sessions to pass without enduring unnecessary power loss. And also the performances of the MC-OXC are analyzed. We performed the cost and cost sensitivity analysis for different MC-OXCs. The results show that the proposed architecture guarantees strictly nonblocking with lower costs.

  18. High-energy femtosecond figure-eight fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsun, T. O.; Islam, M. K.; Chu, P. L.

    1997-02-01

    A simple figure-8 fibre laser that generates femtosecond pulses with large pulse energy is reported. The pulsewidth is 125 fs and pulse energy is 0.5 nJ. The high energy is achieved by pulse stretching effect by using an erbium-doped fibre in the amplifier with normal dispersion and the narrow pulsewidth is obtained by means of a long length of dispersion shifted fibre. Furthermore, the pulses are made stable by introducing a gradual twist to the dispersion shifted fibre. The central wavelength and the spectral width of the pulses can be tuned by simply adjusting the polarisation-controllers in the loop. No additional components are required.

  19. A continuous active monitoring approach to identify cross-connections between potable water and effluent distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Friedler, E; Alfiya, Y; Shaviv, A; Gilboa, Y; Harussi, Y; Raize, O

    2015-03-01

    A continuous active monitoring approach was developed for identification of cross-connections between potable water supply systems and treated wastewater effluent reuse distribution systems. The approach is based on monitoring the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) at the potable water system while injecting sulfite (a reducing agent) into the effluent line. A sharp decrease in the ORP of the potable water would indicate a cross-connection event. The approach was tested in batch experiments on treated municipal wastewater effluent of varying degree of treatment, and at dilution ratios of up to 1:100 (effluent/potable). The approach was then examined under continuous flow conditions, which simulated cross-connection events at various dilution ratios (up to 1:100). In the continuous runs, differences between the potable water ORP and the effluent-potable water mixture (containing sulfite as sodium bisulfite (SBS)) ORP were 450-630 mV. This suggests high potential for identifying a cross-connection event. Implementation of the approach includes adding sulfite to effluent used for agricultural irrigation; hence, possible effects on soil and on crops were studied in soil columns and pots planted with basil (Ocimum basilicum) as a model plant. No negative effects of sulfite addition to the irrigation effluent were observed in the irrigated soils and plants, and therefore, it could be safely implemented also in agricultural applications. PMID:25701471

  20. Parallel and simultaneous spatial mode conversion using photorefractive crystal for photonic cross-connect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanfeng; Okamoto, Atsushi; Maeda, Tomohiro; Hirasaki, Yuki; Tomita, Akihisa; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technology for photonic cross-connect (PXC) in spatial mode domain for the realization of advanced and flexible optical transmission of spatial modes. The PXC is a kind of all -optical devices to switch highspeed optical signals for mode-division multiplexing (MDM) network and it is able to perform signal labeling in the spatial mode domain similar to current photonic switching in the wavelength domain. In addition, parallel and simultaneous mode conversion can be realized using multiplex holograms in a photorefractive crystal (PRC). In our experiment, during the recording process, a rewritable hologram is recorded in the PRC (LiNbO3) through the interference between the signal beam with certain input mode and the reference beam with the phase distribution of the desired output mode. Signal beams are generated by computer generated hologram (CGH) using a spatial light modulator (SLM) instead of an optical fiber emergent beam, and reference beams are generated by phase only modulation using another SLM. Subsequently, during the converting process, the input signal beam is converted into the desired output mode through the holographic diffract ion in the crystal and free-space propagation by an optical lens. By using phase code multiplexing method, parallel mode conversions can be realized. We performed an experiment on parallel mode conversions of several different conversion pairs. Signal beams and reference beams intersected in the PRC with an angle of 18.43 degree. The intensity distributions of converted modes were observed by CCD camera set on the Fourier plane. We confirmed that the two modes inter-conversion of LP11 with LP21 was successfully implemented.

  1. Fluorescence monitoring at a recycled water treatment plant and associated dual distribution system--implications for cross-connection detection.

    PubMed

    Hambly, A C; Henderson, R K; Storey, M V; Baker, A; Stuetz, R M; Khan, S J

    2010-10-01

    Dual distribution systems are becoming increasingly common in greenfield housing developments in Australia for the redistribution of recycled water to households for non-potable use. Within such schemes there exists the potential for cross-connections between recycled and drinking water systems. Due to the high level of recycled water treatment, these events are unlikely to lead to outbreaks of illness in the community. Nonetheless, they do represent a breach of the recycled water risk management strategy and therefore an elevated level of risk to consumers. Furthermore, cross-connection events have the potential to undermine public confidence in these types of water recycling. A rapid, highly sensitive method of cross-connection detection may therefore provide an additional level of confidence in these schemes. The aim of this research was to determine the potential for using fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring tool in water treatment plants and dual distribution systems. Samples from both the water recycling plant and dual distribution system were collected on a weekly basis over 12 weeks. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra and water quality parameters including dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), pH, conductivity, free chlorine and turbidity were obtained for each sample. The fluorescence EEM spectra of recycled and drinking water were distinctly different and exhibited low variability throughout the course of the sampling program, indicating a degree of stability of the fluorescent components within the organic matter. A ten-fold difference in mean fluorescence intensity was observed for recycled water compared to drinking water, which was greater than the difference observed for the other measured water quality parameters. Probabilistic analysis was used to determine the reliable detection limit of recycled water contamination of drinking water. Accounting for the inherent variability of both recycled water and drinking water, a 45% contamination of recycled water in drinking water could be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 for more than 95% of individual random sample pairs. Greater sensitivity can be assured by averaging numerous samples. In comparison, a 70% contamination of recycled water in drinking water was required for the same detection using conductivity. PMID:20655084

  2. Proposal and demonstration of lambda-based internet exchange (IX) point using GMPLS protocols and photonic cross-connect (PXC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuritani, Takehiro; Okamoto, Shuichi; Ogino, Nagao; Otani, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2004-10-01

    This paper proposes an architecture of a next-generation Internet eXchange (IX) based on the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) technologies and the photonic cross-connect (PXC), hereafter referred to a Lambda-IX. At first, we investigate a basic Lambda-IX model where the PXC provides a GMPLS-controlled lambda label-switched path (LSP) to interconnect different ISPs' border routers. We verify that the proposed Lambda-IX model can achieve the lambda-based and resilient interconnection for the ISPs, thanks to the PXC's bit-rate insensitive operation as well as fast restoration operation. In addition, once GMPLS functionalities are introduced on the border routers as well as the PXC, very flexible interconnection can be achieved such as demand-based creation and deletion of lambda LSPs. Next, we initiatively demonstrate an experimental Lambda-IX using a PXC and IP/MPLS routers. A Lambda-LSP with OC-192 bandwidth can be successfully created by using the GMPLS RSVP-TE signaling protocol via a control plane, and an EGP session of Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4) can be established over the Lambda-LSP created between the GMPLS-enabled border routers via a data plane. We also evaluate the fault recovery operation in the case where such Lambda-IXs are consisted of several PXCs and demonstrate that the Lambda-LSP as well as the corresponding BGP session can be restored with a fast recovery time of less than 1s. Through these investigation and demonstration, it is revealed that the Lambda-IX can be put to practical use aiming at inter-exchanging a large traffic in a near future, while enriching the functions of IX.

  3. Performance analysis of dedicated protection and shared protection for waveband switching based on multi-granularity optical cross-connect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xingwei; Jiang, Dingde; Hou, Weigang; Ji, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In order to save the switching ports and the cost of Multi-Granularity Optical Cross-Connect (MG-OXC), the waveband switching technique was proposed to groom multiple wavelength-level traffic to a few waveband tunnels to be switched by a few switching ports in MG-OXC. At the same time, protection for fibers is very important to ensure the service continuity since each wavelength carries a lot of traffic. Although existing works have addressed the waveband switching protection, most of them separately considered only the dedicated protection or shared protection in static demand scenario and did not deeply analyze and compare the dedicated protection and shared protection in dynamic demand scenario. Therefore, in this paper, we deeply study the consumptions of wavelengths in fibers and ports in MG-OXCs for Waveband Shared Protection (WSP) and Waveband Dedicated Protection (WDP) in dynamic demand scenario, and propose the port-cost calculation and update methods based on a new waveband layered auxiliary graph that is developed based on MG-OXC structure. In simulations, we compare WSP, WDP, traditional end-to-end waveband shared protection and traditional end-to-end waveband dedicated protection. Simulation results show that the shared protection has smaller port-cost, better wavelength utilization efficiency and lower blocking probability than the dedicated protection with the same waveband switching policy, and the sub-path waveband switching has bigger port-cost, better wavelength utilization efficiency and lower blocking probability than the end-to-end waveband switching with the same backup wavelength assignment policy.

  4. EVALUATION OF THE ABILITY OF CHLORINE TO INACTIVATE SELECTED ORGANISMS FROM THE BIOFILM OF A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR FOLLOWING A LONG-TERM WASTEWATER CROSS-CONNECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water distribution system simulator (DSS) from the U.S. EPA was operated with a direct cross-connection of 0.3% wastewater to system volume per day for 70 d. During the cross-connection, tap water, wastewater, and system discharge water were monitored to ensure that ...

  5. Novel MEMS L-Switching Matrix Optical Cross-Connect Architecture: Design and Analysis-Optimal and Staircase-Switching Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeow, John T. W.; Abdallah, Samer S.

    2005-10-01

    Free-space optical cross connect (OXC) for optical switching has shown promise in replacing traditional electronic switching fabrics. Micromachined optical switches offer superior performance in terms of bit rate and protocol transparency, which make them futureproof; however, they suffer from nonuniformity in port-to-port optical losses, which limit their use in large-scale optical connects. Recent reports on a novel two-dimensional (2-D) OXC architecture, L-switching matrix, presented that it can significantly improve nonuniformity in optical losses among all output ports. The drawback of L-switching matrix is that it is rearrangeably nonblocking (RNB) and not strictly nonblocking. This paper presents solutions to optimize its switching algorithms. A staircase-switching algorithm is proposed to minimize the occurrence of internal blocking conditions.

  6. UV-free red electroluminescence from the cross-connected p-ZnO:Cu nanobushes/n-GaN light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumei; Han, Yibo; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Xianghui; Chen, Ying; Wang, Siliang; Wen, Li; Liu, Nishuang; Su, Jun; Li, Luying; Gao, Yihua

    2016-02-22

    A p-ZnO:Cu/n-GaN heterojunction light emitting diode (LED) is fabricated by growing cross-connected p-ZnO:Cu nanobushes on n-GaN film using chemical vapor deposition under oxygen-rich condition. This LED emits stable UV-free red light of 677 nm and 745 nm. The electroluminescence (EL) light of this LED is tuned from ultraviolet (UV) of ZnO/GaN to UV-free red by the electronic interfacial transition from the conduction band of n-GaN to the deep acceptor levels of p-ZnO:Cu. Both room temperature and low temperature (5K) photoluminescence spectra of ZnO:Cu indicate that the UV emission of ZnO is suppressed and the green emission is enhanced, which implies the formation of Cu-related deep levels introduced by intentionally doping Cu in ZnO. These deep levels help the EL red emission in the LED device. PMID:26907047

  7. Simulation Study to Improve Focalization of a Figure Eight Coil by Using a Conductive Shield Plate and a Ferromagnetic Block.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Shunqi; Liu, Zhipeng; Yin, Tao

    2015-07-01

    A new method to improve the focalization and efficiency of the Figure of Eight (FOE) coil in rTMS is discussed in this paper. In order to decrease the half width of the distribution curve (HWDC), as well to increase the ratio of positive peak value to negative peak value (RPN) of the induced electric field, a shield plate with a window and a ferromagnetic block are assumed to enhance the positive peak value of the induced electrical field. The shield is made of highly conductive copper, and the block is made of highly permeable soft magnetic ferrite. A computer simulation is conducted on ANSYS® software to conduct the finite element analysis (FEA). Two comparing coefficients were set up to optimize the sizes of the shield window and the block. Simulation results show that a shield with a 60 mm × 30 mm sized window, together with a block 40 mm thick, can decrease the focal area of a FOE coil by 46.7%, while increasing the RPN by 135.9%. The block enhances the peak value of the electrical field induced by a shield-FOE by 8.4%. A real human head model was occupied in this paper to further verify our method. PMID:25594972

  8. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  9. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL); He, Jianliang (Woodridge, IL); Johnson, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of FIG. 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the FIG. 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  10. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

    1994-01-04

    A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

  11. EVALUATION OF FIGURE-EIGHT MAZE ACTIVITY AND GENERAL BEHAVIORAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO FORTY CHEMICALS: EFFECTS OF CYTOSINE ARABINOSIDE, DINOCAP, NITROFEN, AND VITAMIN A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present report describes the effects of prenatal administration exposure of a large number of compounds on the locomotor activity levels of mice. The effects of these treatments on the postnatal growth, viability, morphology and reproductive function from the first experiment...

  12. Computation of magnetic suspension of maglev systems using dynamic circuit theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, J. L.; Rote, D. M.; Coffey, H. T.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic circuit theory is applied to several magnetic suspensions associated with maglev systems. These suspension systems are the loop-shaped coil guideway, the figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil guideway, and the continuous sheet guideway. Mathematical models, which can be used for the development of computer codes, are provided for each of these suspension systems. The differences and similarities of the models in using dynamic circuit theory are discussed in the paper. The paper emphasizes the transient and dynamic analysis and computer simulation of maglev systems. In general, the method discussed here can be applied to many electrodynamic suspension system design concepts. It is also suited for the computation of the performance of maglev propulsion systems. Numerical examples are presented in the paper.

  13. Applications of the dynamic circuit theory to maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jian Liang; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper discusses the applications of dynamic circuit theory to electrodynamic suspension EDS systems. In particular, the paper focuses on the loop-shaped coil and the figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems. Mathematical models, including very general force expressions that can be used for the development of computer codes, are provided for each of these suspension systems. General applications and advantages of the dynamic circuit model are summarized. The paper emphasizes the transient and dynamic analysis and computer simulation of maglev systems. In general, the method discussed here can be applied to many EDS maglev design concepts. It is also suited for the computation of the performance of maglev propulsion systems. Numerical examples are presented in the paper to demonstrate the capability of the model.

  14. Computation of magnetic suspension of maglev systems using dynamic circuit theory

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic circuit theory is applied to several magnetic suspensions associated with maglev systems. These suspension systems are the loop-shaped coil guideway, the figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil guideway, and the continuous sheet guideway. Mathematical models, which can be used for the development of computer codes, are provided for each of these suspension systems. The differences and similarities of the models in using dynamic circuit theory are discussed in the paper. The paper emphasizes the transient and dynamic analysis and computer simulation of maglev systems. In general, the method discussed here can be applied to many electrodynamic suspension system design concepts. It is also suited for the computation of the performance of maglev propulsion systems. Numerical examples are presented in the paper. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Spatial light modulators for full cross-connections in optical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A polarization-independent optical switch is disclosed for switching at least one incoming beam from at least one input source to at least one output drain. The switch includes a polarizing beam splitter to split each of the at least one incoming beam into a first input beam and a second input beam, wherein the first input beam and the second input beams are independently polarized; a wave plate optically coupled to the second input beam for converting the polarization of the second input beam to an appropriately polarized second input beam; a beam combiner optically coupled to the first input beam and the modified second input beam, wherein the beam combiner accepts the first input beam and the modified second input beam to produce a combined beam; the combined beam is invariant to the polarization state of the input source's polarization; and a controllable spatial light modulator optically coupled to the combined beam, wherein the combined beam is diffracted by the controllable spatial light modulator to place light at a plurality of output locations.

  16. Microsecond regime optical cross connect: 32 port to 32 port scalable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Brittany; Miles, Alexander; Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Wissinger, John; Carothers, Daniel; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2014-03-01

    Presented here is a 32 × 32 optical switch for telecommunications applications capable of reconfiguring at speeds of up to 12 microseconds. The free space switching mechanism in this interconnect is a digital micromirror device (DMD) consisting of a 2D array of 10.8?m mirrors optimized for implementation at 1.55?m. Hinged along one axis, each micromirror is capable of accessing one of two positions in binary fashion. In general reflection based applications this corresponds to the ability to manifest only two display states with each mirror, but by employing this binary state system to display a set of binary amplitude holograms, we are able to access hundreds of distinct locations in space. We previously demonstrated a 7 × 7 switch employing this technology, providing a proof of concept device validating our initial design principles but exhibiting high insertion and wavelength dependent losses. The current system employs 1920 × 1080 DMD, allowing us to increase the number of accessible ports to 32 × 32. Adjustments in imaging, coupling component design and wavelength control were also made in order to improve the overall loss of the switch. This optical switch performs in a bit-rate and protocol independent manner, enabling its use across various network fabrics and data rates. Additionally, by employing a diffractive switching mechanism, we are able to implement a variety of ancillary features such as dynamic beam pick-off for monitoring purposes, beam division for multicasting applications and in situ attenuation control.

  17. THE EFFECT OF LONG TERM WASTEWATER CROSS-CONNECTION'S EFFECT ON THE BIOFILM OF A SIMULATED WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  18. Complex Rotating Waves and Long Transients in a Ring Network of Electrochemical Oscillators with Sparse Random Cross-Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebek, Michael; Tönjes, Ralf; Kiss, István Z.

    2016-02-01

    We perform experiments and phase model simulations with a ring network of oscillatory electrochemical reactions to explore the effect of random connections and nonisochronicity of the interactions on the pattern formation. A few additional links facilitate the emergence of the fully synchronized state. With larger nonisochronicity, complex rotating waves or persistent irregular phase dynamics can derail the convergence to global synchronization. The observed long transients of irregular phase dynamics exemplify the possibility of a sudden onset of hypersynchronous behavior without any external stimulus or network reorganization.

  19. Science 101: How Does the Motion of the Earth Affect Our View of the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The question examined in this "Science 101" column was inspired by "Find Your School's Analemma" (in this issue). What causes the Sun's apparent position in the sky to trace a figure-eight pattern throughout one year? The analemma, or figure eight pattern that the Sun makes throughout the year, is due to two major…

  20. Design of NSLS-II High Order Multipole Correctors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak,M.; Danby, G.; Bengtsson, Jo; Jackson, J.; Skaritka, J.; Spataro, C.

    2009-05-04

    Feasibility studies for two families of corrector magnets for NSLS-II are presented. The first family of magnets are generalizations of figure eight quadrupoles using rotationally symmetric breaks in the return yoke to fit in available space. Properties specific to figure eight magnet are identified. The second type of magnet is a combined sextupole/dipole trim.

  1. Science 101: How Does the Motion of the Earth Affect Our View of the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The question examined in this "Science 101" column was inspired by "Find Your School's Analemma" (in this issue). What causes the Sun's apparent position in the sky to trace a figure-eight pattern throughout one year? The analemma, or figure eight pattern that the Sun makes throughout the year, is due to two major…

  2. On Periodic Perturbations of Asymmetric Duffing-Van-der-Pol Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Albert D.; Kostromina, Olga S.

    2014-05-01

    Time-periodic perturbations of an asymmetric Duffing-Van-der-Pol equation close to an integrable equation with a homoclinic "figure-eight" of a saddle are considered. The behavior of solutions outside the neighborhood of "figure-eight" is studied analytically. The problem of limit cycles for an autonomous equation is solved and resonance zones for a nonautonomous equation are analyzed. The behavior of the separatrices of a fixed saddle point of the Poincare map in the small neighborhood of the unperturbed "figure-eight" is ascertained. The results obtained are illustrated by numerical computations.

  3. TRIMETHYLTIN-INDUCED HYPERACTIVITY: TIME COURSE AND PATTERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male Long-Evans rats were intubated with either 0,5,6, or 7 mg/kg trimethyltin chloride. Activity was measured for 1 hr in a figure-eight maze 2 hr after dosing (day 0) and again on days 4,8,16 and 32 after dosing. On days 49-51, activity was measured in a figure-eight maze...

  4. Study of lift enhancing mechanisms via comparison of two distinct flapping patterns in the dragonfly Sympetrum flaveolum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Skote, M.

    2015-03-01

    The computational fluid dynamic model of a live-sized dragonfly (Sympetrum flaveolum) hindwing is simulated according to the in-flight flapping motions measured in kinematic experiments. The flapping motion of the simulated wing is accomplished by dynamically re-gridding the wing-fluid mesh according to the established kinematic model for each flapping pattern. Comparisons between two distinct flapping patterns (double figure-eight and simple figure-eight) are studied via analysis of the aerodynamic forces and flow field structures. The result shows that additional lift is generated during supination and upstroke for the double figure-eight pattern, while maximum thrust is generated during pronation for the simple figure-eight pattern. In addition, through our comparisons of the different kinematics, we are able to reveal the mechanism behind the leading edge vortex stabilization prior to supination and the kinematic movement responsible for additional lift generation during supination. By increasing the translational deceleration during stroke-end rotations in the double figure-eight flapping pattern, a trailing edge vortex is formed which is stronger as compared to the single figure-eight flapping pattern, thus enhancing the lift.

  5. A new structure of torque sensors using thin pickup head—Use of mutual coupling modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasada, I.; Koga, F.

    1994-05-01

    A new structure is proposed for the magnetoelastic torque sensors using a pair of figure-eight coils as a pickup. Mutual coupling between two figure-eight coils is used as a measure of torque applied to a shaft. The mutual coupling is governed by torque-induced anisotropic permeability at the surface of the shaft. Basic characteristics of the torque sensor are examined using a tempered steel shaft of 25 mm in diameter and a pair of 25-turn figure-eight coils. Sensitivity was 16 ?V/N m and hysteresis was 1.3% at the coil excitation condition of 60 kHz, 0.8 A (RMS). Exciting power needed to reduce hysteresis is much smaller with this structure than with previous methods using self-inductance as a measure of torque.

  6. Independent gain and bandwidth control of a traveling wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trowbridge, D. L. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An X-band traveling wave maser of the folded-comb type is presented, with two figure-eight coils for gain and bandwidth control. One figure-eight coil covers the full lengths of the comb structure for bandwidth adjustment of an external magnetic field. The other coil covers a central half of the comb structure for independent gain adjustment of the external magnetic field. The half of each figure-eight coil at the turn around end of the comb structure is oriented to aid the external magnetic field, and the half of each coil at the input-output end of the comb structure is oriented to buck the external magnetic field. The maser is pumped in the push-push mode with two different frequencies.

  7. Three topologically nontrivial choreographic motions of three bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šuvakov, Milovan; Shibayama, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    Choreographies are periodic orbits in which all bodies move on the same trajectory with equal time delay. The best known three-body choreography is figure-eight orbit. Here we introduce a search method specialized for choreographies and present three new orbits with vanishing angular momentum that are the first clear examples of choreographies that cannot be described as k-th powers of the figure-eight solution, according to the topological classification of orbits. We have also found 17 new "powers of the eight" choreographies. According to our numerical computation, one of two distinct k=7 choreographies is linearly stable.

  8. AUDITORY DEFICITS AND MOTOR DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING IMINODIPROPIONITRILE ADMINISTRATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavioral effects of 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) were studied using reflex modification of the acoustic startle response and figure-eight maze activity. umber of experiments were conducted with separate groups of adult male Long Evans hooded rats exposed to saline, or 5...

  9. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TRIADIMEFON, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, IN MALE AND FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon is a widely used systemic fungicide, yet there is little published information on its effects in mammals. This study describes the effects of triadimefon in male and female rats using a functional observational battery (FOB), motor activity (measured in a figure-eight...

  10. 77 FR 29740 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... office of the Exchange, on the Exchange's Internet Web site at http://boxexchange.com , and at the... Connect'' fees are per physical connection and vary by size from the smallest (T-1) to the largest (CAT 6... Connect per T-3 350 Cross Connect per CAT 5, 5E, 6 \\8\\ 500 Monthly Hosting 200 Cross Connect per T-1...

  11. Three-body problem periodic orbits with vanishing angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V.

    2015-04-01

    Periodic solutions of the general three-body problem are investigated in the shape space. Two different solutions are considered: the first is an extension of the well-known figure-eight orbit, and the second one is from the free-fall problem. Using the shape space, we reduce the dimension of the problem. These orbits are obtained numerically and described on the Euclidean plane and on the shape sphere.

  12. A symplectic integrator for the symmetry reduced and regularised planar 3-body problem with vanishing angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Danya; Dullin, Holger R.

    2013-10-01

    We construct an explicit reversible symplectic integrator for the planar 3-body problem with zero angular momentum. We start with a Hamiltonian of the planar 3-body problem that is globally regularised and fully symmetry reduced. This Hamiltonian is a sum of 10 polynomials each of which can be integrated exactly, and hence a symplectic integrator is constructed. The performance of the integrator is examined with three numerical examples: The figure eight, the Pythagorean orbit, and a periodic collision orbit.

  13. Dynamics of an electron driven by relativistically intense laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Galkin, A. L.; Korobkin, V. V.; Romanovsky, M. Yu.; Shiryaev, O. B.

    2008-02-15

    The dynamics of an electron driven by a relativistically intense laser pulse is analyzed on the basis of the equation of motion with the Lorentz force in the cases of linear and circular polarizations. Laser fields with nonplane phase fronts accelerate electrons in the longitudinal direction. An electron initially at rest is found not to move along figure-eight trajectories for the linear polarization, and not to move along circular trajectories for the circular polarization.

  14. 40 CFR 141.130 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connection events. ... 141.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Disinfectant Residuals, Disinfection Byproducts,...

  15. 40 CFR 141.130 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connection events. ... 141.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Disinfectant Residuals, Disinfection Byproducts,...

  16. 40 CFR 141.130 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connection events. ... 141.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Disinfectant Residuals, Disinfection Byproducts,...

  17. 40 CFR 141.130 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., distribution line breaks, storm run-off events, source water contamination events, or cross-connection events. ... 141.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Disinfectant Residuals, Disinfection Byproducts,...

  18. Design Optimization for a Maglev System Employing Flux Eliminating Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, Kent R.

    1996-01-01

    Flux eliminating coils have received no little attention over the past thirty years as an alternative for realizing lift in a MAGLEV system. When the magnets on board the vehicle are displaced from the equilibrium or null flux point of these coils, they induce current in those coils which act to restore the coil to its null flux or centerline position. The question being addressed in this paper is that of how to choose the best coil for a given system. What appears at first glance to be an innocent question is in fact one that is actually quite involved, encompassing both the global economics and physics of the system. The real key in analyzing that question is to derive an optimization index or functional which represents the cost of the system subject to constraints, the primary constraint being that the vehicle lift itself at a certain threshold speed. Outlined in this paper is one scenario for realizing a total system design which uses sequential quadratic programming techniques.

  19. Project W-320 high vacuum 241-AY-102 annulus ventilation system operability test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-03-12

    This report documents the test results of OTP-320-001, Tank 241-AY-102 Annulus Ventilation System Testing. Included in the appendices are: (1) Supporting documentation prepared to demonstrate the structural integrity of the tank at high annulus vacuum (<20 INWG), and (2) a report that identifies potential cross connections between the primary and annulus ventilation systems. These cross connections were verified to be eliminated prior to the start of testing.

  20. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: component analysis of EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana Maria; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy; McIntyre, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A central question in Neuroscience is that of how the nervous system generates the spatiotemporal commands needed to realize complex gestures, such as handwriting. A key postulate is that the central nervous system (CNS) builds up complex movements from a set of simpler motor primitives or control modules. In this study we examined the control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when performing different types of movement: discrete, point-to-point movements in eight different directions and continuous figure-eight movements in both the normal, upright orientation and rotated 90°. To test for the effects of biomechanical constraints, movements were performed in the frontal-parallel or sagittal planes, corresponding to two different nominal flexion/abduction postures of the shoulder. In all cases we measured limb kinematics and surface electromyographic activity (EMG) signals for seven different muscles acting around the shoulder. We first performed principal component analysis (PCA) of the EMG signals on a movement-by-movement basis. We found a surprisingly consistent pattern of muscle groupings across movement types and movement planes, although we could detect systematic differences between the PCs derived from movements performed in each shoulder posture and between the principal components associated with the different orientations of the figure. Unexpectedly we found no systematic differences between the figure eights and the point-to-point movements. The first three principal components could be associated with a general co-contraction of all seven muscles plus two patterns of reciprocal activation. From these results, we surmise that both “discrete-rhythmic movements” such as the figure eight, and discrete point-to-point movement may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the impedance of the limb over the time span of the movement and two others operating to generate movement, one aligned with the vertical and the other aligned with the horizontal. PMID:25620928

  1. Neurobehavioral toxicology of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Crofton, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as either Type I or Type II based upon in vivo toxic signs, and neurophysiological and biochemical data. Both axonal sodium channels and the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex have been proposed as the major site of action of the Type II pyrethroids. This investigation characterized the behavior and biochemical effects of low dosages of pyrethroids in rats. Type I and II pyrethroids were tested for effects on figure-eight maze activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR). All compounds decreased figure-eight maze activity. Interactions of Type I and II pyrethroids with the three major binding sites on the GABA complex were determined in vivo. Radioligand binding experiments assessed in vitro interactions of pyrethroids with the three major GABA-complex binding sites. None of the pyrethroids competed for (/sup 3/H)-muscimol or (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam binding. Only Type II pyrethroids inhibited binding of (/sup 35/S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in cortical synaptosome preparations with K/sub i/ values of 5 to 10 ..mu..M. The (/sup 35/S)-TBPS data implicate the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site in the mechanism of Type II pyrethroid toxicity. The results of these experiments support the classification of pyrethroids into two classes, and demonstrate the utility of the figure-eight maze and the ASR in studies to elucidate neurotoxic mechanisms. The interaction of the Type II pyrethroids is probably restricted to the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding domain on the GABA complex as shown by both the in vivo and in vitro studies.

  2. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: component analysis of EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana Maria; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy; McIntyre, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A central question in Neuroscience is that of how the nervous system generates the spatiotemporal commands needed to realize complex gestures, such as handwriting. A key postulate is that the central nervous system (CNS) builds up complex movements from a set of simpler motor primitives or control modules. In this study we examined the control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when performing different types of movement: discrete, point-to-point movements in eight different directions and continuous figure-eight movements in both the normal, upright orientation and rotated 90°. To test for the effects of biomechanical constraints, movements were performed in the frontal-parallel or sagittal planes, corresponding to two different nominal flexion/abduction postures of the shoulder. In all cases we measured limb kinematics and surface electromyographic activity (EMG) signals for seven different muscles acting around the shoulder. We first performed principal component analysis (PCA) of the EMG signals on a movement-by-movement basis. We found a surprisingly consistent pattern of muscle groupings across movement types and movement planes, although we could detect systematic differences between the PCs derived from movements performed in each shoulder posture and between the principal components associated with the different orientations of the figure. Unexpectedly we found no systematic differences between the figure eights and the point-to-point movements. The first three principal components could be associated with a general co-contraction of all seven muscles plus two patterns of reciprocal activation. From these results, we surmise that both "discrete-rhythmic movements" such as the figure eight, and discrete point-to-point movement may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the impedance of the limb over the time span of the movement and two others operating to generate movement, one aligned with the vertical and the other aligned with the horizontal. PMID:25620928

  3. Flexible polyvinyl chloride neutron guides for transporting ultracold and very cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arzumanov, S. S. Bondarenko, L. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Morozov, V. I.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Panin, Yu. N.; Strepetov, A. N.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    2011-12-15

    The transmission of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) through flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes with lengths of up to 3 m and an internal diameter of 6-8 mm has been studied. High UCN transmission is found even for arbitrarily bent tubes (single bend, double bend, triple bend, figure eight, etc.). The transmission can be improved significantly by coating the inner surface of the tube with a thin layer of liquid fluorine polymer. The prospects of these neutron guides in fundamental and applied research are discussed.

  4. The Stealth Biplane: a Proposal in Response to a Low Reynolds Number Station Keeping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Timothy E.; Flynn, Kevin T.; Donovan, Steven; Paul, Chris; Pangilinan, Harold; Padgett, John; Twomey, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The Stealth Biplane is conceived and constructed to serve as a remotely piloted vehicle designed to navigate a low-level figure-eight course at a target Reynolds number of 100,000. This flight vehicle will combine the latest in lightweight radio controlled hardware in conjunction with current low Reynolds number aerodynamic research to demonstrate feasible operation in a variety of applications. These potential low Reynolds number applications include high altitude atmospheric sampling, search and rescue, and even law enforcement. Design specs and fabrication technique are discussed.

  5. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 25th ANNIVERSARY OF THE A.M. PROKHOROV GENERAL PHYSICS INSTITUTE: Relativistic motion and radiation of an electron in the field of an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, A. L.; Korobkin, V. V.; Romanovskii, M. Yu; Shiryaev, O. B.

    2007-10-01

    The motion of an electron in the fields of relativistic-intensity linearly and circularly polarised laser radiation is analysed. The analysis is based on the numerical solution of the Newton equation with the Lorentz force. The electromagnetic radiation of an electron interacting with a laser pulse is studied. It is shown that this radiation is emitted in the form of extremely short attosecond pulses. It is found that an initially immobile electron does not move along figure-eight trajectories in the field of a linearly polarised laser pulse.

  6. Comparison of major parameters in electrodynamic and electromagnetic levitation transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. S.; Dauwalter, C. R.; Heger, F.; Weinberg, M. S.

    1992-09-01

    The study compiles quantitative design information that can be used in selecting a high-speed magnetic levitation system. Analytic models were developed for three configurations of electromagnetic (EMS) and three electrodynamic (EDS) systems, and for linear induction and synchronous motors. The models permit comparisons based on consistent assumptions. The following results indicate that the hoped-for advantages of EDS are difficult to realize: (1) all of the systems studied require smooth guideways to achieve acceptable ride quality unless active control techniques are developed; (2) the estimated weight of the superconducting magnets for the EDS systems is surprisingly large and comparable to the weight of the EMS onboard electromagnets; and (3) real power consumption in sheet guideway null flux EDS is similar to EMS when practical configurations and end effects are considered.

  7. Analysis of an electrodynamic maglev system

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.

    1999-09-01

    Electrodynamic systems (EDS's) for maglev have an advantage over electromagnetic systems (EMS's) in that the stability is built into the system. EDS's induce the currents used for levitation and guidance, while EMS's impose those currents with controlled feedback. The movement of a magnet over properly designed EDS coils results in forces to keep the system fixed in the lowest energy or null flux spot. In the past such systems have been examined through two-dimensional boundary element techniques. An approximation to the full three-dimensional time harmonic problem is obtained through LaPlace transform theory after using boundary element methods to predict the mutual coupling of the magnets with the track coils. The analytic solution offers helpful design and operation guidelines.

  8. Design and achievement of an efficient low-order pointer multiplexing and mapping scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangyi; Su, Shaojing; Zuo, Zhen; Huang, Zhiping; Zhang, Yimeng

    2015-10-01

    With the improvement of people's living standard, the requirement of network is higher and higher. The rate and capacity of network communication are rising all the time, it 's outstanding on the backbone networks. The rate of backbone network had improved from 10G to 100G in recent years. This change also put forward new requirement for optical network equipment . The key technologies of lower order cross-connect equipment is discussing in this passage. This passage mainly discusses the following aspects: time division multiplexing of STM-1 lower-order pointer interpretation and lower -order pointer generation. By using the technologies discussed in this passage, the lower -order cross-connect devices has the higher cross-connect capacity under consuming the same logic resource, and the equipment will meet the requirement of the backbone network transmission capacity.

  9. Blended head analyses to reduce uncertainty in packer testing in fractured-rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2015-11-01

    Open boreholes in fractured rock often cross-connect fractures with differing hydraulic head and the head differences between these fractures cause vertical flow in the water column. This cross-connection has potential to bias transmissivity (T) values obtained from straddle packer tests. This study demonstrates how measurements of the blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the straddle-packer test interval can be used to correct packer tests for cross-connection effects. A pressure response observed in the open-hole segment above and/or below the packers isolating a test interval during a hydraulic test indicates short-circuiting of water from the injection interval through the vertically connected fracture network to the open-hole segments, resulting in the overestimation of T. A method is presented using blended head concepts to minimize this error using a trial-and-error procedure to determine the short-circuiting flow rate to account for the head conditions in the open-hole segments during each hydraulic test. Observed differences between the measured head and the calculated blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the test interval are attributed to cross-connection effects around the 1-m-long packers. The head and corrected T values determined from packer tests are used to estimate the flow in and out of the open hole at each of the intervals tested for assessing the cross-connection effects under open borehole conditions. Understanding open-hole flow dynamics gives insight about the potential for vertical cross connection of chemical constituents caused by the open hole.

  10. Blended head analyses to reduce uncertainty in packer testing in fractured-rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2016-02-01

    Open boreholes in fractured rock often cross-connect fractures with differing hydraulic head and the head differences between these fractures cause vertical flow in the water column. This cross-connection has potential to bias transmissivity ( T) values obtained from straddle packer tests. This study demonstrates how measurements of the blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the straddle-packer test interval can be used to correct packer tests for cross-connection effects. A pressure response observed in the open-hole segment above and/or below the packers isolating a test interval during a hydraulic test indicates short-circuiting of water from the injection interval through the vertically connected fracture network to the open-hole segments, resulting in the overestimation of T. A method is presented using blended head concepts to minimize this error using a trial-and-error procedure to determine the short-circuiting flow rate to account for the head conditions in the open-hole segments during each hydraulic test. Observed differences between the measured head and the calculated blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the test interval are attributed to cross-connection effects around the 1-m-long packers. The head and corrected T values determined from packer tests are used to estimate the flow in and out of the open hole at each of the intervals tested for assessing the cross-connection effects under open borehole conditions. Understanding open-hole flow dynamics gives insight about the potential for vertical cross connection of chemical constituents caused by the open hole.

  11. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  12. Numerical investigation on flow-induced vibration of a triangular cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huakun; Zhao, Dongliang; Yang, Wenyu; Yu, Guoliang

    2015-02-01

    Flow-induced vibration (FIV) of a triangular cylinder is numerically investigated at a Reynolds number of Re = 100. The four-step fractional finite element method is employed to solve the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The cylinder is endowed with a two-degree-of-freedom motion with the reduced mass ratio of Mr = 2. Three typical flow incidence angles, ? = 0°, 30° and 60°, are examined to identify the effect of incidence angle on the vibration characteristics of the cylinder. For each ?, computations are conducted in a wide range of reduced velocities 2 Ur ? 18. The numerical results show that at ? = 0° and 30°, the responses of the cylinder are dominated by vortex-induced vibration which resembles that of a circular cylinder. At ? = 0°, the peak amplitude of transverse vibration is the smallest among the three investigated ?, and most of the cylinder motions exhibit a regular figure-eight trajectory. Some single-loop trajectories are observed at ? = 30°, where the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is always identical to that in the transverse direction. At ? = 60°, the triangular cylinder undergoes a typical transverse galloping with large amplitude and low frequency, and the vibration trajectories appear to be regular or irregular figure-eight patterns, which are strongly affected by the reduced velocity.

  13. The Advent of WDM and the All-Optical Network: A Reality Check.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutkowitz, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of the telecommunications industry focuses on WDM (wavelength division multiplexing) as a solution for dealing with capacity constraints. Highlights include fiber optic technology; cross-connecting and switching wavelengths; SONET (Synchronous Optical Network) and wavelength networking; and optical TDM (Time Division Multiplexing). (LRW)

  14. 77 FR 10792 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend its Fee Schedule To Provide for a New Cross Connection Charge and...'' (i.e. not physical) connectivity. The Exchange will also further specify that one port charge is... connection charges will clarify the Fee Schedule. The Exchange also proposes deleting the subheading...

  15. WATERBORNE PATHOGEN INVASIONS: A CASE FOR WATER QUALITY PROTECTION IN DISTRIBUTION PROTECTION IN DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    No degree of treatment will insure the delivery of a safe water supplyto the consumer's tap when the distribution system is subject to cross-connections water pressure losses, frequent line breaks, open reservoirs and infrastructure deterioration. n one recent U.S. outbreak, wate...

  16. 9 CFR 416.2 - Establishment grounds and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... creation of insanitary conditions must be provided. (e) Plumbing. Plumbing systems must be installed and... waste on the floor; (5) Prevent back-flow conditions in and cross-connection between piping systems that discharge waste water or sewage and piping systems that carry water for product manufacturing; and...

  17. 9 CFR 416.2 - Establishment grounds and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... creation of insanitary conditions must be provided. (e) Plumbing. Plumbing systems must be installed and... waste on the floor; (5) Prevent back-flow conditions in and cross-connection between piping systems that discharge waste water or sewage and piping systems that carry water for product manufacturing; and...

  18. 9 CFR 416.2 - Establishment grounds and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... creation of insanitary conditions must be provided. (e) Plumbing. Plumbing systems must be installed and... waste on the floor; (5) Prevent back-flow conditions in and cross-connection between piping systems that discharge waste water or sewage and piping systems that carry water for product manufacturing; and...

  19. 9 CFR 416.2 - Establishment grounds and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... creation of insanitary conditions must be provided. (e) Plumbing. Plumbing systems must be installed and... waste on the floor; (5) Prevent back-flow conditions in and cross-connection between piping systems that discharge waste water or sewage and piping systems that carry water for product manufacturing; and...

  20. 9 CFR 416.2 - Establishment grounds and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... creation of insanitary conditions must be provided. (e) Plumbing. Plumbing systems must be installed and... waste on the floor; (5) Prevent back-flow conditions in and cross-connection between piping systems that discharge waste water or sewage and piping systems that carry water for product manufacturing; and...

  1. 47 CFR 69.112 - Direct-trunked transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... assigned to the lowest priced density pricing zone (zone 1) under an approved density pricing zone plan as... cross-connects for the transmission of switched traffic per office assigned to the lowest priced density pricing zone (zone 1). (g) In study areas in which the telephone company has implemented density...

  2. 47 CFR 69.112 - Direct-trunked transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... assigned to the lowest priced density pricing zone (zone 1) under an approved density pricing zone plan as... cross-connects for the transmission of switched traffic per office assigned to the lowest priced density pricing zone (zone 1). (g) In study areas in which the telephone company has implemented density...

  3. MICROBIAL GROWTH IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is not sterile. Microbes are commonly found in delivered water. Some survive treatment, while others may be introduced due to cross connections, line breaks, or by other means. Biofilm forms in drinking water pipes when bacteria and other organisms adhere to pip...

  4. 46 CFR 78.17-5 - Valves and closing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valves and closing appliances. 78.17-5 Section 78.17-5..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-5 Valves and closing appliances. (a) It shall be the duty of the master to see that all valves, including cross connecting valves where fitted, and other appliances such...

  5. Waterworks Operator Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    Sixteen self-study waterworks operators training modules are provided. Module titles are the following: basic mathematics, basic chemistry, analysis procedures, microbiology, basic electricity, hydraulics, chlorination, plant operation, surface water, ground water, pumps, cross connections, distribution systems, safety, public relations, and…

  6. LAND USE AND SEASONAL EFFECTS ON URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF MICROORGANISM CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater samples collected from storm sewers draining small municipal separate storm sewer systems shown to be free of cross connections within an urban watershed dominated by a single land use were analyzed for pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus) and i...

  7. Backflow prevention and responsibilities of HVAC professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, N.

    1996-09-01

    This article highlights the seriousness of backflow of harmful substances into potable water systems from cross-connections with other systems. Topics include backflow hazard examples, taking action, piping system surveys. The examples cited included schools, police station, hospitals, and a college. The contaminants included heat transfer fluids and corrosion inhibitors such as zinc chromate and ethylene glycol.

  8. A new magnetic bar code system based on a magnetic anisotropy detection (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasada, I.; Watanabe, N.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic bar codes can be used in unclean environments, where widely used optical bar code systems cannot be applied. Readout system for magnetic bar codes can also be made much simpler than optical ones. A new magnetic bar code system is proposed, in which binary information is coded in the sign of tilted angles of magnetic strips from a given standard direction. This scheme is unique compared to the conventional optical bar code, where width or space of the parallel pattern carries information, or an already reported magnetic bar code, where cross sectional shapes of pattern engraved in a ferromagnetic body carries information. Each of the magnetic strips brings about magnetic anisotropy due to its shape effect, hence angular dependent permeability in the proximity of the strip. The sign of the tilted angle of each magnetic strip is detected inductively through the angular dependent permeability by using a magnetic pickup head with a pair of cross-coupled figure-eight coils, where the sign of mutual inductance between the primary and the secondary figure-eight coil has one to one relationship to the sign of the tilted angle. Because the detection of the tilted angle is independent of scanning speed, variation in the scanning speed of the readout head does not affect the performance. In our preliminary study, the proposed magnetic bar code system was examined using pickup head consisting of a pair of cross-coupled 10-turn figure-eight coils which was embedded in a rectangular ferrite rod with cross-shape groove on the top surface of 6.5×3 mm dimension. The head was made thinner in the scanning direction to allow dense alignment of the pattern. Two kinds of pattern were made: the one was by aligning short amorphous wires (5 mm in length and 120 μm in diameter) on the plastic film and the other by using a thin (10 μm in thickness) copper film with tilted slits backed by an amorphous ribbon. These samples of magnetic bar code patterns were scanned with lift-off of 1 mm under the operating condition of 120 kHz and 200 mA. Amplitudes of the positive and the negative peak of the output voltage well exceeded 10 mV. Density of the pattern in the preliminary study was 7 bits for the bar code length of 2.6 cm. We will discuss several factors to make density of the pattern higher. Because the pickup coils can be assembled with planar coils and because the magnetic bar code itself is thin, the total system of this bar code scheme can be realized in thin form.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of time-varying magnetic fields from therapeutic devices

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Bhatia, Vivek; Prem-Kumar, Krishan; Ulfarsson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging of static magnetic fields generated by external probes has been previously demonstrated, there is an unmet need to image time-varying magnetic fields, such as those generated by transcranial magnetic stimulators or radiofrequency hyperthermia probes. A method to image such time-varying magnetic fields is introduced in this work. This article presents the theory behind the method and provides proof of concept by imaging time-varying magnetic fields generated by a figure-eight coil inside simple phantoms over a range of frequencies and intensities, using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. The method is able to reconstruct the three-dimensional components of the oscillating magnetic field vector. PMID:23355446

  10. Lorentz force on an electron in a strong plane-wave laser field and the low-frequency limit for ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Jaroslaw H.

    2010-01-15

    A motion of a classical free charge in an electromagnetic plane wave can be found exactly in a fully relativistic case. I have found an approximate non-parametric form of the suitable equations of motion. In a linearly polarized wave, in the simplest frame of reference, the charge moves along the well-known figure-eight path. I have numerically calculated the Lorentz force acting on the charge as a function of time. By virtue of this, for the low-frequency ionization (or detachment) rate, I discuss a manifestation of nondipole and relativistic effects. When intensity of the plane wave increases, these effects can first appear in angular distributions, then in spectra of outgoing electrons, but have quite little effect on total ionization rates. I try to give an explanation of the latter fact.

  11. Simple all-PM-fiber laser mode-locked with a nonlinear loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek, Jan; Karda?, Tomasz M; Michalska, Maria; Radzewicz, Czes?aw; Stepanenko, Yuriy

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter, we present a figure-eight all-PM-fiber laser oscillator design with a nonlinear optical loop mirror as an artificial saturable absorber. Unlike previous constructions using the same mode-locking technique, our cavity is constructed entirely of polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers, making the oscillator more resistant to thermal and mechanical perturbations. Two simple and robust laser configurations that differ by the output coupling ratio (70% or 30%) are presented. The first configuration delivers high energy pulses of 3.5 nJ, and the second configuration delivers pulses of 1.6 nJ at a common repetition rate of 15 MHz. In either configuration, the pulsed operation is stable, and the laser operates in a single pulse train regime, even for pump powers approaching twice the power required for mode-locking. We have also observed that, at higher intracavity powers, stimulated Raman scattering plays a significant role. PMID:26258342

  12. Dynamics of a spiral pair source and its interaction with plane waves.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, A; Biton, Y; Gutman, M; Aviram, I

    2009-05-01

    Spiral pair creation and dynamics is a widely occurring phenomenon in nature. It can appear in the heart tissue, causing severe arrhythmia, known as a figure-eight reentry. We consider the appearance of a spiral pair source, its minimal strength for survival, and the possible results of its interaction with a plane wave. In particular, its ability to outlast such an encounter is of interest. We also consider the question of exposing the source to a train of pulses, in terms of the frequency and angle of encounter. Results show different regimes of behavior, e.g. source annihilation, motion of the source away from, or towards the origin of the plane waves, its breaking and multiplication. Relevance of these results to heart arrhythmia and their possible cancellation by external pacing are briefly discussed. PMID:19303070

  13. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Raimund; Spoerl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Glaser, Steffen J.; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Myers, John M.

    2010-03-15

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for a small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots.

  14. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Spörl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Myers, John M.; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots. PMID:21461143

  15. 1/1 resonances in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, L.

    1984-03-01

    The condition of appearance of the 1/1 resonance whose corresponding condition is closed inside corotation in SB galaxies is clarified. It is shown that the relation between the appearance of the so-called bubbles and the value of parameters characterizing the strength of the bar is demonstrated. The effect of the resonance on the shape and stability of the main direct family of periodic orbits is described. In general, the bifurcation of this family into the 1/1 resonant family of symmetric periodic orbits almost always exists jointly with another bifurcation of an asymmetrical 1/1 family whose orbits have a figure eight shape similar to those found by Miller and Smith (1979) in N-body simulations. The possibility of real galaxies existing with 1/1 resonance present in them is examined.

  16. The Penguin: a Low Reynolds Number Powered Glider for Station Keeping Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, J. K.; Greene, D. W.; Lee, T. T.; Matier, P. T.; Mccarthy, T. R.; Mcguire, R. J.; Schuette, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The Penguin is a low Reynolds number (approx. 100,000) remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). It was designed to fly three laps indoors around two pylons in a figure-eight course while maximizing loiter time. The Penguin's low Reynolds number mission is an important one currently being studied for possible future flights in the atmospheres of other planets and for specialized military missions. Although the Penguin's mission seemed quite simple at first, the challenges of such low Reynolds number flight have proven to be quite unique. In addition to the constraint of low Reynolds number flight, the aircraft had to be robust in its control, highly durable, and it had to carry a small instrument package. The Penguin's flight plan, concept, performance, aerodynamic design, weight estimation, structural design, propulsion, stability and control, and cost estimate is detailed.

  17. Complex investigations of structural and optical homogeneities of low-photorefractivity lithium niobate crystals by the conoscopy and photoinduced and Raman light scattering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, N. V.; Pikoul, O. Yu.; Kruk, A. A.; Teplyakova, N. A.; Yanichev, A. A.; Palatnikov, M. N.

    2015-02-01

    Using photoinduced light scattering, conoscopy, and Raman spectroscopy methods, we have studied stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals and congruent crystals that were doped with Mg(0.078, 0.89 mas %), Zn(0.03, 0.52, 0.62), Cu(0.015), B(0.12), Gd(0.51), Y(0.46), Gd(0.23):Mg(0.75), Mg(0.86):Fe(0.0036), Ta(1.13):Mg(0.011), and Y(0.24):Mg(0.63) cations. It has been found that, depending on the kind of the pattern of photoinduced light scattering, investigated specimens can be divided into three groups. We have shown that the asymmetry of the indicatrix of photoinduced light scattering of LiNbO3 crystals is caused by birefringence of exciting laser radiation as it propagates perpendicularly to the polar axis of the crystal, whereas the asymmetry of the Raman spectrum arises due to the occurrence of spontaneous polarization, the vector of which is directed along the polar axis, and by birefringence. The pattern of the photoinduced light scattering depends on the difference of the refractive indices ? n = n o - n e of the ordinary ( n o ) and extraordinary ( n e ) rays and their energies E. If En o {ie259-1} En e , the proportion of the photoinduced light scattering has the shape of a three-layer round spot. For equal energies, the pattern has the shape of a symmetric figure-eight. At En o < En e , the figure-eight is asymmetric. In this case, its large "lobe" is directed in the positive direction of the polar axis of the crystal.

  18. FBG-based reconfigurable bidirectional OXC for 8×10 Gb/s DWDM transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Tsai, Pei-Shih; Wang, Hsiang; Le Minh, Hoa; Ghassemlooy, Zabih

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a bidirectional high-speed, power-compensated, 3×3 reconfigurable and multiwavelength optical cross-connect (RMB-OXC) for all-optical networks. RMB-OXC characteristics and its performance are experimentally verified in a bidirectional 8-channel×10 Gb/s capacity system. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) is achieved of 18.4 dB corresponds to a BER of 5×10-10. The channel cross-connect function was demonstrated by incorporating RMB-OXC in an 50 km lightwave system. We have observed only ~0.5 dB power penalty in the bidirectional transmission in comparison to the unidirectional transmission. The proposed RMB-OXC has vast potential and it can be utilized in many applications in high-speed wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks.

  19. Novel cryogen-free actively shielded superconducting magnets for maglev vehicles. Final report, August 1991-June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Vermilyea, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    The report presents the results of a research effort into the design of a shielded superconducting magnet system for a maglev vehicle. The magnet design is based on a novel cryogen-free technology which allows operation without the use of any cryogenic fluids. This is accomplished by the use of a two-stage Gifford-McMahon (G-M) cryogenic refrigerator to provide cooling of the coil and a single cryostat thermal radiation shield by conduction. The design operating temperature of the magnet is 7.5 K, and that of the shield is 43 K. The magnet is wound with a tape form of niobium tin superconductor which allows operation at a module current density of 8100 A/sq cm at a flux density of 3.4 T at the 7.5 K temperature with a margin of 4.5 K to critical temperature. The magnet design is coupled with a linear synchronous motor and null-flux sidewall levitation system to provide a workable maglev system design. Costs for several components of the design, including coils and cryostat, shielding, and power conditioning apparatus are estimated.

  20. Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Dart, Eli; Gore, Brooklin; Habib, Salman; Myers, Steven T.; Nugent, Peter; Petravick, Don; Thomas, Rollin

    2015-10-02

    In February 2015 the third workshop in the CrossConnects series, with a focus on Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology, was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Scientists from fields including astrophysics, cosmology, and astronomy collaborated with experts in computing and networking to outline strategic opportunities for enhancing scientific productivity and effectively managing the ever-increasing scale of scientific data.

  1. Digital-data receiver synchronization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-12-06

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock may be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  2. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  3. Digital-data receiver synchronization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN) [Loudon, TN; Turner, Gary W. (Clinton, TN) [Clinton, TN

    2009-09-08

    Digital data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  4. Smart design of multigranular optical switching fabric with traffic grooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi Yun; Zeng, QingJi; Lu, Lihua; Sui, Zhicheng

    2006-03-01

    We introduce an intelligent optical cross connect (OXC) structure based on our lambda-group model, as well as a dynamic algorithm of configuration helpful to complicated optical traffic grooming, which presents a distinctive approach of dividing granularities into specific tunnels for effective treatment. Results and figures from experiments show that the particular channel partition not only is helpful to port reduction significantly, but also improves the channel and blocking performance for dynamic connection requests.

  5. Comparative human health risk analysis of coastal community water and waste service options.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Mary E; Xue, Xiaobo; Hawkins, Troy R; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-08-19

    As a pilot approach to describe adverse human health effects from alternative decentralized community water systems compared to conventional centralized services (business-as-usual [BAU]), selected chemical and microbial hazards were assessed using disability adjusted life years (DALYs) as the common metric. The alternatives included: (1) composting toilets with septic system, (2) urine-diverting toilets with septic system, (3) low flush toilets with blackwater pressure sewer and on-site greywater collection and treatment for nonpotable reuse, and (4) alternative 3 with on-site rainwater treatment and use. Various pathogens (viral, bacterial, and protozoan) and chemicals (disinfection byproducts [DBPs]) were used as reference hazards. The exposure pathways for BAU included accidental ingestion of contaminated recreational water, ingestion of cross-connected sewage to drinking water, and shower exposures to DBPs. The alternative systems included ingestion of treated greywater from garden irrigation, toilet flushing, and crop consumption; and ingestion of treated rainwater while showering. The pathways with the highest health impact included the ingestion of cross-connected drinking water and ingestion of recreational water contaminated by septic seepage. These were also among the most uncertain when characterizing input parameters, particularly the scale of the cross-connection event, and the removal of pathogens during groundwater transport of septic seepage. A comparison of the health burdens indicated potential health benefits by switching from BAU to decentralized water and wastewater systems. PMID:24988142

  6. Toroidal Dehn surgeries on knots in lens spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McA. Gordon, C.

    1999-01-01

    Let M be a compact, orientable 3-manifold with [partial partial differential]M a torus. If r is a slope on [partial partial differential]M (the isotopy class of an unoriented essential simple loop), then we can form the closed 3-manifold M(r) by gluing a solid torus Vr to M along their boundaries in such a way that r bounds a disc in Vr. We say that M(r) is obtained from M by r-Dehn filling.Assume now that M contains no essential sphere, disc, torus or annulus. Then, by Thurston's Geometrization Theorem for Haken manifolds [T1, T2], M is hyperbolic, in the sense that int M has a complete hyperbolic structure of finite volume. Furthermore, M(r) is hyperbolic for all but finitely many r [T1, T2] and the precise nature of the set of exceptional slopes E(M)={r: M(r) is not hyperbolic} has been the subject of a considerable amount of investigation. The maximal observed value of e(M)=[mid R:]E(M)[mid R:] (the cardinality of E(M)) is 10, realized, apparently uniquely, by the exterior of the figure eight knot [T1].Let [Delta](r1, r2) denote as usual the minimal geometric intersection number of two slopes r1 and r2. If [script S] is any set of slopes, then clearly any upper bound for [Delta]([script S])=max{[Delta](r1, r2): r1, r2[set membership][script S]} gives one for [mid R:][script S][mid R:]. For example, one can check (using [GLi, lemma 2·1]) that for 1[less-than-or-eq, slant][Delta]([script S])[less-than-or-eq, slant]10, the maximum values of [mid R:][script S][mid R:] are as given in Table 1.In particular, any upper bound for [Delta](M)=[Delta](E(M)) gives a corresponding bound for e(M). (The maximal observed value of [Delta](M) is 8, realized by the figure eight knot exterior and the figure eight sister manifold [T1, HW].)If M(r) is not hyperbolic, then it is either reducible (contains an essential sphere), toroidal (contains an essential torus), a small Seifert fibre space (one with base S2 and at most three singular fibres), or a counterexample to the Geometrization Conjecture [T1, T2]. A survey of the presently known upper bounds on the distances [Delta](r1, r2) between various classes of exceptional slopes r1 and r2, and the maximal values realized by known examples, is given in [Go2]. (See also [Wu2] for a discussion of the additional cases that arise when M has more than one boundary component.) In the present note we prove the following theorem, which deals with one further pair of possibilities.

  7. Wireless power transmission for biomedical implants: The role of near-zero threshold CMOS rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Ali; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet R

    2015-08-01

    Biomedical implants require an electronic power conditioning circuitry to provide a stable electrical power supply. The efficiency of wireless power transmission is strongly dependent on the power conditioning circuitry specifically the rectifier. A cross-connected CMOS bridge rectifier is implemented to demonstrate the impact of thresholds of rectifiers on wireless power transfer. The performance of the proposed rectifier is experimentally compared with a conventional Schottky diode full wave rectifier over 9cm distance of air and tissue medium between the transmitter and receiver. The output voltage generated by the CMOS rectifier across a 1K? resistive load is around twice as much as the Schottky rectifier. PMID:26737525

  8. Integrated photonic systems redefine air vehicle management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, David L.; Fazi, Floyd A., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Future military aircraft will be taking advantage of advances in optical information networks. Fly by Light will encompass not only using commercially based databus networks between processors but also incorporating purely optical sensors and transducers. Several types of optical transducers are available and have been demonstrated for feedback and health monitoring. Integration techniques that include optical tunable filters, high-speed switches, cross- connect switches, multiplexers and demultiplexers operating in the 1550-nm band have been demonstrated. This integrated approach shows the potential to reduce weight, increase bandwidth and improve supportability for production air vehicles.

  9. Performance analysis and optimization of various MG-OXCs multi-granularity WDM optical networks based on waveband switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yongmin; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Tianshu; Zhou, Xuefang; Qian, Sheng; Li, Qiliang

    2008-11-01

    Multi-granularity optical cross-connects (MG-OXC) is proposed as a promising technique to reduce the cost of the optical nodes in the wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical networks. In this paper, we use the on-line Maximize the Number of Waveband Route (MNWR) algorithm to evaluate the performance and optimize the design of multi-granularity optical WDM networks based on two different MG-OXCs: the serial MG-OXCs and the interconnecting MG-OXCs. The numerical results show that our optimal design can significantly reduce the network complexity and the blocking probability.

  10. Micromirrors: overview and application roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaud, Jeremie; Bahle, Carsten; Wicht, Henning

    2005-01-01

    The Telecom sector has driven until 2000 the development of micro-mirrors with subsystems like optical cross-connects and add/drop multiplexers for all-optical networks. Following the collapse of the telecom equipment market, much attention has been given to emerging applications in consumer electronics, IT, industry, and biomedical. WTC will give an overview on existing and emerging markets of micro-mirrors outside telecom. The various micro-mirror techniques and their respective applications from high value niches to mass markets will be presented. The supply chain will be analysed and a roadmap of implementation of micro-mirrors will be proposed.

  11. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a computer code for the analysis of the detailed flow of helium in prismatic fuel reactors is reported. The code, called BYPASS, solves, a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The discretization of the flow in a core region typically considers the main coolant flow paths, the bypass gap flow paths, and the crossflow connections between them. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Spatial Light Modulators as Optical Crossbar Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of implementing cross connections in an optical communication network is based on the use of a spatial light modulator (SLM) to form controlled diffraction patterns that connect inputs (light sources) and outputs (light sinks). Sources would typically include optical fibers and/or light-emitting diodes; sinks would typically include optical fibers and/or photodetectors. The sources and/or sinks could be distributed in two dimensions; that is, on planes. Alternatively or in addition, sources and/or sinks could be distributed in three dimensions -- for example, on curved surfaces or in more complex (including random) three-dimensional patterns.

  13. Localization by indirect immunofluorescence of tetrin, actin, and centrin to the oral apparatus and buccal cavity of the macrostomal form of Tetrahymena vorax.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Neil B; Buhse, Howard E

    2004-01-01

    We have taken advantage of the size of the macrostomal oral apparatus of Tetrahymena vorax to investigate the immunofluorescent localization of three cytoskeletal proteins--tetrin, actin, and centrin. Tetrin and actin antibodies co-localize to cross-connectives that anchor the membranelles. These antibodies also recognize the coarse filamentous reticulum, a filament associated with the undulating membrane. Actin-specific localization extends beyond the coarse filamentous reticulum-undulating membrane complex into a region called the specialized cytoplasm. A centrin antibody localizes to the fine filamentous reticulum which, along with microtubules of the oral ribs, circumscribes the cytostomal opening. Models of phagocytic contraction based on these data are presented. PMID:15134263

  14. Lamar repowering project's creative modeling of old and new wins Marmaduke award

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2008-08-15

    Lamar Light and Power is a municipal utility that has been generating the south eastern Colorado city's electricity since 1920. Rising natural gas and oil costs pushed LL & P to retire its steam plant five years ago and begin hunting for more economic power sources. The answer: repower the existing plant with a state-of-the-art coal-fired circulating fluidized-bed combustor and cross-connect old and new steam turbines. The 120 million dollar project will stabilize the region's electricity rates for many years to come. 10 figs. 1 tab.

  15. A parameter map of synthetic jet regimes based on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers: Commentary on the article by Rimasauskiene et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brou?ková, Z.; Šafa?ík, P.; Trávní?ek, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, Rimasauskiene et al. ([1] Mech. Syst. Signal Process. (2015) 50-51) presented an experimental study focusing on synthetic jets. Their paper presented a parameter map based on the Reynolds number. However, the map was shown without an adequate explanation, without definition of the horizontal axis, and without cross-connections with previous literature. This commentary attempts (A) to elucidate the unnecessary misunderstanding for readers and (B) to reveal that the parameter map, based on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers, can be a useful tool in the study of synthetic jets.

  16. Nematic droplets on fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, V. M. O.; Silvestre, N. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of new techniques for the fabrication of nematic droplets with nontrivial topology provides new routes for the assembly of responsive devices. Here we explore some of the properties of nematic droplets on fibers, which constitute the basic units of a type of device that is able to respond to external stimuli, including the detection of gases. We perform a numerical study of spherical nematic droplets on fibers. We analyze the equilibrium textures for homogeneous and hybrid boundary conditions and find that in some cases the nematic avoids the nucleation of topological defects, which would provide a different optical response. We consider in detail a homeotropic nematic droplet wrapped around a fiber with planar anchoring. We investigate the effect of an electric field on the texture of this droplet. In the presence of a dc field, the system undergoes an orientational transition above a given threshold Ec, for which a ring defect is transformed into a figure-eight defect. We also consider ac fields, at high and low frequencies, and find that the textures are similar to those observed for static fields, in contrast with recently reported experiments.

  17. PIV Measurements in Model and Full Scale Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangubhotla, Lavanya; Jacob, Jamey; Wala, Andrew; Taylor, Charles

    2002-11-01

    The present research focuses on examining effective ventilation in a coal mine using PIV. The purpose of these experiments is to study in detail the flow characteristics in a 1:15 scale mine model and compare it with a full-scale mine to develop effective means of face ventilation in a coal mine. PIV measurements were conducted in the prototype model with various channel geometries with width to height ratios of 1.7 to 4 and length to height ratios of 2 to 5, with and without slabs. Gross separation was observed to occur immediately downstream of the ventilation exit (curtain) in all cases below a critical channel width resulting in a figure eight pattern and drastically reduced face ventilation. PIV measurements taken on a full-scale mine model (6.1 m wide by 18.3 m long) at NIOSH displayed similar flow patterns, including separation immediately downstream of the curtain resulting in inadequate ventilation. In addition to time-averaged and unsteady velocity fields, volumetric flow rates, wall skin friction in the separation region, and possible methods of improved face ventilation are presented.

  18. Three-body choreographies in given curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Toshiaki

    2009-10-01

    As shown by Johannes Kepler in 1609, in the two-body problem, the shape of the orbit, a given ellipse, and a given non-vanishing constant angular momentum determine the motion of the planet completely. Even in the three-body problem, in some cases, the shape of the orbit, conservation of the center of mass and a constant of motion (the angular momentum or the total energy) determine the motion of the three bodies. We show, by a geometrical method, that choreographic motions, in which equal mass three bodies chase each other around the same curve, will be uniquely determined for the following two cases. (i) Convex curves that have point symmetry and non-vanishing angular momentum are given. (ii) Eight-shaped curves which are similar to the curve for the figure-eight solution and the energy constant are given. The reality of the motion should be tested whether the motion satisfies an equation of motion or not. Extensions of the method for generic curves are shown. The extended methods are applicable to generic curves which do not have point symmetry. Each body may have its own curve and its own non-vanishing masses.

  19. Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Scott A.; Tremblay, Yann; Weimerskirch, Henri; Scott, Darren; Thompson, David R.; Sagar, Paul M.; Moller, Henrik; Taylor, Graeme A.; Foley, David G.; Block, Barbara A.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic tracking tags have revolutionized our understanding of broad-scale movements and habitat use of highly mobile marine animals, but a large gap in our knowledge still remains for a wide range of small species. Here, we report the extraordinary transequatorial postbreeding migrations of a small seabird, the sooty shearwater, obtained with miniature archival tags that log data for estimating position, dive depth, and ambient temperature. Tracks (262 ± 23 days) reveal that shearwaters fly across the entire Pacific Ocean in a figure-eight pattern while traveling 64,037 ± 9,779 km roundtrip, the longest animal migration ever recorded electronically. Each shearwater made a prolonged stopover in one of three discrete regions off Japan, Alaska, or California before returning to New Zealand through a relatively narrow corridor in the central Pacific Ocean. Transit rates as high as 910 ± 186 km·day?1 were recorded, and shearwaters accessed prey resources in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere’s most productive waters from the surface to 68.2 m depth. Our results indicate that sooty shearwaters integrate oceanic resources throughout the Pacific Basin on a yearly scale. Sooty shearwater populations today are declining, and because they operate on a global scale, they may serve as an important indicator of climate change and ocean health. PMID:16908846

  20. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible cylinder at large inclination angle

    PubMed Central

    Bourguet, Rémi; Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The free vibrations of a flexible circular cylinder inclined at 80° within a uniform current are investigated by means of direct numerical simulation, at Reynolds number 500 based on the body diameter and inflow velocity. In spite of the large inclination angle, the cylinder exhibits regular in-line and cross-flow vibrations excited by the flow through the lock-in mechanism, i.e. synchronization of body motion and vortex formation. A profound reconfiguration of the wake is observed compared with the stationary body case. The vortex-induced vibrations are found to occur under parallel, but also oblique vortex shedding where the spanwise wavenumbers of the wake and structural response coincide. The shedding angle and frequency increase with the spanwise wavenumber. The cylinder vibrations and fluid forces present a persistent spanwise asymmetry which relates to the asymmetry of the local current relative to the body axis, owing to its in-line bending. In particular, the asymmetrical trend of flow–body energy transfer results in a monotonic orientation of the structural waves. Clockwise and counter-clockwise figure eight orbits of the body alternate along the span, but the latter are found to be more favourable to structure excitation. Additional simulations at normal incidence highlight a dramatic deviation from the independence principle, which states that the system behaviour is essentially driven by the normal component of the inflow velocity. PMID:25512586

  1. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  2. Bulk mixed ion electron conduction in amorphous gallium oxide causes memristive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitaka; Wiemann, Carsten; Feyer, Vitaliy; Kim, Hong-Seok; Schneider, Claus Michael; Ill-Yoo, Han; Martin, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    In thin films of mixed ionic electronic conductors sandwiched by two ion-blocking electrodes, the homogeneous migration of ions and their polarization will modify the electronic carrier distribution across the conductor, thereby enabling homogeneous resistive switching. Here we report non-filamentary memristive switching based on the bulk oxide ion conductivity of amorphous GaOx (x~1.1) thin films. We directly observe reversible enrichment and depletion of oxygen ions at the blocking electrodes responding to the bias polarity by using photoemission and transmission electron microscopies, thus proving that oxygen ion mobility at room temperature causes memristive behaviour. The shape of the hysteresis I-V curves is tunable by the bias history, ranging from narrow counter figure-eight loops to wide hysteresis, triangle loops as found in the mathematically derived memristor model. This dynamical behaviour can be attributed to the coupled ion drift and diffusion motion and the oxygen concentration profile acting as a state function of the memristor. PMID:24632885

  3. Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Scott A; Tremblay, Yann; Weimerskirch, Henri; Scott, Darren; Thompson, David R; Sagar, Paul M; Moller, Henrik; Taylor, Graeme A; Foley, David G; Block, Barbara A; Costa, Daniel P

    2006-08-22

    Electronic tracking tags have revolutionized our understanding of broad-scale movements and habitat use of highly mobile marine animals, but a large gap in our knowledge still remains for a wide range of small species. Here, we report the extraordinary transequatorial postbreeding migrations of a small seabird, the sooty shearwater, obtained with miniature archival tags that log data for estimating position, dive depth, and ambient temperature. Tracks (262+/-23 days) reveal that shearwaters fly across the entire Pacific Ocean in a figure-eight pattern while traveling 64,037+/-9,779 km roundtrip, the longest animal migration ever recorded electronically. Each shearwater made a prolonged stopover in one of three discrete regions off Japan, Alaska, or California before returning to New Zealand through a relatively narrow corridor in the central Pacific Ocean. Transit rates as high as 910+/-186 km.day-1 were recorded, and shearwaters accessed prey resources in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere's most productive waters from the surface to 68.2 m depth. Our results indicate that sooty shearwaters integrate oceanic resources throughout the Pacific Basin on a yearly scale. Sooty shearwater populations today are declining, and because they operate on a global scale, they may serve as an important indicator of climate change and ocean health. PMID:16908846

  4. The vertical disk structure of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Cecil, G.; Tully, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    NGC 3079 is an edge-on SB(s)c galaxy at a redshift of 1225 km/s relative to the Local Group. Earlier researchers found a spectacular 'figure-eight' radio structure aligned along the minor axis of the galaxy, centered on the nucleus, and extending 3 kpc above and below the plane. The geometry of this structure and the evidence of unusually high nuclear gas velocities suggest that a wind-type outflow from the nucleus is taking place. The disk of NGC 3079 is also remarkable: it is extremely rich in H 2 regions and is the only unambiguous example of a galaxy outside M31 and our own Galaxy to exhibit 'Heiles-like' shells. Other researchers have also identified a nebulosity with a ragged X-shaped morphology formed by a system of lumpy filaments with individual lengths of 3 - 5 kpc. They suggest that this material is ambient halo gas entrained into the boundary layers of the nuclear outflow. The complex structure of the line emission in NGC 3079 makes this object an ideal target for an imaging spectroscopic study. The present paper reports the preliminary results of such a study.

  5. Crystal and molecular structure of didemnin B, an antiviral and cytotoxic depsipeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M B; van der Helm, D; Antel, J; Sheldrick, G M; Sanduja, S K; Weinheimer, A J

    1988-01-01

    Didemnin B, a highly active depsipeptide isolated from a Caribbean tunicate, crystallizes from chloroform/benzene in the orthorhombic space group C2221, with cell parameters a = 14.990 +/- 0.003 A, b = 22.574 +/- 0.004 A, c = 41.112 +/- 0.009 A, V = 13911.7 A3 at 138 K and a calculated density of 1.143 g/cm3 based on C57H89N7O15, 1.5C6H6.H2O and eight formula units per cell. The overall agreement factor R = 0.052 for 7699 reflections, 20 theta max = 150 degrees, Cu K-alpha radiation. The structure determination revealed that didemnin B contains an isostatine residue instead of a statine residue. The conformation of the 23-membered depsipeptide ring is stabilized by one transannular hydrogen bond. The ring does not show the antiparallel beta-pleated-sheet structure but, instead, has a fold in the shape of a bent figure-eight. The linear peptide moiety, containing N-methylleucine and lactylproline, forms a beta (II)-bend and is folded back toward the cyclic backbone, giving the overall molecule a globular character. Comparison with the structure of cyclosporin A shows distinct stereochemical differences between the two molecules. It is suggested that didemnin B and cyclosporin A are unlikely to have a common receptor binding site. PMID:3380783

  6. Comparison of current distributions in electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2002-05-01

    We compared current density distributions in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) by numerical calculations. The model consisted of an air region and three types of tissues with different conductivities representing the brain, the skull, and the scalp. In the ECT model, electric currents were applied through electrodes with a voltage of 100 V. In the TMS model, a figure-eight coil (6 cm diameter per coil) was placed on the vertex of the head model. An alternating current with a peak intensity of 3.0 kA and a frequency of 4.2 kHz was applied to the coil. The maximum current densities inside the brain in ECT (bilateral electrode position) and TMS were 234 and 322 A/m2, respectively. The results indicate that magnetic stimulators can generate comparable current densities to ECT. While the skull significantly affected current distributions in ECT, TMS efficiently induced eddy currents in the brain. In addition, TMS is more beneficial than ECT because the localized current distribution reduces the risk of adverse side effects.

  7. Disturbance of visual search by stimulating to posterior parietal cortex in the brain using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iramina, Keiji; Ge, Sheng; Hyodo, Akira; Hayami, Takehito; Ueno, Shoogo

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we applied a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the temporal aspect for the functional processing of visual attention. Although it has been known that right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in the brain has a role in certain visual search tasks, there is little knowledge about the temporal aspect of this area. Three visual search tasks that have different difficulties of task execution individually were carried out. These three visual search tasks are the "easy feature task," the "hard feature task," and the "conjunction task." To investigate the temporal aspect of the PPC involved in the visual search, we applied various stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and measured the reaction time of the visual search. The magnetic stimulation was applied on the right PPC or the left PPC by the figure-eight coil. The results show that the reaction times of the hard feature task are longer than those of the easy feature task. When SOA=150 ms, compared with no-TMS condition, there was a significant increase in target-present reaction time when TMS pulses were applied. We considered that the right PPC was involved in the visual search at about SOA=150 ms after visual stimulus presentation. The magnetic stimulation to the right PPC disturbed the processing of the visual search. However, the magnetic stimulation to the left PPC gives no effect on the processing of the visual search.

  8. Differences in gaze anticipation for locomotion with and without vision.

    PubMed

    Authié, Colas N; Hilt, Pauline M; N'Guyen, Steve; Berthoz, Alain; Bennequin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown a spontaneous anticipation of locomotor trajectory by the head and gaze direction during human locomotion. This anticipatory behavior could serve several functions: an optimal selection of visual information, for instance through landmarks and optic flow, as well as trajectory planning and motor control. This would imply that anticipation remains in darkness but with different characteristics. We asked 10 participants to walk along two predefined complex trajectories (limaçon and figure eight) without any cue on the trajectory to follow. Two visual conditions were used: (i) in light and (ii) in complete darkness with eyes open. The whole body kinematics were recorded by motion capture, along with the participant's right eye movements. We showed that in darkness and in light, horizontal gaze anticipates the orientation of the head which itself anticipates the trajectory direction. However, the horizontal angular anticipation decreases by a half in darkness for both gaze and head. In both visual conditions we observed an eye nystagmus with similar properties (frequency and amplitude). The main difference comes from the fact that in light, there is a shift of the orientations of the eye nystagmus and the head in the direction of the trajectory. These results suggest that a fundamental function of gaze is to represent self motion, stabilize the perception of space during locomotion, and to simulate the future trajectory, regardless of the vision condition. PMID:26106313

  9. Preliminary observations on the response of Chironex fleckeri (Cnidaria: Cubozoa: Chirodropida) to different colors of light.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Dawes, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Cubozoans are well known for their attraction to light and light-colored objects. Two highly venomous types are a public safety concern in Australian waters and elsewhere: Chironex fleckeri, long considered the world's deadliest animal and colloquially called the box jellyfish; and the irukandjis, a group of at least 10 species that cause various degrees of debilitating illness. We were asked by the tourism industry whether there might be a color of light that box jellyfish and irukandjis are not attracted to, such that nighttime diving activities might pose less risk of being stung. Our preliminary trials with Chironex fleckeri indicated a marked positive response to lights of white, red, yellow, green, orange, and blue. All colors elicited a strong and directed attraction to light; however, medusae slowed down their pulsation rate, streamed out their tentacles, and performed a series of figure-eight patterns back and forth through the lighted area when exposed to blue light, which we interpreted as feeding behavior. This compares curiously with a report subsequent to our testing, in which the small, mangrove-inhabiting cubomedusa Tripedalia cystophora and the beach-dwelling Chiropsella bronzie demonstrate a peak sensitivity to blue-green light in the region of 500 nm, and that the former is behaviorally attracted to blue and green light, but ignores red. This leaves open the possibility that Irukandji species, which are more closely related to Tripedalia than to Chironex, may be blind to red. PMID:18723637

  10. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2011-05-31

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  11. Dynamic multi-channel TMS with reconfigurable coil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruoli; Jansen, Ben H; Sheth, Bhavin R; Chen, Ji

    2013-05-01

    Investigations of the causal involvement of particular brain areas and interconnections in behavior require an external stimulation system with reasonable spatio-temporal resolution. Current transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology is limited to stimulating a single brain area once in a given trial. Here, we present a feasibility study for a novel TMS system based on multi-channel reconfigurable coils. With this hardware, researchers will be able to stimulate multiple brain sites in any temporal order in a trial. The system employs a wire-mesh coil, constructed using x- and y-directional wires. By varying the current direction and/or strength on each wire, we can configure the proposed mesh-wire coil into a standard loop coil and figure-eight coil of varying size. This provides maximum flexibility to the experimenter in that the location and extent of stimulation on the brain surface can be modified depending on experimental requirement. Moreover, one can dynamically and automatically modify the site(s) of stimulation several times within the span of seconds. By pre-storing various sequences of excitation patterns inside a control unit, one can explore the effect of dynamic TMS on behavior, in associative learning, and as rehabilitative therapy. Here, we present a computer simulation and bench experiments that show the feasibility of the dynamically-reconfigurable coil. PMID:23193321

  12. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible cylinder at large inclination angle.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, Rémi; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2015-01-28

    The free vibrations of a flexible circular cylinder inclined at 80° within a uniform current are investigated by means of direct numerical simulation, at Reynolds number 500 based on the body diameter and inflow velocity. In spite of the large inclination angle, the cylinder exhibits regular in-line and cross-flow vibrations excited by the flow through the lock-in mechanism, i.e. synchronization of body motion and vortex formation. A profound reconfiguration of the wake is observed compared with the stationary body case. The vortex-induced vibrations are found to occur under parallel, but also oblique vortex shedding where the spanwise wavenumbers of the wake and structural response coincide. The shedding angle and frequency increase with the spanwise wavenumber. The cylinder vibrations and fluid forces present a persistent spanwise asymmetry which relates to the asymmetry of the local current relative to the body axis, owing to its in-line bending. In particular, the asymmetrical trend of flow-body energy transfer results in a monotonic orientation of the structural waves. Clockwise and counter-clockwise figure eight orbits of the body alternate along the span, but the latter are found to be more favourable to structure excitation. Additional simulations at normal incidence highlight a dramatic deviation from the independence principle, which states that the system behaviour is essentially driven by the normal component of the inflow velocity. PMID:25512586

  13. Crystal and molecular structure of didemnin B, an antiviral and cytotoxic depsipeptide.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M B; van der Helm, D; Antel, J; Sheldrick, G M; Sanduja, S K; Weinheimer, A J

    1988-06-01

    Didemnin B, a highly active depsipeptide isolated from a Caribbean tunicate, crystallizes from chloroform/benzene in the orthorhombic space group C2221, with cell parameters a = 14.990 +/- 0.003 A, b = 22.574 +/- 0.004 A, c = 41.112 +/- 0.009 A, V = 13911.7 A3 at 138 K and a calculated density of 1.143 g/cm3 based on C57H89N7O15, 1.5C6H6.H2O and eight formula units per cell. The overall agreement factor R = 0.052 for 7699 reflections, 20 theta max = 150 degrees, Cu K-alpha radiation. The structure determination revealed that didemnin B contains an isostatine residue instead of a statine residue. The conformation of the 23-membered depsipeptide ring is stabilized by one transannular hydrogen bond. The ring does not show the antiparallel beta-pleated-sheet structure but, instead, has a fold in the shape of a bent figure-eight. The linear peptide moiety, containing N-methylleucine and lactylproline, forms a beta (II)-bend and is folded back toward the cyclic backbone, giving the overall molecule a globular character. Comparison with the structure of cyclosporin A shows distinct stereochemical differences between the two molecules. It is suggested that didemnin B and cyclosporin A are unlikely to have a common receptor binding site. PMID:3380783

  14. Functional outcomes of conservatively treated clavicle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bajuri, Mohd Yazid; Maidin, S; Rauf, A; Baharuddin, M; Harjeet, S

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The main aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes of clavicle fractures in adults treated non-surgically and to evaluate the clinical effects of displacement, fracture patterns, fracture location, fracture comminution, shortening and fracture union on shoulder function. METHODS: Seventy clavicle fractures were non-surgically treated in the Orthopedics Department at the Tuanku Ja'afar General Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in Seremban, Malaysia, an average of six months after injury. The clavicle fractures were treated conservatively with an arm sling and a figure-eight splint for three weeks. No attempt was made to reduce displaced fractures, and the patients were allowed immediate free-shoulder mobilization, as tolerated. They were prospectively evaluated clinically and radiographically. Shoulder function was evaluated using the Constant scoring technique. RESULTS: There were statistically significant functional outcome impairments in non-surgically treated clavicle fractures that correlated with the fracture type (comminution), the fracture displacement (21 mm or more), shortening (15 mm or more) and the fracture union (malunion). CONCLUSION: This article reveals the need for surgical intervention to treat clavicle fractures and improve shoulder functional outcomes. PMID:21655759

  15. Neural network training by integration of adjoint systems of equations forward in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically, it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved, but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. The trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  16. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  17. New species of Cardicola (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) from heart of Atlantic croaker, Micropogonias undulatus (Perciformes: Sciaenidae), of the South Atlantic Bight.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Stephen A; Baker, Tiffany; de Buron, Isaure

    2012-04-01

    Cardicola parvus n. sp. (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) infects the heart of Atlantic croaker, Micropogonias undulatus (Linnaeus, 1766) (Perciformes: Sciaenidae), in the South Atlantic Bight off Cow Island (34°38'49?N, 76°33'41?W, type locality) and Figure Eight Island (34°15'48?N, 77°44'27?W), North Carolina, USA, and off Jacksonville Beach (30°08'23?N, 81°20'52?W), Florida, USA. The new species is most easily differentiated from other members of Cardicola Short, 1953 by the combination of having a minute adult body (? 1 mm total length) that is 3.1-4.7× longer than wide, widely dispersed ventral tegumental sensory papillae, ~180 tegumental spine rows per side of body, a spheroid anterior sucker that is apparently aspinous, an esophagus that is 38-39% of the body total length, a male genital pore that is anterior to the ootype, a uterus that transitions from ascending to descending portions posterolaterally to the ovary, and a nearly transverse oviducal seminal receptacle. The new species is the second named aporocotylid from a littoral fish of the South Atlantic Bight and the fifth aporocotylid species reported from fishes of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. PMID:22017493

  18. The Lie-Poisson structure of the reduced n-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullin, Holger R.

    2013-06-01

    The classical n-body problem in d-dimensional space is invariant under the Galilean symmetry group. We reduce by this symmetry group using the method of polynomial invariants. One novelty of our approach is that we do not fix the centre of mass but rather use a momentum shifting trick to change the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian to arrive at a new, dynamically equivalent Hamiltonian which is easier to reduce. As a result we obtain a reduced system with a Lie-Poisson structure which is isomorphic to \\mathfrak{sp}(2n-2) , independently of d. The reduction preserves the natural form of the Hamiltonian as a sum of kinetic energy that depends on velocities only and a potential that depends on positions only. This splitting allows us to construct a Poisson integrator for the reduced n-body problem which is efficient away from collisions for n = 3. In particular, we could integrate the figure eight orbit in 18 time steps.

  19. Trajectories of Listeria-type motility in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-12-01

    Force generated by actin polymerization is essential in cell motility and the locomotion of organelles or bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments on actin-based motility have observed geometrical trajectories including straight lines, circles, S-shaped curves, and translating figure eights. This paper reports a phenomenological model of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions that generates geometrical trajectories. Our model shows that when the evolutions of actin density and force per filament on the disk are strongly coupled to the disk self-rotation, it is possible for a straight trajectory to lose its stability. When the instability is due to a pitchfork bifurcation, the resulting trajectory is a circle; a straight trajectory can also lose stability through a Hopf bifurcation, and the resulting trajectory is an S-shaped curve. We also show that a half-coated disk, which mimics the distribution of functionalized proteins in Listeria, also undergoes similar symmetry-breaking bifurcations when the straight trajectory loses stability. For both a fully coated disk and a half-coated disk, when the trajectory is an S-shaped curve, the angular frequency of the disk self-rotation is different from that of the disk trajectory. However, for circular trajectories, these angular frequencies are different for a fully coated disk but the same for a half-coated disk.

  20. Differences in gaze anticipation for locomotion with and without vision

    PubMed Central

    Authié, Colas N.; Hilt, Pauline M.; N'Guyen, Steve; Berthoz, Alain; Bennequin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown a spontaneous anticipation of locomotor trajectory by the head and gaze direction during human locomotion. This anticipatory behavior could serve several functions: an optimal selection of visual information, for instance through landmarks and optic flow, as well as trajectory planning and motor control. This would imply that anticipation remains in darkness but with different characteristics. We asked 10 participants to walk along two predefined complex trajectories (limaçon and figure eight) without any cue on the trajectory to follow. Two visual conditions were used: (i) in light and (ii) in complete darkness with eyes open. The whole body kinematics were recorded by motion capture, along with the participant's right eye movements. We showed that in darkness and in light, horizontal gaze anticipates the orientation of the head which itself anticipates the trajectory direction. However, the horizontal angular anticipation decreases by a half in darkness for both gaze and head. In both visual conditions we observed an eye nystagmus with similar properties (frequency and amplitude). The main difference comes from the fact that in light, there is a shift of the orientations of the eye nystagmus and the head in the direction of the trajectory. These results suggest that a fundamental function of gaze is to represent self motion, stabilize the perception of space during locomotion, and to simulate the future trajectory, regardless of the vision condition. PMID:26106313

  1. MOEMS for optical communication: status of the European industrial activities and technical and economical trends for the next three years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounier, Eric; Eloy, Jean-Christophe

    2001-10-01

    The fiber-optic telecommunication market has dramatically evolved. Over the 1999-2000 period, almost $110 billion have been exchanged for companies and new technology acquisitions by large groups. This market continues to stimulate the creation of new start-ups. 2 to 5 companies are created every month in Europe in this field and the same in the USA and numerous other ones are in launching phase. Moreover, there are still high investment efforts form Venture Capitalists in this field. Today, it is obvious that fiber-optics telecom is the new Killer Applications that microsystems technology was looking for. As the objective is to have all-optical routing systems, the routing function could be achieved using MEMS components, which is the only technology which could cope with the realization of large matrix size cross-connects. Moreover, as demand is not uniform in the network, there is also a growing need for reconfiguration of parts of the network (to create regions of higher capacity for example). MEMS are suitable components for reconfiguration: WDM add/drop, optical cross-connect or optical switches. The presentation will make the up-to-date analysis on who is doing what in this field in Europe and what are the products for which applications on MEMS for optical telecom.

  2. Proton-decoupled, Overhauser-enhanced, spatially localized carbon-13 spectroscopy in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Hardy, C.J.; Roemer, P.B.; Mueller, O.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Spatially localized, natural abundance, carbon (13C) NMR spectroscopy has been combined with proton (1H) decoupling and nuclear Overhauser enhancement to improve 13C sensitivity up to five-fold in the human leg, liver, and heart. Broadhand-decoupled 13C spectra were acquired in 1 s to 17 min with a conventional 1.5-T imaging/spectroscopy system, an auxiliary 1H decoupler, an air-cooled dual-coil coplanar surface probe, and both depth-resolved surface coil spectroscopy (DRESS) and one-dimensional phase-encoding gradient NMR pulse sequences. The surface coil probe comprised circular and figure-eight-shaped coils to eliminate problems with mutual coupling of coils at high decoupling power levels applied during 13C reception. Peak decoupler RF power deposition in tissue was computed numerically from electromagnetic theory assuming a semi-infinite plane of uniform biological conductor. Peak values at the surface were calculated at 4 to 6 W/kg in any gram of tissue for each watt of decoupler power input excluding all coil and cable losses, warning of potential local RF heating problems in these and related experiments. The average power deposition was about 9 mW/kg per watt input, which should present no systemic hazard. At 3 W input, human 13C spectra were decoupled to a depth of about 5 cm while some Overhauser enhancement was sustained up to about 3 cm depth, without ill effect. The observation of glycogen in localized natural abundance 13C spectra of heart and muscle suggests that metabolites in the citric acid cycle should be observable noninvasively using 13C-labeled substrates.

  3. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network

    PubMed Central

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M.; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions. PMID:25278868

  4. Segmentation of endpoint trajectories does not imply segmented control.

    PubMed

    Sternad, D; Schaal, S

    1999-01-01

    While it is generally assumed that complex movements consist of a sequence of simpler units, the quest to define these units of action, or movement primitives, remains an open question. In this context, two hypotheses of movement segmentation of endpoint trajectories in three-dimensional human drawing movements are reexamined: (1) the stroke-based segmentation hypothesis based on the results that the proportionality coefficient of the two-thirds power law changes discontinuously with each new "stroke," and (2) the segmentation hypothesis inferred from the observation of piecewise planar endpoint trajectories of three-dimensional drawing movements. In two experiments human subjects performed a set of elliptical and figure eight patterns of different sizes and orientations using their whole arm in three dimensions. The kinematic characteristics of the endpoint trajectories and the seven joint angles of the arm were analyzed. While the endpoint trajectories produced similar segmentation features to those reported in the literature, analyses of the joint angles show no obvious segmentation but rather continuous oscillatory patterns. By approximating the joint angle data of human subjects with sinusoidal trajectories, and by implementing this model on a 7-degree-of-freedom (DOF) anthropomorphic robot arm, it is shown that such a continuous movement strategy can produce exactly the same features as observed by the above segmentation hypotheses. The origin of this apparent segmentation of endpoint trajectories is traced back to the nonlinear transformations of the forward kinematics of human arms. The presented results demonstrate that principles of discrete movement generation may not be reconciled with those of rhythmic movement as easily as has been previously suggested, while the generalization of nonlinear pattern generators to arm movements can offer an interesting alternative to approach the question of units of action. PMID:9928796

  5. Basic study on the influence of inhibition induced by the magnetic stimulation on the peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the inhibition mechanism of magnetic stimulation on motor function. A magnetic stimulator with a flat figure-eight coil was used to stimulate the peripheral nerve of the antebrachium. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 0.8 T, and the stimulation frequency was 1 Hz. The amplitudes of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and first dorsal interosseous muscle were used to evaluate the effects of magnetic stimulation. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the MEP amplitude before and after magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex. The results showed that MEP amplitude after magnetic stimulation compared with before magnetic stimulation decreased. Because there were individual differences in MEP amplitude induced by magnetic stimulation, the MEP amplitude after stimulation was normalized by the amplitude of each participant before stimulation. The MEP amplitude after stimulation decreased by approximately 58% (p < 0.01) on average compared with before stimulation. Previous studies suggested that magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex induced an increase or a decrease in MEP amplitude. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that the alteration in MEP amplitude was induced by cortical excitability based on magnetic stimulation. The results of this study showed that MEP amplitude decreased following magnetic stimulation to the peripheral nerve. We suggest that the decrease in MEP amplitude found in this study was obtained via the feedback from a peripheral nerve through an afferent nerve to the brain. This study suggests that peripheral excitement by magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerve may control the central nervous system via afferent feedback.

  6. Integrating research on ecohydrology and land use change with land use management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Brad; Byers, Ralph E.; Lister, Nina-Marie

    1998-10-01

    One objective of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme is to provide a scientific basis for sustainable development policies. Land use change and ecohydrology are important components of this scientific basis, but predicting change is difficult because of the scale and complexity of the interactions between non-linear ecohydrological and socio-economic processes at different spatial and temporal scales. A systems framework, the Ecosystem Approach, has been developed to conceptualize these interactions for the purpose of providing information for sustainable development policy. The Ecosystem Approach combines the dynamics of the Holling figure-eight model - a conceptual model of dynamics that stresses discontinuous change and destruction as an internal property of the system - and the properties of self-organizing systems with the socio political aspects of decision making.The Ecosystem Approach highlights the problems of managing change in complex systems when that change may involve unpredictable shifts to a different attractor. Although there are methods available to detect the occurrence of such shifts, both detection and modelling are complicated by the presence of semi-stable attractors. When a model or an ecosystem is on a semi-stable attractor, it may appear to remain stable for an extended period prior to changing as a consequence of inherent instabilities. When the shift to a new attractor occurs, it is quite sudden and unpredictable. A technical discussion on prediction under conditions of semi-stability and chaos is included because it enhances our understanding of the role of surprise in ecosystems, as well as the utility of simulation models.The principles of the Ecosystem Approach are derived from the theoretical discussion and an example of a land use policy in the Huron Natural Area in south-western Ontario. These principles provide a clear role for scientific research, and particularly simulation modelling, within the larger context of policy and land use management.

  7. Movement strategies for maintaining standing balance during arm tracking in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Matthew C.; Hyngstrom, Allison S.; Ng, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify hip and ankle movement strategies during a standing arm tracking task in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Full-body kinematics and kinetics were assessed with motion analysis cameras and force plates in nine MS and nine age-matched control subjects. While standing, participants used their dominant hand to track a target moving around a large horizontal or vertical figure eight on a screen in front of them. The target moved at constant speed, or linearly increasing speeds, with a frequency between 0.05 Hz and 0.35 Hz. Hip and ankle moments and angles during tracking were calculated from kinematic and kinetic measurements. Ratios of peak-to-peak (PP) hip/ankle moments (kinetics) and angles (kinematics) were calculated to determine the strategies of the hips and ankles used to maintain balance during arm movements. Center of mass (CoM) root mean square (RMS) acceleration was calculated as a measure of overall balance performance. The MS group produced larger PP hip/ankle moments at all speeds compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The CoM RMS acceleration increased with tracking speed for both groups but was not significantly different between groups. Additionally, the ratios of hip to ankle moments were highly correlated with the Berg Balance Scale during horizontal steady-speed tracking in MS. These results suggest that people with MS increase the use of the hip during standing arm tracking compared with age-matched control subjects. This adapted strategy might allow people with MS to achieve balance performance similar to control subjects, possibly increasing the importance of the hip in maintaining balance during voluntary movements. PMID:24966303

  8. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  9. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions. PMID:25278868

  10. Solar powered multipurpose remotely powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Environmental problems such as the depletion of the ozone layer and air pollution demand a change in traditional means of propulsion that is sensitive to the ecology. Solar-powered propulsion is a favorable alternative that is both ecologically harmless as well as cost effective. Integration of solar energy into designs ranging from futuristic vehicles to heating is, therefore, beneficial to society. The design and construction of a Multipurpose Remotely Piloted Vehicle (MPRPV) seeks to verify the feasibility of using solar propulsion as a primary fuel source. This task has been a year-long effort by a group of eight students, divided into four teams, each dealing with different aspects of the design. The aircraft was designed to take off, climb to the design altitude, fly in a sustained figure-eight flight path, and cruise for approximately one hour. This mission requires flight at Reynolds numbers between 150,000 and 200,000 and demands special considerations in the aerodynamic design to achieve flight in this regime. Optimal performance requires a lightweight configuration with both structural integrity and maximum power availability. The structural design and choice of solar cells for the propulsion were governed by weight, efficiency, and cost considerations. The final design is an MPRPV weighing 35 N that cruises at 7 m/s at the design altitude of 50 m. The configuration includes a wing composed of balsa and foam NACA 6409 airfoil sections and carbon fiber spars, a tail of similar construction, and a truss structure fuselage. The propulsion system consists of 98 12.5 percent-efficient solar cells donated by Mobil Solar, a NiCad battery for energy storage, and a folding propeller regulated by a lightweight and efficient control system. The airfoils and propeller chosen for the design were researched and tested during the design process.

  11. NASA advanced aeronautics design solar powered remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elario, David S.; Guillmette, Neal H.; Lind, Gregory S.; Webster, Jonathan D.; Ferreira, Michael J.; Konstantakis, George C.; Marshall, David L.; Windt, Cari L.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental problems such as the depletion of the ozone layer and air pollution demand a change in traditional means of propulsion that is sensitive to the ecology. Solar powered propulsion is a favorable alternative that is both ecologically harmless as well as cost effective. Integration of solar energy into designs ranging from futuristic vehicles to heating is beneficial to society. The design and construction of a Multi-Purpose Remotely Piloted Vehicle (MPRPV) seeks to verify the feasibility of utilizing solar propulsion as a primary fuel source. This task has been a year long effort by a group of ten students, divided into five teams, each dealing with different aspects of the design. The aircraft was designed to take-off, climb to the design altitude, fly in a sustained figure-eight flight path, and cruise for approximately one hour. This mission requires flight at Reynolds numbers between 150,000 and 200,000 and demands special considerations in the aerodynamic design in order to achieve flight in this regime. Optimal performance requires a light weight configuration with both structural integrity and maximum power availability. The structure design and choice of solar cells for the propulsion was governed by the weight, efficiency, and cost considerations. The final design is a MPRPV weighting 35 N which cruises 7 m/s at the design altitude of 50 m. The configuration includes a wing composed of balsa and foam NACA 6409 airfoil sections and carbon fiber spars, a tail of similar construction, and a truss structure fuselage. The propulsion system consists of 98 10 percent efficient solar cells donated by Mobil Solar, a NiCad battery for energy storage, and a folding propeller regulated by a lightweight and efficient control system. The airfoils and propeller chosen for the design were research and tested during the design process.

  12. Streamline topologies for integrable vortex motion on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Rangachari; Newton, Paul K.

    2000-06-01

    We describe the instantaneous streamline patterns that occur on the surface of a two-dimensional sphere in the presence of point vortices of general strength for cases in which the system is completely integrable. After stating some general results based on the spherical topology, we categorize all possible instantaneous streamline patterns and describe their stagnation point structure for the cases of two and three vortices. It is found that for the case of two vortices, the only non-degenerate topologies that can arise are a figure eight (lemniscate) or a limacon, which are homotopically equivalent. For the case of three vortices, there are 12 topologically distinct primitives, from which an additional 23 patterns can be produced via continuous deformations on the sphere (homotopies). All possible streamline patterns that arise from three vortex motion can be obtained via linear superposition of the primitive topologies and their homotopic equivalents. In this sense, the primitives can be viewed as the ‘building blocks’ for the general flow patterns. The equations of motion and streamline patterns in the stereographic plane are obtained using the projected equations of motion in Hamiltonian form. We describe streamline patterns for three vortex fixed equilibria and relative equilibria as seen in both a fixed and a rotating frame of reference. Non-equilibrium streamline patterns for a collapsing and special periodic solution are studied, although to generally understand and classify the many bifurcations associated with non-equilibrium patterns would require more extensive computation. We conclude with a discussion of the relevance of the three vortex topological classification scheme and the bifurcation of streamline topologies for understanding global atmospheric weather patterns (spherical isobars) and large scale mixing phenomena.

  13. Motor cortical activity during drawing movements: population representation during lemniscate tracing.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, A B; Moran, D W

    1999-11-01

    Activity was recorded extracellularly from single cells in motor and premotor cortex as monkeys traced figure-eights on a touch-sensitive computer monitor using the index finger. Each unit was recorded individually, and the responses collected from four hemispheres (3 primary motor and 1 dorsal premotor) were analyzed as a population. Population vectors constructed from this activity accurately and isomorphically represented the shape of the drawn figures showing that they represent the spatial aspect of the task well. These observations were extended by examining the temporal relation between this neural representation and finger displacement. Movements generated during this task were made in four kinematic segments. This segmentation was clearly evident in a time series of population vectors. In addition, the (2)/(3) power law described for human drawing was also evident in the neural correlate of the monkey hand trajectory. Movement direction and speed changed continuously during the task. Within each segment, speed and direction changed reciprocally. The prediction interval between the population vector and movement direction increased in the middle of the segments where curvature was high, but decreased in straight portions at the beginning and end of each segment. In contrast to direction, prediction intervals between the movement speed and population vector length were near-constant with only a modest modulation in each segment. Population vectors predicted direction (vector angle) and speed (vector length) throughout the drawing task. Joint angular velocity and arm muscle EMG were well correlated to hand direction, suggesting that kinematic and kinetic parameters are correlated in these tasks. PMID:10561439

  14. Architecture Design and Experimental Platform Demonstration of Optical Network based on OpenFlow Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangyuan; Wang, Honghuan; Yin, Hongxi; Li, Ming; Luo, Shenzi; Wu, Chenguang

    2016-02-01

    With the extensive application of cloud computing and data centres, as well as the constantly emerging services, the big data with the burst characteristic has brought huge challenges to optical networks. Consequently, the software defined optical network (SDON) that combines optical networks with software defined network (SDN), has attracted much attention. In this paper, an OpenFlow-enabled optical node employed in optical cross-connect (OXC) and reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM), is proposed. An open source OpenFlow controller is extended on routing strategies. In addition, the experiment platform based on OpenFlow protocol for software defined optical network, is designed. The feasibility and availability of the OpenFlow-enabled optical nodes and the extended OpenFlow controller are validated by the connectivity test, protection switching and load balancing experiments in this test platform.

  15. Peptide immunomodulators versus infection; an analysis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ranjna C

    2002-10-01

    A disease gets manifested only when the host immune system is not strong enough to fight off the infective agents. A number of small peptides both from natural and synthetic origin are found to be capable of modulating the immune response. While immune adjuvants are known to strengthen the immune response and help the host not to give way to the pathogens thereby preventing their establishment, the immunosuppressors are found useful in autoimmune conditions as well as in facilitating the organ transplants. Recent understanding of immune network, however, reveals its cross connectivity with the endocrine and central nervous systems as well. Thus, the inhibition and control of disease by planned restoration of homeostatis in these systems through immunomodulation is also possible. PMID:12095705

  16. Optical Switch Fabrics (OSFs) and Thier Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Kyriakos; Raptis, Lambros; Teixeira, Antonio; Beleffi, Giorgio Maria Tosi; Yiannopoulos, Kostas

    The structure of this chapter is the following: First we present some key performance indicators of optical switch components, which allows us to understand and compare the different optical switch technologies that are presented in the next chapter. Then, different applications of optical switches are described focusing on the two main network elements that are used in optical networks, namely optical cross connects (OXC) and optical add/drop multiplexers (OADM). Special attention is also given to the protection switching, an attribute that is the most important factor for the provided quality of service. Based on the provided material the reader should be able to understand simple and well as complex optical network topologies based on OXC and OADM nodes.

  17. 3DScapeCS: application of three dimensional, parallel, dynamic network visualization in Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The exponential growth of gigantic biological data from various sources, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI), genome sequences scaffolding, Mass spectrometry (MS) molecular networking and metabolic flux, demands an efficient way for better visualization and interpretation beyond the conventional, two-dimensional visualization tools. Results We developed a 3D Cytoscape Client/Server (3DScapeCS) plugin, which adopted Cytoscape in interpreting different types of data, and UbiGraph for three-dimensional visualization. The extra dimension is useful in accommodating, visualizing, and distinguishing large-scale networks with multiple crossed connections in five case studies. Conclusions Evaluation on several experimental data using 3DScapeCS and its special features, including multilevel graph layout, time-course data animation, and parallel visualization has proven its usefulness in visualizing complex data and help to make insightful conclusions. PMID:24225050

  18. Mechanisms for achieving steerability at an optical switching node: architectures and cost models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, S. Richard; Anis, Hanan; Mouftah, Hussein T.

    2006-12-01

    We present what we consider to be three novel switching mechanisms for achieving steerability at optical cross-connect (OXC) sites. By achieving steerability, the traffic that needs to be added or dropped at a node can be routed to any of the available transponders, thus improving the utilization of deployed transponders. We present nodal architectures that maximize system performance and deployment flexibility while minimizing cost of subsystems and components (such as wavelength selective switches (WSSs), amplifiers, etc.), which make up these nodes. A comparative analysis of the cost of these architectures as a function of individual component costs and varying wavelength fill is also provided. We also analyze the port dimensioning of such steerable architectures and calculate the optimal port allocation based on the cost and loss compensation.

  19. Electrothermally actuated tip-tilt-piston micromirror with integrated varifocal capability.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica; Imboden, Matthias; Little, Thomas D C; Bishop, D J

    2015-04-01

    MEMS micromirrors have proven to be very important optical devices with applications ranging from steerable mirrors for switches and cross-connects to spatial light modulators for correcting optical distortions. Usually beam steering and focusing are done with different MEMS devices and tilt angles in excess of 10 degrees are seldom obtained. Here we describe a single MEMS device that combines tip/tilt, piston mode and varifocal capability into a single, low cost device with very large tilt angles. Our device consists of a 400 micron diameter mirror driven with thermal bimorphs. We have demonstrated deflection angles of ± 40 degrees along both axes, a tunable focal length which varies between -0.48 mm to + 20.5 mm and a piston mode range of 300 microns - four separately controllable degrees of freedom in a single device. Potential applications range from smart lighting to optical switches and devices for telecom systems. PMID:25968784

  20. A novel optical path routing network that combines coarse granularity optical multicast with fine granularity add/drop and block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Mauro M.; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel optical path routing mechanism that combines coarse-granularity optical multicast with fine-granularity add/drop and block. We implement the proposal in an optical cross-connect node with broadcast-and-select functionality that offers high cost-effectiveness since no addition equipment from conventional ROADMs is needed. The proposed method, called branching, enhances the routing capabilities over the original grouped routing networks by enabling wavelength paths to be established through different GRE pipes. We also present a novel path/GRE routing and wavelength/GRE index assignment algorithm that supports the new routing function. Numerical experiments using real network topologies verify the improved routing performance and the superior efficiency of the proposed control algorithm over original GRE-based networks.

  1. Global seamless network demonstrator: carrier grade automatic switched transport network implementation in realistic telecom field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foisel, Hans-Martin; Hanik, Norbert; Braun, Ralf-Peter; Lehr, Georg; Gladisch, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The Global Seamless Network (GSN) Demonstrator is presented, a joint effort of system vendors and Deutsche Telekom Group R&D to demonstrate network functions and management integration and enable, for the first time, experiences with a carrier grade Automatically Switched Transport Network (ASTN) implementation and the envisaged main ASTN clients, IP and Ethernet. For end-to-end monitoring capability, integrating the view on the ASTN and Ethernet-MAN configuration, an UMS (Upper Monitoring System) is being developed. Furthermore broadband application were implemented to visualise the network functions. The ASTN backbone consists of four cross connects and an ULH-WDM system with 3x 10Gbit/s channels (OCh) between Berlin and Darmstadt, whereby each OCh is treated as a virtual fibre.

  2. A channel for 3D environmental shape in anterior inferotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Siavash; Carlson, Eric T.; Wang, Zhihong; Connor, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Inferotemporal cortex (IT) has long been studied as a single pathway dedicated to object vision, but connectivity analysis reveals anatomically distinct channels, through ventral superior temporal sulcus (STSv) and dorsal/ventral inferotemporal gyrus (TEd, TEv). Here, we report a major functional distinction between channels. We studied individual IT neurons in monkeys viewing stereoscopic 3D images projected on a large screen. We used adaptive stimuli to explore neural tuning for 3D abstract shapes ranging in scale and topology from small, closed, bounded objects to large, open, unbounded environments (landscape-like surfaces and cave-like interiors). In STSv, most neurons were more responsive to objects, as expected. In TEd, surprisingly, most neurons were more responsive to 3D environmental shape. Previous studies have localized environmental information to posterior cortical modules. Our results show it is also channeled through anterior IT, where extensive cross-connections between STSv and TEd could integrate object and environmental shape information. PMID:25242216

  3. Fbis report. Science and technology: China, October 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-18

    ;Partial Contents: Nanomaterials Fabrication, Applications Research Advances Noted; CAST Announces World`s First Space-Grown Large-Diameter GaAs Monocrystal; Assay of Antiviral Activity of Antisense Phosphorothioate Oligodeoxynucleotide Against Dengue Virus; Expression and Antigenicity of Chimeric Proteins of Cholera Toxin B Subunit With Hepatitis C Virus; CNCOFIEC Signs Agreement With IBM for New Intelligent Building; Latest Reports on Optical Computing, Memory; BIDC To Introduce S3 Company`s Multimedia Accelerator Chipset; Virtual Private PCN Ring Network Based on ATM VP Cross-Connection; Beijing Gets Nation`s First Frame Relay Network; Situation of Power Industry Development and International Cooperation; Diagrams of China`s Nuclear Waste Containment Vessels; Chinese-Developed Containment Vessel Material Reaches World Standards; Second Fuel Elements for Qinshan Plant Passes Inspection; and Geothermal Deep-Well Electric Pump Technology Developed.

  4. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be used in conjunction with other site datasets (e.g. gradients) to estimate profiles of formation hydraulic properties including transmissivity.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2000-12-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period.

  6. Adaptive Morphological Feature-Based Object Classifier for a Color Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing a Compact Color Microscope Imaging System (CCMIS), a unique algorithm has been developed that combines human intelligence along with machine vision techniques to produce an autonomous microscope tool for biomedical, industrial, and space applications. This technique is based on an adaptive, morphological, feature-based mapping function comprising 24 mutually inclusive feature metrics that are used to determine the metrics for complex cell/objects derived from color image analysis. Some of the features include: Area (total numbers of non-background pixels inside and including the perimeter), Bounding Box (smallest rectangle that bounds and object), centerX (x-coordinate of intensity-weighted, center-of-mass of an entire object or multi-object blob), centerY (y-coordinate of intensity-weighted, center-of-mass, of an entire object or multi-object blob), Circumference (a measure of circumference that takes into account whether neighboring pixels are diagonal, which is a longer distance than horizontally or vertically joined pixels), . Elongation (measure of particle elongation given as a number between 0 and 1. If equal to 1, the particle bounding box is square. As the elongation decreases from 1, the particle becomes more elongated), . Ext_vector (extremal vector), . Major Axis (the length of a major axis of a smallest ellipse encompassing an object), . Minor Axis (the length of a minor axis of a smallest ellipse encompassing an object), . Partial (indicates if the particle extends beyond the field of view), . Perimeter Points (points that make up a particle perimeter), . Roundness [(4(pi) x area)/perimeter(squared)) the result is a measure of object roundness, or compactness, given as a value between 0 and 1. The greater the ratio, the rounder the object.], . Thin in center (determines if an object becomes thin in the center, (figure-eight-shaped), . Theta (orientation of the major axis), . Smoothness and color metrics for each component (red, green, blue) the minimum, maximum, average, and standard deviation within the particle are tracked. These metrics can be used for autonomous analysis of color images from a microscope, video camera, or digital, still image. It can also automatically identify tumor morphology of stained images and has been used to detect stained cell phenomena (see figure).

  7. Modulation of amplitude and latency of motor evoked potential by direction of transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Itoh, Yuji; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of monophasic magnetic stimulation to the motor cortex. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The amplitude and latency of MEPs on the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were used to evaluate the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation. A figure eight-shaped flat coil was used to stimulate the region over the primary motor cortex. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 120% of the resting motor threshold, and the frequency of magnetic stimulation was 0.1 Hz. In addition, the direction of the current in the brain was posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP). The latency of MEP was compared with PA and AP on initial magnetic stimulation. The results demonstrated that a stimulus in the AP direction increased the latency of the MEP by approximately 2.5 ms. MEP amplitude was also compared with PA and AP during 60 magnetic stimulations. The results showed that a stimulus in the PA direction gradually increased the amplitude of the MEP. However, a stimulus in the AP direction did not modulate the MEP amplitude. The average MEP amplitude induced from every 10 magnetic pulses was normalized by the average amplitude of the first 10 stimuli. These results demonstrated that the normalized MEP amplitude increased up to approximately 150%. In terms of pyramidal neuron indirect waves (I waves), magnetic stimulation inducing current flowing backward to the anterior preferentially elicited an I1 wave, and current flowing forward to the posterior elicited an I3 wave. It has been reported that the latency of the I3 wave is approximately 2.5 ms longer than the I1 wave elicitation, so the resulting difference in latency may be caused by this phenomenon. It has also been reported that there is no alteration of MEP amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. However, this study suggested that the modulation of MEP amplitude depends on stimulation strength and stimulation direction.

  8. Evaluation of steel shafts for magnetostrictive torque sensors (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, F.; Yoshida, K.; Sasada, I.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the magnetostrictive effect in steel, a robust, noncontacting shaft torque sensor can be obtained. A fundamental problem is compatibility between mechanical strength required for a shaft and a magnetic one needed for a torque sensor. To find shaft material accommodating these two requirements, we investigated basic characteristics, such as hysteresis, linearity, and zero-level fluctuation associated with shaft rotation, of the magnetostrictive torque sensor for various nickel chromium molybdenum steel shafts (SNCM in Japanese Industrial Standard) subjected to case hardening. We prepared three kinds of shafts of 25 mm in diameter: SNCM 420 (Ni=1.69{percent}, C=0.2{percent}), SNCM 616 (Ni=2.91{percent}, C=0.15{percent}), and SNCM 447 (Ni=1.67{percent}, C=0.49{percent}). Shafts of the first two materials were carburized, whereas those of the last one were quenched. We used a magnetic head-type torque sensor consisting of a pair of cross-coupled figure-eight coils (14 turn). The hysteresis in the input{endash}output relationship was measured for the excitation current from 0.1 to 1.0 A at 60 kHz. The hysteresis of the SNCM 420 shaft changes from negative to positive with the increase in excitation current and that of the SNCM 616 shaft decreases monotonically but never reaches zero, whereas that of the SNCM 447 shaft exhibits minimum. The smallest values obtained are nearly zero for the SNCM 420 shaft at 0.3 A, 1.5{percent}/(full scale (FS)=400 Nm) for the SNCM 616 shaft at 1.0 A and 0.7{percent}/FS for the SNCM 447 shaft at 0.8 A, respectively. The linearity measured for the SNCM 420 shaft, which has the smallest hysteresis of the three, at 0.3 A and 60 kHz was virtually straight for the applied torque range {minus}400{endash}400 Nm and 0.8{percent} of nonlinearity error for the range {minus}1000{endash}1000 Nm. The zero-level fluctuation was measured for the SNCM 420 shaft by rotating the shaft without applying torque. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Femoral fracture repair and postoperative management in new zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Jon D; Ovadia, Shira; Howell, Paula; Jaskwich, David H

    2002-07-01

    Low bone density and large muscle mass predispose rabbits to femoral fractures. However, there are few reports describing treatment and prognosis. Two New Zealand White rabbits presented with unilateral left rear limb abduction and lateral rotation of the distal left rear limb 2 and 17 days after experimental surgery to create a "stair step" in the patellar groove of the left medial femoral chondyle. This procedure was performed after approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Radiography revealed a spiral oblique mid-shaft fracture of the left femur in both rabbits. Open fracture reduction was undertaken. Because of the presence of screws and Kirschner-wires in the medial femoral condyle, a lateral approach to surgical correction was chosen. Intramedullary fixation was used to reduce and stabilize the fractures. A 0.062" Kirschner wire was selected for the intramedullary device, because it was sufficiently flexible to allow easy passage into the femoral canal while being sufficiently stiff to promote reduction of the fracture. In addition, the ends of the fracture were secured with a 0.032" Kirschner cerclage wire to provide additional control of rotation and angulation. Then we assessed the range of motion of the knee joint to determine fracture stability and ensure that the hardware did not impinge on soft-tissue elements. After closure and application of sterile dressing, the hind legs were hobbled proximal to the hock by using elastic veterinary wrap in a figure-eight pattern to maintain limb alignment and prevent formation of pressure ulcers. Intraoperative fluoroscopic evaluation and postoperative radiographs confirmed fracture reduction. Bruising and seroma formation occurred at the surgical site, and transient anorexia developed. Rabbits were treated with fluids, analgesics, antibiotics, and fitted with Elizabethan collars. They were housed in isolation to limit excessive environmental stimulation, which could alarm them and provoke "thumping" of the rear legs. Muscular weakness and atrophy developed in the affected legs, but the fractures remained immobilized. Radiographs obtained 21 days after surgery confirmed marked callus formation and integrity of the implanted hardware. Four weeks after surgical fixation, both rabbits showed increased muscle development in the repaired leg and were ambulating normally. The long-term prognosis was excellent. These cases demonstrate that repair of femoral fractures in rabbits can be achieved by using basic orthopedic techniques and diligent post-operative management. PMID:12109898

  10. Integrable point vortex motion on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Rangachari

    This dissertation is concerned with integrable point vortex motion on a sphere. First, we solve the equations governing the relative motion of three point vortices of arbitrary strength moving on the surface of a sphere of radius R. The system is more general than the corresponding one in the plane and reduces to it in the limit R ? infinity, as long as the three vortices remain sufficiently close to each other during the course of their motion. We then fully characterize all fixed and relative equilibria and more general relative motions on the sphere. We then describe self-similar vortex collapse on the sphere, stating necessary and sufficient conditions for collapse to occur, computing the collapse times and vortex trajectories on the route towards collapse. Collapse trajectories occur in pairs, called 'partner states', which have two distinct collapse times tau -- < tau+. In the plane, there is only one collapse time associated with a given configuration---the partner state is one that expands self-similarly. The instantaneous streamline patterns that can occur are then considered. After stating some general results based on the spherical topology, we categorize all possible instantaneous streamline patterns and describe their stagnation point structure for the cases of two and three vortices. For the case of two vortices, the only non-degenerate patterns that can arise are a figure eight (lemniscate) or a limacon, which are homotopically equivalent. For the case of three vortices, there: are 12 topologically distinct primitives, from which an additional 23 patterns can be produced via continuous deformations on the sphere (homotopies). All possible streamline patterns that arise from three vortex motion can be obtained via linear superposition of the primitives and their homotopic equivalents. In this sense, the primitives can be viewed as the 'building blocks' for the general instantaneous flow topology. We describe streamline patterns for three vortex fixed equilibria and relative equilibria as seen in both a fixed and a rotating frame of reference. Finally, we examine vortex motion on the sphere with solid boundaries. For highly symmetric domains, we show that known solutions in the plane, obtained by the method of images, can be used to generate solutions on the sphere by stereographic projection. We explicitly compute the particle and vortex motion for several domains on the sphere, including a spherical cap, a longitudinal wedge, channel and rectangle.

  11. Enhanced detection of hydraulically active fractures by temperature profiling in lined heated bedrock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehme, P. E.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Molson, J. W.; Greenhouse, J. P.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryThe effectiveness of borehole profiling using a temperature probe for identifying hydraulically active fractures in rock has improved due to the combination of two advances: improved temperature sensors, with resolution on the order of 0.001 °C, and temperature profiling within water inflated flexible impermeable liners used to temporarily seal boreholes from hydraulic cross-connection. The open-hole cross-connection effects dissipate after inflation, so that both the groundwater flow regime and the temperature distribution return to the ambient (background) condition. This paper introduces a third advancement: the use of an electrical heating cable that quickly increases the temperature of the entire static water column within the lined hole and thus places the entire borehole and its immediate vicinity into thermal disequilibrium with the broader rock mass. After heating for 4-6 h, profiling is conducted several times over a 24 h period as the temperature returns to background conditions. This procedure, referred to as the Active Line Source (ALS) method, offers two key improvements over prior methods. First, there is no depth limit for detection of fractures with flow. Second, both identification and qualitative comparison of evidence for ambient groundwater flow in fractures is improved throughout the entire test interval. The benefits of the ALS method are demonstrated by comparing results from two boreholes tested to depths of 90 and 120 m in a dolostone aquifer used for municipal water supply and in which most groundwater flow occurs in fractures. Temperature logging in the lined holes shows many fractures in the heterothermic zone both with and without heating, but only the ALS method shows many hydraulically active fractures in the deeper homothermic portion of the hole. The identification of discrete groundwater flow at many depths is supported by additional evidence concerning fracture occurrence, including continuous core visual inspection, acoustic televiewer logs, and tests for hydraulic conductivity using straddle packers as well as rock core VOC data, where available, that show deep penetration and many migration pathways. Confidence in the use of temperature profiles and the conceptual model is provided by numerical simulation and the demonstrated reproducibility of the evolution of the temperature signal measured in the lined holes with and without heating. This approach for using temperature profiling in lined holes with heating is a practical advance in fractured rock hydrogeology because the liners are readily available, the equipment needed for heating is low cost and rugged, and the time needed to obtain the profiles is not excessive for most projects.

  12. An Experiment of GMPLS-Based Dispersion Compensation Control over In-Field Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Shoichiro; Horiuchi, Eiichi; Yoshida, Sota; Sugihara, Takashi; Onohara, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Misato; Baba, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kazuo; Mizuochi, Takashi

    As ROADMs (Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexers) are becoming widely used in metro/core networks, distributed control of wavelength paths by extended GMPLS (Generalized MultiProtocol Label Switching) protocols has attracted much attention. For the automatic establishment of an arbitrary wavelength path satisfying dynamic traffic demands over a ROADM or WXC (Wavelength Cross Connect)-based network, precise determination of chromatic dispersion over the path and optimized assignment of dispersion compensation capabilities at related nodes are essential. This paper reports an experiment over in-field fibers where GMPLS-based control was applied for the automatic discovery of chromatic dispersion, path computation, and wavelength path establishment with dynamic adjustment of variable dispersion compensation. The GMPLS-based control scheme, which the authors called GMPLS-Plus, extended GMPLS's distributed control architecture with attributes for automatic discovery, advertisement, and signaling of chromatic dispersion. In this experiment, wavelength paths with distances of 24km and 360km were successfully established and error-free data transmission was verified. The experiment also confirmed path restoration with dynamic compensation adjustment upon fiber failure.

  13. Variation of microorganism concentrations in urban stormwater runoff with land use and seasons.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Ariamalar; Borst, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Stormwater runoff samples were collected from outfalls draining small municipal separate storm sewer systems. The samples were collected from three different land use areas based on local designation (high-density residential, low-density residential and landscaped commercial). The concentrations of microorganisms in the stormwater runoff were found to be similar in magnitude to, but less variable than, those reported in the stormwater National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) database. Microorganism concentrations from high-density residential areas were higher than those associated with low-density residential and landscaped commercial areas. Since the outfalls were free of sanitary wastewater cross-connections, the major sources of microorganisms to the stormwater runoff were most likely from the feces of domestic animals and wildlife. Concentrations of microorganisms were significantly affected by the season during which the samples were collected. The lowest concentrations were observed during winter except for Staphylococcus aureus. The Pearson correlation coefficients among different indicators showed weak linear relationships and the relationships were statistically significant. However, the relationships between indicators and pathogens were poorly correlated and were not statistically significant, suggesting the use of indicators as evidence of the presence of pathogens is not appropriate. Further, the correlation between the concentration of the traditionally monitored indicators (total coliforms and fecal coliforms) and the suggested substitutes (enterococci and E. coli) is weak, but statistically significant, suggesting that historical time series will be only a qualitative indicator of impaired waters under the revised criteria for recreational water quality by the US EPA. PMID:16604843

  14. “Stop Ne(c)king around”: How interactomics contributes to functionally characterize Nek family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Perez, Arina Marina; de Souza, Edmárcia Elisa; Basei, Fernanda Luisa; Papa, Priscila Ferreira; Melo Hanchuk, Talita Diniz; Cardoso, Vanessa Bomfim; Kobarg, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Aside from Polo and Aurora, a third but less studied kinase family involved in mitosis regulation is the never in mitosis-gene A (NIMA)-related kinases (Neks). The founding member of this family is the sole member NIMA of Aspergillus nidulans, which is crucial for the initiation of mitosis in that organism. All 11 human Neks have been functionally assigned to one of the three core functions established for this family in mammals: (1) centrioles/mitosis; (2) primary ciliary function/ciliopathies; and (3) DNA damage response (DDR). Recent findings, especially on Nek 1 and 8, showed however, that several Neks participate in parallel in at least two of these contexts: primary ciliary function and DDR. In the core section of this in-depth review, we report the current detailed functional knowledge on each of the 11 Neks. In the discussion, we return to the cross-connections among Neks and point out how our and other groups’ functional and interactomics studies revealed that most Neks interact with protein partners associated with two if not all three of the functional contexts. We then raise the hypothesis that Neks may be the connecting regulatory elements that allow the cell to fine tune and synchronize the cellular events associated with these three core functions. The new and exciting findings on the Nek family open new perspectives and should allow the Neks to finally claim the attention they deserve in the field of kinases and cell cycle biology. PMID:24921005

  15. Real-time determination of the efficacy of residual disinfection to limit wastewater contamination in a water distribution system using filtration-based luminescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoung; Deininger, Rolf A

    2010-05-01

    Water distribution systems can be vulnerable to microbial contamination through cross-connections, wastewater backflow, the intrusion of soiled water after a loss of pressure resulting from an electricity blackout, natural disaster, or intentional contamination of the system in a bioterrrorism event. The most urgent matter a water treatment utility would face in this situation is detecting the presence and extent of a contamination event in real-time, so that immediate action can be taken to mitigate the problem. The current approved microbiological detection methods are culture-based plate count methods, which require incubation time (1 to 7 days). This long period of time would not be useful for the protection of public health. This study was designed to simulate wastewater intrusion in a water distribution system. The objectives were 2-fold: (1) real-time detection of water contamination, and (2) investigation of the sustainability of drinking water systems to suppress the contamination with secondary disinfectant residuals (chlorine and chloramine). The events of drinking water contamination resulting from a wastewater addition were determined by filtration-based luminescence assay. The water contamination was detected by luminescence method within 5 minutes. The signal amplification attributed to wastewater contamination was clear-102-fold signal increase. After 1 hour, chlorinated water could inactivate 98.8% of the bacterial contaminant, while chloraminated water reduced 77.2%. PMID:20480769

  16. Optical switch based on thermocapillarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Tomomi; Makihara, Mitsuhiro; Togo, Hiroyoshi; Shimokawa, Fusao; Kaneko, Kazumasa

    2001-11-01

    Space-division optical switches are essential for the protection, optical cross-connects (OXCs), and optical add/drop multiplexers (OADMs) needed in future fiber-optic communication networks. For applications in these areas, we proposed a thermocapillarity switch called oil-latching interfacial-tension variation effect (OLIVE) switch. An OLIVE switch is a micro-mechanical optical switch fabricated on planar lightwave circuits (PLC) using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. It consists of a crossing waveguide that has a groove at each crossing point and a pair of microheaters. The groove is partially filled with the refractive-index-matching liquid, and optical signals are switched according to the liquid's position in the groove, i.e., whether it is passing straight through the groove or reflecting at the sidewall of the groove. The liquid is driven by thermocapillarity and latched by capillarity. Using the total internal reflection to switch the optical path, the OLIVE switch exhibits excellent optical characteristics, such as high transparency (insertion loss: < 2 dB), high extinction ratio (> 50 dB), and low crosstalk (< -50 dB). Moreover, since this switch has a simple structure and bi-stability, it has wide variety of applications in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks.

  17. Death and Transfiguration in Static Staphylococcus epidermidis Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Schaudinn, Christoph; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Gorur, Amita; Remis, Jonathan; Wu, Siva; Auer, Manfred; Hertwig, Stefan; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Hu, Fen Ze; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, John William; Robinson, Douglas H.; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of bacteria live in slime embedded microbial communities termed biofilms, which are typically adherent to a surface. However, when several Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were cultivated in static liquid cultures, macroscopic aggregates were seen floating within the broth and also sedimented at the test tube bottom. Light- and electron microscopy revealed that early-stage aggregates consisted of bacteria and extracellular matrix, organized in sheet-like structures. Perpendicular under the sheets hung a network of periodically arranged, bacteria-associated strands. During the extended cultivation, the strands of a subpopulation of aggregates developed into cross-connected wall-like structures, in which aligned bacteria formed the walls. The resulting architecture had a compartmentalized appearance. In late-stage cultures, the wall-associated bacteria disintegrated so that, henceforth, the walls were made of the coalescing remnants of lysed bacteria, while the compartment-like organization remained intact. At the same time, the majority of strand-containing aggregates with associated culturable bacteria continued to exist. These observations indicate that some strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis are able to build highly sophisticated structures, in which a subpopulation undergoes cell lysis, presumably to provide continued access to nutrients in a nutrient-limited environment, whilst maintaining structural integrity. PMID:24964210

  18. Geochemical heterogeneity in a small, stratigraphically complex moraine aquifer system (Ontario, Canada): interpretation of flow and recharge using multiple geochemical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, Randy L.; Frape, Shaun K.; El Mugammar, Humam Taha; Johnston, Craig; Judd-Henrey, Ian; Harvey, F. Edwin; Drimmie, Robert; Jones, Jon Paul

    2011-02-01

    The Waterloo Moraine is a stratigraphically complex system and is the major water supply to the cities of Kitchener and Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Despite over 30 years of investigation, no attempt has been made to unify existing geochemical data into a single database. A composite view of the moraine geochemistry has been created using the available geochemical information, and a framework created for geochemical data synthesis of other similar flow systems. Regionally, fluid chemistry is highly heterogeneous, with large variations in both water type and total dissolved solids content. Locally, upper aquifer units are affected by nitrate and chloride from fertilizer and road salt. Typical upper-aquifer fluid chemistry is dominated by calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, a result of calcite and dolomite dissolution. Evidence also suggests that ion exchange and diffusion from tills and bedrock units accounts for some elevated sodium concentrations. Locally, hydraulic "windows" cross connect upper and lower aquifer units, which are typically separated by a clay till. Lower aquifer units are also affected by dedolomitization, mixing with bedrock water, and locally, upward diffusion of solutes from the bedrock aquifers. A map of areas where aquifer units are geochemically similar was constructed to highlight areas with potential hydraulic windows.

  19. What is a memory schema? A historical perspective on current neuroscience literature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Vanessa E; Gilboa, Asaf

    2014-01-01

    The term "schema" has been used to describe vastly different knowledge structures within the memory neuroscience literature. Ambiguous terminology hinders cross-study comparisons and confounds interpretation of the suggested role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in schema functions. Based on an extensive review of the psychological literature, we propose a framework for distinguishing memory schemas from other knowledge structures. The framework includes a definition of schema as possessing four necessary and sufficient features, and four additional features schemas are sensitive to, which are not required but do play a frequent and central role in schema functions. Necessary schema features are (1) an associative network structure, (2) basis on multiple episodes, (3) lack of unit detail, and (4) adaptability. Features schemas are sensitive to are (5) chronological relationships, (6) hierarchical organization, (7) cross-connectivity, and (8) embedded response options. Additionally, we suggest that vmPFC activity observed in studies of schemas corresponds with participants' coordination of existing schemas with ongoing task demands. PMID:24280650

  20. Detection of fecal coliforms in water by using ((14)C)mannitol

    SciTech Connect

    Reasoner, D.J.; Geldreich, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    Interest in rapid bacterial detection methods for sanitary indicator bacteria in water prompted a study of the use of (14)C-mannitol (UL) to detect fecal coliforms (FC). A simple method was developed using m-FC broth, membrane filtration, and two-temperature incubation (35 C for 2 h, followed by 44.5 C for 2.5 h). Results indicated that FC numbers ranging from 1 x 10(1) to 2.1 x 10(5) cells could be detected in 4.5 h. Within sample reproducibility at all cell concentrations was good, but sample-to-sample reproducibility was variable. Comparisons between m-FC broth and m-FC broth modified by substituting 4-mannitol for lactose indicated that the standard m-FC broth was the better test medium. Results from experiments employing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to increase permeability of FC to (14)C-mannitol indicated no increase in (14)CO{sub 2} production due to DMSO. Detection of FC using this method may be useful for rapid analyses of potable water suspected of contamination due to distribution line breaks or cross-connections, or for quick surveys of potable source water quality.

  1. Engineering Building And Campus Networks For Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Thomas F.

    1990-01-01

    The FDDI standard provides a high speed optical channel for interconnection among mainframes and peripherals, and for use as a backbone network between lower speed local area networks (LANs). As FDDI networks move out of the data center environment, detailed engineering rules are required to construct and administer the dual ring architectures for building and campus applications. This paper examines generic building and campus layouts, and demonstrates the implementation of the logical rings within the star physical topology of the AT&T Premises Distribution System (PDS). A companion paper presents optical performance models to determine distance limitations of the cable plant for these networks, with or without optical bypass switches.' The networks addressed range from a single closet, to a single multi-floor building, to a campus involving multiple buildings. Standard interfaces to the distribution system are defined for each administrative location in the generic building layout. Uniform jumper configurations are specified for cross-connections among the interfaces, which form the network into a dual ring architecture. Using the design guidelines presented, networks of any size and configuration can be constructed which conform to the FDDI dual ring standard.

  2. Contamination of stormwater by wastewater: a review of detection methods.

    PubMed

    Panasiuk, Oleksandr; Hedström, Annelie; Marsalek, Jiri; Ashley, Richard M; Viklander, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Even in separate sewer systems, wastewater may find its way into the receiving waters through stormwater sewers. The main reasons for this are cross-connections, illicit connections, overflows and leakages through broken sewers. Such discharges may affect receiving water quality and increase risks to public health and aquatic organisms. Detecting wastewater contamination and locating its points of ingress into storm sewer systems can be a challenging task, which should be addressed using proper methods and indicator parameters. A number of detection methods have already been proposed in this area, yet there is a lack of a general overview of such methods. This literature review summarizes and evaluates the methods used for detecting wastewater in stormwater, including those recently developed. The advantages, weaknesses and limitations of individual methods are discussed. It is concluded that while no single method can as yet produce results in a precise, fast and inexpensive way, the use of human waste specific chemical and microbiological markers, and their innovative sampling, offer the way forward. Guidance for selecting the most effective combinations of detection methods, under specific conditions, is also provided. PMID:25662485

  3. All-optical OXC transition strategy from WDM optical network to elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Li, Juhao; Guo, Bingli; Zhu, Paikun; Tang, Ruizhi; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2016-02-22

    Elastic optical network (EON) has been proposed recently as a spectrum-efficient optical layer to adapt to rapidly-increasing traffic demands instead of current deployed wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical network. In contrast with conventional WDM optical cross-connect (OXCs) based on wavelength selective switches (WSSs), the EON OXCs are based on spectrum selective switches (SSSs) which are much more expensive than WSSs, especially for large-scale switching architectures. So the transition cost from WDM OXCs to EON OXCs is a major obstacle to realizing EON. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a transition OXC (TOXC) structure based on 2-stage cascading switching architectures, which make full use of available WSSs in current deployed WDM OXCs to reduce number and port count of required SSSs. Moreover, we propose a contention-aware spectrum allocation (CASA) scheme for EON built with the proposed TOXCs. We show by simulation that the TOXCs reduce the network capital expenditure transiting from WDM optical network to EON about 50%, with a minor traffic blocking performance degradation and about 10% accommodated traffic number detriment compared with all-SSS EON OXC architectures. PMID:26907058

  4. Death and transfiguration in static Staphylococcus epidermidis cultures.

    PubMed

    Schaudinn, Christoph; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Gorur, Amita; Remis, Jonathan; Wu, Siva; Auer, Manfred; Hertwig, Stefan; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Hu, Fen Ze; Ehrlich, Garth D; Costerton, John William; Robinson, Douglas H; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of bacteria live in slime embedded microbial communities termed biofilms, which are typically adherent to a surface. However, when several Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were cultivated in static liquid cultures, macroscopic aggregates were seen floating within the broth and also sedimented at the test tube bottom. Light- and electron microscopy revealed that early-stage aggregates consisted of bacteria and extracellular matrix, organized in sheet-like structures. Perpendicular under the sheets hung a network of periodically arranged, bacteria-associated strands. During the extended cultivation, the strands of a subpopulation of aggregates developed into cross-connected wall-like structures, in which aligned bacteria formed the walls. The resulting architecture had a compartmentalized appearance. In late-stage cultures, the wall-associated bacteria disintegrated so that, henceforth, the walls were made of the coalescing remnants of lysed bacteria, while the compartment-like organization remained intact. At the same time, the majority of strand-containing aggregates with associated culturable bacteria continued to exist. These observations indicate that some strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis are able to build highly sophisticated structures, in which a subpopulation undergoes cell lysis, presumably to provide continued access to nutrients in a nutrient-limited environment, whilst maintaining structural integrity. PMID:24964210

  5. Posterior mini-incision hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Prodromos, Chadwick C

    2010-03-01

    Many orthopedists looking for alternatives to autograft bone-patellar-tendon-bone grafts are uncertain of their ability to harvest a hamstring graft of adequate length. They may use an allograft instead for this reason despite recent reports of high failure rates. This article presents step-by-step instructions for a posterior mini-incision hamstring harvest that offers a safe and simple method of reliably harvesting sufficient hamstring for 4 or 6 strand repair, while using tiny incisions for excellent cosmesis and minimal pain. Access from the posterior mini-incision allows easy identification and differentiation of the semitendinosus and gracilis (Gr) tendons, as well as precise placement of the anterior mini-incision for tibial tunnel drilling and fixation. Most importantly sectioning of the intertendinous cross-connections is performed under easy direct vision posteriorly, instead of at a distance from the typical anterior incision under retractors. This prevents the tendons from being cut too short by the tendon stripper and is particularly useful in large patients. In addition to the surgical procedure, details on the required equipment are presented. PMID:20160624

  6. Assessment of domestic water quality: case study, Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Samira Ibrahim; Jurdi, Mey

    2007-12-01

    In urban cities, the environmental services are the responsibility of the public sector, where piped water supply is the norm for urban household. Likewise, in Beirut City (capital of Lebanon) official water authorities are the main supplier of domestic water through a network of piping system that leaks in many areas. Beirut City and its suburbs are overpopulated since it is the residence of 1/3 of the Lebanese citizens. Thus, Beirut suffers deficiency in meeting its water demand. Water rationing, as a remedial action, is firmly established since four decades by the Lebanese Water Authorities. Consumers resorted then to private wells to supplement their domestic water needs. Consequently, household water quality is influenced by external factors relating to well water characteristics and internal factors depending on the types of the pipes of the distribution network and cross connections to sewer pipes. These factors could result in chemical and microbial contamination of drinking water. The objective of this study is to investigate domestic water quality variation in Beirut City emerging form the aforementioned factors. The presented work encircles a typical case study of Beirut City (Ras Beirut). Results showed deterioration pattern in domestic water quality. The predicted metal species and scales within the water pipes of distribution network depended on water pH, hardness, sulfate, chloride, and iron. The corrosion of iron pipes mainly depended on Mg hardness. PMID:17380419

  7. Improved resolution of ambient flow through fractured rock with temperature logs.

    PubMed

    Pehme, P E; Parker, B L; Cherry, J A; Greenhouse, J P

    2010-01-01

    In contaminant hydrogeology, investigations at fractured rock sites are typically undertaken to improve understanding of the fracture networks and associated groundwater flow that govern past and/or future contaminant transport. Conventional hydrogeologic, geophysical, and hydrophysical techniques used to develop a conceptual model are often implemented in open boreholes under conditions of cross-connected flow. A new approach using high-resolution temperature (+/-0.001 degrees C) profiles measured within static water columns of boreholes sealed using continuous, water-inflated, flexible liners (FLUTe) identifies hydraulically active fractures under ambient (natural) groundwater flow conditions. The value of this approach is assessed by comparisons of temperature profiles from holes (100 to 200 m deep) with and without liners at four contaminated sites with distinctly different hydrogeologic conditions. The results from the lined holes consistently show many more hydraulically active fractures than the open-hole profiles, in which the influence of vertical flow through the borehole between a few fractures masks important intermediary flow zones. Temperature measurements in temporarily sealed boreholes not only improve the sensitivity and accuracy of identifying hydraulically active fractures under ambient conditions but also offer new insights regarding previously unresolvable flow distributions in fractured rock systems, while leaving the borehole available for other forms of testing and monitoring device installation. PMID:19840124

  8. Earth and Space Science in the new NRC "Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Duggan-Haas, D. A.; Linneman, S. R.; Pyle, E.; Schatz, D.

    2010-12-01

    The National Academy of Sciences has begun the process of creating a new set of K-12 science education standards. At the start of 2011 the National Research Council will release its “Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards,” which provides a vision for creating new and improved set of guidelines for the teaching of science. The Earth & Space content was formulated by an Earth & Space Design Team, consisting of the authors of this abstract. The “Framework,” funded by the Carnegie Foundation of New York, places a greater emphasis on the practices of learning and on major cross-cutting themes that run through the four content areas: Earth and Space Science, Physical Science, Life Science, and Engineering and Technology. One aim of the framework is to inspire a set of science standards that are more fundamental, cross-connecting, and less fact-oriented. Compared to previous efforts, the Earth & Space Science component places greater emphasis on a systems approach to Earth Science, on the interrelationships between humans and Earth systems, and on the science surrounding and connected to climate change. The organization Achieve, Inc., has already begun to use this “Framework” for the creation of a set of national K-12 science education standards.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of a high port-density WDM optical packet switch architecture for data centers.

    PubMed

    Di Lucente, S; Luo, J; Centelles, R Pueyo; Rohit, A; Zou, S; Williams, K A; Dorren, H J S; Calabretta, N

    2013-01-14

    Data centers have to sustain the rapid growth of data traffic due to the increasing demand of bandwidth-hungry internet services. The current intra-data center fat tree topology causes communication bottlenecks in the server interaction process, power-hungry O-E-O conversions that limit the minimum latency and the power efficiency of these systems. In this paper we numerically and experimentally investigate an optical packet switch architecture with modular structure and highly distributed control that allow configuration times in the order of nanoseconds. Numerical results indicate that the candidate architecture scaled over 4000 ports, provides an overall throughput over 50 Tb/s and a packet loss rate below 10(-6) while assuring sub-microsecond latency. We present experimental results that demonstrate the feasibility of a 16x16 optical packet switch based on parallel 1x4 integrated optical cross-connect modules. Error-free operations can be achieved with 4 dB penalty while the overall energy consumption is of 66 pJ/b. Based on those results, we discuss feasibility to scale the architecture to a much larger port count. PMID:23388919

  10. ProPepper: a curated database for identification and analysis of peptide and immune-responsive epitope composition of cereal grain protein families

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Haraszi, Réka; Maulis, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    ProPepper is a database that contains prolamin proteins identified from true grasses (Poaceae), their peptides obtained with single- and multi-enzyme in silico digestions as well as linear T- and B-cell-specific epitopes that are responsible for wheat-related food disorders. The integrated database and analysis platform contains datasets that are collected from multiple public databases (UniprotKB, IEDB, NCBI GenBank), manually curated and annotated, and interpreted in three main data tables: Protein-, Peptide- and Epitope list views that are cross-connected by unique identifications. Altogether 21 genera and 80 different species are represented. Currently, the database contains 2146 unique and complete protein sequences related to 2618 GenBank entries and 35 657 unique peptide sequences that are a result of 575 110 unique digestion events obtained by in silico digestion methods involving six proteolytic enzymes and their combinations. The interface allows advanced global and parametric search functions along with a download option, with direct connections to the relevant public databases. Database URL: https://propepper.net PMID:26450949

  11. Energy efficiency in WDM fiber-optical links considering OADM/OXC nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalcovs, Aleksejs; Bobrovs, Vjaceslavs

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, authors discuss the energy consumption for 1 bit transmission as a function of spectral efficiency (SE, bps/Hz), aggregated traffic amount (C, bps), and overall transmission distance (LP2P, km) in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems with optical add-drop multiplexer/ optical cross-connect (OADM/OXC) nodes. The choice of bitrate and modulation formats was limited to three options: 10G non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK), 40G NRZ differential phase-shift keying (NRZ-DPSK) and 100 dual polarization quadrature phase-shift keying (DP-QPSK). The reasons for that is the legacy in transmission networks and high energy efficiency of 3R (re-amplification, re-timing, re-shaping) regenerators and transponders, respectively. In addition, these formats are commonly used for 10-40-100G mixed-line rate solutions in core networks. It is found out that 100G DP-QPSK is the best solutions among two other considered in terms of both energy consumption per bit and spectral efficiency. Finally and foremost, it is estimated that for the WDM channels added at the OADM/OXC node, energy consumption per 1 transmitted bit could growth more than two times as compared to wavelengths transmitted over point-to-point fiber-optical links and then dropped at the receiving node.

  12. The Role of Aromaticity, Hybridization, Electrostatics, and Covalency in Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds of Adenine–Thymine (AT) Base Pairs and Their Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Guillaumes, Laia; Simon, Sílvia; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2015-01-01

    Invited for this issues cover are Dr. Célia Fonseca Guerra from the VU University of Amsterdam and her collaborators at the University of Girona. The cover picture shows H-bonds in the adenine–thymine Watson–Crick base pair. An essential part of these H-bonds is their covalent component arising from donor–acceptor interactions between N or O lone pairs and the N−H antibonding σ* acceptor orbital. This charge-transfer interaction is represented by green figures walking on the pedestrian crossing, connecting the bases. This covalent component is the reason why H-bonds between DNA and/or unsaturated model bases are significantly stronger than those between analogous saturated bases. This contrasts sharply with the classical picture of predominantly electrostatic H-bonds which is not only incomplete in terms of a proper bonding mechanism, but also fails to explain the trend in stability. For more details, see the Full Paper on p. 318 ff. PMID:26246979

  13. Human enteric viruses in groundwater from a confined bedrock aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Gotkowitz, M.B.; Cherry, J.A.; Parker, B.L.

    2007-01-01

    Confined aquifers are overlain by low-permeability aquitards that are commonly assumed to protect underlying aquifers from microbial contaminants. However, empirical data on microbial contamination beneath aquitards is limited. This study determined the occurrence of human pathogenic viruses in well water from a deep sandstone aquifer confined by a regionally extensive shale aquitard. Three public water-supply wells were each sampled 10 times over 15 months. Samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for several virus groups and by cell culture for infectious enteroviruses. Seven of 30 samples were positive by RT-PCR for enteroviruses; one of these was positive for infectious echovirus 18. The virus-positive samples were collected from two wells cased through the aquitard, indicating the viruses were present in the confined aquifer. Samples from the same wells showed atmospheric tritium, indicating water recharged within the past few decades. Hydrogeologic conditions support rapid porous media transport of viruses through the upper sandstone aquifer to the top of the aquitard 61 m below ground surface. Natural fractures in the shale aquitard are one possible virus transport pathway through the aquitard; however, windows, cross-connecting well bores, or imperfect grout seals along well casings also may be involved. Deep confined aquifers can be more vulnerable to contamination by human viruses than commonly believed. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  14. Managing risks from virus intrusion into water distribution systems due to pressure transients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; LeChevallier, Mark W; Teunis, Peter F M; Xu, Minhua

    2011-06-01

    Low or negative pressure transients in water distribution systems, caused by unexpected events (e.g. power outages) or routine operation/maintenance activities, are usually brief and thus are rarely monitored or alarmed. Previous studies have shown connections between negative pressure events in water distribution systems and potential public health consequences. Using a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) model previously developed, various factors driving the risk of viral infection from intrusion were evaluated, including virus concentrations external to the distribution system, maintenance of a disinfectant residual, leak orifice sizes, the duration and the number of nodes drawing negative pressures. The most sensitive factors were the duration and the number of nodes drawing negative pressures, indicating that mitigation practices should be targeted to alleviate the severity of low/negative pressure transients. Maintaining a free chlorine residual of 0.2 mg/L or above is the last defense against the risk of viral infection due to negative pressure transients. Maintaining a chloramine residual did not appear to significantly reduce the risk. The effectiveness of ensuring separation distances from sewer mains to reduce the risk of infection may be system-specific. Leak detection/repair and cross-connection control should be prioritized in areas vulnerable to negative pressure transients. PMID:21942194

  15. Compensation control study based on impairment-aware for Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongyan; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli

    2011-10-01

    In an optical network, the optical signal transmitted along the lightpath may need to travel through a number of cross connect switches (OXCs), optical amplifiers, and fiber segments. While the signal propagates toward its destination, the optical components would continuously degrade the signal quality by inducing impairments. When the signal degradation is so severe that the received bit-error rate (BER) becomes unacceptably high, the lightpath would not be able to provide good service quality to a connection request. Such a lightpath, which has poor signal quality due to transmission impairments in the physical layer, should not be used for connection provisioning in the network layer. This paper presents an adaptive PID controller based on the power compensation of BP neural network to restrict the influence of the impairment power for a networked control system (NCS) with the presence of controller time-delay and power compensation at amplifiers' node firstly. Control algorithms continuously adjust their channel powers in response to dynamic information from the network links. And the controller could achieve the on-line adaptive power compensation without changing the parameters of PID controller. The results of simulation show that the proposed controller could adjust better channel power at the transmitter sites and achieve channel optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) optimization with controller's time-delay.

  16. Pressure-driven ballistic Kelvin's water dropper for energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanbo; de Boer, Hans L; Sprenkels, Ad J; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce a microfluidic-based self-excited energy conversion system inspired by Kelvin's water dropper but driven by inertia instead of gravity. Two micro water jets are produced by forcing water through two micropores by overpressure. The jets break up into microdroplets which are inductively charged by electrostatic gates. The droplets land on metal targets which are gradually charged up to high voltages. Targets and electrostatic gates are cross-connected in a way similar to Kelvin's water dropper. Application of pressure as driving force instead of gravity as in Kelvin's dropper allows for much higher energy densities. To prevent overcharging of the droplets by the inductive mechanism and consequent droplet loss by repulsion from the target as in Kelvin's water dropper, a voltage divider using inversely connected diodes was introduced in our system to control the charge induction providing self-limiting positive feedback by the diode characteristics. A maximal 18% energy conversion efficiency was obtained with the diode-gated system. PMID:25112848

  17. Telecommunications administration standard

    SciTech Connect

    Gustwiller, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    The administration of telecommunications is critical to proper maintenance and operation. The intent is to be able to properly support telecommunications for the distribution of all information within a building/campus. This standard will provide a uniform administration scheme that is independent of applications, and will establish guidelines for owners, installers, designers and contractors. This standard will accommodate existing building wiring, new building wiring and outside plant wiring. Existing buildings may not readily adapt to all applications of this standard, but the requirement for telecommunications administration is applicable to all buildings. Administration of the telecommunications infrastructure includes documentation (labels, records, drawings, reports, and work orders) of cables, termination hardware, patching and cross-connect facilities, telecommunications rooms, and other telecommunications spaces (conduits, grounding, and cable pathways are documented by Facilities Engineering). The investment in properly documenting telecommunications is a worthwhile effort. It is necessary to adhere to these standards to ensure quality and efficiency for the operation and maintenance of the telecommunications infrastructure for Sandia National Laboratories.

  18. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multi-agency law enforcement operations

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Jones, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Smith, S.F.; Tolley, A.L.; Rochelle, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype smart repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30--50, 118--136, 138--174, and 403--512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  19. Design and Implementation of a RF Powering Circuit for RFID Tags or Other Batteryless Embedded Devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wang, Rencai; Yao, Ke; Zou, Xuecheng; Guo, Liang

    2014-01-01

    A RF powering circuit used in radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and other batteryless embedded devices is presented in this paper. The RF powering circuit harvests energy from electromagnetic waves and converts the RF energy to a stable voltage source. Analysis of a NMOS gate-cross connected bridge rectifier is conducted to demonstrate relationship between device sizes and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the rectifier. A rectifier with 38.54% PCE under normal working conditions is designed. Moreover, a stable voltage regulator with a temperature and voltage optimizing strategy including adoption of a combination resistor is developed, which is able to accommodate a large input range of 4 V to 12 V and be immune to temperature variations. Latch-up prevention and noise isolation methods in layout design are also presented. Designed with the HJTC 0.25 ?m process, this regulator achieves 0.04 mV/°C temperature rejection ratio (TRR) and 2.5 mV/V voltage rejection ratio (VRR). The RF powering circuit is also fabricated in the HJTC 0.25 ?m process. The area of the RF powering circuit is 0.23 × 0.24 mm2. The RF powering circuit is successfully integrated with ISO/IEC 15693-compatible and ISO/IEC 14443-compatible RFID tag chips. PMID:25123466

  20. Enhancing tilt range of electrostatic torsional micromirrors using robust adaptive critic-based neurofuzzy control.

    PubMed

    Malmir, Hessam; Salarieh, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    Electrostatic torsional micromirrors, as instances of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have many optical network applications; such as optical wavelength-selective switches, optical cross-connects, etc. For all these applications, the micromirror needs to have minimal overshoot and settling time in order to minimize the time between two successive switching operations. Moreover, the controllability and stability of a torsional micromirror are major challenges due to high nonlinearities in its dynamic characteristics. In this paper, a robust adaptive critic-based neurofuzzy controller is proposed for electrostatic torsional micromirrors, which can improve the performance of the mirror tilting and enhance the robustness of the system to any stochastic perturbations. Furthermore, utilizing this adaptive neurofuzzy controller, which is based on a proportional and derivative (PD) critic, the micromirror "pull-in" phenomenon is crucially eliminated. Thus, the mirror tilting range is significantly expanded. Moreover, the stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed via the Lyapunov theorem. The robust adaptive critic-based neurofuzzy controller is simulated for a 1-DOF electrostatic torsional micromirror and the results show the effectiveness of this approach for various tilt ranges and conditions. In addition, the robustness of this controller is examined in the presence of input noises and parameter uncertainties. PMID:24957275

  1. Metro Optical Networks for Homeland Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, James H.

    Metro optical networks provide an enticing opportunity for strengthening homeland security. Many existing and emerging fiber-optic networks can be adapted for enhanced security applications. Applications include airports, theme parks, sports venues, and border surveillance systems. Here real-time high-quality video and captured images can be collected, transported, processed, and stored for security applications. Video and data collection are important also at correctional facilities, courts, infrastructure (e.g., dams, bridges, railroads, reservoirs, power stations), and at military and other government locations. The scaling of DWDM-based networks allows vast amounts of data to be collected and transported including biometric features of individuals at security check points. Here applications will be discussed along with potential solutions and challenges. Examples of solutions to these problems are given. This includes a discussion of metropolitan aggregation platforms for voice, video, and data that are SONET compliant for use in SONET networks and the use of DWDM technology for scaling and transporting a variety of protocols. Element management software allows not only network status monitoring, but also provides optimized allocation of network resources through the use of optical switches or electrical cross connects.

  2. Holding time aware differentiated protection method for survivable waveband switching optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weigang; Guo, Lei; Li, Yan; Wu, Tengfei

    2011-12-01

    Due to the number of wavelengths in fibers increasing, the transmission ports consumed in optical cross-connect (OXC) are greatly enhanced. To reduce the complexity and the cost of OXC, waveband switching technology is proposed. At the same time, since an optical channel carries a lot of traffic, its failure may lead to a huge data loss. Therefore, survivability in waveband switching (WBS) optical networks is important. Previous work for survivable WBS optical networks did not consider the holding time of connection request. However, in a practical network, the different connection requests generally have different holding times. This fact affects the network performances. In this paper, we propose a new method, holding time aware differentiated protection (HTADP), to provide the survivability for single-link failure in WBS optical networks. In HTADP, if the holding time of a connection request is smaller than the preset threshold, the protection path will not be assigned for saving network resources. In addition, we design a waveband integrated auxiliary graph for HTADP to well support the routing and waveband assignment. Simulation results demonstrate that HTADP not only saves more transmission ports but also is able to obtain lower blocking probability compared with previous method.

  3. Improved Dynamic Lightpath Provisioning for Large Wavelength-Division Multiplexed Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Huifang; Phillips, Chris

    2007-07-01

    Technology already exists that would allow future optical networks to support automatic lightpath configuration in response to dynamic traffic demands. Given appropriate commercial drivers, it is possible to foresee carrier network operators migrating away from semipermanent provisioning to enable on-demand short-duration communications. However, with traditional lightpath reservation protocols, a portion of the lightpath is idly held during the signaling propagation phase, which can significantly reduce the lightpath bandwidth efficiency in large wavelength-division multiplexed backbones. This paper proposes a prebooking mechanism to improve the lightpath efficiency over traditional reactive two-way reservation protocols, consequently liberating network resources to support higher traffic loads. The prebooking mechanism predicts the time when the traffic will appear at the optical cross connects, and intelligently schedules the lightpath components such that resources are only consumed as necessary. We describe the proposed signaling procedure for both centralized and distributed control planes and analyze its performance. This paper also investigates the aggregated flow length characteristics with the self-similar incident traffic and examines the effects of traffic prediction on the blocking probability as well as the ability to support latency sensitive traffic in a wide-area environment.

  4. Demonstration of 1×32 LCOS-based wavelength selective switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Xiao; Gao, Yunshu; Tian, Miao; Chen, Ran; Wang, Shan; Chen, Genxiang; Wang, Yiquan

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, reconfigurable optical add drop multiplexers (ROADM) and multiple-dimensions optical cross-connection (OXC), as the essential devices of next-generation dynamic optical networks, have been attracted great interests by research institutions and relevant industry. 1×N Wavelength selective switches (WSSs) are one of the key components in current and next generation ROADM. Currently, WSS primarily rely on micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators (LCOS-SLM) switches. LCOS-based WSSs have several advantages, including flexible spectrum coverage, adaptive alignment, and robustness. Based on a novel 2-f optical structure, we therefore propose 1×32 WSS system including a 1×32 fiber-coupling lenslet arrays, a collimating lens, a transmission grating, a cylindrical lens and a LCOS-SLM. By uploading the optimized phased holograms on the LCOS, we have successfully switched input signal with arbitrary wavelength in C-band into any output port. The output channel spacing can be adjusted flexibly and each port switches independently. Experimental results demonstrate the insertion loss is around 5~10dB and the switch crosstalk at 1550nm is -35dB. The 3dB-bandwidth of signal@100G is 40G.The research has established the theory and experiment foundation for the development of M×N WSS in future.

  5. An effect scheme for fixed-length tunnel allocation in hierarchical WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Tse-Yu; Chen, Chien; Chen, Ying-Yu

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the static tunnel allocation problem in multigraularity optical cross-connect (MG-OXC) networks. Our goal is to allocate a set of tunnels that minimize the blocking probability for the dynamic traffic that will follow the prior-known historical traffic matrix. A heuristic Capacity-Balanced Static Tunnel Allocation (CB-STA) has been proposed, which always tries to allocate a tunnel from the node with maximal predicted traffic going out to the node with maximal predicted traffic coming in. However, the tunnel length constraint is not carefully considered while selecting node pairs. Thus, this work proposes a heuristic, Weighted Tunnel Allocation (WTA), to improve CB-STA. WTA adds some additional edges with predefined hop length, termed auxiliary links, to the original topology to form an auxiliary graph. Node pair incident to an auxiliary link means that there could be tunnels allocated for it. By routing the historical traffic on the auxiliary graph, preference of tunnel allocation for each node pair incident to the auxiliary link can be estimated. Finally the tunnels will be allocated according to the preference. The simulation results show that WTA outperforms CB-STA in all switching type combinations.

  6. Real-time monitoring of river water quality using in-line continuous acquisition of fluorescence excitation and emission matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstea, E.; Baker, A.; Johnson, R.; Reynolds, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    In-line fluorescence EEM monitoring has been performed over an eleven-day period for Bournbrook River, Birmingham, UK. River water was diverted to a portable laboratory via a continuous flow pump and filter system. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices data was recorded every 3 minutes using a flow cell (1cm pathlength) coupled to a fiber optic probe. This real-time fluorescence EEM data (Excitation, 225-400 nm at 5 nm steps, emission, 280-500 nm at 2 nm steps) was collected 'in-line'and directly compared with the spectrophotometric properties and physical and chemical parameters of river water samples collected off-line at known time intervals. Over the monitoring period, minor pollution pulses from cross connections were detected and identified hourly along with a random diesel pollution event. This work addresses the practicalities of measuring and detecting fluorescence EEM in the field and discusses the potential of this technological approach for further understanding important hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Problems associated with fouling and system failure are also reported. Example of the data generated from the continuous fluorescence EEM monitoring.

  7. Design and implementation of a RF powering circuit for RFID tags or other batteryless embedded devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wang, Rencai; Yao, Ke; Zou, Xuecheng; Guo, Liang

    2014-01-01

    A RF powering circuit used in radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and other batteryless embedded devices is presented in this paper. The RF powering circuit harvests energy from electromagnetic waves and converts the RF energy to a stable voltage source. Analysis of a NMOS gate-cross connected bridge rectifier is conducted to demonstrate relationship between device sizes and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the rectifier. A rectifier with 38.54% PCE under normal working conditions is designed. Moreover, a stable voltage regulator with a temperature and voltage optimizing strategy including adoption of a combination resistor is developed, which is able to accommodate a large input range of 4 V to 12 V and be immune to temperature variations. Latch-up prevention and noise isolation methods in layout design are also presented. Designed with the HJTC 0.25 ?m process, this regulator achieves 0.04 mV/°C temperature rejection ratio (TRR) and 2.5 mV/V voltage rejection ratio (VRR). The RF powering circuit is also fabricated in the HJTC 0.25 ?m process. The area of the RF powering circuit is 0.23 × 0.24 mm². The RF powering circuit is successfully integrated with ISO/IEC 15693-compatible and ISO/IEC 14443-compatible RFID tag chips. PMID:25123466

  8. Geochemical heterogeneity in a small, stratigraphically complex moraine aquifer system (Ontario, Canada): Interpretation of flow and recharge using multiple geochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stotler, R.L.; Frape, S.K.; El Mugammar, H.T.; Johnston, C.; Judd-Henrey, I.; Harvey, F.E.; Drimmie, R.; Jones, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Waterloo Moraine is a stratigraphically complex system and is the major water supply to the cities of Kitchener and Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Despite over 30 years of investigation, no attempt has been made to unify existing geochemical data into a single database. A composite view of the moraine geochemistry has been created using the available geochemical information, and a framework created for geochemical data synthesis of other similar flow systems. Regionally, fluid chemistry is highly heterogeneous, with large variations in both water type and total dissolved solids content. Locally, upper aquifer units are affected by nitrate and chloride from fertilizer and road salt. Typical upper-aquifer fluid chemistry is dominated by calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, a result of calcite and dolomite dissolution. Evidence also suggests that ion exchange and diffusion from tills and bedrock units accounts for some elevated sodium concentrations. Locally, hydraulic "windows" cross connect upper and lower aquifer units, which are typically separated by a clay till. Lower aquifer units are also affected by dedolomitization, mixing with bedrock water, and locally, upward diffusion of solutes from the bedrock aquifers. A map of areas where aquifer units are geochemically similar was constructed to highlight areas with potential hydraulic windows. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Technologies for large-scale optical switching: recent advances and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Chuan; Wu, Chris

    2002-09-01

    For the past decade, the explosive growth of Internet data communication, together with the ever-increasing traffic demand for traditional voice service, has fueled the rapid development of optical communication systems. While the aggregate traffic demand is largely met by the deployment of DWDM technologies and the increasing data rates toward 40 Gb/s, the current optical communication system has also evolved into a complicated multi-wavelength system, which asks for many innovative technologies for realizing its vast capacities and promises. One such greatly desired network element is a large-scale optical cross-connect (OXC) in the core network to facilitate optical layer networking at the wavelength level. In recent years a variety of technologies have been studied as potential candidates. Many advances have been made, and many lessons have been learned. In this paper, we will discuss the architectural and performance requirements for OXC, and analyze various optical switching technologies. Particularly we will focus on the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology that has demonstrated vast promises for large-scale OXCs.

  10. Microbial health risks associated with exposure to stormwater in a water plaza.

    PubMed

    Sales-Ortells, Helena; Medema, Gertjan

    2015-05-01

    Climate change scenarios predict an increase of intense rainfall events in summer in Western Europe. Current urban drainage systems cannot cope with such intense precipitation events. Cities are constructing stormwater storage facilities to prevent pluvial flooding. Combining storage with other functions, such as recreation, may lead to exposure to contaminants. This study assessed the microbial quality of rainwater collected in a water plaza and the health risks associated with recreational exposure. The water plaza collects street run-off, diverges first flush to the sewer system and stores the rest of the run-off in the plaza as open water. Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and Legionella pneumophila were the pathogens investigated. Microbial source tracking tools were used to determine the origin (human, animal) of the intestinal pathogens. Cryptosporidium was not found in any sample. Campylobacter was found in all samples, with higher concentrations in samples containing human Bacteroides than in samples with zoonotic contamination (15 vs 3.7 gc (genomic copies)/100 mL). In both cases, the estimated disease risk associated with Campylobacter and recreational exposure was higher than the Dutch national incidence. This indicates that the health risk associated with recreational exposure to the water plaza is significant. L. pneumophila was found only in two out of ten pond samples. Legionnaire's disease risks were lower than the Dutch national incidence. Presence of human Bacteroides indicates possible cross-connections with the CSS that should be identified and removed. PMID:25706222

  11. Influence of the observation window size on the performance of multilayer traffic engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiang; De Maesschalck, Sophie; Colle, Didier; Puype, Bart; Lievens, Ilse; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    2003-08-01

    Although the Optical Transport Network, based on technologies such as Wavelength Division Multiplexing and Optical Cross-Connects, offers tremendous transportation capacity, its management requires frequent manual intervention. However, as the traffic pattern offered to today's transport networks is subject to continuous changes due to the Internet traffic dominance, an optical transport network with a smart, automatic and real-time control system, denoted as Intelligent Optical Network (ION) or Automatic Switched Optical Network (ASON), is desired by network operators. Duly and correctly retrieving the changing traffic load information is a very important factor for the successful deployment of an ION. In this paper, we discuss the influence of the observation window size used for collecting the traffic load information, on the performance of an ION. By comparing the performance of an ION using different traffic observation window sizes, we show that a smaller observation window harms the network stability; while a too large observation window worsens the network reliability. We demonstrate that a suitable traffic observation window size improves the offered Quality of Service (QoS) by reconfiguring the logical layer network at the right time and in the right way.

  12. Vulnerability of water distribution systems to pathogen intrusion: how effective is a disinfectant residual?

    PubMed

    Propato, Marco; Uber, James G

    2004-07-01

    Can the spread of infectious disease through water distribution systems be halted by a disinfectant residual? This question is overdue for an answer. Regulatory agencies and water utilities have long been concerned about accidental intrusions of pathogens into distribution system pipelines (i.e., cross-connections) and are increasingly concerned about deliberate pathogen contamination. Here, a simulation framework is developed and used to assess the vulnerability of a water system to microbiological contamination. The risk of delivering contaminated water to consumers is quantified by a network water quality model that includes disinfectant decay and disinfection kinetics. The framework is applied to two example networks under a worst-case deliberate intrusion scenario. Results show that the risk of consumer exposure is affected by the residual maintenance strategy employed. The common regulation that demands a "detectable" disinfectant residual may not provide effective consumer protection against microbial contamination. A chloramine residual, instead of free chlorine, may significantly weaken this final barrier against pathogen intrusions. Moreover, the addition of a booster station at storage tanks may improve consumer protection without requiring excessive disinfectant. PMID:15296325

  13. Manufacturing microcomponents for optical information technology using the LIGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Hossfeld, Jens; Paatzsch, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Recently, splices and connectors for fibers ribbons, optical cross connects and especially planar waveguide devices have been fabricated via LIGA in combination with precision engineering techniques. LIGA combines high precision and mass production capability, necessary for products designed for applications in the telecom and datacom market. In this presentation the fabrication of three-level molding and embossing tools is presented, which have been used for the manufacturing of waveguide prestructures consisting of waveguide channels and bier-to-waveguide coupling grooves. The precision of the tools is better than 1 micrometers in all directions, which allows for simple passive pigtailing. A first product, a precision of the tool is better than 1 micrometers in all directions, which allows for simple passive pigtailing. A first product, sixfold array of 4 X 4 multimode star couplers has been realized. The molding behavior of PMMA and COC material has been tested and compared. Production and assembly was tested by fabricating a series of 300 star couplers. The average insertion los has been found better than 9dB, the uniformity better than 3dB, both measured at 830nm. THe device is designed for application in optical backplanes for high-speed computers.

  14. Review of Campylobacter spp. in drinking and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Tarja

    2013-10-01

    Consumption of contaminated drinking water is a significant cause of Campylobacter infections. Drinking water contamination is known to result from septic seepage and wastewater intrusion into non-disinfected sources of groundwater and occasionally from cross-connection into drinking water distribution systems. Wastewater effluents, farm animals and wild birds are the primary sources contributing human-infectious Campylobacters in environmental waters, impacting on recreational activities and drinking water sources. Culturing of Campylobacter entails time-consuming steps that often provide qualitative or semi-quantitative results. Viable but non-culturable forms due to environmental stress are not detected, and thus may result in false-negative assessments of Campylobacter risks from drinking and environmental waters. Molecular methods, especially quantitative PCR applications, are therefore important to use in the detection of environmental Campylobacter spp. Processing large volumes of water may be required to reach the desired sensitivity for either culture or molecular detection methods. In the future, applications of novel molecular techniques such as isothermal amplification and high-throughput sequencing applications are awaited to develop and become more affordable and practical in environmental Campylobacter research. The new technologies may change the knowledge on the prevalence and pathogenicity of the different Campylobacter species in the water environment. PMID:23810971

  15. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multiagency law enforcement operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard I.; Jones, R. W.; Moore, Michael R.; Smith, S. F.; Tolley, Alan L.; Rochelle, Robert W.

    1997-02-01

    A prototype 'smart' repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30-50, 118-136, 138-174, and 403-512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  16. An extensive gastroenteritis outbreak after drinking-water contamination by sewage effluent, Finland.

    PubMed

    Laine, J; Huovinen, E; Virtanen, M J; Snellman, M; Lumio, J; Ruutu, P; Kujansuu, E; Vuento, R; Pitkänen, T; Miettinen, I; Herrala, J; Lepistö, O; Antonen, J; Helenius, J; Hänninen, M-L; Maunula, L; Mustonen, J; Kuusi, M

    2011-07-01

    An inappropriate cross-connection between sewage- and drinking-water pipelines contaminated tap water in a Finnish town, resulting in an extensive waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in this developed country. According to a database and a line-list, altogether 1222 subjects sought medical care as a result of this exposure. Seven pathogens were found in patient samples of those who sought treatment. To establish the true disease burden from this exposure, we undertook a population-based questionnaire investigation with a control population, infrequently used to study waterborne outbreaks. The study covered three areas, contaminated and uncontaminated parts of the town and a control town. An estimated 8453 residents fell ill during the outbreak, the excess number of illnesses being 6501. Attack rates were 53% [95% confidence interval (CI) 49.5-56.4] in the contaminated area, 15.6% (95% CI 13.1-18.5) in the uncontaminated area and 6.5% (95% CI 4.8-8.8) in the control population. Using a control population allowed us to differentiate baseline morbidity from the observed morbidity caused by the water contamination, thus enabling a more accurate estimate of the disease burden of this outbreak. PMID:20843387

  17. Evaluation of steel shafts for magnetostrictive torque sensors (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, F.; Yoshida, K.; Sasada, I.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the magnetostrictive effect in steel, a robust, noncontacting shaft torque sensor can be obtained. A fundamental problem in this scheme is compatibility between mechanical strength required for a shaft and a magnetic one needed for a torque sensor. In order to find shaft material accommodating these two requirements, we investigated basic characteristics, such as hysteresis, linearity, and zero-level fluctuation associated with shaft rotation, of the magnetostrictive torque sensor for various nickel chromium molybdenum steel shafts (SNCM in Japanese Industrial Standard) subjected to case hardening. We prepared three kinds of shafts of 25 mm in diameter: SNCM 420 (Ni=1.69%, C=0.2%), SNCM 616 (Ni=2.91%, C=0.15%), and SNCM 447 (Ni=1.67%, C=0.49%). Shafts of the first two materials were carburized, whereas those of the last one were quenched. We used a magnetic head-type torque sensor consisting of a pair of cross-coupled figure-eight coils (14 turn), which has been already proposed by us.1 The hysteresis in the input-output relationship was measured for the excitation current from 0.1 to 1.0 A at the excitation frequency of 60 kHz. The hysteresis of the SNCM 420 shaft changes sign from negative to positive with the increase in excitation current and that of the SNCM 616 shaft decreases monotonically but never reaches zero, whereas that of the SNCM 447 shaft exhibits minimum. The smallest values obtained are nearly zero for the SNCM 420 shaft at 0.3 A, 1.5%/(full scale (FS)=400 Nm) for the SNCM 616 shaft at 1.0 A and 0.7%/FS for the SNCM 447 shaft at 0.8 A, respectively. The linearity measured for the SNCM 420 shaft, which has the smallest hysteresis of the three, at 0.3 A and 60 kHz was virtually straight for the applied torque range -400-400 Nm and 0.8% of nonlinearity error for the range -1000-1000 Nm. The zero-level fluctuation was measured for the SNCM 420 shaft by rotating the shaft without applying torque. The level of the fluctuation was as small as ±1.8%/FS (FS=1000 Nm). It is interesting to consider the effect of carburization on the performance of the shaft seen from the torque sensor. The sensitivity of the as-ground SNCM 420 shaft is approximately ten times larger than that of carburized shafts, however, the input-output relationship measured for the as-ground shaft was saturated completely at the applied torque of 400 Nm. The zero-level fluctuation for the as-ground shaft was about the same in terms of %/FS as that of carburized shaft. Considering that the reduction of the sensitivity by carburization is a factor of 10, magnetic inhomogeneities at the surface are well improved by the carburizing process. We measured the two-dimensional pattern of magnetic anisotropy distribution by scanning the shaft surface using a 6.5 mm square eddy current probe that is sensitive to magnetic anisotropy.2 We found that the as-ground shaft has a peculiar magnetic anisotropy pattern, which is probably induced during manufacturing steel bars. The pattern was erased by the heat treatment at 920 °C for 4 h, which is a main course of carburization treatment.

  18. Detailed measurement of the magnitude and orientation of thermal gradients in lined boreholes for characterizing groundwater flow in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehme, Peeter; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.; Blohm, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments have led to revitalization of the use of temperature logging for characterizing flow through fractured rock. The sealing of boreholes using water-filled, flexible impermeable liners prevents vertical cross connection between fractures intersecting the hole and establishes a static water column with a temperature stratification that mimics that in the surrounding formation. Measurement of the temperature profile of the lined-hole, water column (using a high sensitivity single-point probe achieving resolution on the order of 0.001 °C) has identified fractures with active flow under ambient groundwater conditions (without cross connecting flow along the borehole). Detection of flow in fractures was further improved with the use of a heater to create thermal disequilibrium in the active line source (ALS) technique and eliminate normal depth limitations in the process. This paper presents another advancement; detailed measurement of the magnitude and direction of the thermal gradient to characterize flow through fractured rock. The temperature within the water column is measured along the length of the lined hole using a temperature vector probe (TVP): four high sensitivity sensors arranged in a tetrahedral pattern oriented using three directional magnetometers. Based on these data, the horizontal and vertical components of the thermal field, as well as the direction of temperature gradient are determined, typically at depth intervals of less than 0.01 m. This probe was assessed and refined by trials in over 30 lined boreholes; the results from two holes through a fractured dolostone aquifer in Guelph, Ontario are used as exampled. Since no other device exists for measuring flow magnitude and direction under the ambient flow condition created by lined holes, the performance of the TVP is assessed by examining the reproducibility of the temperature measurements through an ALS test, and by the consistency of the results relative to other types of larger-scale information from the study area. Temperature profiles were measured in lined holes under both ambient thermal conditions and subject to ALS heating of the entire length of the holes to demonstrate resolution and reproducibility. The hydraulic gradient in three-dimensional space, based on pressure measurements from three depth discrete, multilevel monitoring systems in nearby holes, was used to independently estimate variations in groundwater flow directions. The characteristics of the hydraulic and thermal regimes are compared to assess response to changes in flow in a fractured rock system. When used in the lined holes, the level of detail provided by this multi-sensor probe is much greater than that provided by a single-sensor probe and this detail strongly supports inferences concerning the relative magnitude and direction of the flow. The results of this study indicate that the details of the thermal gradient can be measured and provides superior results compared to a conventional one dimensional temperature profile, thereby substantially enhancing the characterization of groundwater flow in fractured rock.

  19. Anatomical study of toe flexion by flexor hallucis longus.

    PubMed

    Edama, Mutsuaki; Kubo, Masayoshi; Onishi, Hideaki; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Erika; Inai, Takuma; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nashimoto, Satoshi; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2016-03-01

    Because connections exist between the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and flexor digitorum longus (FDL), the FHL is surmised to exert a flexion action on the lesser toes, but this has not been studied quantitatively. The objectives of this study have thus been to clarify the types of FHL and FDL connections and branching, and to deduce the toe flexion actions of the FHL. One hundred legs from 55 cadavers were used for the study, with FHLs and FDLs harvested from the plantar aspect of the foot, and connections and branches classified. Image-analysis software was then used to analyze cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of each tendon, and the proportion of FHL was calculated in relation to flexor tendons of each toe. Type I (single slip from FHL to FDL tendon) was seen in 86 legs (86%), Type II (crossed connection) in 3 legs (3%), and Type III (single slip from FDL to FHL tendon) or Type IV (no connection between muscles) in 0 legs (0%). In addition, Type V (double slip from FHL to FDL tendon) was seen in 11 legs (11%), representing a new type not recorded in previous classifications. In terms of the various flexor tendons, the proportion of FHL showing tendons to toes 2 and 3 was high, at approximately 50-70%. Consequently, considering the branching type and proportion of CSA, the FHL was conjectured to not only act to flex the hallux, but also play a significant role in the flexion of toes 2 and 3. These results offer useful information for future clarification of the functional roles of tendinous slips from the FHL. PMID:26704354

  20. Quantifying Urban Water Subsidies with Hydrological Tracers of Domestic Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Sikora, M. T.; Wozniak, E.; Fisher, K. R.; Carr, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Connections between urban hydrological systems and human water infrastructure are well established. Interactions between these systems occur at a wide range of scales, from large inter-basin transfers to individual leaking pipes. However, much of the interest in these connections arises from practical considerations, for example, substantially altered in-stream flow or the presence/absence of sewage in surface water systems. Less recognized is that in smaller urban catchments, daily water flux through human water distribution systems is often much larger than low flow surface water flux from the catchment. As infrastructure ages and cross-connections grow, transfers from the substantial human fluxes to the catchment will increasingly subsidize urban water budgets. Tools for quantifying the contribution of this subsidy to urban hydrological systems can clarify both practical questions for urban managers and our understanding of flow generation in catchments. Stream water chemistry from a multi-year sampling campaign in Nine Mile Run (Pittsburgh, PA) is used to examine potential hydrological tracers of human domestic water. In particular, we examine the use of fluoride added in precise quantities as a dental health supplement as a tracer of human domestic water (e.g., drinking and waste water). While fluoride is not necessarily a conservative tracer, equilibrium reactions governing fluoride solubility generally require substantially higher cationic concentrations than those observed in surface water chemistry. Further, during periods where human subsidies dominate (e.g., water line breaks or hydrant flushes discharging to the stream) fluoride concentrations generally approach the concentration added to domestic water. We use multiple modeling approaches to demonstrate the appropriateness of fluoride as a tracer, infer contributions of human domestic water to the hydrologic budget, and explore fluoride dynamics in the Nine Mile Run basin. A fluoride tracer is particularly exciting due to applicability in a large number of urban systems fluoridating drinking waters and due to robust, high-frequency measurement capacity via off-the-shelf drinking water treatment technologies.

  1. Facilitation of Stepping with Epidural Stimulation in Spinal Rats: Role of Sensory Input

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, Igor; Courtine, Grégoire; Dy, Christine J.; van den Brand, Rubia; Fong, Andy J.; Gerasimenko, Yuri; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of afferent information during recovery of coordinated rhythmic activity of the hindlimbs in rats with a complete spinal cord section (~T8) and unilateral deafferentation (T12-S2) to answer the following questions: 1) Can bilateral stepping be generated with only afferent projections intact on one side? 2) Can the sensory input from the non-deafferented side compensate for the loss of the afferent input from the deafferented side through the crossed connections within the lumbosacral spinal cord? 3) Which afferent projections to the spinal cord from the non-deafferented side predominantly mediate the effect of epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping? Recovery of stepping ability was tested under the facilitating influence of epidural stimulation at the S1 spinal segment or epidural stimulation plus quipazine, a 5-HT agonist. All chronic spinal rats were able to generate stepping-like patterns on a moving treadmill on the non-deafferented, but not deafferented, side 3–7 weeks after surgery when facilitated by epidural stimulation. Adaptation to the loss of unilateral afferent input was evident at 7 weeks after surgery, when some movements occurred on the deafferented side. Spinal cord evoked potentials were observed on both sides, although middle (monosynaptic) and late (long-latency) responses were more prominent on the non-deafferented side. The afferent information arising from the non-deafferented side, however, eventually could mediate limited restoration of hindlimb movements on the deafferented side. These data suggest that facilitation of stepping with epidural stimulation is mediated primarily through ipsilateral afferents that project to the locomotor networks. PMID:18667609

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of synthetic brow-suspension materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyung-Ah; Shipley, Rebecca J; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Ezra, Daniel George; Rose, Geoffrey E; Rayment, Andrew W; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2014-02-01

    Levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) is a muscle responsible for lifting the upper eyelid and its malfunction leads to a condition called "ptosis", resulting in disfigurement and visual impairment. Severe ptosis is generally treated with "brow-suspension" surgery, whereby the eyelid is cross-connected to the mobile tissues above the eyebrow using a cord-like material, either natural (e.g. fascia lata harvested from the patient) or a synthetic cord. Synthetic brow-suspension materials are widely used, due to not requiring the harvesting of fascia lata that can be associated with pain and donor-site complications. The mechanical properties of some commonly-used synthetic brow-suspension materials were investigated--namely, monofilament polypropylene (Prolene®), sheathed braided polyamide (Supramid Extra® II), silicone frontalis suspension rod (Visitec® Seiff frontalis suspension set), woven polyester (Mersilene® mesh), and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Ptose-Up). Each material underwent a single tensile loading to the failure of the material, at three different displacement rates (1, 750 and 1500 mm/min). All the materials exhibited elastic-plastic tensile stress-strain behaviour with considerable differences in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength, elastic limit and work of fracture. The results suggest that, as compared to other materials, the silicone brow-suspension rod (Visitec® SFSS) might be the most suitable, providing relatively long-lasting stability and desirable performance. These findings, together with other factors such as commercial availability, cost and clinical outcomes, will provide clinicians with a more rational basis for selection of brow-suspension materials. PMID:24411372

  3. Detection of fecal coliforms in water by using (/sup 14/C)mannitol

    SciTech Connect

    Reasoner, D.J.; Geldreich, E.E.

    1989-04-01

    Interest in rapid bacterial detection methods for sanitary indicator bacteria in water prompted a study of the use of (U-14C)mannitol to detect fecal coliforms (FC). A simple method which used m-FC broth, membrane filtration, and two-temperature incubation (35 degrees C for 2 h followed by 44.5 degrees C for 2.5 h) was developed. (U-14C)mannitol was added to the medium, and the temperature was raised to 44.5 degrees C after 2 h at 35 degrees C. 14CO2 was collected as Ba14CO3 and assayed by liquid scintillation spectroscopy. Correlations were examined between FC cell numbers at the start of incubation (standard 24-h FC test) and Ba14CO3 counts per minute after 4.5 h. Results indicated that FC numbers ranging from 1 x 10(1) to 2.1 x 10(5) cells could be detected in 4.5 h. Within-sample reproducibility at all cell concentrations was good, but sample-to-sample reproducibility was variable. Comparisons between m-FC broth and m-FC broth modified by substituting D-mannitol for lactose indicated that the standard m-FC broth was the better test medium. Results from experiments in which dimethyl sulfoxide was used to increase permeability of FC to (U-14C)mannitol indicated no increase in 14CO2 production due to dimethyl sulfoxide. Detection of FC by this method may be useful for rapid estimation of FC levels in freshwater recreational areas, for estimating the quality of potable source water, and potentially for emergency testing of potable water, suspected of contamination due to distribution line breaks or cross-connections.

  4. Multiscale fracture network characterization and impact on flow: A case study on the Latemar carbonate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Maier, C.; Nick, H.; Geiger, S.; Bertotti, G.; Boro, H.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture network arrangement is quantified across an isolated carbonate platform from outcrop and aerial imagery to address its impact on fluid flow. The network is described in terms of fracture density, orientation, and length distribution parameters. Of particular interest is the role of fracture cross connections and abutments on the effective permeability. Hence, the flow simulations explicitly account for network topology by adopting Discrete-Fracture-and-Matrix description. The interior of the Latemar carbonate platform (Dolomites, Italy) is taken as outcrop analogue for subsurface reservoirs of isolated carbonate build-ups that exhibit a fracture-dominated permeability. New is our dual strategy to describe the fracture network both as deterministic- and stochastic-based inputs for flow simulations. The fracture geometries are captured explicitly and form a multiscale data set by integration of interpretations from outcrops, airborne imagery, and lidar. The deterministic network descriptions form the basis for descriptive rules that are diagnostic of the complex natural fracture arrangement. The fracture networks exhibit a variable degree of multitier hierarchies with smaller-sized fractures abutting against larger fractures under both right and oblique angles. The influence of network topology on connectivity is quantified using Discrete-Fracture-Single phase fluid flow simulations. The simulation results show that the effective permeability for the fracture and matrix ensemble can be 50 to 400 times higher than the matrix permeability of 1.0 · 10-14 m2. The permeability enhancement is strongly controlled by the connectivity of the fracture network. Therefore, the degree of intersecting and abutting fractures should be captured from outcrops with accuracy to be of value as analogue.

  5. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  6. Design of physical and logical topologies with fault-tolerant ability in wavelength-routed optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunfeng; Liu, Hua; Fan, Ge

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of designing a network of optical cross-connects(OXCs) to provide end-to-end lightpath services to label switched routers (LSRs). Like some previous work, we select the number of OXCs as our objective. Compared with the previous studies, we take into account the fault-tolerant characteristic of logical topology. First of all, using a Prufer number randomly generated, we generate a tree. By adding some edges to the tree, we can obtain a physical topology which consists of a certain number of OXCs and fiber links connecting OXCs. It is notable that we for the first time limit the number of layers of the tree produced according to the method mentioned above. Then we design the logical topologies based on the physical topologies mentioned above. In principle, we will select the shortest path in addition to some consideration on the load balancing of links and the limitation owing to the SRLG. Notably, we implement the routing algorithm for the nodes in increasing order of the degree of the nodes. With regarding to the problem of the wavelength assignment, we adopt the heuristic algorithm of the graph coloring commonly used. It is clear our problem is computationally intractable especially when the scale of the network is large. We adopt the taboo search algorithm to find the near optimal solution to our objective. We present numerical results for up to 1000 LSRs and for a wide range of system parameters such as the number of wavelengths supported by each fiber link and traffic. The results indicate that it is possible to build large-scale optical networks with rich connectivity in a cost-effective manner, using relatively few but properly dimensioned OXCs.

  7. Tunable wavelength conversion in optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakaki, Anna

    This thesis focuses on the properties and characteristics of all-optical tunable wavelength converters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and their applications in future all-optical networks. A novel detailed theoretical model that investigates the features of tunable converters based on cross-gain modulation in SOAs, operating in the counter-propagating mode was developed. Theoretical evaluation of the performance of the converter was carried out and the results were experimentally verified. The penalty introduced in WDM systems due to crosstalk imposed by wavelength converters was analysed and calculated. Theoretical evaluation of a Mach-Zehnder interferometric wavelength converter, based on cross-phase modulation in SOAs, was performed and experimental results using an all-active Mach-Zehnder interferometer were obtained. An optical cross-connect (OXC) design comprising a passive wavelength router and tunable wavelength converters was implemented and evaluated employing both an InP and an arrayed waveguide grating router (AWG). Very good concatenation performance of the OXC utilising the AWG router was demonstrated through a recirculating loop experiment. The cascading performance of a reduced crosstalk OXC architecture that incorporates an AWG and dual wavelength conversion stage was also investigated. Experimental evaluation on the effect of systems employing partial wavelength conversion in the transmission performance of WDM channels was carried out. Cross-gain modulation in SOAs operating in the counter- propagating mode was proposed, for optical packet switching applications that require fast tunable wavelength conversion. The WASPNET packet switch node incorporating this type of converter is described and results from the final project demonstrator are presented.

  8. Novel packet-loss free reconfiguration scheme for GMPLS optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Aihua; Chen, Wenlu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Zhonghua; Chen, Yung J.

    2002-09-01

    Reconfigurable optical network, the way of the future, can encounter serious packet loss problem during optical level reconfiguration. This paper presents a novel buffering scheme for GMPLS optical networks that minimizes packet loss during reconfiguration of optical nodes, consisting of both a reconfigurable optical cross-connects (OXCs), or an optical add-drop multiplexers (OADMs), and a packet-capable layer-two switch [1]. In this scheme, buffering takes place whenever an optical path is altered due to either a node reconfiguration or protection/restoration. Packets are buffered in a distributed manner starting from the first O/E/O-capable node before the reconfigured optical node all the way to the ingress node, if needed. In the worst-case scenario, where the path is all-optical or buffers are full along the path, all incoming packets are buffered at the ingress node, or the edge router. Buffering is carried out at layer two so that the interruption of service is kept at a minimum (less than 50ms, if possible). Furthermore, if buffers are overflowed, packets dropping will be carried out in accordance with the QoS levels, which further ensure that QoS of the network is maintained. It is shown by both analysis and simulation methods that this scheme performs quite well on either a general local area network, such as the UMBC WDM optical testbed, or the MCI backbone network. It is also cost-effective in that, even at the worst-case scenario, the required buffer is quite small.

  9. Proline-rich protein-like PRPL1 controls elongation of root hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boron, Agnieszka Karolina; Van Orden, Jürgen; Nektarios Markakis, Marios; Mouille, Grégory; Adriaensen, Dirk; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Höfte, Herman; Vissenberg, Kris

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis and composition of cell walls is dynamically adapted in response to many developmental and environmental signals. In this respect, cell wall proteins involved in controlling cell elongation are critical for cell development. Transcriptome analysis identified a gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, which was named proline-rich protein-like, AtPRPL1, based on sequence similarities from a phylogenetic analysis. The most resemblance was found to AtPRP1 and AtPRP3 from Arabidopsis, which are known to be involved in root hair growth and development. In A. thaliana four proline-rich cell wall protein genes, playing a role in building up the cross-connections between cell wall components, can be distinguished. AtPRPL1 is a small gene that in promoter::GUS (?-glucuronidase) analysis has high expression in trichoblast cells and in the collet. Chemical or mutational interference with root hair formation inhibited this expression. Altered expression levels in knock-out or overexpression lines interfered with normal root hair growth and etiolated hypocotyl development, but Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) analysis did not identify consistent changes in cell wall composition of root hairs and hypocotyl. Co-localization analysis of the AtPRPL1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein and different red fluorescent protein (RFP)-labelled markers confirmed the presence of AtPRPL1-GFP in small vesicles moving over the endoplasmic reticulum. Together, these data indicate that the AtPRPL1 protein is involved in the cell's elongation process. How exactly this is achieved remains unclear at present. PMID:25147272

  10. WDM transmission upgrade using low-cost uncooled components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Hans J.; Winzer, Peter J.

    2005-11-01

    Cost-effective short-haul but high-capacity optical transport systems are becoming increasingly important for metropolitan-area and access applications; examples are metro-feeders, inter- or intra-office links between routers and cross-connects, and storage-area networks. Transmission links of this kind are characterized by distances of 10 to 100 km and typically use directly modulated lasers providing a high output power at a low device cost. Due to the inherent wavelength drift of uncooled system components, full spectrum CWDM is defined for up to 16 or 18 channels on a coarse 20-nm wavelength grid between 1270 and 1610 nm. To meet the demand for the increase of transmission capacity in the metro and access domain, there are several potential strategies to remove the capacity limit of 16×2.5 Gb/s found in conventional CWDM systems while still retaining the cost-effectiveness and the modular "pay as you grow" philosophy of CWDM. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent progress in the field of CWDM upgrade techniques. CWDM architectures with increased per channel bit-rates and sub-band DWDM channel overlays are reviewed and experimental results are presented. The particular combination of CWDM with DWDM sub-bands and bit-rate upgrades is expected to deliver the highest capacity gain. However, we also show that the suitability of the system for higher bit-rates hinges on the following considerations: the availability of low-cost 10-Gb/s DMLs at the respective wavelengths, the link budget and the chromatic dispersion of the deployed system.

  11. The structure of the cuticular plate, an in vivo actin gel.

    PubMed

    DeRosier, D J; Tilney, L G

    1989-12-01

    The cuticular plate is a network of actin filaments found in hair cells of the cochlea. In the alligator lizard, it consists of rootlets, emanating from the stereocilia, and of cross-connecting actin filaments that anchor these rootlets. In thin sections, this network displays striking patches of 650 +/- 110-A striae. By quantitative analyses of the images, the mystery of the striae can be explained. They are due in part to the rootlets which are sets of flat ribbons of actin filaments. The ribbons in each set are separated by approximately 650 A. Numerous whiskers 30 A in diameter extend from each ribbon's face, interconnecting adjacent ribbons. The nonrootlet filaments, except at the margins of the cell, occur primarily as single filaments. Like the ribbons, they are bristling with whiskers. The patches of striae are explained by ribbons and filaments held at a 650-A separation by the whiskers that project from them. A simple model for regions of bewhiskered filaments is a box crammed full of randomly oriented test-tube brushes. A thin slice through the box will show regions of dark lines or striae due to the wire backbones of the brushes separated from one another by the bristle length. Using the computer instead of test-tube brushes, we have been able to model quantitatively the filament distribution and pattern of striae seen in the cuticular plate of the lizard. The organization of actin filaments we have deduced from our simulations differs from that found in macrophages or in the terminal web of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:2592408

  12. A complete design flow for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James; Cone, Chris; Chrostowski, Lukas; Klein, Jackson; Flueckiger, Jonas; Liu, Amy; McGuire, Dylan; Wang, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Broad adoption of silicon photonics technology for photonic integrated circuits requires standardized design flows that are similar to what is available for analog and mixed signal electrical circuit design. We have developed a design flow that combines mature electronic design automation (EDA) software with optical simulation software. An essential component of any design flow, whether electrical or photonic, is the ability to accurately simulate largescale circuits. This is particularly important when the behavior of the circuit is not trivially related to the individual component performance. While this is clearly the case for electronic circuits consisting of hundreds to billions of transistors, it is already becoming important in photonic circuits such as WDM transmitters, where signal cross talk needs to be considered, as well as optical cross-connect switches. In addition, optical routing to connect different components requires the introduction of additional waveguide sections, waveguide bends, and waveguide crossings, which affect the overall circuit performance. Manufacturing variability can also have dramatic circuit-level consequences that need to be simulated. Circuit simulations must rely on compact models that can accurately represent the behavior of each component, and the compact model parameters must be extracted from physical level simulation and experimental results. We show how large scale circuits can be simulated in both the time and frequency domains, including the effects of bidirectional and, where appropriate, multimode and multichannel photonic waveguides. We also show how active, passive and nonlinear individual components such as grating couplers, waveguides, splitters, filters, electro-optical modulators and detectors can be simulated using a combination of electrical and optical algorithms, and good agreement with experimental results can be obtained. We then show how parameters, with inclusion of fabrication process variations, can be extracted for use in the circuit level simulations. Ultimately, we show how a multi-channel WDM transceiver can be created, from schematic design to tapeout, using key features of EDA design flows such as schematic driven layout, design rule checking and layout versus schematic.

  13. New method for continuous transmissivity profiling in fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carl E; Cherry, John A; Parker, Beth L

    2014-01-01

    A new method is presented to search for hydraulically transmissive features in open boreholes in bedrock. A flexible borehole liner made of a watertight, nylon fabric is filled with water to create a constant driving head to evert (reverse of invert) the liner down the hole so that the liner pushes the borehole water out into transmissive fractures or other permeable features. The descent rate is governed by the bulk transmissivity of the remaining permeable features below the liner. Initially, the liner descent rate or velocity is a measure of transmissivity (T) of the entire hole. As the everting liner passes and seals each permeable feature, changes in the liner velocity indicate the position of each feature and an estimate of T using the Thiem equation for steady radial flow. This method has been performed in boreholes with diameters ranging from 96 to 330?mm. Profiling commonly takes a few hours in holes 200- to 300-m long. After arrival of the liner at the bottom of the hole, the liner acts as a seal preventing borehole cross connection between transmissive features at different depths. Liner removal allows the hole to be used for other purposes. The T values determined using this method in a dolostone aquifer were found to be similar to the values from injection tests using conventional straddle packers. This method is not a replacement for straddle-packer hydraulic testing of specific zones where greater accuracy is desired; however, it is effective and efficient for scanning entire holes for transmissive features. PMID:23692626

  14. Fluorescence as a potential monitoring tool for recycled water systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R K; Baker, A; Murphy, K R; Hambly, A; Stuetz, R M; Khan, S J

    2009-03-01

    A rapid, highly sensitive and selective detector is urgently required to detect contamination events in recycled water systems - for example, cross-connection events in dual reticulation pipes that recycle advanced treated sewage effluent - as existing technologies, including total organic carbon and conductivity monitoring, cannot always provide the sensitivity required. Fluorescence spectroscopy has been suggested as a potential monitoring tool given its high sensitivity and selectivity. A review of recent literature demonstrates that by monitoring the fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the ratios of humic-like (Peak C) and protein-like (Peak T) fluorescence peaks can be used to identify trace sewage contamination in river waters and estuaries, a situation analogous to contamination detection in recycled water systems. Additionally, strong correlations have been shown between Peak T and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in rivers, which is indicative of water impacted by microbial activity and therefore of sewage impacted systems. Hence, this review concludes that the sensitive detection of contamination events in recycled water systems may be achieved by monitoring Peak T and/or Peak C fluorescence. However, in such systems, effluent is treated to a high standard resulting in much lower DOM concentrations and the impact of these advanced treatment processes on Peaks T and C fluorescence is largely unknown and requires investigation. This review has highlighted that further work is also required to determine (a) the stability and distinctiveness of recycled water fluorescence in relation to the treatment processes utilised, (b) the impact of matrix effects, particularly the impact of oxidation, (c) calibration issues for online monitoring, and (d) the advanced data analytical techniques required, if any, to improve detection of contamination events. PMID:19081598

  15. Operation of the Tevatron satellite refrigerators for. 75- and 2. 0-kilometer-long magnet strings

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, C.H.; Andrews, R.A.; Ferry, R.; Gannon, J.; Makara, J.; Martin, M.; Misek, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.

    1983-08-01

    The Tevatron magnets at Fermilab are cooled by a hybrid system which consists of a 5000 liters/hr central helium liquefier coupled with a small-diameter liquid transfer line connecting twenty-four satellite refrigerators. The transfer line supplies liquid helium for both the refrigerators and the magnet lead flow as well as liquid nitrogen for the magnet shields. The satellites act as amplifiers with a gain of twelve by using the enthalpy of the helium supplied by the central liquefier as liquid and converting it to 4.5-K refrigeration and then returning it as 300-K gas. This arrangement combines the advantages of a single central facility with those of individual stand-alone units stationed around the ring. The central liquefier has the high efficiency associated with large components but its requirements for distribution of both cryogenic liquids and electric power to the service buildings is reduced. The six compressor buildings supply 20 atm helium to the twenty-four refrigerators through a discharge header located on the berm and a suction header located in the tunnel. The compressor buildings each have four-two stage 58 g/sec screw compressors; each of these has its own oil removal system. The inventory in the ring is controlled at the first compressor building through a cross-connect line to the central liquefier. The suction header is also used as the cooldown line as well as for quench relief. A third header located in the tunnel is the nitrogen collection and relief header.

  16. Collagen fibre arrangement and functional crimping pattern of the medial collateral ligament in the rat knee.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Quaranta, Marilisa; Macciocca, Maria; Leonardi, Luisa; Ottani, Vittoria; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2010-12-01

    Ligaments have been described as multifascicular structures with collagen fibres cross-connecting to each other or running straight and parallel also showing a waviness or crimping pattern playing as a shock absorber/recoiling system during joint motions. A particular collagen array and crimping pattern in different ligaments may reflect different biomechanical roles and properties. The aim of the study was to relate the 3D collagen arrangement in the crimping pattern of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) to its functional role. The MCL is one of the most injured ligaments during sports activities and an experimental model to understand the rate, quality and composition of ligaments healing. A deep knowledge of structure-function relationship of collagen fibres array will improve the development of rehabilitation protocols and more appropriate exercises for recovery of functional activity. The rat MCL was analysed by polarized light microscopy, confocal laser microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that MCL crimps have a smaller base length versus other tendons. SEM observations demonstrated that collagen fibres showing few crimps were composed of fibrils intertwining and crossing one another in the outer region. Confocal laser analyses excluded a helical array of collagen fibres. By contrast, in the core portion, densely packed straight collagen fibres ran parallel to the main axis of the ligament being interrupted both by planar crimps, similar to tendon crimps, and by newly described right-handed twisted crimps. It is concluded that planar crimps could oppose or respond exclusively to tensional forces parallel to the main ligament axis, whereas the right-handed twisted crimps could better resist/respond to a complex of tensional/rotational forces within the ligament thus opposing to an external rotation of tibia. PMID:20182866

  17. Regulation of excitation-contraction coupling in mouse cardiac myocytes: integrative analysis with mathematical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Koivumäki, Jussi T; Korhonen, Topi; Takalo, Jouni; Weckström, Matti; Tavi, Pasi

    2009-01-01

    Background The cardiomyocyte is a prime example of inherently complex biological system with inter- and cross-connected feedback loops in signalling, forming the basic properties of intracellular homeostasis. Functional properties of cells and tissues have been studied e.g. with powerful tools of genetic engineering, combined with extensive experimentation. While this approach provides accurate information about the physiology at the endpoint, complementary methods, such as mathematical modelling, can provide more detailed information about the processes that have lead to the endpoint phenotype. Results In order to gain novel mechanistic information of the excitation-contraction coupling in normal myocytes and to analyze sophisticated genetically engineered heart models, we have built a mathematical model of a mouse ventricular myocyte. In addition to the fundamental components of membrane excitation, calcium signalling and contraction, our integrated model includes the calcium-calmodulin-dependent enzyme cascade and the regulation it imposes on the proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling. With the model, we investigate the effects of three genetic modifications that interfere with calcium signalling: 1) ablation of phospholamban, 2) disruption of the regulation of L-type calcium channels by calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK) and 3) overexpression of CaMK. We show that the key features of the experimental phenotypes involve physiological compensatory and autoregulatory mechanisms that bring the system to a state closer to the original wild-type phenotype in all transgenic models. A drastic phenotype was found when the genetic modification disrupts the regulatory signalling system itself, i.e. the CaMK overexpression model. Conclusion The novel features of the presented cardiomyocyte model enable accurate description of excitation-contraction coupling. The model is thus an applicable tool for further studies of both normal and defective cellular physiology. We propose that integrative modelling as in the present work is a valuable complement to experiments in understanding the causality within complex biological systems such as cardiac myocytes. PMID:19715618

  18. Cross-Coupled Eye Movement Supports Neural Origin of Pattern Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Ghasia, Fatema F.; Shaikh, Aasef G.; Jacobs, Jonathan; Walker, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Pattern strabismus describes vertically incomitant horizontal strabismus. Conventional theories emphasized the role of orbital etiologies, such as abnormal fundus torsion and misaligned orbital pulleys as a cause of the pattern strabismus. Experiments in animal models, however, suggested the role of abnormal cross-connections between the neural circuits. We quantitatively assessed eye movements in patients with pattern strabismus with a goal to delineate the role of neural circuits versus orbital etiologies. Methods. We measured saccadic eye movements with high-precision video-oculography in 14 subjects with pattern strabismus, 5 with comitant strabismus, and 15 healthy controls. We assessed change in eye position in the direction orthogonal to that of the desired eye movement (cross-coupled responses). We used fundus photography to quantify the fundus torsion. Results. We found cross-coupling of saccades in all patients with pattern strabismus. The cross-coupled responses were in the same direction in both eyes, but larger in the nonviewing eye. All patients had clinically apparent inferior oblique overaction with abnormal excylotorsion. There was no correlation between the amount of the fundus torsion or the grade of oblique overaction and the severity of cross-coupling. The disconjugacy in the saccade direction and amplitude in pattern strabismics did not have characteristics predicted by clinically apparent inferior oblique overaction. Conclusions. Our results validated primate models of pattern strabismus in human patients. We found no correlation between ocular torsion or oblique overaction and cross-coupling. Therefore, we could not ascribe cross-coupling exclusively to the orbital etiology. Patients with pattern strabismus could have abnormalities in the saccade generators. PMID:26024072

  19. Integrated conceptual modelling of faecal contamination in an urban estuary catchment.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Dusan; Henry, Rebekah; Coleman, Rhys; Deletic, Ana; McCarthy, David

    2015-01-01

    Urban stormwater is regarded as a key input of faecal contamination in receiving water bodies and therefore, a major concern for health risks associated with aquatic recreation. Wastewater leakages, cross connections and overflows, together with faeces washed from surfaces during rainfall events, are possible origins of faecal contamination which enter these water bodies through stormwater drains. This paper applies conceptual models to a case study of the Yarra River estuary to understand the relative importance of fluxes derived from an urban creek and the 219 urban stormwater pipes which drain directly to the estuary as compared with other inputs, such as the Yarra River itself. Existing hydrologic-microorganism models were used for the estimation of the inputs from riverine and urban stormwater fluxes. These predictions were applied as boundary conditions for a new, highly simplified, model which accounts for the transport and survival of faecal microorganisms in the estuary. All models were calibrated using a rich dataset, containing over 2,000 measured Escherichia coli concentrations. Mass balances from the riverine and stormwater models indicate the limited influence of urban stormwater drains on the estuary during dry weather; less than 0.05% to 10% (5th and 95th percentile; median 0.5%) of the total daily E. coli load entering the estuary was derived from urban stormwater drains. While wet weather contributions from stormwater drains could be more significant (2% to 50%; 5th and 95th percentile), the average contribution remained marginal (median 10%). Sensitivity testing of the estuarine microorganism model by switching off stormwater boundary conditions resulted in minimal model efficiency reduction; this may reflect the low average daily contribution from urban stormwater drains. While these results confirm previous studies which show that E. coli loads derived from stormwater drains are dwarfed by other inputs, it is essential to note that these results also demonstrate that some conditions reveal the opposite; high proportions from stormwater are possible when combined with low riverine inputs and high urban rainfall. Furthermore, this study focuses on the overall impacts of direct urban stormwater inputs on the faecal contamination levels within the estuary, and localized impacts would certainly require further investigation. PMID:26524437

  20. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (?15N and ?18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by inputs of human waste despite high rates of atmospheric nitrate deposition. Further isotopic analysis of nitrate will examine seasonal variations in nitrate sources; compare nitrate dynamics and sources during low- versus high-flows, and the influence of interannual climatic variability on nitrate export.

  1. Single-phase Mn1-xZnxFe2O4(x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) hollow ceramic microspheres: One-step preparation and electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Lou; Jianjiang, Wang; Baocai, Xu; Guanhui, Liang; Zhiguang, Li; Yongshen, Hou; Guoshun, Wan; Haitao, Gao; Liang, Yu

    2014-11-01

    Single-phase Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) hollow ceramic microspheres (MnZn-HCMs) was one-step prepared using self-reactive quenching method. Material parameters of three MnZn-HCMs were studied by SEM and XRD, and electromagnetic properties were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer. The results showed that the phase composition of three MnZn-HCMs presents single-phase, with particle size distribution of 20-60 ?m; when x was equal to 0.2 or 0.8, the surface of HCMs showed a large number of nano-lamellar crystal with crossing, connecting or laminating each other, and for 0.5, a large quantity of nano-isometric crystal was formed. Thanks to special surface structure and micron-particle size, three MnZn-HCMs exhibited superparamagnetic. With the content of Zn increases, the saturated magnetization (Ms) decreases first and then increases, meanwhile, the coercivity (Hc) decreases gradually. In the 0.1-18 GHz range, due to nano-lamellar structure could enhance the interfacial polarization and space charge polarization, Mn0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 HCMs and Mn0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 HCMs have higher real part of permittivity (?') value than Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 HCMs. Owing to higher conductivity, the value of imaginary part of permittivity (??) of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 HCMs was the highest in 0.1-0.8 GHz range, however, with the frequency increases, the ?? of Mn0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 HCMs and Mn0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 HCMs increased significantly resulting from orientation polarization and interfacial polarization, which was greater than Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 HCMs. Due to the higher Ms, the value of imaginary part of permeability (??) of Mn0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 HCMs and Mn0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 HCMs was greater than Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 HCMs. Moreover, the ??-f curve reveals a broad resonance peak of Mn0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 HCMs ranging from 0.1 to 8 GHz, which maybe relate to its thick nano-lamellar crystal.

  2. "I CAMMINI DELLA REGINA" - Open Source based tools for preserving and culturally exploring historical traffic routes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, Massimiliano; Colombo, Massimo; Antonovic, Milan; Cardoso, Mirko; Delucchi, Andrea; Gianocca, Giancarlo; Brovelli, Maria Antonia

    2015-04-01

    "I CAMMINI DELLA REGINA" (The Via Regina Paths) is an Interreg project funded within the transnational cooperation program between Italy and Switzerland 2007-2013. The aim of this project is the preservation and valorization of the cultural heritage linked to the walking historically paths crossing, connecting and serving the local territories. With the approach of leveraging the already existing tools, which generally consist of technical descriptions of the paths, the project uses the open source geospatial technologies to deploy innovative solutions which can fill some of the gaps in historical-cultural tourism offers. The Swiss part, and particularly the IST-SUPSI team, has been focusing its activities in the realization of two innovative solutions: a mobile application for the survey of historical paths and a storytelling system for immersive cultural exploration of the historical paths. The former, based on Android, allows to apply in a revised manner a consolidated and already successfully used methodology of survey focused on the conservation of the historical paths (Inventory of historical traffic routes in Switzerland). Up to now operators could rely only on hand work based on a combination of notes, pictures and GPS devices synthesized in manually drawn maps; this procedure is error prone and shows many problems both in data updating and extracting for elaborations. Thus it has been created an easy to use interface which allows to map, according to a newly developed spatially enabled data model, paths, morphological elements, and multimedia notes. When connected to the internet the application can send the data to a web service which, after applying linear referencing and further elaborating the data, makes them available using open standards. The storytelling system has been designed to provide users with cultural insights embedded in a multimedial and immersive geospatial portal. Whether the tourist is exploring physically or virtually the desired historical path, the system will provide notifications and immersive multimedia information that foster a new sight of the territory: award of the culture and history of the place thanks to attractive description of the geological, land use, historical and ethnographic contexts. The technologies used for these developments are: mongoDB, tornado, Android SDK, geoserver, bootstrap, OpenLayers, HTML5, CSS3, JQuery. The approach, methodologies and technical implementations will be discussed and presented.

  3. IP over optical layer restoration: architecture, design, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Angela L.; Strand, John

    2005-11-01

    Optical layer capacity and unit cost improvements are basic to the rapid growth of IP networks. However, the new rapid reconfiguration and restoration capabilities of the optical layer have been sparingly utilized by IP network operators. This is consistent with the economics: the widely deployed optical layer architecture based on a "discrete" optical crossconnect (DOXC - one not integrated into the WDM) incurs heavy interface costs. In addition, there are architectural and control issues which are roadblocks to IP exploitation of rapid optical layer agility. In the first part of the paper, we describe a next generation all-optical architecture based on OXCs integrated with the WDM ("IOXCs"), and one instantiation of this architecture using a class of reconfigurable degree-N optical add-drop multiplexer (OADM). A new shared mesh restoration mechanism based on hot standbys is designed to overcome slow convergence and transient behaviors that are typical in all-optical networks. A series of economic comparisons are made on both a 120-node hypothetical national network and a smaller express backbone network to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of the new IOXC-based restoration in comparison to the IP layer restoration after some optical layer failure that results in one or more IP link failures. In the IP over Optical architecture, the Optical Layer can provide its IP clients rapid and efficient restoration for IP link failures that are due to some optical layer failure; however its inability to protect against router and router interface failures erodes its attractiveness. In the second part of the paper, we propose a joint IP/Optical restoration mechanism to deal with this. It is suitable for IP offices with at least two backbone routers and an optical cross-connect. The OXC is used to re-terminate OC-48/OC-192 links from a failed backbone router to its mate. The entire interoffice portion of the re-terminated link is reused, thus minimizing the amount of additional inter-office capacity required to protect against router failures. The proposed scheme is also applicable to restoration for router interface failures as well as to cases with single backbone router office architecture.

  4. Fiber optic DTS in sealed and heated boreholes for active groundwater flow characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas; Parker, Beth; Cherry, John; Mondanos, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, advances in technology have allowed temperature profiling to evolve to offer new insight into fractured rock hydrogeology. Temperature profiles in open boreholes within fractured rock have long been used to identify and characterize flow in the rock formation and/or in the borehole. An advance in temperature logging makes use of precision temperature profiles collected using wireline trolling methods in a heated borehole to identify fractures with active groundwater flow by creating a thermal disequilibrium and monitoring the temperature response. A second development is based on collecting wireline temperature profiles within a sealed borehole to eliminate short circuiting effects caused by the open borehole conduit. The borehole is temporarily sealed with a flexible impervious fabric liner so that the water column in the borehole is static and cross-connection is eliminated. Though highly precise temperature and spatial measurements are possible using these techniques, the temporal resolution is limited by the rate at which the wireline probe can be raised and lowered in the borehole. There is a need to measure temperature profiles continuously over time to characterize transient processes. Fibre optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a technique that allows for collecting temperature profiles continuously. This tool was advanced by the oil and gas industry for collecting temperature data in multi kilometer deep boreholes over relatively coarse measurement scales. In contrast, very fine spatial and temperature resolutions are needed for freshwater contaminant fractured rock hydrogeology where the scale of interest is much more acute. Recent advances in the spatial, temperature, and temporal resolution of DTS systems allow this technology to be adapted well to the shallow subsurface environment. This project demonstrates the first application of DTS used in conjunction with flexible borehole liners in a heated borehole environment. The integration of DTS, active heating, and lined boreholes was tested in the context of fractured rock site characterization. DTS heat pulse tests were carried out in two boreholes located at a well characterized research site in Guelph, ON, Canada. The capabilities for long-term and high temporal resolution site monitoring and characterization from the developed methods were assessed. The results of this technique are promising and indicate evidence for identifying active groundwater flow. Advancements to the DTS heat pulse method are possible to offer further improved insight into natural groundwater flow systems.

  5. Analysis of elemental concentration using ICP-AES and pathogen indicator in drinking water of Qasim Abad, District Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sehar, Shama; Naz, Iffat; Ali, Naeem; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-02-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate drinking water quality (groundwater) from water samples taken from Qasim Abad, a locality of approximately 5,000 population, situated between twin cities Rawalpindi and Islamabad in Pakistan. The main sources of drinking water in this area are water bores which are dug upto the depth of 250-280 ft in almost every house. The study consists of the determination of physico-chemical properties, trace metals, heavy metals, rare earth elements and microbiological quality of drinking water. The data showed the variation of the investigated parameters in samples as follows: pH 6.75 to 8.70, electrical conductivity 540 to 855 μS/cm, total dissolved solids 325.46 to 515.23 ppm and dissolved oxygen 1.50 to 5.64 mg/L which are within the WHO guidelines for drinking water quality. The water samples were analysed for 30 elements (aluminium, iron, magnesium, manganese, silicon, zinc, molybdenum, titanium, chromium, nickel, tungsten, silver, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, gallium, mercury, lanthanum, niobium, neodymium, lead, selenium, samarium, tin, vanadium and zirconium) by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The organic contamination was detected in terms of most probable number (MPN) of faecal coliforms. Overall, elemental levels were lower than the recommended values but three water bores (B-1, B-6, B-7) had higher values of iron (1.6, 2.206, 0.65 ppm), two water bores (B-1, B-6) had higher values of aluminium (0.95, 1.92 ppm), respectively, and molybdenum was higher by 0.01 ppm only in one water bore (B-11). The total number of coliforms present in water samples was found to be within the prescribed limit of the WHO except for 5 out of 11 bore water samples (B-2, B-3, B-4, B-8, B-11), which were found in the range 5-35 MPN/100 mL, a consequence of infiltration of contaminated water (sewage) through cross connection, leakage points and back siphoning. PMID:22544071

  6. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics: The Physics of Magnetic Reconnection and Associated Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, James

    2010-11-01

    Solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere, and disruptions in laboratory fusion experiments are driven by the explosive release of magnetic energy through the process of magnetic reconnection. During reconnection oppositely directed magnetic fields break and cross-connect. The resulting magnetic slingshots convert magnetic energy into high velocity flows, thermal energy and energetic particles. A major scientific challenge has been the multi-scale nature of the problem: a narrow boundary layer, ``the dissipation region,'' breaks field lines and controls the release of energy in a macroscale system. Significant progress has been made on fundamental questions such as how magnetic energy is released so quickly and why the release occurs as an explosion. At the small spatial scales of the dissipation region the motion of electrons and ions decouples, the MHD description breaks down and whistler and kinetic Alfven dynamics drives reconnection. The dispersive property of these waves leads to fast reconnection, insensitive to system size and weakly dependent on dissipation, consistent with observations. The evidence for these waves during reconnection in the magnetosphere and the laboratory is compelling. The role of turbulence within the dissipation region in the form of ``secondary islands'' or as a source of anomalous resistivity continues to be explored. A large fraction of the magnetic energy released during reconnection appears in the form of energetic electrons and protons -- up to 50% or more during solar flares. The mechanism for energetic particle production during magnetic reconnection has remained a mystery. Models based on reconnection at a single large x-line are incapable of producing the large numbers of energetic electrons seen in observations. Scenarios based on particle acceleration in a multi-x-line environment are more promising. In such models a link between the energy gain of electrons and the magnetic energy released, a requirement to explain the observations, has been established. The talk will review key observational data and emphasize basic physical principles to introduce the topic to the non-specialist.[4pt] Thanks to the many colleagues who have contributed to this work. This work was supported by DOE, NASA and NSF.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Equations of Motion in General Relativity Equations of Motion in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    Devoted exclusively to the problem of motion in general relativity, this book by H. Asada, T. Futamase, and P. A. Hogan is highly welcome to close up a gap in the book sector presenting a concise account of theoretical developments and results on gravitational equations of motion achieved since the discovery of the binary neutron star system PSR 1913+16 in 1974. For the most part, the book is concerned with the development and application of the important post-Newtonian approximation (PNA) framework which allows for highly efficient approximate analytic solutions of the Einstein field equations for many-body systems in terms of a slow-motion and weak-field ordering parameter. That approximation scheme is shown to be applicable also to the external motion of strongly self-gravitating objects if their internal dynamics is frozen in (strong field point particle limit) and the external conditions fit. Relying on the expertise of the authors, the PNA framework is presented in a form which, at the 1PNA level, had become famous through the work by Einstein, Infeld and Hoffmann in 1938; therein, surface integrals over gravitational field expressions in the outside-body regime play a crucial role. Other approaches which also succeeded with the highest achieved PNA level so far are mentioned too, if not fully exhaustively with respect to the highest, the 3.5PNA level which contains the inverse power of the speed of light to the seventh order. Regarding the 3PNA, the reader gains a clear understanding of how the equations of motion for binary systems with compact components come about. Remarkably, no deviation from four-dimensional space-time is needed. Various explicit analytic expressions are derived for binary systems: the periastron advance and the orbital period at the 2PNA, the orbital decay through gravitational radiation reaction at the 2.5PNA, and effects of the gravitational spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings on the orbital motion. Also the propagation of light-like signals in gravitational fields of binary systems is treated, which is important for a precise interpretation of pulsar observation measurements. Based on original research by the authors, a detailed presentation is given of a mathematical scheme which makes feasible the treatment of small black holes in background space-times. Using that approach, the equations of motion of small charged black holes are derived in vacuum Einstein-Maxwell space-times without encountering infinities, showing up electromagnetic radiation reaction, background field, and tail forces. At this stage, the book defines various issues to be tackled in future research within the given formalism, such as a physical understanding of the very structure of the tail contribution or a more detailed calculation of the motion of a small Schwarzschild black hole in an external vacuum gravitational field. A unique chapter is devoted to the choreographic three-body solution of the 1PNA dynamics, also mentioning the 2PNA dynamics, in the form of figure-eight configurations. The emitted gravitational waves are shown, and a discussion of their observability in future gravitational wave astronomy is given. Four appendices support and complement the main part of the book. Here, the far zone non-contribution to the equations of motion at 3PNA is carefully investigated, forces resulting from the extendedness of objects are presented in analytic form, null geodesic congruences with their optical scalars are discussed, and the perturbed vacuum Einstein-Maxwell field equations are given. The book delivers a very readable account of the problem of motion in general relativity. It covers the state of the art up to the years 2006/8 and presents a plethora of interesting and important topics and results. Whenever appropriate, connection with observation is made. A reader with good post-introductory knowledge of the theory of general relativity should find easy access to the book, and will surely benefit from the mathematical and conceptual issues elaborated on therein. Being of observational relevance too, the book fits into every library which provides a collection of advanced books in physics-applied mathematics, gravitational physics, astronomy, or astrophysics.

  8. Waterborne transmission of epidemic cholera in Trujillo, Peru: lessons for a continent at risk.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Swerdlow DL; Mintz ED; Rodriguez M; Tejada E; Ocampo C; Espejo L; Greene KD; Saldana W; Seminario L; Tauxe RV

    1992-07-04

    The epidemic of cholera that began in Peru in January, 1991, marked the first such epidemic in South America this century. Subsequently, over 533,000 cases and 4700 deaths have been reported from nineteen countries in that hemisphere. We investigated the epidemic in Trujillo, the second largest city in Peru. Trujillo's water supply was unchlorinated and water contamination was common. Suspect cholera cases were defined as persons presenting to a health facility with acute diarrhoea between Feb 1, and March 31, 1991. We studied a cohort of 150 patients who had been admitted to hospital and conducted a matched case-control study with 46 cases and 65 symptom-free and serologically uninfected controls; we also carried out a water quality study. By March 31, 1991, 16,400 cases of suspected cholera (attack rate 2.6%), 6673 hospital admissions, and 71 deaths (case-fatality rate 0.4%) had been reported in the province of Trujillo. 79% of stool cultures of patients with diarrhoea presenting to a single hospital yielded Vibrio cholerae O1. In the case-control study, drinking unboiled water (odds ratio [OR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-7.3), drinking water from a household water storage container in which hands had been introduced into the water (4.2, 1.2-14.9), and going to a fiesta (social event) (3.6, 1.1-11.1) were associated with illness. The water quality study showed progressive contamination during distribution and storage in the home: faecal coliform counts were highest in water from household storage containers and lowest in city well water. V cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba, was isolated from three city water samples. Cholera control measures in Trujillo should focus on treatment of water and prevention of contamination during distribution and in the home. Trujillo's water and sanitation problems are common in South America; similar control measures are needed throughout the continent to prevent spread of epidemic cholera.Researchers conducted various studies simultaneously in Trujillo. Peru (population 626,456) in March 1991 to set up a cholera surveillance system and to determine clinical characteristics of suspect cholera cases, modes of transmission, and municipal water quality during distribution and storage. These studies occurred after the population received information on how to avoid cholera. The cholera attack rate for the 1st 2 months of the epidemic stood at 2.6% (16,400 cases). The case fatality rate was 0.4% (71 deaths). The median hours between onset of symptoms and arrival at Belen hospital were 12 hours. 56% of the patients were treated with oral rehydration solution before coming to the hospital and 13% with homemade rehydration solution. Laboratory personnel isolated toxigenic nonhemolytic Vibrio cholera 01, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba from the rectal swabs of 79% of cholera patients. None of the hospital patients died. 29% of controls from the case control study claimed to not have witnessed a personal or household attack of diarrhea recently, yet their vibrocidal antibody titers indicated a recent cholera infection. 58% of cases drank unboiled water within 3 days of falling ill compared to only 28% of controls (matched odds ratio [OR] 3.1; p.05). Other significant risk factors (p.05) were drank water from container also used to dip hands (OR 4.2) and attended a fiesta (OR 3.6). There were significantly more total coliforms in water containers than tap water and municipal water (mean 794 vs. 6 and 1 respectively; p.05). The same was true for fecal coliforms (20 vs. 2 and 1 respectively). In conclusion, the drinking water was contaminated with V. cholera. Eventually the city should eliminate cross connections, provide continuous supplies of water at high pressure, and improve the sewage system.

  9. Microbial Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Stormwater in a Water Plaza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales-Ortells, Helena; Medema, Gertjan

    2015-04-01

    Climate change scenarios predict an increase of intense rainfall events in summer in Western Europe. Current urban drainage systems cannot cope with such intense precipitation events. Cities are constructing local stormwater storage facilities to prevent pluvial flooding. Combining storage with other functions, such as recreation, may lead to exposure to contaminants. This study assessed the microbial quality of rainwater collected in a water plaza in Rotterdam (The Netherlands) and the health risks associated with recreational exposure. The water plaza collects street run-off, diverges first flush to the sewer system and stores the rest of the run-off in the plaza as open water. A rain simulation experiment was conducted using drinking water from fire hydrants. The water flowed over the street pavement into the street gutters and into the square. Samples were collected from the first flush diverted water and from two different levels of the water plaza at different points in time. Campylobacter spp., Cryptosporidium, and Legionella pneumophila were the pathogens investigated, using quantitative PCR. Escherichia coli was quantified with culture methods to obtain information on faecal contamination. Microbial source tracking tools (human Bacteroides, avian Helicobacter and canine mitochondrial DNA, all analysed with quantitative PCR) were used to determine the origin (human, animal) of the intestinal pathogens. To estimate the health risks for children playing in the water plaza after a rain event, a quantitative microbial risk assessment model was built. The volume of water ingested was obtained from literature on similar locations (flooded streets). Published dose-response models were used to calculate the risk per event. Exposure frequency was estimated using weather data (precipitation events). E. coli concentrations were below the level for excellent bathing water in the EU Bathing Water Directive. Cryptosporidium was not found in any sample. Campylobacter spp. was found in all samples, with higher concentrations in samples that contained human Bacteroides than in samples with contamination from birds and dogs (15 vs 3.7 gc (genomic copies)/100mL). In both cases, the estimated disease risk associated with Campylobacter and recreational exposure to the water plaza were higher than the Dutch national incidence. This indicates that the health risk associated with recreational exposure to the water plaza is significant. L. pneumophila was found only in two out of ten pond samples. Legionnaire's disease risks were lower than the Dutch national incidence. However,higher health risks are expected in the future because of increased frequency of rain events. Presence of human Bacteroides indicates possible cross-connections with the combined sewer system that should be identified and removed to reduce the gastrointestinal disease risks. Other measures include cleaning/disinfection of the water plaza after extreme precipitation; increasing the capacity of the first flush pump; regular cleaning of the catchment area and gutters; informing the neighbours of the importance of keeping the streets clean of pets depositions; and informing the public about the health risks derived from recreational uses of the water plaza after rain events. Finally, monitoring the water quality during real rain events is recommended to better characterize the health risks.

  10. Polarization-insensitive all-optical dual pump-phase transmultiplexing from 2 x 10-GBd OOKs to 10-GBd RZ-QPSK using cross-phase modulation in a passive nonlinear birefringent photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Tanvir

    Considering the network size, bit rate, spectral and channel capacity limitations, different modulation formats may be selectively used in future optical networks. Although the traditional metropolitan area networks (MANs) still uses the non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation format due to its technical simplicity and therefore low cost, QPSK format is more advantageous in spectrally efficient long-haul fiber optic transmission systems because of its constant power envelope, and robustness to various transmission impairments. Consequently, an important problem may arise, in particular how to route the OOK-data streams from MANs to long-haul backbone networks when the state of polarization (SOP) of the remotely generated OOK is unpredictable. Hence, the focus of this dissertation was to investigate a polarization insensitive (PI) all-optical nonlinear optical signal processing (NOSP) method that can be implemented at the network cross-connect (X-connect) to transfer data from a remotely and a locally generated OOK data simultaneously to more effectual QPSK format for long-haul transmission. By utilizing cross-phase modulation (XPM) and inherent birefringence of the device, the work demonstrated, for the first time, PI all-optical data transfer utilizing dual pump-phase transmultiplexing (DPTM) from 2 x 10-GBd OOKs to 10-GBd RZ-QPSK in a passive nonlinear birefringent photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Polarization insensitivity was achieved by scrambling the SOP of the remotely generated OOK pump and launching the locally generated OOK pump and the probe off-axis. To mitigate polarization induced power fluctuations and detrimental effects due to nearby partially degenerate and non-degenerate four wave mixings, an optimum pump-probe detuning was also utilized. The PI DPTM RZ-QPSK demonstrated a pre-amplified receiver sensitivity penalty < 5.5 dB at 10--9 bit-error-rate (BER), relative to relative to the FPGA-precoded RZ-DQPSK baseline in ASE-limited transmission system. The effect of the remotely generated OOK pump OSNR degradation on PI DPTM RZ-QPSK was also investigated and it was established that 10 -9 BER metric was attainable till the remotely generated OOK pump reached the threshold OSNR limit of 34 dB/0.1nm. Finally, DWDM transmission performance of the PI DPTM RZ-QPSK signal was evaluated using 138-km long recirculating loop and it was demonstrated that the PI DPTM RZ-QPSK can be transmitted over 1,500 km before it reached ITU-T G.709 7% HD-FEC overhead limit. This propagation distance was well beyond the transmission requisites of any typical metro network (≈ 600 km). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that, within the threshold limit, OSNR degradation of the remotely generated OOK pump had minimal impact on the transmission distance of the PI DPTM RZ-QPSK before it reached 7% HD-FEC overhead limit.

  11. Simulation of external contamination into water distribution systems through defects in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, P. A.; Mora, J. J.; García, F. J.; López, G.

    2009-04-01

    Water quality can be defined as a set of properties (physical, biological and chemical) that determine its suitability for human use or for its role in the biosphere. In this contribution we focus on the possible impact on water distribution systems quality of external contaminant fluids entering through defects in pipes. The physical integrity of the distribution system is a primary barrier against the entry of external contaminants and the loss in quality of the treated drinking water, but this integrity can be broken. Deficiencies in physical and hydraulic integrity can lead into water losses, but also into the influx of contaminants through pipes walls, either through breaks coming from external subsoil waters, or via cross connections coming from sewerage or other facilities. These external contamination events (the so called pathogen intrusion phenomenon) can act as a source of income by introducing nutrients and sediments as well as decreasing disinfectant concentrations within the distribution system, thus resulting in a degradation of the distribution water quality. The objective of this contribution is to represent this pathogen intrusion phenomenon. The combination of presence of defects in the infrastructures (equipment failure), suppression and back-siphonage and lack of disinfection is the cause of propagation of contamination in the clean current of water. Intrusion of pathogenic microorganisms has been studied and registered even in well maintained services. Therefore, this situation can happen when negative pressure conditions are achieved in the systems combined with the presence of defects in pipes nearby the suppression. A simulation of the process by which the external fluids can come inside pipes across their defects in a steady-state situation will be considered, by using different techniques to get such a successful modeling, combining numerical and experimental simulations. The proposed modeling process is based on experimental and computational simulations. An analysis of the intrusion behavior considering hydrodynamic and transportation of pollutant phenomena has been developed, comparing the influence of the turbulence consideration and the agreement of both computational and experimental results. This paper is focused on the analysis of such external intrusion phenomenon, the relationship between the income flow and the pressure inside the pipe, depending on the characteristics of the defect and the pressure level, as well as the effect on the water quality of the income substances dispersion. Two different experiments have been developed. In order to represent the intrusion phenomenon in steady state, two suitable assemblies have been implemented in the laboratory. In a lower order of pressures a Venturi tube has been used for generating the depression. In a higher level of pressures, a pumping system has been used. The defect on the pipe has been simulated by a circular hole, and the dispersion of pollutant has been considered by means of salinity as a conservative contaminant. The simulated scenarios of different suppressions can vary from 0.001 to 0.7 bars. The prototypes are also simulated by numerical modeling in two and three dimensions using Computational Fluid Dynamics techniques. For this purpose Fluent 6.3™ has been used, which displays the fields of hydrodynamic components and salinity. After doing a proper calibration process, the contrast made between models will allows us to establish the foundation for further pathogen intrusion simulations in the distribution system. Different turbulent models based on turbulent viscosity and different boundary conditions will also be considered. The agreement between experimental and computational models will be analyzed, and the differences between series of results will be compared, validating thus the use of computational models for representing the pathogen intrusion problem. By both, mathematical and physical models, it is intended to have a better knowledge of quantities that can not be measured, such as velocity fields, aspects of turbulence, pressure fields, concentrations, etc. existing in mixing processes related to external intrusion.

  12. Detection of Human Sewage in Urban Stormwater Using DNA Based Methods and Stable Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, S. L.; Malet, N.; Sauer, E.; Mueller-Spitz, S.; Borchardt, M.

    2008-12-01

    Urban stormwater is a major source of fecal indicator bacteria in the Milwaukee River Basin, a major watershed draining to Lake Michigan. Much of the watershed is in highly urbanized areas and Escherichia coli (E. coli) levels have been found to be 20,000 CFU per 100 ml in the estuary leading to Lake Michigan. Aging infrastructure and illicit cross connections may allow sewage to infiltrate the stormwater system and could contribute both fecal indicator bacteria and human pathogens to these waters. We conducted extensive sampling of stormwater outfalls in the lower reaches of three major tributaries. Three outfalls along the heavily urbanized Kinnickinnick (KK) were found to have geometric mean E. coli and enterococci levels of 16,200 and 28,700 CFU/100 ml, respectively. Four outfalls along the Menomonee River, draining both suburban and urban areas, had geometric mean E. coli and enterococci levels of 14,700 and 12,800 CFU/100 ml, respectively. These seven outfalls had more than 60% of the samples positive for human specific Bacteroides genetic marker (n=46), suggesting the presence of human sources. In addition, two outfalls on Lincoln Creek, a smaller tributary of the Milwaukee River, had geometric mean E. coli and enterococci levels of 16,700 and 14,900 CFU per 100 ml, respectively. The human specific Bacteroides marker was positive in nearly 90% of the samples (n=24). Subsequent virus testing at one of these outfalls confirmed human pathogens were present with adenovirus detected at 1.3 x 10E3 genomic equivalents (ge)/L, enterovirus at 1.9 x 10E4 ge/L and G1 norovirus at 1.5 x 10E3 ge/L; these values are similar to concentrations found in sewage. Stable isotope studies were conducted in the three tributaries to investigate the relationship between delta C and delta N isotopic composition and microbiological quality of this urban freshwater system. This work is based on the premise that the organic matter of the stormwater will have a stable isotopic signature related to the mixed organic matter sources in polluted stormwater runoff, and that this signal will distinct from untreated sanitary sewage. Stable isotope signatures of stormwater and untreated sewage were determined and compared with the rivers. Isotopic values of stormwater was delta 15N = 1.1 ± 2 %; delta 13C = -25.5 ± 3 % and sewage was delta 15N = -1.9 ± 0.2 %; delta 13C = -23.6 ± 0.3. Suspended particular organic matter (SPOM) of Milwaukee River showed depleted delta 13C (-28.6 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 15N (7.7 ± 1.9 %) values. SPOM of the KK River exhibited the most depleted delta 15N (0.2 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 13C (-24.8 ± 1.8 %) isotopic values. Menomonee River SPOM showed intermediate isotopic values. The delta 13C values of each river and the estuary enriched significantly throughout the summer storm periods. The isotope signals in the KK and Menomonee were indicative of stormwater runoff and sewage contamination. These results suggest that unrecognized sewage inputs are chronically present and may be delivered through urban stormwater systems. DNA based methods combined with isotope analysis may provide a useful tool for urban watershed assessments and to identify sewage inputs. Delineating the relative contribution of stormwater and sewage to overall degraded water quality might give the first indication of the impact of these sources on the Michigan Lake waters.

  13. A Multiple-Tracer Approach for Identifying Sewage Sources to an Urban Stream System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyer, Kenneth Edward

    2007-01-01

    The presence of human-derived fecal coliform bacteria (sewage) in streams and rivers is recognized as a human health hazard. The source of these human-derived bacteria, however, is often difficult to identify and eliminate, because sewage can be delivered to streams through a variety of mechanisms, such as leaking sanitary sewers or private lateral lines, cross-connected pipes, straight pipes, sewer-line overflows, illicit dumping of septic waste, and vagrancy. A multiple-tracer study was conducted to identify site-specific sources of sewage in Accotink Creek, an urban stream in Fairfax County, Virginia, that is listed on the Commonwealth's priority list of impaired streams for violations of the fecal coliform bacteria standard. Beyond developing this multiple-tracer approach for locating sources of sewage inputs to Accotink Creek, the second objective of the study was to demonstrate how the multiple-tracer approach can be applied to other streams affected by sewage sources. The tracers used in this study were separated into indicator tracers, which are relatively simple and inexpensive to apply, and confirmatory tracers, which are relatively difficult and expensive to analyze. Indicator tracers include fecal coliform bacteria, surfactants, boron, chloride, chloride/bromide ratio, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and water temperature. Confirmatory tracers include 13 organic compounds that are associated with human waste, including caffeine, cotinine, triclosan, a number of detergent metabolites, several fragrances, and several plasticizers. To identify sources of sewage to Accotink Creek, a detailed investigation of the Accotink Creek main channel, tributaries, and flowing storm drains was undertaken from 2001 to 2004. Sampling was conducted in a series of eight synoptic sampling events, each of which began at the most downstream site and extended upstream through the watershed and into the headwaters of each tributary. Using the synoptic sampling approach, 149 sites were sampled at least one time for indicator tracers; 52 of these sites also were sampled for confirmatory tracers at least one time. Through the analysis of multiple-tracer levels in the synoptic samples, three major sewage sources to the Accotink Creek stream network were identified, and several other minor sewage sources to the Accotink Creek system likely deserve additional investigation. Near the end of the synoptic sampling activities, three additional sampling methods were used to gain better understanding of the potential for sewage sources to the watershed. These additional sampling methods included optical brightener monitoring, intensive stream sampling using automated samplers, and additional sampling of several storm-drain networks. The samples obtained by these methods provided further understanding of possible sewage sources to the streams and a better understanding of the variability in the tracer concentrations at a given sampling site. Collectively, these additional sampling methods were a valuable complement to the synoptic sampling approach that was used for the bulk of this study. The study results provide an approach for local authorities to use in applying a relatively simple and inexpensive collection of tracers to locate sewage sources to streams. Although this multiple-tracer approach is effective in detecting sewage sources to streams, additional research is needed to better detect extremely low-volume sewage sources and better enable local authorities to identify the specific sources of the sewage once it is detected in a stream reach.

  14. Evaluation of long-term water-level declines in basalt aquifers near Mosier, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Erick R.; Morgan, David S.; Lee, Karl K.; Haynes, Jonathan V.; Conlon, Terrence D.

    2012-01-01

    The Mosier area lies along the Columbia River in northwestern Wasco County between the cities of Hood River and The Dalles, Oregon. Major water uses in the area are irrigation, municipal supply for the city of Mosier, and domestic supply for rural residents. The primary source of water is groundwater from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) aquifers that underlie the area. Concerns regarding this supply of water arose in the mid-1970s, when groundwater levels in the orchard tract area began to steadily decline. In the 1980s, the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) conducted a study of the aquifer system, which resulted in delineation of an administrative area where parts of the Pomona and Priest Rapids aquifers were withdrawn from further appropriations for any use other than domestic supply. Despite this action, water levels continued to drop at approximately the same, nearly constant annual rate of about 4 feet per year, resulting in a current total decline of between 150 and 200 feet in many wells with continued downward trends. In 2005, the Mosier Watershed Council and the Wasco Soil and Water Conservation District began a cooperative investigation of the groundwater system with the U.S. Geological Survey. The objectives of the study were to advance the scientific understanding of the hydrology of the basin, to assess the sustainability of the water supply, to evaluate the causes of persistent groundwater-level declines, and to evaluate potential management strategies. An additional U.S. Geological Survey objective was to advance the understanding of CRBG aquifers, which are the primary source of water across a large part of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. In many areas, significant groundwater level declines have resulted as these aquifers were heavily developed for agricultural, municipal, and domestic water supplies. Three major factors were identified as possible contributors to the water-level declines in the study area: (1) pumping at rates that are not sustainable, (2) well construction practices that have resulted in leakage from aquifers into springs and streams, and (3) reduction in aquifer recharge resulting from long-term climate variations. Historical well construction practices, specifically open, unlined, uncased boreholes that result in cross-connecting (or commingling) multiple aquifers, allow water to flow between these aquifers. Water flowing along the path of least resistance, through commingled boreholes, allows the drainage of aquifers that previously stored water more efficiently. The study area is in the eastern foothills of the Cascade Range in north central Oregon in a transitional zone between the High Cascades to the west and the Columbia Plateau to the east. The 78-square mile (mi2) area is defined by the drainages of three streams - Mosier Creek (51.8 mi2), Rock Creek (13.9 mi2), and Rowena Creek (6.9 mi2) - plus a small area that drains directly to the Columbia River.The three major components of the study are: (1) a 2-year intensive data collection period to augment previous streamflow and groundwater-level measurements, (2) precipitation-runoff modeling of the watersheds to determine the amount of recharge to the aquifer system, and (3) groundwater-flow modeling and analysis to evaluate the cause of groundwater-level declines and to evaluate possible water resource management strategies. Data collection included the following: 1. Water-level measurements were made in 37 wells. Bi-monthly or quarterly measurements were made in 30 wells, and continuous water-level monitoring instruments were installed in 7 wells. The measurements principally were made to capture the seasonal patterns in the groundwater system, and to augment the available long-term record. 2. Groundwater pumping was measured, reported, or estimated from irrigation, municipal and domestic wells. Flowmeters were installed on 74 percent of all high-capacity irrigation wells in the study area. 3. Borehole geophysical data were collected from a known commingling well. These data measured geologic properties and vertical flow through the well. 4. Streamflow measurements were made in Rock, Rowena, and Mosier Creeks. A long-term recording stream-gaging station was reestablished on Mosier Creek to provide a continuous record of streamflow. Streamflow measurements also were made along the creeks periodically to evaluate seasonal patterns of exchange between streams and the groundwater system. Major findings from the study include: 1. Annual average precipitation ranges from 20 to 54 inches across the study area with an average value of about 30 inches. Based on rainfall-runoff modeling, about one-third of this water infiltrates into the aquifer system. 2. Currently, about 3 percent of the water infiltrated into the groundwater system is extracted for municipal, agricultural, and rural residential use. The remainder of the water flows through the aquifer system, discharging into local streams and the Columbia River. About 80 percent of recent pumping supports crop production. The city of Mosier public supply wells account for about 10 percent of total pumping, with the remaining 10 percent being pumped from the private wells of rural residents. 3. Groundwater-flow simulation results indicate that leakage through commingling wells is a significant and likely the dominant cause of water level declines. Leakage patterns can be complex, but most of the leaked water likely flows out the CRBG aquifer system through very permeable sediments into Mosier Creek and its tributary streams in the OWRD administrative area. Model-derived estimates attribute 80-90 percent of the declines to commingling, with pumping accounting for the remaining 10-20 percent. Although decadal trends in precipitation have occurred, associated changes in aquifer recharge are likely not a significant contributor to the current water level declines. 4. As many as 150 wells might be commingling. To evaluate whether or not the local combination of geology and well construction have resulted in aquifer commingling at a particular well, the well needs to be tested by measuring intraborehole flow. During geophysical testing of one known commingling well, the flow rate through the well between aquifers ranged between 70 and 135 gallons per minute (11-22 percent of total annual pumping in the study area). Historically, when aquifer water levels were 150-200 feet higher, this flow rate would have been correspondingly higher. 5. Because aquifer commingling through well boreholes is likely the dominant cause of aquifer declines, flow simulations were conducted to evaluate the benefit of repairing wells in specified locations and the benefit of recharging aquifers using diverted flow from study area creeks. As part of this analysis, maps were generated that show which areas are more vulnerable to commingling. These maps indicate that the value of repairing wells in the area generally coincident with the OWRD administrative area is higher than in areas farther upstream in the watershed. Simulation results also indicate that artificial recharge of the aquifers using diverted creek water will not significantly improve water levels in the aquifer system unless at least some commingling wells are repaired first. Repairs would entail construction of wells in a manner that prevents commingling of multiple aquifers. The value of artificially recharging the aquifers improves as more wells are repaired because the aquifer system more efficiently stores water.